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Sample records for surface-engineered yeast strain

  1. Direct ethanol production from cassava pulp using a surface-engineered yeast strain co-displaying two amylases, two cellulases, and {beta}-glucosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Rugthaworn, Prapassorn [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Post-Harvest Science and Technology Div.; Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Nanotechnology and Biotechnology Div.; Murata, Yoshinori; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Mori, Yutaka [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Post-Harvest Science and Technology Div.; Yamada, Ryosuke; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2011-04-15

    In order to develop a method for producing fuel ethanol from cassava pulp using cell surface engineering (arming) technology, an arming yeast co-displaying {alpha}-amylase ({alpha}-AM), glucoamylase, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrase, and {beta}-glucosidase on the surface of the yeast cells was constructed. The novel yeast strain, possessing the activities of all enzymes, was able to produce ethanol directly from soluble starch, barley {beta}-glucan, and acid-treated Avicel. Cassava is a major crop in Southeast Asia and used mainly for starch production. In the starch manufacturing process, large amounts of solid wastes, called cassava pulp, are produced. The major components of cassava pulp are starch (approximately 60%) and cellulose fiber (approximately 30%). We attempted simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation of cassava pulp with this arming yeast. During fermentation, ethanol concentration increased as the starch and cellulose fiber substrates contained in the cassava pulp decreased. The results clearly showed that the arming yeast was able to produce ethanol directly from cassava pulp without addition of any hydrolytic enzymes. (orig.)

  2. Production of ethanol from cassava pulp via fermentation with a surface-engineered yeast strain displaying glucoamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosugi, Akihiko; Murata, Yoshinori; Arai, Takamitsu; Mori, Yutaka [Post-harvest Science and Technology Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), 1-1 Ohwashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8686 (Japan); Kondo, Akihiko [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan); Ueda, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Vaithanomsat, Pilanee; Thanapase, Warunee [Nanotechnology and Biotechnology Division, Kasetsart Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Product Improvement Institute (KAPI), Kasetsart University, 50 Chatuchak, Ladyao, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2009-05-15

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) pulp, produced in large amounts as a by-product of starch manufacturing, is a major biomass resource in Southeast Asian countries. It contains abundant starch (approximately 60%) and cellulose fiber (approximately 20%). To effectively utilize the cassava pulp, an attempt was made to convert its components to ethanol using a sake-brewing yeast displaying glucoamylase on the cell surface. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kyokai no. 7 (strain K7) displaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase, designated strain K7G, was constructed using the C-terminal-half region of {alpha}-agglutinin. A sample of cassava pulp was pretreated with a hydrothermal reaction (140 C for 1 h), followed by treatment with a Trichoderma reesei cellulase to hydrolyze the cellulose in the sample. The K7G strain fermented starch and glucose in pretreated samples without addition of amylolytic enzymes, and produced ethanol in 91% and 80% of theoretical yield from 5% and 10% cassava pulp, respectively. (author)

  3. Bioadsorption of cadmium ion by cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying metallothionein and hexa-His

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, K.; Ueda, M. [Lab. of Applied Biological Chemistry, Kyoto Univ., Yoshida, Kyoto (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The Cd{sup 2+}-chelating abilities of yeast metallothionein (YMT) and hexa-His displayed on the yeast-cell surface were compared. Display of YMT and hexa-His by {alpha}-agglutinin-based cell-surface engineering was confirmed by immunofluorescent labeling. Surface-engineered yeast cells with YMT and hexa-His fused in tandem showed superior cell-surface adsorption and recovery of Cd{sup 2+} under EDTA treatment on the cell surface than hexa-His-displaying cells. YMT was demonstrated to be more effective than hexa-His for the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+}. Yeast cells displaying YMT and/or hexa-His exhibited a higher potential for the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+} than Escherichia coli cells displaying these molecules. In order to investigate the effect of the displayed YMT and hexa-His on sensitivity to toxic Cd{sup 2+}, growth in Cd{sup 2+}-containing liquid medium was monitored. Unlike hexa-His-displaying cells, cells displaying YMT and hexa-His fused in tandem induced resistance to Cd{sup 2+} through active and enhanced adsorption of toxic Cd{sup 2+}. These results indicate that YMT-displaying yeast cells are a unique bioadsorbent with a functional chelating ability superior to that of E. coli. (orig.)

  4. Development of Industrial Yeast Platform Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Dato, Laura; Förster, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Most of the current metabolic engineering projects are carried out using laboratory strains as the starting host. Although such strains are easily manipulated genetically, their robustness does not always meet the requirements set by industrial fermentation conditions. In such conditions, the cel...... screening of the 36 industrial and laboratory yeast strains. In addition, progress in the development of molecular biology methods for generating the new strains will be presented....

  5. Construction of a novel selection system for endoglucanases exhibiting carbohydrate-binding modules optimized for biomass using yeast cell-surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Akihito; Bae, Jungu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-23

    To permit direct cellulose degradation and ethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (Δsed1) codisplaying 3 cellulases (Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II [EG], T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II [CBH], and Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase I [BG]) was constructed by yeast cell-surface engineering. The EG used in this study consists of a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a catalytic module. A comparison with family 1 CBMs revealed conserved amino acid residues and flexible amino acid residues. The flexible amino acid residues were at positions 18, 23, 26, and 27, through which the degrading activity for various cellulose structures in each biomass may have been optimized. To select the optimal combination of CBMs of EGs, a yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM was constructed. The mixture consisted of yeasts codisplaying EG with mutated CBMs, in which 4 flexible residues were comprehensively mutated, CBH, and BG. The yeast mixture was inoculated in selection medium with newspaper as the sole carbon source. The surviving yeast consisted of RTSH yeast (the mutant sequence of CBM: N18R, S23T, S26S, and T27H) and wild-type yeast (CBM was the original) in a ratio of 1:46. The mixture (1 RTSH yeast and 46 wild-type yeasts) had a fermentation activity that was 1.5-fold higher than that of wild-type yeast alone in the early phase of saccharification and fermentation, which indicates that the yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM could be used to select the optimal combination of CBMs suitable for the cellulose of each biomass.

  6. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Nicolino, Martina Picca; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food ferment...

  7. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintare Gulbiniene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. Total dsRNA extractions in 11 killer strains of yeast isolated from spontaneous fermentations revealed that the molecular basis of the killer phenomenon was not only dsRNAs, but also unidentified genetic determinants.

  8. Terroir of yeasts? – Application of FTIR spectroscopy and molecular methods for strain typing of yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The site specific influence on wine (Terroir is an often by wine producers, consumers and scientists discussed topic in the world of wine. A study on grapes and (spontaneous fermentations from six different vineyards was done to investigate the biodiversity of yeasts and to answer the question if there is a terroir of yeast and how it could be influenced. Randomly isolated yeasts were identified by FTIR-spectroscopy and molecular methods on species and strain level. Vineyard specific yeast floras would be observed but they are not such important as expected. Only a few overlapping strain patterns would be identified during both vintages. The yeast flora of the winery had a huge impact on the spontaneous fermentations, but is not really constant and influenced by different factors from outside.

  9. Influence of yeast strain on Shiraz wine quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Helen; Cozzolino, Daniel; McCarthy, Jane; Abrahamse, Caroline; Holt, Sylvester; Solomon, Mark; Smith, Paul; Chambers, Paul J; Curtin, Chris

    2013-08-01

    Wine styles are defined by complex and highly diverse chemical compositions. Evidence suggests that some of this complexity is determined by the choice of yeast strain used in fermentation. There are hundreds of different commercially available wine yeast strains that, potentially, provide a means by which winemakers can tailor their wines for different consumer market segments. In this study we evaluated the impacts of fermenting Shiraz must with different yeast strains, with a focus on chemical composition and tannin content of the finished wines. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the wines indicated that choice of yeast strain had a strong influence on a number of wine compositional parameters, including tannin. In three fermentation experiments, across two vintages and using different winemaking protocols, a compelling case for yeast strain 'signature' was evident. The results demonstrate that there is an opportunity to use commercial wine yeast diversity to modulate red wine composition and, by implication, the style of finished wines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Trehalose biosynthesis enhancement for six yeast strains under pressurized culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Changsheng; Jia, Shiru; Dai, Yujie; Wang, Rui; Sun, Aiyou

    2010-01-01

    Six yeast strains of the commercial brewing yeasts CICC1391 and CICC1471, the commercial baker yeasts CICC1339 and CICC1447, and the commercial alcohol yeasts CICC1286 and CICC1291 have been cultured under 1.0 MPa of pressure with N(2) and CO(2) as pressure media. The concentration of intracellular trehalose and the activity of trehalose synthases complex have been measured. Also, the morphology changes of yeast cells have been observed by scanning electronic microscope. There was a positive correlation between the activity of trehalose synthase complex and the concentration of intracellular trehalose; and there was a negative correlation between the activity of trehalose synthase complex and the viability of yeast strains. Having been cultured for 3 h at high pressure of 1.0 MPa, the concentration of intracellular trehalose and the activity of trehalose synthases complex were improved by 50.1% to 116.4% and 45.2% to 219.1%, respectively, compared to those of atmospheric pressure culture. Under high pressure, many wrinkles appeared on the membrane surface of yeast cells. It has been found that yeasts are more sensitive to high pressure for having more and sharper wrinkles on their cell membranes.

  11. Fusion of two yeast strains for enhanced crude oil degradation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A hybrid strain S24 was developed from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5A and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis Y7B, using protoplast fusion technique. The yeast protoplasts were prepared using gut juice from Helix pomatia (Land Snail) as cell digesting enzyme. The ability of the wild and the hybrid strains to degrade medium ...

  12. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of a yeast strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... optimal in situ bioremediation strategies. In the current study, three yeast strains were isolated from oil- contaminated soil by enrichment technique in mineral basal salts (MBS) medium supplemented with phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Out of these, strain AH70 was selected for PAHs degradation,.

  13. Characterisation of commercial and natural Torulaspora delbrueckii wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, Valmary; Jolly, Neil; van Wyk, Jessy

    2013-05-15

    Forty-three South African Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast isolates from the ARC Infruitec-Nietvoorbij yeast culture collection, the T. delbrueckii type strain (CBS 1146), one reference T. delbrueckii strain (CBS 4663), two T. delbrueckii strains isolated from commercial yeast blends (Viniflora® Harmony.nsac and Viniflora® Melody.nsac), and a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (VIN 13) had their identities confirmed and were characterised using conventional and molecular microbiological techniques. These included a selection of growth media as well as CHEF electrophoretic karyotyping and PCR-RFLP analyses. Based on the biochemical and physiological results the strains were divided into 13 groups. The performances of the yeasts were also monitored by means of laboratory-scale fermentations in grape must at 15 °C and 22 °C. The fermentation kinetic data showed that at 22 °C, the yeasts were divided into two distinct groups, a faster and a slower fermenting group. The fermentation curves of the laboratory-scale study at 15 °C showed that, at this lower temperature, the yeasts also fermented at different speeds, but the fermentation curves showed greater separation. The biochemical and physiological grouping did not coincide with the fermentation abilities and good fermenters could be found in more than one group. Chemical analyses of the resultant wines (alcohol, volatile acidity, glycerol, total SO2, residual sugar) were used in Principle Component Analyses. The yeasts that grouped close to the S. cerevisiae reference strain (VIN 13) showed more acceptable wine chemical profiles, while those further away displayed less acceptable profiles. Three locally isolated strains and one commercial T. delbrueckii yeast strain, Viniflora® Harmony.nsac. produced wines with acceptable chemical profiles at both temperatures. These strains also had comparable fermentation kinetics to the S. cerevisiae reference. Therefore, depending on the fermentation temperature

  14. Comparative transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of industrial wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Debra; van den Dool, Adri H; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F

    2010-06-01

    The geno- and phenotypic diversity of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains provides an opportunity to apply the system-wide approaches that are reasonably well established for laboratory strains to generate insight into the functioning of complex cellular networks in industrial environments. We have previously analyzed the transcriptomes of five industrial wine yeast strains at three time points during alcoholic fermentation. Here, we extend the comparative approach to include an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis of two of the previously analyzed wine yeast strains at the same three time points during fermentation in synthetic wine must. The data show that differences in the transcriptomes of the two strains at a given time point rather accurately reflect differences in the corresponding proteomes independently of the gene ontology (GO) category, providing strong support for the biological relevance of comparative transcriptomic data sets in yeast. In line with previous observations, the alignment proves to be less accurate when assessing intrastrain changes at different time points. In this case, differences between the transcriptome and proteome appear to be strongly dependent on the GO category of the corresponding genes. The data in particular suggest that metabolic enzymes and the corresponding genes appear to be strongly correlated over time and between strains, suggesting a strong transcriptional control of such enzymes. The data also allow the generation of hypotheses regarding the molecular origin of significant differences in phenotypic traits between the two strains.

  15. Screening of oleaginous yeast strains tolerant to lignocellulose degradation compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Zihui; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Hu, Fengxian; Ryu, Dewey D Y; Bao, Jie

    2009-12-01

    High cost of triacylglycerol lipid feedstock is the major barrier for commercial production of biodiesel. The fermentation of oleaginous yeasts for lipid production using lignocellulose biomass provides a practical option with high economic competitiveness. In this paper, the typical oleaginous yeast strains were screened under the pressure of lignocellulose degradation compounds for selection of the optimal strains tolerant to lignocellulose. The inhibitory effect of lignocellulose degradation products on the oleaginous yeast fermentation was carefully investigated. Preliminary screening was carried out in the minimum nutritious medium without adding any expensive complex ingredients then was carried out in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate pretreated by dilute sulfuric acid. Seven typical lignocellulose degradation products formed in various pretreatment and hydrolysis processing were selected as the model inhibitors, including three organic acids, two furan compounds, and two phenol derivatives. The inhibition of the degradation compounds on the cell growth and lipid productivity of the selected oleaginous yeasts were examined. Acetic acid, formic acid, furfural, and vanillin were found to be the strong inhibitors for the fermentation of oleaginous yeasts, while levulinic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and hydroxybenzaldehyde were relatively weak inhibitors. Trichosporon cutaneum 2.1374 was found to be the most adopted strain to the lignocellulose degradation compounds.

  16. Ethanol production potential of local yeast strains isolated from ripe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of different yeast strains isolated from ripe banana peels to produce ethanol was investigated. Of the 8 isolates screened for their fermentation ability, 5 showed enhanced performance and were subsequently identified and assessed for important ethanol fermentation attributes such as ethanol producing ability, ...

  17. Yeast strains designed for 2. generation bioethanol production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennow, B.

    2013-04-15

    The aim of the project was to develop a suitable fermentation organism for 2G bioethanol production that would efficiently ferment all of the sugars in lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol at a commercially viable rate (comparable to yeast based 1G ethanol production). More specifically, a yeast strain would be developed with the ability to ferment also the pentoses in lignocellulosic biomass and thereby increase the ethanol yield of the process by 30-45% with a profound positive effect on the total process economy. The project has succeeded in developing a new industrial yeast strain V1. The yeast strain can transform the difficult C5 sugars to ethanol from waste products such as straw and the like from the agricultural sector. The classic issues relating to industrial uses such as inhibitor and ethanol tolerance and high ethanol production is resolved satisfactorily. The potential of the use of the new strain for 2nd generation bioethanol production is that the ethanol yields increase by 30-45%. With the increased ethanol yield follows a marked improvement in the overall process economics. (LN)

  18. Molecular and biochemical studies of some yeast strains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Kluyveromyces lactis (Y.9) and Pichia jadinii (Y.10) contained almost double the amount of total amino ... Differences between ... biochemical analysis (total protein profile and total amino acids) were used as tools to select the best yeast strains in Saudi Arabia and Egypt as a rich source of animal protein.

  19. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abreu-Cavalheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast.

  20. Development of intra-strain self-cloning procedure for breeding baker's yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Youji; Ogihara, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Chisato; Yamamura, Hideki; Iimura, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Previously reported self-cloning procedures for breeding of industrial yeast strains require DNA from other strains, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis. Therefore, we aimed to construct a self-cloning baker's yeast strain that exhibits freeze tolerance via an improved self-cloning procedure. We first disrupted the URA3 gene of a prototrophic baker's yeast strain without the use of any marker gene, resulting in a Δura3 homozygous disruptant. Then, the URA3 gene of the parental baker's yeast strain was used as a selection marker to introduce the constitutive TDH3 promoter upstream of the PDE2 gene encoding high-affinity cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This self-cloning procedure was performed without using DNA from other Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis and was therefore designated an intra-strain self-cloning procedure. Using this self-cloning procedure, we succeeded in producing self-cloning baker's yeast strains that harbor the TDH3p-PDE2 gene heterozygously and homozygously, designated TDH3p-PDE2 hetero and TDH3p-PDE2 homo strains, respectively. These self-cloning strains expressed much higher levels of PDE2 mRNA than the parental strain and exhibited higher viability after freeze stress, as well as higher fermentation ability in frozen dough, when compared with the parental strain. The TDH3p-PDE2 homo strain was genetically more stable than the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero strain. These results indicate that both heterozygous and homozygous strains of self-cloning PDE2-overexpressing freeze-tolerant strains of industrial baker's yeast can be prepared using the intra-strain self-cloning procedure, and, from a practical viewpoint, the TDH3p-PDE2 homo strain constructed in this study is preferable to the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero strain for frozen dough baking. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genotyping 1000 yeast strains by next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkening Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The throughput of next-generation sequencing machines has increased dramatically over the last few years; yet the cost and time for library preparation have not changed proportionally, thus representing the main bottleneck for sequencing large numbers of samples. Here we present an economical, high-throughput library preparation method for the Illumina platform, comprising a 96-well based method for DNA isolation for yeast cells, a low-cost DNA shearing alternative, and adapter ligation using heat inactivation of enzymes instead of bead cleanups. Results Up to 384 whole-genome libraries can be prepared from yeast cells in one week using this method, for less than 15 euros per sample. We demonstrate the robustness of this protocol by sequencing over 1000 yeast genomes at ~30x coverage. The sequence information from 768 yeast segregants derived from two divergent S. cerevisiae strains was used to generate a meiotic recombination map at unprecedented resolution. Comparisons to other datasets indicate a high conservation of recombination at a chromosome-wide scale, but differences at the local scale. Additionally, we detected a high degree of aneuploidy (3.6% by examining the sequencing coverage in these segregants. Differences in allele frequency allowed us to attribute instances of aneuploidy to gains of chromosomes during meiosis or mitosis, both of which showed a strong tendency to missegregate specific chromosomes. Conclusions Here we present a high throughput workflow to sequence genomes of large number of yeast strains at a low price. We have used this workflow to obtain recombination and aneuploidy data from hundreds of segregants, which can serve as a foundation for future studies of linkage, recombination, and chromosomal aberrations in yeast and higher eukaryotes.

  2. Selection of yeast strains for bioethanol production from UK seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas, Emily T; White, Daniel A; Du, Chenyu; Cook, David J

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are a promising feedstock for the production of third generation bioethanol, since they have high carbohydrate contents, contain little or no lignin and are available in abundance. However, seaweeds typically contain a more diverse array of monomeric sugars than are commonly present in feedstocks derived from lignocellulosic material which are currently used for bioethanol production. Hence, identification of a suitable fermentative microorganism that can utilise the principal sugars released from the hydrolysis of macroalgae remains a major objective. The present study used a phenotypic microarray technique to screen 24 different yeast strains for their ability to metabolise individual monosaccharides commonly found in seaweeds, as well as hydrolysates following an acid pre-treatment of five native UK seaweed species ( Laminaria digitata , Fucus serratus , Chondrus crispus , Palmaria palmata and Ulva lactuca ). Five strains of yeast (three Saccharomyces spp, one Pichia sp and one Candida sp) were selected and subsequently evaluated for bioethanol production during fermentation of the hydrolysates. Four out of the five selected strains converted these monomeric sugars into bioethanol, with the highest ethanol yield (13 g L -1 ) resulting from a fermentation using C. crispus hydrolysate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPS128. This study demonstrated the novel application of a phenotypic microarray technique to screen for yeast capable of metabolising sugars present in seaweed hydrolysates; however, metabolic activity did not always imply fermentative production of ethanol.

  3. Yeast strains as potential aroma enhancers in dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Mónica; Corral, Sara; Cano-García, Liliana; Salvador, Ana; Belloch, Carmela

    2015-11-06

    Actual healthy trends produce changes in the sensory characteristics of dry fermented sausages therefore, new strategies are needed to enhance their aroma. In particular, a reduction in the aroma characteristics was observed in reduced fat and salt dry sausages. In terms of aroma enhancing, generally coagulase-negative cocci were selected as the most important group from the endogenous microbiota in the production of flavour compounds. Among the volatile compounds analysed in dry sausages, ester compounds contribute to fruity aroma notes associated with high acceptance of traditional dry sausages. However, the origin of ester compounds in traditional dry sausages can be due to other microorganisms as lactic acid bacteria, yeast and moulds. Yeast contribution in dry fermented sausages was investigated with opposite results attributed to low yeast survival or low activity during processing. Generally, they affect sausage colour and flavour by their oxygen-scavenging and lipolytic activities in addition to, their ability to catabolize fermentation products such as lactate increasing the pH and contributing to less tangy and more aromatic sausages. Recently, the isolation and characterization of yeast from traditional dry fermented sausages made possible the selection of those with ability to produce aroma active compounds. Molecular methods were used for genetic typing of the isolated yeasts whereas their ability to produce aroma compounds was tested in different systems such as in culture media, in model systems and finally on dry fermented sausages. The results revealed that the appropriate selection of yeast strains with aroma potential may be used to improve the sensory characteristics of reformulated fermented sausages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular and biochemical studies of some yeast strains | El-Assal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work focuses on detecting the level of polymorphisms among eleven KSA and Egyptian yeast strains, as efficient tools to assess the genetic relationships and development of yeast strain-specific molecular fingerprints. Moreover, estimation of the amino acid concentration was efficient in selecting the protein rich strains ...

  5. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  6. Antagonistic Activity of Three Newly Isolated Yeast Strains from the Surface of Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Ortansa Csutak; Ionela Sarbu; Ileana Stoica; Petruta Cornea; Tatiana Vassu

    2013-01-01

    Three Metschnikowia pulcherrima strains isolated from white grapes(strains designated SG1 and SG2) and cherries (strain CPM1) from Romania were tested for antagonistic activity against natural and reference yeasts, fungi and E. coli. The best results were obtained for SG2 strain against the following microbes isolated from natural environments: yeasts Candida tropicalis OT4 and Candida albicans Cc, and fungal strains Botrytis cinerea BCS and BCF1. Using 2 % sodium hydrogen carbonate and 1 or ...

  7. Production of ethanol from guava pulp by yeast strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.; Modi, D.R.; Garg, S.K. [Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Avadh University, Faizabad (India)

    1997-06-01

    Guava pulp used for ethanol production by three yeast strains contained 10% (w/v) total sugars and was pH 4.1. Ethanol production at the optimum sugar concentration of 10%, at pH 4.1 and 30{sup o}C was 1.5%, 3.6% and 3.9% (w/v) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 1972, Isolate-1 and Isolate-2, respectively, at 60 h fermentation. Higher sugar concentrations at 15 and 20% were inhibitory for ethanol production by all test cultures. The maximum production of ethanol at optimum natural sugar concentration (10%) of guava pulp, was 5.8% (w/v) at pH 5.0 by Isolate-2 over 36 h fermentation, which was only slightly more than the quantity of ethanol produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (5.0%) and Isolate-1 (5.3%) over 36 and 60 h fermentation, respectively. (Author)

  8. Improvement of Saccharomyces yeast strains used in brewing, wine making and baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donalies, Ute E B; Nguyen, Huyen T T; Stahl, Ulf; Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Yeast was the first microorganism domesticated by mankind. Indeed, the production of bread and alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine dates from antiquity, even though the fact that the origin of alcoholic fermentation is a microorganism was not known until the nineteenth century. The use of starter cultures in yeast industries became a common practice after methods for the isolation of pure yeast strains were developed. Moreover, effort has been undertaken to improve these strains, first by classical genetic methods and later by genetic engineering. In general, yeast strain development has aimed at improving the velocity and efficiency of the respective production process and the quality of the final products. This review highlights the achievements in genetic engineering of Saccharomyces yeast strains applied in food and beverage industry.

  9. Study on the IAA (Indole acetic acid) Productivity of Soil Yeast Strain Isolats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwe Nwe Soe Hlaing; Swe Zin Yu; San San Yu

    2011-12-01

    Twelve isolated soil yeast were tested in IAA production in peptone yeast glucose broth (PYG). All strains were screened for the Indole Acetic Acid (IAA) producing activity in PYG broth supplemented with or without L-Tryptophan (L-TRP) as precusor. IAA production was assayed calorimetrically using Salkowski's reagent. The concentration of IAA produced by yeast strains was measured by spectrophotometric method at 530nm. Y6 strain was the highest IAA producer (79ppm) at 9 days incubation period without tryptophan. Y3, Y10 and Y12 strains that were incubated without L-TRP also had the higher ability in the production of IAA than other yeast isolates. The selected yeasts having high IAA production activity were characterized by morphological study and biochemical tests including sugar assimilation and fermentation tests.

  10. Phenotypic evaluation and characterization of 21 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, In Iok; Turner, Timothy Lee; Kim, Heejin; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2018-02-01

    Microorganisms have been studied and used extensively to produce value-added fuels and chemicals. Yeasts, specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae, receive industrial attention because of their well-known ability to ferment glucose and produce ethanol. Thousands of natural or genetically modified S. cerevisiae have been found in industrial environments for various purposes. These industrial strains are isolated from industrial fermentation sites, and they are considered as potential host strains for superior fermentation processes. In many cases, industrial yeast strains have higher thermotolerance, increased resistances towards fermentation inhibitors and increased glucose fermentation rates under anaerobic conditions when compared with laboratory yeast strains. Despite the advantages of industrial strains, they are often not well characterized. Through screening and phenotypic characterization of commercially available industrial yeast strains, industrial fermentation processes requiring specific environmental conditions may be able to select an ideal starting yeast strain to be further engineered. Here, we have characterized and compared 21 industrial S. cerevisiae strains under multiple conditions, including their tolerance to varying pH conditions, resistance to fermentation inhibitors, sporulation efficiency and ability to ferment lignocellulosic sugars. These data may be useful for the selection of a parental strain for specific biotechnological applications of engineered yeast. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. New hybrids between Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast species found among wine and cider production strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masneuf, I; Hansen, J.; Groth, C

    1998-01-01

    as different sequences of the OLI1 gene. The sequence of the OLI1 gene from the wine hybrid strain appeared to be the same as that of the S. cerevisiae gene, whereas the OLI1 gene of the cider hybrid strain its equally divergent from both putative parents, S. bayanus and S, cerevisiae, Some fermentative......Two yeast isolates, a wine-making yeast first identified as a Mel(+) strain (ex. S. uvarum) and a cider-making yeast, were characterized for their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, Electrophoretic karyotyping analyses, restriction fragment length polymorphism maps of PCR-amplified MET2 gene...

  12. Thermochemical surface engineering of steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels provides a comprehensive scientific overview of the principles and different techniques involved in thermochemical surface engineering, including thermodynamics, kinetics principles, process technologies and techniques for enhanced performance of steels...

  13. Non-Conventional Yeast Strains Increase the Aroma Complexity of Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Steensels, Jan; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used yeast in food fermentations because it combines several key traits, including fermentation efficiency and production of desirable flavors. However, the dominance of S. cerevisiae in industrial fermentations limits the diversity in the aroma profiles of the end products. Hence, there is a growing interest in non-conventional yeast strains that can help generate the diversity and complexity desired in today’s diversified and consumer-driven markets. Here, we selected a set of non-conventional yeast strains to examine their potential for bread fermentation. Here, we tested ten non-conventional yeasts for bread fermentation, including two Saccharomyces species that are not currently used in bread making and 8 non-Saccharomyces strains. The results show that Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces bayanus combine satisfactory dough fermentation with an interesting flavor profile. Sensory analysis and HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis confirmed that these strains produce aroma profiles that are very different from that produced by a commercial bakery strain. Moreover, bread produced with these yeasts was preferred by a majority of a trained sensory panel. These results demonstrate the potential of T. delbrueckii and S. bayanus as alternative yeasts for bread dough leavening, and provide a general experimental framework for the evaluation of more yeasts and bacteria. PMID:27776154

  14. Non-Conventional Yeast Strains Increase the Aroma Complexity of Bread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aslankoohi

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used yeast in food fermentations because it combines several key traits, including fermentation efficiency and production of desirable flavors. However, the dominance of S. cerevisiae in industrial fermentations limits the diversity in the aroma profiles of the end products. Hence, there is a growing interest in non-conventional yeast strains that can help generate the diversity and complexity desired in today's diversified and consumer-driven markets. Here, we selected a set of non-conventional yeast strains to examine their potential for bread fermentation. Here, we tested ten non-conventional yeasts for bread fermentation, including two Saccharomyces species that are not currently used in bread making and 8 non-Saccharomyces strains. The results show that Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces bayanus combine satisfactory dough fermentation with an interesting flavor profile. Sensory analysis and HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis confirmed that these strains produce aroma profiles that are very different from that produced by a commercial bakery strain. Moreover, bread produced with these yeasts was preferred by a majority of a trained sensory panel. These results demonstrate the potential of T. delbrueckii and S. bayanus as alternative yeasts for bread dough leavening, and provide a general experimental framework for the evaluation of more yeasts and bacteria.

  15. Isolation and molecular identification of yeast strains from “Rabilé” a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and molecular identification of yeast strains from “Rabilé” a starter of local fermented drink. Ibrahim Keita, Marius K Somda, Aly Savadogo, Iliassou Mogmenga, Ousmane Koita, Alfred S Traore ...

  16. Isolation and characterization of some dominant yeast strains for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was initiated to isolate and characterize yeasts from wet Arabica coffee processing wastes for bioethanol production. Yeast isolates were collected from wet Arabica coffee processing effluent 1, effluent 2, effluent 3, pulp 1 and pulp 2. They were screened and characterized for ethanol production following ...

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutheina Gargouri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  18. Study of the role of the covalently linked cell wall protein (Ccw14p) and yeast glycoprotein (Ygp1p) within biofilm formation in a flor yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, J; Coi, A L; Zara, G; García-Martínez, T; Mauricio, J C; Budroni, M

    2018-03-01

    Flor yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains noted by their ability to create a type of biofilm in the air-liquid interface of some wines, known as 'flor' or 'velum', for which certain proteins play an essential role. Following a proteomic study of a flor yeast strain, we deleted the CCW14 (covalently linked cell wall protein) and YGP1 (yeast glycoprotein) genes-codifying for two cell surface glycoproteins-in a haploid flor yeast strain and we reported that both influence the weight of the biofilm as well as cell adherence (CCW14).

  19. Microsatellite marker-based assessment of the biodiversity of native bioethanol yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangelo, Ana Teresa B F; Alonso, Diego P; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Colombi, Débora

    2013-08-01

    Although many Brazilian sugar mills initiate the fermentation process by inoculating selected commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the unsterile conditions of the industrial sugar cane ethanol fermentation process permit the constant entry of native yeast strains. Certain of those native strains are better adapted and tend to predominate over the initial strain, which may cause problems during fermentation. In the industrial fermentation process, yeast cells are often exposed to stressful environmental conditions, including prolonged cell recycling, ethanol toxicity and osmotic, oxidative or temperature stress. Little is known about these S. cerevisiae strains, although recent studies have demonstrated that heterogeneous genome architecture is exhibited by some selected well-adapted Brazilian indigenous yeast strains that display high performance in bioethanol fermentation. In this study, 11 microsatellite markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of the native autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains in various Brazilian sugar mills. The resulting multilocus data were used to build a similarity-based phenetic tree and to perform a Bayesian population structure analysis. The tree revealed the presence of great genetic diversity among the strains, which were arranged according to the place of origin and the collection year. The population structure analysis revealed genotypic differences among populations; in certain populations, these genotypic differences are combined to yield notably genotypically diverse individuals. The high yeast diversity observed among native S. cerevisiae strains provides new insights on the use of autochthonous high-fitness strains with industrial characteristics as starter cultures at bioethanol plants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Yeasts Associated with Culex pipiens and Culex theileri Mosquito Larvae and the Effect of Selected Yeast Strains on the Ontogeny of Culex pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, A; Roets, F; Botha, A

    2016-04-01

    The success of mosquitoes in nature has been linked to their microbiota and bacteria in particular. Yet, knowledge on their symbioses with yeasts is lacking. To explore possible associations, culturable yeasts were isolated from wild larvae of Culex pipiens and Culex theileri. These yeasts were classified using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses and identified by sequencing the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. Representative strains of Candida, Cryptococcus, Galactomyces, Hannaella, Meyerozyma, Pichia, Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Wickerhamomyces were isolated. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first records of the yeast microbiota from wild mosquito larvae and show that they may harbour potential clinically relevant yeast species, including the well-known opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans. Also, diminished numbers of yeast isolates originating from adults, compared to larvae, support the hypothesis of microbial reduction/elimination during adult emergence and extend it to include yeasts. In addition, strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida pseudolambica, Cryptococcus gattii, Metschnikowia bicuspidata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus were tested as sole feed during a 21-day feeding experiment wherein cumulative larval growth, survival and pupation of Cx. pipiens were recorded. Although most yeasts supported larval growth in a similar manner to the positive control S. cerevisiae strain, the different yeast strains impacted differently on Culex pipiens ontogeny. Notably, survival and pupation of larvae were negatively impacted by a representative strain of the primary pathogen C. gattii - signifying some yeasts to be natural antagonists of mosquitoes.

  1. Yeast strain affects phenolic concentration in Pinot noir wines made by microwave maceration with early pressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, A L; Close, D C; Dambergs, R G

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of yeast strains in a novel winemaking process that had been designed to optimize phenolic extraction and improve production efficiency for Pinot noir winemaking. Microwave maceration with early pressing and co-inoculation of yeast and malolactic bacteria for simultaneous alcoholic and malolactic fermentation was investigated. Yeast treatments (Saccharomyces cerevisiae RC212 and EC1118, and Saccharomyces bayanus AWRI1176) were co-inoculated with Oenococcus oeni PN4 immediately after must microwave maceration. Alcoholic and malolactic fermentation were complete 17 days postinoculation for all three yeast treatments. At 16-month bottle age, the AWRI1176-treated wines had approximately twice the nonbleachable pigment and colour density of wines fermented by EC1118 and RC212. The novel winemaking process produced Pinot noir wine that was stable 37 days after fruit had been harvested and yeast strain choice significantly impacted the stability and phenolic character of wine. Successful simultaneous alcoholic and malolactic fermentation in 17 days, and a demonstrated lack of inhibition between the yeast strains and malolactic strain applied in this study, provide proof of concept for very rapid red winemaking using the novel winemaking approach described herein. Further investigation would be required to assess strain effects on wine aroma, mouth feel and taste, however, this novel winemaking approach may offer significant industry efficiencies. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Relationship of trehalose accumulation with ethanol fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Du, Feng-Guang; Sun, Pei-Yong; Qu, Ai-Min; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The protective effect and the mechanisms of trehalose accumulation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated during ethanol fermentation. The engineered strains with more intercellular trehalose achieved significantly higher fermentation rates and ethanol yields than their wild strain ZS during very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, while their performances were not different during regular fermentation. The VHG fermentation performances of these strains were consistent with their growth capacity under osmotic stress and ethanol stress, the key stress factors during VHG fermentation. These results suggest that trehalose accumulation is more important for VHG fermentation of industrial yeast strains than regular one. The differences in membrane integrity and antioxidative capacity of these strains indicated the possible mechanisms of trehalose as a protectant under VHG condition. Therefore, trehalose metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving the VHG fermentation performance of industrial yeast strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antagonistic Activity of Three Newly Isolated Yeast Strains from the Surface of Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortansa Csutak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three Metschnikowia pulcherrima strains isolated from white grapes(strains designated SG1 and SG2 and cherries (strain CPM1 from Romania were tested for antagonistic activity against natural and reference yeasts, fungi and E. coli. The best results were obtained for SG2 strain against the following microbes isolated from natural environments: yeasts Candida tropicalis OT4 and Candida albicans Cc, and fungal strains Botrytis cinerea BCS and BCF1. Using 2 % sodium hydrogen carbonate and 1 or 2 % calcium chloride, antimicrobial activities of strains SG1 and SG2 were maintained or even enhanced, while strain CPM1 was less influenced. Antimicrobial tests revealed four types of colonies and halos of strains SG1, SG2 and CPM1 reflecting differences in iron immobilization under similar growth conditions. Antifungal activity and the level of pigment production increased at 25 °C, and the largest diffusible pigment area was obtained by strain SG2, which altered Botrytis conidia germination and induced modifications of mycelium. Competition for iron seems to be the major mechanism of antagonistic action of our strains, which is reduced/absent under iron chloride addition. Lowering of antifungal activity by heating or proteolytic treatment indicates that a protein might also be involved. The inhibitory activity of yeast supernatants was less important, suggesting a cell-related mechanism. When combined, strains SG1 and SG2 had synergistic activity, which was reduced in the presence of CPM1 due to possible production of an inhibitory compound.

  4. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Patrícia M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural

  5. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel A S

    2008-11-04

    Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome.

  6. Microarray karyotyping of commercial wine yeast strains reveals shared, as well as unique, genomic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine R Paul

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic differences between yeast strains used in wine-making may account for some of the variation seen in their fermentation properties and may also produce differing sensory characteristics in the final wine product itself. To investigate this, we have determined genomic differences among several Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains by using a "microarray karyotyping" (also known as "array-CGH" or "aCGH" technique. Results We have studied four commonly used commercial wine yeast strains, assaying three independent isolates from each strain. All four wine strains showed common differences with respect to the laboratory S. cerevisiae strain S288C, some of which may be specific to commercial wine yeasts. We observed very little intra-strain variation; i.e., the genomic karyotypes of different commercial isolates of the same strain looked very similar, although an exception to this was seen among the Montrachet isolates. A moderate amount of inter-strain genomic variation between the four wine strains was observed, mostly in the form of depletions or amplifications of single genes; these differences allowed unique identification of each strain. Many of the inter-strain differences appear to be in transporter genes, especially hexose transporters (HXT genes, metal ion sensors/transporters (CUP1, ZRT1, ENA genes, members of the major facilitator superfamily, and in genes involved in drug response (PDR3, SNQ1, QDR1, RDS1, AYT1, YAR068W. We therefore used halo assays to investigate the response of these strains to three different fungicidal drugs (cycloheximide, clotrimazole, sulfomethuron methyl. Strains with fewer copies of the CUP1 loci showed hypersensitivity to sulfomethuron methyl. Conclusion Microarray karyotyping is a useful tool for analyzing the genome structures of wine yeasts. Despite only small to moderate variations in gene copy numbers between different wine yeast strains and within different isolates of a given

  7. Minor Volatile Compounds Profiles of ‘Aligoté’ Wines Fermented with Different Yeast Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin VARARU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aroma of wine can be classified accordingly to its origin, in varietal aroma, pre-fermentative aroma, fermentative aroma and post-fermentative aroma. Although a number of flavor components are found in the original grape, the dominant and major compounds contributing to white wines are formed during alcoholic fermentation, in concordance with the yeast strain used. In order to highlight the influence of the yeast strain to the aroma composition of wines, wine samples from ‘Aligoté’ grape variety made with 8 different yeast strains were subjected to stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SBSE-GC-MS analyses. Also, a sensorial analysis of the studied wines was performed by a tasting panel consisting of 15 tasters. 38 minor volatile compounds were quantified by SBSE-GC-MS technique. Different concentration of the same compound and different aroma compounds were identified and quantified in wines obtained with different yeast strains. A wine finger printing was obtained by multivariate data analyses of aroma compounds grouped by chemical families. The analytical and sensorial analysis of the wine samples confirms that there are differences in aroma composition of the wines made with different yeast strains.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Yeast Strains Isolated from Different Sources by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M. S.; Latif, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Various molecular techniques like analysis of the amplified rDNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS), intragenic spacers and total ITS region analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) has been introduced for yeast identification but there are limited databases to identify yeast species on the basis of 5.8S rDNA. In this study, twenty nine yeast strains from various sources including spoiled fruits, vegetables, foodstuffs, and concentrated juices were characterized by PCR-RFLP. PCR-RFLP has been used to characterize yeasts present in different spoiled food samples after isolation of the yeasts. By using this technique, the isolated yeast strains were characterized by direct 5.8S-ITS rDNA region amplification. RFLP analysis was applied to each of the amplification products (varied from 400bp to 800bp) detected, and the corresponding yeast identifications were made according to each specific restriction patterns obtained after treatment with two endonucleases TaqI and HaeIII which yielded a specific banding pattern for each species. For further confirmation amplified products of eleven selected isolates were sequenced and blast on NCBI. Both RFLP and sequence analyses of the strains with accession nos. KF472163, KF472164, KF472165, KF472166, KF472167, KF472168, KF472169, KF472170, KF472171, KF472172, KF472173 gave significantly similar results. The isolates were found to belong five different yeast species including; Candida spp., Pichia spp., Kluyveromyces spp., Clavispora spp. and Hanseniaspora spp. This method provides a fast, easy, reliable and authentic way for determining yeast population present in different type of samples, as compared to traditional characterization technique. (author)

  9. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of a yeast strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yeast was identified by molecular genetics technique based on sequence analysis of the variable D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA. Subsequent 26S rRNA gene sequencing showed 100% base sequence homology and it was identified as Candida viswanathii. The degradation of PAHs

  10. Assimilation of cholesterol by yeast strains isolated from infant feces and Feta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psomas, E I; Fletouris, D J; Litopoulou-Tzanetaki, E; Tzanetakis, N

    2003-11-01

    Eight yeast strains isolated from infant feces and the traditional Greek Feta cheese, selected for their probiotic properties, were tested along with a commercially available strain of Saccharomyces boulardii for their ability to remove cholesterol from a growth medium (yeast extract glucose peptone broth) supplemented with 0.3% Oxgall. The amount of cholesterol removed during 72 h of growth at 37 degrees C revealed significant variations among the yeast strains examined. Two isolates from infant feces, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae KK1 and Isaatchenkia orientalis KK5.Y.1 and one isolate from Feta cheese, namely S. cerevisiae 832, along with the commercial strain S. boulardii, were able to remove cholesterol from the growth medium after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. However, Saccharomyces strains proved to be able to remove cholesterol even after 24 h of growth at 37 degrees C. The cholesterol removed from the growth medium was not metabolically degraded but was rather assimilated into the yeast cells. The ability to assimilate cholesterol in vitro and to tolerate low pH levels, gastric juice, and bile indicate that S. cerevisiae 832, and especially S. cerevisiae KK1 and I. orientalis KK5.Y.1 (being more bile and gastric juice tolerant because of their human origin) may be promising candidate strains for use as probiotics.

  11. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Selection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains for reducing alcohol levels in wine by sugar respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Manuel; Rojas, Virginia; Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar

    2014-07-02

    Respiration of sugars by non-Saccharomyces yeasts has been recently proposed for lowering alcohol levels in wine. Development of industrial fermentation processes based on such an approach requires, amongst other steps, the identification of yeast strains which are able to grow and respire under the relatively harsh conditions found in grape must. This work describes the characterization of a collection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in order to identify candidate yeast strains for this specific application. It involved the estimation of respiratory quotient (RQ) values under aerated conditions, at low pH and high sugar concentrations, calculation of yields of ethanol and other relevant metabolites, and characterization of growth responses to the main stress factors found during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Physiological features of some strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima or two species of Kluyveromyces, suggest they are suitable for lowering ethanol yields by respiration. The unsuitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for this purpose was not due to ethanol yields (under aerated conditions they are low enough for a significant reduction in final ethanol content), but to the high acetic acid yields under these growth conditions. According to results from controlled aeration fermentations with one strain of M. pulcherrima, design of an aeration regime allowing for lowering ethanol yields though preserving grape must components from excessive oxidation, would be conceivable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Induction, separation and identification of haploid strains from industrial brewer's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weina; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-01-04

    Lager brewing yeasts (Saccharomyces pastorianus), the natural hybrids of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus, are usually heterothallic polyploidy or aneuploidy. Their intricate ploidy is a great challenge to genetic studies and strain improvement. Haploid breeding is an effective method to overcome these difficulties. Also, haploid strains play an important role in scientific research and breeding. However, lager brewing yeasts only divide asexually and hardly bear spores under normal conditions, so it is very difficult to get haploid strains from them. In this study, we established comprehensive methods to induce, separate and identify haploid strains of industrial brewer's yeast. First, we selected efficient sporulation medium to induce the sporulation of an industrial brewer's yeast strain G-03, and ther isolated spores from vegetative cells and formed colonies on YPD plates. After that, flow cytometry was used to determine the ploidy types of the pre-judged haploid candidates. Ultimately, we analyzed the genotypes of the segregants by PCR reaction and mating test in order to get precise results. Using this protocol, we obtained 26 yeast segregants by spore isolation, and 4 of them pre-judged as haploid candidates were finally confirmed as haploid by flow cytometric analysis. Two of them were MATa and others were MATα. By scanning electron microscope (SEM), the cells of 4 haploid segregants showed similar morphology to each other but had obvious differences compared with the parent strain. Pseudohyphal growth occurred in parent cells after long-period cultivation but none was found in haploid segregants. Sporulation of industrial brewer's yeast and germination of their spores was difficult but not impossible. Nevertheless, the screening and identification of haploid segregants were more challenging.

  14. Modelling Sporangiospore-yeast transformation of Dimorphomyces strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoifo, C O

    1996-01-01

    Two types of buffered media, strictly defined-Ammonium sulphate-basal salts and complex Peptone-basal salts, were used for the cultivation of Dimorphomyces pleomorphis, one of two dimorphic fungi isolated from fermenting juice of soursop fruit, Annona muricata L. The growth count was taken every twenty-four hours. Transient morphologies were observed to change from sporangiospores through enlarged globose cells, to granular particles and eventually, polar budding yeast cells in the strictly defined medium at 15 degrees, 20 degrees, or 37 degrees C, but the complex medium casually terminally induced polar budding yeast cells and multipolar budding yeast like cells in between the growth phases, at 15 degrees and 20 degrees C, while mainly multipolar budding yeastlike morphology was observed at elevated temperature. There was obvious influence of nutritional factor or morphological expression (p < 0.01). After analysis of variance, the growth data could not fit into predictive quadratic polynomial model because the organism's response curves were incongruent with basic assumptions of the model. Furthermore, a stepwise regression analysis gave very low coefficients of determination, r2, for the interactive combinations. They were therefore, considered unfit for the data. Construction of the pII-profiles led to inference being drawn from the chemiosmotic theory, polyelectrolyte theory to account for the behaviour in the buffered multiionic media. It was also thought that inherent cellular mitotic division and glycolytic activity led to a prelogarithmic growth response.

  15. Technological properties of indigenous wine yeast strains isolated from wine production regions of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağder Elmacı, Simel; Özçelik, Filiz; Tokatlı, Mehmet; Çakır, İbrahim

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the important technological and fermentative properties of wine yeast strains previously isolated from different wine producing regions of Turkey. The determination of the following important properties was made: growth at high temperatures; fermentative capability in the presence of high sugar concentration; fermentation rate; hydrogen sulfide production; killer activity; resistance to high ethanol and sulfur dioxide; foam production; and enzymatic profiles. Ten local wine yeast strains belonging to Saccharomyces, and one commercial active dry yeast as a reference strain were evaluated. Fermentation characteristics were evaluated in terms of kinetic parameters, including ethanol yield (YP/S), biomass yield (YX/S), theoretical ethanol yield (%), specific ethanol production rate (qp; g/gh), specific glucose uptake rate (qs; g/gh), and the substrate conversion (%). All tested strains were able to grow at 37 °C and to start fermentation at 30° Brix, and were resistant to high concentrations of sulfur dioxide. 60 % of the strains were weak H2S producers, while the others produced high levels. Foam production was high, and no strains had killer activity. Six of the tested strains had the ability to grow and ferment at concentrations of 14 % ethanol. Except for one strain, all fermented most of the media sugars at a high rate, producing 11.0-12.4 % (v/v) ethanol. Although all but one strain had suitable characteristics for wine production, they possessed poor activities of glycosidase, esterase and proteinase enzymes of oenological interest. Nine of the ten local yeast strains were selected for their good oenological properties and their suitability as a wine starter culture.

  16. The impact of different ale brewer’s yeast strains on the proteome of immature beer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berner, Torben Sune; Jacobsen, Susanne; Arneborg, Nils

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation, ...... was present in beer brewed with KVL011, while lacking in WLP001 beer.......BACKGROUND: It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation......, by ale brewer’s yeast strains with different abilities to degrade fermentable sugars were investigated. RESULTS: Beers were fermented from standard hopped wort (13° Plato) using two ale brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains with different attenuation degrees. Both immature beers had the same...

  17. CRISPR-UnLOCK: Multipurpose Cas9-Based Strategies for Conversion of Yeast Libraries and Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenkamp, Emily; Giersch, Rachael M; Wedeman, Emily; Eaton, Muriel; Turnquist, Emily; Schrock, Madison N; Alkotami, Linah; Jirakittisonthon, Thitikan; Schluter-Pascua, Samantha E; Bayne, Gareth H; Wasko, Cory; Halloran, Megan; Finnigan, Gregory C

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to serve as a powerful model system for both basic biological research and industrial application. The development of genome-wide collections of individually manipulated strains (libraries) has allowed for high-throughput genetic screens and an emerging global view of this single-celled Eukaryote. The success of strain construction has relied on the innate ability of budding yeast to accept foreign DNA and perform homologous recombination, allowing for efficient plasmid construction ( in vivo ) and integration of desired sequences into the genome. The development of molecular toolkits and "integration cassettes" have provided fungal systems with a collection of strategies for tagging, deleting, or over-expressing target genes; typically, these consist of a C-terminal tag (epitope or fluorescent protein), a universal terminator sequence, and a selectable marker cassette to allow for convenient screening. However, there are logistical and technical obstacles to using these traditional genetic modules for complex strain construction (manipulation of many genomic targets in a single cell) or for the generation of entire genome-wide libraries. The recent introduction of the CRISPR/Cas gene editing technology has provided a powerful methodology for multiplexed editing in many biological systems including yeast. We have developed four distinct uses of the CRISPR biotechnology to generate yeast strains that utilizes the conversion of existing, commonly-used yeast libraries or strains. We present Cas9-based, marker-less methodologies for (i) N-terminal tagging, (ii) C-terminally tagging yeast genes with 18 unique fusions, (iii) conversion of fluorescently-tagged strains into newly engineered (or codon optimized) variants, and finally, (iv) use of a Cas9 "gene drive" system to rapidly achieve a homozygous state for a hypomorphic query allele in a diploid strain. These CRISPR-based methods demonstrate use of targeting universal sequences

  18. Use of non-saccharomyces Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast strains in winemaking and brewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tataridis Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Selected Saccharomyces yeast strains have been used for more than 150 years in brewing and for several decades in winemaking. They are necessary in brewing because of the boiling of the wort, which results in the death of all yeast cells, with the exception of some Belgian style beers (ex. Lambic, where the wort is left to be colonized by indigenous yeast and bacteria from the environment and ferment naturally. In winemaking their use is also pertinent because they provide regular and timely fermentations, inhibit the growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms and contribute to the desired sensory characters. Even though the use of selected Saccharomyces strains provides better quality assurance in winemaking in comparison to the unknown microbial consortia in the must, it has been debated for a long time now whether the use of selected industrial Saccharomyces strains results in wines with less sensory complexity and “terroir” character. In previous decades, non-Saccharomyces yeasts were mainly considered as spoilage/problematic yeast, since they exhibited low fermentation ability and other negative traits. In the last decades experiments have shown that there are some non-Saccharomyces strains (Candida, Pichia, Kluyveromyces, Torulaspora, etc which, even though they are not able to complete the fermentation they can still be used in sequential inoculation-fermentation with Saccharomyces to increase sensory complexity of the wines. Through fermentation in a laboratory scale, we have observed that the overall effects of selected Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast strains, is highly positive, leading to products with pronounced sensory complexity and floral/fruity aroma in winemaking and brewing.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of preparations after combined cultivation of lactic acid bacteria and yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabekyan, Ts R; Karapetyan, K J; Khachatryan, T V; Khachatryan, G E; Tatikyan, S Sh

    2018-03-30

    Use of antimicrobials in both human and animal populations over the past several decades has led to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria populations that are resistant to many commercially available drugs. For example, acquired resistance to first-line antimicrobial agents increasingly complicates the management of extra-intestinal infections due to Escherichia coli, which are a major source of illness and death. The continued development of new classes of natural antimicrobial agents, possessing antibacterial activity, has become of increasing importance for medicine and veterinary. So, selection of lactic acid bacteria and yeast strains for their combined cultivation with the aim of increasing of the activity is topical. It was shown that during combined cultivation of the lactic acid bacteria with probiotic properties and yeast strains, antimicrobial activity depends on the genus and species to which the strain of lactic acid bacteria and yeast belongs. They inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria with better efficiency. Increasing of the antimicrobial activity can be explained by the synergetic effect of products of cultures metabolism and by interaction between lactic acid bacteria cells with the cell wall of yeasts. Our data showed perspectives of combined cultivation of yeast and lactic acid bacteria for creation of a new class of antimicrobial preparations with high antibacterial activity and broad spectrum of action. Preparation can be recommended for treatment of animals. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Karyotype rearrangements in a wine yeast strain by rad52-dependent and rad52-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, David; Bartra, Enric; Piña, Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Yeast strains isolated from the wild may undergo karyotype changes during vegetative growth, a characteristic that compromises their utility in genetic improvement projects for industrial purposes. Karyotype instability is a dominant trait, segregating among meiotic derivatives as if it depended upon only a few genetic elements. We show that disrupting the RAD52 gene in a hypervariable strain partially stabilizes its karyotype. Specifically, RAD52 disruption eliminated recombination at telomeric and subtelomeric sequences, had no influence on ribosomal DNA rearrangement rates, and reduced to 30% the rate of changes in chromosomal size. Thus, there are at least three mechanisms related to karyotype instability in wild yeast strains, two of them not requiring RAD52-mediated homologous recombination. When utilized for a standard sparkling-wine second fermentation, Deltarad52 strains retained the enological properties of the parental strain, specifically its vigorous fermentation capability. These data increase our understanding of the mechanisms of karyotype instability in yeast strains isolated from the wild and illustrate the feasibility and limitations of genetic remediation to increase the suitability of natural strains for industrial processes.

  1. Relationship between ethanol and oxidative stress in laboratory and brewing yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleoanca, Iulia; Silva, Ana Rita Courelas; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Menezes, Regina de Andrade

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol is a chemical stress factor that inhibits cellular growth and determines metabolic changes leading to reduction of cell viability during fermentation and yeast storage. To determine the effect of time, temperature and ethanol during storage of brewing yeasts we have monitored viability of cells stored for 72 h, at 6 °C or 12 °C, in the presence of various ethanol concentrations. Under the conditions tested, 6 °C is the most favourable temperature to store brewing yeast creams emphasizing the importance of a tight temperature control in the storage vessels. Because W210 is less resistant to storage in the presence of ethanol than W34/70, the optimal storage parameters obtained under our laboratory conditions vary significantly. The ale strain is sensitive to storage under ethanol concentrations higher than 5% (v/v) for more than 48 h at 6 °C whereas at the same temperature the lager strain tolerates ethanol up to 7.5% (v/v) for 72 h. Also, the viability assays indicate that the antioxidant protein Yap1 is an important factor to storage resistance of BY4741 laboratory strain. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance of brewing yeast strains to ethanol, we have performed phenotypic analysis, localization studies and have monitored the activation of antioxidant and protection genes as well as the intracellular contents of glycogen and trehalose. Overall, our data suggest that the ale strain W210 has a defective antioxidant defence system and that ethanol may induce the antioxidant defences as well as glycogen and trehalose protection mechanisms in laboratory and brewing yeast strains. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Karyotype Rearrangements in a Wine Yeast Strain by rad52-Dependent and rad52-Independent Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Carro, David; Bartra, Enric; Piña, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Yeast strains isolated from the wild may undergo karyotype changes during vegetative growth, a characteristic that compromises their utility in genetic improvement projects for industrial purposes. Karyotype instability is a dominant trait, segregating among meiotic derivatives as if it depended upon only a few genetic elements. We show that disrupting the RAD52 gene in a hypervariable strain partially stabilizes its karyotype. Specifically, RAD52 disruption eliminated recombination at telome...

  3. Effect of Agave tequilana age, cultivation field location and yeast strain on tequila fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinal, L; Cornejo, E; Arellano, M; Herrera, E; Nuñez, L; Arrizon, J; Gschaedler, A

    2009-05-01

    The effect of yeast strain, the agave age and the cultivation field location of agave were evaluated using kinetic parameters and volatile compound production in the tequila fermentation process. Fermentations were carried out with Agave juice obtained from two cultivation fields (CF1 and CF2), as well as two ages (4 and 8 years) and two Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (GU3 and AR5) isolated from tequila fermentation must. Sugar consumption and ethanol production varied as a function of cultivation field and agave age. The production of ethyl acetate, 1-propanol, isobutanol and amyl alcohols were influenced in varying degrees by yeast strain, agave age and cultivation field. Methanol production was only affected by the agave age and 2-phenylethanol was influenced only by yeast strain. This work showed that the use of younger Agave tequilana for tequila fermentation resulted in differences in sugar consumption, ethanol and volatile compounds production at the end of fermentation, which could affect the sensory quality of the final product.

  4. Under pressure: evolutionary engineering of yeast strains for improved performance in fuels and chemicals production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, R.; Daran, J.G.; Pronk, J.T.

    2018-01-01

    Evolutionary engineering, which uses laboratory evolution to select for industrially relevant traits, is a popular strategy in the development of high-performing yeast strains for industrial production of fuels and chemicals. By integrating whole-genome sequencing, bioinformatics, classical

  5. Identification and typing of the yeast strains isolated from bili bili, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy six yeast strains isolated form bili bili and others sample were identified and typed in purpose of selecting appropriate starter culture. Identification techniques included conventional phenetic method, PCR/RFLP of NTS2 rDNA region, partial sequencing of the D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA and karyotyping using ...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Dimorphic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Strain W29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, Kyle R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-11-25

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the dimorphic ascomycete yeastYarrowia lipolyticastrain W29 (ATCC 20460).Y. lipolyticais a commonly employed model for the industrial production of lipases, small molecules, and more recently for its ability to accumulate lipids.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Dimorphic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Strain W29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomraning, Kyle R; Baker, Scott E

    2015-11-25

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the dimorphic ascomycete yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain W29 (ATCC 20460). Y. lipolytica is a commonly employed model for the industrial production of lipases, small molecules, and more recently for its ability to accumulate lipids. Copyright © 2015 Pomraning and Baker.

  8. Production of ethanol from mannitol by the yeast strain Saccharomyces paradoxus NBRC 0259.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Anri; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Oda, Hiroshi; Iohara, Keishi; Murata, Kousaku

    2013-09-01

    Mannitol is a promising marine macroalgal carbon source. However, organisms that produce ethanol from mannitol are limited; to date, only the yeast Pichia angophorae and the bacterium Escherichia coli KO11 have been reported to possess this capacity. In this study, we searched a yeast strain with a high capacity to produce ethanol from mannitol and selected Saccharomyces paradoxus NBRC 0259 for its ability to produce ethanol from mannitol. This ability was enhanced after a 3-day cultivation of this strain in medium containing mannitol; the enhanced strain was renamed S. paradoxus NBRC 0259-3. We compared the ability of strain NBRC 0259-3 to produce ethanol from mannitol and glucose, under several conditions, with those of P. angophorae and E. coli KO11. As a result, we concluded that S. paradoxus NBRC 0259-3 strain is the most suitable yeast strain for the production of ethanol from mannitol. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic engineering of a haploid strain derived from a triploid industrial yeast for producing cellulosic ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Kong, In Iok; Kim, Heejin; Maurer, Matthew J; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Peng, Dairong; Wei, Na; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Many desired phenotypes for producing cellulosic biofuels are often observed in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, many industrial yeast strains are polyploid and have low spore viability, making it difficult to use these strains for metabolic engineering applications. We selected the polyploid industrial strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 4124 exhibiting rapid glucose fermentation capability, high ethanol productivity, strong heat and inhibitor tolerance in order to construct an optimal yeast strain for producing cellulosic ethanol. Here, we focused on developing a general approach and high-throughput screening method to isolate stable haploid segregants derived from a polyploid parent, such as triploid ATCC 4124 with a poor spore viability. Specifically, we deleted the HO genes, performed random sporulation, and screened the resulting segregants based on growth rate, mating type, and ploidy. Only one stable haploid derivative (4124-S60) was isolated, while 14 other segregants with a stable mating type were aneuploid. The 4124-S60 strain inherited only a subset of desirable traits present in the parent strain, same as other aneuploids, suggesting that glucose fermentation and specific ethanol productivity are likely to be genetically complex traits and/or they might depend on ploidy. Nonetheless, the 4124-60 strain did inherit the ability to tolerate fermentation inhibitors. When additional genetic perturbations known to improve xylose fermentation were introduced into the 4124-60 strain, the resulting engineered strain (IIK1) was able to ferment a Miscanthus hydrolysate better than a previously engineered laboratory strain (SR8), built by making the same genetic changes. However, the IIK1 strain showed higher glycerol and xylitol yields than the SR8 strain. In order to decrease glycerol and xylitol production, an NADH-dependent acetate reduction pathway was introduced into the IIK1 strain. By consuming 2.4g/L of acetate, the resulting strain (IIK1A

  10. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Hyphal-like extension and pseudohyphal formation in industrial strains of yeasts induced by isoamyl alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccato-Antonini Sandra Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can produce pseudohyphae and hyphal-like extensions under certain growth conditions like isoamyl alcohol (IAA induction, a chief constituent of fusel oil, which is a subproduct from the ethanolic fermentation. The morphology switch from yeast to a filamentous form can be troublesome to the process. In this work it was studied the influence of fusel alcohols, nitrogen sources (ammonium sulphate and leucine and glifosate (a chemical maturator for sugar cane added to a complex medium on some industrial strains of yeasts isolated from the fermentative process. Two industrial strains showed transition to hyphal-like extensions or pseudohyphae (clusters of cells upon addition of IAA from 0.3 to 0.9% /v. The alterations were reversible when the yeasts were reinoculated in YEPD without IAA. Although pseudohyphae are a result of nitrogen-limited medium, we observed them as a result of IAA addition. No influence of the nitrogen source or isopropilic alcohol or glifosate was detected for any strain studied in the concentrations used.

  12. Isolation of a yeast strain able to produce a polygalacturonase with maceration activity of cassava roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alicia Martos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was the isolation of a yeast strain, from citrus fruit peels, able to produce a polygalacturonase by submerged fermentation with maceration activity of raw cassava roots. Among 160 yeast strains isolated from citrus peels, one strain exhibited the strongest pectinolytic activity. This yeast was identified as Wickerhamomyces anomalus by 5.8S-ITS RFLP analysis and confirmed by amplification of the nucleotide sequence. The yeast produced a polygalacturonase (PG in Erlenmeyer shake flasks containing YNB, glucose, and citrus pectin. PG synthesis occurred during exponential growth phase, reaching 51 UE.mL-1 after 8 hours of fermentation. A growth yield (Yx/s of 0.43 gram of cell dry weight per gram of glucose consumed was obtained, and a maximal specific growth rate (µm of 0.346 h-1 was calculated. The microorganism was unable to assimilate sucrose, galacturonic acid, polygalacturonic acid, or citrus pectin, but it required glucose as carbon and energy source and polygalacturonic acid or citrus pectin as inducers of enzyme synthesis. The crude enzymatic extract of Wickerhamomyces anomalus showed macerating activity of raw cassava. This property is very important in the production of dehydrated mashed cassava, a product of regional interest in the province of Misiones, Argentina.

  13. SELECTION OF INDIGENOUS YEAST STRAINS ISOLATED FROM CV. GEWURZTRAMINER FROM ILOK WINEGROWING REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora DUJMOVIĆ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 36 indigenous strains belonging to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex isolated from the variety of Gewurztraminer from Ilok winegrowing region were tested with the purpose of making top-quality wines. Microfermentation was applied in order to examine the synthesis of ethyl alcohol and volatile acidity. Killer factor, synthesis of pectinase, ß-glucosidase and H2S was determined in isolated yeast strains. In the selection results, strains RO 1344, RO 1351, RO 1364 were the best evaluated and they should be examined in midifermentation.

  14. Probiotic yeasts: anti-inflammatory potential of various non-pathogenic strains in experimental colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foligné, Benoît; Dewulf, Joëlle; Vandekerckove, Pascal; Pignède, Georges; Pot, Bruno

    2010-05-07

    To evaluate the in vitro immunomodulation capacity of various non-pathogenic yeast strains and to investigate the ability of some of these food grade yeasts to prevent experimental colitis in mice. In vitro immunomodulation was assessed by measuring cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma] released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 24 h stimulation with 6 live yeast strains (Saccharomyces ssp.) and with bacterial reference strains. A murine model of acute 2-4-6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-colitis was next used to evaluate the distinct prophylactic protective capacities of three yeast strains compared with the performance of prednisolone treatment. The six yeast strains all showed similar non-discriminating anti-inflammatory potential when tested on immunocompetent cells in vitro. However, although they exhibited similar colonization patterns in vivo, some yeast strains showed significant anti-inflammatory activities in the TNBS-induced colitis model, whereas others had weaker or no preventive effect at all, as evidenced by colitis markers (body-weight loss, macroscopic and histological scores, myeloperoxidase activities and blood inflammatory markers). A careful selection of strains is required among the biodiversity of yeasts for specific clinical studies, including applications in inflammatory bowel disease and other therapeutic uses.

  15. Influence of yeast strain, priming solution and temperature on beer bottle conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Ombretta; Rossi, Serena; Galgano, Fernanda; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of microbreweries. Usually, craft beers are bottle conditioned; however, few studies have investigated beer refermentation. One of the objectives of this study was to evaluate the impacts of different experimental conditions, specifically yeast strain, priming solution and temperature, on the standard quality attributes, the volatile compounds and the sensory profile of the bottle-conditioned beer. The other aim was to monitor the evolution of volatile compounds and amino acids consumption throughout the refermentation process to check if it is possible to reduce the time necessary for bottle conditioning. The results indicate that the volatile profile was mainly influenced by the strain of yeast, and this may have obscured the possible impacts of the other parameters. Our results also confirm that the two yeast strains showed different metabolic activity, particularly with respect to esters production. Moreover, we found the Safbrew S-33® strain when primed with Siromix® and refermented at 30 °C yielded the fastest formation of higher alcohols while maintaining low production of off-flavours. These results suggest a formulation that may reduce the time needed for bottle conditioning without affecting the quality of the final beer which may simultaneously improve efficiency and economic profits. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Influence of Pectolytic Enzymes and Selected Yeast Strains on the Chemical Composition of Blackberry Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Antonija

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of individual o rganic acids, polyphenolic and aromatic compounds in blackberry wine, and to define the influence of different yeast strains (Uvaferm BDX and Lalvin 71B and pectolytic enzymes (L allzyme OE and Lallzyme EX-V on the chemical composition and quality of the wine. Blackberry wines were produced in five variants, depending on yeasts and enzymes used: BDX OE, BDX EX-V, 71B OE, 71B EX-V, and Control without the addition of selected yeasts and enzymes. All blackberry wine variants were defined by a relatively high sum of organic acids. The citric acid was the predominant one, which concentrations ranged from 5.42 to 7.31 g/L. The concentration of gallic acid ranged from 19 to 37 mg/L and was in dependence of the yeast strain used. The concentration of procyanidin B2 which was the predominant flavan-3-ol compound, ranged from 103 to 117 mg/L, and there were no significant differences between individual wine variants in the experiment. Rutin is the predominant compound in the flavonol group, followed by quercetin-3-O-glucoside. The predominant one among the anthocyanins was cyanidin-3-O-glucoside whose concentrations ranged from 134 to 229 mg/L. According to the obtained results, the yeast strain and pectolytic enzymes had a significant impact on the concentration of individual anthocyanins in the analyzed wines. The predominant group of aromatic compounds was monoterpenes, among which linalool was the most prominent in all of blackberry wine variants, except in Control.

  18. Pyruvate Decarboxylase Activity Assay in situ of Different Industrial Yeast Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kręgiel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1 is one of the key enzymes of yeast fermentative metabolism. PDC is the first enzyme which, under anaerobic conditions, leads to decarboxylation of pyruvate with acetaldehyde as the end product. The aim of this study is to develop a suitable method for PDC activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. Saccharomyces sp. and Debaryomyces sp. yeast strains grew in fermentative medium with 12 % of glucose. Enzymatic assay was conducted in cell suspension treated with digitonin as permeabilisation agent, and with sodium pyruvate as a substrate, at temperature of 30 °C. Metabolites of PDC pathway were detected using gas chromatographic (GC technique. Various parameters like type and molar concentration of the substrate, minimal effective mass fraction of digitonin, cell concentration, reaction time and effect of pyrazole (alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor were monitored to optimize PDC enzymatic assay in situ. In the concentration range of yeast cells from 1⋅10^7 to 1⋅10^8 per mL, linear correlation between the produced acetaldehyde and cell density was noticed. Only pyruvate was the specific substrate for pyruvate decarboxylase. In the presence of 0.05 M sodium pyruvate and 0.05 % digitonin, the enzymatic reaction was linear up to 20 min of the assay. During incubation, there was no formation of ethanol and, therefore, pyrazole was not necessary for the assay.

  19. Candida galli strain PGO6: a novel isolated yeast strain capable of transformation of isoeugenol into vanillin and vanillic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashengroph, Morahem; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Momenbeik, Fariborz

    2011-03-01

    Candida galli strain PGO6 isolated from oil-contaminated water is the first isolated yeast strain which is capable to form vanillin and vanillic acid during isoeugenol biotransformation. The products were confirmed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), changes in the UV absorption pattern and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The phenotypic and physiochemical characteristics as well as molecular phylogenetic analysis based on amplification the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA regions indicated the isolated strain PGO6 was identified as C. galli (GenBank accession number HM641231). Resting cells of C. galli PGO6 from the late-exponential of growth phase were used as biocatalysts for the biotransformation of isoeugenol. The optimal molar conversion of vanillin (48%) and vanillic acid (19%) was obtained after a 30 h incubation using 0.1% (v/v) of isoeugenol and 6 mg of dry weight of cells per ml without further optimization. Under these conditions, the total amount of vanillin and vanillic acid was 583 mg l(-1). Further biotransformation was carried out using 0.5% (v/v) of isoeugenol under the resting cells conditions, yielding a vanillin concentration of 1.12 g l(-1) (molar yield 25.7%) after 60 h incubation. This study brings the first evidence for biotransformation of isoeugenol to vanillin and vanillic acid by a yeast strain.

  20. Integrative Expression of Glucoamylase Gene in a Brewer’s Yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyi Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus strain was constructed byintroducing the ilv2:GLA fragment released from pMGI6, carrying glucoamylase gene (GLA and using the yeast α-acetolactate synthase gene (ILV2 as the recombination sequence. The strain was able to utilise starch as the sole carbon source, its glucoamylase activity was 6.3 U/mL and its α-acetolactate synthase activity was lowered by 33.3 %. The introduced GLA gene was integrated at the recipient genomic ILV2 gene, one copy of ILV2 gene was disrupted and the other copy remained intact. Primary wort fermentation test confirmed that the diacetyl and residual sugar concentration in the wort fermented by the recombinant strain were reduced by 65.6 and 34.2 % respectively, compared to that of the recipient strain. Under industrial operating conditions, the maturation time of beer fermented by the recombinant strain was reduced from 7 to 4 days, there were no significant differences in the appearance and mouthfeel, and the beer satisfied the high quality demands. That is why the strain could be used in beer production safely.

  1. Integrated multilaboratory systems biology reveals differences in protein metabolism between two reference yeast strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canelas, Andre B.; Harrison, Nicola; Fazio, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    , a widely used model organism that is also used in the production of fuels, chemicals, food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. With the current focus on biofuels and sustainability, there is much interest in harnessing this species as a general cell factory. In this study, we characterized two yeast strains...... analysis of the high-throughput data, we hypothesize that differences in phenotype are due to differences in protein metabolism....

  2. Gradual enhancement of ethyl acetate production through promoter engineering in chinese liquor yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jian; Hong, Kun-Qiang; Hao, Ai-Li; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Fu, Xiao-Meng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2018-01-05

    As content and proportion of ethyl acetate is critical to the flavor and quality of beverages, the concise regulation of the ethyl acetate metabolism is a major issue in beverage fermentations. In this study, for ethyl acetate yield regulation, we finely modulated the expression of ATF1 through precise and seamless insertion of serially truncated PGK1 promoter from the 3' end by 100bp steps in the Chinese liquor yeast, CLy12a. The three engineered promoters carrying 100-, 200-, and 300-bp truncations exhibited reduced promoter strength but unaffected growth. These three promoters were integrated into the CLy12a strain, generating strains CLy12a-P-100, CLy12a-P-200, and CLy12a-P-300, respectively. The transcription levels of CLy12a-P-100, CLy12a-P-200, and CLy12a-P-300 were 20%, 17%, and 10% of that of CLy12a-P, respectively. The AATase (alcohol acetyl transferases, encoded by the ATF1 gene) activity of three engineered strains were 36%, 56%, and 62% of that of CLy12a-P. In the liquid fermentation of corn hydrolysate at 30°C, the concentration of ethyl acetate in CLy12a-P-100, CLy12a-P-200, and CLy12a-P-300 were reduced by 28%, 30%, and 42%, respectively, compared to CLy12a-P. These results verifying that the ethyl acetate yield could be gradually enhanced by finely modulating the expression of ATF1. The engineered strain CLy12a-P-200 produced the ethyl acetate concentration with the best sensorial quality compared to the other engineered yeast strains. The method proposed in this work supplies a practical proposal for breeding Chinese liquor yeast strains with finely modulated ethyl acetate yield. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Genetic analysis of the karyotype instability in natural wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, D; Piña, B

    2001-12-01

    Yeast strains isolated from the wild may show high rates of changes in their karyotypes during vegetative growth. We analysed over 500 karyotypes from mitotic and meiotic derivatives of strain DC5, which has a chromosome rearrangement rate of 8.2 x 10(-3) changes/generation. About 70% of the meiotic derivatives of DC5 had low rearrangement rates, with an average of 5.8 x 10(-4) changes/generation, suggesting that karyotype instability behaved as a dominant phenotype. Diploid derivatives with low karyotype variability in mitosis also had low rates of chromosomal rearrangement during meiosis, suggesting that the two phenotypes may be linked. DC5 and some of its meiotic derivatives (both with high and low karyotype variability) had chromosome XII hypervariable bands. Their distribution among the meiotic products indicates that they are not indicators for genetic instability. To our knowledge, data in this paper are the first to indicate that karyotypically unstable yeast strains may give stable progeny at high rates. Understanding of the relevant mechanism(s) may allow the design of genetic strategies to stabilize karyotypes from natural and/or industrial wine yeasts with unacceptable karyotype rearrangement rates. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by a recombinant xylose- and cellooligosaccharide-assimilating yeast strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Satoshi; Fukuda, Hideki [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Div. of Molecular Science; Mizuike, Atsuko; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2006-10-15

    The sulfuric acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood chips, from the forest industry is an important material for fuel bioethanol production. In this study, we constructed a recombinant yeast strain that can ferment xylose and cellooligosaccharides by integrating genes for the intercellular expressions of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis, and xylulokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a gene for displaying ss-glucosidase from Aspergillus acleatus on the cell surface. In the fermentation of the sulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips, xylose and cellooligosaccharides were completely fermented after 36 h by the recombinant strain, and then about 30 g/l ethanol was produced from 73 g/l total sugar added at the beginning. In this case, the ethanol yield of this recombinant yeast was much higher than that of the control yeast. These results demonstrate that the fermentation of the lignocellulose hydrolysate is performed efficiently by the recombinant Saccharomyces strain with abilities for xylose assimilation and cellooligosaccharide degradation. (orig.)

  5. Quantification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeast strains during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovani, Giovanna; Rosi, Iolanda; Bertuccioli, Mario

    2012-11-15

    In order to improve knowledge about the oenological characteristics of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, and to reconsider their contribution to wine quality, we studied the release of polysaccharides by 13 non-Saccharomyces strains of different species (three wine yeasts, six grape yeasts, and three spoilage yeasts) during alcoholic fermentation in synthetic must. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were included for comparison. All of the non-Saccharomyces strains released polysaccharides into fermentation medium; the amount released depended on the yeast species, the number of cells formed and their physiological conditions. Normalizing the quantity of macromolecules released to the cell biomass revealed that most non-Saccharomyces strains produced a greater quantity of polysaccharides compared to S. cerevisiae strains after 7 and 14days of fermentation. This capacity was particularly expressed in the studied wine spoilage yeasts (Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis). Chemical characterization of exocellular polysaccharides produced by non-Saccharomyces yeasts revealed them to essentially be mannoproteins with high mannose contents, ranging from 93% for S'codes. ludwigii to 73-74% for Pichia anomala and Starmerella bombicola. Protein contents varied from 9% for P. anomala to 29% for Z. bailii. These compositions were very similar to those of the S. cerevisiae strains, and to the chemical composition of the cell wall mannoproteins of different yeast species. The presence of galactose, in addition to mannose and glucose, in the exocellular polysaccharides released by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, confirmed the parietal nature of the polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeasts; only this species has a galactomannan located in the outer layer of the cell wall. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Melanin production by a yeast strain XJ5-1 of Aureobasidium melanogenum isolated from the Taklimakan desert and its role in the yeast survival in stress environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhe; Wang, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Ly-Ly; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The yeast strain XJ5-1 isolated from the Taklimakan desert soil was identified to be a strain of Aureobasdium melanogenum and could produce a large amount of melanin when it was grown in the PDA medium, but its melanin biosynthesis and expression of the PKS gene responsible for the melanin biosynthesis was significantly repressed in the presence of (NH4)2SO4. However, A. melanogenum P5 strain isolated from a mangrove ecosystem grown in both the presence and the absence of (NH4)2SO4 did not produce any melanin. The cell size of A. melanogenum XJ5-1 strain was much higher than that of A. melanogenum P5 strain. The melanized cells of the yeast strain XJ5-1 had higher tolerance to UV radiation, oxidation (200.0 mM H2O2), heat treatment (40 °C), salt shock (200.0 g/L NaCl), desiccation and strong acid hydrolysis (6.0 M HCl) at high temperature (80 °C) than the non-melanized cells of the same yeast strain XJ5-1. At the same time, the melanized cells of the yeast strain XJ5-1 also had higher tolerance to UV radiation, oxidation (200.0 mM H2O2), desiccation and strong acid hydrolysis (6.0 M HCl) at high temperature (80 °C) than A. melanogenum P5 strain, but had similar resistance to heat treatment (40 °C) and salt shock (200.0 g/L NaCl) compared to those of A. melanogenum P5 strain. All the results revealed that many characteristics of A. melanogenum XJ5-1 isolated from the Taklimakan desert soil was different from those of A. melanogenum P5 strain isolated from the mangrove ecosystem.

  7. Filtration, haze and foam characteristics of fermented wort mediated by yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Meneses, F J; Jiranek, V

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the choice of yeast strain on the haze, shelf life, filterability and foam quality characteristics of fermented products. Twelve strains were used to ferment a chemically defined wort and hopped ale or stout wort. Fermented products were assessed for foam using the Rudin apparatus, and filterability and haze characteristics using the European Brewing Convention methods, to reveal differences in these parameters as a consequence of the choice of yeast strain and growth medium. Under the conditions used, the choice of strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae effecting the primary fermentation has an impact on all of the parameters investigated, most notably when the fermentation medium is devoid of macromolecular material. The filtration of fermented products has a large cost implication for many brewers and wine makers, and the haze of the resulting filtrate is a key quality criterion. Also of importance to the quality of beer and some wines is the foaming and head retention of these beverages. The foam characteristics, filterability and potential for haze formation in a fermented product have long been known to be dependant on the raw materials used, as well as other production parameters. The choice of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain used to ferment has itself been shown here to influence these parameters.

  8. Exploration of Brazilian biodiversity and selection of a new oleaginous yeast strain cultivated in raw glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Susan Hartwig; de Andrade, Cristiane Conte Paim; Ghiselli, Gislaine; Maugeri, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to use glycerol generated from the synthesis of biodiesel to study the oleaginous potential of wild yeasts. An initial selection was performed via a rapid and qualitative technique by staining with Sudan Black B. Initially 129 yeasts were present, from which 5 were selected and cultivated in liquid medium containing pure or raw glycerol. The yeast LEB-M3, isolated from the Pantanal, presented lipid content of 20.46% and 56.58% for cultivation in pure and raw glycerol, respectively. This strain was genotypically identified as Candida sp. The fatty acid profile showed predominance of oleic acid (C18:1), 57.35% for cultivation in pure glycerol, and in raw glycerol linoleic acid (C18:2) was predominant (46.0%). It was possible to select a yeast with high lipid concentrations 9.14 g/L and fatty acid profile similar to vegetable oils commonly used in the synthesis of biodiesel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen requirements of commercial wine yeast strains during fermentation of a synthetic grape must.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Chiva, Rosana; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Nitrogen deficiencies in grape musts are one of the main causes of stuck or sluggish wine fermentations. Currently, the most common method for dealing with nitrogen-deficient fermentations is adding supplementary nitrogen (usually ammonium phosphate). However, it is important to know the specific nitrogen requirement of each strain, to avoid excessive addition that can lead to microbial instability and ethyl carbamate accumulation. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of increasing nitrogen concentrations of three different nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance in four industrial wine yeast strains. This task was carried out using statistical modeling techniques. The strains PDM and RVA showed higher growth-rate and maximum population size and consumed nitrogen much more quickly than strains ARM and TTA. Likewise, the strains PDM and RVA were also the greatest nitrogen demanders. Thus, we can conclude that these differences in nitrogen demand positively correlated with higher growth rate and higher nitrogen uptake rate. The most direct effect of employing an adequate nitrogen concentration is the increase in biomass, which involves a higher fermentation rate. However, the impact of nitrogen on fermentation rate is not exclusively due to the increase in biomass because the strain TTA, which showed the worst growth behavior, had the best fermentation activity. Some strains may adapt a strategy whereby fewer cells with higher metabolic activity are produced. Regarding the nitrogen source used, all the strains showed the better and worse fermentation performance with arginine and ammonium, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglin Tao

    Full Text Available Very high gravity (VHG fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2 with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes.

  11. Extracellular Phytase Production by the Wine Yeast S. cerevisiae (Finarome Strain) during Submerged Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Mikulski, Dawid; Jankowiak, Oliwia

    2018-04-08

    One of the key steps in the production of phytases of microbial origin is selection of culture parameters, followed by isolation of the enzyme and evaluation of its catalytic activity. It was found that conditions for S. cerevisiae yeast culture, strain Finarome, giving the reduction in phytic acid concentration of more than 98% within 24 h of incubation were as follows: pH 5.5, 32 °C, continuous stirring at 80 rpm, the use of mannose as a carbon source and aspartic acid as a source of nitrogen. The highest catalytic activity of the isolated phytase was observed at 37 °C, pH 4.0 and using phytate as substrate at concentration of 5.0 mM. The presence of ethanol in the medium at a concentration of 12% v / v reduces the catalytic activity to above 60%. Properties of phytase derived from S. cerevisiae yeast culture, strain Finarome, indicate the possibility of its application in the form of a cell's free crude protein isolate for the hydrolysis of phytic acid to improve the efficiency of alcoholic fermentation processes. Our results also suggest a possibility to use the strain under study to obtain a fusant derived with specialized distillery strains, capable of carrying out a highly efficient fermentation process combined with the utilization of phytates.

  12. Evaluation of the Components Released by Wine Yeast Strains on Protein Haze Formation in White Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Cristine Giese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultures of 23 indigenous yeast strains (22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a non-Saccharomyces, Torulaspora delbrueckii, isolated from fermentation tanks at wineries in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain, and were performed under winemaking conditions using a synthetic must. Polysaccharide analysis and turbidity assays were conducted so as to observe the capacity of the released mannoproteins against protein haze formation in white wine, and 3 strains (2 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and T. delbrueckii were chosen for further experiments. The action of a commercial b-glucanolytic enzyme preparation (Lallzyme BETA®, and a β-(1→3-glucanase preparation from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai were evaluated to release polysaccharides from the different yeast strains’ cell walls. Protection against protein haze formation was strain dependent, and only two strains (Sc2 and Sc4 presented >50% stabilization in comparison to controls. Addition of β-glucanases did not increase the concentrations of polysaccharides in the fermentation musts; however, a significant increase of polymeric mannose (mannoproteins was detected using an enzymatic assay following total acid hydrolysis of the soluble polysaccharides. Enzymatic treatment presented positive effects and decreased protein haze formation in white wine. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i6.869

  13. Hsp12p and PAU genes are involved in ecological interactions between natural yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Damaríz; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Baruffini, Enrico; Bergerat, Agnes; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of different yeasts in a single vineyard raises the question on how they communicate and why slow growers are not competed out. Genetically modified laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are extensively used to investigate ecological interactions, but little is known about the genes regulating cooperation and competition in ecologically relevant settings. Here, we present evidences of Hsp12p-dependent altruistic and contact-dependent competitive interactions between two natural yeast isolates. Hsp12p is released during cell death for public benefit by a fast-growing strain that also produces a killer toxin to inhibit growth of a slow grower that can enjoy the benefits of released Hsp12p. We also show that the protein Pau5p is essential in the defense against the killer effect. Our results demonstrate that the combined action of Hsp12p, Pau5p and a killer toxin is sufficient to steer a yeast community. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Surface engineering and environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguero, A.

    2007-01-01

    Surface engineering addresses the modification of the microstructure and/or composition of the surface of components by mechanical, physical or chemical methods that may imply adding a material in order to change the surface properties of said components. One of its most important consequences is the significant increase of the useful life of a variety of components in a large number of industrial applications. Moreover, it contributes to energy savings by increasing efficiencies as it allows higher combustion temperatures, by allowing the use of lighter components and by significant friction reduction. In this paper, surface engineering is introduced, as well as its different modalities, examples of industrial applications and positive and negative environmental impacts. (Author) 29 refs

  15. Analysis and dynamics of the chromosomal complements of wild sparkling-wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, D; Carro, D; Fernández-Larrea, J; Piña, B

    1999-04-01

    We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains that are able to carry out the second fermentation of sparkling wine from spontaneously fermenting musts in El Penedès (Spain) by specifically designed selection protocols. All of them (26 strains) showed one of two very similar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction patterns, whereas their karyotypes differed. These strains showed high rates of karyotype instability, which were dependent on both the medium and the strain, during vegetative growth. In all cases, the mtDNA restriction pattern was conserved in strains kept under the same conditions. Analysis of different repetitive sequences in their genomes suggested that ribosomal DNA repeats play an important role in the changes in size observed in chromosome XII, whereas SUC genes or Ty elements did not show amplification or transposition processes that could be related to rearrangements of the chromosomes showing these sequences. Karyotype changes also occurred in monosporidic diploid derivatives. We propose that these changes originated mainly from ectopic recombination between repeated sequences interspersed in the genome. None of the rearranged karyotypes provided a selective advantage strong enough to allow the strains to displace the parental strains. The nature and frequency of these changes suggest that they may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the genetic diversity observed in S. cerevisiae wild populations.

  16. Substrate-Limited Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Allow Control of Fermentation during Bread Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Nore; Laurent, Jitka; Verspreet, Joran; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2017-04-26

    Identification and use of yeast strains that are unable to consume one or more otherwise fermentable substrate types could allow a more controlled fermentation process with more flexibility regarding fermentation times. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different capacities to consume substrates present in wheat were selected to investigate the impact of substrate limitation on dough fermentation and final bread volume. Results show that fermentation of dough with maltose-negative strains relies on the presence of fructan and sucrose as fermentable substrates and can be used for regular bread making. Levels of fructan and sucrose, endogenously present or added, hence determine the extent of fermentation and timing at the proofing stage. Whole meal is inherently more suitable for substrate-limited fermentation than white flour due to the presence of higher native levels of these substrates. Bread making protocols with long fermentation times are accommodated by addition of substrates such as sucrose.

  17. Decolorization of certain reactive dye from aqueous solution using Baker’s Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Baker’s yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae was evaluated for its ability to decolorize a synthetic dye aqueous solution and real industry effluent from Giza spinning and weaving company, Giza, Egypt. The removal of color from one of the azo dyes, ramazole blue (Vinyl sulfone, had been carried out by Baker’s yeast using repeated-batch process. Factors such as solution pH, dye concentration and biomass dosage at different interval times were experimentally tested. The effect of pH on dye bioremoval was investigated at a pH range from 1 ± 0.02 to 6 ± 0.02. The optimum pH values were 2 ± 0.02, 1 ± 0.02, 3 ± 0.02, 4 ± 0.02 and 5 ± 0.02 for direct dye removal, respectively. The effect of dye concentrations was studied using different concentrations of synthetic dye containing 100–600 ppm and the effect of biomass weight was also studied at pH 2 ± 0.02 for different interval times. The equilibrium concentration and the adsorption capacity at equilibrium were determined using two different sorption models namely; Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. These isothermal models were applied to evaluate differences in the biosorption rates and uptakes of textile dye with a high degree of correlation coefficients in case of Freundlich’s isothermal model (R2 = 0.947. At the end of the experiments, the treatment with Baker’s yeast strain could reduce color absorbance and COD value of real textile wastewater by 100% and 61.82%, respectively. Baker’s yeast cells were characterized using SEM and FTIR spectroscopy.

  18. Antifungal susceptibility profiles of 1698 yeast reference strains revealing potential emerging human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Desnos-Ollivier

    Full Text Available New molecular identification techniques and the increased number of patients with various immune defects or underlying conditions lead to the emergence and/or the description of novel species of human and animal fungal opportunistic pathogens. Antifungal susceptibility provides important information for ecological, epidemiological and therapeutic issues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of the various species based on their antifungal drug resistance, keeping in mind the methodological limitations. Antifungal susceptibility profiles to the five classes of antifungal drugs (polyens, azoles, echinocandins, allylamines and antimetabolites were determined for 1698 yeast reference strains belonging to 992 species (634 Ascomycetes and 358 Basidiomycetes. Interestingly, geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of all antifungal drugs tested were significantly higher for Basidiomycetes compared to Ascomycetes (p<0.001. Twenty four strains belonging to 23 species of which 19 were Basidiomycetes seem to be intrinsically "resistant" to all drugs. Comparison of the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the 4240 clinical isolates and the 315 reference strains belonging to 53 shared species showed similar results. Even in the absence of demonstrated in vitro/in vivo correlation, knowing the in vitro susceptibility to systemic antifungal agents and the putative intrinsic resistance of yeast species present in the environment is important because they could become opportunistic pathogens.

  19. Investigation of Antibacterial Properties of Yeast Strains Isolated from Iranian Richal and Traditional Dairy Products in Armenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Karimpour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:The use of bio preservative or strains as sources are interesting for food bioprocessing technologist,   and is one of the latest methods to increase the shelf life of food by the health authorities . The present study aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity of supernatants of yeasts isolated from Richal as a traditional dairy product and fermented dairy products in Armenia. Methods: In the present experimental study, the purified supernatant of 77 strains of Armenian yeast products and 12 strains from Iranian Richal were isolated. The purified supernatant were tested against three strains as food spoilages bacteria includes: B. subtilis 17-89, B. Thuringensis17-89, S.typhimuium G-38 , on 3media in 2 condition as aerobic and anaerobic. The inhibition zone of the supernatant were measured   and reported as antibacterial activity. Data were analyzed using statistical tests. Result: A total of 89 strains of yeasts, three species of Rachel and 9 strains of Armenian products (13.5% percent had demonstrated antibacterial activity. T86 strains of Armenian yeasts and FA1 (25 of Rachel had shown more ZOI and antibacterial activity on three media at both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Comparing the mean of ZOI upon three corruption factors, Rachel strains were significantly different (p <0.05. The highest and lowest effect was observed on Bacillus subtilis effect and Salmonella typhimurium respectively. Conclusion: The results indicated that the yeast strains isolated in anaerobic and aerobic conditions on spoilage bacteria had antibacterial activity effect. Thus, it could be concluded that adding the yeast or its supernatant to food as a bio preservative, may introduce a operative product to the food industry.

  20. Creation of an ethanol-tolerant yeast strain by genome reconstruction based on chromosome splitting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A-Hwang; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi; Kim, Yeon-Hee

    2012-02-01

    We sought to breed an industrially useful yeast strain, specifically an ethanol-tolerant yeast strain that would be optimal for ethanol production, using a novel breeding method, called genome reconstruction, based on chromosome splitting technology. To induce genome reconstruction, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain SH6310, which contains 31 chromosomes including 12 artificial mini-chromosomes, was continuously cultivated in YPD medium containing 6% to 10% ethanol for 33 days. The 12 mini-chromosomes can be randomly or specifically lost because they do not contain any genes that are essential under high-level ethanol conditions. The strains selected by inducing genome reconstruction grew about ten times more than SH6310 in 8% ethanol. To determine the effect of minichromosome loss on the ethanol tolerance phenotype, PCR and Southern hybridization were performed to detect the remaining mini-chromosomes. These analyses revealed the loss of mini-chromosomes no. 11 and no. 12. Mini-chromosome no. 11 contains ten genes (YKL225W, PAU16, YKL223W, YKL222C, MCH2, FRE2, COS9, SRY1, JEN1, URA1) and no. 12 contains fifteen genes (YHL050C, YKL050W-A, YHL049C, YHL048C-A, COS8, YHLComega1, ARN2, YHL046W-A, PAU13, YHL045W, YHL044W, ECM34, YHL042W, YHL041W, ARN1). We assumed that the loss of these genes resulted in the ethanol-tolerant phenotype and expect that this genome reconstruction method will be a feasible new alternative for strain improvement.

  1. Influence of the Addition of Riboflavin in Culture Medium on Delivering Biomass Using Yeast Strains of Saccharomyces Carlsbengensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Nicoară

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts requirements for growth factors should be considered both in terms of ability to summarize the simpleaverage and the dependence on external supplies. Vitamins are components of coenzymes or enzymes prostheticgroups and thus they are growth factors for yeast. The study concerns about the influence of the addition ofriboflavin in culture medium in different quantities, the accumulation of yeast biomass under the action of yeaststrains of beer. The process of cultivation has been made for 24 hours at a temperature of 220C. The addition ofriboflavin in culture medium of yeast biomass increased in each strain of yeast compared with the witness - thesample without added riboflavin. Biomass obtained by follow this procedure could be used to create new foodproducts with high ration nutritional value.

  2. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuepeng Sun

    Full Text Available Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations.

  3. Yeast Autolysis in Sparkling Wine Aging: Use of Killer and Sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains in Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Silvia Jane; De Leonardis, Antonella; Lustrato, Giuseppe; Testa, Bruno; Iorizzo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Sparkling wines produced by traditional method owe their characteristics to secondary fermentation and maturation that occur during a slow ageing in bottles. Yeast autolysis plays an important role during the sparkling wine aging. Using a combination of killer and sensitive yeasts is possible to accelerate yeast autolysis and reduce maturing time. killer and sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, separately and in co-cultures, were inoculated in base wine and bottled on pilot-plant scale. Commercial Saccaromyces bayanus strain was also investigated. Protein free amino acid and polysaccharides contents and sensory analysis were determined on the wine samples at 3, 6 and 9 months of aging. Yeast autolysis that occurs during the production of sparkling wines, obtained with co-cultures of killer and sensitive strains, has influenced free amino acids, total protein and polysaccharides content after 3 months aging time: sparkling wines, produced without the use of these yeasts, have reached the same results only after 9 months aging time. These results demonstrate that killer and sensitive yeasts in co-culture can accelerate the onset of autolysis in enological conditions, and has a positive effect on the quality of the aroma and flavor of sparkling wine. This paper offers an interesting biotechnological method to reduce production time of sparkling wine with economical benefits for the producers. We revised all patents relating to sparkling wine considering only those of interest for our study.

  4. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains. PMID:28231223

  5. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lentz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  6. Energy metabolism after U.V.-irradiation in a sensitive yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1976-01-01

    Stationary-phase cells of an excision-repair deficient diploid yeast (strain 2094) were UV-irradiated at exposures of up to 440 erg mm -2 and then resuspended in fresh medium. Measurements of energy metabolism per cell at periods of up to 6 hours after irradiation showed that cellular respiration was increased for all doses tested from about 3 hours after exposure, whereas fermentation did not start before about 2 hours after irradiation, never significantly exceeded control values and was markedly inhibited by the higher doses. The results suggest that respiration is under nuclear control, since a mutation in one gene is thought to be the only difference between this strain and the wild-type. The D 0 value of about 360 erg mm -2 found for the relative cellular fermentation at 2 hours after irradiation was used to give an estimate of the size of the structural gene involved, of about 3000 nucleotides, or a protein with 1000 amino-acid residues, compatible with the molecular weight of alcohol dehydrogenase. Fermentation can therefore be inhibited in this sensitive strain by lesions in the structural gene of a key enzyme. Since respiration was increased even more in repair-deficient than in repair-proficient strains, it must be assumed that higher energy metabolism is not linked to the repair process, but rather reflects a general disturbance in cellular regulation. (U.K.)

  7. Melatonin and derived l-tryptophan metabolites produced during alcoholic fermentation by different wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cruz, E; Álvarez-Fernández, M A; Valero, E; Troncoso, A M; García-Parrilla, M C

    2017-02-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms in humans. Evidence has recently been found of its occurrence in wines and its role in the winemaking process. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is consequently thought to be important in Melatonin synthesis, but limited data and reference texts are available on this synthetic pathway. This paper aims to elucidate whether the synthetic pathway of Melatonin in Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains involves these intermediates. To this end, seven commercial strains comprising Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Red Fruit, ES488, Lalvin QA23, Uvaferm BC, and Lalvin ICV GRE) and non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) were monitored, under controlled fermentation conditions, in synthetic must, for seven days. Samples were analysed using a UHPLC-HRMS system (Qexactive). Five out of the seven strains formed Melatonin during the fermentation process: three S. cerevisiae strains and the two non-Saccharomyces. Additionally, other compounds derived from l-tryptophan occurred during fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Significant and systematic expression differentiation in long-lived yeast strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Cheng

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that the regulation of longevity may be partially conserved in many eukaryotes ranging from yeast to mammals. The three yeast mutants sch9Delta, ras2Delta, tor1Delta show extended chronological life span up to three folds. Our aim is to dissect the mechanisms that lead to the yeast life span extension.We obtain gene expression profiles of sch9Delta, ras2Delta, tor1Delta as well as that for a wild type at day 2.5 in SDC medium using Affymetrix Yeast2.0 arrays. To accurately estimate the expression differentiation between the wild type and the long-lived mutants, we use sub-array normalization followed by a variant of the median-polishing summarization. The results are validated by the probe sets of S. pombe on the same chips. To translate the differentiation into changes of biological activities, we make statistical inference by integrating the expression profiles with biological gene subsets defined by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways, and cellular localization of proteins. Other than subset-versus-other comparisons, we also make local comparisons between two directly-related gene subsets such as cytosolic and mitochondrial ribosomes. Our consensus is obtained by cross-examination of these inferences. The significant and systematic differentiation in the three long-lived strains includes: lower transcriptional activities; down-regulation of TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation versus up-regulation of the KEGG pathway Glycolysis/Gluconeogenesis; the overall reduction of mitochondrial activities. We also report some different expression patterns such as reduction of the activities relating to mitosis in ras2Delta.The modification of energy pathways and modification of compartment activities such as down-regulation of mitochondrial ribosome proteins versus up-regulation of cytosolic ribosome proteins are directly associated with the life span extension in yeast. The results provide a new and systematic S. cerevisiae version of

  9. A new approach to species determination for yeast strains: DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a yeast DNA microarray with 6000 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahito; Murata, Yoshinori; Oka, Syuichi; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2004-03-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization is known as the superior method in the elucidation of relationships between closely related taxa, such as species and strain. For species determination we propose a new DNA-DNA hybridization method: the DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) method, using a yeast DNA microarray with approximately 6000 genes. The genome from a yeast strain as a sample strain (Sample) was labelled with Cy3-dye and hybridized to a single DNA microarray, together with the Cy5-labelled genome of S. cerevisiae S288C as a reference strain (Reference). The log2 ratio values [log2[Cy3(Sample)/Cy5(Reference)]: Ratio] of signal intensities of all the gene spots were estimated and divided into the following groups: Ratio < or = -1; -1 < Ratio < 1; 1 < or = Ratio. The hybridization profiles of the genomes of type strains belonging to the genus Saccharomyces were significantly different from that of S. cerevisiae S288C. The Ratio-based grouping allowed us to discriminate between some species from S. cerevisiae more clearly. Furthermore, cluster analysis discriminated between closely related species and strains. Using this method, we were able to not only perform species determination but also to obtain information on alternation in gene copy number of such gene amplifications and deletions with single-gene resolution. These observations indicated that DNA microarray-based CGH is a powerful system for species determination and comparative genome analysis. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Influence of Yeast Strains on the Composition and Sensory Quality of Gewürztraminer Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Jenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of yeast strains on the composition and sensory quality of Gewürztraminer wine. Three different commercial yeast strains were examined on the microvinification scale. In the wines, the chemical parameters and the concentration of free volatile monoterpene alcohols were measured and a descriptive sensory analysis was performed. Significantly more geraniol and nerol were detected in the fermentation conducted with reference Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and more citronellol was found in the fermentation conducted with a hybrid of S. cerevisiae hybrid and S. paradoxus. However, more α-terpineol and linalool were found in the wine fermented with a combination of Saccharomyces and Torulaspora delbrueckii strains. The best wine flavour of tropical fruits was obtained using a hybrid of S. cerevisiae hybrid and S. paradoxus, and the best wine quality was achieved with a combination of Saccharomyces and T. delbrueckii strains. The selection of yeast strains for the fermentation of Gewürztraminer must significantly influenced the concentration of free volatile monoterpene alcohols and the sensory quality of the wine. With the selected hybrid of S. cerevisiae hybrid and S. paradoxus or the combination of Saccharomyces and T. delbrueckii strains either a better flavour or overall wine quality than with the reference strain can be achieved.

  11. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K M; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Hallström, Björn M; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-08

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole carbon source, and requires supplementation of C2 compounds to the medium in order to meet the requirement for cytosolic acetyl-CoA for biosynthesis of fatty acids and ergosterol. In this study, a Pdc negative strain was adaptively evolved for improved growth in glucose medium via serial transfer, resulting in three independently evolved strains, which were able to grow in minimal medium containing glucose as the sole carbon source at the maximum specific rates of 0.138, 0.148, 0.141 h(-1), respectively. Several genetic changes were identified in the evolved Pdc negative strains by genomic DNA sequencing. Among these genetic changes, 4 genes were found to carry point mutations in at least two of the evolved strains: MTH1 encoding a negative regulator of the glucose-sensing signal transduction pathway, HXT2 encoding a hexose transporter, CIT1 encoding a mitochondrial citrate synthase, and RPD3 encoding a histone deacetylase. Reverse engineering of the non-evolved Pdc negative strain through introduction of the MTH1 (81D) allele restored its growth on glucose at a maximum specific rate of 0.053 h(-1) in minimal medium with 2% glucose, and the CIT1 deletion in the reverse engineered strain further increased the maximum specific growth rate to 0.069 h(-1). In this study, possible evolving mechanisms of Pdc negative strains on glucose were investigated by genome sequencing and reverse engineering. The non-synonymous mutations in MTH1 alleviated the glucose repression by repressing expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in

  12. Yeast transformation mediated by Agrobacterium strains harboring an Ri plasmid: comparative study between GALLS of an Ri plasmid and virE of a Ti plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sato, Yukari; Momota, Naoto; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium strains containing a Ti plasmid can transfer T-DNA not only to plants but also to fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no Agrobacterium strain harboring an Ri plasmid has been evaluated in fungal transformation. Some Ri plasmids have GALLS , instead of virE1 and virE2. GALLS protein can functionally substitute in plant transformation for a structurally different protein VirE2. In this study, we compared the yeast transformation ability among Agrobacterium donors: a strain containing a Ti plasmid, strains harboring either an agropine-type or a mikimopine-type Ri plasmid, and a strain having a modified Ri plasmid supplemented with a Ti plasmid type virE operon. Agrobacterium strains possessing GALLS transformed yeast cells far less efficiently than the strain containing virE operon. Production of GALLS in recipient yeast cells improved the yeast transformation mediated by an Agrobacterium strain lacking neither GALLS nor virE operon. A reporter assay to detect mobilization of the proteins fused with Cre recombinase revealed that VirE2 protein is much more abundant in yeast cells than GALLS. Based on these results, we concluded that the low yeast transformability mediated by Agrobacterium strains having the Ri plasmid is because of low amount of mobilized GALLS in yeast cells. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Use of Native Yeast Strains for In-Bottle Fermentation to Face the Uniformity in Sparkling Wine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; Barrera Cardenas, Shirley; Valdetara, Federica; Faccincani, Monica; Panont, Carlo A; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The in-bottle fermentation of sparkling wines is currently triggered by few commercialized Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. This lack of diversity in tirage yeast cultures leads to a prevalent uniformity in sensory profiles of the end products. The aim of this study has been to exploit the natural multiplicity of yeast populations in order to introduce variability in sparkling wines throughout the re-fermentation step. A collection of 133 S. cerevisiae strains were screened on the basis of technological criteria (fermenting power and vigor, SO 2 tolerance, alcohol tolerance, flocculence) and qualitative features (acetic acid, glycerol and H 2 S productions). These activities allowed the selection of yeasts capable of dominating the in-bottle fermentation in actual cellar conditions: in particular, the performances of FX and FY strains (isolated in Franciacorta area), and OX and OY strains (isolated in Oltrepò Pavese area), were compared to those of habitually used starter cultures (IOC18-2007, EC1118, Lalvin DV10), by involving nine wineries belonging to the two Consortia of Appellation of Origin. The microbiological analyses of samples have revealed that the indigenous strains showed an increased latency period and a higher cultivability along the aging time than the commercial starter cultures do. Results of chemical analyses and sensory evaluation of the samples after 18 months sur lies have shown that significant differences ( p enology," where the wine is designed on specific vine cultivars and microorganisms, this work underlines that exploring yeast biodiversity is a strategic activity to improve the production.

  14. Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for identification and strain discrimination of the wine spoilage yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%.

  15. The influence of presaccharification, fermentation temperature and yeast strain on ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Carlos J A; Costa, Daniela A; Rodrigues, Marina Q R B; dos Santos, Ancély F; Lopes, Mariana R; Abrantes, Aline B P; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Silveira, Wendel Batista; Passos, Flávia M L; Fietto, Luciano G

    2012-04-01

    Ethanol can be produced from cellulosic biomass in a process known as simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The presence of yeast together with the cellulolytic enzyme complex reduces the accumulation of sugars within the reactor, increasing the ethanol yield and saccharification rate. This paper reports the isolation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae LBM-1, a strain capable of growth at 42 °C. In addition, S. cerevisiae LBM-1 and Kluyveromyces marxianus UFV-3 were able to ferment sugar cane bagasse in SSF processes at 37 and 42 °C. Higher ethanol yields were observed when fermentation was initiated after presaccharification at 50°C than at 37 or 42° C. Furthermore, the volumetric productivity of fermentation increased with presaccharification time, from 0.43 g/L/h at 0 h to 1.79 g/L/h after 72 h of presaccharification. The results suggest that the use of thermotolerant yeasts and a presaccharification stage are key to increasing yields in this process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physicochemical characterization of pomegranate wines fermented with three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, María; Vegara, Salud; Barrajón, Enrique; Saura, Domingo; Valero, Manuel; Martí, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains: Viniferm Revelación, Viniferm SV and Viniferm PDM were evaluated for the production of pomegranate wine from a juice coupage of the two well-known varieties Mollar and Wonderfull. Further malolactic fermentation was carried out spontaneously. The same fermentation patterns were observed for pH, titratable acidity, density, sugar consumption, and ethanol and glycerol production. Glucose was exhausted while fructose residues remained at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A high ethanol concentration (10.91 ± 0.27% v/v) in combination with 1.49 g/L glycerol was achieved. Citric acid concentration increased rapidly a 31.7%, malic acid disappeared as result of malolactic fermentation and the lactic acid levels reached values between 0.40 and 0.96 g/L. The analysis of CIEa parameter and total anthocyanin content highlights a lower degradation of monomeric anthocyanins during winemaking with Viniferm PDM yeast. The resulting wine retains a 34.5% of total anthocyanin content of pomegranate juice blend. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  18. A comparison of stress tolerance in YPD and industrial lignocellulose-based medium among industrial and laboratory yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Eva; Larsson, Christer

    2009-08-01

    In general, it is believed that fermentation by yeast under harsh industrial conditions, especially if substrates such as wood hydrolysate or lignocellulosic substrates are used, requires the use of so-called industrial strains. In order to check whether this is always true, a comparison of performance was made using two industrial strains and four commonly used laboratory strains, the haploid and diploid versions of CEN-PK and X2180, under industrially relevant stress conditions. The industrial strains were a Swedish commercial baker's yeast strain and a strain previously isolated from an industrial bioethanol production plant using lignocellulosic substrate. Stress conditions included, apart from growth in the lignocellulosic substrate itself, elevated concentrations of glucose, NaCl, ethanol, and lactate as well as low pH. Results showed that, indeed, the strain adapted to lignocellulosic substrate also possessed the highest growth rate as well as shortest duration of the lag phase in this type of medium. However, the higher the additional stress level, the lower the difference compared to other strains, and X2180 in particular displayed a high resistance to these additional stress conditions. Furthermore, no difference in performance could be detected between the haploid or diploid versions of the laboratory strains. It might be that, at least under some circumstances, a laboratory strain such as X2180 could be an industrially attractive production organism with the advantage of facilitating the possibilities for making controlled genetic manipulations.

  19. Impact of apple cultivar, ripening stage, fermentation type and yeast strain on phenolic composition of apple ciders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Oskar; Kuldjärv, Rain; Paalme, Toomas; Virkki, Mira; Yang, Baoru

    2017-10-15

    Hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonoids in apple juices and ciders were studied using liquid chromatography. Samples were produced from four different Estonian apple cultivars using unripe, ripe and overripe apples, and six different commercial yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, and Torulaspora delbrueckii strains. Part of the samples was additionally inoculated with malolactic bacteria, Oenococcus oeni. The most notable difference among the samples was the appearance of phloretin in malolactic ciders in comparison to conventional ciders and the juices. Furthermore, the apple cultivars were significantly different in their phenolic contents and compositions. Additionally, ciders and juices made from unripe apples contained more phenolic compounds than the ripe or overripe, but the effect was dependent on cultivar. The commercial yeast strains differed in the release of free HCAs, especially p-coumaric acid, during the yeast fermentation. In ciders inoculated with S. bayanus, the content was higher than in ciders fermented with S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved protein synthesis and secretion through medium enrichment in a stable recombinant yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Da Silva, N A

    1993-06-05

    Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were employed to investigate the effects of medium enrichment on the expression and secretion of a recombinant protein. One was a stable autoselection strain with mutations in the ura3, fur1, and urid-k genes. The combination of these three mutations blocks both the pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic and salvage pathways and is lethal to the cells. Retention of the plasmid, which carries a URA3 gene, was essential for cell viability. Therefore, all media were selective, allowing cultivation of the strain in complex medium. The second strain was a nonautoselection (control) strain and is isogenic to the first except for the fur1 and urid-k mutations. The plasmid utilized contains the yeast invertase gene under the control of the MFalpha1 promoter and leader sequence. The expression and secretion of invertase for the autoselection strain were examined in batch culture for three media: a minimal medium (SD), a semidefined medium (SDC), and a rich complex medium (YPD). Biomass yields and invertase productivity (volumetric activity) increased with the complexity of the medium; total invertase volumetric activity in YPD was 100% higher than in SDC and 180% higher than in SD. Specific activity, however, was lowest in the SDC medium. Secretion efficiency was extremely high in all three media; for the majority of the culture, 80-90% of the invertase was secreted into the periplasmic space and/or culture medium. A glucose pulse at the end of batch culture in YPD facilitated the transport of residual cytoplasmic invertase. For the nonautoselection strain, invertase productivity did not improve as the medium was enriched from SDC to YPD, and plasmid stability in the complex YPD medium dropped from 54% to 34% during one batch fermentation. During long-term sequential batch culture in YPD, invertase activity decreased by 90% and the plasmid-containing fraction dropped from 56% to 8.8% over 44 generations of growth. The expression level for

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Pseudozyma antarctica Type Strain JCM10317, a Producer of the Glycolipid Biosurfactants, Mannosylerythritol Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai; Morita, Tomotake

    2014-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica is known as a producer of industrial enzymes and the extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain JCM10317. The draft genome assembly has a size of 18.1 Mb and a G+C content of 60.9%, and it consists of 197 scaffolds.

  2. In vitro antifungal susceptibility profile and correlation of mycelial and yeast forms of molecularly characterized Histoplasma capsulatum strains from India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kathuria, S.; Singh, P.K.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Chowdhary, A.

    2014-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibility profiles of the mycelial and yeast forms of 23 Histoplasma capsulatum strains from pulmonary and disseminated histoplasmosis patients in India are reported here. The MIC data of this dimorphic fungus had good agreement between both forms for azoles, amphotericin B, and

  3. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts.

  4. Molecular characterization and molasses fermentation performance of a wild yeast strain operating in an extremely wide temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Nisiotou, Aspasia; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Panas, Panayiotis; Nychas, George J-E; Kanellaki, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Molasses fermentation performance by both a cryotolerant and a thermophilic yeast (strain AXAZ-1) isolated from grapes in Greece was evaluated in an extremely wide temperature range (3-40 degrees C). Sequence analysis of the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer and the D1/D2 ribosomal DNA (rDNA) regions assigned isolate to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the mitochondrial DNA showed that strain AXAZ-1 is genetically divergent compared to other wild strains of Greek origin or commercial yeast starters. Yeast cells growing planktonically were capable of fermentation in a wide temperature spectrum, ranging from 3 degrees C to 38 degrees C. Immobilization of yeast on brewer's spent grains (BSG) improved the thermo-tolerance of the strain and enabled fermentation at 40 degrees C. Time to complete fermentation with the immobilized yeast ranged from 20 days at 3 to 38 h at 40 degrees C. The daily ethanol productivity reached maximum (58.1 g/L) and minimum (2.5 g/L) levels at 30 and 3 degrees C, respectively. The aroma-related compounds' profiles of immobilized cells at different fermentation temperatures were evaluated by using solid phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Molasses fermentation resulted in a high quality fermentation product due to the low concentrations of higher and amyl alcohols at all temperatures tested. Strain AXAZ-1 is very promising for the production of ethanol from low cost raw materials, as it was capable to perform fermentations of high ethanol concentration and productivities in both low and high temperatures.

  5. Effects of feedstock and co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during fuel ethanol fermentation by the industrial yeast strain PE-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda R; Bassi, Ana Paula G; Cerri, Bianca C; Almeida, Amanda R; Carvalho, Isis G B; Bastos, Reinaldo G; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra R

    2018-02-16

    Even though contamination by bacteria and wild yeasts are frequently observed during fuel ethanol fermentation, our knowledge regarding the effects of both contaminants together is very limited, especially considering that the must composition can vary from exclusively sugarcane juice to a mixture of molasses and juice, affecting the microbial development. Here we studied the effects of the feedstock (sugarcane juice and molasses) and the co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and a wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (rough colony and pseudohyphae) in single and multiple-batch fermentation trials with an industrial strain of S. cerevisiae (PE-2) as starter yeast. The results indicate that in multiple-cycle batch system, the feedstock had a minor impact on the fermentation than in single-cycle batch system, however the rough yeast contamination was more harmful than the bacterial contamination in multiple-cycle batch fermentation. The inoculation of both contaminants did not potentiate the detrimental effect in any substrate. The residual sugar concentration in the fermented broth had a higher concentration of fructose than glucose for all fermentations, but in the presence of the rough yeast, the discrepancy between fructose and glucose concentrations were markedly higher, especially in molasses. The biggest problem associated with incomplete fermentation seemed to be the lower consumption rate of sugar and the reduced fructose preference of the rough yeast rather than the lower invertase activity. Lower ethanol production, acetate production and higher residual sugar concentration are characteristics strongly associated with the rough yeast strain and they were not potentiated with the inoculation of L. fermentum.

  6. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoqiong Zheng

    Full Text Available The application of active dry yeast (ADY in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  7. Potential Role of Yeast Strains Isolated from Grapes in the Production of Aglianico of Taurasi DOCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eAponte

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Twelve samples of Aglianico grapes, collected in different locations of the Taurasi DOCG (Appellation of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin production area were naturally fermented in sterile containers at room temperature. A total of 70 yeast cultures were isolated from countable WL agar plates: 52 in the middle of the fermentation and 18 at the end. On the basis of ITS-RFLP analysis and ITS sequencing, all cultures collected at the end of fermentations were identified as Saccharomyces (S. cerevisiae; while, the 52 isolates, collected after one week, could be referred to the following species: Metschnikowia (M. pulcherrima; Starmerella (Star. bacillaris; Pichia (P. kudriavzevii; Lachancea (L. thermotolerans; Hanseniaspora (H. uvarum; Pseudozyma (Pseud. aphidis; S. cerevisiae. By means of Interdelta analysis, 18 different biotypes of S. cerevisiae were retrieved. All strains were characterized for ethanol production, SO2 resistance, H2S development, β-glucosidasic, esterasic and antagonistic activities. Fermentation abilities of selected strains were evaluated in micro-fermentations on Aglianico must. Within non-Saccharomyces species, some cultures showed features of technological interest. Antagonistic activity was expressed by some strains of M. pulcherrima, L. thermotolerans, P. kudriavzevii and S. cerevisiae. Strains of M. pulcherrima showed the highest β-glucosidase activity and proved to be able to produce high concentrations of succinic acid. L. thermotolerans produced both succinic and lactic acids. The lowest amount of acetic acid was produced by M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans; while the highest content was recorded for H. uvarum. The strain of Star. bacillaris produced the highest amount of glycerol and was able to metabolize all fructose and malic acid. Strains of M. pulcherrima and H. uvarum showed a low fermentation power (about 4%, while, L. thermotolerans, Star. bacillaris and P. kudriavzevii of about 10%. Significant

  8. Bio-Technological Characterization of the Saccharomyces bayanus Yeast Strains in Order to Preserve the Local Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Gaspar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The wine yeasts have multiple and important applications in the industry, aiming to obtain pure cultures and the selection of those strains which, according to the lab investigations, present superior bio-technological properties. In this study we monitored three types of Saccharomyces bayanus yeast strains, isolated from indigenous grapes varieties, Apold Iordana, Italian Blaj Riesling and Royal Feteasca from Jidvei area, which are present in the collection of the Biotechnologies and Microbiology Research Center of SAIAPM University. The yeast strains were subject to alcoholic fermentation in malt must at different temperatures, in the presence of alcohol, sugar and SO2 in various concentrations. The obtained results led to selecting of those strains which had best results regarding the alcoholic tolerance, osmo-tolerance, fermentation speed under stress conditions and resistance to SO2. These results can have practical applications in using the indigenous strains, isolated from grapes which are from inside the country, so that we preserve the local specificity, and reduce imports regarding this area.

  9. Evaluation of baker's yeast strains exhibiting significant growth on Japanese beet molasses and compound analysis of the molasses types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroaki; Tamura, Masahiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-06-01

    Cane molasses, most of which is imported, is used as a raw material for production of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Japan. On the other hand, beet molasses is scarcely used for this purpose, but it can be of great advantage to cane molasses because it is domestically produced in relatively high amounts as a by-product of beet sugar processing. However, the yield of baker's yeast is sometimes low with Japanese beet molasses compared to imported cane molasses. For the production of baker's yeast with Japanese beet molasses, we evaluated S. cerevisiae strains, including industrial and laboratory strains, to group them according to the growth profile on beet and cane molasses. To discuss the factors affecting growth, we further analyzed the major compounds in both types of molasses. Beet molasses seems to contain compounds that promote the growth of beet molasses-favoring strains rather than inhibit the growth of cane molasses-favoring strains. It was assumed that α-amino acid was one of the growth promotion factors for beet molasses-favoring strains. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative physiology and fermentation performance of Saaz and Frohberg lager yeast strains and the parental species Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brian R; Storgårds, Erna; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve

    2013-07-01

    Two distinct genetic groups (Saaz and Frohberg) exist within the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus) taxon. However, physiological/technological differences that exist between the two groups are not known. Fermentative capability of the parental S. eubayanus has likewise never been studied. Here, 58 lager strains were screened to determine which hybrid group they belonged to, and selected strains were characterized to determine salient characteristics. In 15 °P all-malt wort fermentations at 22 °C, Frohberg strains showed greater growth and superior fermentation (80% apparent attenuation, 6.5% alcohol by volume in 3-4 days) compared to all other strains and maintained highest viability values (>93%). Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at the same temperature (33% apparent attenuation, 2.7% alcohol by volume at 6 days and viability reduced to 75%). Saaz strains and S. eubayanus were the least sensitive to cold (10 °C), though this did not translate to greater fermentation performance. Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at 10 °C but equal to or greater than that of the Saaz strains. Performance of Saaz yeast/S. eubayanus was limited by an inability to use wort maltotriose. [(14)C]-Maltotriose transport assays also showed negligible activity in these strains (≤0.5 µmol min(-1) g(-1) dry yeast). Beers from Saaz fermentations were characterized by two- to sixfold lower production of the flavour compounds methyl butanol, ethyl acetate and 3-methylbutyl acetate compared to Frohberg strains. Higher alcohol and ester production by S. eubayanus was similar to that of Frohberg strains. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Quality improvement and geographical indication of cachaça (Brazilian spirit) by using locally selected yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, E A; Souza, M T; Diniz, R H S; Godoy-Santos, F; Faria-Oliveira, F; Correa, L F M; Alvarez, F; Coutrim, M X; Afonso, R J C F; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the quality and to create a biological basis for obtainment of the protected denomination of origin (PDO), indigenous yeast were isolated and characterized for use in Salinas city (the Brazilian region of quality cachaça production). Seven thousand and two hundred yeast colonies from 15 Salinas city distilleries were screened based on their fermentative behaviour and the physicochemical composition of cachaça. Molecular polymorphic analyses were performed to characterize these isolates. Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (nos. 678 and 680) showed appropriate characteristics to use in the cachaça production: low levels of acetaldehyde and methanol, and high ethyl lactate/ethyl acetate ratio respectively. They also presented polymorphic characteristics more closely related between themselves even when compared to other strains from Salinas. The application of selected yeast to cachaça production can contribute for the improvement of the quality product as well as be used as a natural marker for PDO. This study suggests that the use of selected yeast strains could contribute to obtain a cachaça similar to those produced traditionally, while getting wide acceptation in the market, yet presenting more homogeneous organoleptic characteristics, and thus contributing to the PDO implementation. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. A strategy for constructing aneuploid yeast strains by transient nondisjunction of a target chromosome

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    Peck Anders T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most methods for constructing aneuploid yeast strains that have gained a specific chromosome rely on spontaneous failures of cell division fidelity. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extra chromosomes can be obtained when errors in meiosis or mitosis lead to nondisjunction, or when nuclear breakdown occurs in heterokaryons. We describe a strategy for constructing N+1 disomes that does not require such spontaneous failures. The method combines two well-characterized genetic tools: a conditional centromere that transiently blocks disjunction of one specific chromosome, and a duplication marker assay that identifies disomes among daughter cells. To test the strategy, we targeted chromosomes III, IV, and VI for duplication. Results The centromere of each chromosome was replaced by a centromere that can be blocked by growth in galactose, and ura3::HIS3, a duplication marker. Transient exposure to galactose induced the appearance of colonies carrying duplicated markers for chromosomes III or IV, but not VI. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH confirmed that disomic strains carrying extra chromosome III or IV were generated. Chromosome VI contains several genes that are known to be deleterious when overexpressed, including the beta-tubulin gene TUB2. To test whether a tubulin stoichiometry imbalance is necessary for the apparent lethality caused by an extra chromosome VI, we supplied the parent strain with extra copies of the alpha-tubulin gene TUB1, then induced nondisjunction. Galactose-dependent chromosome VI disomes were produced, as revealed by CGH. Some chromosome VI disomes also carried extra, unselected copies of additional chromosomes. Conclusion This method causes efficient nondisjunction of a targeted chromosome and allows resulting disomic cells to be identified and maintained. We used the method to test the role of tubulin imbalance in the apparent lethality of disomic chromosome VI. Our results indicate

  13. Modification of Salmonella Typhimurium motility by the probiotic yeast strain Saccharomyces boulardii.

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    Rodolphe Pontier-Bres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motility is an important component of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST pathogenesis allowing the bacteria to move into appropriate niches, across the mucus layer and invade the intestinal epithelium. In vitro, flagellum-associated motility is closely related to the invasive properties of ST. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B is widely prescribed for the prophylaxis and treatment of diarrheal diseases caused by bacteria or antibiotics. In case of Salmonella infection, S.b-B has been shown to decrease ST invasion of T84 colon cell line. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of S.b-B on ST motility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on human colonic T84 cells infected by the Salmonella strain 1344 alone or in the presence of S.b-B. The motility of Salmonella was recorded by time-lapse video microscopy. Next, a manual tracking was performed to analyze bacteria dynamics (MTrackJ plugin, NIH image J software. This revealed that the speed of bacterial movement was modified in the presence of S.b-B. The median curvilinear velocity (CLV of Salmonella incubated alone with T84 decreased from 43.3 µm/sec to 31.2 µm/sec in the presence of S.b-B. Measurement of track linearity (TL showed similar trends: S.b-B decreased by 15% the number of bacteria with linear tract (LT and increased by 22% the number of bacteria with rotator tract (RT. Correlation between ST motility and invasion was further established by studying a non-motile flagella-deficient ST strain. Indeed this strain that moved with a CLV of 0.5 µm/sec, presented a majority of RT and a significant decrease in invasion properties. Importantly, we show that S.b-B modified the motility of the pathogenic strain SL1344 and significantly decreased invasion of T84 cells by this strain. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that S.b-B modifies Salmonella's motility and trajectory which may account for the modification

  14. Improvement of multiple stress tolerance in yeast strain by sequential mutagenesis for enhanced bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rajni; Pramanik, Krishna

    2012-12-01

    The present work deals with the improvement of multiple stress tolerance in a glucose-xylose co-fermenting hybrid yeast strain RPR39 by sequential mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, near and far ultraviolet radiations. The mutants were evaluated for their tolerance to ethanol, temperature and fermentation inhibitors. Among these mutants, mutant RPRT90 exhibited highest tolerance to 10% initial ethanol concentration, 2 g L(-1) furfural and 8 g L(-1) acetic acid. The mutant also showed good growth at high temperature (39-40°C). A study on the combined effect of multiple stresses during fermentation of glucose-xylose mixture (3:1 ratio) was performed using mutant RPRT90. Under the combined effect of thermal (39°C) and inhibitor stress (0.25 g L(-1) vanillin, 0.5 g L(-1) furfural and 4 g L(-1) acetic acid), the mutant produced ethanol with a yield of 0.379 g g(-1), while under combined effect of ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitor stress the ethanol yield obtained was 0.43 g g(-1). Further, under the synergistic effect of sugar (250 g L(-1)), thermal (39°C), ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitors stress, the strain produced a maximum of 47.93 g L(-1) ethanol by utilizing 162.42 g L(-1) of glucose-xylose mixture giving an ethanol yield of 0.295 g g(-1) and productivity of 0.57 g L(-1) h(-1). Under same condition the fusant RPR39 produced a maximum of 30.0 g L(-1) ethanol giving a yield and productivity of 0.21 g g(-1) and 0.42 g L(-1) h(-1) respectively. The molecular characterization of mutant showed considerable difference in its genetic profile from hybrid RPR39. Thus, sequential mutagenesis was found to be effective to improve the stress tolerance properties in yeast. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of yeast killer activity in fermenting sugarcane juice using selected ethanol-making strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Ceccato-Antonini

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four yeasts out of 342 isolated from the fermentative process showed killer activity and three of them were selected for the fermentative efficiency evaluation in batch system with cell recycle, flask and fermentor experiments. The selected three killer strains did not present similar results to those of pressed (baking yeast concerning ethanol (0.07-0.18; 0.12-0.20; 0.10-0.13; 0.22-0.25 g/g, respectively and biomass (0.19-0.26; 0.33-0.39; 0.13-0.27; 0.47-0.61 g/g, respectively yields and fermentative efficiency (12.3-36.3; 21.0-40.0; 19.3-26.3; 47.6-54.0 %, respectively in sugarcane juice, in flasks. In fermentor, similar behaviour was observed. However, the selected strains showed high cellular viability and killer activity (using cell-free filtrate along the fermentative cycles, in spite of the unfavourable conditions of the medium, like high pH variation of the medium (from 5.5-6.0 to 3.0-4.0, low aeration and higher temperature (30º C, which were not the ideal ones for the production/activity of killer toxins. A Pichia strain (CCA 510 showed the best results among the killer yeasts tested, exhibiting a killer activity against 92% of isolated fermentative yeasts of the process and against the pressed (baking ferment. It also demonstrated killer activity (using crude toxin preparation at higher temperatures (38ºC and low pH (4.0 after 72 hours of incubation, under proliferative and non-proliferative conditions. The results indicated that the killer activity should be a characteristic to be looked for in the strain selection for ethanolic fermentation, beside other important productivity-based characteristics, since it assure the permanence of the selected strain during the process.A atividade 'killer' poderia garantir às leveduras fermentativas uma vantagem competitiva sobre outras linhagens durante a fermentação etanólica, no entanto, pouco se sabe sobre o papel do sistema 'killer' nesse tipo de fermentação alcoólica. A sele

  16. A biotechnological valorization and treatment of olive mill waste waters by selected yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouncif, M.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill waste waters were diluted to 1/10, supplied with 2% urea and inoculated with yeast strains. 20 yeast strains isolated from Olive Mill Waste (OMW water were screened for their biomass production, GOD reduction and polyphenols bioconversión activities. Pure cultures of yeasts were realized in 100 ml erlen-meyer flasks. 50 ml cultures were used and the flasks were incubated at room temperature (22°G on a shaker. Biomass production, COD (chemical oxygen demand reduction and Polyphenols bioconversión were followed up in the inoculated OMW waters. Results showed that the urea supply improve significantly the biomass production relatively to the control. This reached in some assays 2.06% expressed as g of biomass dry weight per 100 mL of OMW water. Polyphenols removal was estimated to around 50% and the COD was decreased from 54.14 g/Kg to 21.56 g/Kg. This aerobic treatment lead to the biomass production and also to a pretreated efluent by the COD and the removal of the methanization inhibiting polyphenolic compounds.

    Aguas residuales de la molturación de la aceituna se diluyeron en la proporción 1/10, se le añadió un 2% de urea y se inoculó con cepas de levaduras. 20 cepas de levaduras aisladas de aguas residuales de la molturación de la aceituna (OMW se seleccionaron por su producción de biomasa, reducción DQO y actividades de bioconversión de polifenoles. Se llevaron a cabo cultivos puros de levaduras en matraces erlenmeyer de 100 mi. Se tomaron 50 ml de cultivos y los matraces se incubaron a temperatura ambiente (22°C en un agitador. Se siguió la producción de biomasa, la reducción de DQO (demanda química de oxígeno y la bioconversión de polifenoles en las aguas residuales de la aceituna. Los resultados mostraron que el suministro de urea mejoró significativamente la producción de biomasa en relación al control. Esta alcanzó en algunos ensayos el 2.06% expresado como g de peso seco de biomasa por 100 ml de

  17. Apple Aminoacid Profile and Yeast Strains in the Formation of Fusel Alcohols and Esters in Cider Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleutério Dos Santos, Caroline Mongruel; Pietrowski, Giovana de Arruda Moura; Braga, Cíntia Maia; Rossi, Márcio José; Ninow, Jorge; Machado Dos Santos, Tâmisa Pires; Wosiacki, Gilvan; Jorge, Regina Maria Matos; Nogueira, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The amino acid profile in dessert apple must and its effect on the synthesis of fusel alcohols and esters in cider were established by instrumental analysis. The amino acid profile was performed in nine apple musts. Two apple musts with high (>150 mg/L) and low (content, and four enological yeast strains, were used in cider fermentation. The aspartic acid, asparagine and glutamic acid amino acids were the majority in all the apple juices, representing 57.10% to 81.95%. These three amino acids provided a high consumption (>90%) during fermentation in all the ciders. Principal component analysis (PCA) explained 81.42% of data variability and the separation of three groups for the analyzed samples was verified. The ciders manufactured with low nitrogen content showed sluggish fermentation and around 50% less content of volatile compounds (independent of the yeast strain used), which were mainly 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) and esters. However, in the presence of amino acids (asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine) there was a greater differentiation between the yeasts in the production of fusel alcohols and ethyl esters. High contents of these aminoacids in dessert apple musts are essential for the production of fusel alcohols and most of esters by aromatic yeasts during cider fermentation. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Process optimization of continuous gluconic acid fermentation by isolated yeast-like strains of Aureobasidium pullulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Aivasidis, Alexander; Wandrey, Christian; Rehm, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-08-20

    This study was focused on the optimization of a new fermentation process for continuous gluconic acid production by the isolated yeast-like strain Aureobasidium pullulans DSM 7085 (isolate 70). Operational fermentation parameters were optimized in chemostat cultures, using a defined glucose medium. Different optima were found for growth and gluconic acid production for each set of operation parameters. Highest productivity was recorded at pH values between 6.5 and 7.0 and temperatures between 29 and 31 degrees C. A gluconic acid concentration higher than 230 g/L was continuously produced at residence times of 12 h. A steady state extracellular gluconic acid concentration of 234 g/L was measured at pH 6.5. 122% air saturation yielded the highest volumetric productivity and product concentration. The biomass-specific productivity increased steadily upon raising air saturation. An intracellular gluconic acid concentration of about 159 g/L (0.83 mol) was determined at 31 degrees C. This is to be compared with an extracellular concentration of 223 g/L (1.16 mol), which indicates the possible existence of an active transport system for gluconic acid secretion, or the presence of extracellular glucose oxidizing enzymes. The new process provides significant advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi operations. The process control becomes easier, thus offering stable product quality and quantity. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ethanol production from kitchen waste using the flocculating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KF-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.-Q.; Koike, Yoji; Liu Kai; An, M.-Z.; Morimura, Shigeru; Wu Xiaolei; Kida, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from kitchen waste was developed in this study. The process consists of freshness preservation of the waste, saccharification of the sugars in the waste, continuous ethanol fermentation of the saccharified liquid, and anaerobic treatment of the saccharification residue and the stillage. Spraying lactic acid bacteria (LCB) on the kitchen waste kept the waste fresh for over 1 week. High glucose recovery (85.5%) from LCB-sprayed waste was achieved after saccharification using Nagase N-40 glucoamylase. The resulting saccharified liquid was used directly for ethanol fermentation, without the addition of any nutrients. High ethanol productivity (24.0 g l -1 h -1 ) was obtained when the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 was used in a continuous ethanol fermentation process at a dilution rate of 0.8 h -1 . The saccharification residue was mixed with stillage and treated in a thermophilic anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR); a VTS loading rate of 6 g l -1 d -1 with 72% VTS digestion efficiency was achieved. Using this process, 30.9 g ethanol, and 65.2 l biogas with 50% methane, was produced from 1 kg of kitchen waste containing 118.0 g total sugar. Thus, energy in kitchen waste can be converted to ethanol and methane, which can then be used as fuels, while simultaneously treating kitchen waste

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Pseudozyma antarctica Type Strain JCM10317, a Producer of the Glycolipid Biosurfactants, Mannosylerythritol Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai; Morita, Tomotake

    2014-09-25

    The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica is known as a producer of industrial enzymes and the extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain JCM10317. The draft genome assembly has a size of 18.1 Mb and a G+C content of 60.9%, and it consists of 197 scaffolds. Copyright © 2014 Saika et al.

  1. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yeast Rice For More Information Key References Acknowledgments © asian-ingredients Red yeast rice is a traditional Chinese ... products varies depending on the yeast strains and culture conditions used to manufacture them. The strains and ...

  2. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  3. Construction of a genetically modified wine yeast strain expressing the Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene, encoding an -L-Rhamnosidase of enological interest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzanares, P.; Orejas, M.; Vicente Gil, J.; Graaff, de L.H.; Visser, J.; Ramon, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene encoding an alpha-L-rhamnosidase has been expressed in both laboratory and industrial wine yeast strains. Wines produced in microvinifications, conducted using a combination of the genetically modified industrial strain expressing rhaA and another strain

  4. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40°C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses...... in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures...

  5. Integrated expression of the α-amylase, dextranase and glutathione gene in an industrial brewer's yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Jing; Wang, Zhao-Yue; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering is widely used to meliorate biological characteristics of industrial brewing yeast. But how to solve multiple problems at one time has become the bottle neck in the genetic modifications of industrial yeast strains. In a newly constructed strain TYRL21, dextranase gene was expressed in addition of α-amylase to make up α-amylase's shortcoming which can only hydrolyze α-1,4-glycosidic bond. Meanwhile, 18s rDNA repeated sequence was used as the homologous sequence for an effective and stable expression of LSD1 gene. As a result, TYRL21 consumed about twice much starch than the host strain. Moreover TYRL21 speeded up the fermentation which achieved the maximum cell number only within 3 days during EBC tube fermentation. Besides, flavor evaluation comparing TYRL21 and wild type brewing strain Y31 also confirmed TYRL21's better performances regarding its better saccharides utilization (83% less in residual saccharides), less off-flavor compounds (57% less in diacetyl, 39% less in acetaldehyde, 67% less in pentanedione), and improved stability index (increased by 49%) which correlated with sensory evaluation of final beer product.

  6. Performance of a newly isolated salt-tolerant yeast strain Pichia occidentalis G1 for degrading and detoxifying azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Shao, Yifan; Ning, Shuxiang; Tan, Liang

    2017-06-01

    A salt-tolerant yeast named G1 which could decolorize various azo dyes was recently isolated and identified as Pichia occidentalis. Systematic researches on characterization, degradation pathway, detoxification effects and enzymes analysis of this yeast were done. The results showed that the optimal metabolism and growth parameters for strain G1 were: 2.0gL -1 glucose, 0.6gL -1 ammonium sulfate, 0.08gL -1 yeast extract, 30gL -1 NaCl, 160rmin -1 , 30°C and pH 5.0. More than 98% of 50mgL -1 Acid Red B (ARB) could be decolorized within 16h under the optimal conditions. Additionally, strain G1 degraded and obviously detoxified ARB through a possible pathway successively consisting of decolorization, deamination/desulfonation and TCA cycle processes. Moreover, NADH-DCIP reductase was estimated as the key reductase for decolorization and ligninases including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase were important oxidoreductases for further degradation of decolorization intermediates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigating cross-contamination by yeast strains from dental solid waste to waste-handling workers by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Cristina Dutra; Tagliaferri, Thaysa Leite; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; de Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Holanda, Rodrigo Assuncao; de Magalhães, Thais Furtado Ferreira; Magalhães, Paula Prazeres; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; de Macêdo Farias, Luiz

    2018-04-01

    Trying to widen the discussion on the risks associated with dental waste, this study proposed to investigate and genetically compare yeast isolates recovered from dental solid waste and waste workers. Three samples were collected from workers' hands, nasal mucosa, and professional clothing (days 0, 30, and 180), and two from dental waste (days 0 and 180). Slide culture, microscopy, antifungal drug susceptibility, intersimple sequence repeat analysis, and amplification and sequencing of internal transcribed spacer regions were performed. Yeast strains were recovered from all waste workers' sites, including professional clothes, and from waste. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated that some yeast recovered from employees and waste exhibited nonsusceptible profiles. The dendrogram demonstrated the presence of three major clusters based on similarity matrix and UPGMA grouping method. Two branches displayed 100% similarity: three strains of Candida guilliermondii isolated from different employees, working in opposite work shifts, and from diverse sites grouped in one part of branch 1 and cluster 3 that included two samples of Candida albicans recovered from waste and the hand of one waste worker. The results suggested the possibility of cross-contamination from dental waste to waste workers and reinforce the need of training programs focused on better waste management routines. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Engineered Trx2p industrial yeast strain protects glycolysis and fermentation proteins from oxidative carbonylation during biomass propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Pastor Rocío

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast biomass production process, protein carbonylation has severe adverse effects since it diminishes biomass yield and profitability of industrial production plants. However, this significant detriment of yeast performance can be alleviated by increasing thioredoxins levels. Thioredoxins are important antioxidant defenses implicated in many functions in cells, and their primordial functions include scavenging of reactive oxygen species that produce dramatic and irreversible alterations such as protein carbonylation. Results In this work we have found several proteins specifically protected by yeast Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2p. Bidimensional electrophoresis and carbonylated protein identification from TRX-deficient and TRX-overexpressing cells revealed that glycolysis and fermentation-related proteins are specific targets of Trx2p protection. Indeed, the TRX2 overexpressing strain presented increased activity of the central carbon metabolism enzymes. Interestingly, Trx2p specifically preserved alcohol dehydrogenase I (Adh1p from carbonylation, decreased oligomer aggregates and increased its enzymatic activity. Conclusions The identified proteins suggest that the fermentative capacity detriment observed under industrial conditions in T73 wine commercial strain results from the oxidative carbonylation of specific glycolytic and fermentation enzymes. Indeed, increased thioredoxin levels enhance the performance of key fermentation enzymes such as Adh1p, which consequently increases fermentative capacity.

  9. Production of different types of mannosylerythritol lipids as biosurfactants by the newly isolated yeast strains belonging to the genus Pseudozyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masaaki; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kakugawa, Koji; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-06-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are abundantly secreted by yeasts, are one of the most promising biosurfactants known. To obtain various types of MEL and to attain a broad range of applications for them, screening of novel producers was undertaken. Thirteen strains of yeasts were successfully isolated as potential MEL producers; they showed high production yields of MEL of around 20 g l(-1) from 40 g l(-1) of soybean oil. Based on the taxonomical study, all the strains were classified to be the genus Pseudozyma. It is interesting to note that they were categorized into three groups according to their production patterns of MEL. The first group, which included 11 strains taxonomically closely related to high-level MEL producers such as Pseudozyma antarctica and Pseudozyma aphidis, mainly produced 4-O-[(4',6'-di-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-A) together with 4-O-[(6'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-B) and 4-O-[(4'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-C) as the minor components. The second group of one strain, which was related to Pseudozyma tsukubaensis, predominantly produced MEL-B. The third group of one strain, which was closely related to Pseudozyma hubeiensis, mainly produced MEL-C; this is the first observation of the efficient production of MEL-C from soybean oil. Moreover, the major fatty acids of the obtained MEL-C were C(6), C(12), and C(16) acids, and were considerably different from those of the other MEL hitherto reported. The biosynthetic manner for MEL is thus likely to significantly vary among the Pseudozyma strains; the newly isolated strains would enable us to attain a large-scale production of MEL and to obtain various types of MEL with different hydrophobic structures.

  10. Surface engineering for enhanced performance against wear

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Surface Engineering constitutes a variety of processes and sub processes. Each chapter of this work covers specific processes by experts working in the area. Included for each topic are tribological performances for each process as well as results of recent research. The reader also will benefit from in-depth studies of diffusion coatings, nanocomposite films for wear resistance, surfaces for biotribological applications, thin-film wear, tribology of thermal sprayed coatings, hardfacing, plating for tribology and high energy beam surface modifications. Material scientists as well as engineers working with surface engineering for tribology will be particularly interested in this work.

  11. Use of two osmoethanol tolerant yeast strain to ferment must from Tempranillo dried grapes: effect on wine composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Lerma, N; Peinado, R A

    2011-01-31

    The must from Tempranillo dried grapes was divided into four batches to produce sweet wine. The first one was fortified with ethanol up to 12% (v/v) to avoid fermentation (traditional way). Other two batches were partially fermented with two osmoethanol tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (X4 and X5). The last one was fermented with native yeast by spontaneous fermentation. Wines fermented partially with the strains X4 and X5 show high volatile acidity values (above 2g/L expressed as acetic acid), and a glycerol concentration around 20 g/L. Both strains also produce high amount of carboxylic acids and therefore the wines show a high ethyl ester concentration. Aromatic series were obtained for all the wines by grouping aroma compounds according to their odor descriptors. The series of the fermented wines with higher values in relation with the control wine were fruity, sweet and fatty, emphasizing the fruity series in the samples fermented with the X4 and X5 strains. The sensorial analysis of the wine samples by a tasting panel put in evidence that the musts fermented with the osmoethanol tolerant yeasts were better valued than the rest of the wine samples. The must fermented with the X4 strain obtained the maximum score in terms of aroma and flavour. So, the use of these osmoethanol tolerant S. cerevisiae strains could be a suitable alternative to produce sweet wines from must with high sugar concentration. The wines obtained this way are chemically and organoleptically more complex than those elaborated traditionally. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Geographic Distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isolates within three Italian Neighboring Winemaking Regions Reveals Strong Differences in Yeast Abundance, Genetic Diversity and Industrial Strain Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Viel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest for natural fermentations has been re-evaluated in terms of increasing the wine terroir and managing more sustainable winemaking practices. Therefore, the level of yeast genetic variability and the abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae native populations in vineyard are becoming more and more crucial at both ecological and technological level. Among the factors that can influence the strain diversity, the commercial starter release that accidentally occur in the environment around the winery, has to be considered. In this study we led a wide scale investigation of S. cerevisiae genetic diversity and population structure in the vineyards of three neighboring winemaking regions of Protected Appellation of Origin, in North-East of Italy. Combining mtDNA RFLP and microsatellite markers analyses we evaluated 634 grape samples collected over 3 years. We could detect major differences in the presence of S. cerevisiae yeasts, according to the winemaking region. The population structures revealed specificities of yeast microbiota at vineyard scale, with a relative Appellation of Origin area homogeneity, and transition zones suggesting a geographic differentiation. Surprisingly, we found a widespread industrial yeast dissemination that was very high in the areas where the native yeast abundance was low. Although geographical distance is a key element involved in strain distribution, the high presence of industrial strains in vineyard reduced the differences between populations. This finding indicates that industrial yeast diffusion it is a real emergency and their presence strongly interferes with the natural yeast microbiota.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence ofMetschnikowia australisStrain UFMG-CM-Y6158, an Extremophile Marine Yeast Endemic to Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Thiago M; Hilário, Heron O; Moreira, Rennan G; Furtado, Carolina; Godinho, Valéria M; Rosa, Luiz H; Franco, Glória R; Rosa, Carlos A

    2017-05-18

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Metschnikowia australis strain UFMG-CM-Y6158, a yeast endemic to Antarctica. We isolated the strain from the marine seaweed Acrosiphonia arcta ( Chlorophyta ). The genome is 14.3 Mb long and contains 4,442 predicted protein-coding genes. Copyright © 2017 Batista et al.

  14. Role of cultivation media in the development of yeast strains for large scale industrial use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görgens Johann

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The composition of cultivation media in relation to strain development for industrial application is reviewed. Heterologous protein production and pentose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used to illustrate the influence of media composition at different stages of strain construction and strain development. The effects of complex, defined and industrial media are compared. Auxotrophic strains and strain stability are discussed. Media for heterologous protein production and for bulk bio-commodity production are summarized.

  15. Functionality of selected strains of moulds and yeasts from Vietnamese rice wine starters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dung, N.T.P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The role of starch-degrading mycelial fungi, and the alcohol production and ethanol tolerance of the yeasts isolated from selected Vietnamese traditional rice wine starters were examined, and optimum conditions for these essential steps in rice wine fermentation were determined. Of pure isolates

  16. Distribution of radioactivity from AFB{sub 1} {sup 3}H in Wistar rats fed with diets contained active yeast strain Y904

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Antonio S.; Abdalla, Adibe L.; Brigide, Priscila; Castilho, Lecio A.; Walder, Julio M.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: asbaptis@cena.usp.br; abdalla@cena.usp.br; brigide@cena.usp.br; lcastil@cena.usp.br; jwalder@cena.usp.br; Aguiar, Claudio Lima de [Universidade do Norte do Parana (Unopar), Londrina, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: claguiar@yahoo.com.br; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: angelita_sampaio@yahoo.com.br; Micheluchi, David; Gloria, Eduardo M.; Calori-Domingues, Maria A; Horii, Jorge [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: dmiquell@esalq.usp.br; emgloria@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; macdomin@esalq.usp.br; jhorri@esalq.usp.br; Cabral Filho, Sergio L.S. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Instituto Central de Ciencias Ala Sul]. E-mail: slcabral@unb.br; Vizioli, Mario R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia]. E-mail: vizioli@fop.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study the action way of the yeast strain Y904 on the AFB{sub 1} 3{sup H} and it effects on the aflatoxicosis. With this purpose were conducted two assays. The first was a radioassay, which 18 animals were separated into two groups of nine each; these ones received diets free yeast (T1) and with yeast (T2). Besides, both groups, received from AFB{sub 1} 3{sup H} a dose of 12580 Becquerel. The radioactivity was monitored during 72 h. In another assay, twelve animals were divided in groups with four each and they were submitted, during 28 days, to the following treatments: negative control (group A), positive control (group B) and diets supplemented with the yeast strain Y904 (group C). In this study, the livers tissues were analyzed. There was verified in the animals submitted to the T1 and T2 eliminated approximately 80 % of the radioactive molecules in 72 h, the radioactivity content in livers were near of 0.5 % in both treatment and the concentration in the carcasses were 10.5 and 15 %, T1 and T2, respectively. The histopathological study revealed hepatotoxicity in the animals that received the positive control diet and the animals that received diets supplemented with yeast they did not showed cytotoxic signs. In conclusion, the absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1}, in Wistar rats fed with diets contained the yeast strain Y904 or without this yeast are similar and, the yeast strain Y904 is able to reduce the hepatotoxicity promoted by aflatoxin ingestion. (author)

  17. A multi-phase approach to select new wine yeast strains with enhanced fermentative fitness and glutathione production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonciani, Tommaso; De Vero, Luciana; Mezzetti, Francesco; Fay, Justin C; Giudici, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    The genetic improvement of winemaking yeasts is a virtually infinite process, as the design of new strains must always cope with varied and ever-evolving production contexts. Good wine yeasts must feature both good primary traits, which are related to the overall fermentative fitness of the strain, and secondary traits, which provide accessory features augmenting its technological value. In this context, the superiority of "blind," genetic improvement techniques, as those based on the direct selection of the desired phenotype without prior knowledge of the genotype, was widely proven. Blind techniques such as adaptive evolution strategies were implemented for the enhancement of many traits of interest in the winemaking field. However, these strategies usually focus on single traits: this possibly leads to genetic tradeoff phenomena, where the selection of enhanced secondary traits might lead to sub-optimal primary fermentation traits. To circumvent this phenomenon, we applied a multi-step and strongly directed genetic improvement strategy aimed at combining a strong fermentative aptitude (primary trait) with an enhanced production of glutathione (secondary trait). We exploited the random genetic recombination associated to a library of 69 monosporic clones of strain UMCC 855 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to search for new candidates possessing both traits. This was achieved by consecutively applying three directional selective criteria: molybdate resistance (1), fermentative aptitude (2), and glutathione production (3). The strategy brought to the selection of strain 21T2-D58, which produces a high concentration of glutathione, comparable to that of other glutathione high-producers, still with a much greater fermentative aptitude.

  18. BAPJ69-4A: a yeast two-hybrid strain for both positive and negative genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Hally Anne; Rood, Michael Kenneth; Kashlan, Badar; Chang, Eileen I-ling; Doyle, Donald Francis; Azizi, Bahareh

    2012-10-01

    Genetic selection systems, such as the yeast two-hybrid system, are efficient methods to detect protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. These systems have been further developed to assess negative interactions, such as inhibition, using the URA3 genetic selection marker. Previously, chemical complementation was used to assess positive selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this work, a new S. cerevisiae strain, called BAPJ69-4A, containing three selective markers ADE2, HIS3, and URA3 as well as the lacZ gene controlled by Gal4 response elements, was developed and characterized using the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA). Further characterization was performed using RXR variants and the synthetic ligand LG335. To assess the functionality of the strain, RXR was compared to the parent strain PJ69-4A in adenine, histidine, and uracil selective media. In positive selection, associating partners that lead to cell growth were observed in all media in the presence of ligand, whereas partners that did not associate due to the absence of ligand displayed no growth. Conversely, in negative selection, partners that did not associate in 5-FOA medium did not display cell death due to the lack of expression of the URA3 gene. The creation of the BAPJ69-4A yeast strain provides a high-throughput selection system, called negative chemical complementation, which can be used for both positive and negative selection, providing a fast, powerful tool for discovering novel ligand receptor pairs for applications in drug discovery and protein engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of yeast strain and some nutritional factors on tannin composition and potential astringency of model wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Aponte, Maria; Moio, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures, isolated from different sources, were tested for their ability to reduce tannins reactive towards salivary proteins, and potentially responsible for wine astringency. Strains were preliminary genetically characterized and evaluated for physiological features of technological interest. Laboratory-scale fermentations were performed in three synthetic media: CT) containing enological grape tannin; CTP) CT supplemented with organic nitrogen sources; CTPV) CTP supplemented with vitamins. Adsorption of total tannins, tannins reactive towards salivary proteins, yellow pigments, phenolics having antioxidant activity, and total phenols, characterizing the enological tannin, was determined by spectrophotometric methods after fermentation. The presence of vitamins and peptones in musts greatly influenced the adsorption of tannins reactive towards salivary proteins (4.24 g/L gallic acid equivalent), thus promoting the reduction of the potential astringency of model wines. With reference to the different phenolic classes, yeast strains showed different adsorption abilities. From a technological point of view, the yeast choice proved to be crucial in determining changes in gustative and mouthfeel profile of red wines and may assist winemakers to modulate colour and astringency of wine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress tolerance and growth physiology of yeast strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Bianca, B E; Gombert, A K

    2013-12-01

    Improved biofuels production requires a better understanding of industrial microorganisms. Some wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from the fuel ethanol industry in Brazil, present exceptional fermentation performance, persistence and prevalence in the harsh industrial environment. Nevertheless, their physiology has not yet been systematically investigated. Here we present a first systematic evaluation of the widely used industrial strains PE-2, CAT-1, BG-1 and JP1, in terms of their tolerance towards process-related stressors. We also analyzed their growth physiology under heat stress. These strains were evaluated in parallel to laboratory and baker's strains. Whereas the industrial strains performed in general better than the laboratory strains under ethanol or acetic acid stresses and on industrial media, high sugar stress was tolerated equally by all strains. Heat and low pH stresses clearly distinguished fuel ethanol strains from the others, indicating that these conditions might be the ones that mostly exert selective pressure on cells in the industrial environment. During shake-flask cultivations using a synthetic medium at 37 °C, industrial strains presented higher ethanol yields on glucose than the laboratory strains, indicating that they could have been selected for this trait-a response to energy-demanding fermentation conditions. These results might be useful to guide future improvements of large-scale fuel ethanol production via engineering of stress tolerance traits in other strains, and eventually also for promoting the use of these fuel ethanol strains in different industrial bioprocesses.

  1. Cell surface engineering to control cellular interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface composition determines all interactions of the cell with its environment, thus cell functions such as adhesion, migration and cell–cell interactions can potentially be controlled by engineering and manipulating the cell membrane. Cell membranes present a rich repertoire of molecules, therefore a versatile ground for modification. However the complex and dynamic nature of the cell surface is also a major challenge for cell surface engineering that should also involve strategies co...

  2. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  3. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  4. Does fingerprinting truly represent the diversity of wine yeasts? A case study with interdelta genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, W P; Sipiczki, M

    2016-12-01

    Simple and efficient genotyping methods are widely used to assess the diversity of a large number of microbial strains, e.g. wine yeasts isolated from a specific geographical area or a vintage. Such methods are often also the first to be applied, to decrease the number of strains deemed interesting for a more time-consuming physiological characterization. Here, we aimed to use a physiologically characterized strain collection of 69 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from Hungarian wine regions to determine whether geographical origin or physiological similarity can be recovered by clustering the strains with one or two simultaneously used variations of interdelta genotyping. Our results indicate that although a detailed clustering with high resolution can be achieved with this method, the clustering of strains is largely contrasting when different primer sets are used and it does not recover geographical or physiological groups. Genotyping is routinely used for assessing the diversity of a large number of isolates/strains of a single species, e.g. a collection of wine yeasts. We tested the efficiency of interdelta genotyping on a collection of Saccharomyces wine yeasts from four wine regions of Hungary that was previously characterized physiologically. Interdelta fingerprinting recovered neither physiological nor geographical similarities, and in addition, the two different primer pairs widely used for this method showed conflicting and barely comparable results. Thus, this method does not necessarily represent the true diversity of a strain collection, but detailed clustering may be achieved by the combined use of primer sets. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolutionary engineering of a wine yeast strain revealed a key role of inositol and mannoprotein metabolism during low-temperature fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Malo, María; García-Rios, Estéfani; Melgar, Bruno; Sanchez, Monica R; Dunham, Maitreya J; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2015-07-22

    Wine produced at low temperature is often considered to improve sensory qualities. However, there are certain drawbacks to low temperature fermentations: e.g. low growth rate, long lag phase, and sluggish or stuck fermentations. Selection and development of new Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains well adapted at low temperature is interesting for future biotechnological applications. This study aimed to select and develop wine yeast strains that well adapt to ferment at low temperature through evolutionary engineering, and to decipher the process underlying the obtained phenotypes. We used a pool of 27 commercial yeast strains and set up batch serial dilution experiments to mimic wine fermentation conditions at 12 °C. Evolutionary engineering was accomplished by using the natural yeast mutation rate and mutagenesis procedures. One strain (P5) outcompeted the others under both experimental conditions and was able to impose after 200 generations. The evolved strains showed improved growth and low-temperature fermentation performance compared to the ancestral strain. This improvement was acquired only under inositol limitation. The transcriptomic comparison between the evolved and parental strains showed the greatest up-regulation in four mannoprotein coding genes, which belong to the DAN/TIR family (DAN1, TIR1, TIR4 and TIR3). Genome sequencing of the evolved strain revealed the presence of a SNP in the GAA1 gene and the construction of a site-directed mutant (GAA1 (Thr108)) in a derivative haploid of the ancestral strain resulted in improved fermentation performance. GAA1 encodes a GPI transamidase complex subunit that adds GPI, which is required for inositol synthesis, to newly synthesized proteins, including mannoproteins. In this study we demonstrate the importance of inositol and mannoproteins in yeast adaptation at low temperature and the central role of the GAA1 gene by linking both metabolisms.

  7. Development of a yeast strain for xylitol production without hydrolysate detoxification as part of the integration of co-product generation within the lignocellulosic ethanol process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Fang; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2011-02-01

    The present study verified an applicable technology of xylitol bioconversion as part of the integration of co-product generation within second-generation bioethanol processes. A newly isolated yeast strain, Candida tropicalis JH030, was shown to have a capacity for xylitol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysate without detoxification. The yeast gives a promising xylitol yield of 0.71 g(p) g(s)(-1) from non-detoxified rice straw hydrolysate that had been prepared by the dilute acid pretreatment under severe conditions. The yeast's capacity was also found to be practicable with various other raw materials, such as sugarcane bagasse, silvergrass, napiergrass and pineapple peel. The lack of a need to hydrolysate detoxification enhances the potential of this newly isolated yeast for xylitol production and this, in turn, has the capacity to improve economics of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolite Profiling during Fermentation of Makgeolli by the Wild Yeast Strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Bai, Dong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage. The flavor of makgeolli is primarily determined by metabolic products such as free sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and aromatic compounds, which are produced during the fermentation of raw materials by molds and yeasts present in nuruk, a Korean fermentation starter. In this study, makgeolli was brewed using the wild yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5, and temporal changes in the metabolites during fermentation were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resultant data were analyzed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Various metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugar alcohols, small peptides, and nucleosides, were obviously altered by increasing the fermentation period. Changes in these metabolites allowed us to distinguish among makgeolli samples with different fermentation periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 days) on a PLS-DA score plot. In the makgeolli brewed in this study, the amounts of tyrosine (463.13 µg/mL) and leucine (362.77 µg/mL) were high. Therefore, our results indicate that monitoring the changes in metabolites during makgeolli fermentation might be important for brewing makgeolli with good nutritional quality.

  9. Genetic analysis of D-xylose metabolism by endophytic yeast strains of Rhodotorula graminis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two novel endophytic yeast strains, WP1 and PTD3, isolated from within the stems of poplar (Populus trees, were genetically characterized with respect to their xylose metabolism genes. These two strains, belonging to the species Rhodotorula graminis and R. mucilaginosa, respectively, utilize both hexose and pentose sugars, including the common plant pentose sugar, D-xylose. The xylose reductase (XYL1 and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2 genes were cloned and characterized. The derived amino acid sequences of xylose reductase (XR and xylose dehydrogenase (XDH were 32%~41% homologous to those of Pichia stipitis and Candida. spp., two species known to utilize xylose. The derived XR and XDH sequences of WP1 and PTD3 had higher homology (73% and 69% identity with each other. WP1 and PTD3 were grown in single sugar and mixed sugar media to analyze the XYL1 and XYL2 gene regulation mechanisms. Our results revealed that for both strains, the gene expression is induced by D-xylose, and that in PTD3 the expression was not repressed by glucose in the presence of xylose.

  10. A novel methodology independent of fermentation rate for assessment of the fructophilic character of wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccioli, T; Chambers, P J; Jiranek, V

    2011-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a fundamental role in fermenting grape juice to wine. During alcoholic fermentation its catabolic activity converts sugars (which in grape juice are a near equal ratio of glucose and fructose) and other grape compounds into ethanol, carbon dioxide and sensorily important metabolites. However, S. cerevisiae typically utilises glucose and fructose with different efficiency: glucose is preferred and is consumed at a higher rate than fructose. This results in an increasing difference between the concentrations of glucose and fructose during fermentation. In this study 20 commercially available strains were investigated to determine their relative abilities to utilise glucose and fructose. Parameters measured included fermentation duration and the kinetics of utilisation of fructose when supplied as sole carbon source or in an equimolar mix with glucose. The data were then analysed using mathematical calculations in an effort to identify fermentation attributes which were indicative of overall fructose utilisation and fermentation performance. Fermentation durations ranged from 74.6 to over 150 h, with clear differences in the degree to which glucose utilisation was preferential. Given this variability we sought to gain a more holistic indication of strain performance that was independent of fermentation rate and therefore utilized the area under the curve (AUC) of fermentation of individual or combined sugars. In this way it was possible to rank the 20 strains for their ability to consume fructose relative to glucose. Moreover, it was shown that fermentations performed in media containing fructose as sole carbon source did not predict the fructophilicity of strains in wine-like conditions (equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose). This work provides important information for programs which seek to generate strains that are faster or more reliable fermenters.

  11. Characterization of technological features of dry yeast (strain I-7-43) preparation, product of electrofusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces diastaticus, in industrial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarska, Katarzyna; Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Czupryński, Bogusław

    2011-06-10

    The aim of the study was to verify the technological usability and stability of biotechnological features of active dry distillery yeast preparation (strain I-7-43 with amylolytic abilities) applied to full-scale production of agricultural distillery. Various reduced doses of glucoamylase preparation (San-Extra L) were used for starch saccharification, from 90% to 70% in relation to the full standard dose of preparation. The dry distillery yeast I-7-43 were assessed positively in respect to fermentation activity and yield of ethanol production. Application of the dry yeast I-7-43 preparation in distillery practice lowers the costs of spirit production by saving the glucoamylase preparation (up to 30%) used in the process of mash saccharification. Concentrations of the volatile fermentation by-products in raw spirits obtained from fermentations with application of I-7-43 strain were on the levels guaranteeing good organoleptic properties of distillates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with {sup 13}C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience and Institute for Molecular Science (Japan); Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Research Center for Medical Glycoscience (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkatonmr@ims.ac.jp [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience and Institute for Molecular Science (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man{sub 8}GlcNAc{sub 2} oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, {sup 13}C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific {sup 13}C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The {sup 13}C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  13. Gentamicin-Containing Peptone-Yeast Extract Medium for Cocultivation of Hartmannella vermiformis ATCC 50256 and Virulent Strains of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Wang, L; Laus, S; Dowling, J N; Kuchta, J M; States, S J; Yee, R B

    1995-12-01

    We evaluated the use of peptone-yeast extract (PY) medium, different strains of Hartmannella vermiformis, and gentamicin in a coculture system to improve the discrimination of virulent and avirulent strains of Legionella pneumophila. H. vermiformis ATCC 50256 was unique among four strains of H. vermiformis, in that it multiplied equally well in Medium 1034 and PY medium (Medium 1034 without fetal calf serum, folic acid, hemin, and yeast nucleic acid and with a 50% reduction of peptone). However, both a virulent strain of L. pneumophila and its avirulent derivative strain multiplied in cocultures when PY medium was used. The multiplication of this avirulent strain was greatly reduced by incorporating gentamicin (1 (mu)g/ml) into the cocultivation system. Five virulent-avirulent sets of L. pneumophila strains were then tested for multiplication in cocultures with H. vermiformis ATCC 50256 and the gentamicin-containing PY medium. Only the virulent strains multiplied. The modified cocultivation system can discriminate between virulent and avirulent strains of L. pneumophila.

  14. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing. Among these genetic changes, 4 genes were found to carry point mutations in at least two of the evolved strains: MTH1 encoding a negative regulator of the glucose-sensing signal transduction pathway, HXT2 encoding a hexose transporter, CIT1 encoding a mitochondrial citrate synthase...... expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in order to ensure production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in the Pdc negative strain....

  15. Effects of distillation system and yeast strain on the aroma profile of Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Garay, Y; Blanco, P; López-Vázquez, C; Rodríguez-Bencomo, J J; Pérez-Correa, J R; López, F; Orriols, I

    2014-10-29

    Orujo is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in Galicia (northwest Spain) from distillation of grape pomace, a byproduct of the winemaking industry. In this study, the effect of the distillation system (copper charentais alembic versus packed column) and the yeast strain (native yeast L1 versus commercial yeast L2) on the chemical and sensory characteristics of orujo obtained from Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace has been analyzed. Principal component analysis, with two components explaining 74% of the variance, is able to clearly differentiate the distillates according to distillation system and yeast strain. Principal component 1, mainly defined by C6-C12 esters, isoamyl octanoate, and methanol, differentiates L1 from L2 distillates. In turn, principal component 2, mainly defined by linear alcohols, linalool, and 1-hexenol, differentiates alembic from packed column distillates. In addition, an aroma descriptive test reveals that the distillate obtained with a packed column from a pomace fermented with L1 presented the highest positive general impression, which is associated with the highest fruity and smallest solvent aroma scores. Moreover, chemical analysis shows that use of a packed column increases average ethanol recovery by 12%, increases the concentration of C6-C12 esters by 25%, and reduces the concentration of higher alcohols by 21%. In turn, L2 yeast obtained lower scores in the alembic distillates aroma profile. In addition, with L1, 9% higher ethanol yields were achieved, and L2 distillates contained 34%-40% more methanol than L1 distillates.

  16. Second-generation ethanol from non-detoxified sugarcane hydrolysate by a rotting wood isolated yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazoti, Suzana F; Golunski, Simone; Pereira Siqueira, Diego; Scapini, Thamarys; Barrilli, Évelyn T; Alex Mayer, Diego; Barros, Katharina O; Rosa, Carlos A; Stambuk, Boris U; Alves, Sérgio L; Valério, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Débora; Treichel, Helen

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to evaluate the production of second-generation ethanol from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate without acetic acid (inhibitor) detoxification. Three isolated yeast strains from lignocellulosic materials were evaluated, and one strain (UFFS-CE-3.1.2), identified using large subunit rDNA sequences as Wickerhamomyces sp., showed satisfactory results in terms of ethanol production without acetic acid removal. A Plackett-Burman design was used to evaluate the influence of hydrolysate composition and nutrients supplementation in the fermentation medium for the second-generation ethanol production. Two fermentation kinetics were performed, with controlled pH at 5.5, or keeping the initial pH at 4.88. The fermentation conducted without pH adjustment and supplementation of nutrients reported the best result in terms of second-generation ethanol production. Wickerhamomyces sp., isolated as UFFS-CE-3.1.2, was considered promising in the production of second-generation ethanol by using crude (non-detoxified) sugarcane hydrolysate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethanol-independent biofilm formation by a flor wine yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Severino; Gross, Michael K; Zara, Giacomo; Budroni, Marilena; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2010-06-01

    Flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a biofilm on the surface of wine at the end of fermentation, when sugar is depleted and growth on ethanol becomes dependent on oxygen. Here, we report greater biofilm formation on glycerol and ethyl acetate and inconsistent formation on succinic, lactic, and acetic acids.

  18. Effects of the strain background and autolysis process on the composition and biophysical properties of the cell wall from two different industrial yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Marion; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Castex, Mathieu; Dague, Etienne; Marie François, Jean

    2015-03-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface is endowed with some relevant technological properties, notably antimicrobial and biosorption activities. For these purposes, yeasts are usually processed and packaged in an 'autolysed/dried' formula, which may have some impacts on cell surface properties. In this report, we showed using a combination of biochemical, biophysical and molecular methods that the composition of the cell wall of two wine yeast strains was not altered by the autolysis process. In contrast, this process altered the nanomechanical properties as shown by a 2- to 4-fold increased surface roughness and to a higher adhesion to the atomic force microscope tips of the autolysed cells as compared to live yeast cells. Besides, we found that the two strains harboured differences in biomechanical properties that could be due in part to higher levels of mannan in one of them, and to the fact that the surface of this mannan-enriched strain is decorated with highly adhesive patches forming nanodomains. The presence of these nanodomains could be correlated with the upregulation of flocculin encoding FLO11 as well as to higher expression of few other genes encoding cell wall mannoproteins in this mannan-enriched strain as compared to the other strain. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  19. A combinatorial approach to synthetic transcription factor-promoter combinations for yeast strain engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dossani, Zain Y.; Apel, Amanda Reider; Szmidt-Middleton, Heather

    2018-01-01

    . Correspondingly, the synthetic transcription factor (TF) consists of the DNA binding domain of the LexA protein, fused with the human estrogen binding domain and the viral activator domain, VP16. The resulting system with a bacterial DNA binding domain avoids the transcription of native S. cerevisiae genes...... regions, we have built a library of hybrid promoters that are regulated by a synthetic transcription factor. The hybrid promoters consist of native S. cerevisiae promoters, in which the operator regions have been replaced with sequences that are recognized by the bacterial LexA DNA binding protein...... levels, using the same synthetic TF and a given estradiol. This set of promoters, in combination with our synthetic TF, has the potential to regulate numerous genes or pathways simultaneously, to multiple desired levels, in a single strain....

  20. New Insights into the Genome Organization of Yeast Killer Viruses Based on “Atypical” Killer Strains Characterized by High-Throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramírez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral M-dsRNAs encoding yeast killer toxins share similar genomic organization, but no overall sequence identity. The dsRNA full-length sequences of several known M-viruses either have yet to be completed, or they were shorter than estimated by agarose gel electrophoresis. High-throughput sequencing was used to analyze some M-dsRNAs previously sequenced by traditional techniques, and new dsRNAs from atypical killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. All dsRNAs expected to be present in a given yeast strain were reliably detected and sequenced, and the previously-known sequences were confirmed. The few discrepancies between viral variants were mostly located around the central poly(A region. A continuous sequence of the ScV-M2 genome was obtained for the first time. M1 virus was found for the first time in wine yeasts, coexisting with Mbarr-1 virus in T. delbrueckii. Extra 5′- and 3′-sequences were found in all M-genomes. The presence of repeated short sequences in the non-coding 3′-region of most M-genomes indicates that they have a common phylogenetic origin. High identity between amino acid sequences of killer toxins and some unclassified proteins of yeast, bacteria, and wine grapes suggests that killer viruses recruited some sequences from the genome of these organisms, or vice versa, during evolution.

  1. New Insights into the Genome Organization of Yeast Killer Viruses Based on "Atypical" Killer Strains Characterized by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Naranjo, Belén; Roig, Francisco; Llorens, Carlos

    2017-09-19

    Viral M-dsRNAs encoding yeast killer toxins share similar genomic organization, but no overall sequence identity. The dsRNA full-length sequences of several known M-viruses either have yet to be completed, or they were shorter than estimated by agarose gel electrophoresis. High-throughput sequencing was used to analyze some M-dsRNAs previously sequenced by traditional techniques, and new dsRNAs from atypical killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii . All dsRNAs expected to be present in a given yeast strain were reliably detected and sequenced, and the previously-known sequences were confirmed. The few discrepancies between viral variants were mostly located around the central poly(A) region. A continuous sequence of the ScV-M2 genome was obtained for the first time. M1 virus was found for the first time in wine yeasts, coexisting with Mbarr-1 virus in T. delbrueckii . Extra 5'- and 3'-sequences were found in all M-genomes. The presence of repeated short sequences in the non-coding 3'-region of most M-genomes indicates that they have a common phylogenetic origin. High identity between amino acid sequences of killer toxins and some unclassified proteins of yeast, bacteria, and wine grapes suggests that killer viruses recruited some sequences from the genome of these organisms, or vice versa, during evolution.

  2. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid via the malonyl-CoA pathway using recombinant fission yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Akiko; Higuchi, Yujiro; Urushihara, Masahiro; Maeda, Yuka; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2017-10-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) can be converted into derivatives such as acrylic acid, a source for producing super absorbent polymers. Although Escherichia coli has often been used for 3-HP production, it exhibits low tolerance to 3-HP. To circumvent this problem, we selected the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as this microorganism has higher tolerance to 3-HP than E. coli. Therefore, we constructed S. pombe transformants overexpressing two genes, one encoding the S. pombe acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Cut6p) and the other encoding the malonyl-CoA reductase derived from Chloroflexus aurantiacus (CaMCR). To prevent the degradation of these expressed proteins, we employed an S. pombe protease-deficient strain. Moreover, to increase the cytosolic concentration of acetyl-CoA, we supplemented acetate to the medium, which improved 3-HP production. To further produce 3-HP by overexpressing Cut6p and CaMCR, we exploited the highly expressing S. pombe hsp9 promoter. Finally, culturing in high-density reached 3-HP production to 7.6 g/L at 31 h. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined

  4. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  5. Murine FATP alleviates growth and biochemical deficiencies of yeast fat1Delta strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirusso, C C; Connell, E J; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2000-01-01

    A synthetase activities were not apparent in cells grown in the presence of oleate. Additionally, beta-oxidation of exogenous long-chain fatty acids is depressed to 30% wild-type levels. The reduction of beta-oxidation was correlated with a depression of intracellular oleoyl CoA levels in the fat1Delta strain......, which is required for maximal levels of fatty-acid import and has an acyl CoA synthetase activity specific for very-long-chain fatty acids suggesting this protein plays a pivotal role in fatty-acid trafficking. In the present work, we present evidence that Fat1p and the murine fatty-acid transport....... Furthermore, fatty-acid transport was restored and was found to be chain length specific: octanoate, a medium-chain fatty acid was transported in a Fat1p- and FATP-independent manner while the long-chain fatty acids myristate, palmitate, and oleate required either Fat1p or FATP for maximal levels of transport...

  6. Impact of process parameters on the sourdough microbiota, selection of suitable starter strains, and description of the novel yeast Cryptococcus thermophilus sp. nov.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogelmann, Stephanie Anke

    2013-01-01

    The microbiota of a ripe sourdough consists of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially of the genus Lactobacillus, and yeasts. Their composition is influenced by the interplay of species or strains, the kind of substrate as well as the process parameters temperature, dough yield, redox potential, refreshment time, and number of propagation steps (Hammes and Gänzle, 1997). As taste and quality of sourdough breads are mainly influenced by the fermentation microbiota, intense research has been fo...

  7. Selection of 80 newly isolated autochthonous yeast strains from the Tikveš region of Macedonia and their impact on the quality of red wines produced from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon grape varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Fidanka; Kostadinović Veličkovska, Sanja; Dimovska, Violeta; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Spasov, Hristo

    2017-02-01

    The main objectives of this study were to (i) isolate newly autochthonous yeast strains from the Tikveš region of Macedonia and (ii) test their impact on the quality of red wines from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon grape varieties. The newly isolated yeast strains were obtained by spontaneous fermentation of grape must from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties collected from ten different micro-regions in Macedonia. The grapevines from both varieties grown in "Barovo" micro-region were the richest sources of yeast strains. In addition, the molecular identification and typing of strains were also carried out. The monomeric anthocyanins, polyphenolic content and other oenochemical characteristics of the wines were also compared with the wines from commercial yeast strain "SiHa". The Vranec wine from yeast strain F-8 and Cabernet Sauvignon wine from yeast strain F-20 had significantly (p<0.05) higher concentrations of monomeric anthocyanins and total phenolic compounds than other wines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microarray data analyses of yeast RNA Pol I subunit RPA12 deletion strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumar Yadav

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ribosomal RNA (rRNA biosynthesis is the most energy consuming process in all living cells and the majority of total transcription activity is dedicated for synthesizing rRNA. The cells may adjust the synthesis of rRNA with the availability of resources. rRNA is mainly synthesized by RNA polymerase I that is composed of 14 subunits. Deletion of RPA12, 14, 39 and 49 are viable. RPA12 is a very small protein (13.6 kDa, and the amount of protein in the cells is very high (12,000 molecules per cell, but the role of this protein is unknown in other cellular metabolic processes (Kulak et al., 2014 [1]. RPA12 consists of two zinc-binding domains and it is required for the termination of rRNA synthesis (Mullem et al., 2002 [2]. Deletions of RPA12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cause a conditional growth defect (Nogi et al., 1993 [3]. In S. pombe, C-terminal deletion behaves like wild-type (Imazawa et al., 2001 [4]. This prompted us to investigate in detail the physiological role of RPA12 in S. cerevisiae, we performed the microarray of rpa12∆ strain and deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under GSE68731. The analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of major cellular metabolism genes is high. The amino acid biosynthesis, nonpolar lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolic genes are highly expressed. The analyses also revealed that the rpa12∆ cells have an uncontrolled synthesis of cell metabolites, so RPA12 could be a master regulator for whole cellular metabolism.

  9. Constitutive expression of the DUR1,2 gene in an industrial yeast strain to minimize ethyl carbamate production during Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dianhui; Li, Xiaomin; Lu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Liang; Xie, Guangfa

    2016-01-01

    Urea and ethanol are the main precursors of ethyl carbamate (EC) in Chinese rice wine. During fermentation, urea is generated from arginine by arginase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and subsequently cleaved by urea amidolyase or directly transported out of the cell into the fermentation liquor, where it reacts with ethanol to form EC. To reduce the amount of EC in Chinese rice wine, we metabolically engineered two yeast strains, N85(DUR1,2) and N85(DUR1,2)-c, from the wild-type Chinese rice wine yeast strain N85. Both new strains were capable of constitutively expressing DUR1,2 (encodes urea amidolyase) and thus enhancing urea degradation. The use of N85(DUR1,2) and N85(DUR1,2)-c reduced the concentration of EC in Chinese rice wine fermented on a small-scale by 49.1% and 55.3%, respectively, relative to fermentation with the parental strain. All of the engineered strains showed good genetic stability and minimized the production of urea during fermentation, with no exogenous genes introduced during genetic manipulation, and were therefore suitable for commercialization to increase the safety of Chinese rice wine. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Yeast ecology of vineyards within Marsala wine area (western Sicily) in two consecutive vintages and selection of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, Luca; Sannino, Ciro; Francesca, Nicola; Guarcello, Rosa; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the yeast ecology associated with the spontaneous fermentation of Grillo cultivar grapes from 10 vineyards was analyzed from grape harvest till complete consumption of must sugars. The microbiological investigation started with the plate count onto two culture media to distinguish total yeasts (TY) and presumptive Saccharomyces (PS). Yeasts were randomly isolated and identified by a combined genotypic approach consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 5.8S rRNA gene and 26S rRNA and sequencing of D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene, which resulted in the recognition of 14 species belonging to 10 genera. The distribution of the yeasts within the vineyards showed some differences in species composition and concentration levels among 2008 and 2009 vintages. Due to the enological relevance, all Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates were differentiated applying two genotypic tools (interdelta analysis and microsatellite multiplex PCR of polymorphic microsatellite loci) that recognized 51 strains. Based on the low production of H(2)S, acetic acid and foam, ethanol resistance, growth in presence of high concentrations of potassium metabisulphite (KMBS) and CuSO(4) and at low temperatures, 14 strains were selected and used as starter to ferment grape must at 13 °C and 17 °C in presence of 100 mg/L of KMBS. Three strains (CS160, CS165 and CS182) showed optimal technological aptitudes. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A yeast strain for simultaneous detection of induced mitotic crossing over, mitotic gene conversion and reverse mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; Kern, R.; Rasenberger, H.

    1975-01-01

    A diploid yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described which can be used to study induction of mitotic crossing-over, mitotic gene conversion and reverse mutation. Mitotic crossing-over can be detected visually as pink and red twin-sectored colonies which are due to the formation of homozygous cells of the genotype ade2-40/ade2-40 (deep red) and ade-2-119/ade2-119 (pink) from the originally heteroallelic condition ade2-40/ade2-119 which forms white colonies. Mitotic gene conversion is monitored by the appearance of tryptophan nonrequiring colonies on selective media. The alleles involved are trp5-12 and trp5-27 derived from the widely used strain D 4 . Mutation induction can be followed by the appearance of isoleucine nonrequiring colonies on selective media. D 7 is homoallelic ilvI-92. The isoleucine requirement caused by ilvI-92 can be alleviated by true reverse mutation and allele non-specific suppressor mutation. The effects of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), nitrous acid, ultraviolet light and hycanthone methanesulfonate were studied with D 7 stationary phase cells. Mitotic crossing-over as monitored by red/pink twin-sectored colonies was almost equally frequent among normal and convertant cells. This showed again that nitotic recombination is not due to the presence of a few cells committed to meiosis in an otherwise mitotic cell population. The dose-response curves for induction of mitotic gene conversion and reversion of the isoleucine requirement were exponential. In contrast to this, the dose-response curve for induction of twin sectored red and pink colonies reached a plateau at doses giving about 30% cell killing. This could partly be due to lethal segregation in the progeny of treated cells. None of the agents tested would induce only one type of mitotic recombination, gene conversion or crossing-over. There was, however, some mutagen specificity in the induction of isoleucine prototrophs

  12. Oxygen availability and strain combination modulate yeast growth dynamics in mixed culture fermentations of grape must with Starmerella bacillaris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englezos, Vasileios; Cravero, Francesco; Torchio, Fabrizio; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Lambri, Milena; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) is a non-Saccharomyces yeast that has been proposed as a co-inoculant of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in mixed culture fermentations to enhance the analytical composition of the wines. In order to acquire further knowledge on the metabolic interactions between these two species, in this study we investigated the impact of oxygen addition and combination of Starm. bacillaris with S. cerevisiae strains on the microbial growth and metabolite production. Fermentations were carried out under two different conditions of oxygen availability. Oxygen availability and strain combination clearly influenced the population dynamics throughout the fermentation. Oxygen concentration increased the survival time of Starm. bacillaris and decreased the growth rate of S. cerevisiae strains in mixed culture fermentations, whereas it did not affect the growth of the latter in pure culture fermentations. This study reveals new knowledge about the influence of oxygen availability on the successional evolution of yeast species during wine fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Genetic control of growth and development of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Phenotypic selection of mutants among strains of the Peterhof genetic collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitavichius, D

    2001-06-01

    Results of identifying phenotypes intrinsic to mutations of genes that regulate the activity of the signal transduction pathway of RAS-cyclic adenosinemonophosphate in six strains belonging to the Peterhof genetic collection of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented: an increase or decrease in the amount of the accumulated glycogen, resistance or sensitivity to heat shock and nitrogen starvation, and the growth and viability in media containing unfermentable carbon sources (potassium acetate, ethanol, and glycerol) at temperatures 30 and 70 degrees C. Collectively these phenotypic characteristics in five examined yeast strains can be interpreted as indicating disturbances in the activity of the RAS/cAMP pathway. However, the discrepancies revealed between cellular phenotypes in these strains and in the strains with a decreased or increased activity of the RAS/cAMP pathway did not allow them to be assigned to a particular functional activity group. The inconsistencies between phenotypes detected in this study may be prerequisites for the identification of new genes responsible for this signal transduction pathway or new mutations in the known genes that determine other phenotypic combinations.

  14. Effect of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains and different aging techniques on the polysaccharide and polyphenolic composition and sensorial characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Medel-Marabolí, Marcela; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains with different capabilities of polysaccharide liberation during alcoholic fermentation in addition to subsequent aging on lees with or without oak wood chips as well as aging with commercial inactive dry yeast on the physical, chemical and sensorial characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon red wines. The HPS (high levels of polysaccharides) yeast strain released higher amounts of polysaccharides (429 g L(-1)) than EC1118 (390 g L(-1)) during alcoholic fermentation, but the concentration equalized during the aging period (424 and 417 g L(-1) respectively). All aging techniques increased the polysaccharide concentration, but the increase was dependent on the technique applied. A higher liberation of polysaccharides reduced the concentration of most of the phenolic families analyzed. Moreover, no clear effect of the different aging techniques used in this study on color stabilization was found. The HPS wines were better valued than the EC1118 wines by the panel of tasters after alcoholic fermentation. In general, the HPS wines showed better physicochemical and sensorial characteristics than the EC1118 wines. According to the results obtained during the aging period, all aging techniques contributed to improve wine quality, but it was difficult to establish the technique that allowed the best wine to be obtained, because it depended on the aging technique used and the period of aging. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Yeast Monitoring of Wine Mixed or Sequential Fermentations Made by Native Strains from D.O. “Vinos de Madrid” Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita García

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing trend toward understanding the impact of non-Saccharomyces yeasts on the winemaking process. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the predominant species at the end of fermentation, it has been recognized that the presence of non-Saccharomyces species during alcoholic fermentation can produce an improvement in the quality and complexity of the final wines. A previous work was developed for selecting the best combinations between S. cerevisiae and five non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida stellata, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Lachancea thermotolorans native yeast strains from D.O. “Vinos de Madrid” at the laboratory scale. The best inoculation strategies between S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains were chosen to analyze, by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR combined with the use of specific primers, the dynamics of inoculated populations throughout the fermentation process at the pilot scale using the Malvar white grape variety. The efficiency of the qPCR system was verified independently of the samples matrix, founding the inoculated yeast species throughout alcoholic fermentation. Finally, we can validate the positive effect of selected co-cultures in the Malvar wine quality, highlighting the sequential cultures of T. delbrueckii CLI 918/S. cerevisiae CLI 889 and C. stellata CLI 920/S. cerevisiae CLI 889 and, mixed and sequential cultures of L. thermotolerans 9-6C combined with S. cerevisiae CLI 889.

  16. Yeast Monitoring of Wine Mixed or Sequential Fermentations Made by Native Strains from D.O. “Vinos de Madrid” Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Margarita; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Crespo, Julia; Cabellos, Juan M.; Arroyo, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing trend toward understanding the impact of non-Saccharomyces yeasts on the winemaking process. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the predominant species at the end of fermentation, it has been recognized that the presence of non-Saccharomyces species during alcoholic fermentation can produce an improvement in the quality and complexity of the final wines. A previous work was developed for selecting the best combinations between S. cerevisiae and five non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida stellata, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Lachancea thermotolorans) native yeast strains from D.O. “Vinos de Madrid” at the laboratory scale. The best inoculation strategies between S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains were chosen to analyze, by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) combined with the use of specific primers, the dynamics of inoculated populations throughout the fermentation process at the pilot scale using the Malvar white grape variety. The efficiency of the qPCR system was verified independently of the samples matrix, founding the inoculated yeast species throughout alcoholic fermentation. Finally, we can validate the positive effect of selected co-cultures in the Malvar wine quality, highlighting the sequential cultures of T. delbrueckii CLI 918/S. cerevisiae CLI 889 and C. stellata CLI 920/S. cerevisiae CLI 889 and, mixed and sequential cultures of L. thermotolerans 9-6C combined with S. cerevisiae CLI 889. PMID:29326669

  17. Advances in surface engineering. V. 1. Fundamentals of coatings. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, P.K.; Burnell-Gray, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    The scientific and technical research papers in these three volumes, on advances in surface engineering, cover the fundamentals of coatings, process technology and engineering applications, and are based on the proceedings of the May 1996 conference of the same name, held at the University of Northumbria. High temperature corrosion, aqueous corrosion, wear and fatigue are covered in Volume 1. Volume 2 includes papers on various surface engineering technologies including physical and chemical vapour deposition, thermal methods, plasmas and welds, lasers, peening and electrochemistry. Applications of surface engineering to the biomedical, aerospace, automotive, cutting tools and manufacturing, power generation and marine industries are discussed in Volume 3. (UK)

  18. Effect of 905 MHz microwave radiation on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains FF18733, FF1481 and D7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, Ivana; Hrascan, Reno; Franekic, Jasna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of weak radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by mobile phones on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae strains FF18733 (wild-type), FF1481 (rad1 mutant) and D7 (commonly used to detect reciprocal and nonreciprocal mitotic recombinations) were exposed to a 905 MHz electromagnetic field that closely matched the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) pulse modulation signals for mobile phones at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.12 W/kg. Following 15-, 30- and 60-minutes exposure to RF/MW radiation, strain FF18733 did not show statistically significant changes in colony growth compared to the control sample. The irradiated strains FF1481 and D7 demonstrated statistically significant reduction of colony growth compared to non-irradiated strains after all exposure times. Furthermore, strain FF1481 was more sensitive to RF/MW radiation than strain D7. The findings indicate that pulsed RF/MW radiation at a low SAR level can affect the rate of colony growth of different S. cerevisiae strains

  19. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  20. The effect of Maillard reaction products and yeast strain on the synthesis of key higher alcohols and esters in beer fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, Rachael E; Black, Gary W; Koutsidis, Georgios; Usher, St John

    2017-10-01

    The effect of Maillard reaction products (MRPs), formed during the production of dark malts, on the synthesis of higher alcohols and esters in beer fermentations was investigated by headspace solid-phase microextraction GC-MS. Higher alcohol levels were significantly (p<0.05) higher in dark malt fermentations, while the synthesis of esters was inhibited, due to possible suppression of enzyme activity and/or gene expression linked to ester synthesis. Yeast strain also affected flavour synthesis with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain A01 producing considerably lower levels of higher alcohols and esters than S288c and L04. S288c produced approximately double the higher alcohol levels and around twenty times more esters compared to L04. Further investigations into malt type-yeast strain interactions in relation to flavour development are required to gain better understanding of flavour synthesis that could assist in the development of new products and reduce R&D costs for the industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures.

  2. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  3. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Standardized surface engineering design of shale gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangchuan Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the special physical properties of shale gas reservoirs, it is necessary to adopt unconventional and standardized technologies for its surface engineering construction. In addition, the surface engineering design of shale gas reservoirs in China faces many difficulties, such as high uncertainty of the gathering and transportation scale, poor adaptability of pipe network and station layout, difficult matching of the process equipments, and boosting production at the late stage. In view of these problems, the surface engineering construction of shale gas reservoirs should follow the principles of “standardized design, modularized construction and skid mounted equipment”. In this paper, standardized surface engineering design technologies for shale gas reservoirs were developed with the “standardized well station layout, universal process, modular function zoning, skid mounted equipment selection, intensive site design, digitized production management” as the core, after literature analysis and technology exploration were carried out. Then its application background and surface technology route were discussed with a typical shale gas field in Sichuan–Chongqing area as an example. Its surface gathering system was designed in a standardized way, including standardized process, the modularized gathering and transportation station, serialized dehydration unit and intensive layout, and remarkable effects were achieved. A flexible, practical and reliable ground production system was built, and a series of standardized technology and modularized design were completed, including cluster well platform, set station, supporting projects. In this way, a system applicable to domestic shale gas surface engineering construction is developed.

  5. Genetic diversity and dynamics of bacterial and yeast strains associated to Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations in large manufacturing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Caballero-Guerrero, Belén; Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2014-11-03

    We have genotyped a total of 1045 microbial isolates obtained along the fermentation time of Spanish-style green table olives from the fermentation yards (patios) of two large manufacturing companies in the Province of Sevilla, south of Spain. Genotyping was carried out using RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. In general, isolates clustered well into the relevant phylogenetic dendrograms, forming separate groups in accordance to their species adscription. We could identify which bacterial and yeast genotypes (strains) persisted throughout the fermentation at each patio. Also, which of them were more adapted to any of the three stages, i.e. initial, middle and final, described for this food fermentation. A number of genotypes were found to be shared by both patios. Fifty seven of these belonged to five different bacterial species, i.e. Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paracollinoides/collinoides, Lactobacillus rapi, Pediococcus ethanolidurans and Staphylococcus sp., although most of them (51) belonged to L. pentosus. Four yeast genotypes were also shared, belonging to the species Candida thaimueangensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora sp. Two genotypes of L. pentosus were found to be grouped with those of two strains used in commercially available starter cultures, one of them bacteriocinogenic, which were used up to three years before this study in these patios, demonstrating the persistence of selected strains in this environment. Biodiversity was assessed though different indexes, including richness, diversity and dominance. A statistically significant decrease in biodiversity between the initial and final stages of the fermentation was found in both patios. However, values of biodiversity indexes in the fermenters were very similar, and no significant differences were found in the total biodiversity between both patios. This study allowed us to identify a range of well adapted strains (genotypes), especially those belonging to the lactic acid bacteria

  6. Relationships and Evolution of Double-Stranded RNA Totiviruses of Yeasts Inferred from Analysis of L-A-2 and L-BC Variants in Wine Yeast Strain Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cousiño, Nieves; Esteban, Rosa

    2017-02-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains secrete a protein toxin active on nonkiller strains of the same (or other) yeast species. Different killer toxins, K1, K2, K28, and Klus, have been described. Each toxin is encoded by a medium-size (1.5- to 2.3-kb) M double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) located in the cytoplasm. M dsRNAs require L-A helper virus for maintenance. L-A belongs to the Totiviridae family, and its dsRNA genome of 4.6 kb codes for the major capsid protein Gag and a minor Gag-Pol protein, which form the virions that separately encapsidate L-A or the M satellites. Different L-A variants exist in nature; on average, 24% of their nucleotides are different. Previously, we reported that L-A-lus was specifically associated with Mlus, suggesting coevolution, and proposed a role of the toxin-encoding M dsRNAs in the appearance of new L-A variants. Here we confirm this by analyzing the helper virus in K2 killer wine strains, which we named L-A-2. L-A-2 is required for M2 maintenance, and neither L-A nor L-A-lus shows helper activity for M2 in the same genetic background. This requirement is overcome when coat proteins are provided in large amounts by a vector or in ski mutants. The genome of another totivirus, L-BC, frequently accompanying L-A in the same cells shows a lower degree of variation than does L-A (about 10% of nucleotides are different). Although L-BC has no helper activity for M dsRNAs, distinct L-BC variants are associated with a particular killer strain. The so-called L-BC-lus (in Klus strains) and L-BC-2 (in K2 strains) are analyzed. Killer strains of S. cerevisiae secrete protein toxins that kill nonkiller yeasts. The "killer phenomenon" depends on two dsRNA viruses: L-A and M. M encodes the toxin, and L-A, the helper virus, provides the capsids for both viruses. Different killer toxins exist: K1, K2, K28, and Klus, encoded on different M viruses. Our data indicate that each M dsRNA depends on a specific helper virus; these helper viruses have

  7. Evidence for three types of x-ray damage repair in yeast and sensitivity of totally repair deficient strains to sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Game, J.C.; Schild, D.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of yeast that confer sensitivity to x-rays are known to fall into two epistasis groups, called here the RAD51 and RAD18 groups, which are each thought to control a different type of x-ray repair. They examine here the role of genes in a third repair pathways in x-ray repair. RAD1 and RAD3 are known to be important in the repair of pyrimidine dimers after uv-irradiation. They find that these genes can also play an important role in x-ray repair, but that this role is only exposed when both the other pathways of x-ray repair are blocked. Double mutants blocked in the RAD51 and RAD18 pathways are significantly less x-ray sensitive than triple mutants blocked in these pathways but also mutant in either the RAD1 or RAD3 genes. In a related experiment, they tested the importance of DNA repair in nature by determining the sensitivity to natural unfiltered sunlight of a strain lacking all known DNA repair pathways. They constructed a quadruple mutant strain containing RAD1-1, RAD18-2, RAD51-1 and PHR1-1. The latter mutation blocks the cell's ability to photoreactivate uv damage. They found that this strain was so sensitive to sunlight that less than three seconds' exposure would cause an average of one lethal hit per cell, and survival was less than 2% after ten seconds' exposure. Wild type yeast at sea level showed no killing after thirty minutes. the quadruple mutant is approximately one thousand times more sensitive to sunlight than the related wild type

  8. The role of respiration, reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in mother cell-specific ageing of yeast strains defective in the RAS signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, Gino; Jarolim, Stefanie; Laun, Peter; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Stolze, Klaus; Perrone, Gabriel G; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Nohl, Hans; Dawes, Ian W; Breitenbach, Michael

    2004-11-01

    We show that the dominant activated allele of the yeast RAS gene, RAS2(ala18,val19), led to redox imbalance in exponential-phase cells and to excretion of almost all of the cellular glutathione into the medium when the cells reached early-stationary phase. The mitochondria of the mutant stained strongly with dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) and the cells displayed a very short mother cell-specific lifespan. Adding 1 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) to the medium partly restored the lifespan. The corresponding RAS2(+) rho-zero strain also displayed a short lifespan, excreted nearly all of its GSH, and stained positively with DHR. Adding 1 mM GSH completely restored the lifespan of the RAS2(+) rho-zero strain to that of the wild-type cells. The double mutant RAS2(ala18,val19) rho-zero cells showed the same lifespan as the RAS2(ala18,val19) cells, and the effect of glutathione in restoring the lifespan was the same, indicating that both mutations shorten lifespan through a similar mechanism. In the RAS2(ala18,val19) mutant strain and its rho-zero derivative we observed for the first time a strong electron spin resonance (ESR) signal characteristic of the superoxide radical anion. The mutant cells were, therefore, producing superoxide in the absence of a complete mitochondrial electron transport chain, pointing to the existence of a possible non-mitochondrial source for ROS generation. Our results indicate that oxidative stress resulting from a disturbance of redox balance can play a major role in mother cell-specific lifespan determination of yeast cells.

  9. QTL Analysis of High Thermotolerance with Superior and Downgraded Parental Yeast Strains Reveals New Minor QTLs and Converges on Novel Causative Alleles Involved in RNA Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yudi; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Clement, Lieven; Erdei, Éva; Tanghe, An; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying additional minor

  10. QTL analysis of high thermotolerance with superior and downgraded parental yeast strains reveals new minor QTLs and converges on novel causative alleles involved in RNA processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Yang

    Full Text Available Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying

  11. Thermochemical Surface Engineering: A Playground for Science and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    at the surface. Current research and innovation activities are used to exemplify thermochemical surface engineering and the interplay of science and innovation. The examples given encompass aspects of the synthesis of extremely porous materials, low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel, surface...

  12. Thermochemical Surface Engineering: A Playground for Science and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering by thermochemical processing is the intentional change of the composition of a material at elevated temperature with the purpose to improve materials performance. In thermochemical processing components from the starting material are essential in the development of the phases ...... hardening of titanium alloys, as well as thermo-reactive diffusion for extreme wear resistance...

  13. Application of a modified culture medium for the simultaneous counting of molds and yeasts and detection of aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimez, J; Fente, C A; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A; Vázquez, B I

    2003-02-01

    Molds and yeasts from 91 samples of feed and raw materials used in feed formulation were enumerated on a new culture medium to which a beta cyclodextrin (beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) had been added. This medium was compared with other media normally used in laboratories for the routine analysis of fungi, such as Sabouraud agar, malt agar supplemented with 2% dextrose, and potato dextrose agar. When a t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) was applied, no statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the new culture medium and those obtained with the other media used to enumerate molds and yeasts were found. For the evaluation of contamination due to aflatoxin for all of the samples, Sabouraud agar and yeast extract agar, both supplemented with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin, and APA (aflatoxin-producing ability) medium were used. Aflatoxin was detected in 21% of the feed samples and in 23% of the raw-material samples analyzed, with maximal amounts of 2.8 and 6.0 microg of aflatoxin B1 per kg, respectively, being detected. In any case, the aflatoxin contents found exceeded the legally stipulated limits. The t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) did not show statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the different culture media used for the detection of aflatoxins. The advantage of the new medium developed (Sabouraud agar with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) is that it allows simultaneous fungal enumeration and determination (under UV light) of the presence of aflatoxin-producing strains without prior isolation and culture procedures involving expensive and/or complex specific media and thus saves work, time, and money.

  14. Continuous ethanol fermentation from non-sulfuric acid-washed molasses using traditional stirred tank reactors and the flocculating yeast strain KF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; An, Ming-Zhe; Zhong, Ya-Ling; Shigeru, Morimura; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Kida, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Waste molasses is one of the most important feedstock for ethanol production in Brazil as well as in many Southeast Asian countries, including China. Sulfuric acid pretreatment is employed in most ethanol distilleries in China to control bacterial contamination, which results in difficulties in the treatment of wastewater containing high levels of sulfate ions. In this study, a high efficiency, non-sterilized, continuous ethanol fermentation process without sulfuric acid pretreatment was developed using the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 and the widely utilized, traditional, stirred tank reactors. An alternative molasses medium feeding method, which differs from traditional methods, is proposed that effectively controls bacterial contamination. Separate feeding of 1.2-fold diluted molasses and tap water into the reactor proved to be effective against bacterial contamination during long-term continuous fermentation. By feeding yeast cells with high metabolic activity to the second reactor, a two-stage continuous fermentation process that yielded a high ethanol concentration of 80 g/l as well as high ethanol productivity of 6.6 g/l/h was successfully operated for more than one month. This fermentation process can be applied to ethanol distilleries in which traditional tank reactors are used. 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of small-scale cocoa fermentations and screening of yeast and bacterial strains to develop a defined starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius de Melo; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-08-01

    Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations performed under bench- and pilot-scale conditions were studied using an integrated microbiological approach with culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, as well as analyses of target metabolites from both cocoa pulp and cotyledons. Both fermentation ecosystems reached equilibrium through a two-phase process, starting with the simultaneous growth of the yeasts (with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant species) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species), which were gradually replaced by the acetic acid bacteria (AAB) (Acetobacter tropicalis was the dominant species). In both processes, a sequence of substrate consumption (sucrose, glucose, fructose, and citric acid) and metabolite production kinetics (ethanol, lactic acid, and acetic acid) similar to that of previous, larger-scale fermentation experiments was observed. The technological potential of yeast, LAB, and AAB isolates was evaluated using a polyphasic study that included the measurement of stress-tolerant growth and fermentation kinetic parameters in cocoa pulp media. Overall, strains L. fermentum UFLA CHBE8.12 (citric acid fermenting, lactic acid producing, and tolerant to heat, acid, lactic acid, and ethanol), S. cerevisiae UFLA CHYC7.04 (ethanol producing and tolerant to acid, heat, and ethanol), and Acetobacter tropicalis UFLA CHBE16.01 (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid producing, and tolerant to acid, heat, acetic acid, and ethanol) were selected to form a cocktail starter culture that should lead to better-controlled and more-reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes.

  17. Epitope-tagged yeast strains reveal promoter driven changes to 3′-end formation and convergent antisense-transcription from common 3′ UTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Angavai; Beilharz, Traude H.

    2016-01-01

    Epitope-tagging by homologous recombination is ubiquitously used to study gene expression, protein localization and function in yeast. This is generally thought to insulate the regulation of gene expression to that mediated by the promoter and coding regions because native 3′ UTR are replaced. Here we show that the 3′ UTRs, CYC1 and ADH1, contain cryptic promoters that generate abundant convergent antisense-transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover we show that aberrant, truncating 3′ –end formation is often associated with regulated transcription in TAP-tagged strains. Importantly, the steady-state level of both 3′ –truncated and antisense transcription products is locus dependent. Using TAP and GFP-tagged strains we show that the transcriptional state of the gene-of-interest induces changes to 3′ –end formation by alternative polyadenylation and antisense transcription from a universal 3′ UTR. This means that these 3′ UTRs contains plastic features that can be molded to reflect the regulatory architecture of the locus rather than bringing their own regulatory paradigm to the gene-fusions as would be expected. Our work holds a cautionary note for studies utilizing tagged strains for quantitative biology, but also provides a new model for the study of promoter driven rewiring of 3′ –end formation and regulatory non-coding transcription. PMID:26481348

  18. Epitope-tagged yeast strains reveal promoter driven changes to 3'-end formation and convergent antisense-transcription from common 3' UTRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Angavai; Beilharz, Traude H

    2016-01-08

    Epitope-tagging by homologous recombination is ubiquitously used to study gene expression, protein localization and function in yeast. This is generally thought to insulate the regulation of gene expression to that mediated by the promoter and coding regions because native 3' UTR are replaced. Here we show that the 3' UTRs, CYC1 and ADH1, contain cryptic promoters that generate abundant convergent antisense-transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover we show that aberrant, truncating 3' -end formation is often associated with regulated transcription in TAP-tagged strains. Importantly, the steady-state level of both 3' -truncated and antisense transcription products is locus dependent. Using TAP and GFP-tagged strains we show that the transcriptional state of the gene-of-interest induces changes to 3' -end formation by alternative polyadenylation and antisense transcription from a universal 3' UTR. This means that these 3' UTRs contains plastic features that can be molded to reflect the regulatory architecture of the locus rather than bringing their own regulatory paradigm to the gene-fusions as would be expected. Our work holds a cautionary note for studies utilizing tagged strains for quantitative biology, but also provides a new model for the study of promoter driven rewiring of 3' -end formation and regulatory non-coding transcription. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of Acid Orange G (AOG) by suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Li, Hua; Ning, Shuxiang; Hao, Jia

    2014-10-01

    In this study, aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dye Acid Orange G (AOG) by both suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1 were studied. The effects of different parameters on decolorization of AOG by both growing suspended and immobilized strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, a possible decolorization mechanism of AOG was proposed through analyzing metabolic intermediates using UV-vis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) methods. Strain TL-F1 could decolorize AOG in both liquid and solid mediums through degradation. The optimal conditions for decolorization with suspended growing cells of strain TL-F1 were as follows: 6-10 g/L sucrose, 5-7 g/L urea, ≥6 % (v/v) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-6.0; and those for immobilized cells, the conditions were as follows: 4-6 g/L glucose, 0.2-0.4 g/L urea, 6-10 g/L (wet cell pellets) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-7.0. Results of UV-vis scanning spectra suggested that AOG was decolorized through biodegradation, and the possible pathway was proposed through the results of HPLC-MS analysis and related literature. This is a systematic research on aerobic decolorization and degradation of AOG by both suspended and immobilized cells of a C. tropicalis strain.

  20. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adhesive interactions between medically important yeasts and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millsap, KW; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    Yeasts are being increasingly identified as important organisms in human infections. Adhesive interactions between yeasts and bacteria may contribute to yeast retention al body sites. Methods for studying adhesive interactions between bacterial strains are well known, and range from simple

  2. The impact of some commercial yeast strains on aroma compounds and sensorial analysis on two white wine varieties made in PGI Dealurile Olteniei, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorica Liviu-Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eight wines of Pinot gris and five wines of Sauvignon blanc obtained by fermenting grape juices from PGI Dealurile Olteniei with different commercial selected yeast strains and with indigenous microbiota were compared in terms of sensorial characteristics and their composition in minor volatile aroma compounds. An easy handle methodology with dynamic head-space trap, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry based, (HS-trap-GC-MS permits the identification of 49 aroma compounds. The aim of the work was to link these aroma compounds, arranged in different chemical families, with the sensorial analysis and to establish the characteristics of each biotechnology used in the trials so we can find solutions to improve the quality of white wines made in hot climate zone that in time was a traditional area of red wines.

  3. [Penicillium-inhibiting yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Ahrendts, M R; Carrillo, L

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of post-harvest pathogenic moulds by yeasts in order to make a biocontrol product. Post-harvest pathogenic moulds Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, P. ulaiense, Phyllosticta sp., Galactomyces geotrichum and yeasts belonging to genera Brettanomyces, Candida, Cryptococcus, Kloeckera, Pichia, Rhodotorula were isolated from citrus fruits. Some yeasts strains were also isolated from other sources. The yeasts were identified by their macro and micro-morphology and physiological tests. The in vitro and in vivo activities against P. digitatum or P. ulaiense were different. Candida cantarellii and one strain of Pichia subpelliculosa produced a significant reduction of the lesion area caused by the pathogenic moulds P. digitatum and P. ulaiense, and could be used in a biocontrol product formulation.

  4. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese.

  5. Characterization of very high gravity ethanol fermentation of corn mash. Effect of glucoamylase dosage, pre-saccharification and yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devantier, Rasmus; Pedersen, S; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol was produced from very high gravity mashes of dry milled corn (35% w/w total dry matter) under simultaneous saccharification and fermentation conditions. The effects of glucoamylase dosage, pre-saccharification and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain on the growth characteristics such as the ......Ethanol was produced from very high gravity mashes of dry milled corn (35% w/w total dry matter) under simultaneous saccharification and fermentation conditions. The effects of glucoamylase dosage, pre-saccharification and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain on the growth characteristics...

  6. Laser Surface Engineering of Magnesium Alloys: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are well known for their high specific strength and low density. However, widespread applications of Mg alloys in structural components are impeded by their insufficient wear and corrosion resistance. Various surface engineering approaches, including electrochemical processes (plating, conversion coatings, hydriding, and anodizing), gas-phase deposition (thermal spray, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, diamond-like coatings, diffusion coatings, and ion implantation), and organic polymer coatings (painting and powder coating), have been used to improve the surface properties of Mg and its alloys. Recently, laser surface engineering approaches are attracting significant attention because of the wide range of possibilities in achieving the desired microstructural and compositional modifications through a range of laser-material interactions (surface melting, shock peening, and ablation). This article presents a review of various laser surface engineering approaches such as laser surface melting, laser surface alloying, laser surface cladding, laser composite surfacing, and laser shock peening used for surface modification of Mg alloys. The laser-material interactions, microstructural/compositional changes, and properties development (mostly corrosion and wear resistance) accompanied with each of these approaches are reviewed.

  7. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria and yeast-LAB cultures isolated from traditional fermented milk against pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufandaedza, J; Viljoen, B C; Feresu, S B; Gadaga, T H

    2006-04-15

    The survival and growth of Escherichia coli 3339 and Salmonella enteritidis 949575 isolated from human clinical samples, in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast strains previously isolated from Zimbabwean naturally fermented milk (NFM) was studied. The LAB starter cultures used were Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis C1 alone (C1) or in combination with Candida kefyr 23 (C1/23), L. lactis subsp. lactis Lc261 alone (LC261) or in combination with C. kefyr 23 (Lc261/23). The growth of the same pathogens in milk fermented with a commercial DL culture (CH-N 22) and spontaneously fermented raw milk was also monitored. The C1 and C1/23 cultures significantly (Pfermentation, both E. coli 3339 and S. enteritidis 949575 counts were significantly (Pmilk. However, in naturally fermented milk and the DL cultured milk, both E. coli 3339 and S. enteritidis 949575 grew and reached high populations of about 9 and 8.8 log cfu ml(-1), respectively, after 18 h. When E. coli 3339 was inoculated into previously fermented milk, the viable counts were significantly (Pfermented NFM and the commercial DL- (CH-N 22) cultured milk. The C1 strain, therefore, offered the best protection against the pathogens. Its inhibitory effect was mainly related to fast acid production.

  8. Influence of yeast strain, canopy management, and site on the volatile composition and sensory attributes of cabernet sauvignon wines from Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Anthony L; Boss, Paul K; Heymann, Hildegarde; Solomon, Peter S; Trengove, Robert D

    2011-04-13

    Understanding what factors are the major influences on wine composition will assist in the successful management of grape composition in the vineyard and/or variables in the winery to produce wines with specific sensory attributes. A recently developed analytical method [headspace solid-phase microextraction comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry] was employed to analyze over 350 volatile compounds in research scale wines and was combined with descriptive sensory analysis. Both compositional and sensory results showed significant differences among the wines, and in many cases, multiple factors influenced the abundance of wine volatile compounds. Site had the most significant influence on sensory scores and wine composition, followed by canopy management. Unexpectedly, yeast strain had no significant sensory effect despite the fact that a number of volatile compounds were significantly different in the wines made from different strains. PLS analysis, combining the sensory and chemical analyses, also supports the concept of volatile compound interactions contributing to the aroma characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon wine.

  9. The radiation resistance and cobalt biosorption activity of yeast strains isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Chin; Chung, Hsiao-Ping; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Chang, Ching-Tu; Wang, Ya-Ting; Chou, Fong-In

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitous nature of microbes has made them the pioneers in radionuclides adsorption and transport. In this study, the radiation resistance and nuclide biosorption capacity of microbes isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) repository in Taiwan was assessed, the evaluation of the possibility of using the isolated strain as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution and the potential impact on radionuclides release. The microbial content of solidified waste and broken fragments of containers at the Lanyu LLRW repository reached 10(5) CFU/g. Two yeast strains, Candida guilliermondii (CT1) and Rhodotorula calyptogenae (RT1) were isolated. The radiation dose necessary to reduce the microbial count by one log cycle of CT1 and RT1 was 2.1 and 0.8 kGy, respectively. Both CT1 and RT1 can grow under a radiation field with dose rate of 6.8 Gy/h, about 100 times higher than that on the surface of the LLRW container in Lanyu repository. CT1 and RT1 had the maximum (60)Co biosorption efficiency of 99.7 ± 0.1% and 98.3 ± 0.2%, respectively in (60)Co aqueous solution (700 Bq/mL), and the (60)Co could stably retained for more than 30 days in CT 1. Nearly all of the Co was absorbed and reached equilibrium within 1 h by CT1 and RT1 in the 10 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Biosorption efficiency test showed almost all of the Co (II) was adsorbed by CT1 in 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution, the efficiency of biosorption by RT1 in 10 μg/g of Co (II) was lower. The maximum Co (II) sorption capacity of CT1 and RT1 was 5324.0 ± 349.0 μg/g (dry wt) and 3737.6 ± 86.5 μg/g (dry wt), respectively, in the 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Experimental results show that microbial activity was high in the Lanyu LLRW repository in Taiwan. Two isolated yeast strains, CT1 and RT1 have high potential for use as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution, on the other hand, but may have the

  10. The ability of the antagonist yeast Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1 to suppress green mould infection in citrus fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Lahlali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies it was shown that Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, isolated from healthy Moroccan citrus Valencia-Late oranges, was effective against Penicillium italicum. Here the effectiveness of strain Z1 was assessed against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould, under different temperature (5-25°C and relative humidity (RH (45-100% regimes for its reliable and largescale application in packinghouse. All main effects and interactions were significant (P80%. Its applications as a formulated product significantly reduced the incidence of infected fruit (55% and the percentage of infected wounds (47% compared to the only pathogen control treatment. However, disease control with formulated product was significantly less than that obtained with thiabendazole (30% or strain Z1 culturable cells (35%. These results highlight that strain Z1 is an effective biological control agent for control of green mould under varying environmental conditions, and control may be optimized by combining its use with other environmentally-safe post-harvest treatments or improved formulation.

  11. INHIBITION OF THE GROWTH OF TOLERANT YEAST Saccharomyces cerevisiae STRAIN I136 BY A MIXTURE OF SYNTHETIC INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Ida Riyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomass from lignocellulosic wastes is a potential source for biobased products.  However, one of the constraints in utilization of biomass hydrolysate is the presence of inhibitors. Therefore, the use of inhibitor-tolerant microorganisms in the fermentation is required. The study aimed to investigate the effect of a mixture of inhibitors on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain I136 grown in medium containing synthetic inhibitors (acetic acid, formic acid, furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural/5-HMF, and levulinic acid in four different concentrations with a mixture of carbon sources, glucose  (50 g.l-1 and xylose (50 g.l-1 at 30oC. The parameters related to growth and fermentation products were observed. Results showed that the strain was able to grow in media containing natural inhibitors (BSL medium with µmax of 0.020/h. Higher level of synthetic inhibitors prolonged the lag phase, decreased the cell biomass and ethanol production, and specific growth rate. The strain could detoxify furfural and 5-HMF and produced the highest ethanol (Y(p/s of 0.32 g.g-1 when grown in BSL. Glucose was utilized as its level decreased in a result of increase in cell biomass, in contrast to xylose which was not consumed. The highest cell biomass was produced in YNB with Y (x/s value of 0.25 g.g-1. The strain produced acetic acid as a dominant side product and could convert furfural into a less toxic compound, hydroxyl furfural. This robust tolerant strain provides basic information on resistance mechanism and would be useful for bio-based cell factory using lignocellulosic materials. 

  12. Enhanced biodegradation of lindane using oil-in-water bio-microemulsion stabilized by biosurfactant produced by a new yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-11-28

    Organochlorine pesticide residues continue to remain as a major environmental threat worldwide. Lindane is an organochlorine pesticide widely used as an acaricide in medicine and agriculture. In the present study, a new lindane-degrading yeast strain, Pseudozyma VITJzN01, was identified as a copious producer of glycolipid biosurfactant. The glycolipid structure and type were elucidated by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, and GC-MS analysis. The surface activity and stability of the glycolipid was analyzed. The glycolipids, characterized as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), exhibited excellent surface active properties and the surface tension of water was reduced to 29 mN/m. The glycolipid was stable over a wide range of pH, temperature, and salinity, showing a very low CMC of 25 mg/l. Bio-microemulsion of olive oil-in-water (O/W) was prepared using the purified biosurfactant without addition of any synthetic cosurfactants, for lindane solubilization and enhanced degradation assay in liquid and soil slurry. The O/W bio-microemulsions enhanced the solubility of lindane up to 40-folds. Degradation of lindane (700 mg/l) by VITJzN01 in liquid medium amended with bio-microemulsions was found to be enhanced by 36% in 2 days, compared with degradation in 12 days in the absence of bio-microemulsions. Lindane-spiked soil slurry incubated with bio-microemulsions also showed 20-40% enhanced degradation compared with the treatment with glycolipids or yeast alone. This is the first report on lindane degradation by Pseudozyma sp., and application of bio-microemulsions for enhanced lindane degradation. MEL-stabilized bio-microemulsions can serve as a potential tool for enhanced remediation of diverse lindanecontaminated environments.

  13. Comparison of the metabolic response to over-production of p-coumaric acid in two yeast strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Angelica; Chen, Yun; Khoomrung, Sakda

    2017-01-01

    The development of robust and efficient cell factories requires understanding of the metabolic changes triggered by the production of the targeted compound. Here we aimed to study how production of p-coumaric acid, a precursor of multiple secondary aromatic metabolites, influences the cellular...... concentrations. Surprisingly, for both strains we found the largest transcriptional changes in genes involved in transport of amino acids and sugars, which were downregulated. Additionally, in S288c amino acid and protein biosynthesis processes were also affected. We systematically overexpressed or deleted genes...... metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We evaluated the growth and p-coumaric acid production in batch and chemostat cultivations and analyzed the transcriptome and intracellular metabolome during steady state in low- and high-producers of p-coumaric acid in two strain backgrounds, S288c or CEN.PK. We found...

  14. Control of enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers by treatment with biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, derived from Pseudozyma spp. yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-02-01

    Cutinase-like esterase from the yeasts Pseudozyma antarctica (PaE) shows strong degradation activity in an agricultural biodegradable plastic (BP) model of mulch films composed of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA). P. antarctica is known to abundantly produce a glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL). Here, the effects of MEL on PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs were investigated. Based on PBSA dispersion solution, the degradation of PBSA particles by PaE was inhibited in the presence of MEL. MEL behavior on BP substrates was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a sensor chip coated with polymer films. The positive SPR signal shift indicated that MEL readily adsorbed and spread onto the surface of a BP film. The amount of BP degradation by PaE was monitored based on the negative SPR signal shift and was decreased 1.7-fold by MEL pretreatment. Furthermore, the shape of PBSA mulch films in PaE-containing solution was maintained with MEL pretreatment, whereas untreated films were almost completely degraded and dissolved. These results suggest that MEL covering the surface of BP film inhibits adsorption of PaE and PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs. We applied the above results to control the microbial degradation of BP mulch films. MEL pretreatment significantly inhibited BP mulch film degradation by both PaE solution and BP-degradable microorganism. Moreover, the degradation of these films was recovered after removal of the coated MEL by ethanol treatment. These results demonstrate that the biodegradation of BP films can be readily and reversibly controlled by a physical approach using MEL.

  15. Evaluation of estrogenic potential of flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and MCF7/BUS cell proliferation assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia A Resende

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, there is a search for compounds with estrogenic activity that can replace estrogen in hormone replacement therapy during menopause, without the undesirable effects of estrogen, such as the elevation of breast cancer occurrence. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to assess the estrogenic activity of flavonoids with different hydroxylation patterns: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone via two different in vitro assays, the recombinant yeast assay (RYA and the MCF-7 proliferation assay (E-screen, since the most potent phytoestrogens are members of the flavonoid family. In these assays, kaempferol was the only compound that showed ERα-dependent transcriptional activation activity by RYA, showing 6.74±1.7 nM EEQ, besides acting as a full agonist for the stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells. The other compounds did not show detectable levels of interaction with ER under the conditions used in the RYA. However, in the E-screen assay, compounds such as galangin, luteolin and fisetin also stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells, acting as partial agonists. In the evaluation of antiestrogenicity, the compounds quercetin, chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone significantly inhibited the cell proliferation induced by 17-β-estradiol in the E-screen assay, indicating that these compounds may act as estrogen receptor antagonists. Overall, it became clear in the assay results that the estrogenic activity of flavonoids was affected by small structural differences such as the number of hydroxyl groups, especially those on the B ring of the flavonoid.

  16. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes. PMID:29351285

  17. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Emilien; Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes.

  18. Combine Use of Selected Schizosaccharomyces pombe andLachancea thermotolerans Yeast Strains as an Alternative to theTraditional Malolactic Fermentation in Red Wine Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Benito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most red wines commercialized in the market use the malolactic fermentationprocess in order to ensure stability from a microbiological point of view. In this secondfermentation, malic acid is converted into L-lactic acid under controlled setups. Howeverthis process is not free from possible collateral effects that on some occasions produceoff-flavors, wine quality loss and human health problems. In warm viticulture regions suchas the south of Spain, the risk of suffering a deviation during the malolactic fermentationprocess increases due to the high must pH. This contributes to produce wines with highvolatile acidity and biogenic amine values. This manuscript develops a new red winemakingmethodology that consists of combining the use of two non-Saccharomyces yeast strains asan alternative to the traditional malolactic fermentation. In this method, malic acid is totallyconsumed by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, thus achieving the microbiological stabilizationobjective, while Lachancea thermotolerans produces lactic acid in order not to reduce andeven increase the acidity of wines produced from low acidity musts. This technique reducesthe risks inherent to the malolactic fermentation process when performed in warm regions.The result is more fruity wines that contain less acetic acid and biogenic amines than thetraditional controls that have undergone the classical malolactic fermentation.

  19. Influence of Fermentation Temperature, Yeast Strain, and Grape Juice on the Aroma Chemistry and Sensory Profile of Sauvignon Blanc Wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deed, Rebecca C; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Gardner, Richard C

    2017-10-11

    Sauvignon blanc wine, balanced by herbaceous and tropical aromas, is fermented at low temperatures (10-15 °C). Anecdotal accounts from winemakers suggest that cold fermentations produce and retain more "fruity" aroma compounds; nonetheless, studies have not confirmed why low temperatures are optimal for Sauvignon blanc. Thirty-two aroma compounds were quantitated from two Marlborough Sauvignon blanc juices fermented at 12.5 and 25 °C, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains EC1118, L-1528, M2, and X5. Fourteen compounds were responsible for driving differences in aroma chemistry. The 12.5 °C-fermented wines had lower 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH) and higher alcohols but increased fruity acetate esters. However, a sensory panel did not find a significant difference between fruitiness in 75% of wine pairs based on fermentation temperature, in spite of chemical differences. For wine pairs with significant differences (25%), the 25 °C-fermented wines were fruitier than the 12.5 °C-fermented wines, with high fruitiness associated with 3MH. We propose that the benefits of low fermentation temperatures are not derived from increased fruitiness but a better balance between fruitiness and greenness. Even so, since 75% of wines showed no significant difference, higher fermentation temperatures could be utilized without detriment, lowering costs for the wine industry.

  20. Self-Organization during Friction in Complex Surface Engineered Tribosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben D. Beake

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization during friction in complex surface engineered tribosystems is investigated. The probability of self-organization in these complex tribosystems is studied on the basis of the theoretical concepts of irreversible thermodynamics. It is shown that a higher number of interrelated processes within the system result in an increased probability of self-organization. The results of this thermodynamic model are confirmed by the investigation of the wear performance of a novel Ti0.2Al0.55Cr0.2Si0.03Y0.02N/Ti0.25Al0.65Cr0.1N (PVD coating with complex nano-multilayered structure under extreme tribological conditions of dry high-speed end milling of hardened H13 tool steel.

  1. Interaction of stress and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard

    dissolution. The present project is devoted to understanding the mutual interaction of stresses and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering by combining numerical modelling with experimental materials science. The modelling was done by combining solid mechanics with thermodynamics...... by chromium atoms, and the effect of composition-induced stress on surface concentration and diffusive flux. The effect of plasticity was also included. Temperature and concentration dependencies of mechanical and diffusion material properties were studied, and the effect of incorporation in the model...... examined. The effect of pre-stressing the sample was also tested, to investigate the effects of a residual stress-state that might be present from processing of the metal specimen. Controlled thermochemical treatment of austenitic stainless steel was investigated experimentally by in-diffusion of nitrogen...

  2. Surface engineering of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2014-09-17

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications.

  3. Gene expression profiles of the thermotolerant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KKU-VN8 during high-temperature ethanol fermentation using sweet sorghum juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techaparin, Atiya; Thanonkeo, Pornthap; Klanrit, Preekamol

    2017-10-01

    To investigate gene expression profiles of the thermotolerant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KKU-VN8, a potential high-ethanol producer, in response to various stresses during high-temperature ethanol fermentation using sweet sorghum juice (SSJ) under optimal conditions. The maximal ethanol concentration obtained by S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8 using SSJ at 40 °C was 66.6 g/l, with a productivity of 1.39 g/l/h and a theoretical ethanol yield of 81%. Quantitative RT-PCR assays were performed to investigate the gene expression profiles of S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8. Differential expression of genes encoding heat-shock proteins (HSP82, HSP104, SSA4), genes involved in trehalose metabolism (TPS1, TPS2, NTH1) and genes involved the glycolytic pathway (ADH1, ADH2, CDC19) at various time points during fermentation was observed. The expression levels of HSP82, HSP104, SSA4, ADH1 and CDC19 were significantly higher than those of the controls (10.2-, 4-, 8-, 8.9- and 5.9-fold higher, respectively). In contrast, the expression levels of TPS1, TPS2, NTH1 and ADH2 were approx. 2-fold less than those of the controls. The highly expressed genes encoding heat-shock proteins, HSP82 and SSA4, potentially play an important role in helping S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8 cope with various stresses that occur during high-temperature fermentation, leading to higher ethanol production efficiency.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b) The...

  5. Pathogenicity characteristics of stocked and fresh yeasts strains Características de patogenicidade de amostras de leveduras preservadas e recém-isoladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Maranhão Chaves

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of yeasts of medical importance, 15 strains stocked in mineral oil at the URM Culture Collection of the Department of Mycology, Biological Sciences Centre, Federal University of Pernambuco and 15 fresh strains isolated from AIDS patients interned at the Clinical Hospital, Centre of Health Sciences, Federal University of Pernambuco, were selected. As pathogenicity characteristics, the ability to grow at 37ºC and production of phospolipase and proteinase were tested. All samples grew at 37ºC and exhibited proteinase activity. However when tested on solid medium, the proteinase activity was negative. Among 15 stocked samples, 13 (86.66% were phospholipase positive and two (13.34% were phospholipase negative. From the 15 samples isolated from AIDS patients, four (26.66% were phospholipase positive and 11 (73.34% were phospholipase negative.Com o objetivo de avaliar a patogenicidade de leveduras de interesse médico, foram selecionadas 15 amostras preservadas em óleo mineral na Micoteca URM, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco e 15 isolados recentes, provenientes de amostras clínicas de pacientes com AIDS, internados no Hospital das Clínicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Com relação as características de patogenicidade, foram avaliados a capacidade desses microorganismos crescerem a 37ºC, bem como apresentarem atividade de fosfolipase e protease. As 30 amostras cresceram a 37ºC e apresentaram atividade quantitativa de protease, entretanto não apresentaram essa atividade quando testadas em meio sólido. Das 15 amostras preservadas, 13 (86,66% apresentaram atividade fosfolipase positiva e duas (13,34% atividade fosfolipásica negativa e das 15 amostras isoladas de pacientes com AIDS, quatro (26,66% apresentaram atividade de fosfolipase positiva e 11 (73,34% apresentaram atividade fosfolipásica negativa.

  6. Exobiopolymer from polyhydroxyalkanoate-producing transgenic yeast

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the wild type yeast Kloeckera sp. strain KY1 was equipped in their cytoplasm with the phaABC operon containing genes phbA, phbB and phbC of the PHA biosynthetic pathway of Ralstonia eutropha. Unpredicted, resulted transgenic yeast strain KY1/PHA was able to synthesize another exopolymer beside the ...

  7. Simultaneous surface engineering and bulk hardening of precipitation hardening stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses simultaneous bulk precipitation hardening and low temperature surface engineering of two commercial precipitation hardening stainless steels: Sandvik Nanoflex® and Uddeholm Corrax®. Surface engineering comprised gaseous nitriding or gaseous carburising. Microstructural char....... The duration and temperature of the nitriding/carburising surface hardening treatment can be chosen in agreement with the thermal treatment for obtaining optimal bulk hardness in the precipitation hardening stainless steel.......This article addresses simultaneous bulk precipitation hardening and low temperature surface engineering of two commercial precipitation hardening stainless steels: Sandvik Nanoflex® and Uddeholm Corrax®. Surface engineering comprised gaseous nitriding or gaseous carburising. Microstructural...

  8. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  9. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  10. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  11. Improved Nanomechanical Test Techniques for Surface Engineered Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Goodes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and implementation of a wide range of innovative nanomechanical test techniques to solve tribological problems in applications as diverse as biomedical and automotive are described in this review. For improved wear resistance and durability, the importance of understanding the system response rather than the coating-only properties is emphasized. There are many applications involving mechanical contact where the key to understanding the problem is to test at higher load and to combine reliable measurements taken across different length scales using both nano- and micro-indentation and related wear measurement techniques which more closely simulate contact conditions to fully understand the mechanical behaviour and hence deliver improved application performance. Results are presented with the NanoTest platform for applications for biomedical devices and surface engineering of lightweight alloys for the automotive industry. By combining results with different techniques it is possible to postulate predictive design rules – based on the elastic and plastic deformation energies involved in contact - to aid the reliable optimisation of mechanical properties in the various contact situations in the different applications.

  12. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  13. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding/carburizing of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge residual ...

  14. Production Of Extracellular Enzymes By Some Soil Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Falih, A. M. [عبد الله مساعد خلف الفالح

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of soil yeasts, Geotrichum candidum, Geotrichum capitatum and Williopsis californica to produce extracellular enzymes (amylase, cellulase and protease) in vitro compared with that of a laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It appears that the soil yeasts studied here were less amylolytic yeasts except the yeast G. candidum, which was highly effective at extracellular amylase production. The soil yeast W. californica was an average producer of cellu...

  15. Effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation was studied at approximately 5 oC intervals over a range of 18 – 37 oC, using one strain each of ale, lager and wine yeast. The ale and wine yeasts grew at all the temperatures tested, but lager yeast failed to grow at 37 oC. All these strains gave lower ...

  16. The evaluation of nanoparticles ZnO and TiO2 effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20 yeast strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usatîi Agafia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the action of nanoparticles ZnO (10 nm and TiO2 (30 nm on growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20 yeast. Nanoparticles in concentration of 0,5; 1,0 and 5,0 mg/L in YPD medium did not modify significantly cell proliferation, biomass production, the carbohydrate content and the content of β-glucans at Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20. Nanoparticles ZnO and TiO2 contributed to the decrease in protein content, which demonstrated the appearance of the alterations of yeast cell membranes.

  17. Enhancement of endothelialisation of coronary stents by laser surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Mirhosseini, Nazanin; Michael, Alun; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Tao

    2013-11-01

    novel surface is also super-hydrophilic with close to zero water/cell culture fluid contact angles and low cytotoxicity. A novel surface created by laser surface-engineering with a combination of defined surface texture and surface chemistry was found beneficial for the improvement of coronary stent endothelialisation. The technology presented here could work with both DES and BMS with added benefit for the improvement of the biocompatibility of current coronary stents. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparative evaluation of 13 yeast species in the Yarrowia clade on lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate and genetic engineering of inhibitor tolerant strains for lipid and biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast that has garnered interest for commercial production of single cell oil and other fatty acid-derived chemicals because of its GRAS status and genetic tractability. Three recent peer-reviewed studies have highlighted the possibility of lipid production by th...

  19. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild...

  20. Occurrence of Killer Yeasts in Leaf-Cutting Ant Nests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreiro, S.C.; Pagnocca, F.C.; Bacci Jr., M.; Bueno, O.C.; Hebling, M.J.A.; Middelhoven, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Killer activity was screened in 99 yeast strains isolated from the nests of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens against 6 standard sensitive strains, as well as against each other. Among this yeast community killer activity was widespread since 77 strains (78 %) were able to kill or inhibit the growth

  1. Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... This study explored a strategy to convert agricultural and forestry residues into microbial lipid, which could be further transformed into biodiesel. Among the 250 yeast strains screened for xylose assimilating capacity, eight oleaginous yeasts were selected by Sudan Black B test. The lipid content of these 8 ...

  2. Yeast (Saccharomyces cereveresiae) Supplementation In High ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A four-week trial to assess the impact of yeast supplementation on the performance characteristics of broiler starters fed high levels of rice bran with or without yeast addition, was conducted using two hundred and forty day old broilers of the Bova nera strain. The chicks were divided into 15 groups of 16 chicks each.

  3. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  4. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, S.; Poli, G. [Univ. of Milan (Italy); Siman-Tov, R.B. [Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Development of industrial yeast strain with improved acid- and thermo-tolerance through evolution under continuous fermentation conditions followed by haploidization and mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Liu, Ze-Shen; Tang, Yue-Qin; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Continuous fermentation using the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strain WW was carried out under acidic or high-temperature conditions to achieve acid- or thermo-tolerant mutants. Mutants isolated at pH 2.5 and 41°C showed improved growth and fermentation ability under acidic and elevated temperature conditions. Haploid strains WW17A1 and WW17A4 obtained from the mutated diploid strain WW17A showed better growth and 4.5-6.5% higher ethanol yields at pH 2.7 than the original strains. Haploid strain WW12T4 obtained from mutated diploid strain WW12T showed 1.25-1.50 times and 2.8-4.7 times higher total cell number and cell viability, respectively, than the original strains at 42°C. Strain AT, which had significantly improved acid- and thermo-tolerance, was developed by mating strain WW17A1 with WW12T4. Batch fermentation at 41°C and pH 3.5 showed that the ethanol concentration and yield achieved during fermentation by strain AT were 55.4 g/L and 72.5%, respectively, which were 10 g/L and 13.4% higher than that of the original strain WW. The present study demonstrates that continuous cultivation followed by haploidization and mating is a powerful approach for enhancing the tolerance of industrial strains. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Distinct Domestication Trajectories in Top-Fermenting Beer Yeasts and Wine Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Margarida; Pontes, Ana; Almeida, Pedro; Barbosa, Raquel; Serra, Marta; Libkind, Diego; Hutzler, Mathias; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-10-24

    Beer is one of the oldest alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars derived from starches present in cereal grains. Contrary to lager beers, made by bottom-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a hybrid yeast, ale beers are closer to the ancient beer type and are fermented by S. cerevisiae, a top-fermenting yeast. Here, we use population genomics to investigate (1) the closest relatives of top-fermenting beer yeasts; (2) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent an independent domestication event separate from those already described; (3) whether single or multiple beer yeast domestication events can be inferred; and (4) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent non-recombinant or recombinant lineages. Our results revealed that top-fermenting beer yeasts are polyphyletic, with a main clade composed of at least three subgroups, dominantly represented by the German, British, and wheat beer strains. Other beer strains were phylogenetically close to sake, wine, or bread yeasts. We detected genetic signatures of beer yeast domestication by investigating genes previously linked to brewing and using genome-wide scans. We propose that the emergence of the main clade of beer yeasts is related with a domestication event distinct from the previously known cases of wine and sake yeast domestication. The nucleotide diversity of the main beer clade more than doubled that of wine yeasts, which might be a consequence of fundamental differences in the modes of beer and wine yeast domestication. The higher diversity of beer strains could be due to the more intense and different selection regimes associated to brewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker's yeast was produced from three selected baker's yeast strains using date syrup as a substrate at low and high flow rate compared to those produced using molasses substrates. Performance of the produced baker's yeasts on Arabic bread quality was investigated. Baking tests showed a positive relationship between ...

  8. BioREFINE-2G project – Engineering of industrial yeast strains for production of dicarboxylic acids from side and waste streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Chen, Xiao; Borodina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    compounds can be polymerised to biodegradable polymersthat can find application as plastics, coatings or adhesives. To reach the goals, the identification of relevant metabolic routes, strain engineering and the development of a toolbox for manipulation of industrial S. cerevisiae strains are required. Here...

  9. The evaluation of nanoparticles ZnO and TiO2 effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20 yeast strain

    OpenAIRE

    Usatîi Agafia; Chiseliţa Natalia; Efremova Nadejda

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the action of nanoparticles ZnO (10 nm) and TiO2 (30 nm) on growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20 yeast. Nanoparticles in concentration of 0,5; 1,0 and 5,0 mg/L in YPD medium did not modify significantly cell proliferation, biomass production, the carbohydrate content and the content of β-glucans at Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-20. Nanoparticles ZnO and TiO2 contributed to the decrease in protein content, which demonstrated the appearance of the alterations o...

  10. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  11. Effect of addition of different strains of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on liquid phase outflow rate, ruminal volume and in situ degradability in buffaloes fed on the sugar cane basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Helena Souza

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of three strains of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yea Sacc 1026 - Allthech, Biosaf SC-47 - Lesaffre e BioSynergy - Kraft, in their respective commercial forms, on liquid phase outflow rate, ruminal volume and in situ degradability for the dry matter, cellulose and hemicellulose of the sugar cane. For this, four ruminal canuladed buffaloes of the Mediterranean breed were used and fed with a composed diet by 83 % of sugar cane and 17 % of concentrate, under experimental designed in 4x4 Latin Square. The four treatments A, B, K and T, with no yeast addition, were added directly into rumen of each animal, in all experimental periods. During the different periods, samples of ruminal content were colleted for estimate liquid phase outflow rate and ruminal volume, and conducted in situ degradability. For liquid phase outflow rate and ruminal volume, no significant differences were observed among the treatments studied. However, in situ degradability showed significant differences among the A, B and K treatments in relation to T (control.

  12. Virgin olive oil yeasts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafardini, Gino; Zullo, Biagi Angelo

    2018-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on virgin olive oil yeasts. Newly produced olive oil contains solid particles and micro drops of vegetation water in which yeasts reproduce to become the typical microbiota of olive oil. To date, about seventeen yeast species have been isolated from different types of olive oils and their by-products, of which six species have been identified as new species. Certain yeast species contribute greatly to improving the sensorial characteristics of the newly produced olive oil, whereas other species are considered harmful as they can damage the oil quality through the production of unpleasant flavors and triacylglycerol hydrolysis. Studies carried out in certain yeast strains have demonstrated the presence of defects in olive oil treated with Candida adriatica, Nakazawaea wickerhamii and Candida diddensiae specific strains, while other olive oil samples treated with other Candida diddensiae strains were defect-free after four months of storage and categorized as extra virgin. A new acetic acid producing yeast species, namely, Brettanomyces acidodurans sp. nov., which was recently isolated from olive oil, could be implicated in the wine-vinegary defect of the product. Other aspects related to the activity of the lipase-producing yeasts and the survival of the yeast species in the flavored olive oils are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Active Expression of Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator (t-PA) c-DNA from Pulmonary Metastases in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia Pastoris KM71H Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Amir Hossein; Soleimani, Mohammad; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Taghinezhad-S, Sedigheh; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-08-27

    Background: Human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a key protease of the trypsin family. It catalyzes the activation of zymogen plasminogen to the fibrin-degrading proteinase, plasmin, leading to digestion of fibrin clots. The recombinant enzyme produced by recombinant technology issued to dissolve blood clots in treatment of various human diseases such as coronary artery thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Pichia pastoris expression system is a unique system for the production of high level of recombinant proteins. GS115 and KM71H are two kinds of Pichia pastoris strains whilst production of recombinant proteins in these strains is not predictable. The aim of the study was evaluation of t-PA expression in KM71H strains. Methods: In this study, the cDNA of the t-PA gene was amplified by PCR, sequenced and cloned into Pichia pastoris KM71H host strain using pPICZalphaA expression vector that allows methanol-induced expression and secretion of the protein. Results: Dot blotting results confirmed the presence oft-PA in the cell supernatant. Western blotting test revealed the approximate size of 70 KDa for recombinant t-PA. Quantitative ELISA experiment showed 810 μg/L of t-PA in the supernatant samples. Zymography analysis confirmed the proteolytic activity and biological function of the expressed recombinant t-PA. Conclusions: Correspondingly, Pichia pastoris KM71H is an appropriate strain for production of active recombinant protein. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  16. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Azhar, Siti Hajar; Abdulla, Rahmath; Jambo, Siti Azmah; Marbawi, Hartinie; Gansau, Jualang Azlan; Mohd Faik, Ainol Azifa; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis

    2017-07-01

    Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  17. New vectors in fission yeast: application for cloning the his2 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weilguny, D; Praetorius, M; Carr, Alan

    1991-01-01

    of transforming Sc. pombe ura4 strains, as well as ura 3 strains of the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used pON163 for the construction of two fission yeast genomic libraries. From these gene banks clones were isolated that were able to complement fission yeast his2 mutants...

  18. Yeast culture collections of the world: meeting the needs of industrial researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2012-05-01

    The importance of selecting optimal yeast strains for research or industrial applications is often underestimated. For example, utilizing a strain background that already provides the desired stress tolerance or nutrient utilization profile can eliminate costly strain optimization. Yeast culture collections can provide not only the yeast strains but also data and curator expertise to help narrow the search for the optimal strain. While some collections are known for a broad range of cultures and services, other "boutique" collections can provide a broader selection of strains of certain categories, a surprising amount of characterization data, and assistance in selecting strains. This article provides information on dozens of yeast collections of the world, profiles of selected yeast culture collections, and the services that they provide: e.g., strain preservation for patent or safe deposit purposes, species identification service, training workshops, and consulting on yeast identification and physiology. Utilization of these services can save industrial researchers valuable time and resources.

  19. Novel brewing yeast hybrids: creation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The natural interspecies Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrid yeast is responsible for global lager beer production and is one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Its success in the lager brewing environment is due to a combination of traits not commonly found in pure yeast species, principally low-temperature tolerance, and maltotriose utilization. Parental transgression is typical of hybrid organisms and has been exploited previously for, e.g., the production of wine yeast with beneficial properties. The parental strain S. eubayanus has only been discovered recently and newly created lager yeast strains have not yet been applied industrially. A number of reports attest to the feasibility of this approach and artificially created hybrids are likely to have a significant impact on the future of lager brewing. De novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids outperform their parent strains in a number of respects, including, but not restricted to, fermentation rate, sugar utilization, stress tolerance, and aroma formation. Hybrid genome function and stability, as well as different techniques for generating hybrids and their relative merits are discussed. Hybridization not only offers the possibility of generating novel non-GM brewing yeast strains with unique properties, but is expected to aid in unraveling the complex evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast.

  20. Biosorption of nickel by yeasts in an osmotically unsuitable environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breierova, Emilia; Kovarova, Annamaria [SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Chemistry; Certik, Milan [SUT, Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Gregor, Tomas [Mendel Univ. of Agriculture and Forestry, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2008-11-15

    The tolerance, sorption of nickel(II) ions, and changes in the production and composition of exopolymers of eight yeast strains grown under nickel presence with/without NaCl were studied. Strains of Pichia anomala and Candida maltosa known as the most resistant yeasts against nickel tolerated up to 3 mm Ni{sup 2+}. NaCl addition decreased both the resistance ofthe yeast strains toward nickel ions and the sorption of metal ions into cells. All yeasts absorbed nickel predominantly into exopolymers (glycoproteins) and on the surface of cells. However, while the amount of polysaccharide moieties of exoglycoproteins of most of the resistant yeasts was induced by stress conditions, the ratio polysaccharide/protein in the exopolymers remained unchanged in the sensitive species Cystofilobasidium. The exopolymer composition might play a key role in yeast adaptation to stress conditions caused by heavy metal ions. (orig.)

  1. Cell surface engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combined with membrane separation technology for xylitol production from rice straw hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirimand, Gregory; Sasaki, Kengo; Inokuma, Kentaro; Bamba, Takahiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    Xylitol, a value-added polyol deriving from D-xylose, is widely used in both the food and pharmaceutical industries. Despite extensive studies aiming to streamline the production of xylitol, the manufacturing cost of this product remains high while demand is constantly growing worldwide. Biotechnological production of xylitol from lignocellulosic waste may constitute an advantageous and sustainable option to address this issue. However, to date, there have been few reports of biomass conversion to xylitol. In the present study, xylitol was directly produced from rice straw hydrolysate using a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPH499 strain expressing cytosolic xylose reductase (XR), along with β-glucosidase (BGL), xylosidase (XYL), and xylanase (XYN) enzymes (co-)displayed on the cell surface; xylitol production by this strain did not require addition of any commercial enzymes. All of these enzymes contributed to the consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of the lignocellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol to produce 5.8 g/L xylitol with 79.5 % of theoretical yield from xylose contained in the biomass. Furthermore, nanofiltration of the rice straw hydrolysate provided removal of fermentation inhibitors while simultaneously increasing sugar concentrations, facilitating high concentration xylitol production (37.9 g/L) in the CBP. This study is the first report (to our knowledge) of the combination of cell surface engineering approach and membrane separation technology for xylitol production, which could be extended to further industrial applications.

  2. Tailor-Made Pore Surface Engineering in Covalent Organic Frameworks: Systematic Functionalization for Performance Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, N.; Krishna, R.; Jiang, D.

    2015-01-01

    Imine-linked covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were synthesized to bear content-tunable, accessible, and reactive ethynyl groups on the walls of one-dimensional pores. These COFs offer an ideal platform for pore-wall surface engineering aimed at anchoring diverse functional groups ranging from

  3. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable

  4. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. A.; Labbe, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable. (author)

  5. Internal oscillating current-sustained RF plasmas: Parameters, stability, and potential for surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrikov, K.; Tsakadze, E.L.; Tsakadze, Z.L.

    2005-01-01

    A new source of low-frequency (0.46 MHz) inductively coupled plasmas sustained by the internal planar "unidirectional" RF current driven through a specially designed internal antenna configuration has been developed. The experimental results of the investigation of the optical and global argon pl...... applications and surface engineering. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Natural and modified promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The ease of highly sophisticated genetic manipulations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has initiated numerous initiatives towards development of metabolically engineered strains for novel applications beyond its traditional use in brewing, baking, and wine making. In fact, baker's yeast has

  7. Adaptation of the Yeast URA3 Selection System to Gram-Negative Bacteria and Generation of a ΔbetCDE Pseudomonas putida Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Galvão, Teca Calcagno; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2005-01-01

    A general procedure for efficient generation of gene knockouts in gram-negative bacteria by the adaptation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 selection system is described. A Pseudomonas putida strain lacking the URA3 homolog pyrF (encoding orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase) was constructed, allowing the use of a plasmid-borne copy of the gene as the target of selection. The delivery vector pTEC contains the pyrF gene and promoter, a conditional origin of replication (oriR6K), an origin ...

  8. Yeast Isolation for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA RURIANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated 12 yeast isolates from five different rotten fruits by using a yeast glucose chloramphenicol agar (YGCA medium supplemented with tetracycline. From pre-screening assay, four isolates exhibited higher substrate (glucose-xylose consumption efficiency in the reaction tube fermentation compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae dan Saccharomyces ellipsoids as the reference strains. Based on the fermentation process in gooseneck flasks, we observed that two isolates (K and SB showed high fermentation efficiency both in sole glucose and mixed glucose-xylose substrate. Moreover, isolates K and SB produced relatively identical level of ethanol concentration compared to the reference strains. Isolates H and MP could only produce high levels of ethanol in glucose fermentation, while only half of that amount of ethanol was detected in glucose-xylose fermentation. Isolate K and SB were identified as Pichia kudriavzeevii (100% based on large sub unit (LSU ribosomal DNA D1/D2 region.

  9. Kinetic analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain adapted for improved growth on glycerol: Implications for the development of yeast bioprocesses on glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Estopier, A; Lesage, J; Gorret, N; Guillouet, S E

    2011-01-01

    Glycerol is an agro-industrial residue generated in high amounts during the biodiesel production. The growing production of biodiesel is creating a worldwide glycerol surplus. Therefore, replacing sugar-based feedstock in bioprocesses by glycerol could be potentially attractive. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most commonly used microorganisms in the agri-food industry and therefore currently produced in large quantities from sugar-based feedstock. Unfortunately, growth of S. cerevisiae strains on glycerol is very low with reported μmax around 0.01 h(-1). This study demonstrates that successive growth of the S. cerevisiae CBS 8066, CEN.PK 113-7 D and Ethanol Red on glycerol as sole carbon source considerably improved the μmax from 0.01 up to 0.2 h(-1). The "adapted strain" CBS 8066-FL20 was kinetically characterized during aerobic and oxygen-limited cultivation in bioreactor and the results discussed in terms of their implication for developing glycerol-based S. cerevisiae bioprocesses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sorption of grape proanthocyanidins and wine polyphenols by yeasts, inactivated yeasts, and yeast cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoue Nguela, J; Sieczkowski, N; Roi, S; Vernhet, A

    2015-01-21

    Inactivated yeast fractions (IYFs) can be used in enology to improve the stability and mouthfeel of red wines. However, information concerning the mechanisms involved and the impact of the IYF characteristics is scarce. Adsorption isotherms were used to investigate interactions between grape proanthocyanidin fractions (PAs) or wine polyphenols (WP) and a commercial yeast strain (Y), the inactivated yeast (IY), the yeast submitted to autolyzis and inactivation (A-IY), and the cell walls obtained by mechanical disruption (CW). High affinity isotherms and high adsorption capacities were observed for grape PAs and whole cells (Y, IY, and A-IY). Affinity and adsorbed amount were lower with wine PAs, due to chemical changes occurring during winemaking. By contrast to whole cells, grape PAs and WP adsorption on CW remained very low. This raises the issue of the part played by cell walls in the interactions between yeast and proanthocyanidins and suggests the passage of the latter through the wall pores and their interaction with the plasma membrane.

  11. 'Killer' character of yeasts isolated from ethanolic fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccato-Antonini Sandra Regina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of killer, neutral and sensitive yeasts was determined from strains isolated from substrates related to alcoholic fermentations. From 113 isolates, 24 showed killer activity against NCYC 1006 (standard sensitive strain, while 30 were sensitive to NCYC 738 (standard killer strain, and 59 had no reaction in assays at 25-27°C. Two wild yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one of Candida colliculosa were tested against 10 standard killer strains and one standard sensitive strain in a cell x cell and well-test assays at four different pHs. None of the isolates displayed strong killer activity or were sensitive to the standard strains. All belonged to the neutral type. It was concluded that although the number of killer strains was high, this character cannot be used to protect ethanol fermentation processes against yeast contaminants like those which form cell clusters.

  12. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in a thermotolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Arellano-Plaza, Melchor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    Stress tolerance is a key attribute that must be considered when using yeast cells for industrial applications. High temperature is one factor that can cause stress in yeast. High environmental temperature in particular may exert a natural selection pressure to evolve yeasts into thermotolerant strains. In the present study, three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MC4, and Kluyveromyces marxianus, OFF1 and SLP1) isolated from hot environments were exposed to increased temperatures and were then compared with a laboratory yeast strain. Their resistance to high temperature, oxidative stress, and antioxidant response were evaluated, along with the fatty acid composition of their cell membranes. The SLP1 strain showed a higher specific growth rate, biomass yield, and biomass volumetric productivity while also showing lower duplication time, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the SLP1 strain demonstrated more catalase activity after temperature was increased, and this strain also showed membranes enriched in saturated fatty acids. It is concluded that the SLP1 yeast strain is a thermotolerant yeast with less oxidative stress and a greater antioxidant response. Therefore, this strain could be used for fermentation at high temperatures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in a thermotolerant yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Mejía-Barajas

    Full Text Available Abstract Stress tolerance is a key attribute that must be considered when using yeast cells for industrial applications. High temperature is one factor that can cause stress in yeast. High environmental temperature in particular may exert a natural selection pressure to evolve yeasts into thermotolerant strains. In the present study, three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MC4, and Kluyveromyces marxianus, OFF1 and SLP1 isolated from hot environments were exposed to increased temperatures and were then compared with a laboratory yeast strain. Their resistance to high temperature, oxidative stress, and antioxidant response were evaluated, along with the fatty acid composition of their cell membranes. The SLP1 strain showed a higher specific growth rate, biomass yield, and biomass volumetric productivity while also showing lower duplication time, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the SLP1 strain demonstrated more catalase activity after temperature was increased, and this strain also showed membranes enriched in saturated fatty acids. It is concluded that the SLP1 yeast strain is a thermotolerant yeast with less oxidative stress and a greater antioxidant response. Therefore, this strain could be used for fermentation at high temperatures.

  14. Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling during ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve ethanolic fermentation performance of self-flocculating yeast, difference between a flocculating yeast strain and a regular industrial yeast strain was analyzed by transcriptional and metabolic approaches. Results: The number of down-regulated (industrial yeast YIC10 vs. flocculating yeast GIM2.71 and up-regulated genes were 4503 and 228, respectively. It is the economic regulation for YIC10 that non-essential genes were down-regulated, and cells put more “energy” into growth and ethanol production. Hexose transport and phosphorylation were not the limiting-steps in ethanol fermentation for GIM2.71 compared to YIC10, whereas the reaction of 1,3-disphosphoglycerate to 3-phosphoglycerate, the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and its subsequent reduction to ethanol were the most limiting steps. GIM2.71 had stronger stress response than non-flocculating yeast and much more carbohydrate was distributed to other bypass, such as glycerol, acetate and trehalose synthesis. Conclusions: Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling will provide clues for improving the fermentation performance of GIM2.71.

  15. Tailor-Made Pore Surface Engineering in Covalent Organic Frameworks: Systematic Functionalization for Performance Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Krishna, Rajamani; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-10

    Imine-linked covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were synthesized to bear content-tunable, accessible, and reactive ethynyl groups on the walls of one-dimensional pores. These COFs offer an ideal platform for pore-wall surface engineering aimed at anchoring diverse functional groups ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic units and from basic to acidic moieties with controllable loading contents. This approach enables the development of various tailor-made COFs with systematically tuned porosities and functionalities while retaining the crystallinity. We demonstrate that this strategy can be used to efficiently screen for suitable pore structures for use as CO2 adsorbents. The pore-surface-engineered walls exhibit an enhanced affinity for CO2, resulting in COFs that can capture and separate CO2 with high performance.

  16. Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Felix H.; Ghaderi, Adel; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol toxicity in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. Elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolster these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation. PMID:25278607

  17. Potential application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aimed at evaluating the fermentation behavior of selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in banana pulp and they were compared with commercial yeast (baker's yeast) for subsequent production of distilled spirits. Five types of microorganisms were used: Four yeast strains obtained from accredited ...

  18. Comparison of Yeast Growth in Mesquite Wood Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Stanlake, Gary J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-water extracts of mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) wood were assayed for their total carbohydrate, reducing sugar, and glucose content. These hydrolysates were then used as complete media for yeast growth. A total of 10 strains of yeasts were evaluated for their biomass production in the mesquite wood hydrolysates. Levels of utilizable carbohydrate proved to be the limiting factor for yeast growth in the hydrolysates.

  19. The responses of lager brewing yeast to low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Somani, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The removal of yeast biomass (cropping) at the end of fermentation to inoculate a subsequent fermentation (serial-repitching) is common practice in the brewing industry. Between successive fermentations cropped yeast is stored as a slurry in cooled storage vessels under anaerobic conditions until required for subsequent use. Maintenance of yeast quality during storage is critical for subsequent fermentation performance. An assumption is made in brewing that all strains benefit from storage at...

  20. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  1. Functional genomics of beer-related physiological processes in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelwood, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the release of the entire genome sequence of the S. cerevisiae laboratory strain S288C in 1996, many functional genomics tools have been introduced in fundamental and application-oriented yeast research. In this thesis, the applicability of functional genomics for the improvement of yeast in

  2. A Method of Visualizing Three-Dimensional Distribution of Yeast in Bread Dough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Shiraga, Seizaburou; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeya, Koji; Endo, Shigeru

    A novel technique was developed to monitor the change in three-dimensional (3D) distribution of yeast in frozen bread dough samples in accordance with the progress of mixing process. Application of a surface engineering technology allowed the identification of yeast in bread dough by bonding EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) to the surface of yeast cells. The fluorescent yeast (a biomarker) was recognized as bright spots at the wavelength of 520 nm. A Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS) with a fluorescence microscope was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of frozen dough samples sliced at intervals of 1 μm. A set of successive two-dimensional images was reconstructed to analyze 3D distribution of yeast. Samples were taken from each of four normal mixing stages (i.e., pick up, clean up, development, and final stages) and also from over mixing stage. In the pick up stage yeast distribution was uneven with local areas of dense yeast. As the mixing progressed from clean up to final stages, the yeast became more evenly distributed throughout the dough sample. However, the uniformity in yeast distribution was lost in the over mixing stage possibly due to the breakdown of gluten structure within the dough sample.

  3. [Overexpression of FKS1 to improve yeast autolysis-stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-09-01

    With the development of high gravity brewing, yeast cells are exposed to multiple brewing-associated stresses, such as increased osmotic pressure, enhanced alcohol concentration and nutritional imbalance. These will speed up yeast autolysis, which seriously influence beer flavor and quality. To increase yeast anti-autolytic ability, FKS1 overexpression strain was constructed by 18S rDNA. The concentration of β-1,3-glucan of overexpression strain was 62% higher than that of wild type strain. Meantime, FKS1 overexpression strain increased anti-stress ability at 8% ethanol, 0.4 mol/L NaCl and starvation stress. Under simulated autolysis, FKS1 showed good anti-autolytic ability by slower autolysis. These results confirms the potential of FKS1 overexpression to tackle yeast autolysis in high-gravity brewing.

  4. Conversion of homothallic yeast to heterothallism through to gene disruption

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, WH

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method was developed for the conversion of homothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains to heterothallism through HO gene disruption. An integrative ho=neo disrupted allele was constructed by cloning a dominant selectable marker...

  5. The Role of Magnesium and Calcium in Governing Yeast Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosslyn M. Birch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available »Grit« formation by agglomerating cells of baker’s yeast is an idiosyncratic phenomenon of irreversible cellular aggregation that is detrimental to yeast quality. Agglomeration results in failure of rehydrated dried yeast to evenly resuspend and has economic consequences for both yeast manufacturers and bakers. Several environmental factors are implicated in governing yeast agglomeration, but no significant differences between 'gritty' and 'non-gritty' yeast in terms of cell hydrophobicity or flocculence have been reported. In this study, analysis of cellular metal ions has revealed high levels of calcium in 'gritty' strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which suggests that calcium ions may positively influence agglomeration. In contrast, it was found that cellular magnesium levels were higher in 'non-gritty' yeast. Furthermore, by increasing magnesium concentrations in molasses yeast growth media, a reduction in cellular calcium was observed and this concomitantly reduced the tendency of cells to agglomerate and form grit. Magnesium thus acted antagonistically against calcium-induced agglomeration, possibly by blocking calcium binding to yeast cell surface receptors. Results suggested that yeast agglomeration and metal ion bioavailability were inextricably linked and the findings are discussed in relation to possible measures of alleviating cellular agglomeration in the production of baker’s yeast.

  6. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP....

  7. Chemical genomic guided engineering of gamma-valerolactone tolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Scott; Dickinson, Quinn; McGee, Mick; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Hebert, Alex; Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Myers, Chad L; Landick, Robert; Piotrowski, Jeff S

    2018-01-12

    Gamma valerolactone (GVL) treatment of lignocellulosic bomass is a promising technology for degradation of biomass for biofuel production; however, GVL is toxic to fermentative microbes. Using a combination of chemical genomics with the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) deletion collection to identify sensitive and resistant mutants, and chemical proteomics to monitor protein abundance in the presence of GVL, we sought to understand the mechanism toxicity and resistance to GVL with the goal of engineering a GVL-tolerant, xylose-fermenting yeast. Chemical genomic profiling of GVL predicted that this chemical affects membranes and membrane-bound processes. We show that GVL causes rapid, dose-dependent cell permeability, and is synergistic with ethanol. Chemical genomic profiling of GVL revealed that deletion of the functionally related enzymes Pad1p and Fdc1p, which act together to decarboxylate cinnamic acid and its derivatives to vinyl forms, increases yeast tolerance to GVL. Further, overexpression of Pad1p sensitizes cells to GVL toxicity. To improve GVL tolerance, we deleted PAD1 and FDC1 in a xylose-fermenting yeast strain. The modified strain exhibited increased anaerobic growth, sugar utilization, and ethanol production in synthetic hydrolysate with 1.5% GVL, and under other conditions. Chemical proteomic profiling of the engineered strain revealed that enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis were more abundant in the presence of GVL compared to the background strain. The engineered GVL strain contained greater amounts of ergosterol than the background strain. We found that GVL exerts toxicity to yeast by compromising cellular membranes, and that this toxicity is synergistic with ethanol. Deletion of PAD1 and FDC1 conferred GVL resistance to a xylose-fermenting yeast strain by increasing ergosterol accumulation in aerobically grown cells. The GVL-tolerant strain fermented sugars in the presence of GVL levels that were inhibitory to the unmodified strain

  8. Characteristics of fermentation yeast isolated from traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous honey wine, known locally as ogol, was collected in a village of the Majangir ethnic group in Southwest Ethiopia, and the procedure for ogol fermentation was investigated. A fermentation yeast was first isolated from ogol and identified as being a strain of the genus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Honey wine made ...

  9. ( Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ) with Brewers Yeast by Protoplast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haploid auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected from palm wine and propagated by protoplast fusion with Brewers yeast. Fusion resulted in an increase in both ethanol production and tolerance against exogenous ethanol. Mean fusion frequencies obtained for a mating types ranged between 8 x ...

  10. Hybridization of Palm Wine Yeasts ( Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haploid auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected from palm wine and propagated by protoplast fusion with Brewers yeast. Fusion resulted in an increase in both ethanol production and tolerance against exogenous ethanol. Mean fusion frequencies obtained for a mating types ranged between 8 x ...

  11. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast strains. S. cerevisiae showed slightly more secondary components, whereas wild strains produced more higher alcohols. Wild yeast strains were shown to be adequate for the production of a high quality "cachaça".O presente trabalho visou estabelecer uma comparação entre composição de cachaças produzidas por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc e estirpes de leveduras selvagens [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 e Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isoladas em destilarias da região de Jaboticabal-SP. Os componentes secundários da fração denominada coração foram determinados por cromatografia gasosa. Os níveis dos componentes secundários foram influenciados pelo pH dos respectivos vinhos, os quais dependem da estirpe de levedura empregada no processo fermentativo. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae apresentou valores ligeiramente superiores de componentes secundários, enquanto as estirpes selvagens produziram maiores teores de álcoois superiores. As estirpes selvagens de leveduras mostraram-se adequadas para obtenção de uma cachaça de boa qualidade.

  12. Automated Yeast Transformation Protocol to Engineer S. cerevisiae Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production with Open Reading Frames that Express Proteins Binding to Xylose Isomerase Identified using Robotic Two-hybrid Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. Since S. cerevisiae naturally metabolizes xylulose, one approach involves introducing xylose isomerase (XI...

  13. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  14. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  15. Overwintering of vineyard yeasts: survival of interacting yeast communities in grapes mummified on vines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eSipiczki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of grape must into wine involves the development and succession of yeast populations differing in species composition. The initial population is formed by vineyard strains which are washed into the must from the crushed grapes and then completed with yeasts coming from the cellar environment. As the origin and natural habitat of the vineyard yeasts are not fully understood, this study addresses the possibility that grape yeasts can be preserved in berries left behind on vines at harvest until the spring of the next year. These berries become mummified during the winter on the vines. To investigate whether yeasts can survive in these overwintering grapes, mummified berries were collected in 16 localities in the Tokaj wine region (Hungary-Slovakia in early March. The collected berries were rehydrated to recover viable yeasts by plating samples onto agar plates. For the detection of minority species which would not be detected by direct plating, an enrichment step repressing the propagation of alcohol-sensitive yeasts was also included in the process. The morphological, physiological and molecular analysis identified 13 basidiomycetous and 23 ascomycetous species including fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance among the 3879 isolates. The presence of viable strains of these species demonstrates that the grapes mummified on the vine can serve as a safe reservoir of yeasts, and may contribute to the maintenance of grape-colonizing yeast populations in the vineyard over years, parallel with other vectors and habitats. All basidiomycetous species were known phylloplane yeasts. Three Hanseniaspora species and pigmented Metschnikowia strains were the most frequent ascomycetes. Other fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance were detected only in the enrichment cultures. Saccharomyces (S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum were recovered from 13 % of the samples. No Candida zemplinina was found. The isolates with Aureobasidium

  16. Characterization of the Respiration-Induced Yeast Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Patrick C.; Pfeiffer, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    When isolated mitochondria from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidize respiratory substrates in the absence of phosphate and ADP, the yeast mitochondrial unselective channel, also called the yeast permeability transition pore (yPTP), opens in the inner membrane dissipating the electrochemical gradient. ATP also induces yPTP opening. yPTP opening allows mannitol transport into isolated mitochondria of laboratory yeast strains, but mannitol is not readily permeable throug...

  17. Hybridization of halotolerant yeast for alcohol fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limtong, S.

    1991-01-01

    Attempt have been made to construct a new yeast strain from alcohol fermenting strains and salt tolerant strains. It is anticipated that the new yeast strain will be able to ferment alcohol in molasses mash with high salinity, up to 3% of NaCl. Another characteristics is its ability to tolerate up to 40 C temperature which is desirable for alcohol fermentation in tropical countries. Commercial and wild strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were screened for their fermenting ability and strain SC90, 191 TJ3, and AM12 were selected as parental strains for fusion among themselves and with other halo tolerant species. Halo tolerant strains selected at 5% NaCl in molasses mash were tentatively identified as Torulopsis grabrata, T. candida, T. Bovina and S. Rouxii whereas all of those strains selected at 17% NaCl were Citeromyces sp. It was found that fusant TA73 derived from wild strain and sake fermenting strain performed best among 4,087 fusants investigated. This fusant fermented much better than their parental strains when salt concentrations were increased to 5 and 7% NaCl. Experiment was carried out in fermentor, 1.5 liter working volume using molasses mash with 3% NaCl and temperature was controlled at 35 degree C. Fermentation rate of TA73, TJ3 and AM12 were 2.17, 1.50 and 1.87 g/L/hr respectively, Maximum ethanol concentration obtained were 7.6, 6.7 and 7.4% by weight after 60 and 78 hours respectively. Other fusants derived from fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with other halo tolerant species were mostly inferior to their parental strains and only 7 fusants were slightly better than parental strains. (author)

  18. Protein patterns of yeast during sporulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litske Petersen, J.G.; Kielland-Brandt, M.C.; Nilsson-Tillgren, T.

    1979-01-01

    High resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study protein synthesis during synchronous meiosis and ascospore formation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stained protein patterns of samples harvested at any stage between meiotic prophase and the four-spore stage in two sporulating strains showed the same approximately 250 polypeptides. Of these only a few seemed to increase or decrease in concentration during sporulation. The characteristic pattern of sporulating yeast was identical to the pattern of glucose-grown staitonary yeast cells adapted to respiration. The latter type of cells readily initiates meiosis when transferred to sporulation medium. This pattern differed from the protein patterns of exponentially growing cells in glucose or acetate presporulation medium. Five major proteins in stationary and sporulating yeast cells were not detected in either type of exponential culture. Two-dimensional autoradiograms of [ 35 S]methionine-labelled yeast proteins revealed that some proteins were preferentially labelled during sporulation, while other proteins were labelled at later stages. These patterns differed from the auroradiograms of exponentially growing yeast cells in glucose presporulation medium in a number of spots. No differences were observed when stained gels or autoradiograms of sporulating cultures and non-sporulating strains in sporulation medium were compared. (author)

  19. Tailoring wine yeast for the new millennium: novel approaches to the ancient art of winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, I S

    2000-06-15

    Yeasts are predominant in the ancient and complex process of winemaking. In spontaneous fermentations, there is a progressive growth pattern of indigenous yeasts, with the final stages invariably being dominated by the alcohol-tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This species is universally known as the 'wine yeast' and is widely preferred for initiating wine fermentations. The primary role of wine yeast is to catalyze the rapid, complete and efficient conversion of grape sugars to ethanol, carbon dioxide and other minor, but important, metabolites without the development of off-flavours. However, due to the demanding nature of modern winemaking practices and sophisticated wine markets, there is an ever-growing quest for specialized wine yeast strains possessing a wide range of optimized, improved or novel oenological properties. This review highlights the wealth of untapped indigenous yeasts with oenological potential, the complexity of wine yeasts' genetic features and the genetic techniques often used in strain development. The current status of genetically improved wine yeasts and potential targets for further strain development are outlined. In light of the limited knowledge of industrial wine yeasts' complex genomes and the daunting challenges to comply with strict statutory regulations and consumer demands regarding the future use of genetically modified strains, this review cautions against unrealistic expectations over the short term. However, the staggering potential advantages of improved wine yeasts to both the winemaker and consumer in the third millennium are pointed out. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Use of non-conventional yeast improves the wine aroma profile of Ribolla Gialla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashko, Sofia; Zhou, Nerve; Tinta, Tinkara; Sivilotti, Paolo; Lemut, Melita Sternad; Trost, Kajetan; Gamero, Amparo; Boekhout, Teun; Butinar, Lorena; Vrhovsek, Urska; Piskur, Jure

    Consumer wine preferences are changing rapidly towards exotic flavours and tastes. In this work, we tested five non-conventional yeast strains for their potential to improve Ribolla Gialla wine quality. These strains were previously selected from numerous yeasts interesting as food production

  1. The role of lager beer yeast in oxidative stability of model beer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berner, Torben Sune; Arneborg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: In this study, we investigated the relationship between the ability of lager brewing yeast strains to tolerate oxidative stress and their ability to produce oxidative stable model beer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Screening of 21 lager brewing yeast strains against diamide and paraquat showed...

  2. Testing of the bactericidal action of products based on the "hydronic" technology ("informed glass") on ATCC strains of pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Aleksandar; Cipriŝ, Josip

    2010-04-01

    Scientific experiments were conducted with drinking water kept in "ordinary, everyday-use" glasses (drinking tumblers) and the so-called "informed" glasses (drinking tumblers), a patent-protected product supposed to have an effect on the "structure, vitality and memory of water," for which the manufacturer claims to have a wide range of positive effects on the health of patients with chronic medical problems, especially a "revitalizing" effect on water and the body (blue informed glass), additional metabolic effects such as facilitating weight loss (green informed glass), and a stress-relieving action (red informed glass). According to the claims of the patent owner, a Slovenian inventor Vili Poznik, by the use of the "orgone methodology," various transcendental, vitalizing information is purportedly coded and inscribed into the glass; this action is additionally enforced by the addition of the "magic life" symbol--a specially designed energy condenser which, together with the selected information, is permanently introduced into the liquid contained in the glass. The process of selection and transfer of information is a production secret known only to the inventors of the original "hydronic technology" for the discovery of which they have been awarded numerous prizes at innovation fairs, among others, a gold medal and a Crystal Globe at INPEX XVI exhibition in Pittsburgh, PA, in 2000. The aim of this research was to test the claims for informed glasses with respect to the bacteriocidal actions that have been claimed for these products. Given that the manufacturer attributes to the products produced by the "hydronic" technology--besides the effects on organoleptic properties of the drinking water consumed (which are subjective and liable to suggestion)--a broad bactericidal action against bacteria, yeasts, and molds but does not state a single scientific proof, the efficacy and bactericidal action of the products based on the hydronic technology were tested using

  3. Surface engineering of polyester-degrading enzymes to improve efficiency and tune specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Antonino; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M

    2018-04-01

    Certain members of the carboxylesterase superfamily can act at the interface between water and water-insoluble substrates. However, nonnatural bulky polyesters usually are not efficiently hydrolyzed. In the recent years, the potential of enzyme engineering to improve hydrolysis of synthetic polyesters has been demonstrated. Regions on the enzyme surface have been modified by using site-directed mutagenesis in order to tune sorption processes through increased hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface. Such modifications can involve specific amino acid substitutions, addition of binding modules, or truncation of entire domains improving sorption properties and/or dynamics of the enzyme. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on different strategies developed in the recent years for enzyme surface engineering to improve the activity of polyester-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  4. Surface Engineering of ZnO Thin Film for High Efficiency Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Zong-Liang; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2015-09-01

    Sputtering made ZnO thin film was used as an electron-transport layer in a regular planar perovskite solar cell based on high quality CH3NH3PbI3 absorber prepared with a two-step spin-coating. An efficiency up to 15.9% under AM 1.5G irradiation is achieved for the cell based on ZnO film fabricated under Ar working gas. The atmosphere of the sputtering chamber can tune the surface electronic properties (band structure) of the resulting ZnO thin film and therefore the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding perovskite solar cell. Precise surface engineering of ZnO thin film was found to be one of the key steps to fabricate ZnO based regular planar perovskite solar cell with high power conversion efficiency. Sputtering method is proved to be one of the excellent techniques to prepare ZnO thin film with controllable properties.

  5. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  6. Technological properties of bakers' yeasts in durum wheat semolina dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Virgilio; Longo, Chiara; Damigella, Arcangelo; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Spina, Alfio; Palumbo, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Properties of 13 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different sources (traditional sourdoughs, industrial baking yeasts etc.) were studied in dough produced with durum wheat (Sicilian semolina, variety Mongibello). Durum wheat semolina and durum wheat flour are products prepared from grain of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) by grinding or milling processes in which the bran and germ are essentially removed and the remainder is comminuted to a suitable degree of fineness. Acidification and leavening properties of the dough were evaluated. Strains isolated from traditional sourdoughs (DSM PST18864, DSM PST18865 and DSM PST18866) showed higher leavening power, valuable after the first and second hours of fermentation, than commercial baking yeasts. In particular the strain DSM PST 18865 has also been successfully tested in bakery companies for the improvement of production processes. Baking and staling tests were carried out on five yeast strains to evaluate their fermentation ability directly and their resistance to the staling process. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) was used to investigate genetic variations in the yeast strains. This study showed an appreciable biodiversity in the microbial populations of both wild and commercial yeast strains.

  7. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  8. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  9. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used...... adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol...... desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype....

  10. Yeast interactions in inoculated wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio eCiani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process.

  11. Screening of oleaginous yeast with xylose assimilating capacity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in industrial-scale production. In our preliminary study, 57 oleaginous yeast with xylose assimilating capacity were isolated from 13 soil samples, 16 strains were identified as potential lipid biomass producer. Four strains which showed higher lipid content were used for further ethanol fermentation at different conditions.

  12. The study of the influence of temperature and initial glucose concentration on the fermentation process in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain immobilized on starch gels by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2012-01-01

    The technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC) was employed for the determination of the alcoholic fermentation phases and of kinetic parameters for free and immobilized cell systems, at different initial glucose concentrations and temperature values. In addition to this, due to its considerable advantages over other techniques, RFGC was used for the characterization of a new biocatalyst, yeast cells immobilized on starch gel, and especially wheat starch gel. Immobilization of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1 was accomplished on wheat and corn starch gels in order to prepare new biocatalysts with great interest for the fermentation industry. The RFGC led with great accuracy, resulting from a literature review, to the determination of reaction rate constants and activation energies at each phase of the fermentation processes. A maximum value of rate constants was observed at initial glucose concentration of 205 g/L, where a higher number of yeast cells was observed. The increase of glucose concentrations had a negative influence on the growth of AXAZ-1 cells and rate constants were decreased. The decrease of fermentation temperature caused a substantial reduction in the viability of immobilized cells as well as in rate constant values. Activation energies of corn starch gel presented lower values than those of wheat starch gel. However, the two supports showed higher catalytic efficiency than free cell systems, proving that starch gels may act as a promoter of the catalytic activity of the yeast cells involved in the fermentation process.

  13. Yeast cell wall chitin reduces wine haze formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Thulile; Divol, Benoit; Bauer, Florian F

    2018-04-27

    Protein haze formation in bottled wines is a significant concern for the global wine industry and wine clarification before bottling is therefore a common but expensive practice. Previous studies have shown that wine yeast strains can reduce haze formation through the secretion of certain mannoproteins, but it has been suggested that other yeast-dependent haze protective mechanisms exist. On the other hand, addition of chitin has been shown to reduce haze formation, likely because grape chitinases have been shown to be the major contributors to haze. In this study, Chardonnay grape must fermented by various yeast strains resulted in wines with different protein haze levels indicating differences in haze protective capacities of the strains. The cell wall chitin levels of these strains were determined, and a strong correlation between cell wall chitin levels and haze protection capability was observed. To further evaluate the mechanism of haze protection, Escherichia coli -produced GFP-tagged grape chitinase was shown to bind efficiently to yeast cell walls in a cell wall chitin concentration-dependent manner, while commercial chitinase was removed from synthetic wine in quantities also correlated with the cell wall chitin levels of the strains. Our findings suggest a new mechanism of reducing wine haze, and propose a strategy for optimizing wine yeast strains to improve wine clarification. Importance In this study, we establish a new mechanism by which wine yeast strains can impact on the protein haze formation of wines, and demonstrate that yeast cell wall chitin binds grape chitinase in a chitin-concentration dependent manner. We also show that yeast can remove this haze-forming protein from wine. Chitin has in the past been shown to efficiently reduce wine haze formation when added to the wine in high concentration as a clarifying agent. Our data suggest that the selection of yeast strains with high levels of cell wall chitin can reduce protein haze. We also

  14. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  15. Negative H2S character and flocculation as yeast strain markers for inoculum recovery O carater H2S negativo e a floculação como marcadores de leveduras na recuperação de inóculo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto França Ribeiro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Routine identification of yeast behavior is essential to measure the control of the alcohol production process and to maintain product quality standards. This work utilized the non-hydrogen sulfide production and flocculation traits as characteristic strain markers for the evaluation of cell recycling during the alcoholic fermentation process for production of sugarcane alcohol. This study evaluated the behavior of a recombinant yeast bank made by protoplast fusion, for strain screening purposes; strain fermentative kinetics in comparison to commercial baker yeast; viability and recovery of the selected strain on differential media, after five consecutive fermentation batches; and the recovery of the selected strain from fermentation with mixed strain cultures. The strain selected for the H2S negative character kept its viability during successive recyclings, with contamination levels not detected by the method of analysis. It also presented a kinetic behavior similar to that of baker yeast, either in single or mixed culture fermentations, opening new possibilities for further work on quality control of cell recycling in the alcoholic fermentation process.A identificação rotineira do comportamento das leveduras é essencial à manutenção do controle e do padrão de qualidade dos processos fermentativos para produção de álcool. Em função da baixa freqüência de ocorrência de leveduras não produtoras de ácido sulfídrico e floculantes, pretendeu-se neste trabalho utilizar estas características como marcadores de linhagem na avaliação da reciclagem de células em processos de fermentação alcoólica do caldo de cana para a produção de aguardente. O trabalho foi elaborado com base no acompanhamento das características de um banco de leveduras recombinantes produzidas por fusão de protoplastos para seleção de linhagem; no acompanhamento da cinética fermentativa da linhagem selecionada em comparação ao fermento de panifica

  16. Adding Flavor to Beverages with Non-Conventional Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ravasio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungi produce a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs during their primary and secondary metabolism. In the beverage industry, these volatiles contribute to the the flavor and aroma profile of the final products. We evaluated the fermentation ability and aroma profiles of non-conventional yeasts that have been associated with various food sources. A total of 60 strains were analyzed with regard to their fermentation and flavor profile. Species belonging to the genera Candida, Pichia and Wickerhamomyces separated best from lager yeast strains according to a principal component analysis taking alcohol and ester production into account. The speed of fermentation and sugar utilization were analysed for these strains. Volatile aroma-compound formation was assayed via gas chromatography. Several strains produced substantially higher amounts of aroma alcohols and esters compared to the lager yeast strain Weihenstephan 34/70. Consequently, co-fermentation of this lager yeast strain with a Wickerhamomyces anomalus strain generated an increased fruity-flavour profile. This demonstrates that mixed fermentations utilizing non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae biodiversity can enhance the flavour profiles of fermented beverages.

  17. Bioprospection of yeasts as biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Maria Rosa-Magri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts isolated from sugar cane and maize rhizosphere, leaves and stalks were screened against the phytopathogenic molds Colletotrichum sublineolum and Colletotrichum graminicola, both causal agents of the anthracnose disease in sorghum and maize, respectively. Strains identified as Torulaspora globosa and Candida intermedia were able to inhibit the mold growth, with the first species also exhibiting killer activity. No previous report on the application and potentiality of these yeasts as biocontrol agents were found neither the killer phenotype in Torulaspora globosa.

  18. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  19. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Direct protein quantification in complex sample solutions by surface-engineered nanorod probes

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2017-06-30

    Detecting biomarkers from complex sample solutions is the key objective of molecular diagnostics. Being able to do so in a simple approach that does not require laborious sample preparation, sophisticated equipment and trained staff is vital for point-of-care applications. Here, we report on the specific detection of the breast cancer biomarker sHER2 directly from serum and saliva samples by a nanorod-based homogeneous biosensing approach, which is easy to operate as it only requires mixing of the samples with the nanorod probes. By careful nanorod surface engineering and homogeneous assay design, we demonstrate that the formation of a protein corona around the nanoparticles does not limit the applicability of our detection method, but on the contrary enables us to conduct in-situ reference measurements, thus further strengthening the point-of-care applicability of our method. Making use of sandwich assays on top of the nanorods, we obtain a limit of detection of 110 pM and 470 pM in 10-fold diluted spiked saliva and serum samples, respectively. In conclusion, our results open up numerous applications in direct protein biomarker quantification, specifically in point-of-care settings where resources are limited and ease-of-use is of essence.

  1. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  2. Engineering yeast metabolism for production of fuels and chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    faster development of metabolically engineered strains that can be used for production of fuels and chemicals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials. Through metabolic engineering of this yeast a number of novel industrial...... as for metabolic design. In this lecture it will be demonstrated how the Design-Build-Test cycle of metabolic engineering has allowed for development of yeast cell factories for production of a range of different fuels and chemicals. Some examples of different technologies will be presented together with examples...

  3. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase. PMID:24949272

  4. Direct concentration and viability measurement of yeast in corn mash using a novel imaging cytometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leo L; Lyettefi, Emily J; Pirani, Alnoor; Smith, Tim; Qiu, Jean; Lin, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Worldwide awareness of fossil-fuel depletion and global warming has been increasing over the last 30 years. Numerous countries, including the USA and Brazil, have introduced large-scale industrial fermentation facilities for bioethanol, biobutanol, or biodiesel production. Most of these biofuel facilities perform fermentation using standard baker's yeasts that ferment sugar present in corn mash, sugar cane, or other glucose media. In research and development in the biofuel industry, selection of yeast strains (for higher ethanol tolerance) and fermentation conditions (yeast concentration, temperature, pH, nutrients, etc.) can be studied to optimize fermentation performance. Yeast viability measurement is needed to identify higher ethanol-tolerant yeast strains, which may prolong the fermentation cycle and increase biofuel output. In addition, yeast concentration may be optimized to improve fermentation performance. Therefore, it is important to develop a simple method for concentration and viability measurement of fermenting yeast. In this work, we demonstrate an imaging cytometry method for concentration and viability measurements of yeast in corn mash directly from operating fermenters. It employs an automated cell counter, a dilution buffer, and staining solution from Nexcelom Bioscience to perform enumeration. The proposed method enables specific fluorescence detection of viable and nonviable yeasts, which can generate precise results for concentration and viability of yeast in corn mash. This method can provide an essential tool for research and development in the biofuel industry and may be incorporated into manufacturing to monitor yeast concentration and viability efficiently during the fermentation process.

  5. Forces in yeast flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  6. Surface-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying α-acetolactate decarboxylase from Acetobacter aceti ssp xylinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejnar, Rudolf; Hložková, Kateřina; Kotrba, Pavel; Dostálek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    To convert α-acetolactate into acetoin by an α-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) to prevent its conversion into diacetyl that gives beer an unfavourable buttery flavour. We constructed a whole Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell catalyst with a truncated active ALDC from Acetobacter aceti ssp xylinum attached to the cell wall using the C-terminal anchoring domain of α-agglutinin. ALDC variants in which 43 and 69 N-terminal residues were absent performed equally well and had significantly decreased amounts of diacetyl during fermentation. With these cells, the highest concentrations of diacetyl observed during fermentation were 30 % less than those in wort fermented with control yeasts displaying only the anchoring domain and, unlike the control, virtually no diacetyl was present in wort after 7 days of fermentation. Since modification of yeasts with ALDC variants did not affect their fermentation performance, the display of α-acetolactate decarboxylase activity is an effective approach to decrease the formation of diacetyl during beer fermentation.

  7. Molecular assessment of indigenous yeast population from traditional balsamic vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solieri, L; Landi, S; De Vero, L; Giudici, P

    2006-07-01

    To identify and describe the indigenous yeast population involved in traditional balsamic vinegar (TBV) fermentation. Using the restriction analysis of the ribosomal region 5.8S (5.8S rRNA) and the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (5.8S-ITS region) we were able to group 133 strains isolated from 17 cooked grape must samples into 10 different yeast species, included into 4 genera. Moreover, we sequenced the D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA and confirmed the reliability of each identification at species level. Most strains belonged to the genus Zygosaccharomyces. In particular, Zygosaccharomyces bailii was found in 41% of the samples, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii and Candida stellata. Strains belonging respectively to Zygosaccharomyces mellis, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora osmophila and Candida lactis-condensi species were also detected. Despite the great number of species recovered, the mtDNA restriction profiles showed low variability at strain level. Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates with an higher degree of intraspecific variance were considered an exception. Many different indigenous yeast species were recovered and TBV yeasts population seems to be far more complex than what was reported in previous literature. This study has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the indigenous yeast species of TBV cooked must.

  8. Yeast selection for fuel ethanol production in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Luiz C; de Amorim, Henrique V; de Oliveira, Antonio J; Lopes, Mario L

    2008-11-01

    Brazil is one of the largest ethanol biofuel producers and exporters in the world and its production has increased steadily during the last three decades. The increasing efficiency of Brazilian ethanol plants has been evident due to the many technological contributions. As far as yeast is concerned, few publications are available regarding the industrial fermentation processes in Brazil. The present paper reports on a yeast selection program performed during the last 12 years aimed at selecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suitable for fermentation of sugar cane substrates (cane juice and molasses) with cell recycle, as it is conducted in Brazilian bioethanol plants. As a result, some evidence is presented showing the positive impact of selected yeast strains in increasing ethanol yield and reducing production costs, due to their higher fermentation performance (high ethanol yield, reduced glycerol and foam formation, maintenance of high viability during recycling and very high implantation capability into industrial fermenters). Results also suggest that the great yeast biodiversity found in distillery environments could be an important source of strains. This is because during yeast cell recycling, selective pressure (an adaptive evolution) is imposed on cells, leading to strains with higher tolerance to the stressful conditions of the industrial fermentation.

  9. Nano surface engineering of Mn 2 O 3 for potential light-harvesting application

    KAUST Repository

    Kar, Prasenjit

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides are well known applied materials including their use as efficient catalysts for various environmental applications. Multiple oxidation states and their change due to various experimental conditions are concluded to be responsible for their multifaceted functionality. Here we demonstrate that the interaction of a small organic ligand with one of the oxide varieties induces completely new optical properties and functionalities (photocatalysis). We have synthesized Mn2O3 microspheres via a hydrothermal route and characterized them using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and elemental mapping (EDAX). When the microspheres are allowed to interact with the biologically important small ligand citrate, nanometer-sized surface functionalized Mn2O3 (NPs) are formed. Raman and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy confirm the covalent attachment of the citrate ligand to the dangling bond of Mn at the material surface. While cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirm multiple surface charge states after the citrate functionalization of the Mn2O3 NPs, new optical properties of the surface engineered nanomaterials in terms of absorption and emission emerge consequently. The engineered material offers a novel photocatalytic functionality to the model water contaminant methylene blue (MB). The effect of doping other metal ions including Fe3+ and Cu2+ on the optical and catalytic properties is also investigated. In order to prepare a prototype for potential environmental application of water decontamination, we have synthesized and duly functionalized the material on the extended surface of a stainless steel metal mesh (size 2 cm × 1.5 cm, pore size 150 μm × 200 μm). We demonstrate that the functionalized mesh always works as a "physical" filter of suspended particulates. However, it works as a "chemical" filter (photocatalyst) for the potential water soluble contaminant (MB) in the presence

  10. Biofuels. Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Felix H; Ghaderi, Adel; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-10-03

    Ethanol toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. The elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolsters these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged, with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding those of industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Taming wild yeast: potential of conventional and nonconventional yeasts in industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are the main driving force behind several industrial food fermentation processes, including the production of beer, wine, sake, bread, and chocolate. Historically, these processes developed from uncontrolled, spontaneous fermentation reactions that rely on a complex mixture of microbes present in the environment. Because such spontaneous processes are generally inconsistent and inefficient and often lead to the formation of off-flavors, most of today's industrial production utilizes defined starter cultures, often consisting of a specific domesticated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, or S. pastorianus. Although this practice greatly improved process consistency, efficiency, and overall quality, it also limited the sensorial complexity of the end product. In this review, we discuss how Saccharomyces yeasts were domesticated to become the main workhorse of food fermentations, and we investigate the potential and selection of nonconventional yeasts that are often found in spontaneous fermentations, such as Brettanomyces, Hanseniaspora, and Pichia spp.

  12. Unsuspected pyocyanin effect in yeast under anaerobiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Rana; Goubet, Isabelle; Manon, Stephen; Berges, Thierry; Rosenfeld, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The blue-green phenazine, Pyocyanin (PYO), is a well-known virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, notably during cystic fibrosis lung infections. It is toxic to both eukaryotic and bacterial cells and several mechanisms, including the induction of oxidative stress, have been postulated. However, the mechanism of PYO toxicity under the physiological conditions of oxygen limitation that are encountered by P. aeruginosa and by target organisms in vivo remains unclear. In this study, wild-type and mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as an effective eukaryotic model to determine the toxicity of PYO (100-500 μmol/L) under key growth conditions. Under respiro-fermentative conditions (with glucose as substrate), WT strains and certain H2 O2 -hypersensitive strains showed a low-toxic response to PYO. Under respiratory conditions (with glycerol as substrate) all the strains tested were significantly more sensitive to PYO. Four antioxidants were tested but only N-acetylcysteine was capable of partially counteracting PYO toxicity. PYO did not appear to affect short-term respiratory O2 uptake, but it did seem to interfere with cyanide-poisoned mitochondria through a complex III-dependent mechanism. Therefore, a combination of oxidative stress and respiration disturbance could partly explain aerobic PYO toxicity. Surprisingly, the toxic effects of PYO were more significant under anaerobic conditions. More pronounced effects were observed in several strains including a 'petite' strain lacking mitochondrial DNA, strains with increased or decreased levels of ABC transporters, and strains deficient in DNA damage repair. Therefore, even though PYO is toxic for actively respiring cells, O2 may indirectly protect the cells from the higher anaerobic-linked toxicity of PYO. The increased sensitivity to PYO under anaerobic conditions is not unique to S. cerevisiae and was also observed in another yeast, Candida albicans. © 2013 The Authors

  13. Inhibition spectrum studies of microthecin and other anhydrofructose derivatives using selected strains of Gram-positive and –negative bacteria, yeast and moulds, and investigation of the cytotoxicity of microthecin to malignant blood cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiskesund, R.; Thomas, L.V.; Schobert, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To prepare 1,5-anhydro-d-fructose (AF) derivatives, test their microbial inhibition spectrum, and to further examine the most effective AF derivative against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and malignant blood cell lines. Methods and Results: Microthecin and nine other AF derivatives were synthesized...... from AF. The 10 compounds were tested in vitro against Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, yeasts and moulds using a well diffusion method and in a Bioscreen growth analyser. Of the test compounds, microthecin exhibited the most significant antibacterial activity at 100–2000 ppm against...

  14. Breeding of lager yeast with Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves stress resistance and fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Sanchez, Rosa; Solodovnikova, Natalia; Wendland, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Lager beer brewing relies on strains collectively known as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, which are hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus-like strains. Lager yeasts are particularly adapted to low-temperature fermentations. Selection of new yeast strains for improved traits or fermentation performance is laborious, due to the allotetraploid nature of lager yeasts. Initially, we have generated new F1 hybrids by classical genetics, using spore clones of lager yeast and S. cerevisiae and complementation of auxotrophies of the single strains upon mating. These hybrids were improved on several parameters, including growth at elevated temperature and resistance against high osmolarity or high ethanol concentrations. Due to the uncertainty of chromosomal make-up of lager yeast spore clones, we introduced molecular markers to analyse mating-type composition by PCR. Based on these results, new hybrids between a lager and an ale yeast strain were isolated by micromanipulation. These hybrids were not subject to genetic modification. We generated and verified 13 hybrid strains. All of these hybrid strains showed improved stress resistance as seen in the ale parent, including improved survival at the end of fermentation. Importantly, some of the strains showed improved fermentation rates using 18° Plato at 18-25°C. Uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance was observed mostly from the S. cerevisiae parent. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Formation of self-organized periodic patterns around yeasts secreting a precursor of a red pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Staneviciene, Ramune; Balynaite, Algima; Vaiciuniene, Jurate; Garjonyte, Rasa

    2016-12-01

    Formation of self-organized regular patterns (Liesegang patterns) due to reaction-diffusion process in the gel medium and related to vital activity of yeasts is presented. Two different yeast strains (Candida pulcherrima and non-Candida pulcherrima) possess a common characteristic feature to secrete a precursor which in the presence of iron(III) ions forms an insoluble red pigment. During yeast cultivation onto solid agar media, periodic spontaneous distinctly spaced red-colored patterns around the yeasts can are formed if the concentration of elemental iron in the growth media is in the range 4-12mg/L. By changing the composition yeast growth media (YEPD or minimal), growth time and temperature, the mode of yeast inoculation, a variety of red-pigmented patterns around live and proliferating yeasts can be obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct ethanol production from cellulosic materials using cellulase-displaying genes integrated with yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Yanase, Shuhei; Yamada, Ryosuke; Kaneko, Shohei; Noda, Hideo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We demonstrate direct ethanol fermentation from amorphous cellulose using cellulase-co-expressing yeast. Endoglucanases (EG), cellobiohydrolases (CBH) from Trichoderma reesei, and ?-glucosidases (BGL) from Aspergillus aculeatus were integrated into genomes of the yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae MT8-1. BGL was displayed on the yeast cell surface and both EG and CBH were secreted or displayed on the cell surface. All enzymes were successfully expressed on the cell surf...

  17. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-09-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth.

  18. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  19. Functional surface engineering of C-dots for fluorescent biosensing and in vivo bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changqin; Zhu, Anwei; Tian, Yang

    2014-01-21

    Nanoparticles are promising scaffolds for applications such as imaging, chemical sensors and biosensors, diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, energy, photonics, medicine, and more. Surface functionalization of nanoparticles introduces an additional dimension in controlling nanoparticle interfacial properties and provides an effective bridge to connect nanoparticles to biological systems. With fascinating photoluminescence properties, carbon dots (C-dots), carbon-containing nanoparticles that are attracting considerable attention as a new type of quantum dot, are becoming both an important class of imaging probes and a versatile platform for engineering multifunctional nanosensors. In order to transfer C-dots from proof-of-concept studies toward real world applications such as in vivo bioimaging and biosensing, careful design and engineering of C-dot probes is becoming increasingly important. A comprehensive knowledge of how C-dot surfaces with various properties behave is essential for engineering C-dots with useful imaging properties such as high quantum yield, stability, and low toxicity, and with desirable biosensing properties such as high selectivity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Several reviews in recent years have reported preparation methods and properties of C-dots and described their application in biosensors, catalysis, photovoltatic cells, and more. However, no one has yet systematically summarized the surface engineering of C-dots, nor the use of C-dots as fluorescent nanosensors or probes for in vivo imaging in cells, tissues, and living organisms. In this Account, we discuss the major design principles and criteria for engineering the surface functionality of C-dots for biological applications. These criteria include brightness, long-term stability, and good biocompatibility. We review recent developments in designing C-dot surfaces with various functionalities for use as nanosensors or as fluorescent probes with fascinating analytical performance

  20. Yeast diversity on grapes in two German wine growing regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysch-Herzberg, Michael; Seidel, Martin

    2015-12-02

    The yeast diversity on wine grapes in Germany, one of the most northern wine growing regions of the world, was investigated by means of a culture dependent approach. All yeast isolates were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ITS region. Besides Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, which are well known to be abundant on grapes, Metschnikowia viticola, Rhodosporidium babjevae, and Curvibasidium pallidicorallinum, as well as two potentially new species related to Sporidiobolus pararoseus and Filobasidium floriforme, turned out to be typical members of the grape yeast community. We found M. viticola in about half of the grape samples in high abundance. Our data strongly suggest that M. viticola is one of the most important fermenting yeast species on grapes in the temperate climate of Germany. The frequent occurrence of Cu. pallidicorallinum and strains related to F. floriforme is a new finding. The current investigation provides information on the distribution of recently described yeast species, some of which are known from a very few strains up to now. Interestingly yeasts known for their role in the wine making process, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus ssp. uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, were not found in the grape samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The Yeast Deletion Collection: A Decade of Functional Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-01-01

    The yeast deletion collections comprise >21,000 mutant strains that carry precise start-to-stop deletions of ∼6000 open reading frames. This collection includes heterozygous and homozygous diploids, and haploids of both MATa and MATα mating types. The yeast deletion collection, or yeast knockout (YKO) set, represents the first and only complete, systematically constructed deletion collection available for any organism. Conceived during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequencing project, work on the project began in 1998 and was completed in 2002. The YKO strains have been used in numerous laboratories in >1000 genome-wide screens. This landmark genome project has inspired development of numerous genome-wide technologies in organisms from yeast to man. Notable spinoff technologies include synthetic genetic array and HIPHOP chemogenomics. In this retrospective, we briefly describe the yeast deletion project and some of its most noteworthy biological contributions and the impact that these collections have had on the yeast research community and on genomics in general. PMID:24939991

  2. Identification of spoilage yeasts in a food-production chain by microsatellite polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baleiras Couto, M.M.; Hartog, B.J.; Veld, J.H.J. Huis in 't; Hofstra, H.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    1996-01-01

    A survey of yeast strains present in the production chain of mayonnaise and salad dressings was carried out over a period of 14 months. Attempts were made to identify the isolated yeasts with the API system, but identification of all species involved was not possible. In the investigation the

  3. Identification and assessment of kefir yeast potential for sugar/ethanol-resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, M.G.C.P.; Cardoso, P.G.; Magalhães-Guedes, K.T.; Schwan, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular analysis was used for identification of different kefir yeasts species from Brazil, Canada and the United States of America. The sugar/ethanol-resistant activity of the yeasts was evaluated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus had the highest growth rates, suggesting biotechnological applications possible for these strains. PMID:24159292

  4. Effects of metal salt catalysts on yeast cell growth in ethanol conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Yin Lin

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the addition of metal salts and metal salt-catalyzed hydrolyzates on yeast cell growth in ethanol fermentation were investigated. Four yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae WT1, Saccharomyces cerevisiae MT81, Candida sp. 1779, and Klumaromyces fragilis), four metal salts (CuCl2, FeCl3, AgNO3, and I2), two metal salt-catalyzed hydrolyzates (...

  5. Response of primiparous and multiparous buffaloes to yeast culture supplementation during early and mid-lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne H.; El-Bordeny, Nasr E.; Ebeid, Hossam M.

    2017-01-01

    Strains of live Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast have exhibited probiotic effects in ruminants. This study investigated the effects of the dietary yeast supplement, S. cerevisiae (Yea-Sacc1026), on primiparous (PP) and multiparous (MP) Egyptian buffaloes in early to mid-lactation. Lactating buffalo...

  6. Glycobiology in yeast: production of bio-ative biopolymers and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheller, Henrik [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The accomplished goals of the CRADA were the establishment of a yeast strain capable of producing levels of vanillin suitable for commercial production and the identification of novel glycosyltransferases to construct the biosynthetic pathway of a gum Arabic-variant in yeast.

  7. Fermentation characteristics of yeasts isolated from traditionally fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, C.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains were characterized to select potential starter cultures for the production of masau fermented beverages. The yeast species originally isolated from Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits and their traditionally fermented fruit pulp in Zimbabwe were examined for their ability to ferment

  8. Remanence and survival of commercial yeast in different ecological niches of the vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Arroyo, Teresa; Serrano, Ana; Valero, Eva

    2011-08-01

    The use of commercial wine yeast strains as starters has been grown extensively over the past three decades. Wine yeasts are annually released in winery environments; however, little is known about the fate of these strains in the vineyard. To evaluate the industrial starter yeasts' ability to survive in nature and become part of the natural microbiota of musts, commercial yeast was disseminated voluntarily in an experimental vineyard in the Madrid region (Spain). A large sampling plan was devised over 3 years, including samples of grapes, leaves, bark and soil. The disseminated yeast was well represented in the vineyard during the first 8 months. After 2 years, the commercial yeast strain had not survived in the sprayed plants, but a residual population was found in plants situated 50 m east of the sprayed area. After 3 years, commercial yeast disseminated was not found in the sampled vineyard. Grapes and soil showed the highest number of yeasts isolated in the vegetative period, the bark being the main natural reservoir during the resting stages. The result of analysis of population variations from year to year indicated that permanent implantation of commercial strain (K1M) in the vineyard did not occur and its presence was limited in time. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetics of Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  10. Yeasts from autochthonal cheese starters: technological and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, A; Carrasco, M; Reinheimer, J; Suárez, V

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to identify 20 yeasts isolated from autochthonal cheese starters and evaluate their technological and functional properties. The capacities of the yeasts to grow at different temperatures, pH, NaCl and lactic acid concentrations as well as the proteolytic and lipolytic activities were studied. Moreover, survival to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, hydrophobicity, antimicrobial activity against pathogens and auto- and co-aggregation abilities were evaluated. The sequentiation of a fragment from the 26S rDNA gene indicated that Kluyveromyces marxianus was the predominant species, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Galactomyces geotrichum. RAPD with primer M13 allowed a good differentiation among strains from the same species. All strains normally grew at pH 4.7-5.5 and temperatures between 15 and 35°C. Most of them tolerated 10% NaCl and 3% lactic acid. Some strains showed proteolytic (eight isolates) and/or lipolytic (four isolates) capacities. All strains evidenced high gastrointestinal resistance, moderate hydrophobicity, intermediate auto-aggregation and variable co-aggregation abilities. No strains inhibited the growth of the pathogens assayed. Some strains from dairy sources showed interesting functional and technological properties. This study has been the first contribution to the identification and characterization of yeasts isolated from autochthonal cheese starters in Argentina. Many strains could be proposed as potential candidates to be used as probiotics and/or as co-starters in cheese productions. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Scheffersomyces cryptocercus: a new xylose-fermenting yeast associated with the gut of wood roaches and new combinations in the Sugiyamaella yeast clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Hector; Frank, Robert; Blackwell, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    The gut of wood-feeding insects is a microhabitat for a specialized community of microbes, including bacteria and several groups of eukaryotes such as nematodes, parabasalids and fungi. The characterization of gut yeast communities from a variety of insects has shown that certain yeasts often are associated with the insects. The gut of wood-feeding insects is rich in ascomycete yeasts and in particular xylose-fermenting (X-F) and assimilating yeasts have been consistently present in the gut of lignicolous insects. The objective of this study was the characterization of the yeast flora from the gut of the wood roach Cryptocercus sp. (Blattodea: Cryptocercidae). Five wood roaches were collected along the Appalachian Trail near the border between Tennessee and North Carolina, USA. We isolated 18 yeast strains from the wood roaches identified as Sugiyamaella paludigena and Sugiyamaella lignohabitans, xylose-assimilating yeasts, and Scheffersomyces cryptocercus (NRRL Y-48824(T) = CBS 12658) a new species of X-F yeast. The presence of X-F and certain non X-F yeasts in the gut of the subsocial wood roach Cryptocercus sp. extends the previous findings of associations between certain ascomycete yeasts and lignicolous insects. New combinations were made for 13 asexual members of the Sugiyamaella clade.

  12. Phytase-producing capacity of yeasts isolated from traditional African fermented food products and PHYPk gene expression of Pichia kudriavzevii strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greppi, Anna; Krych, Lukasz; Costantini, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Phytate is known as a strong chelate of minerals causing their reduced uptake by the human intestine. Ninety-three yeast isolates from traditional African fermented food products, belonging to nine species (Pichia kudriavzevii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kluyveromyces...... marxianus, Millerozyma farinosa, Candida glabrata, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Debaryomyces nepalensis) were screened for phytase production on solid and liquid media. 95% were able to grow in the presence of phytate as sole phosphate source, P. kudriavzevii being the best...... growing species. A phytase coding gene of P. kudriavzevii (PHYPk) was identified and its expression was studied during growth by RT-qPCR. The expression level of PHYPk was significantly higher in phytate-medium, compared to phosphate-medium. In phytate-medium expression was seen in the lag phase...

  13. EVALUACIÓN DEL CONTENIDO DE NUTRIENTES Y PRODUCCIÓN DE BIOMASA EN CEPAS DE LEVADURA COLOMBIANAS Y COMERCIALES EVALUATION OF THE NUTRIENT CONTENT AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION IN COLOMBIAN AND COMMERCIAL YEAST STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohora Patricia Manovacía Moreno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se evaluó la producción de biomasa, el contenido de algunos nutrientes (selenio, carbohidratos totales y proteína microbiana y el consumo de sustrato de cepas de levaduras comerciales y nativas pertenecientes al Banco de Germoplasma de la Nación Colombiana, manejado por la Corporación Colombiana de Investigación Agropecuaria, CORPOICA. Inicialmente se determinó el crecimiento de tres levaduras nativas seleccionadas al azar bajo diferentes condiciones de pH, temperatura y tiempo de fermentación usando un medio líquido de extracto de malta. Dentro de estas condiciones, las mejores respuestas se observaron a pH de 4,5, 25 °C y 24 horas de fermentación. Usando estas condiciones se evaluaron 100 accesiones de levaduras nativas y 4 comerciales por su producción de biomasa, contenido de selenio, carbohidratos totales y proteína microbiana y consumo de sustratos. De acuerdo con estas variables y un análisis de conglomerados fue posible agrupar las levaduras en grupos homogéneos. Hubo elevada variabilidad en la producción de biomasa entre las 104 cepas evaluadas, probablemente debido a la variabilidad biológica existente en la población estudiada. Los rendimientos de biomasa variaron entre 0,101 y 0,480 g de biomasa g-1 de azúcar consumido y las velocidades de producción de biomasa oscilaron entre 0,040 y 0,185 g L-1 h-1. El consumo promedio de nutrientes (g de nutrientes consumidos/ g de nutrientes disponibles fue de 91,6% en el caso de los carbohidratos y de 17,8% en el caso de la proteína. Se identificaron diez cepas de superior crecimiento y contenido de nutrientes, cuyo potencial prebiótico y probiótico será evaluado en futuros ensayos In vivo.In the present study biomass production and nutrient (selenium, total carbohydrate and microbial protein were evaluated in both commercial and native yeast isolates from the Colombian Germplasm Bank managed by the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural Research

  14. Characteristics of the Storage Stability for Different Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Gomaa N. Abdel-Rahman; Nadia R. A. Nassar; Yehia A. Heikal; Mahmoud A. M. Abou-Donia; Mohamed B. M. Ahmed; Mohamed Fadel

    2017-01-01

    Storage stability is the important factor of baker's yeast quality. Effect of the storage period (fifteen days) on storage sugars and cell viability of baker's yeast, produced from three S. cerevisiae strains (FC-620, FH-620, and FAT-12) as comparison with baker's yeast produced by S. cerevisae F-707 (original strain of baker's yeast factory) were investigated. Studied trehalose and glycogen content ranged from 10.19 to 14.79 % and from 10.05 to 10.69 % (d.w.), respectively before storage. Th...

  15. Isolation and characterization of yeasts from fermented apple bagasse as additives for ruminant feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Castillo, Y; Ruiz-Barrera, O; Burrola-Barraza, M E; Marrero-Rodriguez, Y; Salinas-Chavira, J; Angulo-Montoya, C; Corral-Luna, A; Arzola-Alvarez, C; Itza-Ortiz, M; Camarillo, J

    Solid-state fermentation can be used to produce feeds for ruminants, which can provide an enriched population of yeasts to improve ruminal fermentation. Fermentation of apple bagasse was performed to obtain a yeast-rich product, with the objective of isolating, identifying, and characterizing yeast strains and testing their capability to enhance in vitro ruminal fermentation of fibrous feeds. Yeasts were isolated from apple bagasse fermented under in vitro conditions, using rumen liquor obtained from cannulated cows and alfalfa as a fibrous substrate. A total of 16 new yeast strains were isolated and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The strains were designated Levazot, followed by the isolate number. Their fermentative capacity was assessed using an in vitro gas production method. Strain Levazot 15 (Candida norvegensis) showed the greatest increase in gas production (p<0.05) compared with the yeast-free control and positively affected in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters of alfalfa and oat straw. Based on these results, it was concluded that the Levazot 15 yeast strain could be potentially used as an additive for ruminants consuming high-fiber diets. However, further studies of effects of these additives on rumen digestion, metabolism, and productive performance of ruminants are required. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  16. Antioxidant defense parameters as predictive biomarkers for fermentative capacity of active dried wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The production of active dried yeast (ADY) is a common practice in industry for the maintenance of yeast starters and as a means of long term storage. The process, however, causes multiple cell injuries, with oxidative damage being one of the most important stresses. Consequentially, dehydration tolerance is a highly appreciated property in yeast for ADY production. In this study we analyzed the cellular redox environment in three Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, which show markedly different fermentative capacities after dehydration. To measure/quantify the effect of dehydration on the S. cerevisiae strains, we used: (i) fluorescent probes; (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities; (ii) intracellular damage; (iii) antioxidant metabolites; and (iv) gene expression, to select a minimal set of biochemical parameters capable of predicting desiccation tolerance in wine yeasts. Our results show that naturally enhanced antioxidant defenses prevent oxidative damage after wine yeast biomass dehydration and improve fermentative capacity. Based on these results we chose four easily assayable parameters/biomarkers for the selection of industrial yeast strains of interest for ADY production: trehalose and glutathione levels, and glutathione reductase and catalase enzymatic activities. Yeast strains selected in accordance with this process display high levels of trehalose, low levels of oxidized glutathione, a high induction of glutathione reductase activity, as well as a high basal level and sufficient induction of catalase activity, which are properties inherent in superior ADY strains. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. An original method for producing acetaldehyde and diacetyl by yeast fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Rosca

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study a natural culture medium that mimics the synthetic yeast peptone glucose medium used for yeast fermentations was designed to screen and select yeasts capable of producing high levels of diacetyl and acetaldehyde. The presence of whey powder and sodium citrate in the medium along with manganese and magnesium sulfate enhanced both biomass and aroma development. A total of 52 yeasts strains were cultivated in two different culture media, namely, yeast peptone glucose medium and yeast acetaldehyde-diacetyl medium. The initial screening of the strains was based on the qualitative reaction of the acetaldehyde with Schiff's reagent (violet color and diacetyl with Brady's reagent (yellow precipitate. The fermented culture media of 10 yeast strains were subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography to quantify the concentration of acetaldehyde and diacetyl synthesized. Total titratable acidity values indicated that a total titratable acidity of 5.5 °SH, implying culture medium at basic pH, was more favorable for the acetaldehyde biosynthesis using strain D15 (Candida lipolytica; 96.05 mg L-1 acetaldehyde while a total titratable acidity value of 7 °SH facilitated diacetyl flavor synthesis by strain D38 (Candida globosa; 3.58 mg L-1 diacetyl. Importantly, the results presented here suggest that this can be potentially used in the baking industry.

  18. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loknath Gidijala

    Full Text Available This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN. As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L. PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents, whose production involves NRPS's.

  19. Biosurfactant-producing yeasts widely inhabit various vegetables and fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masaaki; Maruoka, Naruyuki; Furuta, Yoshifumi; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of biosurfactant-producing yeasts from food materials was accomplished. By a combination of a new drop collapse method and thin-layer chromatography, 48 strains were selected as glycolipid biosurfactant producers from 347 strains, which were randomly isolated from various vegetables and fruits. Of the producers, 69% were obtained from vegetables of the Brassica family. Of the 48 producers, 15 strains gave relatively high yields of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), and were identified as Pseudozyma yeasts. These strains produced MELs from olive oil at yields ranging from 8.5 to 24.3 g/L. The best yield coefficient reached 0.49 g/g as to the carbon sources added. Accordingly, MEL producers were isolated at high efficiency from various vegetables and fruits, indicating that biosurfactant producers are widely present in foods. The present results should facilitate their application in the food and related industries.

  20. Biotechnological aspects concerning the ergosterol obtaining from yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena MOLODOI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the experimental results for selection of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis CNMN-Y-15 yeast strain with high potential for ergosterol biosynthesis; determination of morpho-cultural and physiologo-biochemical characteristics of this yeast strain; establishment of the effect of low-intensity millimeter waves on ergosterol biosynthesis. Research results contributed to the elaboration of technological flow for obtaining of high yield of ergosterol from yeasts. The significant increasing of ergosterol content is possible due to the utililization of optimized nutritive medium with manganese acetate (0.012 g/L and glucose (40.0 g/L; the treatment of inoculum with low-intensity millimeter waves for 20-30 minutes.

  1. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among ...

  2. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  3. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  4. Proteolytic activities in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, T; Holzer, H

    1975-03-28

    Studies on the mechanism and time course of the activation of proteinases A (EC 3.4.23.8), B (EC 3.4.22.9) and C (EC 3.4.12.--) in crude yeast extracts at pH 5.1 and 25 degrees C showed that the increase in proteinase B activity is paralleled with the disappearance of proteinase B inhibitor. Addition of purified proteinase A to fresh crude extracts accelerates the inactivation of the proteinase B inhibitor and the appearance of maximal activities of proteinases B and C. The decrease of proteinase B inhibitor activity and the increase of proteinase B activity are markedly retarded by the addition of pepstatin. Because 10-minus 7 M pepstatin completely inhibits proteinase A without affecting proteinase B activity, this is another indication for the role of proteinase A during the activation of proteinase B. Whereas extracts of yeast grown on minimal medium reached maximal activation of proteinases B and C after 20 h of incubation at pH 5.1 and 25 degrees C, extracts of yeast grown on complete medium had to be incubated for about 100 h. In the latter case, the addition of proteinas A results in maximal activation of proteinases B and C and disappearance of proteinase B inhibitor activity only after 10--20 h of incubation. With the optimal conditions, the maximal activities of proteinases A, B and C, as well as of the proteinase B inhibitor, were determined in crude extracts of yeast that had been grown batchwise for different lengths of time either on minimal or on complete medium. Upon incubation, all three proteinases were activated by several times their initial activity. This reflects the existence of proteolytically degradable inhibitors of the three proteinases and together with the above mentioned observations it demonstrates that the "activation" of yeast proteinases A, B and C upon incubation results from the proteolytic digestion of inhibitors rather than from activation of inactive zymogens by limited proteolysis.

  5. Improvement of nutritional quality and antioxidant activities of yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the potential use and improves the health beneficial properties of the soybean waste manufacturing products by solid-state fermentation of six GRAS different yeast strains, including extractable antioxidant activities and bioavailable nutritional compositions. In comparison with nonfermented okara ...

  6. Method for using a yeast alpha-amylase promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Johnway; Skeen, Rodney S.; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  7. Ameliorative effect of glucomannan-containing yeast product ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of aflatoxin (AF), yeast glucomannan (YG) and sodium bentonite (SB) on performance and immunization against Newcastle disease (ND) in broiler feed with naturally contaminated diet with aflatoxin. For this experiment, 300 7-day-old Ross 308-strain broiler chickens were ...

  8. Ethanol and sugar tolerance of wine yeasts isolated from fermenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventeen wine yeasts isolated from fermenting cashew apple juice were screened for ethanol and sugar tolerance. Two species of Saccharomyces comprising of three strains of S. cerevisiae and one S. uvarum showed measurable growth in medium containing 9% (v/v) ethanol. They were equally sugar-tolerant having ...

  9. Engineering yeast for high-level production of stilbenoid antioxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mingji; Schneider, Konstantin; Kristensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of stilbenoids on a simple mineral medium typically used for industrial production. We applied a pull-push-block strain engineering strategy that included overexpression of the resveratrol biosynthesis pathway, optimization of the electron transfer...

  10. Ethyl acetate production by the elusive alcohol acetyltransferase from yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, Alex; Levisson, Mark; Mars, Astrid E.; Ploeg, van der Max; Garcés Daza, Fernando; Ellena, Valeria; Kengen, Servé W.M.; Oost, van der John; Weusthuis, Ruud A.

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl acetate is an industrially relevant ester that is currently produced exclusively through unsustainable processes. Many yeasts are able to produce ethyl acetate, but the main responsible enzyme has remained elusive, hampering the engineering of novel production strains. Here we describe the

  11. Metabolic engineering for improved fermentation of pentoses by yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. W. Jeffries; Jin. Y.-S.

    2004-01-01

    The fermentation of xylose is essential for the bioconversion of lignocellulose to fuels and chemicals, but wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not metabolize xylose, so researchers have engineered xylose metabolism in this yeast. Glucose transporters mediate xylose uptake, but no transporter specific for xylose has yet been identified. Over-expressing...

  12. Screening of yeasts capable of producing cellulase-free xylanase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In all, 119 yeast strains were isolated and evaluated in terms of their ability to degrade xylan, which was found in the medium by using agar degradation halos, the basis of this polysaccharide, and Congo red dye. Selected microorganisms were grown in complex medium and the enzymatic activities of endo-xylanase, ...

  13. (BRCM) meal supplemented with yeast on the performance and gut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and twenty (120) arbor acre strain day old broiler chicks were used to investigate the effects of blood rumen content mixture (BRCM) meal supplemented with Levucel SB yeast on the performance and gut microbial populations of broiler chickens. Four diets were formulated both at the starter and finisher ...

  14. In vitro investigation of the hypoglycemic activity of yeasts using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes (3T3-L1 model) were used in studying glucose metabolisms without the need for feeding (Sprague-Dawley, SD model) the rat prior to hypoglycemic activity evaluation. Both models were adopted to evaluate the hypoglycemic activities of 58 yeast strains isolated from various ...

  15. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  16. Flavour-active wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordente, Antonio G; Curtin, Christopher D; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2012-11-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can influence wine style. This review explores recent progress towards understanding the range of 'flavour phenotypes' that wine yeast exhibit, and how this knowledge has been used to develop novel flavour-active yeasts. In addition, emerging opportunities to augment these phenotypes by engineering yeast to produce so-called grape varietal compounds, such as monoterpenoids, will be discussed.

  17. Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS): a computer-assisted method for directed protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Hoeffken, Hans Wolfgang; Haefner, Stefan; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS) is a simple and efficient method for directed protein evolution combining computational analysis and molecular biology tools to engineer protein surfaces. ProCoS is based on the hypothesis that conserved residues originated from a common ancestor and that these residues are crucial for the function of a protein, whereas highly variable regions (situated on the surface of a protein) can be targeted for surface engineering to maximize performance. ProCoS comprises four main steps: ( i ) identification of conserved and highly variable regions; ( ii ) protein sequence design by substituting residues in the highly variable regions, and gene synthesis; ( iii ) in vitro DNA recombination of synthetic genes; and ( iv ) screening for active variants. ProCoS is a simple method for surface mutagenesis in which multiple sequence alignment is used for selection of surface residues based on a structural model. To demonstrate the technique's utility for directed evolution, the surface of a phytase enzyme from Yersinia mollaretii (Ymphytase) was subjected to ProCoS. Screening just 1050 clones from ProCoS engineering-guided mutant libraries yielded an enzyme with 34 amino acid substitutions. The surface-engineered Ymphytase exhibited 3.8-fold higher pH stability (at pH 2.8 for 3 h) and retained 40% of the enzyme's specific activity (400 U/mg) compared with the wild-type Ymphytase. The pH stability might be attributed to a significantly increased (20 percentage points; from 9% to 29%) number of negatively charged amino acids on the surface of the engineered phytase.

  18. Stress Tolerance in Doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trehalase Mutants Derived from Commercial Baker’s Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Jun; Hino, Akihiro; Yamada-Iyo, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Mori, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Δnth1), acid trehalase mutants (Δath1), and double mutants (Δnth1 ath1) by using commercial baker’s yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption me...

  19. Possibility for simultaneous electricity generation and bioremediation by using Candida melibiosica yeast in biofuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Georgiev, Danail; Mitov, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proved that Candida melibiosica 2491 yeast strain possesses electrogenic properties and could be used as a biocatalyst in yeast-based biofuel cells. In this paper we demonstrate that when the yeast is cultivated under polarization conditions in a biofuel cell its phytase activity exceeds that obtained during cultivation in a conventional bioreactor. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the yeast phytase activity and the electrical characteristic of the biofuel cell during the different yeast growth phases. The obtained results reveal a possibility for application of C.melibiosica for simultaneous electricity generation and bioremediation of hardly degradable polyphosphates, especially in the regions with intensive stock-farming. Keywords: Biofuel cells, yeast, Candida melibiosica, electricity generation, bioremediation

  20. Synthetic biology stretching the realms of possibility in wine yeast research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh B; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A; Pretorius, Isak S

    2017-07-03

    It took several millennia to fully understand the scientific intricacies of the process through which grape juice is turned into wine. This yeast-driven fermentation process is still being perfected and advanced today. Motivated by ever-changing consumer preferences and the belief that the 'best' wine is yet to be made, numerous approaches are being pursued to improve the process of yeast fermentation and the quality of wine. Central to recent enhancements in winemaking processes and wine quality is the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains with improved robustness, fermentation efficiencies and sensory properties. The emerging science of Synthetic Biology - including genome engineering and DNA editing technologies - is taking yeast strain development into a totally new realm of possibility. The first example of how future wine strain development might be impacted by these new 'history-making' Synthetic Biology technologies, is the de novo production of the raspberry ketone aroma compound, 4-[4-hydroxyphenyl]butan-2-one, in a wine yeast containing a synthetic DNA cassette. This article explores how this breakthrough and the imminent outcome of the international Yeast 2.0 (or Sc2.0) project, aimed at the synthesis of the entire genome of a laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, might accelerate the design of improved wine yeasts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of ethanol fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast by disrupting mitophagy function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Shodai; Jayakody, Lahiru Niroshan; Horie, Kenta; Okamoto, Koji; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 has one of the highest fermentation rates among brewery yeasts used worldwide; therefore, it is assumed that it is not possible to enhance its fermentation rate. However, in this study, we found that fermentation by sake yeast can be enhanced by inhibiting mitophagy. We observed mitophagy in wild-type sake yeast during the brewing of Ginjo sake, but not when the mitophagy gene (ATG32) was disrupted. During sake brewing, the maximum rate of CO2 production and final ethanol concentration generated by the atg32Δ laboratory yeast mutant were 7.50% and 2.12% higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. This mutant exhibited an improved fermentation profile when cultured under limiting nutrient concentrations such as those used during Ginjo sake brewing as well as in minimal synthetic medium. The mutant produced ethanol at a concentration that was 2.76% higher than the parent strain, which has significant implications for industrial bioethanol production. The ethanol yield of the atg32Δ mutant was increased, and its biomass yield was decreased relative to the parent sake yeast strain, indicating that the atg32Δ mutant has acquired a high fermentation capability at the cost of decreasing biomass. Because natural biomass resources often lack sufficient nutrient levels for optimal fermentation, mitophagy may serve as an important target for improving the fermentative capacity of brewery yeasts.

  2. Persistence of two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora and Starmerella in the cellar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric eGrangeteau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different genera and/or species of yeasts present on grape-berries, in musts and wines are widely described. Nevertheless, the community of non-Saccharomyces yeasts present in the cellar is still given little attention. Thus it is not known if the cellar is a real ecological niche for these yeasts or if it is merely a transient habitat for populations brought in by grape-berries during the winemaking period. This study focused on three species of non-Saccharomyces yeasts commonly encountered during vinification: Starmerella bacillaris (synonymy with Candida zemplinina, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Hanseniaspora uvarum. More than 1200 isolates were identified at the strain level by FT-IR spectroscopy (207 different FTIR strain pattern. Only a small proportion of non-Saccharomyces yeasts present in musts came directly from grape-berries for the three species studied. Some strains were found in the must in 2 consecutive years and some of them were also found in the cellar environment before the arrival of the harvest of second vintage. This study demonstrates for the first time the persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains from year to year in the cellar. Sulfur dioxide can affect yeast populations in the must and therefore their persistence in the cellar environment.

  3. The influence of sucrose and maltose on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast multiplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Ponomareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on the influence of fermentable carbohydrates concentration on yeast multiplication are widely represented in the literature. This study presents the results of experiments showing an influence of sucrose and maltose concentration on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast multiplication. The objects of this research are bakery, beer, wine and alcohol yeast that are widely used in fermentation industry. Beet molasses and malt wort were chosen as nutrient medium for yeast breeding. Their basic sugars are mainly represented by sucrose and maltose. The concentration of sugars was 9, 12, 16 and 20%. The intensity of yeast multiplication was evaluated based on yeast cells concentration during their cultivation and the specific growth rate. Sugar concentrations causing an intensive accumulation of examined yeast strains were determined. This paper presents the experimental data that were received describing the influence of sucrose and maltose concentration on the duration of a lag phase period for different yeast strains. Specific growth rates of researched strains were determined for nutrient mediums with different glucose and maltose concentrations. It was found that the Crabtree effect, that is caused by high carbohydrates concentration in culture medium, is most pronounced when yeast cells grow on a sucrose medium. Brewer’s and baker's yeast are more adapted to high concentrations of carbohydrates. The obtained experimental data could be utilized to develop flow charts of growing a pure culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast to use at fermentation plants, including low power ones.

  4. Genetically engineered yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate semialde......A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate...... semialdehyde. The yeast may also express a 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) and a 3-hydroxypropanoate dehydrogenase (3-HPDH) and aspartate 1-decarboxylase. Additionally the yeast may express pyruvate carboxylase and aspartate aminotransferase....

  5. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Yeast synthetic biology for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunah; Yoo, Su Jin; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2015-02-01

    The production of recombinant therapeutic proteins is one of the fast-growing areas of molecular medicine and currently plays an important role in treatment of several diseases. Yeasts are unicellular eukaryotic microbial host cells that offer unique advantages in producing biopharmaceutical proteins. Yeasts are capable of robust growth on simple media, readily accommodate genetic modifications, and incorporate typical eukaryotic post-translational modifications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a traditional baker's yeast that has been used as a major host for the production of biopharmaceuticals; however, several nonconventional yeast species including Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing attention as alternative hosts for the industrial production of recombinant proteins. In this review, we address the established and emerging genetic tools and host strains suitable for recombinant protein production in various yeast expression systems, particularly focusing on current efforts toward synthetic biology approaches in developing yeast cell factories for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  7. [Yeast microbiota in artisanal cheeses from Corrientes, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Marina C; Fusco, Ángel J V; Carrasco, Marta S

    2017-10-24

    The artisanal cheese from Corrientes (from the Spanish acronym QAC-Queso Artesanal de Corrientes/Artisanal Cheese from Corrientes) is a soft cheese elaborated with raw cow milk and an artisanal coagulant agent. Lactic bacteria contitute the main flora of this cheese although yeasts are also present in high quantities as secondary microbiota and might play a relevant role in cheese ripening. The aim of this work was to evaluate yeast occurrence during QAC elaboration and ripening, and the effect of seasonal variation. Yeasts were isolated and purified from raw materials and cheese at different ripening stagesl elaborated during the different seasons. Yeast sample counts were in the order of 10 3 - 10 7 UFC/ml o UFC/g. Ninety yeast strains were classified: 9 from milk, 28 from the coagulant agent, 10 from curd and 43 from cheese. Candida predominated in milk samples while other yeast genera had low incidence. Candida also predominated in the coagulant agent samples, followed by genera Myxozyma and Debaryomyces. The isolates obtained from cheese belonged to the same genera predominating in the coagulant agent, and showed the same order of prevalence. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The Slime Production by Yeasts Isolated from Subclinical Mastitic Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süheyla Türkyılmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate yeasts from subclinical mastitic cows and to investigate the slime production by the isolated yeasts. The material used in this study included 339 milk samples from 152 dairy cattle with subclinical mastitis. Milk was plated onto blood agar, MacConkey agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar. Forty-one samples (12.1% of total milk samples were found positive for the yeast by API 20 C AUX identification system. The isolated yeasts were classified into four genera of Candida, Trichosporon, Cryptococcus and Saccharomyces. The Candida species were following: C. krusei, C. kefyr, C. guilliermondii, C. famata, C. rugosa and C. utulis. Other yeasts were identified as Trichosporon mucoides, T. asahii, Cryptococcus laurentii, C.  neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Slime production was tested on Congo red brain heart infusion agar and evaluated according to Congo red phenomenon. Fifteen (36.6% strains were slime factor positive: seven were C. krusei, four C. kefyr, one C. guilliermondii, one C. famata, one T. asahii, and one C. laurentii. The results of the present study indicate that yeast mastitis is significant for causing economic losses and slime production is mostly found in non-albicans Candida species. Therefore, non-albicans Candida species should be examined for slime production.

  9. The Fermentative and Aromatic Ability of Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Montaño, Dulce M.; de Jesús Ramírez Córdova, J.

    Spontaneous alcoholic fermentation from grape, agave and others musts into an alcoholic beverage is usually characterized by the presence of several non-Saccharomyces yeasts. These genera yeasts are dominant in the early stages of the alcoholic fermentation. However the genera Hanseniaspora and Kloeckera may survive at a significant level during fermentation and can influence the chemical composition of the beverage. Several strains belonging to the species Kloeckera api-culata and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii have been extensively studied in relation to the formation of some metabolic compounds affecting the bouquet of the final product. Indeed some apiculate yeast showed positive oenological properties and their use in the alcoholic fermentations has been suggested to enhance the aroma and flavor profiles. The non- Saccharomyces yeasts have the capability to produce and secrete enzymes in the medium, such as β -glucosidases, which release monoterpenes derived from their glycosylated form. These compounds contribute to the higher fruit-like characteristic of final product. This chapter reviews metabolic activity of Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora yeasts in several aspects: fermentative capability, aromatic compounds production and transformation of aromatic precursor present in the must, also covers the molecular methods for identifying of the yeast

  10. Comparison of wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups against surface-engineered femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Hatto, P; Burton, A; Isaac, G; Stone, M; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2008-10-01

    Alumina ceramic heads have been previously shown to reduce polyethylene wear in comparison to cobalt chrome (CoCr) heads in artificial hip joints. However, there are concerns about the brittle nature of ceramics. It is therefore of interest to investigate ceramic-like coatings on metallic heads. The aim of this study was to compare the friction and wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against alumina ceramic, CoCr, and surface-engineered ceramic-like coatings in a friction simulator and a hip joint simulator. All femoral heads tested were 28 mm diameter and included: Biolox Forte alumina, CoCr, arc evaporative physical vapour deposition (AEPVD) chromium nitride (CrN) coated CoCr, plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (PACVD) amorphous diamond-like carbon (aDLC) coated CoCr, sputter CrN coated CoCr, reactive gas controlled arc (RGCA) AEPVD titanium nitride (TiN) coated CoCr, and Graphit-iC coated CoCr. These were articulated against UHMWPE acetabular cups in a friction simulator and a hip joint simulator. Alumina and CoCr gave the lowest wear volumes whereas the sputter coated CrN gave the highest. Alumina also had the lowest friction factor. There was an association between surface parameters and wear. This study indicates that surface topography of surface-engineered femoral heads is more important than friction and wettability in controlling UHMWPE wear.

  11. Past and Future of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts: From Spoilage Microorganisms to Biotechnological Tools for Improving Wine Aroma Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Gil, José V.; Manzanares, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition, and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed. PMID:27065975

  12. Past and future of non-Saccharomyces yeasts: from spoilage microorganisms to biotechnological tools for improving wine aroma complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz ePadilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed.

  13. Yeast diversity and novel yeast D1/D2 sequences from corn phylloplane obtained by a culture-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasanit, Rujikan; Jaibangyang, Sopin; Tantirungkij, Manee; Limtong, Savitree

    2016-12-01

    Culture-independent techniques have recently been used for evaluation of microbial diversity in the environment since it addresses the problem of unculturable microorganisms. In this study, the diversity of epiphytic yeasts from corn (Zea mays Linn.) phylloplanes in Thailand was investigated using this technique and sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit ribosomal DNA sequences. Thirty-seven samples of corn leaf were collected randomly from 10 provinces. The DNA was extracted from leaf washing samples and the D1/D2 domains were amplified. The PCR products were cloned and then screened by colony PCR. A total of 1049 clones were obtained from 37 clone libraries. From this total, 329 clones (213 sequences) were closely related to yeast strains in the GenBank database, and they were clustered into 77 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a similarity threshold of 99 %. The majority of sequences (98.5 %) were classified into the phylum Basidiomycota. Sixteen known yeast species were identified. Interestingly, more than 65 % of the D1/D2 sequences obtained by this technique were suggested to be sequences from new yeast taxa. The predominant yeast sequences detected belonged to the order Ustilaginales with relative frequency of 68.0 %. The most common known yeast species detected on the leaf samples were Pseudozyma hubeiensis pro tem. and Moesziomyces antarcticus with frequency of occurrence of 24.3 and 21.6 %, respectively.

  14. Yeasts in Hevea brasiliensis Latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Maksimova, I A; Chernov, I Yu

    2016-07-01

    Yeast abundance and species diversity in the latex of caoutchouc tree Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex Juss.) M611. Arg., on its green leaves, and in soil below the plant Was studied. The yeasts present in the fresh latex in concentrations of up to 5.5 log(CFU/g) were almost exclusively represented by the species Candida heveicola, which was previously isolated from Hevea latex in China. In the course of natural modification of the latex yeast diversity increased, while yeast abundance decreased. The yeasts of thickened and solidified latex were represented by typical epiphytic and ubiquitous species: Kodamea ohmeri, Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and synanthropic species Candida parapsilosis and Cutaneotrichosporon arbori- formis. The role of yeasts in latex modification at the initial stages of succession and their probable role in de- velopment of antifungal activity in the latex are discussed.

  15. The impact of Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast in winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Santiago

    2018-04-01

    Commercial Saccharomyces strains are usually inoculated to ferment alcoholic beverages due to their ability to convert all fermentable sugars into ethanol. However, modern trends in winemaking have turned toward less known, non-Saccharomyces yeast species. These species perform the first stages of natural spontaneous fermentation and play important roles in wine variety. New alcoholic fermentation trends have begun to consider objectives other than alcohol production to improve flavor diversity. This review explores the influence of the most used and commercialized non-Saccharomyces yeast, Torulaspora delbrueckii, on fermentation quality parameters, such as ethanol, glycerol, volatile acidity, volatile profile, succinic acid, mannoproteins, polysaccharides, color, anthocyanins, amino acids, and sensory perception.

  16. Genetic Instability of Heterozygous, Hybrid, Natural Wine Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Manuel; Vinagre, Antonia; Ambrona, Jesús; Molina, Felipe; Maqueda, Matilde; Rebollo, JoséE.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a genetic instability found in natural wine yeasts but not in the common laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Spontaneous cyh2R/cyh2R mutants resistant to high levels of cycloheximide can be directly isolated from cyh2S/cyh2S wine yeasts. Heterozygous cyh2R/cyh2S hybrid clones vary in genetic instability as measured by loss of heterozygosity at cyh2. There were two main classes of hybrids. The lawn hybrids have high genetic instability and generally become cyh2R/cyh2R h...

  17. Heterologous transporter expression for improved fatty alcohol secretion in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yating; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    transporters tested, human FATP1 was shown to mediate fatty alcohol export in a high fatty alcohol production yeast strain. An approximately five-fold increase of fatty alcohol secretion was achieved. The results indicate that the overall cell fitness benefited from fatty alcohol secretion and that the acyl...... as a free fatty acid importer to date. We furthermore successfully identified the functional domain of FATP1 involved in fatty alcohol export through domain exchange between FATP1 and another transporter, FATP4. This study may facilitate a successful commercialization of fatty alcohol production in yeast...

  18. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Kamalika; Lahiri, Susanta; Sinha, P.

    2006-01-01

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152 Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  19. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  20. Flavour-active wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Christopher D.; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2012-01-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can infl...

  1. MALDI-TOF MS typing enables the classification of brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces to major beer styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are either available from yeast distributor centers or from breweries employing their own "in-house strains". During the last years, the classification and characterization of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces was achieved by using biochemical and DNA-based methods. The current lack of fast, cost-effective and simple methods to classify brewing yeasts to a beer type, may be closed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS upon establishment of a database based on sub-proteome spectra from reference strains of brewing yeasts. In this study an extendable "brewing yeast" spectra database was established including 52 brewing yeast strains of the most important types of bottom- and top-fermenting strains as well as beer-spoiling S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains. 1560 single spectra, prepared with a standardized sample preparation method, were finally compared against the established database and investigated by bioinformatic analyses for similarities and distinctions. A 100% separation between bottom-, top-fermenting and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains was achieved. Differentiation between Alt and Kölsch strains was not achieved because of the high similarity of their protein patterns. Whereas the Ale strains show a high degree of dissimilarity with regard to their sub-proteome. These results were supported by MDS and DAPC analysis of all recorded spectra. Within five clusters of beer types that were distinguished, and the wheat beer (WB cluster has a clear separation from other groups. With the establishment of this MALDI-TOF MS spectra database proof of concept is provided of the discriminatory power of this technique to classify brewing yeasts into different major beer types in a rapid, easy way, and focus brewing trails accordingly. It can be extended to yeasts for specialty beer types and other applications including wine making or baking.

  2. MALDI-TOF MS typing enables the classification of brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces to major beer styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Alexander; Usbeck, Julia C; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-01-01

    Brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are either available from yeast distributor centers or from breweries employing their own "in-house strains". During the last years, the classification and characterization of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces was achieved by using biochemical and DNA-based methods. The current lack of fast, cost-effective and simple methods to classify brewing yeasts to a beer type, may be closed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) upon establishment of a database based on sub-proteome spectra from reference strains of brewing yeasts. In this study an extendable "brewing yeast" spectra database was established including 52 brewing yeast strains of the most important types of bottom- and top-fermenting strains as well as beer-spoiling S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains. 1560 single spectra, prepared with a standardized sample preparation method, were finally compared against the established database and investigated by bioinformatic analyses for similarities and distinctions. A 100% separation between bottom-, top-fermenting and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains was achieved. Differentiation between Alt and Kölsch strains was not achieved because of the high similarity of their protein patterns. Whereas the Ale strains show a high degree of dissimilarity with regard to their sub-proteome. These results were supported by MDS and DAPC analysis of all recorded spectra. Within five clusters of beer types that were distinguished, and the wheat beer (WB) cluster has a clear separation from other groups. With the establishment of this MALDI-TOF MS spectra database proof of concept is provided of the discriminatory power of this technique to classify brewing yeasts into different major beer types in a rapid, easy way, and focus brewing trails accordingly. It can be extended to yeasts for specialty beer types and other applications including wine making or baking.

  3. Immobilised Sarawak Malaysia yeast cells for production of bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Masniroszaime Mohd; Kofli, Noorhisham Tan; Rozaimah, Siti; Abdullah, Sheikh

    2011-05-01

    Bioethanol production using yeast has become a popular topic due to worrying depleting worldwide fuel reserve. The aim of the study was to investigate the capability of Malaysia yeast strains isolated from starter culture used in traditional fermented food and alcoholic beverages in producing Bioethanol using alginate beads entrapment method. The starter yeast consists of groups of microbes, thus the yeasts were grown in Sabouraud agar to obtain single colony called ST1 (tuak) and ST3 (tapai). The growth in Yeast Potatoes Dextrose (YPD) resulted in specific growth of ST1 at micro = 0.396 h-1 and ST3 at micro = 0.38 h-1, with maximum ethanol production of 7.36 g L-1 observed using ST1 strain. The two strains were then immobilized using calcium alginate entrapment method producing average alginate beads size of 0.51 cm and were grown in different substrates; YPD medium and Local Brown Sugar (LBS) for 8 h in flask. The maximum ethanol concentration measured after 7 h were at 6.63 and 6.59 g L-1 in YPD media and 1.54 and 1.39 g L-1in LBS media for ST1 and ST3, respectively. The use of LBS as carbon source showed higher yield of product (Yp/s), 0.59 g g-1 compared to YPD, 0.25 g g-1 in ST1 and (Yp/s), 0.54 g g-1 compared to YPD, 0.24 g g-1 in ST3 . This study indicated the possibility of using local strains (STI and ST3) to produce bioethanol via immobilization technique with local materials as substrate.

  4. Thermotolerant yeasts and application for ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To-on, N.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 70 thermotolerant yeast strains were isolated at 40oC from 145 samples including fruit, leaves, flowers, soils and oil-palm fruits. Six isolates showed maximum growth at 40oC within 18 h. Three isolates (MIY1, MIY48 and MIY57 were selected based on their ability to ferment glucose and sucrose rapidly (24 h and showed the maximum temperature for growth at 42oC but it was good at 40oC. MIY57 produced 4.6% (v/v ethanol at 40oC from a medium containing 15% glucose. The optimum cultivation conditions for growth and ethanol production of MIY57 was 5% inoculum into the fermentation medium containing 15% glucose and 1% yeast extract with initial pH of 4.5 on a shaking incubator at 150 rpm at 40oC. MIY57, under these conditions, produced maximum ethanol of 5.0% (v/v after 48 h incubation while S. cerevisiae TISTR 5048 produced only 3.7% (v/v. Maximum cell dry weight was 7.2 g/L (at 18 h, again much higher than that of S. cerevisiae TISTR 5048 (4.1 g/L. Based on morphological, physiological and molecular studies, this strain (MIY57 was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  5. Industrial Application of Artificially Induced Diploid Strains of Torulaspora delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Ohshima, Yoshinobu; Sugaura, Toshio; Horita, Munehiro; Sasaki, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    Diploid strains of Torulaspora delbrueckii were tested for industrial application. Because the cell volume of the diploid strain was three times as large as that of the parental haploid strain, collection and subsequent dehydration to make compressed yeast cakes were greatly improved with the diploid YL3. The time required for dehydration of the diploid strain was shortened to 1/2.5 that of the parent strain under conventional conditions. Moreover, for the diploid cells frequent filter change...

  6. [Metabolic characteristics of the Yarrowia lipolytica strain producing alpha-ketoglutaric and citric acids from ethanol and the effect of [NH4+] and [O2] on yeast respiration and biosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'chenko, A P; Cherniavskaia, O G; Shishkanova, N V; Finogenova, T V

    2001-01-01

    The comparative studies performed in this work showed that overproduction of alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) from ethanol by the mutant Yarrowia lipolytica strain I requires both a deficiency of thiamine and a relatively high concentration of ammonium ions in the medium, whereas CA overproduction requires an almost zero concentration of ammonium ions. The threshold value of the dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, pO2, for CA overproduction is considerably higher than for KGA overproduction. The respiration rate of CA-overproducing cells was 2-3.5 times higher than that of KGA-overproducing cells. The main terminal electron carrier functioning in the KGA-overproducing cells was cytochrome oxidase. In the CA-overproducing cells, the main terminal oxidase was presumably o-type cytochrome.

  7. Current awareness on yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, this current awareness service is provided by John Wiley & Sons and contains newly-published material on yeasts. Each bibliography is divided into 10 sections. 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Biochemistry; 4 Biotechnology; 5 Cell Biology; 6 Gene Expression; 7 Genetics; 8 Physiology; 9 Medical Mycology; 10 Recombinant DNA Technology. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author. If, in the preceding period, no publications are located relevant to any one of these headings, that section will be omitted. (3 weeks journals - search completed 5th. Dec. 2001)

  8. Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Producing Yeasts in the Phyllosphere of the Carnivorous Plant Drosera indica L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25464336

  9. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Feng Sun

    Full Text Available Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  10. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pei-Feng; Fang, Wei-Ta; Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  11. The presence of a mycangium in European Sinodendron cylindricum (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) and the associated yeast symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Masahiko; Hawes, Colin J

    2016-01-01

    Part of the exoskeleton of some wood-inhabiting insects is modified to form a mycangium, which is a specialized organ used to convey fungal spores or yeasts to their offspring. Although most stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) are known to have female-specific mycangia and associated yeast symbionts, the evolutionary origin of the mycangium in this group remains unresolved. Here, we report the presence of a mycangium and associated yeast symbionts in the European horned stag beetle Sinodendron cylindricum (L.), which belongs to an ancestral clade of the Lucanidae. The mycangium of S. cylindricum is shown to be female-specific and have the same developmental origin as that of other stag beetles. A total of five yeast strains were isolated from adult mycangia and larval gut of S. cylindricum Of these, we suggest that SICYAM1 is an undescribed yeast with taxonomic novelty, and have identified SICYLG3 as the xylose-fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces insectosa using nuclear ribosomal RNA and ITS sequences. The remaining three yeast strains, SICYAM2, SICYLG1, and SICYLG2, were assigned to the genus Sugiyamaella Yeast density in the adult mycangium was lower than that of the more evolutionarily advanced stag beetles, the European Lucanus cervus (L.) and Dorcus parallelipipedus (L.), which were also examined in this study. No living yeasts were isolated from the adult guts. However, a third instar larva of S. cylindricum harbored 10(4)-10(6) living yeasts in each gut region, which suggests that gut yeasts play an important role in these wood-feeding larvae. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  12. Improvement of aromatic thiol release through the selection of yeasts with increased β-lyase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their ability to grow on YCB-SMC medium. Yeast strains with an increased β-lyase activity grew rapidly because of their ability to release ammonium from SMC in comparison to others, and allowed for the easy isolation and differentiation of yeasts with promising properties in oenology, or another field, for aromatic thiol release. The selective medium was also helpful for the discrimination between those S. cerevisiae strains, which present a common 38-bp deletion in the IRC7 sequence (present in around 88% of the wild strains tested and are likely to be less functional for 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) production), and those S. cerevisiae strains homozygous for the full-length IRC7 allele. The medium was also helpful for the selection of non-Saccharomyces yeasts with increased β-lyase activity. Based on the same medium, a highly sensitive, reproducible and non-expensive GC-MS method for the evaluation of the potential volatile thiol release by different yeast isolates was developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Yeast Isolates from Pharmaceutical Waste Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjeta Recek

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop an efficient an system for waste water pretreatment, the isolation of indigenous population of microorganisms from pharmaceutical waste water was done. We obtained pure cultures of 16 yeast isolates that differed slightly in colony morphology. Ten out of 16 isolates efficiently reduced COD in pharmaceutical waste water. Initial physiological characterization failed to match the 10 yeast isolates to either Pichia anomala or Pichia ciferrii. Restriction analysis of rDNA (rDNA-RFLP using three different restriction enzymes: HaeIII, MspI and CfoI, showed identical patterns of the isolates and Pichia anomala type strain. Separation of chromosomal DNAs of yeast isolates by the pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed that the 10 isolates could be grouped into 6 karyotypes. Growth characteristics of the 6 isolates with distinct karyotypes were then studied in batch cultivation in pharmaceutical waste water for 80 hours.

  14. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme a metabolism in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting...... chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl......-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol....

  15. Simultaneous and successive inoculations of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation of an unsulfited Tannat grape must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between yeasts and lactic acid bacteria are strain specific, and their outcome is expected to change in simultaneous alcoholic -malolactic fermentations from the pattern observed in successive fermentations. One Oenococcus oeni strain Lalvin VP41TM was inoculated with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains either simultaneously, three days after the yeast inoculation, or when alcoholic fermentation was close to finish. Early bacterial inoculations with each yeast strain allowed for the growth of the bacterial populations, and the length of malolactic fermentation was reduced to six days. Alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® yeast strain left the highest residual sugar, suggesting a negative effect of the bacterial growth and malolactic activity on its performance. In sequential inoculations the bacterial populations did not show actual growth with either yeast strain. In this strategy, both yeast strains finished the alcoholic fermentations, and malolactic fermentations took longer to finish. Lalvin ICV D80® allowed for higher viability and activity of the bacterial strain than Fermicru UY4® under the three inoculation strategies. This was beneficial for the sequential completion of both fermentations, but negatively affected the completion of alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® in the early bacteria additions. Conversely, Fermicru UY4®, which was rather inhibitory towards the bacteria, favored the timely completion of both fermentations simultaneously. As bacteria in early inoculations with low or no SO2 addition can be expected to multiply and interact with fermenting yeasts, not only are the yeast-bacterium strains combination and time point of the inoculation to be considered, but also the amount of bacteria inoculated.

  16. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level p...

  17. Diddensiella caesifluorescens gen. nov., sp. nov., a riboflavin-producing yeast species of the family Trichomonascaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four strains of a novel heterothallic yeast species were isolated from rotten wood collected in or near the Pilis Mountains in Hungary. The strains produced riboflavin in liquid culture. Analysis of gene sequences for the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA), as well as an...

  18. Cryptococcus spencermartinsiae sp. nov., a basidiomycetous yeast isolated from glacial waters and apple fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Garcia, V.; Brizzio, S.; Russo, G.; Rosa, C.A.; Boekhout, T.; Theelen, B.J.F.; Libkind, D.; van Broock, M.

    2010-01-01

    Seven strains representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Cryptococcus were isolated from different substrates from Patagonia Argentina and The Netherlands. Three strains were isolates from a meltwater river draining from the Frias glacier at Mount Tronador situated in Nahuel Huapi

  19. Ogataea saltuana sp. nov., a novel methanol-assimilating yeast species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four ascosporulating strains of an undescribed methanol-assimilating yeast species were isolated from forest habitats in Hungary. Three of them were recovered from rotten wood and one from leaves of a sessile oak. A closely related, but somewhat divergent strain was recovered from insect frass in a ...

  20. Functional expression of parasite drug targets and their human orthologs in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The exacting nutritional requirements and complicated life cycles of parasites mean that they are not always amenable to high-throughput drug screening using automated procedures. Therefore, we have engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to act as a surrogate for expressing anti-parasitic targets from a range of biomedically important pathogens, to facilitate the rapid identification of new therapeutic agents.Using pyrimethamine/dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as a model parasite drug/drug target system, we explore the potential of engineered yeast strains (expressing DHFR enzymes from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Homo sapiens, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi to exhibit appropriate differential sensitivity to pyrimethamine. Here, we demonstrate that yeast strains (lacking the major drug efflux pump, Pdr5p expressing yeast ((ScDFR1, human ((HsDHFR, Schistosoma ((SmDHFR, and Trypanosoma ((TbDHFR and (TcDHFR DHFRs are insensitive to pyrimethamine treatment, whereas yeast strains producing Plasmodium ((PfDHFR and (PvDHFR DHFRs are hypersensitive. Reassuringly, yeast strains expressing field-verified, drug-resistant mutants of P. falciparum DHFR ((Pfdhfr(51I,59R,108N are completely insensitive to pyrimethamine, further validating our approach to drug screening. We further show the versatility of the approach by replacing yeast essential genes with other potential drug targets, namely phosphoglycerate kinases (PGKs and N-myristoyl transferases (NMTs.We have generated a number of yeast strains that can be successfully harnessed for the rapid and selective identification of urgently needed anti-parasitic agents.

  1. Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae--their ecology, genetics and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Hervé

    2013-10-15

    The aging of certain white wines is dependent on the presence of yeast strains that develop a biofilm on the wine surface after the alcoholic fermentation. These strains belong to the genus Saccharomyces and are called flor yeasts. These strains possess distinctive characteristics compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting strain. The most important one is their capacity to form a biofilm on the air-liquid interface of the wine. The major gene involved in this phenotype is FLO11, however other genes are also involved in velum formation by these yeast and will be detailed. Other striking features presented in this review are their aneuploidy, and their mitochondrial DNA polymorphism which seems to reflect adaptive evolution of the yeast to a stressful environment where acetaldehyde and ethanol are present at elevated concentration. The biofilm assures access to oxygen and therefore permits continued growth on non-fermentable ethanol. This specific metabolism explains the peculiar organoleptic profile of these wines, especially their content in acetaldehyde and sotolon. This review deals with these different specificities of flor yeasts and will also underline the existing gaps regarding these astonishing yeasts. © 2013.

  2. Geotrichum silvicola sp. nov., a novel asexual arthroconidial yeast species related to the genus Galactomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Raphael S; Alves, Priscila D D; Corrêa, Ary; Lachance, Marc-André; Prasad, G S; Rajaram; Sinha, B R R P; Rosa, Carlos A

    2005-01-01

    Four strains of an asexual arthroconidial yeast species were isolated from Drosophila flies in two Atlantic rain forest sites in Brazil and two strains from oak tasar silkworm larvae (Antheraea proylei) in India. Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 large subunit rRNA gene showed that this yeast represented a novel species of the genus Geotrichum, described as Geotrichum silvicola sp. nov. The novel species was related to the ascogenous genus Galactomyces. The closest relatives of Geotrichum silvicola were Galactomyces sp. strain NRRL Y-6418 and Galactomyces geotrichum. The type culture of Geotrichum silvicola is UFMG-354-2T (=CBS 9194T=NRRL Y-27641T).

  3. Sociobiology of the budding yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for sociobiological research. I discuss the problems connected with clear classification of yeast behaviour based on the fitness-based Hamilton paradigm. Relevant traits include different types of communities, production of flocculins, invertase and toxins, and the presence of apoptosis.

  4. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  5. Evolutionary History of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    2014-06-06

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comparison of these with several other previously published yeast genomes have added increased confidence to the phylogenetic positions of previously poorly placed species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that yeasts with alternative nuclear codon usage where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes with Lipomyces starkeyi and the previously published Pneumocystis jirovecii being notable exceptions. Intron analysis suggests that early diverging species have more introns. We also observed a large number of unclassified lineage specific non-simple repeats in these genomes.

  6. Yeast Cell Factory-Platform for the Screening and the Industrial Production of Flavonoids and other Phenolic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehka, Beata Joanna

    is a precursor for other commercially relevant flavonoids we developed a platform for the production of a library of flavonoid derivatives and screened them for antibacterial properties. Seven different yeast strains producing flavonoids (naringenin, kaempferol, dihydrokaempferol, apigenin and afzelechin...

  7. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I M; Baker, A; Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L

    2015-11-01

    The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast

  8. Levaduras inhibidoras de Penicillium Inhibitory Penicillium yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Benítez Ahrendts

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la acción inhibitoria in vitro e in vivo de algunas cepas de levaduras de la zona citrícola jujeña sobre el crecimiento de los mohos patógenos post-cosecha y seleccionarlas para elaborar un producto de biocontrol. Se aislaron de frutos cítricos cepas de los mohos patógenos post-cosecha Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum,P. ulaiense, Phyllosticta sp. y Galactomyces geotrichum, así como de levaduras saprófítas de los géneros Brettanomyces, Candida, Cryptococcus, Kloeckera, Pichia y Rhodotorula. También se obtuvieron algunas levaduras de otras fuentes. Se identificaron las levaduras por las características macro y micromorfológicas y las pruebas fisiológicas. La actividad in vitro e in vivo de las diferentes cepas fue diferente según se enfrentaran a P. digitatum o P. ulaiense. Candida cantarellii y una cepa de Pichia subpelliculosa produjeron una reducción significativa del área de las lesiones provocadas por estas especies de Penicillium, y podrían ser empleadas en la formulación de un producto para biocontrol.The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of post-harvest pathogenic moulds by yeasts in order to make a biocontrol product. Post-harvest pathogenic moulds Penicillium digitatumP. italicum, P. ulaiense, Phyllosticta sp., Galactomyces geotrichum and yeasts belonging to genera Brettanomyces, Candida, Cryptococcus, Kloeckera,Pichia, Rhodotorula were isolated from citrus fruits. Some yeasts strains were also isolated from other sources. The yeasts were identified by their macro and micro-morphology and physiological tests. The in vitro and in vivo activities against P. digitatum or P. ulaiense were different. Candida cantarellii and one strain of Pichia subpelliculosa produced a significant reduction of the lesion area caused by the pathogenic moulds P. digitatum and P. ulaiense, and could be used in a biocontrol product formulation.

  9. Yeast diversity in new, still fermenting wine "federweisser"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate and identify yeasts in different new wine "federweisser" samples. We collected the samples at the end of the August 2015 and in the middle of the September 2015. Used 15 new wine samples in this study (5 white and 10 red were from the local Slovak winemakers. Irsai Oliver (3, Moravian Muscat (2, Agria/Turan (1, Dornfelder (3, Blue Frankish (3, Pinot Noir (1 and Saint Laurent (2. Three cultivation media were used for detection of yeasts in "federweisser" samples. Malt extract agar base (MEA, Wort agar (WA and Wild yeast medium (WYM were used for the cultivation of yeasts. Cultivation was performed by spread plate method. Ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure was used for preparation of samples. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometer (Microflex LT/SH (Bruker Daltonics, Germany was used for the identification of yeasts. We identified seven different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (23; 70%, two strains of Kloeckera apiculata [teleomorph Hanseniaspora uvarum] (7; 21%, and one strain of Pichia kluyveri (1; 3%, Pichia occidentalis [anamorph Candida sorbosa] (1; 3% and Metschnikowia pulcherrima (1; 3% in 15 new wine "federweisser" samples. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was dominant species in each new wine sample, and formed creamy convex colonies with circular edge. Metschnikowia pulcherrima formed convex to pulvinate, circular white-pink colored colonies, Kloeckera apiculata formed flat, circular smooth colonies with turquoise center with gray edge, Pichia occidentalis formed irregular pulvinate light-cream colored colonies, and Pichia kluyveri formed turquoise, convex, undulate and smooth colonies on Malt extract agar base with bromocresol green.   Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  10. Influence of sodium chloride on wine yeast fermentation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stilianos Logothetis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stilianos Logothetis1, Elias T Nerantzis2, Anna Gioulioti3, Tasos Kanelis2, Tataridis Panagiotis2, Graeme Walker11University of Abertay Dundee, School of Contemporary Sciences, Dundee, Scotland; 2TEI of Athens Department of Oenology and Spirit Technology, Biotechnology and Industrial Fermentations Lab Agiou Spiridonos, Athens, Greece; 3Ampeloiniki SA Industrial Park Thermi, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: This paper concerns research into the influence of salt (sodium chloride on growth, viability and fermentation performance in a winemaking strain of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Experimental fermentations were conducted in both laboratory-scale and industrial-scale experiments. Preculturing yeasts in elevated levels of sodium chloride, or salt “preconditioning” led to improved fermentation performance. This was manifest by preconditioned yeasts having an improved capability to ferment high-sugar containing media with increased cell viability and with elevated levels of produced ethanol. Salt-preconditioning most likely influenced the stress-tolerance of yeasts by inducing the synthesis of key metabolites such as trehalose and glycerol. These compounds may act to improve cells’ ability to withstand osmostress and ethanol toxicity during fermentations of grape must. Industrial-scale trials using salt-preconditioned yeasts verified the benefit of this novel physiological cell engineering approach to practical winemaking fermentations.Keywords: salt, preconditioning, fermentation performance, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wine

  11. Responses of Yeast Biocontrol Agents to Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yuan; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeast species, is a research topic that has received considerable attention in the literature over the past 30 years. In principle, it represents a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for the management of postharvest decay of fruits, vegetables, and grains. A yeast-based biocontrol system is composed of a tritrophic interaction between a host (commodity), a pathogen, and a yeast species, all of which are affected by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and UV light as well as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Additionally, during the production process, biocontrol agents encounter various severe abiotic stresses that also impact their viability. Therefore, understanding the ecological fitness of the potential yeast biocontrol agents and developing strategies to enhance their stress tolerance are essential to their efficacy and commercial application. The current review provides an overview of the responses of antagonistic yeast species to various environmental stresses, the methods that can be used to improve stress tolerance and efficacy, and the related mechanisms associated with improved stress tolerance. PMID:25710368

  12. Systems Biology for Mapping Genotype-Phenotype Relations in Yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-25

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials. Through metabolic engineering of this yeast a number of novel new industrial processes have been developed over the last 10 years. Besides its wide industrial use, S. cerevisiae serves as an eukaryal model organism, and many systems biology tools have therefore been developed for this organism. Among these genome-scale metabolic models have shown to be most successful as they easy integrate with omics data and at the same time have been shown to have excellent predictive power. Despite our extensive knowledge of yeast metabolism and its regulation we are still facing challenges when we want to engineer complex traits, such as improved tolerance to toxic metabolites like butanol and elevated temperatures or when we want to engineer the highly complex protein secretory pathway. In this presentation it will be demonstrated how we can combine directed evolution with systems biology analysis to identify novel targets for rational design-build-test of yeast strains that have improved phenotypic properties. In this lecture an overview of systems biology of yeast will be presented together with examples of how genome-scale metabolic modeling can be used for prediction of cellular growth at different conditions. Examples will also be given on how adaptive laboratory evolution can be used for identifying targets for improving tolerance towards butanol, increased temperature and low pH and for improving secretion of heterologous proteins.

  13. Yarrowia lipolytica: a model yeast for citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Ema; Charreau, Hernán; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2017-12-01

    Every year more than 2 million tons of citric acid (CA) are produced around the world for industrial uses. Although initially extracted from citrus, the low profitability of the process and the increasing demand soon stimulated the search for more efficient methods to produce CA. Currently, most world CA demand (99%) is satisfied by fermentations with microorganisms, especially filamentous fungi and yeasts. CA production with yeasts has certain advantages over molds (e.g. higher productivity and easier cultivation), which in the last two decades have triggered a clear increase in publications and patents devoted to the use of yeasts in this field. Yarrowia lipolytica has become a model yeast that proved to be successful in different production systems. Considering the current interest evidenced in the literature, the most significant information on CA production using Y. lipolytica is summarized. The relevance on CA yields of key factors such as strains, media formulation, environmental conditions and production regimes is thoroughly discussed, with particular focus on increasing CA productivity. Besides, the possibility of tuning the mentioned variables to reduce concomitant isocitric acid production-the biggest disadvantage of using yeasts-is analyzed. Available methods for CA purification/quantification are also discussed. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Yeast synthetic biology toolbox and applications for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kwak, Suryang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-02-01

    Yeasts are efficient biofuel producers with numerous advantages outcompeting bacterial counterparts. While most synthetic biology tools have been developed and customized for bacteria especially for Escherichia coli, yeast synthetic biological tools have been exploited for improving yeast to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass. Here we review the current status of synthetic biological tools and their applications for biofuel production, focusing on the model strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe assembly techniques that have been developed for constructing genes, pathways, and genomes in yeast. Moreover, we discuss synthetic parts for allowing precise control of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Applications of these synthetic biological approaches have led to identification of effective gene targets that are responsible for desirable traits, such as cellulosic sugar utilization, advanced biofuel production, and enhanced tolerance against toxic products for biofuel production from renewable biomass. Although an array of synthetic biology tools and devices are available, we observed some gaps existing in tool development to achieve industrial utilization. Looking forward, future tool development should focus on industrial cultivation conditions utilizing industrial strains. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  15. Genetic manipulation of amylotic yeast for degradation of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasim, A.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of a variety of techniques in Genetic Engineering has greatly facilitated the manipulation of hereditary material. These methodologies provide effective tools to utilize the existing microorganisms for creating novel combinations of hybrid strains for the degradation of substrates that can be converted into alcohol. Yeasts have several distinct advantages including the long standing industrial experience of scaling up the growth. The present report deals with the account of some experimental approaches used to obtained amylolytic yeast strains with ability to degrade starch. From among the naturally occurring yeasts schwanniomyces was found to be very efficient for this purpose. Both gene cloning and protoplast fusion were used to transfer DNA from Saccharomyces diastaticus to the bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glucoamylase gene of S. diastaticus has been successfully cloned into S. cerevisiae. The observations are discussed as there relate to the current efforts to degrade substrates for energy placing special emphasis on the tremendous potential that naturally occurring microbes may have. This emphasizes the need to examine this aspect critically before initiating attempts to genetically engineer microbes for heterologous gene transfer, which appears to have serious limitations as far as the production of the end products adequate for industrial purposes are concerned. (author)

  16. Industrial Relevance of Chromosomal Copy Number Variation in Saccharomyces Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter de Vries, Arthur R; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc G

    2017-06-01

    Chromosomal copy number variation (CCNV) plays a key role in evolution and health of eukaryotes. The unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important model for studying the generation, physiological impact, and evolutionary significance of CCNV. Fundamental studies of this yeast have contributed to an extensive set of methods for analyzing and introducing CCNV. Moreover, these studies provided insight into the balance between negative and positive impacts of CCNV in evolutionary contexts. A growing body of evidence indicates that CCNV not only frequently occurs in industrial strains of Saccharomyces yeasts but also is a key contributor to the diversity of industrially relevant traits. This notion is further supported by the frequent involvement of CCNV in industrially relevant traits acquired during evolutionary engineering. This review describes recent developments in genome sequencing and genome editing techniques and discusses how these offer opportunities to unravel contributions of CCNV in industrial Saccharomyce s strains as well as to rationally engineer yeast chromosomal copy numbers and karyotypes. Copyright © 2017 Gorter de Vries et al.

  17. Optimization of culture medium for heavy-ion irradiation bread yeast design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Liang; Wang Jufang; Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Xiao Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    A mutant bread yeast strain with high protein content of 55% was gained by use of 12 C 6+ ions. The MINITAB 16.0 software, Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology were applied to optimize the culture medium for the irradiated yeast. The most important three factors which influenced the culture results were identified as glucose, magnesium sulphate and yeast extract. The path of the steepest ascent was undertaken to approach the optimal region of the three significant factors. Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology were used for the regression analysis. Finally, the optimal fermentation conditions were identified as glucose 11.03 g/L, yeast extract 6.53 g/L and magnesium sulphate 5.59 g/L by the regression analysis. It was found that the biomass of the bread yeasts reached 4.84 g/L and increased by 15% compared to original conditions. (authors)

  18. Detection and quantitative determination by PIXE of the mutagen Sn{sup 2+} in yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viau, C.M. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Yoneama, M.-L. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, CEP 91501-970, CP 15051, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: jfdias@if.ufrgs.br; Dias, J.F. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, CEP 91501-970, CP 15051, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pungartnik, C. [Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Brendel, M. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Henriques, J.A.P. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, ULBRA, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    The main goal of this work was to determine the concentration of Sn{sup 2+} ions in cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to correlate their quantity with the genotoxicity of intracellularly accumulated metal ions. The intracellular metal content of yeast cells was determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) after cell exposure to SnCl{sub 2}. To that end, a thick target protocol was developed for PIXE analysis. The samples were irradiated with a 2 MeV proton beam, while the induced X-rays were detected with a high-purity germanium detector. The results of the toxicity of SnCl{sub 2} and the PIXE analysis performed with two different yeast strains (haploid and diploid) suggest that the exposure of haploid and diploid yeast to Sn{sup 2+} induces DNA lesions and that the absorption depends on the genetic background of each strain.

  19. [Heat shock-induced changes in the respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhvanov, E G; Varakina, N N; Rusaleva, T M; Rachenko, E I; Kiseleva, V A; Voĭnikov, V K

    2001-01-01

    The incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at elevated temperature (45 degrees C) stimulated the respiration of yeast cells and decreased their survival rate. The respiration-deficient mutant of this yeast was found to be more tolerant to the elevated temperature than the wild-type strain. At the same time, the cultivation of the wild-type strain in an ethanol-containing medium enhanced the respiration, catalase activity, and thermotolerance of yeast cells, as compared with their growth in a glucose-containing medium. It is suggested that the enhanced respiration of yeast cells at 45 degrees C leads to an intense accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which may be one of the reasons for the heat shock-induced cell death.

  20. Detection and quantitative determination by PIXE of the mutagen Sn2+ in yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viau, C.M.; Yoneama, M.-L.; Dias, J.F.; Pungartnik, C.; Brendel, M.; Henriques, J.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to determine the concentration of Sn 2+ ions in cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to correlate their quantity with the genotoxicity of intracellularly accumulated metal ions. The intracellular metal content of yeast cells was determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) after cell exposure to SnCl 2 . To that end, a thick target protocol was developed for PIXE analysis. The samples were irradiated with a 2 MeV proton beam, while the induced X-rays were detected with a high-purity germanium detector. The results of the toxicity of SnCl 2 and the PIXE analysis performed with two different yeast strains (haploid and diploid) suggest that the exposure of haploid and diploid yeast to Sn 2+ induces DNA lesions and that the absorption depends on the genetic background of each strain

  1. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  2. Yeast Population Dynamics in Spontaneous and Inoculated Alcoholic Fermentations of Zametovka Must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Cus

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inoculated fermentations, which are more rapid and more reliable than spontaneous fermentations, and assure predictable wine quality, are nowadays prevalent in Slovenia’s large-scale wine production. However, spontaneous fermentation strengthens local characteristics of wine and offers opportunities for technological innovation. In the 1999 vintage, spontaneous and inoculated fermentations of Zametovka (Vitis vinifera grape must were studied. Zametovka is the main red variety in production of traditional Slovene red blend wine, Cvicek. The diversity of yeast species and strains in both of the investigated fermentations was determined by molecular and traditional identification methods. The outset of alcoholic fermentation, yeast growth kinetics, and yeast population dynamics presents the main differences between the examined fermentations. Yeast population diversity was higher in the spontaneous process. Dominant yeast isolates from spontaneous fermentation were identified as Candida stellata, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; whereas Saccharomyces bayanus, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia membranifaciens and Torulaspora delbrueckiim were found less frequently. Dominant species in the inoculated fermentation was Saccharomyces cerevisiae; other species found in smaller numbers were Candida stellata, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii. Using PFGE, we were able to distinguish among 15 different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and three different Saccharomyces bayanus strains isolated from spontaneous fermentation, whereas, in the case of inoculated fermentation, only two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were found. Their chromosomal patterns coincide with the chromosomal patterns of the starter culture strains.

  3. Breeding of Freeze-tolerant Yeast and the Mechanisms of Stress-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Akihiro

    Frozen dough method have been adopted in the baking industry to reduce labor and to produce fresh breads in stores. New freeze-tolerant yeasts for frozen dough preparations were isolated from banana peel and identified. To obtain strains that have fermentative ability even after several months of frozen storage in fermented dough, we attempted to breed new freeze-tolerantstrain. The hybrid between S.cerevisiae, which is a isolated freeze-tolerant strain, and a strain isolated from bakers' yeast with sexual conjugation gave a good quality bread made from frozen dough method. Freeze-tolerant strains showed higher surviving and trehalose accumulating abilities than freeze-sensitive strains. The freeze tolerance of the yeasts was associated with the basal amount of intracellular trehalose after rapid degradation at the onset of the prefermentation period. The complicated metabolic pathway and the regulation system of trehalose in yeast cells are introduced. The trehalose synthesis may act as a metabolic buffer system which contribute to maintain the intracellular inorganic phosphate and as a feedback regulation system in the glycolysis. However, it is not known enough how the trehalose protects yeast cells from stress.

  4. Synthetic genome engineering forging new frontiers for wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Isak S

    2017-02-01

    Over the past 15 years, the seismic shifts caused by the convergence of biomolecular, chemical, physical, mathematical, and computational sciences alongside cutting-edge developments in information technology and engineering have erupted into a new field of scientific endeavor dubbed Synthetic Biology. Recent rapid advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and DNA synthesis techniques are enabling the design and construction of new biological parts (genes), devices (gene networks) and modules (biosynthetic pathways), and the redesign of biological systems (cells and organisms) for useful purposes. In 2014, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae became the first eukaryotic cell to be equipped with a fully functional synthetic chromosome. This was achieved following the synthesis of the first viral (poliovirus in 2002 and bacteriophage Phi-X174 in 2003) and bacterial (Mycoplasma genitalium in 2008 and Mycoplasma mycoides in 2010) genomes, and less than two decades after revealing the full genome sequence of a laboratory (S288c in 1996) and wine (AWRI1631 in 2008) yeast strain. A large international project - the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project - is now underway to synthesize all 16 chromosomes (∼12 Mb carrying ∼6000 genes) of the sequenced S288c laboratory strain by 2018. If successful, S. cerevisiae will become the first eukaryote to cross the horizon of in silico design of complex cells through de novo synthesis, reshuffling, and editing of genomes. In the meantime, yeasts are being used as cell factories for the semi-synthetic production of high-value compounds, such as the potent antimalarial artemisinin, and food ingredients, such as resveratrol, vanillin, stevia, nootkatone, and saffron. As a continuum of previously genetically engineered industrially important yeast strains, precision genome engineering is bound to also impact the study and development of wine yeast strains supercharged with synthetic DNA. The first taste of what the future

  5. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Matos, Cláudia; Møller, Birger L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has...... recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results: Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis...... thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets...

  6. Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, a new ascosporogenous yeast from 'Kombucha tea'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J; Basehoar-Powers, E

    2001-07-01

    A new ascosporogenous yeast, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis sp. n. (type strain NRRL YB-4811, CBS 8849), is described; it was isolated from Kombucha tea, a popular fermented tea-based beverage. The four known strains of the new species have identical nucleotide sequences in domain D1/D2 of 26S rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of D1/D2 and 18S rDNA sequences places Z. kombuchaensis near Zygosaccharomyces lentus. The two species are indistinguishable on standard physiological tests used for yeast identification, but can be recognized from differences in restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns obtained by digestion of 18S-ITS1 amplicons with the restriction enzymes DdeI and MboI.

  7. Yeast red pigment modifies Amyloid beta growth in Alzheimer disease models in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzglyadova, Olga V; Mikhailova, Ekaterina V; Amen, Triana R; Zenin, Valeriy V; Artemov, Alexey V; Kostyleva, Elena I; Mezhenskaya, Daria A; Rodin, Dmitry I; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Soidla, Tonu R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of yeast red pigment on amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and fibril growth was studied in yeasts, fruit flies and in vitro. Yeast strains accumulating red pigment (red strains) contained less amyloid and had better survival rates compared to isogenic strains without red pigment accumulation (white strains). Confocal and fluorescent microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent Aβ-GFP aggregates. Yeast cells containing less red pigment had more Aβ-GFP aggregates despite the lower level of overall GFP fluorescence. Western blot analysis with anti-GFP, anti-Aβ and A11 antibodies also revealed that red cells contained a considerably lower amount of Aβ GFP aggregates as compared to white cells. Similar results were obtained with exogenous red pigment that was able to penetrate yeast cells. In vitro experiments with thioflavine and TEM showed that red pigment effectively decreased Aβ fibril growth. Transgenic flies expressing Aβ were cultivated on medium containing red and white isogenic yeast strains. Flies cultivated on red strains had a significant decrease in Aβ accumulation levels and brain neurodegeneration. They also demonstrated better memory and learning indexes and higher locomotor ability.

  8. Genome sequence of the food spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii CLIB 213T.

    OpenAIRE

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Devillers, Hugo; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Dequin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeasts in food and beverage industries, due to its exceptional resistance to various stresses. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these stress resistance phenotypes might help develop strategies to improve food quality. Thus, we determined and annotated the genome sequence of the strain Z. bailii CLIB 213(T) (= CBS 680).

  9. Genome Sequence of the Food Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii CLIB 213T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Devillers, Hugo; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Dequin, Sylvie

    2013-08-22

    The ascomycetous yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeasts in food and beverage industries, due to its exceptional resistance to various stresses. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these stress resistance phenotypes might help develop strategies to improve food quality. Thus, we determined and annotated the genome sequence of the strain Z. bailii CLIB 213(T) (= CBS 680).

  10. Detection of homologous recombination between yeast artificial chromosomes with overlapping inserts.

    OpenAIRE

    Cellini, A; Lacatena, R M; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system which facilitates the detection of recombination between Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YAC's) carrying homologous inserts. The system consists of a classical YAC vector, a new YAC vector and two appropriately labelled yeast strains of opposite mating type. The new YAC vector differs in markers from the canonical YAC vector. To test whether homologous recombination takes place, phage lambda DNA was cloned in the two vectors to provide a region of homology. The two co...

  11. Screening of native yeast from Agave duranguensis fermentation for isoamyl acetate production

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Carbajal,Gerardo; Rutiaga-Quiñones,Olga Miriam; Pérez-Silva,Araceli; Saucedo-Castañeda,Gerardo; Medeiros,Adriane; Soccol,Carlos Ricardo; Soto-Cruz,Nicolás Óscar

    2013-01-01

    In this work, fifty yeast strains, isolated from the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of Agave duranguensis to produce mezcal, were tested using the double coupling system. These yeasts were from the genera Pichia, Torulaspora, Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Deckera, Hanseniaspora, and Candida. P. fermentans ITD00165 was the best isoamyl acetate producer, yielding 0.38 g/L of ester after incubation for 24 h, while K. marxianus ITD00211 produced 0.32 g/L of ester. Thus P. fermentans TD00165 c...

  12. Adhesive interactions between voice prosthetic yeast and bacteria on silicone rubber in the absence and presence of saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsap, K W; Bos, R; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J

    2001-09-01

    Biofilms on silicone rubber voice prostheses are the major cause for frequent failure and replacement of these devices. The presence of both bacterial strains and yeast has been suggested to be crucial for the development of voice prosthetic biofilms. Adhesive interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida tropicalis with 14 bacterial strains, all isolated from explanted voice prostheses were investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. Bacteria were first allowed to adhere to silicone rubber, after which the flow chamber was perfused with yeast, suspended either in saliva or buffer. Generally, when yeast were adhering from buffer and saliva, the presence of adhering bacteria suppressed adhesion of yeast. In saliva, Rothia dentocariosa and Staphylococcus aureus enhanced adhesion of yeast, especially of C. albicans. This study shows that bacterial adhesion mostly reduces subsequent adhesion of yeast, while only a few bacterial strains stimulate adhesion of yeast, provided salivary adhesion mediators are present. Interestingly, different clinical studies have identified R. dentocariosa and S. aureus in biofilms on explanted prostheses of patients needing most frequent replacement, while C. albicans is one of the yeast generally held responsible for silicone rubber deterioration.

  13. Development of industrial yeast for second generation bioethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-15

    involved in furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) reductions by this yeast have both cofactor preferences for NADH. Due to the low inhibitor tolerance, the growth of S. passalidarum was completely inhibited in the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover and wheat straw. The inhibitor tolerance of S. passalidarum was improved by the method of genome shuffling including UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion. The protoplast of a UV-induced furfural-resistant mutant of S. passalidarum (S. passalidarum M7) was fused with the protoplast of a robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. The finally selected hybrid strain (FS22) has desired phenotypes derived from both parents, namely the ability to ferment xylose from S. passalidarum and an increased tolerance to inhibitors from S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Phenotypic and molecular analysis indicated that S. passalidarum M7 was the dominant parental contributor to the hybrid. Rearrangement of DNA segments from the other parental strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 possibly occurred in FS22. The inhibitor tolerance of the robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 was further improved by sequentially adapting this strain into media with increasing amounts of the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover (CSLQ). The adapted strain completely fermented glucose in 100% CSLQ and the ethanol yield was 0.48 g/g glucose, while the parental strain was unable to ferment under this condition. Co-fermentation of this adapted strain with the selected protoplast fused hybrids (FS2 or FS22) in the pretreated wheat straw hydrolysate improved the final ethanol yield by 11% and 26%, respectively, due to partial conversion of xylose in the hydrolysate by the xylose-fermenting hybrids. Co-fermentation with one robust C6 fermenting yeast for detoxification and one C5 fermenting yeast for converting xylose into ethanol could be a viable strategy for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. (Author)

  14. Extension of Yeast Chronological Lifespan by Methylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronological aging of yeast cells is commonly used as a model for aging of human post-mitotic cells. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose in the presence of ammonium sulphate is mainly used in yeast aging research. We have analyzed chronological aging of the yeast

  15. Parallel comparative studies on toxicity of quantum dots synthesized and surface engineered with different methods in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu F

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fengjun Liu1,* Wen Ye1,* Jun Wang2 Fengxiang Song1 Yingsheng Cheng3 Bingbo Zhang21Department of Radiology, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, 2Institute of Photomedicine, Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, The Institute for Biomedical Engineering & Nano Science, Tongji University School of Medicine, 3Department of Radiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs have been considered to be promising probes for biosensing, bioimaging, and diagnosis. However, their toxicity issues caused by heavy metals in QDs remain to be addressed, in particular for their in vivo biomedical applications. In this study, a parallel comparative investigation in vitro and in vivo is presented to disclose the impact of synthetic methods and their following surface modifications on the toxicity of QDs. Cellular assays after exposure to QDs were conducted including cell viability assessment, DNA breakage study in a single cellular level, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS receptor measurement, and transmission electron microscopy to evaluate their toxicity in vitro. Mice experiments after QD administration, including analysis of hemobiological indices, pharmacokinetics, histological examination, and body weight, were further carried out to evaluate their systematic toxicity in vivo. Results show that QDs fabricated by the thermal decomposition approach in organic phase and encapsulated by an amphiphilic polymer (denoted as QDs-1 present the least toxicity in acute damage, compared with those of QDs surface engineered by glutathione-mediated ligand exchange (denoted as QDs-2, and the ones prepared by coprecipitation approach in aqueous phase with mercaptopropionic acid capped (denoted as QDs-3. With the extension of the investigation time of mice respectively injected with QDs, we found that the damage caused by QDs to the organs can be

  16. Comparison of the yeast microbiota of different varieties of cool-climate grapes by PCR-RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Drożdż

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The yeast microbiota occurring on different varieties of grapes grown in cool-climate is not completely researched. Therefore, its identification is important to research. On the other hand, yeasts occurring in these fruits can be potentially used as starter cultures to obtain particularly demanded features in the production of wine. In addition, rapid methods for yeast identification allow to eliminate the contamination with pathogenic yeasts, which could cause the loss of wine production. The aim of the study was to isolate and identify the yeasts occurring on the surface of the different varieties of white and red grapes, grown in cool-climate of Poland. Also, the aim was to compare the qualitative and quantitative composition of yeasts on the tested grapes. The 84 cultures of yeasts were isolated, that were initially macroscopic and microscopic analyzed and the purity of cultures was rated on the WL medium. Identification of yeasts by PCR-RAPD was carried using the M13 primer. In the PCR-RFLP method ITS1 and ITS4 primers, as well as restriction enzymes HhaI, HinfI, HaeIII, were used. Preliminary identification of yeasts by standard methods produced results very different from the results obtained by molecular methods. Among the isolated microorganisms yeasts were dominating, but bacteria and molds were also present. Using the PCR-RAPD method most strains of yeasts were identified. Yeast microflora of different varieties of white and red grapes was very similar as the same species of yeasts were identified. Yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces were present in all varieties of grapes. The Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Rhodotorula minuta, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were identified by PCR-RAPD. 4 of the 33 tested strains of yeasts were identified by PCR-RFLP. By PCR-RAPD only Hanseniaspora uvarum was identified. The quantity and quality of microorganisms living

  17. In vitro anidulafungin activity against yeasts – system and disseminated mycosis pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kulko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed susceptibility to anidulafungin of yeasts clinical strains of Candida (14 species, Cryptococcus (1 species, Geotrichum (1 species, Rhodotorula (1 species and Saccharomyces (1 species. We revealed high anidulafungin activity against Candida spp., both common species and rare pathogens of candidiasis. It was found that over 99 % of Candida strains do not have an acquired resistance mechanisms to anidulafungin (microbiological criteria. The anidulafungin is not active against strains of Cryptococcus neoformans and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

  18. The Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii Forms Mitotic Spores: a Screening Method for Haploidization

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H. Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2003-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 and the type strain of this spoilage yeast show a diploid DNA content. Together with a rather peculiar life cycle in which mitotic but no meiotic spores appear to be formed, the diploid DNA content explains the observed difficulties in obtaining auxotrophic mutants. Mitotic chromosome loss induced by benomyl and selection on canavanine media resulted in three haploid strains of Z. bailii. This new set of Z. bailii strains allows the easy isolation...

  19. Yeast tolerance to the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Shi, Shuang; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Simmons, Christopher W

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the target feedstock for production of second-generation biofuels. Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment can enhance deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. Although biomass is typically washed following IL pretreatment, small quantities of residual IL can inhibit fermentative microorganisms downstream, such as the widely used ethanologenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The aim of this study was to identify yeasts tolerant to the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, one of the top performing ILs known for biomass pretreatment. One hundred and sixty eight strains spanning the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla were selected for screening, with emphasis on yeasts within or closely related to the Saccharomyces genus and those tolerant to saline environments. Based on growth in media containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, tolerance to IL levels ranging 1-5% was observed for 80 strains. The effect of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate concentration on maximum cell density and growth rate was quantified to rank tolerance. The most tolerant yeasts included strains from the genera Clavispora, Debaryomyces, Galactomyces, Hyphopichia, Kazachstania, Meyerozyma, Naumovozyma, Wickerhamomyces, Yarrowia, and Zygoascus. These yeasts included species known to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides and those capable of ethanol fermentation. These yeasts warrant further investigation for use in saccharification and fermentation of IL-pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol or other products. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of PAD1 and FDC1 show a positive relationship with ferulic acid decarboxylation ability among industrial yeasts used in alcoholic beverage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Nobuhiko; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Among industrial yeasts used for alcoholic beverage production, most wine and weizen beer yeasts decarboxylate ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, which has a smoke-like flavor, whereas sake, shochu, top-fermenting, and bottom-fermenting yeast strains lack this ability. However, the factors underlying this difference among industrial yeasts are not clear. We previously confirmed that both PAD1 (phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR538W) and FDC1 (ferulic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR539W) are essential for the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAD1 and FDC1 in sake, shochu, wine, weizen, top-fermenting, bottom-fermenting, and laboratory yeast strains were examined to clarify the differences in ferulic acid decarboxylation ability between these types of yeast. For PAD1, a nonsense mutation was observed in the gene sequence of standard top-fermenting yeast. Gene sequence analysis of FDC1 revealed that sake, shochu, and standard top-fermenting yeasts contained a nonsense mutation, whereas a frameshift mutation was identified in the FDC1 gene of bottom-fermenting yeast. No nonsense or frameshift mutations were detected in laboratory, wine, or weizen beer yeast strains. When FDC1 was introduced into sake and shochu yeast strains, the transformants exhibited ferulic acid decarboxylation activity. Our findings indicate that a positive relationship exists between SNPs in PAD1 and FDC1 genes and the ferulic acid decarboxylation ability of industrial yeast strains. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation, identification and selection of antagonistic yeast against Alternaria alternata infection and tenuazonic acid production in wine grapes from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendes, Luciana P; Merín, María G; Fontana, Ariel R; Bottini, Rubén A; Ramirez, María L; Morata de Ambrosini, Vilma I

    2018-02-02

    Epiphytic isolates with yeast characteristics from grapes of the Malbec cultivar were obtained in order to find antagonists against Alternaria alternata. From a total of 111 isolates, 82% corresponded to the yeast-like organism Aureobasidium pullulans and the rest to the non-Saccharomyces yeasts Hanseniaspora uvarum (6.3%), Metschnikowia pulcherrima or spp. (5.4%), Cryptoccocus laurentti II (2.7%), Starmerella bacilaris or Candida zemplinina (2.7%) and Rhodotorula spp. (0.9%). The 22.4% (15 out of 67) of epiphytic yeasts and yeast-like organisms evaluated were able to reduce A. alternata infection from 0.0 to 4.4% when applied 2h previous to pathogen inoculation on wounds of grape berries. From these selected strains, 14 out of 15 strains completely prevented A. alternata infection (0.0%), which implies potential for field application. All Metschnikowia (pulcherrima or spp.), S. bacillaris and almost all H. uvarum evaluated strains showed antagonist capability against A. alternata. Meanwhile, none of the lesser nutritional requirement strains belonging to A. pullulans, Cr. laurenti II and Rhodotorula spp. did. All the yeasts with capacity to prevent A. alternata infection also reduced tenuazonic acid (TA) production by 81.2 to 99.8%, finding TA levels similar to negative controls. Therefore, the epiphytic yeasts selected are promising as biological control agents against Alternaria infection and toxin production in grapes for winemaking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts Nitrogen Source Preferences: Impact on Sequential Fermentation and Wine Volatile Compounds Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Antoine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Morge, Christophe; Sparrow, Céline; Liu, Youzhong; Quintanilla-Casas, Beatriz; Vichi, Stefania; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen sources in the must are important for yeast metabolism, growth, and performance, and wine volatile compounds profile. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) deficiencies in grape must are one of the main causes of stuck and sluggish fermentation. The nitrogen requirement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism has been described in detail. However, the YAN preferences of non-Saccharomyces yeasts remain unknown despite their increasingly widespread use in winemaking. Furthermore, the impact of nitrogen consumption by non-Saccharomyces yeasts on YAN availability, alcoholic performance and volatile compounds production by S. cerevisiae in sequential fermentation has been little studied. With a view to improving the use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, we studied the use of amino acids and ammonium by three strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Starmerella bacillaris, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Pichia membranifaciens) in grape juice. We first determined which nitrogen sources were preferentially used by these yeasts in pure cultures at 28 and 20°C (because few data are available). We then carried out sequential fermentations at 20°C with S. cerevisiae, to assess the impact of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on the availability of assimilable nitrogen for S. cerevisiae. Finally, 22 volatile compounds were quantified in sequential fermentation and their levels compared with those in pure cultures of S. cerevisiae. We report here, for the first time, that non-Saccharomyces yeasts have specific amino-acid consumption profiles. Histidine, methionine, threonine, and tyrosine were not consumed by S. bacillaris, aspartic acid was assimilated very slowly by M. pulcherrima, and glutamine was not assimilated by P. membranifaciens. By contrast, cysteine appeared to be a preferred nitrogen source for all non-Saccharomyces yeasts. In sequential fermentation, these specific profiles of amino-acid consumption by non-Saccharomyces yeasts may account for some of the

  3. Non-SaccharomycesYeasts Nitrogen Source Preferences: Impact on Sequential Fermentation and Wine Volatile Compounds Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Antoine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Morge, Christophe; Sparrow, Céline; Liu, Youzhong; Quintanilla-Casas, Beatriz; Vichi, Stefania; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen sources in the must are important for yeast metabolism, growth, and performance, and wine volatile compounds profile. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) deficiencies in grape must are one of the main causes of stuck and sluggish fermentation. The nitrogen requirement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism has been described in detail. However, the YAN preferences of non- Saccharomyces yeasts remain unknown despite their increasingly widespread use in winemaking. Furthermore, the impact of nitrogen consumption by non- Saccharomyces yeasts on YAN availability, alcoholic performance and volatile compounds production by S. cerevisiae in sequential fermentation has been little studied. With a view to improving the use of non- Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, we studied the use of amino acids and ammonium by three strains of non- Saccharomyces yeasts ( Starmerella bacillaris, Metschnikowia pulcherrima , and Pichia membranifaciens ) in grape juice. We first determined which nitrogen sources were preferentially used by these yeasts in pure cultures at 28 and 20°C (because few data are available). We then carried out sequential fermentations at 20°C with S. cerevisiae , to assess the impact of the non- Saccharomyces yeasts on the availability of assimilable nitrogen for S. cerevisiae . Finally, 22 volatile compounds were quantified in sequential fermentation and their levels compared with those in pure cultures of S. cerevisiae . We report here, for the first time, that non- Saccharomyces yeasts have specific amino-acid consumption profiles. Histidine, methionine, threonine, and tyrosine were not consumed by S. bacillaris , aspartic acid was assimilated very slowly by M. pulcherrima , and glutamine was not assimilated by P. membranifaciens . By contrast, cysteine appeared to be a preferred nitrogen source for all non- Saccharomyces yeasts. In sequential fermentation, these specific profiles of amino-acid consumption by non- Saccharomyces yeasts may account for

  4. Enhanced ethanol production from sugarcane juice by galactose adaptation of a newly isolated thermotolerant strain of Pichia kudriavzevii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhaliwal, S.S.; Oberoi, H.S.; Sandhu, S.K.; Nanda, D.; Kumar, D.; Uppal, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The thermotolerant yeast strain isolated from sugarcane juice through enrichment technique was identified as a strain of Pichiakudriavzevii (Issatchenkiaorientalis) through molecular characterization. The P. kudriavzevii cells adapted to galactose medium produced about 30% more ethanol from

  5. Perchlorate Reduction by Yeast for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alaisha

    2015-01-01

    Martian soil contains high levels (0.6 percentage by mass) of calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2), which readily dissociates into calcium and the perchlorate ion (ClO4-) in water. Even in trace amounts, perchlorates are toxic to humans and have been implicated in thyroid dysfunction. Devising methods to lessen perchlorate contamination is crucial to minimizing the health risks associated with human exploration and colonization of Mars. We designed a perchlorate reduction pathway, which sequentially reduces perchlorate to chloride (Cl-) and oxygen (O2), for implementation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using genes obtained from perchlorate reducing bacteria Azospira oryzae and Dechloromonas aromatica, we plan to assemble this pathway directly within S. cerevisiae through recombinational cloning. A perchlorate reduction pathway would enable S. cerevisiae to lower perchlorate levels and produce oxygen, which may be harvested or used directly by S. cerevisiae for aerobic growth and compound synthesis. Moreover, using perchlorate as an external electron acceptor could improve the efficiency of redox-imbalanced production pathways in yeast. Although several perchlorate reducing bacteria have been identified and utilized in water treatment systems on Earth, the widespread use of S. cerevisiae as a synthetic biology platform justifies the development of a perchlorate reducing strain for implementation on Mars.

  6. Parameters affecting methanol utilization by yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, M.S.; El-Masry, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Screening of 28 yeast cultures, representing 22 species of various yeasts, with respect to their capabilities to assimilate methanol, has shown that this property was mostly found in certain species of the two genera Hansenula and Candida. When methanol was used as a sole carbon source for a methanol-adapted strain of Hansenula polymorpha, a linear yield response could be obtained with increasing alcohol up to 2% concentration. The amount of inoculum proved to be the decisive factor in determining a priori the ability of the organism to grow at 6% methanol as final concentration. The optimum pH values for growth ranged between 4.5-5.5 with no growth at pH 6.5 or higher. A marked growth stimulation was obtained when the medium was supplied with phosphate up to 0.08 M as final concentration. Within the nitrogen sources tested, corn steep liquor concentrate gave the highest yield of cells. The significance of the obtained results are discussed with reference to feasibilities of application.

  7. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants by basidiomycetous yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-05-01

    BSs (biosurfactants) produced by various micro-organisms show unique properties (e.g. mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared with chemically synthesized surfactants. The numerous advantages of BSs have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries but also in environmental protection and energy-saving technology. Among BSs, glycolipid types are the most promising, owing to their high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. MELs (mannosylerythritol lipids), which are glycolipid BSs abundantly produced by basidiomycetous yeasts such as strains of Pseudozyma, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties, but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukaemia cells. MELs also show high binding affinity towards different immunoglobulins and lectins. Recently, a cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BSs should broaden their application in new advanced technologies. In the present review the current status of research and development on glycolipid BSs, especially their production by Pseudozyma yeasts, is described.

  8. Biotechnical Microbiology, yeast and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid Stampe

    1999-01-01

    This section contains the following single lecture notes: Eukaryotic Cell Biology. Kingdom Fungi. Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination. Genetics of Yeast. Organisation of the Chromosome. Organization and genetics of the mitochondrial Geneme. Regulatio of Gene Expression. Intracellular Compart...

  9. Probiotic Yeasts and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yıldıran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are a group of organism those confer health benefit to consumers. There are lots of studies about health benefits of probiotic treatments. The more commonly used probiotic bacteria are bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria, such as lactobacilli, lactococci and streptococci. Microorganisms that are probiotic to humans also include yeasts, bacilli and enterococci. Probiotic yeasts have become a field of interest to scientists in recent years. Several previous studies showed that members of Saccharomyces genus can possess anti-bacterial and probiotic properties. Saccharomyces boulardii is non-pathogenic yeast used for many years as a probiotic agent to prevent or treat a variety of human gastrointestinal disorders. S. boulardii is commonly used in lyophilized form especially in the pharmaceutical industry. In this review, information about the probiotics, properties of probiotic yeasts, their usage fields is provided and the results of researches in this area has been presented.

  10. Mitochondrial metabolism and stress response of yeast: Applications in fermentation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondria are sites of oxidative respiration. During sake brewing, sake yeasts are exposed to long periods of hypoxia; the structure, role, and metabolism of mitochondria of sake yeasts have not been studied in detail. It was first elucidated that the mitochondrial structure of sake yeast transforms from filamentous to dotted structure during sake brewing, which affects malate metabolism. Based on the information of yeast mitochondria during sake brewing, practical technologies have been developed; (i) breeding pyruvate-underproducing sake yeast by the isolation of a mutant resistant to an inhibitor of mitochondrial pyruvate transport; and (ii) modifying malate and succinate production by manipulating mitochondrial activity. During the bread-making process, baker's yeast cells are exposed to a variety of baking-associated stresses, such as freeze-thaw, air-drying, and high sucrose concentrations. These treatments induce oxidative stress generating reactive oxygen species due to mitochondrial damage. A novel metabolism of proline and arginine catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 in the mitochondria eventually leads to synthesis of nitric oxide, which confers oxidative stress tolerance on yeast cells. The enhancement of proline and arginine metabolism could be promising for breeding novel baker's yeast strains that are tolerant to multiple baking-associated stresses. These new and practical methods provide approaches to improve the processes in the field of industrial fermentation technologies. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Equilibrium Isotherm, Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Characterization Studies of Cadmium Adsorption by Surface-Engineered Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafakori, Vida; Zadmard, Reza; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2017-11-01

    Amongst the methods that remove heavy metals from environment, biosorption approaches have received increased attention because of their environmentally friendly and cost-effective feature, as well as their superior performances. In the present study, we investigated the ability of a surface-engineered Escherichia coli, carrying the cyanobacterial metallothionein on the cell surface, in the removal of Ca (II) from solution under different experimental conditions. The biosorption process was optimized using central composite design. In parallel, the kinetics of metal biosorption was studied, and the rate constants of different kinetic models were calculated. Cadmium biosorption is followed by the second-order kinetics. Freundlich and Langmuir equations were used to analyze sorption data; characteristic parameters were determined for each adsorption isotherm. The biosorption process was optimized using the central composite design. The optimal cadmium sorption capacity (284.69 nmol/mg biomass) was obtained at 40°C (pH 8) and a biomass dosage of 10 mg. The influence of two elutants, EDTA and CaCl2, was also assessed on metal recovery. Approximately, 68.58% and 56.54% of the adsorbed cadmium were removed by EDTA and CaCl2 during desorption, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR) analysis indicated that carboxyl, amino, phosphoryl, thiol, and hydroxyl are the main chemical groups involved in the cadmium bioadsorption process. Results from this study implied that chemical adsorption on the heterogeneous surface of E. coli E and optimization of adsorption parameters provides a highly efficient bioadsorbent.

  12. INFLUENCE OF AUTOCHTHONOUS SACCHAROMYCES SPP. STRAINS ON THE SULFUR DIOXIDE CONCENTRATION IN WINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip BELJAK

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the infl uence of 8 autochthonous yeasts strains on the sulfur dioxide formation. For this purpose grape must from the Traminer, Muller Turgau and Chardonnay grapes was used. Yeast strains used were cultivated at the Department for Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb. Five of them were H2S negative and three H2S positive. Tested yeast strains produced from 19 up to 45 mg/l of sulfur dioxide. The highest sulfur dioxide producer was one of the H2S positive yeast strains. The results indicated the initial sugar concentration to be very important for the ratio of sulfur dioxide production. Yeasts were more effi cient at higher sugar levels.

  13. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production.

  14. Modeling Huntington disease in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Yeast have been extensively used to model aspects of protein folding diseases, yielding novel mechanistic insights and identifying promising candidate therapeutic targets. In particular, the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington disease (HD), which is caused by the abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (htt) protein, has been widely studied in yeast. This work has led to the identification of several promising therapeutic targets and compounds that have been validated in mammalian cells, Drosophila and rodent models of HD. Here we discuss the development of yeast models of mutant htt toxicity and misfolding, as well as the mechanistic insights gleaned from this simple model. The role of yeast prions in the toxicity/misfolding of mutant htt is also highlighted. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the application of HD yeast models in both genetic and chemical screens, and the fruitful results obtained from these approaches. Finally, we discuss the future of yeast in neurodegenerative research, in the context of HD and other diseases. PMID:22052350

  15. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  16. Novel Wine Yeast for Improved Utilisation of Proline during Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfeng Long

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Proline is the predominant amino acid in grape juice, but it is poorly assimilated by wine yeast under the anaerobic conditions typical of most fermentations. Exploiting the abundance of this naturally occurring nitrogen source to overcome the need for nitrogen supplementation and/or the risk of stuck or sluggish fermentations would be most beneficial. This study describes the isolation and evaluation of a novel wine yeast isolate, Q7, obtained through ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS mutagenesis. The utilisation of proline by the EMS isolate was markedly higher than by the QA23 wild type strain, with approximately 700 and 300 mg/L more consumed under aerobic and self-anaerobic fermentation conditions, respectively, in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources. Higher intracellular proline contents in the wild type strain implied a lesser rate of proline catabolism or incorporation by this strain, but with higher cell viability after freezing treatment. The expression of key genes (PUT1, PUT2, PUT3, PUT4, GAP1 and URE2 involved in proline degradation, transport and repression were compared between the parent strain and the i