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Sample records for surface-dwelling foraminifera globigerinoides

  1. Fossil and genetic evidence for the polyphyletic nature of the planktonic foraminifera "Globigerinoides", and description of the new genus Trilobatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia; Kucera, Michal; Pearson, Paul Nicholas; Wade, Bridget Susan; Rappo, Sacha; Poole, Christopher Robert; Morard, Raphaël; Stalder, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are one of the most abundant and diverse protists in the oceans. Their utility as paleo proxies requires rigorous taxonomy and comparison with living and genetically related counterparts. We merge genetic and fossil evidence of "Globigerinoides", characterized by supplementary apertures on spiral side, in a new approach to trace their "total evidence phylogeny" since their first appearance in the latest Paleogene. Combined fossil and molecular genetic data indicate that this genus, as traditionally understood, is polyphyletic. Both datasets indicate the existence of two distinct lineages that evolved independently. One group includes "Globigerinoides" trilobus and its descendants, the extant "Globigerinoides" sacculifer, Orbulina universa and Sphaeroidinella dehiscens. The second group includes the Globigerinoides ruber clade with the extant G. conglobatus and G. elongatus and ancestors. In molecular phylogenies, the trilobus group is not the sister taxon of the ruber group. The ruber group clusters consistently together with the modern Globoturborotalita rubescens as a sister taxon. The re-analysis of the fossil record indicates that the first "Globigerinoides" in the late Oligocene are ancestral to the trilobus group, whereas the ruber group first appeared at the base of the Miocene with representatives distinct from the trilobus group. Therefore, polyphyly of the genus "Globigerinoides" as currently defined can only be avoided either by broadening the genus concept to include G. rubescens and a large number of fossil species without supplementary apertures, or if the trilobus group is assigned to a separate genus. Since the former is not feasible due to the lack of a clear diagnosis for such a broad genus, we erect a new genus Trilobatus for the trilobus group (type species Globigerina triloba Reuss) and amend Globoturborotalita and Globigerinoides to clarify morphology and wall textures of these genera. In the new concept, Trilobatus n

  2. Fossil and genetic evidence for the polyphyletic nature of the planktonic foraminifera "Globigerinoides", and description of the new genus Trilobatus.

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    Silvia Spezzaferri

    Full Text Available Planktonic foraminifera are one of the most abundant and diverse protists in the oceans. Their utility as paleo proxies requires rigorous taxonomy and comparison with living and genetically related counterparts. We merge genetic and fossil evidence of "Globigerinoides", characterized by supplementary apertures on spiral side, in a new approach to trace their "total evidence phylogeny" since their first appearance in the latest Paleogene. Combined fossil and molecular genetic data indicate that this genus, as traditionally understood, is polyphyletic. Both datasets indicate the existence of two distinct lineages that evolved independently. One group includes "Globigerinoides" trilobus and its descendants, the extant "Globigerinoides" sacculifer, Orbulina universa and Sphaeroidinella dehiscens. The second group includes the Globigerinoides ruber clade with the extant G. conglobatus and G. elongatus and ancestors. In molecular phylogenies, the trilobus group is not the sister taxon of the ruber group. The ruber group clusters consistently together with the modern Globoturborotalita rubescens as a sister taxon. The re-analysis of the fossil record indicates that the first "Globigerinoides" in the late Oligocene are ancestral to the trilobus group, whereas the ruber group first appeared at the base of the Miocene with representatives distinct from the trilobus group. Therefore, polyphyly of the genus "Globigerinoides" as currently defined can only be avoided either by broadening the genus concept to include G. rubescens and a large number of fossil species without supplementary apertures, or if the trilobus group is assigned to a separate genus. Since the former is not feasible due to the lack of a clear diagnosis for such a broad genus, we erect a new genus Trilobatus for the trilobus group (type species Globigerina triloba Reuss and amend Globoturborotalita and Globigerinoides to clarify morphology and wall textures of these genera. In the new

  3. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shell weights of planktonic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber in the size range of 300–355 μm were measured from sediment traps in the western and eastern Arabian Sea which represent upwelling and non-upwelling conditions respectively. In the Western Arabian Sea Trap (WAST), G. ruber flux ranged from 33.3 ...

  4. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between upwelling and non-upwelling regions in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.; Ramaswamy, V.

    Shell weights of planktonic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber in the size range of 300–355 mew m were measured from sediment traps in the western and eastern Arabian Sea which represent upwelling and non-upwelling conditions respectively...

  5. The isotopic signature of planktonic foraminifera from the NE Atlantic surface sediments: implications for the reconstruction of past oceanic conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganssen, G.M.; Kroon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stable isotope compositions of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink varieties), Globigerinoides trilobus, Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides (right- and left-coiling types) were examined as recorders of North Atlantic

  6. Interindividual variability and ontogenetic effects on Mg and Sr incorporation in the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenas-Bohorquez, A.; Da Rocha, R.E.; Kuroyanagi, A.; Nooijer, L.J. de; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the interindividual and ontogenetic effects on Mg and Sr incorporation, magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) and strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios of cultured planktonic foraminifera have been determined. Specimens of Globigerinoides sacculifer were grown under controlled physical and

  7. Planktonic foraminifera from core tops of western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    A set of seven core tops from western equatorial Indian ocean were analysed for planktonic foraminifera, which has yielded 20 planktonic foraminiferal species. Among them Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinoides sacculifer and G. ruber constitute...

  8. Living planktonic foraminifera of the Wadge bank, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    Twenty three species of living planktonic Foraminifera belonging to 11 genera have been studied from the Wadge Bank area off southern tip of the Indian peninsula. The fauna is characterized by species such as Globigerinoides conglobatus, G...

  9. Low Latitude Pelagic Foraminifera Found in the Hudson River: Are They Hurricane Deposits?

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    Monahan, K. M.; Abbott, D. H.; Hoenisch, B.; Breger, D.

    2011-12-01

    River sediment cores provide a record of past environmental changes through stacked layers of sediments. In core CD02-29A, recovered from the southern Hudson River, a significant number of tropical planktic foraminifer tests were found. Foraminifera were concentrated in sediment layers of low impedance, suggesting high carbonate content. Because modern planktic foraminifera are exclusively marine, their presence in Hudson sediments in the core was remarkable. We can think of only two mechanisms that could explain this observation: either living specimens are carried upriver with the daily tides, or storm surges carry large amounts of seawater and re-suspended marine sediment upriver. To test for the presence of living specimens in Hudson River water, plankton tow samples were collected during high tide at the Hudson Battery south of the sample site, and at Piermont Pier north of the sample site and no living foraminifera were found. In addition, oxygen isotope (δ18O) analyses reveal a marine composition but the large difference in δ18O between the two surface dwelling species Globigerinoides ruber (pink) and Globigerinoides sacculifer, picked from the same sediment layer, suggests re-suspension and mixing of marine sediment deposits. Because only planktic, tropical to subtropical foraminiferal assemblages were found, the Hudson River deposits differ from previously recorded storm deposits found on Long Island and in New Jersey. In particular, the foraminiferal assemblages contain up to 40% G. ruber (pink), suggesting a highly tropical signal from a location where abundances of G. ruber are very low. This data, in addition to the pulsed occurrence of tests in the sediment suggests that the introduction of planktic foraminifera into the Hudson River must be driven by rare events. We suggest that storm surges from rare high-intensity hurricanes most likely explain the presence of these tests in Hudson River sediments, possibly assisted by the Gulf Stream entraining

  10. A comparison of Mg/Ca ratios in Globigerinoides ruber (white): sensu stricto versus a mixture of genotypes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    Mg/Ca ratios were measured in core AAS9/21 from the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS), on two sets of planktonic foraminifera, one with a mixture of Globigerinoides ruber genotypes (sensu stricto and sensu lato) and the second which contained only G. ruber...

  11. Oxygen isotopic analyses of individual planktic foraminifera species: Implications for seasonality in the western Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.; Naik, S.S.

    The variation of stable isotopes between individual shells of planktic foraminifera of a given species and size may provide short-term seasonal insight on Paleoceanography. In this context, oxygen isotope analyses of individual Globigerinoides...

  12. Deglacial Western Equatorial Pacific pCO2 Reconstruction Using Boron Isotopes of Planktonic Foraminiferas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Sagawa, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamazaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (ca. 19 - 11 ka), partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) of the atmosphere increased by 80 μatm. Many paleoceanographers point out that the ocean had played an important role in atmospheric CO2 rise, since the ocean have 60 times larger capacity to store carbon compared to the atmosphere. However, evidence on where carbon was transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere is still lacking, hampering our understanding of global carbon cycles in glacial-interglacial timescales. Boron isotope of skeletons of marine calcifying organisms such as corals and foraminiferas can pin down where CO2 source/sink existed, because boron isotopes of marine calcium carbonates is dependent on seawater pH, from which pCO2 of the past seawater can be reconstructed. In previous studies using the boron isotope teqnique, Martinez-Boti et al. (2015, Nature) and Kubota et al. (2014, Scientific Reports) revealed that central and eastern parts of the equatorial Pacific acted as a CO2 source (i.e., CO2 emission) during the last deglaciation, suggesting the equatorial Pacific's contribution to atmospheric CO2 rise. However, some conflicting results have been confirmed in a marine sediment record from the western part of the equatorial Pacific (Palmer & Pearson, 2003, Science), making the conclusion elusive. In this presentation, we will show new results of Mg/Ca, oxygen isotope, and boron isotope measurements during the last 35 ka on two species of surface dwelling foraminiferas (Globigerinoides ruber and G. sacculifer) which was hand-picked separatedly from a well-dated marine sediment core recovered from the West Caroline Basin (KR05-15 PC01) (Yamazaki et al., 2008, GRL). From the new records, we will discuss how the equatorial Pacific behaved during the last deglaciation and how it related to the global carbon cycles.

  13. Benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    sensitive to the changes in ambient environment. The response of benthic foraminifera to the changes in the ambient environment is incorporated in their tests, which have high preservation potential. Therefore, the characteristics of the benthic...

  14. Ecology of planktonic foraminifera and their symbiotic algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrich, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of symbiotic algae occurred abundantly and persistently in the cytoplasm of several species of planktonic Foraminifera over a ten year period in different tropical and subtropical areas of the North Atlantic Ocean. These planktonic Foraminifera host species consistently harbored either dinoflagellates or a newly described minute coccoid algal type. There appeared to be a specific host-symbiont relationship in these species regardless of year, season or geographic locality. The larger ovoid dinoflagellates (Pyrrhophycophyta) occur in the spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, G. conglobatus and Orbulina universa. The smaller alga, from 1.5 to 3.5 um in diameter, occurs in one spinose species Globigerinella aequilateralis and also in the non-spinose species Globigerinita glutinata, Globoquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globorotalia cristata, Globorotalia inflata, Candeina nitida, in various juvenile specimens and at all seasons except the winter months in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalial hirsuta. Controlled laboratory studies indicated a significant C incorporation into the host cytoplasm and inorganic calcium carbonate test of Globigerinoides ruber. During incubation for up to two hours, the 14 C uptake into the cytoplasm and test in the light was significantly greater than uptake in the dark by living specimens or by dead foraminifers. There appears to be light-enhanced uptake of 14 C into the test with dinoflagellate photosynthesis contributing to host calcification. In culture, symbiotic algae were observed to survive for the duration of the lifespan of their hosts

  15. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable isotopic ratios of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahmad, S.M.; Patil, D.J.; Rao, P.S.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rajagopalan, G.

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene d18O amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent...

  16. Paleozoic Foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C A; Ross, J R

    1991-01-01

    The approximately 300 million years that make up Paleozoic time saw the evolution of eight of the fifteen recognized suborders of Foraminifera. Of the suborders present in the Paleozoic, seven are morphologically relatively simple, slowly evolving, and continued into Mesozoic and Cenozoic times to become the ancestoral lineages from which evolved several additional post-Paleozoic suborders. In contrast, an eighth Paleozoic suborder, the Fusulinina, was an abundant, ecologically dominant group that evolved from simple to highly specialized forms and had a history of rapid evolution with diverse lineages. Fusulinines became extinct at the end of the Paleozoic. Their early representatives may have given rise to three and eventually four post-Paleozoic suborders. A number of suborders in the Paleozoic have similar, supposedly independent, early evolutionary patterns with the following series of morphological steps: (1) single chambers with or without apertures depending on the amount of wall cement; (2) groups of chambers that appear to be buds or aggregations of individuals rather than true chambers; (3) a proloculus followed by a tubular second chamber that is first erect and gradually evolves into enrolled free-living individuals; (4) development of constrictions in the tubular chamber; and finally (5) evolution of true chambers. These morphological steps, which are basic organizational steps with evolutionary significance, appear in lineages with quite different test compositions and, therefore, are considered only distantly related in the present classification.

  17. Boron isotope-based seasonal paleo-pH reconstruction for the Southeast Atlantic - A multispecies approach using habitat preference of planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitzsch, Markus; Bijma, Jelle; Benthien, Albert; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Steinhoefel, Grit; Kučera, Michal

    2018-04-01

    The boron isotopic composition of planktonic foraminiferal shell calcite (δ11BCc) provides valuable information on the pH of ambient water at the time of calcification. Hence, δ11BCc of fossil surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifera can be used to reconstruct ancient aqueous pCO2 if information on a second carbonate system parameter, temperature and salinity is available. However, pH and pCO2 of surface waters may vary seasonally, largely due to changes in temperature, DIC, and alkalinity. As also the shell fluxes of planktonic foraminifera show species-specific seasonal patterns that are linked to intra-annual changes in temperature, it is obvious that δ11BCc of a certain species reflects the pH and thus pCO2 biased towards a specific time period within a year. This is important to consider for the interpretation of fossil δ11BCc records that may mirror seasonal pH signals. Here we present new Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) δ11BCc coretop data for the planktonic foraminifera species Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Trilobatus sacculifer and Orbulina universa and compare them with δ11Bborate derived from seasonally resolved carbonate system parameters. We show that the inferred season-adjusted δ11BCc /δ11Bborate relationships are similar to existing calibrations and can be combined with published δ11BCc field and culture data to augment paleo-pH calibrations. To test the applicability of these calibrations, we used a core drilled on the Walvis Ridge in the Southeast Atlantic spanning the last 330,000 years to reconstruct changes in surface-water pCO2. The reconstruction based on G. bulloides, which reflects the austral spring season, was shown to yield values that closely resemble the Vostok ice-core data indicating that surface-water pCO2 was close to equilibrium with the atmosphere during the cooler spring season. In contrast, pCO2 estimated from δ11BCc of O. universa, T. sacculifer and G. ruber that

  18. Automatic Picking of Foraminifera: Design of the Foraminifera Image Recognition and Sorting Tool (FIRST) Prototype and Results of the Image Classification Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garidel-Thoron, T.; Marchant, R.; Soto, E.; Gally, Y.; Beaufort, L.; Bolton, C. T.; Bouslama, M.; Licari, L.; Mazur, J. C.; Brutti, J. M.; Norsa, F.

    2017-12-01

    Foraminifera tests are the main proxy carriers for paleoceanographic reconstructions. Both geochemical and taxonomical studies require large numbers of tests to achieve statistical relevance. To date, the extraction of foraminifera from the sediment coarse fraction is still done by hand and thus time-consuming. Moreover, the recognition of morphotypes, ecologically relevant, requires some taxonomical skills not easily taught. The automatic recognition and extraction of foraminifera would largely help paleoceanographers to overcome these issues. Recent advances in automatic image classification using machine learning opens the way to automatic extraction of foraminifera. Here we detail progress on the design of an automatic picking machine as part of the FIRST project. The machine handles 30 pre-sieved samples (100-1000µm), separating them into individual particles (including foraminifera) and imaging each in pseudo-3D. The particles are classified and specimens of interest are sorted either for Individual Foraminifera Analyses (44 per slide) and/or for classical multiple analyses (8 morphological classes per slide, up to 1000 individuals per hole). The classification is based on machine learning using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), similar to the approach used in the coccolithophorid imaging system SYRACO. To prove its feasibility, we built two training image datasets of modern planktonic foraminifera containing approximately 2000 and 5000 images each, corresponding to 15 & 25 morphological classes. Using a CNN with a residual topology (ResNet) we achieve over 95% correct classification for each dataset. We tested the network on 160,000 images from 45 depths of a sediment core from the Pacific ocean, for which we have human counts. The current algorithm is able to reproduce the downcore variability in both Globigerinoides ruber and the fragmentation index (r2 = 0.58 and 0.88 respectively). The FIRST prototype yields some promising results for high

  19. Morphological changes during the ontogeny of Velapertina indigena (Foraminifera) from the Transylvanian Basin (Romania)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, P.; Ruman, A.; Hudackova, N.; Hermanova, Z

    2017-01-01

    Species Velapertina indigena (Luczkowska, 1955) represents common Upper Badenian planktonic foraminifera in the Western Carpathians region. Correct taxonomic determination is often precluded by the complicated ontogenetic evolution resulted into several distinguished morphological stages. In this study the inner shell structures were observed by using tomographic microscope to identify five ontogenetic stages (sensu Brummer). General morphological features of the shell, such as the chamber shape and number, the aperture position and character, the wall texture, and the chambers coiling direction were documented for each stage. The reconstructed ontogenetic model, composed of five ontogenetic stages, was correlated with the 'five stage concept' of Globigerinoides sacculifer. Our study shows potential of the tomographic microscope visualization in improvement of the correct taxonomic classification of non-adult individuals as well as the foraminifera trophic mechanisms interpretation. (authors)

  20. Biomineralization in Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooijer, L. D.; Toyofuku, T.; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Foraminifera are popular tools for paleoceanograpic reconstructions since incorporation of numerous elements and fractionation of stable isotopes into their carbonate tests depend on environmental conditions. Their test chemistry is markedly different from that of inorganically precipitated CaCO3 (Figure), reflecting that calcification is a process under tight biological control. The cellular components responsible for calcification are only partly identified in foraminifera and include the involvement of organic templates, trans-membrane ion transporters and proton removal. Recent results have suggested that transmembrane H+ and Ca2+ transport is directly coupled and that a key feature of foraminiferal calcification is the intracellular conversion of bicarbonate into carbonate ions. Amongst others, this explains how some foraminifera are able to calcify in undersaturated seawater and may explain their moderate response to ocean acidification. Minor and trace metals incorporated into test carbonate reflect the processes involved in biomineralization and can thus be used to unravel the different factors and processes involved. Still, a more detailed understanding of the processes involved in foraminiferal calcification is needed to explain observed (inter-species) differences in partition coefficients for the incorporation of minor and trace metals and isotopic fractionation.

  1. Biomineralization in foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooijer, L. D.; Toyofuku, T.; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Foraminifera are popular tools in paleoceanography since incorporation of minor/ major elements and fractionation of stable isotopes into their carbonate shells depend on environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, salinity, pH). Their shell chemistry is markedly different from that of inorganically precipitated CaCO3, reflecting that calcification is a process under strong biological control. The cellular components responsible for calcification are only partly identified in foraminifera and include the involvement of organic templates, trans-membrane ion transporters and selective ion removal. Recent results suggest that transmembrane exchange of H+ for Ca2+ is directly responsible for calcification. The resulting high pH inside and lowered pH outside the foraminifer results in an efficient CO2 'trap' after which carbon dioxide is converted to carbonate prior to calcification. Amongst others, this explains how some foraminifera are able to calcify in undersaturated seawater and may explain their moderate response to ocean acidification. Minor and trace metals incorporated into test carbonate reflect the processes involved in biomineralization and can thus be used to unravel the different factors and processes involved. Still, a more detailed understanding of the processes involved in foraminiferal calcification is needed to explain observed (inter-species) differences in partition coefficients for the incorporation of minor and trace metals and isotopic fractionation.

  2. Ecological controls on the shell geochemistry of pink and white Globigerinoides ruber in the northern Gulf of Mexico: implications for paleoceanographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Julie N.; Poore, Richard Z.; Flower, Benjamin P.; Hollander, David J.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the relationship between foraminiferal test size and shell geochemistry (δ13C, δ18O, and Mg/Ca) for two of the most commonly used planktonic foraminifers for paleoceanographic reconstruction in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean: the pink and white varieties of Globigerinoides ruber. Geochemical analyses were performed on foraminifera from modern core-top samples of high-accumulation rate basins in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mg/Ca analysis indicates a positive relationship with test size, increasing by 1.1 mmol/mol (~ 2.5 °C) from the smallest (150–212 μm) to largest (> 500 μm) size fractions of G. ruber (pink), but with no significant relationship in G. ruber (white). In comparison, oxygen isotope data indicate a negative relationship with test size, decreasing by 0.6‰ across the size range of both pink and white G. ruber. The observed increase in Mg/Ca and decrease in δ18O are consistent with an increase in calcification temperature of 0.7 °C per 100 μm increase in test size, suggesting differences in the seasonal and/or depth distribution among size fractions. Overall, these results stress the necessity for using a consistent size fraction in downcore paleoceanographic studies. In addition, we compare downcore records of δ18O and Mg/Ca from pink and white G. ruber in a decadal-resolution 1000-year sedimentary record from the Pigmy Basin. Based on this comparison we conclude that pink G. ruber is calcifying in warmer waters than co-occurring white G. ruber, suggesting differences in the relative seasonal distribution and depth habitat of the two varieties.

  3. Recovery of surface-dwelling assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Staphylinidae) during clear-cut originated reforestation with native tree species

    OpenAIRE

    D Nagy, Dávid; Magura, Tibor; Mizser, Szabolcs; Debnár, Zsuzsanna; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Timber-oriented forest management has an important impact on biodiversity in forest ecosystems. Recovery dynamics of two groups of beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Staphylinidae) were studied after reforestation with native English oak (Quercus robur). We expected that reforestation with heavy site preparation causes a shift in the diversity of surface-dwelling beetles in early phases of reforestation. Moreover, we tested the habitat specialist hypothesis, assuming that...

  4. An Integrated Transcriptome-Wide Analysis of Cave and Surface Dwelling Astyanax mexicanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua B.; Furterer, Allison; Carlson, Brian M.; Stahl, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous organisms around the globe have successfully adapted to subterranean environments. A powerful system in which to study cave adaptation is the freshwater characin fish, Astyanax mexicanus. Prior studies in this system have established a genetic basis for the evolution of numerous regressive traits, most notably vision and pigmentation reduction. However, identification of the precise genetic alterations that underlie these morphological changes has been delayed by limited genetic and genomic resources. To address this, we performed a transcriptome analysis of cave and surface dwelling Astyanax morphs using Roche/454 pyrosequencing technology. Through this approach, we obtained 576,197 Pachón cavefish-specific reads and 438,978 surface fish-specific reads. Using this dataset, we assembled transcriptomes of cave and surface fish separately, as well as an integrated transcriptome that combined 1,499,568 reads from both morphotypes. The integrated assembly was the most successful approach, yielding 22,596 high quality contiguous sequences comprising a total transcriptome length of 21,363,556 bp. Sequence identities were obtained through exhaustive blast searches, revealing an adult transcriptome represented by highly diverse Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Our dataset facilitated rapid identification of sequence polymorphisms between morphotypes. These data, along with positional information collected from the Danio rerio genome, revealed several syntenic regions between Astyanax and Danio. We demonstrated the utility of this positional information through a QTL analysis of albinism in a surface x Pachón cave F2 pedigree, using 65 polymorphic markers identified from our integrated assembly. We also adapted our dataset for an RNA-seq study, revealing many genes responsible for visual system maintenance in surface fish, whose expression was not detected in adult Pachón cavefish. Conversely, several metabolism-related genes expressed in cavefish were not detected in

  5. The effects of temperature, salinity, and the carbonate system on Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber (white): A global sediment trap calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William R.; Weldeab, Syee; Lea, David W.; Rosenthal, Yair; Gruber, Nicolas; Donner, Barbara; Fischer, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    The Mg/Ca of planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white) is a widely applied proxy for tropical and sub-tropical sea-surface temperature. The accuracy with which temperature can be reconstructed depends on how accurately relationships between Mg/Ca and temperature and the multiple secondary controls on Mg/Ca are known; however, these relationships remain poorly quantified under oceanic conditions. Here, we present new calibrations based on 440 sediment trap/plankton tow samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, including 130 new samples from the Bay of Bengal/Arabian Sea and the tropical Atlantic Ocean. Our results indicate temperature, salinity and the carbonate system all significantly influence Mg/Ca in G. ruber (white). We propose two calibration models: The first model assumes pH is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.0 ± 0.8%/°C (2σ), a salinity sensitivity of 3.3 ± 2.2%/PSU and a pH sensitivity of - 8.3 ± 7.7%/0.1 pH units; The second model assumes carbonate ion concentration ([3 2-CO]) is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.7 ± 0.8%/°C, a salinity sensitivity of 5.0 ± 3.0%/PSU and a [3 2-CO] sensitivity of - 0.24 ± 0.11%/μmol kg-1. In both models, the temperature sensitivity is significantly lower than the widely-applied sensitivity of 9.0 ± 0.6%/°C. Application of our new calibrations to down-core data from the Last Glacial Maximum, considering whole ocean changes in salinity and carbonate chemistry, indicate a cooling of 2.4 ± 1.6°C in the tropical oceans if pH is the controlling parameter and 1.5 ± 1.4°C if [3 2-CO] is the controlling parameter.

  6. Globigerinoides ruber morphotypes in the Gulf of Mexico: a test of null hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Richey, Julie N; Quinn, Terrence M; Poore, Richard Z

    2014-08-11

    Planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (G. ruber), due to its abundance and ubiquity in the tropical/subtropical mixed layer, has been the workhorse of paleoceanographic studies investigating past sea-surface conditions on a range of timescales. Recent geochemical work on the two principal white G. ruber (W) morphotypes, sensu stricto (ss) and sensu lato (sl), has hypothesized differences in seasonal preferences or calcification depths, implying that reconstructions using a non-selective mixture of morphotypes could potentially be biased. Here, we test these hypotheses by performing stable isotope and abundance measurements on the two morphotypes in sediment trap, core-top, and downcore samples from the northern Gulf of Mexico. As a test of null hypothesis, we perform the same analyses on couplets of G. ruber (W) specimens with attributes intermediate to the holotypic ss and sl morphologies. We find no systematic or significant offsets in coeval ss-sl δ(18)O, and δ(13)C. These offsets are no larger than those in the intermediate pairs. Coupling our results with foraminiferal statistical model INFAUNAL, we find that contrary to previous work elsewhere, there is no evidence for discrepancies in ss-sl calcifying depth habitat or seasonality in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Application of individual foraminifera Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses for paleoceanographic reconstructions in the Bay of Bengal and other active depositional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz-Endres, T.; Dekens, P.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.; Stine, A.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoceanographic research traditionally focuses on regions where sediment deposition is minimally affected by transport. However, sediment fans near tectonically active regions provide an opportunity to link oceanographic climate to terrestrial processes. Sediment cores recovered during IODP Expedition 354 in the Bay of Bengal include hemipelagic sections that record the history of tectonic uplift and the development of the Indian Monsoon through the last 10 Ma. Although these cores provide a unique opportunity to link marine and terrestrial climate, the complex depositional environment requires that the source of foraminifera is carefully considered before using these proxies to reconstruct oceanographic conditions. Foraminifera in Bengal Fan sediments may have been transported via turbidity currents from the northern Bay of Bengal, where the seasonal variability of SST and SSS is larger compared to the southern Bay of Bengal. We measured single Globigerinoides sacculifer Mg/Ca and δ18O from mudline samples of IODP Site U1454 (8.4°N, 85.5°E, 3721 m water depth) near the modern active channel and Site U1449 (8.4°N, 88.7°E, 3653 m water depth) far from channel activity. We compare these sites to single G. sacculifer from the core-top sample of Site 342KL (20.6°N, 90.1°E, 1256 m water depth) located on the continental shelf. Each foraminifera lives 2-4 weeks and the distribution of 60 to 80 data points reflects the seasonal range of SST and SSS at the location where the foraminifera calcified. Measurements in foraminifera from Site U1449 (away from active channel) are statistically different from the site in the northern Bay of Bengal and more consistent with local conditions. Conversely, foraminifera from the site near the active channel reflect a combined signal of local conditions recorded from the site far from channel activity and those recorded from the continental shelf. This suggests a portion of foraminifera from the active channel site have been

  8. Role of foraminifera in oceanographic events

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    assists in the correlation with foraminifera as indicators. The planktonic assemblages also show effects of climatic control on water masses as seen in some deep sea cores. Species like @iOrbulina universa, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Globorotalia...

  9. Distribution of foraminifera in the Cochin estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Balasubramanian, T.

    monsoon seasons for prevalence of marine conditions. Further, it has been noted that texture of the sediments has a bearing on the faunal density. Also, an environmental assessment study of the deepening of the navigation channel on Foraminifera...

  10. Foraminifera and changing pattern of monsoon rainfall

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    The palaeomonsoonal history can be reconstructed utilizing climatically sensitive properties of marine microorganisms; foraminifera. The results show a major boundary at 3500 years B.P. and periods of rather low precipitation approximately at 420...

  11. Boron/calcium ratios in Globigerinoides ruber from the Arabian Sea: Implications for controls on boron incorporation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    Culture and downcore studies have been used to argue that B/Ca ratios in planktic foraminifera are correlated with seawater pH and may record seawater borate/bicarbonate ratios, although other factors may also control B/Ca. Specimens...

  12. Foraminifera size evolution through the Phanerozoic (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, K.; Tachiki, N.; Cummins, R.; Jost, A. B.; Payne, J.

    2009-12-01

    In this research project we wanted to find out how the body size of Foraminifera, small unicellular protists which most frequently live in marine environments, changed through the Phanerozoic Eon (the past 543 million years). We measured maximum test length in 2,637 different Foraminifera genera catalogued by Loeblich and Tappan (1988), and used those data to determine how their body size has evolved. We learned that Foraminiferan size correlates closely with mass extinction and major ocean anoxic events, test composition does not correlate well with body size, and that Berner’s (2006) Phanerozoic atmospheric oxygen concentration curve strongly correlates with mean test size.

  13. Rare earth element association with foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Natalie L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Elderfield, Henry; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2012-10-01

    Neodymium isotopes are becoming widely used as a palaeoceanographic tool for reconstructing the source and flow direction of water masses. A new method using planktonic foraminifera which have not been chemically cleaned has proven to be a promising means of avoiding contamination of the deep ocean palaeoceanographic signal by detrital material. However, the exact mechanism by which the Nd isotope signal from bottom waters becomes associated with planktonic foraminifera, the spatial distribution of rare earth element (REE) concentrations within the shell, and the possible mobility of REE ions during changing redox conditions, have not been fully investigated. Here we present REE concentration and Nd isotope data from mixed species of planktonic foraminifera taken from plankton tows, sediment traps and a sediment core from the NW Atlantic. We used multiple geochemical techniques to evaluate how, where and when REEs become associated with planktonic foraminifera as they settle through the water column, reside at the surface and are buried in the sediment. Analyses of foraminifera shells from plankton tows and sediment traps between 200 and 2938 m water depth indicate that only ˜20% of their associated Nd is biogenically incorporated into the calcite structure. The remaining 80% is associated with authigenic metal oxides and organic matter, which form in the water column, and remain extraneous to the carbonate structure. Remineralisation of these organic and authigenic phases releases ions back into solution and creates new binding sites, allowing the Nd isotope ratio to undergo partial equilibration with the ambient seawater, as the foraminifera fall through the water column. Analyses of fossil foraminifera shells from sediment cores show that their REE concentrations increase by up to 10-fold at the sediment-water interface, and acquire an isotopic signature of bottom water. Adsorption and complexation of REE3+ ions between the inner layers of calcite contributes

  14. Factors controlling the depth habitat of planktonic foraminifera in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebotim, Andreia; Voelker, Antje H. L.; Jonkers, Lukas; Waniek, Joanna J.; Meggers, Helge; Schiebel, Ralf; Fraile, Igaratza; Schulz, Michael; Kucera, Michal

    2017-02-01

    Planktonic foraminifera preserved in marine sediments archive the physical and chemical conditions under which they built their shells. To interpret the paleoceanographic information contained in fossil foraminifera, the recorded proxy signals have to be attributed to the habitat and life cycle characteristics of individual species. Much of our knowledge on habitat depth is based on indirect methods, which reconstruct the depth at which the largest portion of the shell has been calcified. However, habitat depth can be best studied by direct observations in stratified plankton nets. Here we present a synthesis of living planktonic foraminifera abundance data in vertically resolved plankton net hauls taken in the eastern North Atlantic during 12 oceanographic campaigns between 1995 and 2012. Live (cytoplasm-bearing) specimens were counted for each depth interval and the vertical habitat at each station was expressed as average living depth (ALD). This allows us to differentiate species showing an ALD consistently in the upper 100 m (e.g., Globigerinoides ruber white and pink), indicating a shallow habitat; species occurring from the surface to the subsurface (e.g., Globigerina bulloides, Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia truncatulinoides); and species inhabiting the subsurface (e.g., Globorotalia scitula and Globorotalia hirsuta). For 17 species with variable ALD, we assessed whether their depth habitat at a given station could be predicted by mixed layer (ML) depth, temperature in the ML and chlorophyll a concentration in the ML. The influence of seasonal and lunar cycle on the depth habitat was also tested using periodic regression. In 11 out of the 17 tested species, ALD variation appears to have a predictable component. All of the tested parameters were significant in at least one case, with both seasonal and lunar cyclicity as well as the environmental parameters explaining up to > 50 % of the variance. Thus, G. truncatulinoides, G. hirsuta and G. scitula

  15. Foraminifera from the Bay of Jakarta, Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1968-01-01

    Foraminifera from the North coast of Java have been described by MILLET (1898-1904); by KEIJZER (1935). The Siboga Expedition did not sample on the Java coast; most of the species described by Millet were also collected elsewhere in the Indonesian Archipelago. Keijzer did not have the intention to

  16. TOF-SIMS characterization of planktonic foraminifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vering, G.; Crone, C.; Bijma, J.; Arlinghaus, H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Oceanic sediment properties that are closely related to former environmental (e.g. climatic) parameters are called 'proxies'. Planktonic foraminifera are small protists which make up part of the plankton. Certain element concentrations, element ratios and isotopic ratios of their calcite shell found in the sediment can be used as proxies reflecting the state of the ocean during the life of the animal; they supply useful information for the reconstruction of environmental parameters. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was used to examine the inner and outer part of foraminiferal shells, as well as foraminiferal shells dissolved in HCl. High resolution elemental images and mass spectra were obtained from the foraminifera. The data show that TOF-SIMS is a useful technique for determining the elemental distribution and for measuring isotope ratios such as δ 11 B with high precision in a single foraminiferal shell

  17. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance.

  18. Vertical distribution of living mangrove foraminifera from KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous intertidal foraminiferal studies have predominantly focused on assemblages in surface sediments (0–1 cm), with the rationale that surface assemblages reflect the modern-day environment. Foraminifera live infaunally and therefore there is a need to document the infaunal vertical distribution of living foraminifera to ...

  19. Morphological recognition of Globigerinoides ruber morphotypes and their susceptibility to diagenetic alteration in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontakiotis, G.; Antonarakou, A.; Mortyn, P. G.; Drinia, H.; Anastasakis, G.; Zarkogiannis, S.; Möbius, J.

    2017-10-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal geochemistry presents a valuable archive for paleoceanographic reconstructions. However in high salinity and carbonate super-saturated settings, precipitation of inorganic calcite onto foraminiferal tests can potentially alter the primary geochemical signal, biasing Mg/Ca ratios and ensuing paleoceanographic reconstructions. Here we utilize test biometrics (specifically related to the compression and elongation of the last chambers) to identify four distinct morphotypes (labelled A-D) of the paleoceanographically important planktonic foraminifer species Globigerinoides ruber, and further evaluate their susceptibility to diagenetic alteration from a suite of surface sediments in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. The three distinguished morphotypes (A-C) correspond to previously recognized morphotypes ("Normal", "Platys", "Elongate" respectively) in the Mediterranean Sea, while the remaining (D or "Twin") was designated for the first time. We also compare Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations performed on four distinguished morphotypes, indicative of potential diagenetic alteration influence. We identified 3 different overgrowth stages (OGA1-OGA3), as a function of geography in the study area. The early diagenesis degrees (involving all the morphotypes) are only geographically distinct along the eastern Mediterranean (increasing to the south), since the morphology does not play a role in the likelihood of diagenetic alteration. Particularly, in the north Aegean Sea, SEM analyses reveal the absence or limited presence of an overgrowth imprint in all recognized morphotypes, while in the central-south Aegean and Levantine Seas they show higher amplitudes of diagenetic overprint supporting the general trend to advanced diagenetic alteration. The semi-enclosed oligotrophic nature and high salinity of this setting, in combination with the different degree of carbonate precipitation and calcite super-saturation between the sub-basins, could

  20. Climate of the past 2500 years in the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean Sea: A high-resolution climate reconstruction based on δ18O and δ13C of Globigerinoides ruber (white)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauel, A.-L.; Goudeau, M.-L.S.; de Lange, G.J.; Bernasconi, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a high-resolution isotope stratigraphy based on Globigerinoides ruber (white) over the past 2500 years in the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean. G. ruber (white) reflects summer conditions in the Gulf of Taranto but is influenced by two major surface water masses: the Western

  1. Intertidal foraminifera from Miramar-Caranzalem Shoreline, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Birajdar, S.M.; Nigam, R.

    Quantitative analysis of foraminifera (entire and broken) revealed that Rotalina, composed of 29 species, constituted 95.18% while Miliolina, composed of 11 species, and Textulariina, with 5 species were poorly represented. Temperature, salinity...

  2. Counts of Foraminifera from Selected North Atlantic Cores, LDEO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Counts of primarily planktonic foraminifera from Dr. W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University are included in these...

  3. Holocene benthonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments of Kerala coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Of the 32 species of benthic foraminifera recovered here some show definite Indo-Pacific affinity. Ecological parameters which govern this offshore region are considered. Several species show similarities with those found in the Neogene while...

  4. Unlocking the biomineralization style and affinity of Paleozoic fusulinid foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubicka, Zofia; Gorzelak, Przemysław

    2017-11-09

    Fusulinids are the most diverse, abundant and geographically widespread Paleozoic foraminifera which are widely considered to possess a "homogeneously microgranular" test microstructure composed of subangular grains of several micrometers in size. However, this texture appears to be a diagenetic artifact. Here we describe well-preserved Devonian calcareous fusulinids (Nanicella) from the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM) in central Poland. Foraminifera from Poland in which the primary nature of tests have not been masked by diagenesis are composed of low magnesium calcite spherical grains up to about 100 nanometers in diameter, identical to those observed in Recent and fossil hyaline foraminifera (Rotaliida, Globothalamea). These data call the paradigm of microgranular test microstructure of Foraminifera into question, and suggest a possible phylogenetic relationship between globothalamids and some fusulinids.

  5. BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA IN SOUTH WAIGEO WATERS, RAJA AMPAT, WEST PAPUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartini M. Natsir

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Waigeo Island is one of four large islands of the Raja Ampat group, West Papua Province. This area lies in the heart of the coral triangle region as the most marine bio-diversity on Earth. Coral reef ecosystem of the Waigeo is a favorable habitat for various organisms including foraminifera. Foraminifera have been proven as useful indicator of water quality surrounding the coral reef environment since FORAM Index was formulated. It gives additional importance of foraminifera beside their common uses on micropalaeontology for petroleum industry and palaeoecology. Therefore, it is very important to obtain data of the benthic foraminifera from various coral reef environments in Indonesia, such as around Waigeo Island. Sediment samples of this study were collected from 12 sites in southern part off Waigeo Island, on July 2011. Observation on benthic foraminifera shows that the study area is dominated by symbiotic bearing benthic foraminifera, Amphistegina lessonii, belongs to Suborder Rotaliina. This occurrence increases the values of FORAM Index (FI at certain sites. Generally, the values of FI from most sites are high (FI>4 that provide a good indication for reef growth or recovery. The values of FI less than 2 are found at RJ3 and RJ4 indicate stress environment for reef growth and they are dominated by opportunistic and heterotrophic functional groups of Elphidium and Quinqueloculina.

  6. Benthic foraminifera as pollution indices in the marine environment of west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    effects monitoring through Foraminifera. In the Thana Creek area, Bombay, the magnitude of corrosive effect, lower-than-normal ornamentation, deepening of grooves and sutural thickenings, enlargement of pores, widening of apertures in Foraminifera were...

  7. The intriguing relationship between coiling direction and reproductive mode in benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Rao, A.S.

    Changes in coiling direction in foraminifera have been used extensively as proxy data for paleoclimates. However, most of the studies centred around planktonic foraminifera, and various causes (including reproductive mode) were suggested for coiling...

  8. Adjustment of the deuterium measurement technique in foraminifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdanevitch, Isabelle

    1985-01-01

    Foraminifera are sea unicellular animals with a calcitic skeleton. The isotopic rate of this carbonate depends on the isotopic composition of seawater and on the temperature of the water in which foraminifera was living. This research thesis reports the study of sea water D/H rate in the case of hydrogenated materials. Four different hydrogenated compounds bonded to calcite have been extracted and separated. The analysis of this isotopic rate is performed in a continuous way during degassing by directly introducing hydrogen in the source of a mass spectrometer [fr

  9. Zoological exploration of the continental shelf of Surinam: The foraminifera of the shelf of Surinam and the Guyanas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1983-01-01

    INDEX Introduction.................................................................................................................................... P. 5 List of samples studied for Foraminifera .................................................................................... P. 7 Alphabetic

  10. Benthic foraminifera from the Adriatic Sea : principles of phenotypic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorissen, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and morphology of the benthic foraminifera in the Adriatic Sea appear to be strongly dependent on two primary controlling environmental parameters, oxygen concentration and food availability. These factors are both governed by the runoff from the Po and other Italian rivers, and

  11. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study is pursued on isotopic values of different pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna–Godavari basin and Peru offshore to understand habitat-wise isotopic variation and ... Department of Applied Geology, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826 004, India.

  12. Rare and remarkable Foraminifera of the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1979-01-01

    When studying samples from the Virgin Islands area, some new Foraminifera were found, together with other species of which little was known about their internal structure and taxonomic status. Most specimens came from samples W of St. Croix, collected by Th. Mortensen at about 17.5°N 64°W, depths

  13. Ecological partitioning and diversity in tropical planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seears Heidi A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological processes are increasingly being viewed as an important mode of diversification in the marine environment, where the high dispersal potential of pelagic organisms, and a lack of absolute barriers to gene flow may limit the occurrence of allopatric speciation through vicariance. Here we focus on the potential role of ecological partitioning in the diversification of a widely distributed group of marine protists, the planktonic foraminifera. Sampling was conducted in the tropical Arabian Sea, during the southwest (summer monsoon, when pronounced environmental conditions result in a strong disparity in temperature, salinity and productivity between distinct northern and southern water masses. Results We uncovered extensive genetic diversity within the Arabian Sea planktonic foraminifera, identifying 13 morphospecies, represented by 20 distinct SSU rRNA genetic types. Several morphospecies/genetic types displayed non-random biogeographical distributions, partitioning between the northern and southern water masses, giving a strong indication of independent ecological adaptations. Conclusions We propose sea-surface primary productivity as the main factor driving the geographical segregation of Arabian Sea planktonic foraminifera, during the SW monsoon, with variations in symbiotic associations possibly playing a role in the specific ecological adaptations observed. Our findings suggest that ecological partitioning could be contributing to the high levels of 'cryptic' genetic diversity observed within the planktonic foraminifera, and support the view that ecological processes may play a key role in the diversification of marine pelagic organisms.

  14. KEANEKARAGAMAN FORAMINIFERA BENTIK TELUK BALIKPAPAN, PROVINSI KALIMANTAN TIMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASTUTI WIDIANINGSIH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Balikpapan Bay is one of locations of sampling sediments for the study of benthic foraminifera. The objective of this research was to determine the diversity of benthic foraminifera at different depths at Balikpapan Bay, East Kalimantan. Samples was selected at  depth of 0-20 m, then divided into 4 depths, 0-5 m, 6-10 m, 11-15 m, and 16-20 m. A total of 1553 specimens were obtained from 66 species, 7 ordo, and 17 family. Asterorotalia trispinosa is a species with the highest of abundance, that followed by Rotalia sp.1, Rotalia sp.2, and Trichammina nana. The diversity index of each sampling point was different, 8 points have stable diversity, 11 moderate points, and 1 unstable point. This condition were influenced by depth, brightness, temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, and DO at each sediment sampling point.

  15. The evolution of test size in the Planktic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraass, A.; Huber, B. T.; Kelly, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera are vital tools for understanding paleoceanography, paleoclimate, and evolution. A dataset of measurements from all planktic foraminiferal species is used here to investigate how their size changes through the late Jurassic to Recent. The mean test size of planktic foraminifera increases in the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic, with substantial drops at the Aptian/Albian boundary, in the Coniacian and Santonian, with the end-Cretaceous extinction, and across the Paleocene/Eocene boundary. The Oligocene contains only a small drop in mean size, which is surprising given the substantial extinction of planktic foraminifera at that boundary. There is a qualitative connection between mean and median size and paleoceanographic events, but several key issues remain before rigorous quantitative interrogation of the dataset can be undertaken. In general, species that originate early in a family's range are smaller than those evolving later, though this is a weak relationship. Individual families do not always conform to that finding, however, and have both increasing and decreasing family age-size relationships. The 'three faunas' concept for foraminiferal evolution fails with respect to mean and median size; each diversification has a unique rate of increase and character. Lastly, through comparison with the Schmidt et al. (2004) population-level test size dataset, the size response to climate in the low-latitudes is at the species-level. In the high-latitude regions, however, the response to climate is at the population level. Thus, methods for uncovering climate responses in planktic foraminifera must be specific to the region. Taxonomic or macroevolutionary responses dominate the tropics and global signals, while the polar regions appear to have a unique, and more microevolutionary response.Schmidt, D., Thierstein, H., Bollmann, J., & Schiebel, R. (2004). Abiotic Forcing of Plankton Evolution in the Cenozoic. Science, 303(5655), 207-210.

  16. Planktic foraminifera form their shells via metastable carbonate phases

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Agbaje, O. B. A.; Branson, O.; Eggins, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The calcium carbonate shells of planktic foraminifera provide our most valuable geochemical archive of ocean surface conditions and climate spanning the last 100 million years, and play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. These shells are preserved in marine sediments as calcite, the stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Here, we show that shells of living planktic foraminifers Orbulina universa and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei originally form from the unstable calcium carbonate polym...

  17. MIDDLE TRIASSIC FORAMINIFERA FROM THE SECEDA CORE (DOLOMITES, NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIAN MAURER

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The assemblage of foraminifera in turbidite beds in Middle Triassic basinal deposits straddling the Anisian/Ladinian boundary interval was studied in 224 thin sections. The fauna consists mainly of shallow-water inhabitants, associated with calcareous hyaline foraminifera (Lagenina of open marine environment. Due to a well established  biostratigraphy in the studied interval, the first and last appearance of some shallow water, benthic foraminifera can be assigned to the Mid Triassic ammonoid stratigraphy. The species Meandrospira dinarica Kochansky-Devidè & Pantic and Arenovidalina chialingchiagensis Ho are limited to the Reitzi ammonoid zone. The species Variostoma alta Kristan and Hoyenella gr. sinensis both do not superate the Curionii zone in age in the studied succession.  The biostratigraphic most important event occurs at the base of the Gredleri zone,  with the appearance of the family Involutinidae Bütschli, represented by the genera Lamelliconus and Aulotortus. The faunal composition is similar to those of neighbouring paleoprovinces, but generally a lower faunistical diversification compared to foraminiferal assemblages in the Anisian or Carnian is observed.   

  18. Agglutinated foraminifera from the Ludlow (Silurian) of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael; Ferretti, Annalisa; Messori, Fabio; Papazzoni, Cesare Andrea; Sevastopulo, George

    2017-04-01

    Agglutinated foraminifera are one of the most primitive groups of foraminifera, possibly already appearing in the Cryogenian but usually rare in lower Paleozoic rocks. Their mean standing diversity slowly increased during Cambrian and Ordovician times, reaching a stable value of about 50 genera in the mid-Silurian which remained fairly constant up to the Triassic. An assemblage of agglutinated foraminifera was unexpectedly found in conodont residue from material collected in the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, southwestern Ireland. This material comes from rare calcareous occurrences in volcanoclastics previously known for their rich trilobite and conodont assemblages. The limestones are trilobite-crinoidal silty wackestone to packstone, with local brachiopod concentrations, documenting brachiopod-trilobite-crinoidal dominated communities of shallow and well-ventilated water that might have periodically colonized the bottom intercalating with volcanic events and then successively redeposited in deeper waters. The conodont fauna indicates an early Ludlow (Gorstian-earliest Ludfordian) age (Kaminski et al., 2016). The foraminiferal assemblage has limited potential for stratigraphical correlation as long-range taxa are present, but it represents the first record from the Silurian of Ireland. The assemblage is dominated by tubothalamids (Rectoammodiscus and rare Sansabaina), with less abundant monothalamids (Psammosiphonella and Psammosphaera). The assemblage displays low diversity compared with other assemblages described from the British Isles (Kircher & Brasier, 1989). At the species level, this assemblage is identical to those described previously from the Silurian of North America but with lower diversity. Only Rectoammodiscus diai had apparently a wider geographic distribution, including not only the central USA (Oklahoma and Kansas) but also the Welsh Borderlands and Senegal. The affinities with the assemblages reported at several localities in the central

  19. Bipolar gene flow in deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, J.; Fahrni, J.; Lecroq, B.

    2007-01-01

    Despite its often featureless appearance, the deep-ocean floor includes some of the most diverse habitats on Earth. However, the accurate assessment of global deep-sea diversity is impeded by a paucity of data on the geographical ranges of bottom-dwelling species, particularly at the genetic level....... Here, we present molecular evidence for exceptionally wide distribution of benthic foraminifera, which constitute the major part of deep-sea meiofauna. Our analyses of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes revealed high genetic similarity between Arctic and Antarctic populations of three common deep...

  20. Benthic Foraminifera from the Capricorn Group, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Briony L

    2016-12-23

    Effective reef management and monitoring has become increasingly important as anthropogenic processes impact upon natural ecosystems. One locality that is under direct threat due to human activities is the Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Marine foraminifera represent an abundant and readily applicable tool that can be used in reef studies to investigate a variety of ecological parameters and assist in understanding reef dynamics and influence management protocols. The first step is to establish a baseline knowledge of taxonomic composition within the region to facilitate comparative studies and monitor how assemblages change in order to maximise effective management. A detailed taxonomic assessment is provided of 133 species of benthic foraminifera in 76 genera from Heron Island, One Tree Island, Wistari and Sykes Reefs, which form the core of the Capricorn Group (CG) at the southern end of the GBR. Of these 133 species, 46% belong to the order Miliolida, 34% to Rotaliida, 7% to Textulariida, 5% to Lagenida, 3% to Lituolida, 3% to Spirillinida, 1% to Loftusiida and 1% to Robertinida. Samples were collected from a variety of shallow shelf reef environments including reef flat, lagoonal and channel environments. Seventy species, representing the most abundant forms, are formally described with detailed distribution data for the remaining 63 species supplied.

  1. Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT) in the Eastern Indian Ocean: a 2000 kyr planktic faunal and isotope record from DSDP site 214

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Dhingra, Hitesh

    2004-01-01

    Planktic foraminiferal faunal and isotope data from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 214 reveal a major change in surface water properties in the eastern Indian Ocean, coinciding with the mid-Pleistocene climate transition (MPT). A comparative study of Globigerinoides sacculifer (a surface dwelling, warm water, mixed layer tropical planktic foraminifera), Globorotalia menardii Complex (a deep dwelling, tropical species group), and Orbulina universa (an intermediate depth warm-water subtropical foraminifera) with the stable isotope record of Globigerinoides ruber suggests a warm, thick mixed layer in the eastern Indian Ocean during,∼ 2000 Kyr to ∼ 900 Kyr. Since,∼ 900 Kyr the surface water mass stratification weakened, and the mixed layer as well as thermocline were shallow. A decrease in the population abundance of Gs. sacculifer, together with a decrease in δ 13 C and increase in δ 18 O values suggest a continuous cool climate and increased surface productivity over the last ∼ 900 Kyr. This coincides with an increased variance in the 400 ∼Kyr component of Earth's eccentricity cycle. (author)

  2. Benthic foraminifera of the Panamanian Province: distribution and origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, R.W.; Poag, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-nine species of benthic foraminifera have been identified from 96 stations representing 33 localities on the eastern Pacific inner continental shelf, ranging from southern Peru to northern Baja California. Their distributions mark nearshore provincial boundaries that are nearly identical with those previously documented from the distribution of ostracodes and molluscs. Thirteen species are characteristic of the Panamanian Province, one is characteristic of the Chilean-Peruvian Province, and one is characteristic of the newly proposed Sonoran Subprovince. Seventeen species (7%) appear to be endemic to the eastern Pacific. Fifty-eight (25%) of the species recognized are disjunct from population centers in the western Pacific, 134 species (59%) are disjunct from modern assemblages of the Atlanto-Carribean region, and 40 species (17%) are disjunct from both the western Pacific and the Atlanto-Caribbean. The distribution of the remaining 57 species (25%) is poorly documented; we classify them as of unknown origin. -Authors

  3. Planktic foraminifera form their shells via metastable carbonate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D E; Wirth, R; Agbaje, O B A; Branson, O; Eggins, S M

    2017-11-02

    The calcium carbonate shells of planktic foraminifera provide our most valuable geochemical archive of ocean surface conditions and climate spanning the last 100 million years, and play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. These shells are preserved in marine sediments as calcite, the stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Here, we show that shells of living planktic foraminifers Orbulina universa and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei originally form from the unstable calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite, implying a non-classical crystallisation pathway involving metastable phases that transform ultimately to calcite. The current understanding of how planktic foraminifer shells record climate, and how they will fare in a future high-CO 2 world is underpinned by analogy to the precipitation and dissolution of inorganic calcite. Our findings require a re-evaluation of this paradigm to consider the formation and transformation of metastable phases, which could exert an influence on the geochemistry and solubility of the biomineral calcite.

  4. Relationship between benthic foraminifera and sediment in the estuarine complex of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.

    Two indices of community association were used to elucidate the relationship between changes in species composition of benthic foraminifera and changes in the grain size composition of the sediment in estuarine complex of Goa. The degree...

  5. Benthic foraminifera show some resilience to ocean acidification in the northern Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, L R; Hart, M B; Medina-Sánchez, A N; Smart, C W; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R; Hall-Spencer, J M; Prol-Ledesma, R M

    2013-08-30

    Extensive CO2 vents have been discovered in the Wagner Basin, northern Gulf of California, where they create large areas with lowered seawater pH. Such areas are suitable for investigations of long-term biological effects of ocean acidification and effects of CO2 leakage from subsea carbon capture storage. Here, we show responses of benthic foraminifera to seawater pH gradients at 74-207m water depth. Living (rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera included Nonionella basispinata, Epistominella bradyana and Bulimina marginata. Studies on foraminifera at CO2 vents in the Mediterranean and off Papua New Guinea have shown dramatic long-term effects of acidified seawater. We found living calcareous benthic foraminifera in low pH conditions in the northern Gulf of California, although there was an impoverished species assemblage and evidence of post-mortem test dissolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An experimental mesocosm study of microhabitat preferences and mobility in benthic foraminifera: Preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, S.R.; Duijnstee, Ivo; Jannink, N.T.; van der Zwaan, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Three small microcosm experiments were carried out to study the microhabitat preferences and mobility of benthic foraminifera from the northern Adriatic Sea. Following initial homogenization, the foraminiferal assemblages developed a clear microhabitat partitioning in the microcosms within 20 days.

  7. Secondary calcification of planktic foraminifera from the Indian sector of Southern ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, R.; Shetye, S.; Tiwari, M.; AnilKumar, N.

    This study focused on planktic foraminifera in plankton tows and surface sediments from the western Indian sector of Southern Ocean in order to evaluate the potential foraminiferal secondary calcification and/or dissolution in the sediment...

  8. Sediment traps as a new tool for estimation of longevity of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Sediment trap technique provides time series data of sinking particles (faunal and sediment) from surface to bottom of the sea. Besides many other applications, data can also be used to estimate life span of planktonic foraminifera. Based on rearing...

  9. Does carbonate ion control planktonic foraminifera shell calcification in upwelling regions?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.

    Planktonic foraminifera shell weights have been recognized as possible proxy for surface water carbonate ion concentration [CO sup(=) sub(3)] and atmospheric CO sub(2). However, to utilize this proxy, it is important to understand whether shell...

  10. Proloculus size variation in Recent benthic foraminifera: Implications for paleoclimatic studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Rao, A.S.

    Ratios of dimorphic (microspheric/megalospheric) forms of Foraminifera are affected by temperature and hence are useful in paleoclimatic studies. In some cases, however, it is not possible to distinguish between the dimorphic forms and, therefore...

  11. Distribution of foraminifera in the lagoons of certain Islands of the Lakshadweep Archipelago, Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Sivadas, P.; Narayanan, B.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    A total of 107 foraminiferal species belonging to 29 families and 48 genera have been identified from the lagoonal sediments of Agatti, Kavaratti, Suhelipar, and Minicoy atolls of Lakshadweep. The fauna is dominated by calcareous Foraminifera...

  12. Planktonic foraminifera from a quaternary deep sea core from the southern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    An investigation on planktonic foraminifera and calcium carbonate content of a box core collected at a depth of 2556 m from the southern part of the Arabian sea indicates faunal changes depicting Quaternary climatic fluctuations. Based on the study...

  13. Response of foraminifera to a reverse osmosis briny discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Richard Eustace Aiken

    Reverse osmosis water treatment plants are becoming the preferred means of generating potable water for many eastern North Carolina communities. At these facilities, reject brine solutions---sometimes containing up to 10 times the initial concentration of dissolved solids---are created and often discharged into estuarine waters. Several state and federal agencies have expressed concern over the potential ecological impacts this wastewater could have on these sensitive environments. Monitoring of a brine discharge site in Currituck County, North Carolina revealed significantly higher conductivity values within ~50 m of the point source. One group of organisms that have proven useful in other studies for monitoring impact of anthropogenic pollution in estuaries is Foraminifera. Foraminifera are abundant microorganisms that are widespread in most marginal-marine and marine environments; nevertheless, individual taxa are highly selective of their habitat. Nearly all species build shells (tests) that are preserved in coastal sediments, allowing for reconstruction of previous marine conditions. Species abundance data was collected from surface and sub-surface samples taken in the area surrounding the brine point source. Two taxa (Ammobaculites spp. and Ammotium sp.) accounted for 98.5% of all normalized specimens. Abundance is significantly less in the sub-surface samples (Student's t-test, p<0.0001), likely due to taphonomic effects. Abundance does not appear correlated with discharge of the wastewater; instead, natural parameters appear to affect abundance in an assemblage to a greater degree. Species distribution is similar in surface and sub-surface samples. Foraminiferal diversity is significantly less near the discharge based on one sample collected within 5 m of the discharge site; samples at greater distances do not appear affected. Loss of diversity within a few meters of the discharge site is consistent with previous studies, but more data would be needed to

  14. Relationship between abundance and morphology of benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua: Palaeoclimatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Deopujari, A.; Nigam, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    foraminiferal species vary with ambient conditions and are used as paleoclimatic proxy (Thiede, 1971; Prell, 1984; Nigam and Rao, 1987; 1989; Anderson and Prell, 1993; Nigam and Khare, 1999; Peeters et al., 2002; Žarić et al., 2005; Saraswat et al., 2005a...; 2005b). The abundance and morphology of benthic foraminifera is closely associated with the reproduction which depends on the ambient environmental conditions. Therefore, the changes in abundance and morphology of the benthic foraminifera should...

  15. Pre-monsoon living planktonic foraminifera from the Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Muralinath, A.S.

    with hexamethylene tetramine. ! In the laboratory, all the planktonic foraminiferal specimens > 200 microns were separated by hand picking for identification and estimation of their relative abundance. . The area of investigation (Fig. lA) is influenced by both... and distribution of Planktonic foraminifera (No, of specimens x 1000). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION A total of 28 species of planktonic foraminifera were encountered in this investigation representing the planktonic foraminiferal assemblage during the month of May 1985...

  16. Planktonic foraminifera in the Arctic: potentials and issues regarding modern and quaternary populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eynaud, Frederique, E-mail: f.eynaud@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux I, Laboratoire EPOC (Environnements et Paleoenvironnements OCeaniques), UMR CNRS 5805, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex - France (France)

    2011-05-15

    Calcareous microfossils are widely used by paleoceanographers to investigate past sea-surface hydrology. Among these microfossils, planktonic foraminifera are probably the most extensively used tool (e.g. [1] for a review), as they are easy to extract from the sediment and can also be used for coupled geochemical (e.g; {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13}C, Mg/Ca) and paleo-ecological investigations. Planktonic foraminifera are marine protists, which build a calcareous shell made of several chambers which reflect in their chemistry the properties of the ambient water-masses. Planktonic foraminifera are known to thrive in various habitats, distributed not only along a latitudinal gradient, but also along different water-depth intervals within surface waters (0-1000 m). Regarding their biogeographical distribution, planktonic foraminifera assemblages therefore mirror different water-masses properties, such as temperature, salinity and nutrient content of the surface water in which they live. The investigation of the specific composition of a fossil assemblage (relative abundances) is therefore a way to empirically obtain (paleo)information on past variations of sea-surface hydrological parameters. This paper focuses on the planktonic foraminifera record from the Arctic domain. This polar region records peculiar sea-surface conditions, with the influence of nearly perennial sea-ice cover development. This has strong impact on living foraminifera populations and on the preservation of their shells in the underlying sediments.

  17. Recent benthic foraminifera from the Caribbean continental slope and shelf off west of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia

    2015-07-01

    A quantitative benthic foraminiferal analysis was conducted on 30 sea-floor sediment samples distributed along the continental slope and shelf in Fuerte Area (Colombian Caribbean), between 39 and 2469 m water depth. The aims of the research were to provide data on the distribution of southwestern Caribbean Recent benthic foraminifera, to estimate changes in the foraminiferal distribution related to the bathymetry and the characteristics of the substrate, to define a data-bank on distribution of recent tropical benthic foraminifera from the southwestern Caribbean, to provide reference on foraminiferal distribution that can be used in bathymetric reconstructions of ancient environments. Three different assemblages corresponding to three different environments were identified by cluster analysis. Assemblage A, characterized by variable percentages of porcellaneous, hyaline and agglutinated benthic foraminifera indicative of shelf environments. Assemblage B, dominated by calcareous hyaline foraminifera mainly composed of infaunal foraminifera corresponding to upper bathyal, marine conditions. Assemblage C, composed by agglutinated and calcareous hyaline foraminifera characteristic of normal deep-water marine environments.

  18. Distribution of benthic foraminifera along the Iranian Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amao, Abduljamiu; Kaminski, Michael

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the distribution of benthic foraminifera along the Iranian coast of the Gulf from the northeast close to Shatt Al-Arab/Arvand Rud to the southeast near the Strait of Hormuz where it connects to the Indian Ocean. The Gulf is a naturally stressed environment due to extremes of salinity, temperatures and anthropogenic influences such as rapid urbanization projects, maritime transport, large numbers of desalination plants and oil platforms. These activities over time continue to compound the already stressed environment. Historical records on foraminiferal diversity and distribution in the Gulf commonly underestimate its benthic foraminiferal composition and diversity. Thirty-two samples collected from depths ranging between 20 to 45 m were analyzed for total foraminiferal assemblages. A total of 224 benthic foraminiferal species and subspecies belonging to 63 genera, 34 families, 22 superfamilies and 6 orders were recognized. The assemblages are dominated by hyaline taxa (45.3%) and porcelaneous foraminiferal (35.3%), while agglutinated foraminiferal groups are comprise a lower proportion (19.4%). The ten most abundant genera include Asterorotalia (13.3%), Quinqueloculina (12.4%), Bolivina (9.8%), Nonion (8.6%), Ammonia (5.5%), Textularia (5.4%), Elphidium (5.2%), Cibicides (3.9%), Challengerella (3.6%) and Hanzawaia (3.4%). The most common species are Nonion sp. 1 (5.45%), Asterorotalia dentata (5.03%), Quinqueloculina sp. 1 (4.8%), Nonion sp. 2 (4.5%), Rotalinoides cf. R. gaimardii (3.3%), Asterorotalia sp. 3 (3.2%), Quinqueloculina sp. 8 (3.1%), Bolivina cf. B. persiensis (3.0%), Bolivina cf. B. striatula (2.9%), and Ammonia sp. 1 (2.9%). We speculate that feeding strategy, e.g., herbivore (Nonion, Ammonia, Elphidium and Asterorotalia), the proportion of finer sediments (mud), availability of nutrients and presence of oxygen are factors controlling the diversity and distribution of benthic foraminifera in the Gulf. Due to the importance of

  19. Benthic foraminifera as indicators of pollution in high latitude marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, N.; Junttila, J.; Husum, K.; Carroll, J.; Klitgaard-Kristensen, D.; Hald, M.

    2012-04-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate the potential of benthic foraminifera to characterize ecological status. However, the use of benthic foraminifera as bio-indicators has previously not been tested in high latitudes. This research contributes to the development of foraminifera as a bio-monitoring technique for the Arctic region, as industrial activities in this region will increase in the coming years. Surface sediments (0-1 cm) from sites close to gas fields in the SW Barents Sea were studied. In addition, to elucidate the range from less to very affected, surface sediments from the harbor of the town of Hammerfest (70° N) were studied. At least 300 living benthic foraminifera from the size fraction 100 µm-1 mm were counted and identified at species level. Pollution levels (heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants) and sediment properties (grainsize and TOC) were also analyzed. Pollution levels at the sea floor in the SW Barents Sea are of background to good level (level I-II) according to the definitions by the Water Framework Directorate (WFD). Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are influenced by natural environmental parameters such as water mass properties, water depth, nutrient availability, bottom current strength, and grain size. Surface sediments from the Hammerfest harbor are of moderate environmental status (WFD level II-III) based on heavy metal concentrations and of bad environmental status (WFD IV-V) based on persistent organic pollutant concentrations. Opportunistic benthic foraminifera are dominating the assemblages. The most polluted areas in the harbor are barren for foraminifera or have high amounts of deformed shells. In both environments the foraminiferal diversity of the samples, does not correspond to expected environmental status based on the pollution levels of the sediments. Environmental status classes, based on benthic foraminifera instead of macrofauna, would allow rapid analyses of the environmental impact of pollution.

  20. Ecological tolerances of Miocene larger benthic foraminifera from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Vibor; Renema, Willem

    2018-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), a quantitative analysis of their assemblage composition is needed. Besides microfacies analysis which includes environmental preferences of foraminiferal taxa, statistical analyses should also be employed. Therefore, detrended correspondence analysis and cluster analysis were performed on relative abundance data of identified LBF assemblages deposited in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (MCS) systems and blue-water (BW) settings. Studied MCS system localities include ten sections from the central part of the Kutai Basin in East Kalimantan, ranging from late Burdigalian to Serravallian age. The BW samples were collected from eleven sections of the Bulu Formation on Central Java, dated as Serravallian. Results from detrended correspondence analysis reveal significant differences between these two environmental settings. Cluster analysis produced five clusters of samples; clusters 1 and 2 comprise dominantly MCS samples, clusters 3 and 4 with dominance of BW samples, and cluster 5 showing a mixed composition with both MCS and BW samples. The results of cluster analysis were afterwards subjected to indicator species analysis resulting in the interpretation that generated three groups among LBF taxa: typical assemblage indicators, regularly occurring taxa and rare taxa. By interpreting the results of detrended correspondence analysis, cluster analysis and indicator species analysis, along with environmental preferences of identified LBF taxa, a palaeoenvironmental model is proposed for the distribution of LBF in Miocene MCS systems and adjacent BW settings of Indonesia.

  1. Oceanographic controls on the diversity and extinction of planktonic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Shanan E; Kelly, Daniel C; Fraass, Andrew J

    2013-01-17

    Understanding the links between long-term biological evolution, the ocean-atmosphere system and plate tectonics is a central goal of Earth science. Although environmental perturbations of many different kinds are known to have affected long-term biological evolution, particularly during major mass extinction events, the relative importance of physical environmental factors versus biological interactions in governing rates of extinction and origination through geological time remains unknown. Here we use macrostratigraphic data from the Atlantic Ocean basin to show that changes in global species diversity and rates of extinction among planktonic foraminifera have been linked to tectonically and climatically forced changes in ocean circulation and chemistry from the Jurassic period to the present. Transient environmental perturbations, such as those that occurred after the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period approximately 66 million years ago, and the Eocene/Oligocene greenhouse-icehouse transition approximately 34 million years ago, are superimposed on this general long-term relationship. Rates of species origination, by contrast, are not correlated with corresponding macrostratigraphic quantities, indicating that physiochemical changes in the ocean-atmosphere system affect evolution principally by driving the synchronous extinction of lineages that originated owing to more protracted and complex interactions between biological and environmental factors.

  2. Selective responses of benthic foraminifera to thermal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titelboim, Danna; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Herut, Barak; Kucera, Michal; Schmidt, Christiane; Hyams-Kaphzan, Orit; Ovadia, Ofer; Abramovich, Sigal

    2016-04-15

    Persistent thermohaline pollution at a site along the northern coast of Israel, due to power and desalination plants, is used as a natural laboratory to evaluate the effects of rising temperature and salinity levels on benthic foraminifera living in shallow hard-bottom habitats. Biomonitoring of the disturbed area and a control station shows that elevated temperature is a more significant stressor compared to salinity, thus causing a decrease in abundance and richness. Critical temperature thresholds were observed at 30 and 35°C, the latter representing the most thermally tolerant species in the studied area Pararotalia calcariformata, which is the only symbiont-bearing species observed within the core of the heated area. Common species of the shallow hard-bottom habitats including several Lessepsian invaders are almost absent in the most exposed site indicating that excess warming will likely impede the survival of these species that currently benefit from the ongoing warming of the Eastern Mediterranean. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent benthic foraminifera assemblages from mangrove swamp and channels of Abu Dhabi (UAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.; Odeh, Weaam A. S. Al; Paul, Andreas; Song, Jianfeng; Freeman, Mark; Michel, Françoise

    2017-04-01

    Zonation of Recent mangrove environments can be defined using benthic foraminifera, however, little is known about foraminifera from mangrove environments of the Persian/Arabian Gulf. The objective of this study is to produce a detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological analysis to identify foraminiferal associations from mangrove swamps and channels located on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island (UAE). Detailed sediment sampling collection in mangal environments of Eastern Abu Dhabi was carried out to assess the distribution of benthic foraminifera in different sedimentary facies in the mangal and in the surrounding natural environments of the upper and lower intertidal area (mud flats and channels). A 100 m transect across a natural channel in a mangal on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island was sampled in detail for sedimentological and foraminiferal analysis. Forty-seven samples were collected at 2 meter intervals along the transect in a number of different sedimentary facies including; fine sediment in areas exposed during low tide and close to mangrove trees (Avicennia marina), fine sediment rich in leaf material, coarse sediment in channels, and coarse sediments with a shell lag. At each sampling location environmental parameters were recorded, including water depth, salinity, temperature and pH. Samples collected for foraminiferal analysis were stained in rose Bengal in order to identify living specimens. Samples collected on the mud flat at the margin of the channel show a living foraminiferal assemblage characterised by abundant foraminifera belonging to the genera Ammonia, Elphidium, Cribroelphidium, Triloculina, Quinqueloculina, Sigmoilinita, Spiroloculina, Peneroplis and Spirolina. Samples collected in the lower (wet) intertidal area close to Avicennia marina roots, presented a low-diversity assemblage mostly comprising small-sized opportunistic foraminifera of the genera Ammonia and Cribroelphidium along with rare Triloculina and

  4. Middle Miocene benthic foraminifera from the Al Khums area, northwestern Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baz, Sherif M.; Al Furjany, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    The present study deals with the benthic foraminifera from three sections cropping out in the Al Khums area, northwestern Libya. Lithostratigraphically, these outcrops belong to the Al Khums Formation, which is locally subdivided into two informal members: An Naggazah and Ras Al Mannubiyah. Detailed investigation of the foraminiferal content led to the recognition of 27 species belonging to 16 genera and 13 families. The absence of index planktonic foraminifera does not enable the recognition of any planktonic biozone within the Al Khums Formation. The presence of the larger benthic foraminifera Borelis melo melo enables the assignment of a Middle Miocene age to this rock unit. The studied sections characterized by the common occurrence of benthic foraminiferal species living in a shallow neritic environment. This conclusion is corroborated by the co-occurrence of large oysters, corals and algae.

  5. Benthic Foraminifera in the Changing Ecosystem of Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, B.; Thomas, E.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2004-05-01

    Long Island Sound (LIS) is an estuary in a heavily urbanized region; Long Island lies to its South, New York City (NYC) to its West and Connecticut to its North. The Connecticut River contributes >70% of the fresh water influx. LIS has a narrow opening to the West (into East River), but exchange with the ocean occurs dominantly at its eastern end, resulting in an east-west gradient in salinity. An east-west gradient is also present in indicators of anthropogenic contamination in the surface sediments (e.g., trace metals) because western LIS is close to the major source of anthropogenic input (NYC). In addition, bottom currents focus fine-grained, contaminant-loaded sediments there. Since the early 1970's western LIS and parts of central LIS have suffered summer hypoxia, probably as a result of increased algal growth caused by anthropogenic nitrogen input. Benthic foraminifera are eukaryote heterotrophic organisms with a calcareous or agglutinated test. We investigated changes in their populations over time in about 2m-long gravity cores in westernmost (WLIS75GGC1; 73o 40'W, 40o 52'N, 19m waterdepth) and coastal central LIS (B1GGC1; 73o 4'W, 41o 10'N, 8m water depth), to document environmental changes over the last millennium, including the time of European settlement and the industrial revolution and population increase. An age model was derived from metal pollution records and 14C dating. Before European settlement, the low-diversity benthic faunas in core B1GGC1, at a depth within the zone of light penetration, were dominated by Elphidium excavatum, a species feeding on living diatoms. In western LIS (below the zone of light penetration) this species was less abundant and Elphidium incertum and Buccella frigida were common. In both cores, the absolute abundance of benthic foraminifera and the relative abundance of Elphidium excavatum increased in the early 1800's, coinciding with a time of rapid increase in human population around LIS and slightly before an

  6. Testing the Molecular Clock Using the Best Fossil Record: Case Studies from the Planktic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, B. A.; Kucera, M.; Darling, K.

    2004-12-01

    Criticism of molecular clock studies often centres on inadequate calibration and a perceived lack of correlation between reproductive isolation and recognisable morphological evolution. Since many major groups (e.g. birds, mammals, reptiles) have a poor fossil record, it is often difficult to test and refute these limitations. Planktic foraminifera represent an exception to this rule. Deep-sea sediments are super-abundant in foraminifera, and large numbers of specimens and occurrences are easily garnered from Ocean Drilling Programme cores. Planktic foraminifera therefore represent an ideal model group with which to test and refine molecular clock studies. Since the 1990AƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAøs, genetic sequences (principally 18S r-RNA) have been extracted from living planktic foraminifera, and a large genetic library has developed. Our study attempts to contextualise and test molecular data, particularly AƒAøAøâ_sA¬Asmall amount of morphological evolution observed within the plexus. We have used morphometric methods on a large (over 2000 pooled specimens) dataset in an effort to independently test the molecular clock, using SEM-based measurement of pore metrics (for Gl. siphonifera) and a multivariate analysis of whole-test characteristics (for Gs. ruber). Comparison of results for the two species suggests interesting patterns; whilst the two cryptic sub-types of Gl. siphonifera seemingly can be traced through time and seem to respond to external oceanographic forcing, the sub-types of Gs. ruber appear to be truly cryptic, and cannot be distinguished in the fossil record beyond 0.7 Ma. This raises two important points; firstly, the molecular clock (at least for foraminifera) bears considerable scrutiny, appears to be relatively robust to substitution bias and is seemingly broadly in accordance with morphological data; and secondly, the relationship between form and function in planktic foraminifera appears to be ill-defined, raising important questions for

  7. Oxygen isotope fractionation and algal symbiosis in benthic foraminifera from the Gulf of Elat, Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchardt, B.; Hansen, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate possible isotopic fractionations due to algal symbiosis the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of shell carbonate from symbiont-free and symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera have been compared to that of molluscs living at the same locality. The material was collected over a depth profile in the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), Israel, covering the interval from 4 to 125 metres. After corrections variations for temperature with depth, characteristic 18 O-depletions were observed in the foraminiferal shell carbonate when compared to the molluscs. These depletions are interpreted as 1) a constant vital effect seen in all the foraminifera studied and 2) an additional, light-dependent vital effect observed in the symbiont-bearing forms only, caused by incorporation of photosynthetic oxygen formed by the symbiotic algae. This additional vital effect emphasizes the difficulties in applying foraminifera to oxygen isotope palaeotemperature analyses. No well-defined differences in carbon isotope compositions are observed between symbiont-bearing and symbiont-free foraminifera. (author)

  8. Ecology and distribution of recent planktonic foraminifera in eastern part of Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    (0-200 m) than in the surface (0-10 m) tows. Further, latitudinal gradient of some species which have a definite bearing on hydrography of the sea, has been outlined. Relative production of planktonic foraminifera shows that it is high in the southern...

  9. Effect of carbonate ion concentration and irradiance on calcification in planktonic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; da Rocha, R. E.; Bijma, J.

    2010-01-01

    rates of these two species are projected to be 6 to 13% lower than the present conditions, while the final shell weights are reduced by 20 to 27% for O. universa and by 4 to 6% for G. sacculifer. These results indicate that ocean acidification would impact on calcite production by foraminifera and may...

  10. Living planktonic foraminifera during the late summer monsoon period in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Mohan, R.; Muralinath, A.S.

    with deepening of the mixed layer, since this species preferentially dwells in nutrient-rich upwelling waters. The population density of planktonic foraminifera ranges between 31 and 185 specimens per 10@u-3@@m@u3@@. The low absolute numbers of planktonic...

  11. Invertebrate shells (mollusca, foraminifera) as pollution indicators, Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mohamed; Madkour, Hashem; Mansour, Abbas; Alharbi, Wedad; El-Taher, Atef

    2017-09-01

    To assess the degree of pollution and its impact on the environment along the Red Sea Coast, the most abundant nine species of recent benthic foraminifera and three species of molluscan shells have been selected for the analysis of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Co, and Cd concentrations. The selected foraminiferal species are: Textularia agglutinans, Amphispsorus hemprichii, Sorites marginalis, Peneroplis planatus, Borelis schlumbergeri, Amphistegina lessonii, Ammonia beccarii, Operculina gaimairdi, and Operculinella cumingii. The selected molluscan shells are: Lambis truncata and Strombus tricornis (gastropods) and Tridacana gigas (bivalves). The inorganic material analysis of foraminifera and molluscs from the Quseir and Safaga harbors indicates that foraminifera tests include higher concentrations of heavy metals such as Fe and Mn than molluscan shells. These results are supported by the black tests of porcelaneous foraminifera and reflect iron selectivity. The Cd and Pb concentrations in molluscan shells are high in the El Esh Area because of oil pollution at this site. The Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in the studied invertebrates are high at Quseir Harbor and in the El Esh Area because of the strong influence of terrigenous materials that are rich in these metals. The heavy metal contamination is mostly attributed to anthropogenic sources.

  12. The Foraminifera of the Saba Bank Expedition, 1972 (Cicar Cruises 34, 35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1980-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bottom samples obtained by means of a Van Veen grab during the 1972 Saba Bank Expedition (CICAR cruises 34 and 35) appeared to comprise many samples with Foraminifera. This material was kindly put at my disposal by Dr. D. van Harten of the Geological Institute of the University of

  13. Paleoecology of benthic foraminifera from the Miocene of the San Jacinto Basin, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, John Sebastian; Fiorini, Flavia; Andres Trejos, Raul; Vallejo, Diego Felipe; Pardo, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative benthic foraminifera analysis was conducted on 34 samples collected from a borehole core (393.72m deep) drilled by Colombian Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) on 2009 in the San Jacinto basin (Northern Colombia). The aims of the research were to define a taxonomical data-bank of Miocene benthic foraminifera for this region, to use the benthic foraminifera assemblages to interpret the paleoenvironment and to identify paleoenvironmental changes. The bottom of the section was dated between lowest Burdigalian to middle Langhian (20.393-17.721 Ma) based on calcareous nannofossils bioevents: LO Helicosphaera ampliaperta, HCO Sphenolithus belemnos and LCO Sphenolithus heteromorphus. The benthic foraminifera fauna identified in the studied samples is composed for the majority of calcareous hyaline tests and is dominated by infaunal taxas. Species belonging to the genera Uvigerina and Lenticulina are commonly occurring in the studied section together with other species typical of outer-shelf upper-bathyal environment. Cibicidoides spp., abundant in the lower part of the section, abruptly decreases in abundance in the upper part. Species belonging to the opportunistic genera Bulimina and Bolivina are more abundant in the upper part of the section. Variability in the abundance of opportunistic species can be associated with tectonic disturbance on the Sinu-San Jacinto fold belt (NW of Colombia) as a result of collision of the Caribbean plate against NW of South America. The tectonics could lead a perturbation on deep ocean sedimentation and circulation.

  14. Larger foraminifera distribution on a mesotrophic carbonate shelf in SW Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renema, W.; Troelstra, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    Larger symbiont bearing foraminifera typically live in shallow tropical seas. In this study the fauna composition of patch reefs scattered over the Spermonde Shelf (SW Sulawesi, Indonesia), a mesotrophic carbonate shelf, is examined. The foraminiferal fauna of the Spermonde Shelf is characterised by

  15. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA AND SEDIMENT TYPES OF SOUTH MAKASSAR STRAIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheilla Zallesa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available South Makassar Strait is located between Kalimantan and Sulawesi Islands that is an important oceanographic pathway connecting between the Pacific and Indian oceans. This area is a part of sedimentary basin that has specific seabed morphology and sediment characteristics, including foraminifera as a component of sediments. The purpose of this study is to determine community structure of benthic foraminifera related to sediment characteristics. This study used 20 top core sediment samples from water depth between 200 and 1500 m. There are identified 38 species of benthic foraminifera and some of them are characterized the study area: Anomalinoides colligerus, Lenticulina suborbicularis, Planulina wuellerstorfi, and Pseudonodosaria discrete. The diversity index is categorized as moderate values (1.0=H'= 3 and the average of evenness values is about 0.79. The dominance values are less than 0.5 indicate that there is no dominant species in the study area. In relation to sediment characteristics, it shows that the high abundance of benthic foraminifera occurs in sediment type of silty sand and sandy silt. Moderate abundance appears in sand following by low abundance in silt and sandy silt sediment types.

  16. Response of benthic foraminifera to phytodetritus in the eastern Arabian Sea under low oxygen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Annekatrin; Wukovits, Julia; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Witte, Ursula; Hunter, William; Heinz, Petra

    2016-04-01

    At water depths between 100 and 1500 m a permanent Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) impinges on the sea floor in the eastern Arabian Sea, exposing benthic organisms to anoxic to suboxic conditions. The flux of organic matter to the sea floor is relatively high at these depths but displays seasonal variation. Deposition of relatively fresh phytodetrital material (phytoplankton remains) can occur within a short period of time after monsoon periods. Several organism groups including foraminifera are involved to different extent in the processing of phytodetritus in the OMZs of the northern Arabian Sea. A series of in situ feeding experiments were performed to study the short-term processing (metabolic processes under hypoxic stress. Variable levels and ratios of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen indicate specific nutritional demands and storage of food-derived nitrogen in some foraminifera species under near anoxia where the mean phytodetrital nitrogen content in foraminifera was elevated. In summary, foraminifera dominate the short-term processing of phytodetritus by fauna in the OMZ core but are less important in the lower OMZ boundary region of the Indian margin as a result of biological interactions and changes in the distribution of individual foraminiferal species.

  17. A Record of Rotaloid Foraminifera from the Upper Permian-Lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRABHAS PANDE

    INTRODUCTION. In the history of organic evolution, the end of Palaeozoic Era was marked by the conspicuous event of mass extinctions. Amongst foraminifera, as many as fourteen families became extinct. (Loeblich and Tappan, 1964) during the Permian Period and many new families evolved in the. Mesozoic. There is a ...

  18. A new model for biomineralization and trace-element signatures of Foraminifera tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, G.; Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.; Meibom, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mg/Ca ratio of Foraminifera calcium carbonate tests is used as proxy for seawater temperature and widely applied to reconstruct global paleo-climatic changes. However, the mechanisms involved in the carbonate biomineralization process are poorly understood. The current paradigm holds that

  19. Distribution of benthic foraminifera within oxygen minima zone, off central west coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Nigam, R.

    and analyzed to study the effect of oxygen minima zone on benthic foraminiferal habitat. Benthic foraminifera were studied upto specific level of identification. However, to get a better picture, and keeping in mind that oxygen minima zone in the Arabian Sea...

  20. Automated species-level identification and segmentation of planktonic foraminifera using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; Mitra, R.; Zhong, B.; Ge, Q.; Kanakiya, B.; Lobaton, E.

    2017-12-01

    Identification and picking of foraminifera from sediment samples is often a laborious and repetitive task. Previous attempts to automate this process have met with limited success, but we show that recent advances in machine learning can be brought to bear on the problem. As a `proof of concept' we have developed a system that is capable of recognizing six species of extant planktonic foraminifera that are commonly used in paleoceanographic studies. Our pipeline begins with digital photographs taken under 16 different illuminations using an LED ring, which are then fused into a single 3D image. Labeled image sets were used to train various types of image classification algorithms, and performance on unlabeled image sets was measured in terms of precision (whether IDs are correct) and recall (what fraction of the target species are found). We find that Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) approaches achieve precision and recall values between 80 and 90%, which is similar precision and better recall than human expert performance using the same type of photographs. We have also trained a CNN to segment the 3D images into individual chambers and apertures, which can not only improve identification performance but also automate the measurement of foraminifera for morphometric studies. Given that there are only 35 species of extant planktonic foraminifera larger than 150 μm, we suggest that a fully automated characterization of this assemblage is attainable. This is the first step toward the realization of a foram picking robot.

  1. Recent foraminifera along west coast of India: Restrospect, perspect and prospect

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    An immense quantum of work on foraminifera is being carried out in Indian waters by various research centers and universities. However, a thorough review of the foraminiferal studies from Indian waters is yet to be amde. A critical review will also...

  2. Off to new shores: Modeling the potential distribution and future range expansion of larger foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, A. E.; Rödder, D.; Lötters, S.; Langer, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    The distribution of larger foraminifera is strongly controlled by environmental variables, especially temperature. Most of today's taxa of larger foraminifera are restricted to tropical and subtropical regions (between 30° N and 30° S) and their minimum temperature limits are governed by the 14 to 20° C isotherms. However, during times of extensive global warming (e.g. the Eocene and Miocene), larger foraminifera have been found as far North as 50° N (North America and Central Europe) as well as towards 40° S in New Zealand. It has been stated that larger foraminifera are more tolerant of rising sea surface temperatures than reef-building corals. As such they may play a more prominent role as future reef framework and carbonate producers in a steadily warming ocean. During the last century, sea surface temperatures have been rising significantly due to higher CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. This trend is expected to continue and climate change scenarios for 2100 suggest a further increase by 1 to 6° C (IPCC Synthesis Report, 2007). We applied Species Distribution Models (SDMs) on several taxa of larger foraminifera in order to evaluate their potential distribution under current climate conditions and to predict range expansions within the next 40 years. The studied taxa include Archaias angulatus, which is regionally distributed within the Caribbean region, Calcarina spp., which occurs in the Indo-Pacific area and the true circumglobal taxon Amphistegina spp. Under present climate, Amphistegina spp. shows the widest distribution range due to its greater temperature tolerance. Both Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. display potential distributions that cover currently uninhabitet regions, suggesting that weak dispersal abilities are major reasons for their limited distributions. Under future climate, Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. show an increase in habitat suitability within their native occurrence ranges, suggesting that their tolerance for

  3. Effects of heavy metals pollution on benthic foraminifera assemblage: the Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Najla; Zghal, Ihsen; Bouzid, Jalel; Abdennaceur Ouali, Jamel

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera are amongst the most abundant protists found in huge marine and brackish water habitat. During the last few decades, many researches had been focused on using benthic foraminifera as bioindicators of marine pollution caused by industrial, domestic and agricultural waste, oil or heavy metal contamination. The aim of this research is to investigate heavy metals pollution in superficial sediments in two industrial locations at the Gulf of Gabes and to examine the reaction of benthic foraminifera towards metallic concentration. The Gulf of Gabes, located on the eastern coast of Tunisia, is regarded as an extremely vital zone and considered as one of the most important area for fishing in the country. During last years, the coastal area of this region had known an important demographic and industrial development, leading to the presence of uncontrolled discharge. Fifteen superficial sediment samples were collected along the coastline of Skhira and Ghannouch- Gabes. They have been analyzed for Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations as well as for the species composition of benthic foraminifera. Results show three levels of metallic contamination with high concentration of cadmium and zinc. Thirty five benthic foraminifera species were identified. Ammonia parkinsoniana, Ammonia beccarii, Peneroplis planatus, Triloculina trigonula and Adelosina longirostraare are the most abundant and common species. Increasing pollution results in a lower species diversity as well as population density, with the presence of a barren zone, and more frequent abnormal specimens. A complementary statistical analysis (PCA/FA and matrix correlation) shows that heavy metals are resulting from the same anthropogenic source and negative correlation between faunal parameters (density and diversity) and pollutants concentrations.

  4. Heavy metals contamination and distribution of benthic foraminifera from the Red Sea coastal area, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Youssef

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of benthic foraminifera was studied in two stations in the coastal area, located around Jeddah, Red Sea coast, Saudi Arabia. Thirty-three species belonging to 15 genera, 14 families and three suborders were recorded in twenty samples. Some foraminiferal tests display abnormalities in their coiling, general shape of chambers and apertures. On the other hand, concentrations of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, and Cd were measured in the tests of the two most common living species of benthic foraminifera (Sorites marginalis and Peneroplis planatus. Significant spatial differences in the metal concentrations of benthic foraminifera were recorded at the two sites. Benthic foraminifera yielded significantly high concentrations of Fe, Mn, Pb and Cu, which may attribute to anthropogenic activities at the studied coastal areas. The anthropogenic activities have a considerable impact, besides other factors, in the abnormalities of foraminiferal test.

  5. Effect of temperature and salinity on stable isotopic composition of shallow water benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Linshy, V.N.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    Quantitative estimation of past climatic parameters from stable isotopic composition of foraminifera relies on estimating the precise relationship between stable isotopic composition of the species analyzed and the physico-chemical factors...

  6. Distribution of planktonic foraminifera in waters of the submarine coral banks in southeast Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balasubramanian, T.

    Twentyfive species of planktonic foraminifera are recorded from 36 plankton tows collected from waters of the submerged coral banks- Bassas de Pedro, Sesostris and Cora Divh-located at northern end of the Laccadive group of islands in southeastern...

  7. Benthic foraminifera in the plankton following storms: what does this mean for (palaeo)-ecological interpretations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Molina, Giulia; Smart, Christopher; Widdicombe, Claire

    2017-04-01

    The Western Channel Observatory was established by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with Plymouth Marine Laboratory managing the two autonomous buoys that are located to the south of Plymouth in the English Channel (Stations L4 and E1): see Smyth et al. (2015). These two locations are now monitored continually and there is regular sampling of the water column and the sea floor at both locations. At Station L4, despite being in waters with a depth of 50 m, benthic foraminifera are regularly found in the surface water plankton samples. Some of these benthic foraminifera contain algal symbionts, indicating that they may be living at the time of capture. If benthic foraminifera can be entrained in the water column, while still living, then this provides a mechanism for 'migration' that is much more rapid and efficient than the rate at which protists could migrate within, or on, the sediment surface. Recolonization by foraminifera, following disturbance, could well be facilitated by this mechanism which has only rarely been reported in the literature (e.g., Murray, 1965). It is clearly limited to depths impacted by fair weather ( 30 m) or storm wave base (80 - 100 m). Data gathered during winter 2015-2016 certainly indicate that, following storm events, the larger the number of benthic foraminifera in the plankton tows and the greater their overall size. Some of the individuals being observed appear to contain sediment, indicating that they have been picked up from the sediment surface and, despite their greater weight, have still been transported into the plankton. Using data from the nearby sea area, off-shore and within Plymouth Sound, we are trying to ascertain if the recorded assemblage is from the L4 area, or whether they have been transported out from shallower-water environments, possibly assisted by increased run-off caused by heavy rainfall (associated with the storms). Clearly, re-distribution of foraminifera in the environment might make

  8. REKONSTRUKSI BATIMETRI DAN IKLIM PURBA BERDASARKAN FORAMINIFERA DAERAH RALLA BARRU, SULAWESI SELATAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meutia Farida

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Daerah Ralla terletak di Kabupaten Barru Provinsi Sulawesi Selatan, tersusun atas batuan karbonat dan vulkanik. Salah satu komponen utama penyusun batuan ini adalah kandungan fosil foraminifera baik planktonik maupun bentonik yang jumlahnya melimpah. Penentuan umur dan lingkungan pengendapan purba (paleobathymetry, menggunakan foraminifera sebagai proksi iklim purba (paleoclimate yang baik. Pengambilan sampel dilakukan dengan metode Penampang Stratigrafi Terukur (Measuring Section pada singkapan napal dan batugamping dengan ketebalan mencapai 748,16 sentimeter yang terdiri dari 23 lapisan batuan. Hasil identifikasi dan determinasi fosil foraminifera menunjukkan bahwa pada sampel terdapat 46 spesies bentonik dan 28 spesies planktonik, dengan kisaran umur batuan adalah Eosen Bawah bagian atas (P9 – Eosen Tengah bagian tengah (P11, perubahan batimetri dengan siklus pengendapan inner neritic – upper bathyal - outer neritic. Jumlah spesies yang beragam dan sangat melimpah serta ukuran fosil yang besar menunjukkan nutrisi pada saat itu sangat berlimpah, dengan temperatur 0⁰– 27⁰C sebagai kondisi iklim hangat (warm water. Ralla area is located in Barru District, South Sulawesi Province which consisted of carbonate and volcanic rocks. One of the main components of these rocks is foraminifera fossils, include planktonic and bentonic which founded to be abundance. In determining the age and depositional environment (paleobathymetry, foraminifera fossils could be used as a good paleoclimate proxy. The research was conducted by Stratigraphy Measured (Measuring Section method in marl and limestone outcrop with a thickness of up to 748.16 centimeters which consists of 23 rock layers. Identification and determination of foraminifera fossils suggests that there are 46 bentonic and 28 planktonic species on samples, which are estimated the age of the rocks range from the end of lower Eocene (P9 till the middle of Middle Eocene (P11, bathymetry changes

  9. Foraminifera Population from South Africa Coast Line (Indian and Atlantic Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Meriç

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cape Town is the second-largest city of the Republic of South Africa. Research is conducted in 3 different stations: Maori Bay, which lies in the southwest of Cape Town, and Pyramid Rock and Partridge Points which lies in the False Bay, southeast part of Cape Town. Samples are taken from young sediments at 10.00 and 20.00 m depths, and collected by scuba-diving method. The aim of the study is to investigate the living benthic foraminifera assemblages in the Atlantic Ocean, and to compare these assemblages with the southeastern part of the Atlantic Ocean, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Western Pacific assemblages. Moreover, the aim of the study is to determine whether there are any benthic foraminifera forms reaching to the Mediterranean from Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean or Red Sea via Suez Channel.

  10. Characterisation of differential mixing of foraminifera and bulk carbonate in NE Atlantic sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.; Cook, G.T.; Mackenzie, A.B.; Naysmith, P.; Anderson, R.; Thomson, J.; Nixon, S.

    2000-01-01

    Radiocarbon age offsets between foraminifera and bulk carbonate samples were investigated in a sediment core from the western Rockall Plateau in the North East Atlantic. Within the surface mixed layer (SML), foraminifera (forams) ages were significantly younger than those of the bulk sediment at corresponding depths. Below the SML, no significant offset was observed between the two, which is in contrast to previous studies. The absence of an offset below the SML may be the result of advective biological mixing dominating over diffusive mixing in the SML, or the foram size fraction being below the threshold at which size selective mixing becomes active. Within the SML, the sampling strategy may bias the collection of forams towards the youngest specimens at each depth

  11. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution of the Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from Recent coastline environments adjacent to the coastline of Abu Dhabi (UAE) was studied in detail with the aim to: 1) provide reliable analogs for understanding and interpreting the depositional environment of ancient shallow-marine sediments from the UAE; 2) assess any modifications in the distribution of benthic environments and sedimentary facies in an area affected by significant anthropogenic activities - particular construction and land reclamation. A total of 100 sea-floor sediment samples were collected in different shallow-marine sedimentary environments (nearshore shelf, beach-front, channels, ooid shoals, lagoon and mangals) close to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island. Where possible, we revisited the sampling sites used in several studies conducted in the middle of last century (prior to any significant anthropogenic activities) to assess temporal changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution during the last 50 years. Five foraminiferal assemblages were recognized in the studied area. Species with a porcellaneous test mainly belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita are common in all studied areas. Larger benthic foraminifera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. The species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples particularly in lagoons and mangal environments and have not been reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the ooid shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach-front and samples collected in dredged channels

  12. Megalodon, mako shark and planktonic foraminifera from the continental shelf off Portugal and their age

    OpenAIRE

    ANTUNES, M.; LEGOINHA, P.; BALBINO, A.

    2015-01-01

    Turbidite fragments collected by a fishing net off the central Portuguese coast (Peniche) present some fossils. The matrix is phosphatized and iron-rich with small quantities of manganese, zinc and copper. The occurrence of Megaselachus megalodon most probably excludes an age older than Middle Miocene. Its very advanced evolution stage is consistent with a Pliocene age. Based on planktonic foraminifera in depressions of cetacean skulls recovered in the same way, from the same area...

  13. Exploring the controls on element ratios in middle Eocene samples of the benthic foraminifera Oridorsalis umbonatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Dawber

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Culturing studies and empirically based core top calibrations have been used to infer that elemental ratios in benthic foraminifera can be used as proxies to reconstruct past variations in bottom water temperature and saturation state (Δ [CO32−]. However the mechanisms linking elemental ratios to these parameters are poorly constrained. Here, we explore the environmental parameters influencing the incorporation of B, Li, Sr and Mg in Oridorsalis umbonatus in early Cenozoic sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209. We investigate the influence of middle Eocene variations in intermediate water Δ [CO32−] using relationships developed from core top samples. The fidelity of bottom water Δ[CO32−] reconstructions based on single element ratios is assessed by comparing the X/Ca-based reconstructions to each other and to carbon cycle proxy records (benthic foraminifera δ13C, organic carbon content, foraminifera dissolution indices, and a seawater δ18O reconstruction for Site 1209. Discrepancies in the reconstructed Δ[CO32−] values based on these different metal ratios suggest that there are still gaps in our understanding of the parameters influencing X/Ca and demonstrate that caution is required when interpreting palaeo-reconstructions that are derived from a single elemental ratio. The downcore record of O. umbonatus Mg/Ca does not exhibit any similarities with the Li/Ca, B/Ca and Sr/Ca records, suggesting that the environmental parameters influencing Mg/Ca may be different for this species, consistent with temperature as the strongest control on this elemental ratio. This hypothesis is supported by the coefficients of multiple linear regression models on published Mg/Ca data. An incomplete understanding of the controls on elemental incorporation into benthic foraminifera hinders our ability to confidently quantify changes in saturation state using single X/Ca reconstructions over a range of timescales.

  14. The distribution of benthic foraminifera in Bel Torrente submarine cave (Sardinia, Italy) and their environmental significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Elena; Bergamin, Luisa; Pierfranceschi, Giancarlo; Provenzani, Claudio; Marassich, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The use of benthic foraminifera as ecological indicators in submarine caves of temperate seas have never been studied before and it represents a new approach, verified by this research. The Bel Torrente submarine cave (Gulf of Orosei, Sardinia, Italy) was surveyed by GUE (Global Underwater Explorers) scuba divers in order to georeferencing the cave before positioning the sampling stations, from the entrance to 430 m inside the cave. A total of 15 water samples were collected to investigate abiotic parameters (temperature, salinity, pH) while 15 sediment samples were collected to analyze grain size and benthic foraminifera. Benthic foraminifera, investigated for the first time in a submarine cave of temperate areas, were exclusively found from the entrance to 300 m inside the cave. Species distribution and assemblage diversity have been found to be correlated to the environmental gradient towards the inner cave, mainly due to the decreasing of temperature and salinity and the increasing of the flow energy. Water acidification seems responsible for the transition from a calcareous hyaline-dominated assemblage to an agglutinant-dominated one, occurring between 120 and 150 m from the entrance. Common taxa of the Sardinian coastal marine area are present only close to the entrance of the cave, while species found in the inner part are nearly exclusively epifaunal clinging/attached or infaunal taxa, with tolerance for wide variability of environmental parameters, such as Gavelinopsis praegeri, and opportunist infaunal taxa such as Eggerella advena. The agglutinant taxa found in the cave are conversely very rare in coastal marine assemblages of the area. This suggests a very efficient dispersal mechanism for the colonization of the caves, involving probably juvenile foraminifera at a "propagule" stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting the global distribution of planktonic foraminifera using a dynamic ecosystem model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fraile

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new planktonic foraminifera model developed for the global ocean mixed-layer. The main purpose of the model is to explore the response of planktonic foraminifera to different boundary conditions in the geological past, and to quantify the seasonal bias in foraminifera-based paleoceanographic proxy records. This model is forced with hydrographic data and with biological information taken from an ecosystem model to predict monthly concentrations of the most common planktonic foraminifera species used in paleoceanography: N. pachyderma (sinistral and dextral varieties, G. bulloides, G. ruber (white variety and G. sacculifer. The sensitivity of each species with respect to temperature (optimal temperature and range of tolerance is derived from previous sediment-trap studies.

    Overall, the spatial distribution patterns of most of the species are in agreement with core-top data. N. pachyderma (sin. is limited to polar regions, N. pachyderma (dex. and G. bulloides are the most common species in high productivity zones, while G. ruber and G. sacculifer are more abundant in tropical and subtropical oligotrophic waters. For N. pachyderma (sin and N. pachyderma (dex., the season of maximum production coincides with that observed in sediment-trap records. Model and sediment-trap data for G. ruber and G. sacculifer show, in general, lower concentrations and less seasonal variability at all sites. A sensitivity experiment suggest that, within the temperature-tolerance range of a species, food availability may be the main parameter controlling its abundance.

  16. New and poorly known Middle Jurassic larger benthic foraminifera from the Karst Dinarides of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlagintweit, Felix; Velić, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Some new and poorly known larger benthic foraminifera are described from Middle Jurassic (Upper Aalenian-Bajocian) shallow-water limestones of the Croatian Karst Dinarides. Cymbriaella lorigae FUGAGNOLI is reported for the first time beside its type-locality, the Upper Pliensbachian of the Southern Alps. New taxa described include Bosniella bassoulleti n. sp. and Dubrovnikella septfontainei n. gen., n. sp. (family Biokovinidae). Both Cymbriaella lorigae and Everticyclammina praevirguliana FUG...

  17. A note on the laboratory culture of benthic foraminifera collected from nearshore region off Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Koli, N.Y.

    of benthic foraminifera was carried out in two phases. In phase 1 we used living organisms collected from the field as parent to be cultured under laboratory conditions using filtered sea water as media. This attempt was made to obtain the offsprings... responded to culture. (2) Food has conducive effect (3) The formation of initial chambers took less time as compared to latter chambers. Fig. 1 shows the growth of successive chambers. However, some of the parents reproduced at varying intervals...

  18. Mg isotope fractionation in biogenic carbonates of deep-sea coral, benthic foraminifera, and hermatypic coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Inoue, Mayuri; Suzuki, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Nozomu; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2011-11-01

    High-precision Mg isotope measurements by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied for determinations of magnesium isotopic fractionation of biogenic calcium carbonates from seawater with a rapid Mg purification technique. The mean δ(26)Mg values of scleractinian corals, giant clam, benthic foraminifera, and calcite deep-sea corals were -0.87‰, -2.57‰, -2.34‰, and -2.43‰, suggesting preferential precipitation of light Mg isotopes to produce carbonate skeleton in biomineralization. Mg isotope fractionation in deep-sea coral, which has high Mg calcite skeleton, showed a clear temperature (T) dependence from 2.5 °C to 19.5 °C: 1,000 × ln(α) = -2.63 (±0.076) + 0.0138 (±0.0051) × T(R(2) = 0.82, p coral. Since the precipitation rates of deep-sea coral and benthic foraminifera are several orders of magnitude different, the results suggest that kinetic isotope fractionation may not be a major controlling factor for high-Mg calcite. The Mg isotope fractionation factors and the slope of temperature dependence from deep-sea corals and benthic foraminifera are similar to that for an inorganically precipitated calcite speleothem. Taking into account element partitioning and the calcification rate of biogenic CaCO(3), the similarity among inorganic minerals, deep-sea corals, and benthic foraminiferas may indicate a strong mineralogical control on Mg isotope fractionation for high-Mg calcite. On the other hand, δ(26)Mg in hermatypic corals composed of aragonite has been comparable with previous data on biogenic aragonite of coral, sclerosponges, and scaphopad, regardless of species differences of samples.

  19. Foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution changes along the Abu Dhabi (UAE) coastline over the last 50 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution along the coastline of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE) were assessed. Anthropogenic activities are modifying the morphology of the coastline causing changes to coastal sedimentary systems. During the early 1960's, prior to any major construction activities, a number of studies examined the distribution of shallow-marine foraminifera and sedimentary facies in the shallow off-shore coastal zone of Abu Dhabi providing a good overall assessment of the distribution of sedimentary facies and foraminifera prior to the anthropogenic activities. The present study revisited, the sampling sites used in the studies conducted in the 1960's. One hundred sea-floor sediment samples were collected, proximal to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island in nearshore shelf, beach front, channels, ooid shoals and lagoonal settings. Samples were collected at a water depth of 1 to 15m in water with a temperature of 22-29˚C and a salinity of 40-46‰. The identified foraminifera consist mainly of species with a porcellaneous test belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita. Larger benthic foraminifera mainly belonging to the genera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. Among the agglutinated foraminifera the species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples and have not reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the oolith shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach front and samples collected in dredged channels do not contain living foraminifera and the dead assemblage is mostly

  20. The Response of Living Benthic Foraminifera at an Organically Polluted Locality in Eastern Bahrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Frontalini, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the response of living benthic foraminifera at a polluted site in eastern Bahrain, with the aim to determine the effects of anthropogenic pollution on their distribution patterns and the occurrence of morphological deformities. The boat harbor in Askar (Bahrain) is subjected to pollution by nutrients, organic matter, and hydrocarbons. Foraminiferal density is found to be higher at the polluted site compared with a nearby unpolluted site, suggesting a higher amount of available food for the benthic foraminifera. Seven taxonomical groups were recognized in the organically polluted transect including Ammonia, Glabratellina, Murrayinella, Elphidium, Brizalina, miliolids, and peneroplids. By comparing the foraminiferal assemblages with a nearby unpolluted transect, the genus Murrayinella appeared to be a dominant and pervasive taxon that was able to proliferate in an organically polluted environment. Strong correlations of Murrayinella with nitrates, sulfates, TOC, and THC put forward the opportunistic behavior of this taxon. Our results contrast with previously published findings on modern foraminiferal assemblage in the Arabian Gulf, as Murrayinella is rarely reported. The population of miliolids was drastically reduced at the polluted site, which suggests that the group was adversely affected by organic pollution when compared with the unpolluted transect. This reaffirms the sensitive nature of the miliolid group of foraminifera, supporting the findings of previous studies of the effect of historical coastal eutrophication on foraminiferal assemblages in the Gulf of Mexico and Japan. Therefore, the miliolids might be considered as a pollution proxy for future biomonitoring studies in the Gulf region.

  1. Species distribution and depth habitat of recent planktic foraminifera in Fram Strait, Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Pados

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To describe the horizontal and vertical distribution of recent planktic foraminifera in Fram Strait (Arctic, plankton samples were collected in the early summer of 2011 using a MultiNet sampler (>63 µm at 10 stations along a west–east transect at 78°50′N. Five depth intervals were sampled from the sea surface down to 500 m. Additionally, sediment surface samples from the same locations were analysed. The ratio between absolute abundances of planktic foraminifera in the open ocean, at the ice margin and in the ice-covered ocean was found to be approximately 2:4:1. The assemblage was dominated by the polar Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin. and the subpolar Turborotalita quinqueloba, which accounted for 76 and 15% of all tests in the warm, saline Atlantic waters and 90 and 5% in the cold and fresh Polar waters, respectively. Both species had maximum absolute abundances between 0 and 100 m water depth, however, they apparently lived shallower under the ice cover than under ice-free conditions. This indicates that the depth habitat of planktic foraminifera in the study area is predominantly controlled by food availability and not by temperature. The distribution pattern obtained by plankton tows was clearly reflected on the sediment surface and we conclude that the assemblage on the sediment surface can be used as an indicator for modern planktic foraminiferal fauna.

  2. Time-response of cultured deep-sea benthic foraminifera to different algal diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, P.; Hemleben, Ch; Kitazato, H.

    2002-03-01

    The vertical distribution of benthic foraminifera in the surface sediment is influenced by environmental factors, mainly by food and oxygen supply. An experiment of three different time series was performed to investigate the response of deep-sea benthic foraminifera to simulated phytodetritus pulses under stable oxygen concentrations. Each series was fed constantly with one distinct algal species in equivalent amounts. The temporal reactions of the benthic foraminifera with regard to the vertical distribution in the sediment, the total number, and the species composition were observed and compared within the three series. Additionally, oxygen contents and bacterial cell numbers were measured to ensure that these factors were invariable and did not influence foraminiferal communities. The addition of algae leads to higher population densities 21 days after food was added. Higher numbers of individuals were probably caused by higher organic levels, which in turn induced reproduction. A stronger response is found after feeding with Amphiprora sp. and Pyramimonas sp., compared to Dunaliella tertiolecta. At a constant high oxygen supply, no migration to upper layers was observed after food addition, and more individuals were found in deeper layers. The laboratory results thus agree with the predictions of the TROX-model. An epifaunal microhabitat preference was shown for Adercotryma glomerata. Hippocrepina sp. was spread over the entire sediment depth with a shallow infaunal maximum. Melonis barleeanum preferred a deeper infaunal habitat. Bacterial cell concentrations were stable during the laboratory experiments and showed no significant response to higher organic fluxes.

  3. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12C- ion source current of 10-15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  4. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO 2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO 2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12 C − ion source current of 10–15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  5. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: wacker@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lippold, J. [Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Molnar, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Schulz, H. [Institute for Geosciencies, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 {mu}g for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO{sub 2} is liberated from 150 to 1150 {mu}g of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO{sub 2} is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 {mu}g (50 {mu}g C) typically gives a {sup 12}C{sup -} ion source current of 10-15 {mu}A over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 {mu}g Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 {+-} 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  6. Foraminifera Models to Interrogate Ostensible Proxy-Model Discrepancies During Late Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P.; Dowsett, H. J.; de Mutsert, K.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera faunal assemblages have been used in the reconstruction of past oceanic states (e.g. the Last Glacial Maximum, the mid-Piacenzian Warm Period). However these reconstruction efforts have typically relied on inverse modeling using transfer functions or the modern analog technique, which by design seek to translate foraminifera into one or two target oceanic variables, primarily sea surface temperature (SST). These reconstructed SST data have then been used to test the performance of climate models, and discrepancies have been attributed to shortcomings in climate model processes and/or boundary conditions. More recently forward proxy models or proxy system models have been used to leverage the multivariate nature of proxy relationships to their environment, and to "bring models into proxy space". Here we construct ecological models of key planktic foraminifera taxa, calibrated and validated with World Ocean Atlas (WO13) oceanographic data. Multiple modeling methods (e.g. multilayer perceptron neural networks, Mahalanobis distance, logistic regression, and maximum entropy) are investigated to ensure robust results. The resulting models are then driven by a Late Pliocene climate model simulation with biogeochemical as well as temperature variables. Similarities and differences with previous model-proxy comparisons (e.g. PlioMIP) are discussed.

  7. Carbon isotopic fractionation in live benthic foraminifera -comparison with inorganic precipitate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses have been performed on live-stained aragonitic and calcitic benthic foraminifera and dissolved inorganic carbon from the Southern California Borderland to examine carbon isotopic fractionation in foraminifera. Temperature, salinity and pH data have also been collected to permit accurate determination of the delta 13 C of bicarbonate ion and thus aragonite-HCO 3 - and calcite-HCO 3 - isotopic enrichment factors (epsilonsub(ar-b) and epsilonsub(cl-b), respectively). Only species which precipitate in 18 O equilibrium have been considered. epsilonsub (ar-b) values based on Hoeglundina elegans range from 1.9 per mille at 2.7 deg C to 1.1 per mille at 9.5 deg C. The temperature dependence of epsilonsub(ar-b) is considerably greater than the equilibrium equation would predict and may be due to a vital effect. The calcitic foraminifera Cassidulina tortuosa, Cassidulina braziliensis, and Cassidulina limbata, Bank and Terrace dwellers, have similar delta 13 C values and yield an average epsilonsub(cl-b) value of -0.2 +- 0.1 per mille between 8 deg and 10 deg C. Calcitic Uvigerina curticosta, Uvigerina peregrina, and megalospheric B, argentea, Slope and Basin dwellers, are -0.7 +- 0.1 per mille enriched relative to ambient bicarbonate for 3 to 9 deg C. (author)

  8. Extremely heat tolerant photo-symbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Titelboim, D.; Brandt, J.; Herut, B.; Abramovich, S.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Kucera, M.

    2016-08-01

    Bleaching, the loss of algal symbionts, occurs in marine photosymbiotic organisms at water temperatures minimally exceeding average summer SST (sea surface temperatures). Pre-adaptation allows organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata. This species occurs at a thermally polluted site in the Mediterranean, where water temperatures reach a maxima daily average of 36 °C during the summer. To test whether this occurrence represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing this species from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures (20-42 °C). It was kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera in two experiments (20-36 °C). Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32 °C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36 °C. Pararotalia calcariformata survived all treatment conditions and grew under 36 °C. The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant. These observations imply that marine eukaryote-eukaryote photosymbiosis can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of symbiont-bearing foraminifera in the early Cenozoic hothouse climate.

  9. The trophic and metabolic pathways of foraminifera in the Arabian Sea: evidence from cellular stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffreys, R. M.; Fisher, E. H.; Gooday, A. J.; Larkin, K. E.; Billett, D. S. M.; Wolff, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Arabian Sea is a region of elevated productivity with the highest globally recorded fluxes of particulate organic matter (POM) to the deep ocean, providing an abundant food source for fauna at the seafloor. However, benthic communities are also strongly influenced by an intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), which impinges on the continental slope from 100 to 1000 m water depth. We compared the trophic ecology of foraminifera on the Oman and Pakistan margins of the Arabian Sea (140-3185 m water depth). These two margins are contrasting both in terms of the abundance of sedimentary organic matter and the intensity of the OMZ. Organic carbon concentrations of surficial sediments were higher on the Oman margin (3.32 ± 1.4%) compared to the Pakistan margin (2.45 ± 1.1%) and sedimentary organic matter (SOM) quality estimated from the Hydrogen Index was also higher on the Oman margin (300-400 mg HC mg TOC-1) compared to the Pakistan margin (responsible for the differences observed in foraminiferal isotopic composition. In addition, at the time of sampling, whole jellyfish carcasses (Crambionella orsini) and a carpet of jelly detritus were observed across the Oman margin transect. Associated chemosynthetic bacteria may have provided an organic-rich food source for foraminifera at these sites. Our data suggest that foraminifera in OMZ settings can utilise a variety of food sources and metabolic pathways to meet their energetic demands.

  10. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weight proxy (Lohmann 1995) and this proxy has been widely utilised (Broecker et al. 1999; Broecker and Clark 1999, 2001). Largely, in the above studies, the shell weights of selected planktonic foraminifer species has been successfully utilized in understanding the carbonate ion variations dur- ing the Holocene and the ...

  11. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    normalised to 2 km of water depth) of 553 mmol C/m2/yr and an inorganic flux of 424 mmol C/m2/yr (Honjo et al. 2008). In the eastern Arabian Sea, organic and inorganic car- bon flux of 234 and 171 mmol C/m2/yr have been noted (Honjo et al. 2008).

  12. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (< 10 % of the metabarcodes can be unambiguously assigned to planktonic taxa. These organisms live exclusively in the surface ocean and the recovered barcodes thus represent an allochthonous component deposited with the rain of organic remains from the surface ocean. We take advantage of the planktonic foraminifera portion of the metabarcodes to establish to what extent the structure of the surface ocean biota is preserved in sedimentary eDNA. We show that planktonic foraminifera DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of

  13. The response of calcifying plankton to climate change in the Pliocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. V. Davis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of anthropogenic pCO2 increases, future oceans are growing warmer and lower in pH and oxygen, conditions that are likely to impact planktic communities. Past intervals of elevated and changing pCO2 and temperatures can offer a glimpse into the response of marine calcifying plankton to changes in surface oceans under conditions similar to those projected for the future. Here we present new records of planktic foraminiferal and coccolith calcification (weight and size from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 (mid-North Atlantic and Ocean Drilling Program Site 999 (Caribbean Sea from the Pliocene, the last time that pCO2 was similar to today, and extending through a global cooling event into the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (3.3 to 2.6 million years ago. Test weights of both surface-dwelling Foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and thermocline-dwelling Foraminifera Globorotalia puncticulata vary with a potential link to regional temperature variation in the North Atlantic, whereas in the tropics Globigerinoides ruber test weight remains stable. In contrast, reticulofenestrid coccoliths show a narrowing size range and a decline in the largest lith diameters over this interval. Our results suggest no major changes in plankton calcite production during the high pCO2 Pliocene or during the transition into an icehouse world.

  14. Carbonate preservation during the 'mystery interval' in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    To understand carbonate dissolution and/or preservation on the sea floor since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), we measured shell weights of planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber from four sediment cores retrieved from different water depths...

  15. SSU rDNA divergence in planktonic foraminifera: molecular taxonomy and biogeographic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore André

    Full Text Available The use of planktonic foraminifera in paleoceanography requires taxonomic consistency and precise assessment of the species biogeography. Yet, ribosomal small subunit (SSUr DNA analyses have revealed that most of the modern morpho-species of planktonic foraminifera are composed of a complex of several distinct genetic types that may correspond to cryptic or pseudo-cryptic species. These genetic types are usually delimitated using partial sequences located at the 3'end of the SSUrDNA, but typically based on empirical delimitation. Here, we first use patristic genetic distances calculated within and among genetic types of the most common morpho-species to show that intra-type and inter-type genetic distances within morpho-species may significantly overlap, suggesting that genetic types have been sometimes inconsistently defined. We further apply two quantitative and independent methods, ABGD (Automatic Barcode Gap Detection and GMYC (General Mixed Yule Coalescent to a dataset of published and newly obtained partial SSU rDNA for a more objective assessment of the species status of these genetic types. Results of these complementary approaches are highly congruent and lead to a molecular taxonomy that ranks 49 genetic types of planktonic foraminifera as genuine (pseudocryptic species. Our results advocate for a standardized sequencing procedure allowing homogenous delimitations of (pseudocryptic species. On the ground of this revised taxonomic framework, we finally provide an integrative taxonomy synthesizing geographic, ecological and morphological differentiations that can occur among the genuine (pseudocryptic species. Due to molecular, environmental or morphological data scarcities, many aspects of our proposed integrative taxonomy are not yet fully resolved. On the other hand, our study opens up the potential for a correct interpretation of environmental sequence datasets.

  16. SSU rDNA divergence in planktonic foraminifera: molecular taxonomy and biogeographic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Aurore; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Morard, Raphaël; Ujiié, Yurika; Escarguel, Gilles; de Vargas, Colomban; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Douady, Christophe J

    2014-01-01

    The use of planktonic foraminifera in paleoceanography requires taxonomic consistency and precise assessment of the species biogeography. Yet, ribosomal small subunit (SSUr) DNA analyses have revealed that most of the modern morpho-species of planktonic foraminifera are composed of a complex of several distinct genetic types that may correspond to cryptic or pseudo-cryptic species. These genetic types are usually delimitated using partial sequences located at the 3'end of the SSUrDNA, but typically based on empirical delimitation. Here, we first use patristic genetic distances calculated within and among genetic types of the most common morpho-species to show that intra-type and inter-type genetic distances within morpho-species may significantly overlap, suggesting that genetic types have been sometimes inconsistently defined. We further apply two quantitative and independent methods, ABGD (Automatic Barcode Gap Detection) and GMYC (General Mixed Yule Coalescent) to a dataset of published and newly obtained partial SSU rDNA for a more objective assessment of the species status of these genetic types. Results of these complementary approaches are highly congruent and lead to a molecular taxonomy that ranks 49 genetic types of planktonic foraminifera as genuine (pseudo)cryptic species. Our results advocate for a standardized sequencing procedure allowing homogenous delimitations of (pseudo)cryptic species. On the ground of this revised taxonomic framework, we finally provide an integrative taxonomy synthesizing geographic, ecological and morphological differentiations that can occur among the genuine (pseudo)cryptic species. Due to molecular, environmental or morphological data scarcities, many aspects of our proposed integrative taxonomy are not yet fully resolved. On the other hand, our study opens up the potential for a correct interpretation of environmental sequence datasets.

  17. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost W van Dam

    Full Text Available Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m, while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v/F(m, interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v/F(m and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  18. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joost W; Negri, Andrew P; Mueller, Jochen F; Altenburger, Rolf; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte) of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m)), while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures) were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v)/F(m) and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1)). The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA) described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  19. Variations in phytodetritus derived carbon uptake of the intertidal foraminifera Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovits, Julia; Bukenberger, Patrick; Enge, Annekatrin; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Heinz, Petra

    2016-04-01

    Phytodetritus represents a major component of particulate organic carbon in intertidal mudflats. Estuaries and tidal currents yield an extensive amount of these particles that display a substantial nutrient source for littoral food webs. For benthic foraminifera, a group of marine protists, phytodetritus serves as the main food source. Foraminifera are considered to play a significant role in marine carbon turnover processes and show seasonally very high population densities in intertidal sediments. Therefore, it is important to gather explicit data about the specific carbon uptake behavior of intertidal foraminiferal species. In this study, laboratory feeding experiments were carried out to observe phytodetrital carbon uptake of foraminiferal specimen collected in the German Wadden Sea. Artificially produced phytodetritus was labelled with 13C to follow carbon ingestion into foraminiferal cytoplasm over time at different simulated conditions. The experiments were performed with monocultures under exclusion of other meiofauna. Chlorophyte detritus (Dunaliella tertiolecta) was fed to the two common species Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica. Ammonia tepida showed a significantly higher affinity to this food source than H. germanica. Testing the effect of temperature revealed a significant decrease of carbon ingestion with increasing temperature in H. germanica. Observations focusing on A. tepida showed a rising phytodetrital carbon content in the biomass of juvenile individuals in contrast to adult foraminifera. In general, carbon uptake reaches saturation levels a few hours after food supply. Furthermore, A. tepida benefits from constant availability of fresh food rather than from a high amount of phytodetritus derived from a single food pulse. Our investigations showed that the foraminiferal impact on intertidal processing of phytodetrital carbon sources is species specific, temperature related and depends on developmental stage and input dynamics

  20. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Darling, Kate F.; Lecroq-Bennet, Béatrice; Winther Pedersen, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Pawlowski, Jan; Mulitza, Stefan; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA) in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of the entire pelagic community, including non-fossilized taxa, thus opening new avenues for paleoceanographic and paleoecological studies.

  1. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2011-11-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which resist transport by the construction of hydrodynamic convenient shapes, the calculation of hydrodynamic parameters of their test defines the energetic input they can resist and therefore the scenario where they can live in. Measuring the density, size and shape of every test, combined with experimental data, helps to define the best mathematical approach for the settling velocity and Reynolds number of every shell. The comparison between water motion at the sediment-water interface and the specimen-specific settling velocity helps to calculate the water depths at which, for a certain test type, transport, deposition and accumulation may occur. The results obtained for the investigated taxa show that the mathematical approach gives reliable results and can discriminate the hydrodynamic behaviour of different shapes. Furthermore, the study of the settling velocities, calculated for all the investigated taxa, shows that several species are capable to resist water motion and therefore they appear to be functionally adapted to the hydrodynamic condition of its specific environment. The same study is not recommended on species which resist water motion by adopting hiding or anchoring strategies to avoid the effect of water motion.

  2. Methane seep events of the southern Joetsu Knoll since middle Pleistocene based on benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, T.; Akiba, F.; Matsumoto, R.; Kakuwa, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Gas hydrates were collected at several sites off Joetsu which presented anomalous seismic structures. "Gas chimneys", major host structures for shallow gas hydrates, were recognized ROV off Joetsu in eastern margin of the Japan Sea, as were a number of active methane seeps. The assemblage components and carbon isotope of benthic foraminifera, which are ubiquitous in global marine settings, can indicate methane seep environments (Akimoto et al., 1994; Bhaumik and Gupta, 2007). Preliminary work by Oi et al. (2015) documented the obvious occurrences of methane related foraminifera, Rutherfordoides sp., in three core sediments recovered from Umitaka Spur, west Oki Trough and north Mogami Trough in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, and found them to comprise the early part of the MIS 2, calculated to 28-25ka. These records suggest that active methane seep events might occur at the same time during early MIS 2, but were confined within the last 100ka. In this study, we analyzed benthic foraminiferal fossils from drilling core J04RB (core length 122 m; one of the gas hydrate bearing sites at a southern part of the Joetsu Knoll) in order to document methane seep events during the last 500ka. Firstly, we estimated sedimentation ages from diatom biostratigraphy and identification of Aso-1 tephra. Based on diatom components, we recognized a boundary between NPD (Neogene North Pacific diatom Zonations) 12 and NPD11, estimated at 300 ka (MIS8/9; Yanagisawa and Akiba, 1998). The bottom age was estimated to almost 530-560 ka (around MIS14) especially from the alternation with warm and cold diatom zones (Akiba et al., 2014). Secondary, we could suppose the paleoenvironments from benthic foraminifera as below. 1. The rare benthic foraminifera during the cold stages (MIS8, MIS10, and MIS12) indicate anoxic bottom conditions characteristic of falling sea level, just as with MIS 2. 2. We recognized the continuous distributions of tiny methane related specimens of Rutherfordoides sp

  3. Microsensor studies of photosynthesis and respiration in the larger symbiont bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera, and Amphisorus hemprichii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Rink, S.; Kühl, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ratio at the shell surface of the foraminifera was ~2 in darkness and ~6 at saturating irradiance, pointing to a large internal supply of CO2 in the host-symbiont association and the use of bicarbonate as source for inorganic carbon. The carbonate chemistry in the vicinity of symbiont-bearing larger......The photosynthesis and respiration of the larger foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera and Amphisorus hemprichii was studied with O2, CO2, and pH microsensors, and with a miniature gas exchange chamber. The diffusive transport of O2 and CO2 through both perforate (A. lobifera) and imperforate (A...

  4. Miocene benthic foraminifera from Nosy Makamby and Amparafaka, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Razafimbelo, Rachel; Rahantarisoa, Lydia; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is well known for its fossil deposits and hosts one of the world's most important Upper Cretaceous terrestrial faunal sites (in the Mahajanga and Morondava Basins in the west and northwest of the island). Cenozoic marine fossils are also described from Madagascar, but these have received far less attention from the paleontological community, with most of this work dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Our study reports a new comprehensive microfossil assemblage from a Miocene sequence on the island of Nosy Makamby. After washing, sieving and sorting (∼30 kg), twenty-five genera of foraminifera were identified including Alveolina, Ammodiscus, Ammonia, Archaias, Bolivina, Borelis, Cassidulina, Cyclammina, Cycloforina, Dentalina, Elphidium, Hauerina, Lagena, Lepidocyclina, Nodosaria, Nonion, Nonionella, Peneroplis, Pyrgo, Quinqueloculina, Rhabdammina, Spirillina, Spirolina, Spiroloculina and Triloculina. Ostracods are found in association with the foraminifera, as well as many other macroinvertebrate fossils (including bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids) in addition to vertebrate fossils. Together, the assemblage indicates that during the late Miocene, Nosy Makamby was a tropical, near-shore environment, probably similar to that seen today. Furthermore, the existence of epiphytic foraminiferans (e.g., Elphidium) suggests that sea-grass beds were likely present.

  5. Diagenetic alteration of benthic foraminifera from a methane seep site on Vestnesa Ridge (NW Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrea; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Lepland, Aivo; Knies, Jochen

    2017-05-01

    Anomalously low δ13C values in foraminiferal calcite tests are due to diagenetic alteration in methane seep sites. Our study applies diagenetically altered fossil benthic foraminiferal tests as geochemical tracers in reconstructing natural past methane seepage episodes at Vestnesa Ridge offshore NW Svalbard. We combine examinations of the test wall microstructure, mineralogical and stable carbon isotope composition of foraminifera and co-occurring authigenic carbonate nodules. We present a classification of visual and mineralogical characteristics of the exterior and interior test wall microstructure of the benthic foraminiferal species Cassidulina neoteretis having experienced different degrees of diagenetic alteration during methane seepage. Carbonate nodules comprising high-Mg calcite cement with 13-15 mol% MgCO3 have δ13C values as low as -32.3‰, which is consistent with a methane-derived origin. The visual, mineralogical and stable isotope investigations of C. neoteretis indicate a variable degree of diagenetic alteration and show δ13C values between -0.6 and -16.9‰. The negative δ13C values in benthic foraminifera are largely caused by precipitation of isotopically light methane-derived authigenic carbonate as high-Mg-calcite coatings, whose relative contribution to the bulk foraminiferal carbonate is estimated to be up to 58 wt%. Another key finding is the identification of the first seepage episode concurrent with Heinrich Event 1 (HE 1), and a second seepage episode at the onset of the Bølling-Allerød Interstadial.

  6. Size-related stable isotope changes in planktic foraminifera across the "Latest Danian Event" (ODP Site 1262, Walvis Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lägel, Friederike; Jehle, Sofie; Deprez, Arne; Speijer, Robert; Bornemann, André

    2015-04-01

    The Latest Danian Event (LDE, ~62.15 Ma) represents a transient carbon cycle perturbation on a global scale similar to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, but of a much lower magnitude. This event took place during a time interval that is characterized by major changes in the calcareous plankton communities like the appearance and diversification of the fasciculithid nannolith group and the establishment of dinoflagellate photosymbiosis within the Praemurica/Morozovella planktic foraminifera. Size-related isotope changes (d13C, d18O) of planktic foraminifera might indicate changes in the depth habitat of foraminifera with ontogeny. An increase in d13C with size may point to the existence of (dinoflagellate) photosymbionts, and are often used to identify photosymbiosis in extinct foraminifera. Size fraction data on middle Paleocene taxa are generally rare and only poorly constrained concerning their stratigraphic age. Here we present detailed isotopic data from seven samples across the LDE of seven taxa including the asymbiotic Parasubbotina variospira and various symbiont-bearing taxa of the Praemurica, Morozovella and Igorina lineages that provide new insights into the life style of these taxa. Moreover, we intend to test if photosymbiotic activity changes occur during the LDE.

  7. Late cretaceous foraminifera, paleoenvironments, and paleoceanography of the rosario formation, San Antonio del Mar, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Y.; MacLeod, K.G.; Douglas, R.; Self-Trail, J.; Ward, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The 315 m of Rosario Formation exposed at the San Antonio del Mar (SADM) section (Baja California, Mexico) contains moderately-to-well preserved benthic and planktic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, and molluscs. Nannofossils suggest most of the SADM section was deposited within a narrow interval of the late Campanian (CC21-CC22), whereas foraminifera and molluscs suggest a younger maximum age (younger than the Globotruncana ventricosa Zone) and allow deposition over a longer interval of time. Planktic foraminifera at SADM represent common Tethyan taxa. They are largely restricted to the lower and middle portions of the section and comprise 0-???40% of foraminiferal assemblages. Stable isotopic analyses of Rugoglobigerina rugosa yield ??18OV-PDB values from -2.27%, to -2.82%, corresponding to salinity-corrected paleotemperature estimates of 26-30??C for the Late Cretaceous eastern Pacific. These estimates are as warm as modern tropical temperatures and are similar to tropical paleotemperature estimates from ??18O analyses of exceptionally preserved Maastrichtian samples; however, they are considerably warmer than most tropical Campanian-Maastrichtian estimates. Benthic foraminifera indicate outer shelf paleodepths with a slight increase in depth or decrease in benthic oxygen levels in the upper parts of the interval studied. The change in the benthic assemblage corresponds to an ???1??? positive shift in benthic ??O18, suggesting a relationship between benthic assemblages and an inferred increase in the local intensity of upwelling.

  8. Effects of radionuclides on the recent foraminifera from the clastic sediments of the Çanakkale Strait-Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal; Kam, Erol

    2017-07-01

    The radionuclides that cause radioactivity accumulate in the sediments as they descend to the seabed, similar to heavy metals. As radionuclides are present on the surface of the sediment or within the sediment, marine benthic foraminifera can be affected by the radioactive pollution. In this study, the habitat of benthic foraminifera was evaluated for radioactive pollution in the Çanakkale Strait, which constitutes the passage of the Marmara Sea and the Aegean Sea. In 2015, seven core samples and one drilling sample were taken from the shallow marine environment, which is the habitat of benthic foraminifera, in the Çanakkale Strait. Locations of the core samples were specifically selected to be pollution indicators in port areas. Gamma spectrometric analysis was used to determine the radioactivity properties of sediments. The radionuclide concentration activity values in the sediment samples obtained from the locations were Cs-137: pollution. Although the Ra-226 values obtained in the study areas remained within normal limits according to UNSCEAR values, the K-40 and Th-232 series values were observed to be high in almost all locations. The values of Cs-137 were found to be maximum 20 in Çanakkale Dere Port and they were parallel to the values in the other places. In the study, 13 genera and 20 species were identified from core and drilling samples. The number of foraminifera species and individuals obtained at locations with high pollution was very low compared to those in non-polluted zones.

  9. Seaweed fails to prevent ocean acidification impact on foraminifera along a shallow-water CO2 gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Laura R; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    Ocean acidification causes biodiversity loss, alters ecosystems, and may impact food security, as shells of small organisms dissolve easily in corrosive waters. There is a suggestion that photosynthetic organisms could mitigate ocean acidification on a local scale, through seagrass protection or seaweed cultivation, as net ecosystem organic production raises the saturation state of calcium carbonate making seawater less corrosive. Here, we used a natural gradient in calcium carbonate saturation, caused by shallow-water CO2 seeps in the Mediterranean Sea, to assess whether seaweed that is resistant to acidification (Padina pavonica) could prevent adverse effects of acidification on epiphytic foraminifera. We found a reduction in the number of species of foraminifera as calcium carbonate saturation state fell and that the assemblage shifted from one dominated by calcareous species at reference sites (pH ∼8.19) to one dominated by agglutinated foraminifera at elevated levels of CO2 (pH ∼7.71). It is expected that ocean acidification will result in changes in foraminiferal assemblage composition and agglutinated forms may become more prevalent. Although Padina did not prevent adverse effects of ocean acidification, high biomass stands of seagrass or seaweed farms might be more successful in protecting epiphytic foraminifera.

  10. Marine connections of Amazonia: Evidence from foraminifera and dinoflagellate cysts (early to middle Miocene, Colombia/Peru)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.; Ramos, M.I.F.; Lammertsma, E.I.; Antoine, P.-O; Hoorn, C.

    2015-01-01

    Species composition in the present-day Amazonian heartland has an imprint of past marine influence. The exact nature, timing and extent of this marine influence, however, are largely unresolved. Here we use calcareous tests of foraminifera and marine palynomorphs from Miocene sediments in

  11. Deep sea benthic foraminifera as a proxy of methane hydrates from IODP site 890B Cascadia Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Ministry of Petroleum, Noida (India). National Gas Hydrates Program; Gupta, A.K. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept of Geology and Geophysics

    2008-07-01

    The release of methane from marine reservoirs of methane hydrates into the atmosphere has been linked to climate change through variations in benthic foraminifera signatures. This paper investigated deep sea benthic foraminifera from 174 samples taken from the north Pacific Ocean near the Cascadia Margin. The aim of the study was to develop a better understanding of benthic foraminiferal distribution in the methane-rich environment of the Cascadia Margin. Benthic foraminifera are good indicators of paleoproductivity in areas where carbon fluxes are high. Factor and cluster analyses were used to identify 6 biofacies. Ecological data from recent deep sea benthic foraminifera were used to characterize the biofacies. A benthic faunal record was used to determine oxygenation, surface productivity, and organic food supplies. Results of the study indicated that benthic assemblages showed a major shift at 2 to 3 K yrs BP and 6 to 10.5 BP coincided with the increasing amplitude of interstadial cycles, in which methane fluxes may have played a significant role. It was concluded that the dissociation of gas hydrates and the release of methane into the atmosphere may have caused an increase in the population of highly reducing environmental species.. 55 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  12. Living deep-sea benthic foraminifera from the Cap de Creus Canyon (western Mediterranean): Faunal-geochemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras-Rosales, L.A.; Koho, K.A.; Duijnstee, I.A.P.; de Stigter, H.C.; García, R.; Koning, E.; Epping, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained benthic foraminifera were sampled along a depth transect from the Cap de Creus Canyon and the adjacent slope. Well-stained individuals were studied in the top 5 cm of sediment and the faunal abundances and assemblages were compared against pore-water geochemistry and biochemical

  13. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from mangrove swamps and channels of Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Odeh, Weaam A. S. Al; Lokier, Stephen W.; Paul, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Zonation of Recent mangrove environments can be defined using benthic foraminifera, however, little is known about foraminifera from mangrove environments of the Arabian Gulf. The objective of this study is to produce a detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological analysis to identify foraminiferal associations in several coastline environments (mangrove swamps and channels) located on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island (UAE). Detailed sediment sampling collection in mangal environments of Eastern Abu Dhabi was carried out to assess the distribution of living and dead benthic foraminifera in different sedimentary facies in the mangal and in the surrounding area comprising natural environments of the upper and lower intertidal area (mud flats and channels) and areas modified by anthropogenic activities (dredged channels). The fine-grain sediments collected near mangrove (Avicenna marina) roots presented a high abundance of living and dead foraminifera tests. The assemblages in these samples show very low diversity and are almost entirely constituted of small-sized opportunistic species belonging to the genera Ammonia and Elphidium. In particular: • Samples collected on the mud flat and in ponds at the margin of the channel show a foraminiferal assemblage characterised by abundant foraminifera belonging to the genera Ammonia, Elphidium, Triloculina, Quinqueloculina, Peneroplis and Spirolina. • Samples collected in the lower (wet) intertidal area close to Avicenna marina roots, presented a low-diversity assemblage mostly comprising opportunistic foraminifera of the genera Ammonia and Elphidium along with rare miliolidae. • Samples from the upper intertidal area (dry) close to Avicenna marina roots, produced an assemblage exclusively composed of small-sized opportunistic Ammonia and Elphidium, together with abundant specimens belonging to the genera Trochammina. Throchammina specimens have not been previously recorded from Recent sedimentary samples of

  14. Intertidal foraminifera (Protista) and carbon-nitrogen cycling: combined effects of temperature and diet quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovits, Julia; Enge, Annekatrin Julie; Oberrauch, Max; Watzka, Margarete; Wanek, Wolfgang; Heinz, Petra

    2017-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera (eukaryotic protists) are to a large extent acting as detrivores, feeding on microalgal detritus. Phytodetritus constitutes a main component of the intertidal carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pool, thus making foraminifera important players in intertidal nutrient fluxes. These fluxes are strongly dependent on interactions between biotic and abiotic environmental factors, as e.g. the energetic value or the quality of phytodetritus that depends on environmental nutrient availability. Increased inorganic C concentrations in coastal water bodies (e.g. due to increased atmospheric CO2) can have a negative effect on the phytodetrital quality by increasing microalgal C:N ratios. Simultanous warming of the environment can cause increased metabolic rates of exposed heterotrophic organisms, like foraminifera. The combination of lower food quality and increased metabolic rates is supposed to cause cascading effects on organismic C cycling, potentially diminishing the role of detrivorous food as a C sink in marine food webs by increased discharge of excess C. In this study, the above described scenario was tested in laboratory feeding experiments on a common and abundant intertidal foraminiferal species (Haynesina germanica, collected in the German Wadden Sea). Two batches of artificially produced and dual isotope labeled (13C and 15N) chlorophyte detritus (1.5 gDW m-2) with different C:N ratios (5.5 and 7.6) and one batch of isotopically labelled diatom detritus (C:N 5.6) were fed under controlled conditions at three different temperatures. Results were extrapolated to the in situ abundance of live H. germanica individuals in the sampling area (sediment core data), to estimate the magnitude of the effect on an areal basis within the natural habitat. The study revealed significant, temperature induced variations in the carbon and nitrogen processing of H. germanica. The food source with an increased C:N ratio doubled the release of carbon from the H. germanica

  15. Microfacies analysis of foraminifera rich sedimentary rocks from the Desert Plateau, central Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnitschar, C.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Microfacies analysis on some samples from the Thebes Group have been carried on by means of thin sections. The study area is included in the Libyan Desert Plateau (central Egypt) at following coordinates N27° 36'30.58" E29° 44'58.34", near the biggest dune of Egypt, the Ghard Abu Muharik. Because of the round shape of the rocks and the desert patina on the surface they could easily be classified as the so called "Melonstones", which are located more southwards and mainly composed by stromatolites. On the contrary, the investigated samples show a completely different fauna and therefore have been separated from the "Melonstones". Even if shape and size are very similar and the desert patina covers all surfaces the same way the differences are impressive. To investigate the samples, two thin-sections have been prepared and analyzed at the microscope. The observed fauna is composed by: agglutinated benthic foraminifera (e.g., Dictyoconus egypticus), complex larger miliolids (e.g., Pseudolacazina cf. danatae, Fabularia sp.), alveolinids (Alveolina vredenburgi), green algae (Dasycladaceae), echinoids and corals. Because of the presence of symbionts bearing larger benthic foraminifera, which need light to feed photosymbionts, the rock was formed in a shallow water environment. With the abundant rock-building benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae the limestone shows a tendency to the packstone/wackestone facies. Based on the presence of Alveolina vredenburgi, the age of the samples can be estimate as lowermost Eocene belonging to the shallow benthic zone 5 (sensu Serra-Kiel et al., 1998). According the obtained data on stratigraphy and palaeoecology, a partial palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is possible for the Libyan Desert Plateau where outcrops are largely missing. Because of the round shape of the samples and the patina which covers them all around it can be assumed that they have been transported from longer distance. According to the geological map of the

  16. Deep-sea Benthic Foraminifera in the SE Atlantic across Eocene Hyperthermal Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.

    2016-12-01

    Short-term episodes of global warming (hyperthermal events) were superimposed on the warming trend into the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO). The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 56 Ma) was the most extreme, followed by Eocene Thermal Maximum-2 and -3 (ETM2: 1.8 myr, ETM3: 3.1 myr post-PETM). Hyperthermals are characterized by negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs, emission of isotopically light carbon in the ocean-atmosphere), negative oxygen isotope excursions (global warming) and carbonate dissolution (ocean acidification). Sensitivity of biota to environmental changes due to carbon emissions can be evaluated by studying their response to hyperthermals of different magnitude. Deep-sea benthic foraminiferal records across PETM, ETM2 and -3 are available for Site 1262 (3600 m) and 1263 (1500m) on SE Atlantic Walvis Ridge. Benthic foraminifera (carbonate and agglutinated) are absent in the carbonate-free PETM clay-layer (Site 1262: 65 kyr; Site1263: 10 kyr). Deep-sea benthic foraminifera suffered extinction and diversity loss at the start of the PETM, as they did globally, with diversity recovering only partially. Stable isotope records show a larger PETM-CIE and amount of warming at Site 1263 than global average (McCarren et al., 2008), and warming was more pronounced at Site 1263 than at 1262 during ETM2 (Jennions et al., 2015) and ETM3 (Roehl et al., 2005). During ETM2 and -3, carbonate dissolution affected the sites, both remaining between CCD and lysocline. Assemblages were more severely affected (larger drop in benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, BFAR) at the shallower site, opposite to expected if caused mainly by carbonate corrosivity. The large decrease in BFAR indicates a decline in food arrival at the sea floor, more pronounced at the shallower site, as supported by changes in relative and absolute abundance of species, and more pronounced at ETM2 than at ETM3. Greater warming at intermediate depths could have been caused by ocean

  17. Earliest record of the invasive Foraminifera Trochammina hadai in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, Trochammina hadai, a benthic Foraminifera prevalent in Japanese estuaries, was found in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Subsequent field investigations determined that the species was also present in nearly all of the major ports and estuaries along the western United States. Because of its widespread colonization, it is of interest to determine when T. hadai first appeared as an invasive in the coastal regions of the North Pacific. In San Francisco Bay, the species was not found in 404 surface samples collected between 1930 and 1981. In 1983, however, a grab sediment sample from one of four sites in the southern portion of the bay contained T. hadai. This site was the most northern of the four and contained 12 specimens of the invasive, comprising 1.5% of the assemblage. This is the earliest appearance on record of T. hadai in San Francisco Bay.

  18. Sea surface salinity reconstruction as seen with foraminifera shells: Methods and cases studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaizé B.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of past salinities in surface oceans (SSS can be done by measuring the isotopic composition of foraminifera shells found in the deep sea sediments. The proportion of heavy oxygen isotopes (18O in the calcite of these shells depend on the temperature and the isotopic oxygen composition of the surrounded waters (δ18 Osw, this latter parameter depending on the water salinity. Mainly two equations allows to reconstructed past SSS, one estimating past temperature variations and the other one changes in the δ18 Osw through time. Uncertainties linked with these calculation can be important, and therefore quantitative reconstructions need to be taken with cautions. For some specific cases, uncertainties on temperature and δ18 Osw estimations can be reduced. For such cases, salinity reconstructions showing amplitude changes higher than 1 per mil can be considered as significative.

  19. Rapid deterioration of sediment surface habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, as indicated by benthic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Elizabeth A; Martin, Ruth A; Martin, David E; Apple, Jude

    2015-08-15

    Foraminiferal assemblages in sediment grab samples were utilized to evaluate the impacts of anthropogenic activities on benthic habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, U.S.A. Seventy-three samples taken in 1987, 1997, 2006 and 2010 yielded 35 species of foraminifera from 28 genera. Assemblage composition and diversity data indicate a marked deterioration between 1987 and 2010, contrary to the published Chemical Index, but analogous to the situation with macrobiota. Correlation of diversity with chemical pollutants and metals did not identify any significant correlations, however, an unrelated but highly relevant study of bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH in Bellingham Bay suggests eutrophication with accompanying hypoxia and acidification may be part of the cause. Thus, the metrics of contamination alone do not adequately characterize habitat viability, and benthic foraminiferal assemblages provide insight into the health of coastal ecosystems. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The influence of seawater carbonate ion concentration [CO32-] on the stable carbon isotope composition of the planktic foraminifera species Globorotalia inflata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilke, I; Bickert, T.; Peeters, F.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We sampled the upper water column for living planktic foraminifera along the SW-African continental margin. The species Globorotalia inflata strongly dominates the foraminiferal assemblages with an overall relative abundance of 70-90%. The shell δ

  1. The effect of heavy metal pollution on foraminifera in the Western Marmara Sea (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heavy metals on foraminiferal assemblages in Holocene sediments in the western Marmara Sea. Accordingly, four drilling samples, one in Bandırma (Balıkesir/Turkey), two in Erdek Bay (Erdek-Bandırma/Turkey) and one in Tekirdağ (Turkey). Samples of cores taken from 43 different locations in the western Marmara Sea also have been examined. Changes in heavy metal concentrations were determined (spatially) in the vertical direction by means of drilling samples in the vertical direction for geochronology and in the horizontal direction by the areal distribution of the core samples, and foraminiferal assemblages were identified. In order to summarize the results of geochemical analyses, an average value defined as Pollution Index (PI) was used for the first time in this study. In this method, the pollution index value is obtained by dividing the sum of average value ratios of heavy metal measurement values by the number of measurements. The obtained index value was correlated separately with the numbers of foraminifer individuals and species. It was observed that the number of individuals and species decreased where the heavy metal measured values (MV) were higher than the pollution index and increased where the heavy metal values were lower than the pollution index. It was also observed that foraminifera were completely absent in some locations where PI was less than MV. Morphological changes were observed in Elphidium crispum, Massilina secans, and Ammonia compacta foraminifer species in the core samples taken in areas where industrial wastes are discharged into the southern parts of the Marmara Sea. No foraminifer species were observed at some locations where the heavy metal density was high (between Misakça-Denizkent, and Erdek-Balikesir). The pollution index (PI) value measured in this area was higher than the critical value, indicating that heavy metal concentrations affect the habitats of foraminifera.

  2. Surviving anoxia in marine sediments: The metabolic response of ubiquitous benthic foraminifera (Ammonia tepida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Geslin, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    High input of organic carbon and/or slowly renewing bottom waters frequently create periods with low dissolved oxygen concentrations on continental shelves and in coastal areas; such events can have strong impacts on benthic ecosystems. Among the meiofauna living in these environments, benthic foraminifera are often the most tolerant to low oxygen levels. Indeed, some species are able to survive complete anoxia for weeks to months. One known mechanism for this, observed in several species, is denitrification. For other species, a state of highly reduced metabolism, essentially a state of dormancy, has been proposed but never demonstrated. Here, we combined a 4 weeks feeding experiment, using 13C-enriched diatom biofilm, with correlated TEM and NanoSIMS imaging, plus bulk analysis of concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition of total organic matter and individual fatty acids, to study metabolic differences in the intertidal species Ammonia tepida exposed to oxic and anoxic conditions. Strongly contrasting cellular-level dynamics of ingestion and transfer of the ingested biofilm components were observed between the two conditions. Under oxic conditions, within a few days, intact diatoms were ingested, degraded, and their components assimilated, in part for biosynthesis of different cellular components: 13C-labeled lipid droplets formed after a few days and were subsequently lost (partially) through respiration. In contrast, in anoxia, fewer diatoms were initially ingested and these were not assimilated or metabolized further, but remained visible within the foraminiferal cytoplasm even after 4 weeks. Under oxic conditions, compound specific 13C analyses showed substantial de novo synthesis by the foraminifera of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as 20:4(n-6). Very limited PUFA synthesis was observed under anoxia. Together, our results show that anoxia induced a greatly reduced rate of heterotrophic metabolism in Ammonia tepida on a time

  3. Can abundance of protists be inferred from sequence data: a case study of foraminifera.

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    Alexandra A-T Weber

    Full Text Available Protists are key players in microbial communities, yet our understanding of their role in ecosystem functioning is seriously impeded by difficulties in identification of protistan species and their quantification. Current microscopy-based methods used for determining the abundance of protists are tedious and often show a low taxonomic resolution. Recent development of next-generation sequencing technologies offered a very powerful tool for studying the richness of protistan communities. Still, the relationship between abundance of species and number of sequences remains subjected to various technical and biological biases. Here, we test the impact of some of these biological biases on sequence abundance of SSU rRNA gene in foraminifera. First, we quantified the rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level of three species of foraminifera by qPCR. Then, we prepared five mock communities with these species, two in equal proportions and three with one species ten times more abundant. The libraries of rDNA and cDNA of the mock communities were constructed, Sanger sequenced and the sequence abundance was calculated. The initial species proportions were compared to the raw sequence proportions as well as to the sequence abundance normalized by rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level per species. Our results showed that without normalization, all sequence data differed significantly from the initial proportions. After normalization, the congruence between the number of sequences and number of specimens was much better. We conclude that without normalization, species abundance determination based on sequence data was not possible because of the effect of biological biases. Nevertheless, by taking into account the variation of rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level we were able to infer species abundance, suggesting that our approach can be successful in controlled conditions.

  4. Arrival and expansion of the invasive foraminifera Trochammina hadai Uchio in Padilla Bay, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Mary; Grossman, Eric E.; Takesue, Renee K.; Penttila, Dan; Walsh, John P.; Corbett, Reide

    2012-01-01

    Trochammina hadai Uchio, a benthic foraminifera native to Japanese estuaries, was first identified as an invasive in 1995 in San Francisco Bay and later in 16 other west coast estuaries. To investigate the timing of the arrival and expansion of this invasive species in Padilla Bay, Washington, we analyzed the distribution of foraminifera in two surface samples collected in 1971, in nine surface samples collected by Scott in 1972–1973, as well as in two cores (Padilla Flats 3 and Padilla V1/V2) obtained in 2004. Trochanimina hadai, originally identified as the native Trochammina pacifica Cushman in several early foraminiferal studies, dominates the assemblage of most of the surface samples. In the Padilla V1/V2 and Padilla Flats 3 cores, the species' abundance follows a pattern of absence, first appearance, rapid expansion commonly seen shortly after the arrival of a successful biological invasion, setback, and second expansion. Using Q-mode cluster analysis, pre-expansion and expansion assemblages were identified. Pb-210 dating of these cores proved unsuccessful. However, based on T. hadai's first appearance occurring stratigraphically well above sedimentological changes in the cores that reflect deposition of sediments in the bay due to previous diversions of the Skagit River, and its dominance in the early 1970s surface samples, we conclude that the species arrived in Padilla Bay somewhere between the late 1800s and 1971. Trochammina hadai may have been introduced into the bay in the 1930s when oyster culturing began there or, at a minimum, ten years prior to its appearance in San Francisco Bay.

  5. Reconstructing Eastern Tropical Pacific productivity across Marine Isotope Stage 3 using foraminifera faunal counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourty, M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Glaubke, R.; Hertzberg, J. E.; Marcantonio, F.; Bianchi, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation is one of Earth's largest sources of interannual climate variability that has many global environmental impacts. Furthermore, the mean state of the tropical Pacific has the potential to change in the near future due to anthropogenic warming of the planet. In order to provide an analogue for future climate states, there is a critical need to understand how the tropical Pacific evolved across abrupt warming events in Earth's recent past. While most studies have focused on the evolution of ENSO across Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 1 and 2, the dynamics of the tropical Pacific across the abrupt climate events of MIS 3 are still highly contentious. To develop a record of past changes in upwelling intensity in the EEP, a parameter critically linked to the tropical Pacific mean state, we quantify the faunal abundances of 6 planktonic foraminifera species from piston core MV1014-02-17JC (00° 10.83'S, 85° 52.00'W; 2846 m depth) on the Carnegie Ridge from 35 - 59 kyr. The relative abundance of Globigerina bulloides, a species associated with upwelling conditions, and 5 other planktonic foraminifera suggest an increase in water column productivity during Heinrich Event 4 and across several Dansgaard-Oeschger stadial intervals. Initial results suggest that stadials in the North Atlantic are associated with more permanent La Niña-like conditions in the EEP. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest that depth intervals in our core between 43.7 - 55.7 kyr were impacted by intense dissolution due to changes in bottom water chemistry, impacting the fidelity of our faunal count records across this interval. Future work includes extending our faunal record back to 100 kyr to include Heinrich Events 6 - 8.

  6. Symbiosis and microbiome flexibility in calcifying benthic foraminifera of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Martina; Ainsworth, Tracy; Roberts, T Edward; Pandolfi, John M; Leggat, William

    2017-03-23

    Symbiosis is a phenomenon that allows organisms to colonise a wide range of environments and occupy a variety of ecological niches in marine environments. Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are crucial marine calcifiers that rely on photo-endosymbionts for growth and calcification, yet the influence of environmental conditions in shaping their interactions with prokaryotic and eukaryotic associates is poorly known. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to identify eukaryotic photosynthesizing and prokaryotic microbes associated with the common LBF Amphistegina lobifera across a physio-chemical gradient on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We collected samples from three reef sites located in the inner-, mid- and outer-shelf regions of the northern section of the GBR. Results showed the consistent presence of Bacillaryophyta as the main eukaryotic taxa associated with A. lobifera across all reef sites analysed; however, the abundance and the diversity of prokaryotic organisms varied among reef sites. Inner-shelf specimens showed the highest diversity of prokaryote associates, with a total of 231 genotypes in their core microbiome. A total of 30 taxa were identified in the core microbiome across all reef sites. Within these taxa, Proteobacteria was the most abundant bacteria present. The presence of groups such as Actinobacteria was significantly correlated with inner-shelf populations, whereas the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was associated with A. lobifera collected from mid- and outer-shelf reef sites. We found that benthic foraminifera form stable and persistent symbiosis with eukaryotic partners, but flexible and site-specific associations with prokaryotic microbes that likely influence the ecological success of these crucial calcifying organisms on the GBR.

  7. Flux and seasonality of planktonic foraminifera in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, R.; Chen, M.; Wang, D.; Chen, Z.; Yan, W.

    2013-12-01

    The modern correlation between planktonic foraminiferal community dynamics and environmental conditions may provide a basis for establishing paleoclimatic proxies. We studied planktic foraminiferal shell fluxes and assemblages in samples collected in a time-series sediment trap deployments in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea (SCS), from June 2009 to August 2011. The general flux shows a unimodal pattern, with high planktonic foraminiferal flux (900-1000 tests m-2 day-1) occurs during the period from late September/October to February, and low flux (200-300 tests m-2 day-1)during the rest period of the year. This flux pattern is contrast to the bimodal pattern of planktonic foraminiferal flux obtained from the central and southern SCS. Ten species, Globigeroides sacculifer, Globigerinoides ruber, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina calida, Globigerinella aequilateralis, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinita glutinata, Orbulina univera and Globorotalia menardii, contributed about 96% of the total flux in each year. Among them, the monsoonal driven seasonality is most prominent for P. obliquiloculata, N. dutertrei and G. bulloides, with more than 70% of their species-specific total fluxes (93% for G. bulloides) occur from late September/October to February. This suggests G. bulloides can be used as a winter proxy-species. On the contrary, Globigeroides conglobatus, mostly appeared during June to August. G. sacculifer, G. ruber and G. aequilateralis generally follow the trend of the total flux of planktonic foraminifer, with about 50-60% of their total fluxes occur from late September/October to February. We also compared the size distribution of the dominant foraminiferal species in the > 250 micrometer fraction and 250-154 micrometer fraction, we found that most shells of G. aequilateralis, O. univera and G. menardii, and G. conglobatus mainly occur in the >250 micrometer fraction, and about 40% of G. sacculifer, 35% of P

  8. Variability of the planktonic foraminifera community across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, Fuente Caldera Section, Baetic Ranges (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Lisarri, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in a massive extinction event that took place about 33.7 million years ago, the current high resolution study analyzes qualitatively and quantitatively the community structure of the planktonic foraminifera that were preserved in the hemipelagic sediments of the Tethys Sea. The sampled section of the Fuente Caldera column, located in the Baetic mountain ranges, spans a register of 396,551.7 years. Based in the identification of 27 species, that belong to 13 genera and 2 families of foraminifera, there have been found three biozones of Gonzalvo Zonation (Gonzalvo, 2002) in the studied stratigraphic interval: Turborotalia cocoaensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii Biozones (Rupelian), and Paragloborotalia increbescens (Priabonian). The planktonic foraminifera associations variability patterns are defined by paleoecologic indexes (diversity index, high and low latitude species index and planktonic and benthic foraminifera index), by geochemical proxies: δ18O and δ13C and by 'Q' Mode Factor Analysis. They prove that the deposition environment is outer platform and also, they suggest that the studied area in the Tethys Sea underwent many thermal pulses, during which some species extinct or appear. In the first extinction event the species Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis became extinct. In the second one, Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Cribrohantkenina lazzarii and Pseudohastigerina micra became extinct while a succession occured; Globigerina officinalis, Globoturborotalita anguliofficinalis and Tenuitellinata angustiumbilicata appeared. The cooling event that finished in the Lower Oligocene was the biggest of these pulses, which was extremely abrupt and corresponds to the Oi-1 event that was described by Miller (Miller, 1991). All this evidences that the planktonic foraminifera extinction in the Upper Eocene was a gradual and fast event, what is supported by the Factor Analysis application. Key

  9. Selandian-Thanetian larger foraminifera from the lower Jafnayn Formation in the Sayq area (eastern Oman Mountains)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra-Kiel, J.; Vicedo, V.; Razin, P.; Grelaud, C.

    2016-01-01

    The larger foraminifera of the lower part of the Jafnayn Formation outcropping in the Wadi Sayq, in the Paleocene series of the eastern Oman Mountains, have been studied and described in detail. The analysis have allowed us to develop a detailed systematic description of each taxa, constraining their biostratigraphic distribution and defining the associated foraminifera assemblages. The taxonomic study has permitted us to identify each morphotype precisely and describe three new taxa, namely, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. and Globoreticulinidae new family. The first assemblage is characterized by the presence of Coskinon sp., Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Anatoliella ozalpiensis Sirel, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. SerraKiel and Vicedo, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Mandanella cf. flabelliformis Rahaghi, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Dictyokathina simplex Smout and Miscellanites globularis (Rahaghi). The second assemblage is constituted by the forms Pseudofallotella persica (Hottinger and Drobne), Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Keramosphera? cf. iranica Rahaghi, Lockhartia haimei (Davies), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Sakesaria trichilata Sander, Kathina delseota Smout, Elazigina harabekayisensis Sirel, Daviesina khatiyahi Smout, and Miscellanea juliettae Leppig. The first assemblage can be considered to belong to the Shallow Bentic Zone SBZ2 (early Selandian age), and the second assemblage to the SBZ3 (late Selandian-early Thanetian age).This paper shows, for the first time in the Middle East area, a correlation between the Selandian larger foraminifera and planktonic foraminifera biozones. (Author)

  10. The morphogroups of small agglutinated foraminifera from the Devonian carbonate complex of the Prague Synform, (Barrandian area, Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holcová, K.; Slavík, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 386, č. 5 (2013), s. 210-214 ISSN 0031-0182 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131201 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Barrandian area * Early Devonian * foraminifera * morphogroups Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.752, year: 2013

  11. GLOMOMIDIELLA N. GEN. (FORAMINIFERA, MILIOLATA, NEODISCIDAE: A NEW GENUS FROM THE LATE GUADALUPIAN-LOPINGIAN OF HYDRA ISLAND (GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL VACHARD

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A new genus of Foraminifera (Miliolata, Cornuspiroidea, Neodiscidae is erected from the late Guadalupian (Capitanian = Midian to Lopingian sedimentary succession of the island of Hydra (Greece. It represents an important phylogenetic form, probably at the origin of several genera (or subfamilies of the authors that became relatively widespread during the Lopingian (Late Permian. Glomomidiella n. gen. is characterized by an entirely glomospiral coiling and rudimentary pseudoseptation. 

  12. Selandian-Thanetian larger foraminifera from the lower Jafnayn Formation in the Sayq area (eastern Oman Mountains)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Kiel, J.; Vicedo, V.; Razin, P.; Grelaud, C.

    2016-07-01

    The larger foraminifera of the lower part of the Jafnayn Formation outcropping in the Wadi Sayq, in the Paleocene series of the eastern Oman Mountains, have been studied and described in detail. The analysis have allowed us to develop a detailed systematic description of each taxa, constraining their biostratigraphic distribution and defining the associated foraminifera assemblages. The taxonomic study has permitted us to identify each morphotype precisely and describe three new taxa, namely, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. and Globoreticulinidae new family. The first assemblage is characterized by the presence of Coskinon sp., Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Anatoliella ozalpiensis Sirel, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. SerraKiel and Vicedo, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Mandanella cf. flabelliformis Rahaghi, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Dictyokathina simplex Smout and Miscellanites globularis (Rahaghi). The second assemblage is constituted by the forms Pseudofallotella persica (Hottinger and Drobne), Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Keramosphera? cf. iranica Rahaghi, Lockhartia haimei (Davies), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Sakesaria trichilata Sander, Kathina delseota Smout, Elazigina harabekayisensis Sirel, Daviesina khatiyahi Smout, and Miscellanea juliettae Leppig. The first assemblage can be considered to belong to the Shallow Bentic Zone SBZ2 (early Selandian age), and the second assemblage to the SBZ3 (late Selandian-early Thanetian age).This paper shows, for the first time in the Middle East area, a correlation between the Selandian larger foraminifera and planktonic foraminifera biozones. (Author)

  13. Biocenoses of benthic foraminifera of the Aveiro Continental Shelf (Portugal: influence of the upwelling events and other shelf processes

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    Maria Virgínia Alves Martins

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to compare the dimensions and composition of benthic foraminiferal biocenoses (living specimens during two summer sampling events. Forty-four sediment samples were collected on the Aveiro Continental Shelf (Center of Portugal (latitude of 40º30'N-40º50'N, longitude of 8º46'W-9º20'W for granulometry, total organic matter (TOM and living foraminiferal analyses. The sediment samples were collected during summers of 1994 and 1995, on stations located along transects (east-west direction and between the bathymetries of 10-200 m. During the sampling campaigns, measurements of salinity, temperature and density data were recorded in the water column. The results showed that the living assemblages were mainly found in stations located between 20-80 m depth. The abundance of living foraminifera was generally reduced at depths <20 m in the so-called “coastal deposits”, where the sediments are frequently remobilized and transported by the littoral drift. Living benthic foraminiferal densities were also reduced in stations at 80-200 m depth, despite the high sedimentary TOM contents. Results obtained in this work indicate that, in this marine setting, the most determinant factors for the dimension and composition of living foraminifera are not the sediments’ granulometry and organic matter content. In fact, the coastal dynamics, sediment stability, availability of quality food, among other factors, such as the bottom salinity oscillations and their combination, should better explain the abundance of living foraminifera and the biocenoses composition.

  14. Benthic Foraminifera and Bacterial Activity as a Proxy for Environmental Characterization in Potengi Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

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    Frederico S. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify possible zonation patterns and assess the environmental impact on the Potengi River Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte State, through the distribution of benthic foraminifera associated to bacterial activity and abiotic parameters. Six sediment samples were collected from locations that presented clear signs of pollution. The environment was predominantly anaerobic and fermentation occurred at all sites. Forty-two species of foraminifera were identified. The dominant species were Ammonia tepida and Arenoparrella mexicana, which are known to be opportunistic, and able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. CCA analyses showed that salinity and organic matter, followed by bacterial carbon, were more strongly linked to organism distribution in the Potengi River Estuary. Dissolved oxygen concentration, temperature and total organic matter were higher at the estuary mouth than at the other sites, creating favorable conditions for foraminiferal growth and allowing the faunistic succession on the upper estuary. As foraminifera assemblages when associated to environmental parameters can be used as efficient proxies for environmental diagnosis, these results suggest that the Potengi Estuary is under great stress from the surrounding urban development.

  15. Late Neogene foraminifera from the northern Namibian continental shelf and the transition to the Benguela Upwelling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Eugene W.; Compton, John S.; Frenzel, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Middle Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene foraminifera provide insights into the palaeoenvironment on the northern Namibian continental shelf located at the far northern end of the present-day Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). Biostratigraphy and Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy (SIS) of the recovered basal olive-green mud unit indicate an age of 16 to 14 Ma. A sharp, erosional contact separates the basal mud from the overlying Plio-Pleistocene gravelly pelletal phosphorite sands. Grain size data, P/B ratios and benthic diversity indices indicate a change between the middle Miocene and overlying Plio-Pleistocene palaeoenvironments linked to the timing and conditions associated with the initiation of the BUS. The different lithological units and microfossil assemblages in the olive-green mud unit and the overlying pelletal phosphorite units support the late Miocene initiation of the BUS and the northwards migration of the Angola-Benguela Front. Planktic foraminifera indicate a shift from warmer surface water conditions to cooler conditions during the initiation of the BUS. Benthic palaeobathymetric ranges and P/B ratios are consistent with outer shelf water depths suggesting a deeper palaeoenvironment during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) than today. Benthic foraminifera in the middle Miocene are dominated by large (>1 mm) taxa and adapted to oligotrophic environments before the initiation of the BUS. The benthic assemblage composition indicates that bottom water conditions changed to eutrophic conditions during the Plio-Pleistocene under intensified upwelling conditions.

  16. Marine ecology conditions at Weda Bay, North Maluku based on statistical analysis on distribution of recent foraminifera

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    Kurniasih Anis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of foraminifera in geology,usually being used to find the age of rocks/ sediments and depositional environment. In this study, recent foraminifera was used not only to determinethe sedimentary environment,but also to estimate the ecological condition of the water through a statistical approach.Analysis was performed quantitatively in 10 surface seabed sediment samples in Weda Bay North Maluku. The analysis includes dominance (Sympson Index, diversity and evenness (Shannon Index, and the ratio of planktonic -benthic. The results were shown in the plotting diagram of M-R-T (Miliolid-Rotalid-Textularid to determine the depositional environment. Quantitative analysis was performed using Past software (paleontological version Statistic 1:29.The analysis result showed there was no domination of certain taxon with a moderate degree of evenness and stable communities and considerably a moderate diversity. The results of this analysis indicated that research area had a stable water conditions with the optimum level of carbonate content, oxygen supply, salinity, and temperature. The ratio of planktonic and benthic indicate the relative depth, which was deeper the water increased the percentage of planktonic foraminifera. Based on M-R-T diagram showed the distribution of sediment deposited on exposed carbonate (carbonate platform environment with normal saline.

  17. Influence of local habitat on the physiological responses of large benthic foraminifera to temperature and nutrient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Martina; Uthicke, Sven; Pandolfi, John M

    2016-02-23

    Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are important for reef sediment formation, but sensitive to elevated temperature and nutrients. However, it is possible that conspecific foraminifera living in different reef sites present divergent response to environmental shifts. We investigated how populations of Amphistegina lobifera from reef sites located along a temperature and nutrient gradient of the northern Great Barrier Reef respond and acclimate to elevated temperature and nitrate under lab-controlled conditions. Generalized linear mixed models showed that interaction between reef sites and temperature or nitrate conditions had a significant effect on survivorship, bleaching frequency and growth rates of A. lobifera. Further physiological analyses of antioxidant capacity and Ca-ATPase activity showed that populations collected from the inner-shelf sites (highest nutrient levels, largest temperature variation) were consistently able to acclimate to both parameters after 30 days. In contrast, foraminifera collected from the reef sites located in the mid- and outer-shelfs were significantly more sensitive to elevated temperatures and nitrate. Our results highlight the importance of local habitat in shaping the tolerance of LBF to changing environmental conditions; populations that live in stable environments are more sensitive to elevated temperature and nitrate, even within their fundamental tolerance range, than those that experience fluctuating conditions.

  18. An endemic post-CTB Pseudorhapydionina (foraminifera) from the Pyrenean palaeobioprovince

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, Lorenzo; Caus, Esmeralda

    2015-04-01

    The genus Pseudorhapydionina and its allies are porcelaneous ranging from cylindrical to fan-shaped larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), with planispiral-involute chamber arrangement becoming uncoiled or flabelliform-to-cyclical in adult stages. The apertural face has pierced by multiple cribate openings. The marginal chamber lumen is partially subdivided by subepidermal plates, while the central area might or might not present pillars. They characterise latest Albian?-Cenomanian (Middle Cretaceous Global Community Maturation Cycle) shallow-water carbonate deposits from Mexico (Caribbean LBF palaeobioprovince) to the Iberian Peninsula, Italy, Greece, Middle East and North of Africa (western, central and eastern Tethyan LBF palaeobioprovinces, respectively), but they have never been found in the Pyrenean palaeobioprovince. It is widely accepted that pseudorhapydioninids and other groups of larger benthic foraminifera, such as alveolinids, with an extreme or moderate K-strategy of life disappear near the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB), when a major extinction took place in both shallow and deep marine realms. However, it seems that some Cenomanian genera, such as Cyclolina, Cyclopsinella, Dicyclina, Cuneolina, and Rotorbinella, escaped from the extinction during the CTB oceanic anoxic event (OAE2 or Bonarelli Event), but more detailed studies are needed to confirm if taxa at both sides of the boundary are actually related. New studies in the South-central Pyrenees have shown the occurrence of Pseudorhapydionina morphotypes in the shallow-water deposits of the uppermost part of the La Cova limestone, which age constrained by strontium isotope stratigraphy (SIS) is lower Santonian (Late Cretaceous GCMC). These pseudorhapydioninid morphotypes co-occur in the levels containing Martiguesia cyclamminiformis, Ramirezella montsechiensis, Lacazina pyrenaica, Pseudolacazina loeblichii, Palandroxina taxyae, Hellenalveolina tappanae, Iberorotalia reicheli, Calcarinella schaubi

  19. The long way of planktonic Foraminifera from biostratigraphy to paleoceanography (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premoli Silva, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    The mid of the last century was a time of flourishing studies concerning the importance of planktonic foraminifera in precisely dating and correlating sedimentary successions after the publication of the first biostratigraphic schemes provided by the Suisse Group (i.e. Kugler, Bolli, Broennimann) from the Caribbean region and former Southern USSR (Subbotina). Soon after Bolli's Trinidad scheme was widespread, planktonic foraminiferal distribution from Upper Cretaceous to Miocene was investigated intensively for dating the Neogene stratotypes, whose identifications were mainly based on poorly age-diagnostic, facies-controlled macrofossils, and for calibrating Paleogene larger foraminiferal distributions. Since these early works planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy was continously ameliorated, extended in time from Early Cretaceous to Recent by several authors and from different settings and domains, reaching progressively the current higher resolution, now calibrated to calcareous nannofossil distributions. To be mentioned, the detailed biostratigraphic studies on the Gubbio section (central Italy) provided (1) the first carefull documentation of the mass extinction of Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera, the presence of tiny Cretaceous survivors, and the rapid recovery of Danian assemblages, and (2) the first calibration of the Upper Cretaceous to Eocene reversal polarity scale in which the K/Pg boundary was demonstrated to fall within the magnetic reversal C29r. A major step forward was the recovery, since 1968, of several thousand of cores from over 1000 holes drilled in all oceans by the DSDP, ODP and IODP projects. The recovery of deep-sea sediments from all latitudes opened a new research field, the paleoceanography. Based on the large knowledge acquired on modern organisms in the '60s, for the Paleogene and Cretaceous reconstructions we started from the assumption that these extinct organisms lived in the water column like their modern counterpart and were

  20. Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, Caulle; Meryem, Mojtahid; Karoliina, Koho; Andy, Gooday; Gert-Jan, Reichart; Gerhard, Schmiedl; Frans, Jorissen

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy. C. Caulle1, M. Mojtahid1, K. Koho2,3, A. Gooday4, G. J. Reichart2,3, G. Schmiedl5, F. Jorissen1 1UMR CNRS 6112 LPG-BIAF, University of Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers Cedex 2Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (Royal NIOZ), Landsdiep 4, 1797 SZ 't Horntje (Texel) 4Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 5Department of Geosciences, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany The thermohaline circulation oxygenates the deep ocean sediment and therefore enables aerobic life on the sea-floor. In the past, interruption of this deep water formation occurred several times causing hypoxic to anoxic conditions on the sea-floor leading to major ecological turnover. A better understanding of the interaction between climate and bottom water oxygenation is therefore essential in order to predict future oceanic responses. Presently, permanent (stable over decadal timescale) low-oxygen conditions occur naturally at mid-water depths in the northern Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea). Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) are key areas to understand the hypoxic-anoxic events and their impact on the benthic ecosystem. In this context, a good knowledge of the ecology and life cycle adaptations of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages living in these low oxygen areas is essential. A series of multicores were recovered from three transects showing an oxygen gradient across the OMZ: the Murray Ridge, the Oman margin and the Indian margin. The stations located at the same depths showed slightly different oxygen concentrations and large differences in organic matter content. These differences are mainly related to the geographic location in the Arabian Sea. We investigated at these stations live and dead benthic

  1. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemila, Olugbenga T; Langer, Martin R; Lipps, Jere H

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago). We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA). The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis) generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs

  2. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T Fajemila

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago. We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA. The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay

  3. Anthropogenic infilling of a Bermudian sinkhole and its impact on sedimentation and benthic foraminifera in the adjacent anchialine cave environment

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    Jacquelyn N. Cresswell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-20th century, an inland brackish pond from Bermuda, known as Eve’s Pond, was filled with marine sediment from an adjacent coastal lagoon. At this time, an eyewitness reported “…sediment billowing out of the Green Bay Cave for days…”, which is a marine-dominated anchialine cave located proximal to the former location of Eve’s Pond (~200 m. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of this infilling event on cave sedimentation and benthic meiofaunal communities, as proxied by the unicellular protists foraminifera that remain preserved in the sediment record. Eight sediment cores were collected from an underwater passage in Green Bay Cave in a transect towards the location where Eve’s Pond was surveyed in 1901 CE. The sediment cores were analyzed for visual and density changes (photography, X-radiography, textural variability, benthic foraminifera fauna and diversity, and radiocarbon dating. The recovered sediment cores mostly sampled a late Holocene carbonate mud facies that had been described during previous research in the cave, with benthic foraminiferal assemblages post-dating the onset of seawater circulating between the saline groundwater flooding the cave and the adjacent Harrington Sound ~1,900 years ago. However, two cores located further into the cave (cores 13 and 17 contain a carbonate sand layer with lagoon foraminifera that is anomalous with respect to the Holocene depositional history of the cave and is most likely related to the mid-20th century infilling of Eve’s Pond. Examination of these two cores showed that after the infilling event, the community of benthic foraminifera rapidly reverted to pre-impact assemblages with foraminiferal stygophiles (e.g., Spirophthalmidium emaciatum, Sigmoilina tenuis, which were not displaced by new colonizers introduced into the cave by the dredge spoils. We caution that the results cannot be extrapolated to the pelagic crustacean community, but the

  4. New species of Cenozoic benthic foraminifera from the former British Petroleum micropalaeontology collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lyndsey R.; Stukins, Stephen; Hill, Tom; Bailey, Haydon

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes four new Cenozoic, deep-water benthic foraminifera from the reference collections at the Natural History Museum in London. The focus is on selected calcareous taxa that are of stratigraphical and/or palaeoecological significance for academic and industrial-related activities. Alabamina heyae (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:1E8A66E9-1F4C-4B61-BA97-6E0ECCD0173E), Nonion cepa (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:9F36350A-1E49-4D69-B2CC-C83F343E2952), Uvigerina kingi (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:C36C89C2-2E65-4FF6-9368-C169B4591995) and Lenticulina stewarti (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:485AE871-CECA-44E8-ABD1-BAE2961FFD59) are described with new illustrations. Their biostratigraphic and palaeoecological significance is briefly discussed.

  5. Tolerance of benthic foraminifera to anthropogenic stressors from three sites of the Egyptian coasts

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    Amani Badawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surely the coupling of natural and anthropogenic stressors combined with a lack of regulation resulted in the current threat to a large part of coastal marine biodiversity as well as coastal human societies, particularly in highly populated regions. The distribution pattern of benthic foraminifera as sensitive bio-indicator is utilized to assess human-induced impact on the coastal area, at Alexandria, Port Said and Suez cites of Egypt. Twenty-two benthic foraminiferal genera were identified and complied by principal component analysis into four factors through cluster analysis. Cross correlation of the generic composition, distribution and relative abundance of common genera in the three investigated cores revealed three different coastal environments entities. The categorized environment ranged from light human impact as Alexandria site to heavily impacted by human activities as Port Said and Suez sites. Fauna of Alexandria site reflects an increase in un-polluted water activity revealing high-energy erosive environment. The second entity involves Port Said site, which represents a highly stressed coastal environment, corresponding to high-energy transport conditions influenced by fresh water flush from local Manzala Lake via Bougaz El Gamel outlet while Suez site is influenced by marine hypersaline water coupling with intensified levels of industrial and domestic pollution, attributed to the anthropogenic impact.

  6. Larger foraminifera of the Devil's Den and Blue Hole sinkholes, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Eder, Wolfgang; Floyd, James

    2018-03-01

    Shallow-water carbonate deposits are well-known from the Eocene of the US Gulf Coast and Caribbean. These deposits frequently contain abundant larger benthic foraminifera (LBF). However, whilst integrated stratigraphic studies have helped to refine the timing of LBF overturning events within the Tethys and Indo-Pacific regions with respect to global bio- and chemo-stratigraphic records, little recent work has been carried out in the Americas. The American LBF assemblages are distinctly different from those of Europe and the Indo-Pacific. It is therefore essential that the American bio-province is included in studies of LBF evolution, biodiversity and climate events to understand these processes on a global scale.Here we present the LBF ranges from two previously unpublished sections spanning 35 and 29 m of the upper Eocene Ocala limestone, as the early stages of a larger project addressing the taxonomy and biostratigraphy of the LBF of Florida. The study indicates that the lower member of the Ocala limestone may be Bartonian rather than Priabonian in age, with implications for the biostratigraphy of the region. In addition, the study highlights the need for multiple sites to assess the LBF assemblages and fully constrain ranges across Florida and the US Gulf and suggests potential LBF events for future integrated stratigraphic study.

  7. Disruptive selection and bet-hedging in planktonic Foraminifera: Shell morphology as predictor of extinctions

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    Manuel F. G. Weinkauf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extinction is a remarkably difficult phenomenon to study under natural conditions. This is because the outcome of stress exposure and associated fitness reduction is not known until the extinction occurs and it remains unclear whether there is any phenotypic reaction of the exposed population that can be used to predict its fate. Here we take advantage of the fossil record, where the ecological outcome of stress exposure is known. Specifically, we analyze shell morphology of planktonic Foraminifera in sediment samples from the Mediterranean, during an interval preceding local extinctions. In two species representing different plankton habitats, we observe shifts in trait state and decrease in variance in association with non-terminal stress, indicating stabilizing selection. At terminal stress levels, immediately before extinction, we observe increased growth asymmetry and trait variance, indicating disruptive selection and bet-hedging. The pre-extinction populations of both species show a combination of trait states and trait variance distinct from all populations exposed to non-terminal levels of stress. This finding indicates that the phenotypic history of a population may allow the detection of threshold levels of stress, likely to lead to extinction. It is thus an alternative to population dynamics in studying and monitoring natural population ecology.

  8. Technical Note: On methodologies for determining the size-normalised weight of planktic foraminifera

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    C. J. Beer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The size-normalised weight (SNW of planktic foraminifera, a measure of test wall thickness and density, is potentially a valuable palaeo-proxy for marine carbon chemistry. As increasing attention is given to developing this proxy it is important that methods are comparable between studies. Here, we compare SNW data generated using two different methods to account for variability in test size, namely (i the narrow (50 μm range sieve fraction method and (ii the individually measured test size method. Using specimens from the 200–250 μm sieve fraction range collected in multinet samples from the North Atlantic, we find that sieving does not constrain size sufficiently well to isolate changes in weight driven by variations in test wall thickness and density from those driven by size. We estimate that the SNW data produced as part of this study are associated with an uncertainty, or error bar, of about ±11%. Errors associated with the narrow sieve fraction method may be reduced by decreasing the size of the sieve window, by using larger tests and by increasing the number tests employed. In situations where numerous large tests are unavailable, however, substantial errors associated with this sieve method remain unavoidable. In such circumstances the individually measured test size method provides a better means for estimating SNW because, as our results show, this method isolates changes in weight driven by variations in test wall thickness and density from those driven by size.

  9. The architecture and associated fauna of Perouvianella peruviana, an endemic larger benthic foraminifera from the Cenomanian–Turonian transition interval of central Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consorti, Lorenzo; Navarro-Ramirez, Juan Pablo; Bodin, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    -strategist foraminifera coexisted with P. peruviana. Moreover, a first description of the soritid taxa Pseudopeneroplis oyonensis n. gen., n. sp. is provided. Interestingly,the superposition of local and global environmental patterns onto the Western Peruvian shelf water masses triggered a mass development...... of the Perouvianella population coincident with Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. Conversely, the migration of foreign complex-shelled K-strategist larger benthic foraminifera from neighboring realms was inhibited.......During the Cenomanian–Turonian transition interval, larger benthic foraminifera became extinct or suffered decreases in terms of their diversity. Anoxic/dysoxic conditions of oceanic bottom water masses and potentially seawater acidification during this pivotal time also affected ecological niches...

  10. Bioerosion by microbial euendoliths in benthic foraminifera from heavy metal-polluted coastal environments of Portovesme (south-western Sardinia, Italy

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    A. Cherchi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A monitoring survey of the coastal area facing the industrial area of Portoscuso-Portovesme (south-western Sardinia, Italy revealed intense bioerosional processes. Benthic foraminifera collected at the same depth (about 2 m but at different distances from the pollution source show extensive microbial infestation, anomalous Mg/Ca molar ratios and high levels of heavy metals in the shell associated with a decrease in foraminifera richness, population density and biodiversity with the presence of morphologically abnormal specimens. We found that carbonate dissolution induced by euendoliths is selective, depending on the Mg content and morpho-structural types of foraminiferal taxa. This study provides evidences for a connection between heavy metal dispersion, decrease in pH of the sea-water and bioerosional processes on foraminifera.

  11. Benthic foraminifera or Ostracoda? Comparing the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental indicators from a Pleistocene lagoon of the Romagna coastal plain (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Giulia; Vaiani, Stefano Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Integrated analyses of multiple groups of microfossils are frequently performed to unravel the palaeoenvironmental evolution of subsurface coastal successions, where the complex interaction among several palaeoecological factors can be detected with benthic assemblages. This work investigates the palaeoenvironmental resolution potential provided by benthic foraminifera and ostracoda within a Pleistocene lagoonal succession of the Romagna coastal plain (northern Italy). Quantitative approaches and statistical techniques have been applied to both groups in order to understand the main factors that controlled the composition of assemblages and compare the palaeoecological record provided by single fossil groups. The two faunal groups are characterized by the high dominance of opportunistic species (Ammonia tepida-Ammonia parkinsoniana and Cyprideis torosa); however, detailed palaeoecological information is inferred from less common taxa. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are mainly determined by the frequencies of abnormal individuals and species related to high concentrations of organic matter, showing two assemblages: a stressed assemblage, consistent with a brackish-water environment subject to salinity and oxygen fluctuations, and an unstressed assemblage, which indicates more stable conditions. Despite the lower number of species, ostracoda show more significant differences in terms of species composition and ecological structure between their three assemblages, formed in response to a salinity gradient and indicative of inner, central, and outer lagoon conditions. The stratigraphic distribution of ostracod assemblages shows a general transgressive-regressive trend with minor fluctuations, whereas benthic foraminifera highlight the presence of a significant palaeoenvironmental stress. In this case, the higher abundance along the stratigraphic succession, the higher differentiation of the assemblages, and the well-defined relationship between taxa and ecological

  12. Benthic foraminifera distribution in high polluted sediments from Niterói Harbor (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Claudia G. Vilela

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Dockyards and harbors are recognized as being important locations where sediment-associated pollutants can accumulate, which constitutes an environmental risk to aquatic life due to potential uptake and accumulation of heavy metals in the biota. The aim of this paper is to assess the concentrations and the effects of some heavy metals in the benthic foraminifera assemblage in Niterói Harbor. Low concentrations in the benthic foraminifera as well as the dominance of indicative species such as Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima and Bolivina lowmani can be associated with an environment under stress. In addition, the occurrence of test abnormalities among foraminifera may represent a useful biomarker for evaluating long-term environmental impacts in a coastal region.Estaleiros e portos são locais reconhecidamente importantes onde poluentes associados a sedimentos podem acumular, constituindo um risco ambiental para a vida aquática devido ao potencial de captação e acumulação de metais pesados na biota. O propósito deste trabalho é avaliar as concentrações e os efeitos de alguns metais pesados na assembléia de foraminíferos bentônicos no Porto de Niterói. Baixas concentrações de foraminíferos bentônicos bem como a dominância de espécies indicativas como Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima e Bolivina lowmani podem ser associadas a um ambiente sob estresse. A ocorrência de anormalidades entre os foraminíferos pode representar um útil biomarcador para avaliação de impactos ambientais de longo termo em uma região costeira.

  13. Response of benthic foraminifera to 4.2 ka cooling event in the Nakdong River delta, southeast Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Khim, B. K.; Cheong, D.; Shin, S.

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the change of benthic foraminifera in response to 4.2 ka cooling event in the Nakdong River delta (southeastern Korea). It has been known that this cooling event caused climatic deteriorations in the world, which is closely related to the decline/development of the civilizations (e.g., Kawahata et al., 2009). This event was also correlated to one of Bond Events in the North Atlantic. Because coastal sediment depositions have been influenced by both oceanographic and terrestrial climatic changes, the study may provide us clue to understand the possible teleconnection of the cooling event between the North Atlantic and the East Asian margin. We investigated fossil benthic foraminiferal faunas and planktonic/total foraminiferal ratio (P/T ratio) at two borehole cores, ND-01 and ND-02 (landward and seaward sites, respectively). Common constituents are taxa from bay to shelf environments in the East Asian margin. Biotic response of benthic foraminifera partly changed after 4.2 ka showing that Haynesina sp. A (opportunistic species?) decreased significantly at core ND-01. In addition, P/T ratio at both core sites showed temporal decline at 4.2 ka. This suggests the decreasing influence of the seawater relative to the coastal water. Holocene fluctuations of the Tsushima Warm Current, a branch of Kuroshio, flowing off the Nakdong River delta, have been documented. The decline pattern of P/T ratio in this area is similar to that of total sulfur content in Lake Tougou-ike, southwestern Japan at 4 ka which was interpreted as the influence of the small sea-level falling (Kato et al., 2003). According to the similar stratigraphic variation patterns between our and their studies, our finding suggests that this event was not regional but related to the fluctuations of the Tsushima Warm Current. Thus, biotic response of benthic foraminifera in the Nakdong River delta recorded 4.2 ka cooling event related to temporal weakening of the Tsushima Warm Current.

  14. Mid-Oligocene climate dynamics using benthic foraminifera from the Central Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Jessica; Herrle, Jens; Pälike, Heiko; Liebrand, Diederik; Batenburg, Sietske

    2014-05-01

    The Oligocene marks the onset of major Antarctic ice sheets and hence the first step into a "icehouse" world, which continues to the present day. To understand the evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet, it is fundamental to assess and quantify changes in the ocean circulation pattern and the intensity of Pacific equatorial upwelling (PEU) since the initiation of southern hemisphere ice caps during the Eocene-Oligocene transition. It is well known that combined variations in the eccentricity, obliquity and precession of Earth's orbit influence long-term climate fluctuations, notably the build up and decay of ice volume. To unravel the importance of orbital forcing on ice volume changes and to estimate its impact on paleoproductivity in the Central Eastern Pacific Ocean, we focused on the Oi-2b event about 26.8 Ma ago, being the most important glacial episode in the mid-Oligocene (Pälike et al., 2006). We calculated benthic foraminifer accumulation rates (BFAR) to reconstruct organic matter flux to the sea floor and hence surface water productivity. Furthermore, to assess and differentiate between changes in productivity and dissolution, a planktic foraminifera-based fragmentation index (FI) was calculated. BFAR values range between 16 and 217 NBF/cm-2/kyr (average: 65 NBF/cm-2/kyr). Increased BFAR indicate phases of higher supply of organic matter to the sea floor and thus enhanced surface water productivity. Our BFAR record indicates variable but generally lower productivity conditions during the glacial event compared to pre- and post-Oi-2b conditions. However, the transition into the Oi-2b event which is documented in heavier δ18O of Cibicidoides grimsdalei (2.1 per mil to 3.0 per mil ) and Oridorsalis umbonatus (1.7 per mil and 2.6 per mil) is characterized by a higher productivity, which is also supported by the assumption of increased productivity for the onset of Oi-2b based on Δδ13C variations of planktic and benthic foraminifera from ODP Site 1218 (Wade

  15. The 'Natural Laboratory', a tool for deciphering growth, lifetime and population dynamics in larger benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    The shells of symbiont-bearing larger benthic Foraminifera (LBF) represent the response to physiological requirements in dependence of environmental conditions. All compartments of the shell such as chambers and chamberlets accommodate the growth of the cell protoplasm and are adaptations for housing photosymbiotic algae. Investigations on the biology of LBF were predominantly based on laboratory studies. The lifetime of LBF under natural conditions is still unclear. LBF, which can build >100 chambers during their lifetime, are thought to live at least one year under natural conditions. This is supported by studies on population dynamics of eulittoral foraminifera. In species characterized by a time-restricted single reproduction period the mean size of specimens increases from small to large during lifetime simultaneously reducing individual number. This becomes more complex when two or more reproduction times are present within a one-year cycle leading to a mixture of abundant small individuals with few large specimens during the year, while keeping mean size more or less constant. This mixture is typical for most sublittoral megalospheric (gamonts or schizonts) LBF. Nothing is known on the lifetime of agamonts, the diploid asexually reproducing generation. In all hyaline LBF it is thought to be significantly longer than 1 year based on the large size and considering the mean chamber building rate of the gamont/schizonts. Observations on LBF under natural conditions have not been performed yet in the deeper sublittoral. This reflects the difficulties due to intense hydrodynamics that hinder deploying technical equipment for studies in the natural environment. Therefore, studying growth, lifetime and reproduction of sublittoral LBF under natural conditions can be performed using the so-called 'natural laboratory' in comparison with laboratory investigations. The best sampling method in the upper sublittoral from 5 to 70 m depth is by SCUBA diving. Irregular

  16. Foraminifera as bioindicators in coral reef assessment and monitoring: The foram index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, P.; Lidz, B.H.; Cockey-Burkhard, E. M.; Donnelly, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    Coral reef communities are threatened worldwide. Resource managers urgently need indicators of the biological condition of reef environments that can relate data acquired through remote-sensing, water-quality and benthic-community monitoring to stress responses in reef organisms. The "FORAM" (Foraminifera in Reef Assessment and Monitoring) Index (FI) is based on 30 years of research on reef sediments and reef-dwelling larger foraminifers. These shelled protists are ideal indicator organisms because: ??? Foraminifers are widely used as environmental and paleoenvironmental indicators in many contexts; ??? Reef-building, zooxanthellate corals and foraminifers with algal symbionts have similar water-quality requirements; ??? The relatively short life spans of foraminifers as compared with long-lived colonial corals facilitate differentiation between long-term water-quality decline and episodic stress events; ??? Foraminifers are relatively small and abundant, permitting statistically significant sample sizes to be collected quickly and relatively inexpensively, ideally as a component of comprehensive monitoring programs; and ??? Collection of foraminifers has minimal impact on reef resources. USEPA guidelines for ecological indicators are used to evaluate the FI. Data required are foraminiferal assemblages from surface sediments of reef-associated environments. The FI provides resource managers with a simple procedure for determining the suitability of benthic environments for communities dominated by algal symbiotic organisms. The FI can be applied independently, or incorporated into existing or planned monitoring efforts. The simple calculations require limited computer capabilities and therefore can be applied readily to reef-associated environments worldwide. In addition, the foraminiferal shells collected can be subjected to morphometric and geochemical analyses in areas of suspected heavy-metal pollution, and the data sets for the index can be used with other

  17. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  18. Interpreting the role of pH on stable isotopes in large benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, P.O.; Wynn, J.G.; Hallock, P.; Harries, P.

    2016-01-01

    Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are prolific producers of calcium carbonate sediments in shallow, tropical environments that are being influenced by ocean acidification (OA). Two LBF species, Amphistegina gibbosa (Order Rotaliida) with low-Mg calcite tests and Archaias angulatus (Order Miliolida) with high-Mg calcite tests, were studied to assess the effects of pH 7.6 on oxygen and carbon isotopic fractionation between test calcite and ambient seawater. The δ18O and δ13C values of terminal chambers and of whole adult tests of both species after 6 weeks were not significantly different between pH treatments of 8.0 and 7.6. However, tests of juveniles produced during the 6-week treatments showed significant differences between δ18O and δ13C values from control (pH 8.0) when compared with the treatment (pH 7.6) for both species. Although each individual's growth was photographed and measured, difficulty in distinguishing and manually extracting newly precipitated calcite from adult specimens likely confounded any differences in isotopic signals. However, juvenile specimens that resulted from asexual reproduction that occurred during the experiments did not contain old carbonate that could confound the new isotopic signals. These data reveal a potential bias in the design of OA experiments if only adults are used to investigate changes in test chemistries. Furthermore, the results reaffirm that different calcification mechanisms in these two foraminiferal orders control the fractionation of stable isotopes in the tests and will reflect decreasing pH in seawater somewhat differently. .

  19. Annual and seasonal distribution of intertidal foraminifera and stable carbon isotope geochemistry, Bandon Marsh, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin; Vane, Christopher; Engelhart, Simon; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.; Khan, Nicole S.; Bridgeland, William

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of inter-annual and seasonal differences on the distribution of live and dead foraminifera, and the inter-annual variability of stable carbon isotopes (d13C), total organic carbon (TOC) values and carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios in bulk sediments from intertidal environments of Bandon Marsh (Oregon, USA). Living and dead foraminiferal species from 10 stations were analyzed over two successive years in the summer (dry) and fall (wet) seasons. There were insignificant inter-annual and seasonal variations in the distribution of live and dead species. But there was a noticeable decrease in calcareous assemblages (Haynesina sp.) between live populations and dead assemblages, indicating that most of the calcareous tests were dissolved after burial; the agglutinated assemblages were comparable between constituents. The live populations and dead assemblages were dominated by Miliammina fusca in the tidal flat and low marsh, Jadammina macrescens, Trochammina inflata and M. fusca in the high marsh, and Trochamminita irregularis and Balticammina pseudomacrescens in the highest marsh to upland. Geochemical analyses (d13C, TOC and C/N of bulk sedimentary organic matter) show no significant influence of inter-annual variations but a significant correlation of d13C values (R = 20.820, p , 0.001), TOC values (R = 0.849, p , 0.001) and C/N ratios (R = 0.885, p , 0.001) to elevation with respect to the tidal frame. Our results suggest that foraminiferal assemblages and d13C and TOC values, as well as C/N ratios, in Bandon Marsh are useful in reconstructing paleosea-levels on the North American Pacific coast.

  20. Molecular evidence for Lessepsian invasion of soritids (larger symbiont bearing benthic foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gily Merkado

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is considered as one of the hotspots of marine bioinvasions, largely due to the influx of tropical species migrating through the Suez Canal, so-called Lessepsian migrants. Several cases of Lessepsian migration have been documented recently, however, little is known about the ecological characteristics of the migrating species and their aptitude to colonize the new areas. This study focused on Red Sea soritids, larger symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera (LBF that are indicative of tropical and subtropical environments and were recently found in the Israeli coast of the Eastern Mediterranean. We combined molecular phylogenetic analyses of soritids and their algal symbionts as well as network analysis of Sorites orbiculus Forskål to compare populations from the Gulf of Elat (northern Red Sea and from a known hotspot in Shikmona (northern Israel that consists of a single population of S. orbiculus. Our phylogenetic analyses show that all specimens found in Shikmona are genetically identical to a population of S. orbiculus living on a similar shallow water pebbles habitat in the Gulf of Elat. Our analyses also show that the symbionts found in Shikmona and Elat soritids belong to the Symbiodinium clade F5, which is common in the Red Sea and also present in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Our study therefore provides the first genetic and ecological evidences that indicate that modern population of soritids found on the Mediterranean coast of Israel is probably Lessepsian, and is less likely the descendant of a native ancient Mediterranean species.

  1. Multiproxies (benthic foraminifera, ostracods and biopolymers approach applied to identify the environmental partitioning of the Guadiana River Estuary (Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaro Luiz Mattos Laut

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Guadiana River is the fourth longest river in Europe and is a natural frontier between southern Portugal and Spain. This river was historically used to transport minerals exploited in the region since the Roman Empire and therefore suffered human interventions that have been intensified after the industrial revolution. The Guadiana River has in its limits the Guadiana Valley Natural Park, which is of great value for the Conservation of Geobiodiversity. This study mainly aims to identify zones with the environmental characteristics in the estuarine area of the Guadiana River based on the distribution and ecology of microorganisms (ostracods and foraminifera associated with physicochemical parameters and sedimentological and geochemical (carbohydrate, lipid, protein, total organic carbon and total sulfur data. Fifty-five foraminifera taxa were identified along the estuary with dominance of Ammonia tepida and Miliammina fusca and 13 ostracods taxa with dominance Leptocythere lacertosa and Loxoconcha elliptica. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA performed using biotic and abiotic variables indicated that pH, grain size, total organic carbon (TOC and lipids were the most influent factors in the distribution of these organisms. Four zones were identified in the Guadiana River estuary: i Low estuary - region with the largest marine influence with sandy sediment, higher salinity and total sulfur and mainly represented by the dominance of estuarine species of foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Cribroelphidium vadescens and by the ostracods (Darwinula stevensoni, Semicytherura sulcata and Urocythereis oblonga; ii Intermediate estuary - region characterized by neutral pH and sandy sediment enriched in carbohydrates; this region is characterized by the presence of the ostracods species Cytherois fischeri and Neocytherideis subulata and by calcareous and agglutinated species in foraminiferal assemblages; iii Upper estuary - silt, high TOC, proteins and

  2. Taxonomy and distribution of benthic foraminifera from the sediments of Palk Strait, Tamil Nadu, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gandhi, S.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Nigam, R.

    d'Orbigny var. porrecta Brady, 1884, Challenger Expedition Reports, Zoology, v.9, pts.2, p.304, p.43, figs.4a-b. Textularia porrecta (Brady, 1884) - Yassini and Jones, 1995, p.76, pl.7, figs.104 - 110. - Rao, 1998, p.GO, pl.6, figs.4-5. Hypotype... 'Challenger' during the year 1873-1876. Soc. Econ. Paleont. Miner. Spec. Pub!. Bhalla, S.N. 1968. Recent foraminifera from Visakhapatnam beaeh sands and its relation to the known foramgeographical provinces in the Indian ocean. Bull. Nat. Inst. Sci. India...

  3. Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, M.; Mohan, R.; Meloth, T.; Naik, S.S.; Sudhakar, M.

    were filtered, dried and individual planktic foraminifera picked. Dried sediment samples were then soaked in water and treated with sodium hexametaphos- phate (calgon powder) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) to dissociate the material and oxidize... decline further and the δ 18 O of N. pachyderma attains a maximum value of 1.93‰. The carbon isotopic values are governed by the iso- topic composition of the dissolved bicarbonate (HCO – 3 ), which in turn is modulated by the productivity and mix...

  4. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Nigam, R.

    species, including two species of Bolivina and a single species of Uvigerina, with the bathymetrical variation from the northern Gulf of Mexico. But there is no attempt to correlate the total population of any important genus of rectilinear foraminifera...–900. Malakoff D 1998 Death by suffocation in the Gulf of Mexico; Science 281 190–192. Mallon J, Glock N and Scho¨nfeld J 2012 The response of benthic foraminifera to low-oxygen conditions of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone; In: ANOXIA: Evidence for eukaryote...

  5. A transgressive Santonian-Campanian boundary sequence revisited - High resolution planktonic and benthic foraminifera stratigraphy of the Schattau section, Northern Calcareous Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgring, Erik; Wagreich, Michael; Summesberger, Herbert; Kroh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The Schattau section is part of the Austrian Gosau Group, Northern Calcareous Alps. We record a Santonian to early Campanian transgressive sequence. Previous investigations already provide a biostratigraphic framework; a multidisciplinary study to reveal the local stratigraphy and palaeoenvironmental properties: Planktonic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, ammonite, echinoid and crinoid biostratigraphy data suggest a Santonian to earliest Campanian age for this section (see Wagreich et al., 2009). This work aims at a high resolution assessment of foraminiferal assemblages recorded from a time interval that has undergone significant palaeoenvironmental changes. The Santonian Hochmoos Formation, with the Sandkalkbank Member representing it's topmost subunit, is overlain by the Santonian to Campanian Bibereck Formation. While The Hochmoos Formation records a shallowing succession that finds the Sandkalkbank Member (representing very shallow conditions, sometimes sub aerial exposure) at its top. The overlying Bibereck Formation records a distinct deepening trend displaying increasingly marine, neritic to outer neritic conditions. The stratigraphically older subunits of the Schattau sections are characterised by abundant larger benthic foraminifera (Nummofallotia cretacea), miliolid foraminifera (Quinqueloculina spp, Spiroloculina fassistomata) as well as rotaliid foraminifera (Hoeglundia spp., Gavellina spp.). The Sandkalkbank member marks the end of the shallow water sequence recorded from foraminifera assemblages at the Schattau section. Up section communities are characterised by increasing share of planktonic foraminifera. Biostratigraphic marker fossils like Dicarinella asymetrica and Sigalia sp. (decoratissima?) were identified and indicate a Santonian age for the Bibereck Formation. The appearance of Globotruncanita elevata and disappearance of D. asymetrica and Sigalia sp. Suggests an early Campanian age for the topmost part of the Schattau section

  6. Heavy metals in benthic foraminifera from the highly polluted sediments of the Naples harbour (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumolo, Paola; Manta, Daniela Salvagio; Sprovieri, Mario; Coccioni, Rodolfo; Ferraro, Luciana; Marsella, Ennio

    2009-10-15

    A systematic investigation evaluated the concentrations of a selected number of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in carbonates of the benthic foraminifera Ammonia tepida collected from surface sediments of the highly polluted harbour of Naples. Application of cleaning procedures, combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy investigation (SEM) of the analysed shells allowed reliable quantification of the elements in the carbonate lattice. Adoption of biogenic carbonate/seawater distribution coefficients reported in the literature provided the ranges of variability of total dissolved trace elements in the studied marine environment. Very high concentrations of Zn, Cd, and Cu calculated in seawater (from 100 to 10,000 times higher than those reported for uncontaminated Mediterranean seawaters) testify to intense effects of anthropogenic impact on the harbour mainly related to the industrial and commercial activities carried out in the neighbouring area. The ensemble of the obtained results emphasizes the high potential of measurements of trace elements in the biogenic carbonates of benthic foraminifera as tracers of anthopogenic pollution of seawater and reliable proxies of potentially bioavailable forms (as free ions and/or more labile organic complexes) of seawater dissolved metals.

  7. Decalcification and survival of benthic foraminifera under the combined impacts of varying pH and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrieau, Laurie M; Filipsson, Helena L; Nagai, Yukiko; Kawada, Sachiko; Ljung, Karl; Kritzberg, Emma; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2018-04-03

    Coastal areas display natural large environmental variability such as frequent changes in salinity, pH, and carbonate chemistry. Anthropogenic impacts - especially ocean acidification - increase this variability, which may affect the living conditions of coastal species, particularly, calcifiers. We performed culture experiments on living benthic foraminifera to study the combined effects of lowered pH and salinity on the calcification abilities and survival of the coastal, calcitic species Ammonia sp. and Elphidium crispum. We found that in open ocean conditions (salinity ∼35) and lower pH than usual values for these species, the specimens displayed resistance to shell (test) dissolution for a longer time than in brackish conditions (salinity ∼5 to 20). However, the response was species specific as Ammonia sp. specimens survived longer than E. crispum specimens when placed in the same conditions of salinity and pH. Living, decalcified juveniles of Ammonia sp. were observed and we show that desalination is one cause for the decalcification. Finally, we highlight the ability of foraminifera to survive under Ω calc  salinity and [Ca 2+ ] as building blocks are crucial for the foraminiferal calcification process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Heavy metals in benthic foraminifera from the highly polluted sediments of the Naples harbour (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumolo, Paola; Manta, Daniela Salvagio; Sprovieri, Mario; Coccioni, Rodolfo; Ferraro, Luciana; Marsella, Ennio

    2009-01-01

    A systematic investigation evaluated the concentrations of a selected number of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in carbonates of the benthic foraminifera Ammonia tepida collected from surface sediments of the highly polluted harbour of Naples. Application of cleaning procedures, combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy investigation (SEM) of the analysed shells allowed reliable quantification of the elements in the carbonate lattice. Adoption of biogenic carbonate/seawater distribution coefficients reported in the literature provided the ranges of variability of total dissolved trace elements in the studied marine environment. Very high concentrations of Zn, Cd, and Cu calculated in seawater (from 100 to 10,000 times higher than those reported for uncontaminated Mediterranean seawaters) testify to intense effects of anthropogenic impact on the harbour mainly related to the industrial and commercial activities carried out in the neighbouring area. The ensemble of the obtained results emphasizes the high potential of measurements of trace elements in the biogenic carbonates of benthic foraminifera as tracers of anthopogenic pollution of seawater and reliable proxies of potentially bioavailable forms (as free ions and/or more labile organic complexes) of seawater dissolved metals.

  9. Possible roles of pH, temperature, and partial dissolution in determining boron concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wara, M.W.; Delaney, M.L.; Bullen, T.D.; Ravelo, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first continuous records from 0 to 5 Ma (in 0.333 m.y. integrated time steps) of paired boron/calcium (B/Ca) ratios and boron isotopes (??11B) in the planktonic foraminifera Globogerinoides sacculifer (without sacc) from a site in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean (Ocean Drilling Program Site 806). These measurements, the first made in conjunction with calcification temperature (magnesium/calcium ratios) and average shell mass measurements, indicate that pH is not the sole environmental variable controlling B in planktonic foraminiferal calcite. Our data are consistent with calcification temperature exerting a primary control on B concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera. If so, calcification temperature must be taken into account if pH for past oceans and atmospheric pCO2 are to be estimated from B isotope measurements in foraminiferal calcite. Doing so will substantially increase the uncertainty of PH estimates. Although this work was designed as a temporal study, its results define new aspects of calibrating the ??11B paleo-pH tracer. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Link between light-triggered Mg-banding and chamber formation in the planktic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Russell, Ann D.; Davis, Catherine V.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Spero, Howard J.; Cliff, John B.; Zhu, Zihua; Martin, Pamela

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between seawater temperature and the average Mg/Ca ratios in planktic foraminifera is well established, providing an essential tool for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. However, many species display alternating high and low Mg-bands within their shell walls that cannot be explained by temperature alone. Recent experiments demonstrate that intrashell Mg variability in Orbulina universa, which forms a spherical terminal shell, is paced by the diurnal light/dark cycle. Whether Mg-heterogeneity is also diurnally paced in species with more complex shell morphologies is unknown. Here we show that high Mg/Ca-calcite forms at night in cultured specimens of the multi-chambered species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Our results demonstrate that N. dutertrei adds a significant amount of calcite, and nearly all Mg-bands, after the final chamber forms. These results have implications for interpreting patterns of calcification in N. dutertrei and suggest that diurnal Mg-banding is an intrinsic component of biomineralization in planktic foraminifera.

  11. Distribution of foraminifera in Chincoteague Bay and the marshes of Assateague Island and the adjacent vicinity, Maryland and Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Shaw, Jaimie; Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2017-11-28

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of estuarine, marsh, and sandy washover surface sediments from Chincoteague Bay, Tom’s Cove, and the surrounding Assateague Island and Delmarva Peninsula in March–April and October 2014, after Hurricane Sandy. Micropaleontology samples were collected as part of a complementary USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program Sea-level and Storm Impacts on Estuarine Environments and Shorelines project study. For comparison with estuarine and overwash deposited foraminifera, a group of scientists from the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center in Massachusetts collected samples offshore of Assateague Island on the inner continental shelf during a seafloor mapping study in the summer of 2014 and shipped select samples to the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. The micropaleontological subsamples analyzed for foraminifera at each site can be used to establish a foraminiferal baseline assemblage that takes into consideration the seasonal variability of the various species, regarding density and geographic extent, which are influenced by transient and stable environmental parameters. By understanding what parameters affect the various foraminiferal assemblages, researchers can delineate how alterations in salinity, temperature, or marsh-to-bay interactions, such as marsh erosion, might affect that assemblage.

  12. Oscillatory growth in Larger Benthic Foraminifera: problems, interpretations and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Antonino; Eder, Wolfgang; Woeger, Julia; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Ferrandez-Canadell, Carles; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to investigate cell growth and its oscillations through time in Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) by means of Micro Computed Tomography (microCT) is a recent and well known methodology. However, the search for factors of oscillations around undisturbed growth - the latter can be modelled by theoretical growth functions (e.g. Gompertz and generalized logistic growth function) - is hampered by a number of factors which have been recently discovered and not yet published. Cycles are obtained based on a mean chamber building rate gained from specimens cultured in the laboratory because punctual data available in the literature are too incomplete to gain a more realistic growth model. The mean chamber building rate can be also modeled (e.g. Power-, Michaelis-Menten- and Bertallanffy function). The periodicity of the cycles observed in LBF is mostly concentrated around a prominent 29 to 30 days cycle. Other cycles, proportions and multiples of this dominant cycle are common, but probably should be considered as calculation effects in case of their inconsistency. The 30 days cycles are present in almost all specimens investigated, which may be a hint to a correlation between cell growth and the light intensity variation of lunar cycles, which can affect the photosynthetic activity of the endosymbionts in LBF tests. However, this correlation is challenged by a number of issues, which need to be further investigated. One of these problems is represented by the recent discovery of similar cycles in LBF tests, which have been laboratory-cultured and should therefore not show any environmental effects. A focused analysis of growth cycles observed in these laboratory tests showed that even if the periods are constant and significant at 30 days, their phases show a much broader variance compared to naturally grown specimens. Epigenetic signals and their influence on the oscillatory growth of cultivated organisms can be considered to play a major role in the

  13. Carbon and nitrogen uptake of calcareous benthic foraminifera along a depth-related oxygen gradient in the OMZ of the Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekatrin Julie Enge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera are an important faunal element of the benthos in oxygen-depleted settings such as Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs where they can play a relevant role in the processing of phytodetritus. We investigated the uptake of phytodetritus (labeled with 13C and 15N by cal-careous foraminifera in the 0-1 cm sediment horizon under different oxygen concentrations within the OMZ in the eastern Arabian Sea. The in situ tracer experiments were carried out along a depth transect on the Indian margin over a period of 4 to 10 days. The uptake of phy-todetrital carbon within 4 days by all investigated species shows that phytodetritus is a rele-vant food source for foraminifera in OMZ sediments. The decrease of total carbon uptake from 540 to 1100 m suggests a higher demand for carbon by species in the low-oxygen core region of the OMZ or less food competition with macrofauna. Especially Uvigerinids showed high uptake of phytodetrital carbon at the lowest oxygenated site. Variation in the ratio of phytodetrital carbon to nitrogen between species and sites indicates that foraminiferal carbon and nitrogen use can be decoupled and different nutritional demands are found between spe-cies. Lower ratio of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen at 540 m could hint for greater demand or storage of food-based nitrogen, ingestion or hosting of bacteria under almost anoxic condi-tions. Shifts in the foraminiferal assemblage structure (controlled by oxygen or food availabil-ity and in the presence of other benthic organisms account for observed changes in the pro-cessing of phytodetritus in the different OMZ habitats. Foraminifera dominate the short-term processing of phytodetritus in the OMZ core but are less important in the lower OMZ bounda-ry region of the Indian margin as biological interactions and species distribution of foraminif-era change with depth and oxygen levels.

  14. Foraminifera eco-biostratigraphy of the southern Evoikos outer shelf, central Aegean Sea, during MIS 5 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinia, Hara; Antonarakou, Assimina; Tsourou, Theodora; Kontakiotis, George; Psychogiou, Maria; Anastasakis, George

    2016-09-01

    The South Evoikos Basin is a marginal basin in the Aegean Sea which receives little terrigenous supply and its sedimentation is dominated by hemipelagic processes. Late Quaternary benthic and planktonic foraminifera from core PAG-155 are investigated in order to understand their response to the glacial-interglacial cycles in this region. The quantitative analysis of planktonic foraminifera, coupled with accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) radiocarbon date measurements, provide an integrated chrono-stratigraphic time framework over the last 90 ka (time interval between late Marine Isotopic Stages 5 and 1; MIS5-MIS1). The temporary appearance and disappearance as well as several abundance peaks in the quantitative distribution of selected climate-sensitive planktonic species allowed the identification of several eco-bioevents, useful to accurately mark the boundaries of the eco-biozones widely recognized in the Mediterranean records and used for large-scale correlations. The established bio-ecozonation scheme allows a detailed palaecological reconstruction for the late Pleistocene archive in the central Aegean, and furthermore provides a notable contribution for palaeoclimatic studies, facilitating intercorrelations between various oceanographic basins. The quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifera identify four distinct assemblages, namely Biofacies: Elphidium spp., Haynesina spp. Biofacies, characterized by neritic species, dominated during the transition from MIS 5 to MIS 4; Cassidulina laevigata/carinata Biofacies dominated till 42 ka (transgressive trend from MIS 4 to MIS 3); Bulimina gibba Biofacies dominated from 42 ka to 9.5 ka (extensive regression MIS 3,2 through lowstand and early transgression; beginning of MIS 1); Bulimina marginata, Uvigerina spp. Biofacies dominated from 9.5 ka to the present (late transgression through early highstand; MIS 1)., This study showed that the South Evoikos Basin which is characterized by its critical depths and

  15. Recipe Book for Larger Benthic Foraminifera X-ray Investigation: a Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgring, E.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    During the past years X-ray microtomography (microCT) has become an essential tool in imaging procedures in micropaleontology. Apart from highest standards in accuracy, well conducted microCT scans aim to resolve the whole specimen in constant quality and free from any artifacts or visual interferences. Normally, to get used to X-ray techniques and get usable results, countless attempts are needed, resulting in enormous waste of time. This work tries to provide an insight into how best exploitable results can be obtained from the scanning process concerning Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF). As each specimen features different characteristics regarding substantial composition, density and conservation status, it is impossible and probably erroneous to give standardized guidelines even within this systematic group. Depending on the attributes of the specimen and on the desired visualization, several details have to be taken into account. Samples preparation: to get sharp images the X-ray has to cross the specimen along its shortest diameter, for LBF the equatorial view is almost always the best positioning (not for alveolinids!). The container itself has to be chosen wisely as well; it must not affect a flawless penetration of the specimen by the X-ray and has to provide a high degree of stability. Small plastic pipettes are perfect to store the specimen (or specimens) and some cardboard may help in keeping the position. The nature and quality of the paste used to fixate the object and its container are essential in ensuring a smooth rotation of the specimen which is inevitable for the consistent quality of the image and to avoid vibrations. Scan parameters: beside the correct choice of dedicated filters (which are always different depending on the working station), settings for kv, µA and resolution might have to be revised for each new object to deliver optimal results. Standard values for hyaline forms with empty chambers are normally around 80 Kv and 100 u

  16. Biomonitoring polluted sediments in Arctic regions - possibilities and challenges using benthic foraminifera. Case studies from northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Kari; Dijkstra, Noortje; Junttila, Juho; Sternal, Beata; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Biomonitoring pollution in marine environments using benthic foraminifera assemblages have proven to be a valid method for many regions. Two important reasons for their suitability are their sensitivity to changes in the environment and their rapid response time due to short life cycles. In addition, they are preserved in the sedimentary record, allowing for baseline studies of conditions prior to introduction of contaminants. Species of benthic foraminifera that appear to tolerate polluted sediments are referred to as opportunistic species. This notion is in general used for species able to dominate environments that are too stressful for most species. The high latitude setting of the northern Norwegian coastal zone experience high seasonality and, hence, largely changing conditions throughout a year: variations in water mass domination, freshwater influence, temperature and current velocity. It is possible that an environment like this is inhibited by a higher amount of opportunistic species generally thriving under high stress conditions. This might make the use of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring more challenging, as the faunal compositions may be a result of a complex set of processes. Consequently, large datasets are necessary in order to make reliable conclusions, which in time may be used as generalized guidelines for biomonitoring in this geographical area. Here, we present preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from two sites in Finnmark, northern Norway, which have been exposed to pollution. The main site is Repparfjorden, where the inner parts of the fjord were used as a submarine waste deposal site for mine tailings from a local copper mine during the 1970´s. Results from four marine sediment cores (10-20 cm long) containing sediments classified to be in moderate to very bad state (according to Norwegian sediment quality criteria) are presented. The contamination is seen in intervals of elevated copper content dated to the 1970

  17. Ostracoda and foraminifera as short-term tracers of environmental changes in very polluted areas: the Odiel Estuary (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F.; Gonzalez-Regalado, M.L.; Borrego, J.; Abad, M.; Pendon, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of 17 cores collected in the Odiel Estuary (SW Spain) permits delimiting the recent evolution of this zone during the past decades and the influence of natural and anthropogenic factors on the distribution of Ostracoda and Foraminifera. In the upper estuary, the coincidence of acid waters, prolonged subaerial exposure, and coarse sediments may explain the absence or the disappearance of these microorganisms during the industrial period (1966-1985) in the major part of this area. In the lower estuary, sedimentary evolution and industrial wastes are the main factors influencing both the distribution and trends of the populations of these two groups. Finally, the main changes observed in the marine estuary are due to the sedimentary effects of the construction of two banks and the dredging of the main estuarine channel. - In a polluted estuary, the meiofaunal assemblages experience different changes even in adjacent sedimentary environments, closely related to anthropogenic and natural causes

  18. Bone Regeneration of Rat Tibial Defect by Zinc-Tricalcium Phosphate (Zn-TCP Synthesized from Porous Foraminifera Carbonate Macrospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera carbonate exoskeleton was hydrothermally converted to biocompatible and biodegradable zinc-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP as an alternative biomimetic material for bone fracture repair. Zn-TCP samples implanted in a rat tibial defect model for eight weeks were compared with unfilled defect and beta-tricalcium phosphate showing accelerated bone regeneration compared with the control groups, with statistically significant bone mineral density and bone mineral content growth. CT images of the defect showed restoration of cancellous bone in Zn-TCP and only minimal growth in control group. Histological slices reveal bone in-growth within the pores and porous chamber of the material detailing good bone-material integration with the presence of blood vessels. These results exhibit the future potential of biomimetic Zn-TCP as bone grafts for bone fracture repair.

  19. Equivalent dose determination in foraminifera: analytical description of the CO{sub 2}{sup -}-signal dose-response curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D. E-mail: dirk.hoffmann@iup.uni-heidelberg.de; Woda, C.; Mangini, A

    2003-02-01

    The dose-response of the CO{sub 2}{sup -}signal (g=2.0006) in foraminifera with ages between 19 and 300 ka is investigated. The sum of two exponential saturation functions is an adequate function to describe the dose-response curve up to an additional dose of 8000 Gy. It yields excellent dating results but requires an artificial doses of at least 5000 Gy. For small additional doses of about 500 Gy the single exponential saturation function can be used to calculate a reliable equivalent dose D{sub E}, although it does not describ the dose-response for higher doses. The CO{sub 2}{sup -}-signal dose-response indicates that the signal has two components of which one is less stable than the other.

  20. On Discocyclina (Foraminifera) occurrence problem in the Tsukeng Formation, Nantou, Taiwan(松丸国照教授退職記念特集)<数学・自然科学>

    OpenAIRE

    松丸, 国照; 邱, 若山; 鐘, 丁茂

    2007-01-01

    DiscocycJina (Foraminifera) from the limestone cobble in Tsukeng Village, Nantou, Taiwan is described briefly, and the cobble may be carried out from the Eocene Hakurei Formation, Taichung County, of the Backbone Range of Taiwan.

  1. Impact of seawater pCO2 on calcification and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera calcite: results from culturing experiments with Ammonia tepida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dissard, D.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence of increasing concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide, especially in the surface ocean and its associated impacts on calcifying organisms, is accumulating. Among these organisms, benthic and planktonic foraminifera are responsible for a large amount of the globally precipitated calcium

  2. Increased temperature causes different carbon and nitrogen processing patterns in two common intertidal foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovits, Julia; Enge, Annekatrin Julie; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Heinz, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Benthic foraminifera are highly abundant heterotrophic protists in marine sediments, but future environmental changes will challenge the tolerance limits of intertidal species. Metabolic rates and physiological processes in foraminifera are strongly dependent on environmental temperatures. Temperature-related stress could therefore impact foraminiferal food source processing efficiency and might result in altered nutrient fluxes through the intertidal food web. In this study, we performed a laboratory feeding experiment on Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica, two dominant foraminiferal species of the German Wadden Sea/Friedrichskoog, to test the effect of temperature on phytodetritus retention. The specimens were fed with 13C and 15N labelled freeze-dried Dunaliella tertiolecta (green algae) at the start of the experiment and were incubated at 20, 25 and 30 °C respectively. Dual labelling was applied to observe potential temperature effects on the relation of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen retention. Samples were taken over a period of 2 weeks. Foraminiferal cytoplasm was isotopically analysed to investigate differences in carbon and nitrogen uptake derived from the food source. Both species showed a positive response to the provided food source, but carbon uptake rates of A. tepida were 10-fold higher compared to those of H. germanica. Increased temperatures had a far stronger impact on the carbon uptake of H. germanica than on A. tepida. A distinct increase in the levels of phytodetrital-derived nitrogen (compared to more steady carbon levels) could be observed over the course of the experiment in both species. The results suggest that higher temperatures have a significant negative effect on the carbon exploitation of H. germanica. For A. tepida, higher carbon uptake rates and the enhanced tolerance range for higher temperatures could outline an advantage in warmer periods if the main food source consists of chlorophyte phytodetritus. These conditions are

  3. Living deep-sea benthic foraminifera from the Cap de Creus Canyon (western Mediterranean): Faunal-geochemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Rosales, L. A.; Koho, K. A.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; de Stigter, H. C.; García, R.; Koning, E.; Epping, E.

    2012-06-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained benthic foraminifera were sampled along a depth transect from the Cap de Creus Canyon and the adjacent slope. Well-stained individuals were studied in the top 5 cm of sediment and the faunal abundances and assemblages were compared against pore-water geochemistry and biochemical composition of the sediment. Total standing stocks (TSS) of foraminifera were positively correlated with the chloroplastic pigment equivalents inventory (CPEinv; here interpreted as food quantity) and the ratio of chlorophyll-a and phaeopigment inventories (Chl-ainv/Phaeoinv; here interpreted as food quality), suggesting food quality as well as quantity play an important role in structuring the foraminiferal community. Food quality and food quantity were also identified by detrended correspondence analyses (DCA) as being the most important environmental parameters shaping the foraminiferal community structure (abundance and faunal composition). In addition, sediment redox chemistry (based here on pore-water nitrate) played an important role in controlling the foraminiferal diversity (H‧) as a negative correlation was seen between this parameter and pore-water nitrate penetration depth (NPD). No conclusive evidence of intense physical disturbance on the benthic canyon community was observed, although it could be anticipated in the area due to shelf-water downwelling (SWD) and dense shelf-water cascading (DSWC). However, foraminiferal faunas living in the canyon head and upper canyon environments may profit from the higher organic-matter availability, which is likely to be related to SWD and DSWC. The similarity between the deeper canyon and slope faunas suggests that sediment characteristics and the associated organic-matter transported by SWC and DSWC do not have a permanent effect at these depths.

  4. Recent Invasion of the Symbiont-Bearing Foraminifera Pararotalia into the Eastern Mediterranean Facilitated by the Ongoing Warming Trend.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schmidt

    Full Text Available The eastern Mediterranean is a hotspot of biological invasions. Numerous species of Indo-pacific origin have colonized the Mediterranean in recent times, including tropical symbiont-bearing foraminifera. Among these is the species Pararotalia calcariformata. Unlike other invasive foraminifera, this species was discovered only two decades ago and is restricted to the eastern Mediterranean coast. Combining ecological, genetic and physiological observations, we attempt to explain the recent invasion of this species in the Mediterranean Sea. Using morphological and genetic data, we confirm the species attribution to P. calcariformata McCulloch 1977 and identify its symbionts as a consortium of diatom species dominated by Minutocellus polymorphus. We document photosynthetic activity of its endosymbionts using Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorometry and test the effects of elevated temperatures on growth rates of asexual offspring. The culturing of asexual offspring for 120 days shows a 30-day period of rapid growth followed by a period of slower growth. A subsequent 48-day temperature sensitivity experiment indicates a similar developmental pathway and high growth rate at 28°C, whereas an almost complete inhibition of growth was observed at 20°C and 35°C. This indicates that the offspring of this species may have lower tolerance to cold temperatures than what would be expected for species native to the Mediterranean. We expand this hypothesis by applying a Species Distribution Model (SDM based on modern occurrences in the Mediterranean using three environmental variables: irradiance, turbidity and yearly minimum temperature. The model reproduces the observed restricted distribution and indicates that the range of the species will drastically expand westwards under future global change scenarios. We conclude that P. calcariformata established a population in the Levant because of the recent warming in the region. In line with observations from other

  5. PFR²: a curated database of planktonic foraminifera 18S ribosomal DNA as a resource for studies of plankton ecology, biogeography and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Darling, Kate F; Mahé, Frédéric; Audic, Stéphane; Ujiié, Yurika; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Seears, Heidi A; Wade, Christopher M; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Douady, Christophe J; Escarguel, Gilles; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (Rhizaria) are ubiquitous marine pelagic protists producing calcareous shells with conspicuous morphology. They play an important role in the marine carbon cycle, and their exceptional fossil record serves as the basis for biochronostratigraphy and past climate reconstructions. A major worldwide sampling effort over the last two decades has resulted in the establishment of multiple large collections of cryopreserved individual planktonic foraminifera samples. Thousands of 18S rDNA partial sequences have been generated, representing all major known morphological taxa across their worldwide oceanic range. This comprehensive data coverage provides an opportunity to assess patterns of molecular ecology and evolution in a holistic way for an entire group of planktonic protists. We combined all available published and unpublished genetic data to build PFR(2), the Planktonic foraminifera Ribosomal Reference database. The first version of the database includes 3322 reference 18S rDNA sequences belonging to 32 of the 47 known morphospecies of extant planktonic foraminifera, collected from 460 oceanic stations. All sequences have been rigorously taxonomically curated using a six-rank annotation system fully resolved to the morphological species level and linked to a series of metadata. The PFR(2) website, available at http://pfr2.sb-roscoff.fr, allows downloading the entire database or specific sections, as well as the identification of new planktonic foraminiferal sequences. Its novel, fully documented curation process integrates advances in morphological and molecular taxonomy. It allows for an increase in its taxonomic resolution and assures that integrity is maintained by including a complete contingency tracking of annotations and assuring that the annotations remain internally consistent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Foraminifera and paleoenvironment of the Plio-Pleistocene Kallithea Bay section, Rhodes, Greece: Evidence for cyclic sedimentation and shallow-water sapropels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Thomsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 250 species of benthic foraminifera have been identified from the Plio-Pleistocene strata of the Kallithea Bay section on the eastern coast of Rhodes. The section comprises an overall transgressive succession ranging from fluviatile and brackish-water gravel at the base to fine-grained dee...... beds in the Kallithea Bay section are interpreted as shallow water extensions of sapropels. The shallowest of the laminated beds were deposited at water depth around 75 m....

  7. Determination on the chemical composition of Ammonia beccarii shell using SEM and EDX: Preliminary study of benthic foraminifera capacity in response to anthropogenic metal contamination in coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rositasari, R.; Suratno; Yogaswara, D.

    2018-02-01

    The use of single-celled and shelled biota, such as foraminifera that lives as benthic, in coastal environmental monitoring activity is very efficient. Several species of the Ammonia have been used as a proxy of various aquatic environmental monitoring activities. Chemical constituents screening in foraminiferal shell is a step ahead to identify the capacity of benthic foraminifera in responding to anthropogenic metal contamination in coastal water areas. The initial hypothesis of this study is the calcite test of Ammonia beccarii binds the anthropogenic metal in its shell structure and triggers the deformation test. The normal and abnormal shells of Ammonia specimens from Jakarta Bay and Batam waters are used in this study. The Ponar grab was used to sample surface sediment in Jakarta Bay and Batam waters in 2015, and the short core was used to acquire substratum sediment in Jakarta Bay in 2011.The Ammonia beccarii shell was analyzed using SEM and EDX detectors (Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive X-ray). The shooting was performed three times in each test, i.e. in the first chamber (proloculus), the last chamber and the chamber between the two. The main building blocks of the foraminifera test are oxygen with an average weight range of 42.86 - 58.79% and carbon with an average weight range of 17.69 - 26.32%. There is a tendency for low levels of C and O elements in the abnormal tests.

  8. Benthic foraminifera as tools in interpretation of subsurface hydrocarbon fluid flow at Veslemøy High and Hola-Vesterålen areas of the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Soma; Sauer, Simone; Knies, Jochen; Chand, Shyam; Jensen, Henning; Klug, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Relatively few studies have focused on high-latitude benthic foraminifera related to hydrocarbon seeps. In this study, we present micropaleontological data from 8 gravity cores from the Veslemøy High and 4 surface sediments (0-1cm) from Hola-Vesterålen, Norway. The study of hydrocarbon impregnation and its effect on benthic foraminfera was conducted on selected sediment samples from the calcium-rich Holocene sediments of the Veslemøy High. The assemblage of foraminifera have been identified from three regional clusters. Cluster I and II are dominated by benthic foraminifera Buccella, Cassidulina, Cibicides, Discopulvinulina, Epistominella, Pullenia and Trifarina. Cluster III is distinct with an elevated abundance of Cassidulina, Cibicides and Trifarina with significant (>5 %) occurrence of Nonionella and Uvigerina. There is no apparent dissolution on the preserved foraminifera. However, there can be differential dissolution or destruction of the more fragile (thinner-walled test) species like Epistominella, Nonionella or Pullenia while leaving behind over-represented species like Cibicides or Trifarina (both preferring coarse grained, high energy areas that can withstand permanent winnowing and redeposition) with higher preservation potential. Also, Cluster III is placed right over the underlying fault line with shallow seep-indications and thus the fluids released may have induced the dissolution of the fragile species. Moreover, the significant occurrence of benthic foraminifera Nonionella auris, and Uvigerina peregrina, in Holocene deposits of Cluster III may be indicative of environments influenced by hydrocarbon migration to the seafloor. Previous studies have reported active natural hydrocarbon seepage in the Hola area and the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane in the sediments suggests a predominantly thermogenic methane source. The seep-assemblage is composed of Cibicides (~60%), Cassidulina, Discanomalina, Textularia and

  9. ForCenS, a curated database of planktonic foraminifera census counts in marine surface sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Census counts of marine microfossils in surface sediments represent an invaluable resource for paleoceanography and for the investigation of macroecological processes. A prerequisite for such applications is the provision of data syntheses for individual microfossil groups. Specific to such syntheses is the necessity of taxonomical harmonisation across the constituent datasets, coupled with dereplication of previous compilations. Both of these aspects require expert knowledge, but with increasing number of records involved in such syntheses, the application of expert knowledge via manual curation is not feasible. Here we present a synthesis of planktonic foraminifera census counts in surface sediment samples, which is taxonomically harmonised, dereplicated and treated for numerical and other inconsistencies. The data treatment is implemented as an objective and largely automated pipeline, allowing us to reduce the initial 6,984 records to 4,205 counts from unique sites and informative technical or true replicates. We provide the final product and document the procedure, which can be easily adopted for other microfossil data syntheses.

  10. New evidence on the origin of non-spinose pitted-cancellate species of the early Danian planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ignacio; Arz, Jose Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Intermediate forms identified in some of the most continuous lower Danian sections allow a better understanding of the origin and evolution of pitted (Globanomalina) and cancellate (Praemurica) planktonic foraminifera. Both Globanomalina and Praemurica are part of a major Paleocene lineage, namely the "non-spinose lineage", which started to diverge in the early Danian. Transitional specimens strongly suggest the evolution from Parvularugoglobigerina to Globanomalina, and then to Praemurica. These evolutionary turnovers were quite rapid (probably lasting less than 10 kyr), and seem to have begun in the time equivalent of the lower part of the E. simplicissima Subzone, namely the middle part of the standard Zone Pa. The initial evolutionary trends within this non-spinose lineage were the increase of test size and lip thickness, and the evolution from tiny pore-murals to large pore-pits, and from smooth to pitted and finally cancellate walls. Biostratigraphic data suggest that evolution of the wall texture preceded the morphological evolution within each genus. The oldest species of both Globanomalina and Praemurica, namely G. archeocompressa and Pr. taurica, initially retained the external morphology of the ancestral Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina. Since their divergence, Globanomalina and Praemurica followed a separate evolutionary path, evolving into morphologically different species.

  11. Early diagenetic overprint in Caribbean sediment cores and its effect on the geochemical composition of planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Regenberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Early diagenetic features are noticed in the vicinity of carbonate platforms. Planktonic foraminifera of two tropical Atlantic deep-sea sediment cores show the strict relation between micro-scale euhydral crystallites of inorganic precipitates, higher oxygen isotope values and Mg/Ca ratios, and lower Sr/Ca ratios than expected for their pelagic environment in the time interval of ~100 000–550 000 calendar years before present. Laser ablation Mg/Ca (Sr/Ca of crystallite-bearing foraminiferal chamber walls revealed 4–6 times elevated (2–3 times depleted ratios, when ablating the diagenetic overgrowth. Crystalline overgrowth in proportion of 10–20% are estimated to cause the observed geochemical alteration. The extent of foraminiferal Mg/Ca alteration, moreover, seems to be controlled by the composition of the bulk sediment, especially the content of high-magnesium calcite. Anomalous ratios of >6 mmol/mol only occur, when high-magnesium calcite has dissolved within the sediment. The older parts (back to ~800 kyrs of the records are characterized by similar trends of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca. We discuss possible scenarios to accommodate the obtained geochemical information.

  12. Environmental monitoring through protist next-generation sequencing metabarcoding: assessing the impact of fish farming on benthic foraminifera communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jan; Esling, Philippe; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Cedhagen, Tomas; Wilding, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The measurement of species diversity represents a powerful tool for assessing the impacts of human activities on marine ecosystems. Traditionally, the impact of fish farming on the coastal environment is evaluated by monitoring the dynamics of macrobenthic infaunal populations. However, taxonomic sorting and morphology-based identification of the macrobenthos demand highly trained specialists and are extremely time-consuming and costly, making it unsuitable for large-scale biomonitoring efforts involving numerous samples. Here, we propose to alleviate this laborious task by developing protist metabarcoding tools based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) of environmental DNA and RNA extracted from sediment samples. In this study, we analysed the response of benthic foraminiferal communities to the variation of environmental gradients associated with salmon farms in Scotland. We investigated the foraminiferal diversity based on ribosomal minibarcode sequences generated by the Illumina NGS technology. We compared the molecular data with morphospecies counts and with environmental gradients, including distance to cages and redox used as a proxy for sediment oxygenation. Our study revealed high variations between foraminiferal communities collected in the vicinity of fish farms and at distant locations. We found evidence for species richness decrease in impacted sites, especially visible in the RNA data. We also detected some candidate bioindicator foraminiferal species. Based on this proof-of-concept study, we conclude that NGS metabarcoding using foraminifera and other protists has potential to become a new tool for surveying the impact of aquaculture and other industrial activities in the marine environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The latest Paleocene to middle Eocene interval in the Bay of Biscay - preliminary results from calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, A.

    2009-04-01

    Calcareous plankton (calcareous nannofossils, planktic foraminifera) is currently studied from DSDP Site 401 during the latest Paleocene to Middle Eocene greenhouse episode. This site is situated on the edge of a tilted fault block underlying the southern edge of the Meriadzek terrace on the North Biscay margin and comprises a 100-m-thick, nearly complete sedimentary record of Paleocene to middle Eocene sediments covering the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as well as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. Detailed age control is achieved by calcareous nannofossil and planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy suggesting that the study interval covers the NP9 to NP16 and P5 to E13 biozones, respectively, with a pronounced condensed interval across the Early to Middle Eocene boundary (NP13/NP14). Besides DSDP Site 550 this site represents one of the most northern locations which consists of Paleogene carbonates and will provide us a more complete picture by considering also long-term records from the northern hemisphere. Here we present first assemblage data from the two plankton groups which are accompanied by planktic and benthic foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope data in order to unravel the impact of the long-term climate change on the planktic ecosystem during the Eocene greenhouse.

  14. Microsensor studies of photosynthesis and respiration in the larger symbiont bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera, and Amphisorus hemprichii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Rink, S.; Kühl, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The photosynthesis and respiration of the larger foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera and Amphisorus hemprichii was studied with O2, CO2, and pH microsensors, and with a miniature gas exchange chamber. The diffusive transport of O2 and CO2 through both perforate (A. lobifera) and imperforate (A....... No photoinhibition was observed up to an irradiance of 2000 pmol photons m-2 s-1. Net photosynthesis (at saturating irradiance) and dark respiration rates were 3.7-22.7 and 5.6-14.3 nmol O2 foraminifer-1 h-1, respectively. Simultaneous CO2, pH and O2 measurements at the shell surface of A. hemprichii during...... experimental light-dark cycles showed rapid concentration changes of all three variables upon light-dark or dark-light shifts. The dynamics of O2 and CO2 at the shell surface of A. hemprichii showed unequal net conversion rates of O2 and CO2 during experimental light-dark cycles. The molar O2/CO2 conversion...

  15. Compositions of foraminifera-rich turbidite sediments from the Shenhu area on the northern slope of the South China Sea: Implication for the presence of deep water bottom currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Niu; Feng, Dong; Chen, Linying; Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Duofu

    2017-05-01

    The sediments in gravity core DH-1, collected from Shenhu area on the northern slope of the South China Sea, are composed of two dark grey clay silt layers (A1 and A3) and two foraminifera-rich layers (A2 and A4) (A1 is the top layer and A4 is the bottom layer). Major and trace metal contents, along with grain size and mineralogic data suggest that these silt layers represent background hemipelagic sedimentation. Unlike silt layers, the intervening foraminifera-rich layerA4 exhibits a fining-upward trend, is distal turbidite. Grain size CM diagram and the sharp contacts between the foraminifera-rich layer A2 and the upper and lower layers suggest layer A2 is the result of depositional interaction between turbidite and bottom currents. AMS 14C dating of planktonic foraminifera indicate the age of the turbidite in A2 is between15.3 ka and 22.6 ka. We hypothesize that turbidite formation in this period was related to the increase supply of terrigenous matter since the Last Glacial Maximum. The rapid deposition of each turbidite led to reduced rates of oxygen diffusion into the sediment, allowing anoxic conditions develop in sediments and fostering U enrichment (>3.1 μg/g) in foraminifera-rich layer A4b. In contrast, decrease concentration of U and U/Mo ratios in foraminifera-rich layerA2, which is possibly due to U remobilization as a consequence of downward penetration of the oxidation front from the oxygen rich bottom currents. These new data suggest that authigenic U was quite sensitive to the inflow of bottom currents, and U/Mo ratios may indicate the depositional environmental change in relation to the bottom current action on the turbidite.

  16. Central Tropical Pacific Variability And ENSO Response To Changing Climate Boundary Conditions: Evidence From Individual Line Island Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustic, G. T.; Polissar, P. J.; Ravelo, A. C.; White, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays a dominant role in Earth's climate variability. Paleoceanographic evidence suggests that ENSO has changed in the past, and these changes have been linked to large-scale climatic shifts. While a close relationship between ENSO evolution and climate boundary conditions has been predicted, testing these predictions remains challenging. These climate boundary conditions, including insolation, the mean surface temperature gradient of the tropical Pacific, global ice volume, and tropical thermocline depth, often co-vary and may work together to suppress or enhance the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks that drive ENSO variability. Furthermore, suitable paleo-archives spanning multiple climate states are sparse. We have aimed to test ENSO response to changing climate boundary conditions by generating new reconstructions of mixed-layer variability from sedimentary archives spanning the last three glacial-interglacial cycles from the Central Tropical Pacific Line Islands, where El Niño is strongly expressed. We analyzed Mg/Ca ratios from individual foraminifera to reconstruct mixed-layer variability at discrete time intervals representing combinations of climatic boundary conditions from the middle Holocene to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 8. We observe changes in the mixed-layer temperature variability during MIS 5 and during the previous interglacial (MIS 7) showing significant reductions in ENSO amplitude. Differences in variability during glacial and interglacial intervals are also observed. Additionally, we reconstructed mixed-layer and thermocline conditions using multi-species Mg/Ca and stable isotope measurements to more fully characterize the state of the Central Tropical Pacific during these intervals. These reconstructions provide us with a unique view of Central Tropical Pacific variability and water-column structure at discrete intervals under varying boundary climate conditions with which to assess factors that shape ENSO

  17. Relationships Between Temperature, pH, and Crusting on Mg/Ca Ratios in Laboratory-Grown Neogloboquadrina Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Hill, Tessa M.; Russell, Ann D.; Spero, Howard J.

    2017-11-01

    Mg/Ca ratio paleothermometry in foraminifera is an important tool for the reconstruction and interpretation of past environments. However, existing Mg/Ca:temperature relationships for planktic species inhabiting middle- and high-latitude environments are limited by a lack of information about the development and impact of low-Mg/Ca ratio "crusts" and the influence of the carbonate system on Mg/Ca ratios in these groups. To address this, we cultured individual specimens of Neogloboquadrina incompta and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in seawater across a range of temperature (6°-12°C) and pH (7.4-8.2). We found by laser ablation inductively couple mass spectrometry analyses of shells that culture-grown crust calcite in N. incompta had a lower Mg/Ca ratio than ontogenetic calcite formed at the same temperature, suggesting that temperature is not responsible for the low-Mg/Ca ratio of neogloboquadrinid crusts. The Mg/Ca:temperature relationship for ontogenetic calcite in N. incompta was consistent with the previously published culture-based relationship, and no significant relationship was found between Mg/Ca ratios and pH in this species. However, the Mg/Ca ratio in laboratory-cultured N. pachyderma was much higher than that reported in previous core top and sediment trap samples, due to lack of crust formation in culture. Application of our ontogenetic calcite-specific Mg/Ca:temperature relationships to fossil N. pachyderma and N. incompta from five intervals in cores from the Santa Barbara Basin and the Bering Sea shows that excluding crust calcite in fossil specimens may improve Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates.

  18. Response of benthic foraminifera to organic matter quantity and quality and bioavailable concentrations of metals in Aveiro Lagoon (Portugal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virgínia Alves Martins

    Full Text Available This work analyses the distribution of living benthic foraminiferal assemblages of surface sediments in different intertidal areas of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal, a polihaline and anthropized coastal lagoon. The relationships among foraminiferal assemblages in association with environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, Eh and pH, grain size, the quantity and quality of organic matter (enrichment in carbohydrates, proteins and lipids, pollution caused by metals, and mineralogical data are studied in an attempt to identify indicators of adaptability to environmental stress. In particular, concentrations of selected metals in the surficial sediment are investigated to assess environmental pollution levels that are further synthetically parameterised by the Pollution Load Index (PLI. The PLI variations allowed the identification of five main polluted areas. Concentrations of metals were also analysed in three extracted phases to evaluate their possible mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the surficial sediment. Polluted sediment in the form of both organic matter and metals can be found in the most confined zones. Whereas enrichment in organic matter and related biopolymers causes an increase in foraminifera density, pollution by metals leads to a decline in foraminiferal abundance and diversity in those zones. The first situation may be justified by the existence of opportunistic species (with high reproduction rate that can live in low oxic conditions. The second is explained by the sensitivity of some species to pressure caused by metals. The quality of the organic matter found in these places and the option of a different food source should also explain the tolerance of several species to pollution caused by metals, despite their low reproductive rate in the most polluted areas. In this study, species that are sensitive and tolerant to organic matter and metal enrichment are identified, as is the differential sensitivity/tolerance of

  19. Biotic response of benthic foraminifera to 4 ka cooling event in the Nakdong River delta of the southeast Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroyuki; Khim, Boo-Keun; Cheong, Daekyo; Shin, Seungwon

    2017-04-01

    It has been reported that the cooling event at 4 ka caused climatic deterioration in the world, which is closely associated with the decline/development of the civilizations (e.g., Kawahata et al., 2009). In particular, various climate events at about 4 ka have been reported in the East Asian margin such as the decline pattern of total sulfur content in Lake Tougou-ike (southwest Japan) (Kato et al., 2003), and the enhanced precipitation and freshwater event in northeast China (Hong et al., 2005) and South Korea (Lim et al., 2015). We investigated fossil benthic foraminiferal faunas at two borehole cores (ND-01: landward site and ND-02: seaward site) drilled at the Nakdong River delta in the southeastern coast of Korea, in order to reveal whether the paleoclimate changes across 4 ka occurred in the southeast Korea. The planktonic/total foraminiferal ratio (P/T ratio) and MDS axis 1, representing the faunal composition, show temporal decline at 4 ka at core ND-01, despite no marked change at core ND-02. In contrast, MDS axis 2, which is negatively related to the dominance of Haynesina sp. A (an opportunistic species in organic-rich condition of neritic environments), at core ND-01 shows positive shift across 4 ka. These biotic changes are interpreted as the increase of river water discharge with rainfalls by East Asian summer monsoon and the weakening of northwestly winds possibly with East Asian winter monsoon. Thus, despite insufficient, benthic foraminifera in the Nakdong River delta likely experienced the paleoclimate change across 4 ka.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shell weights of planktonic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber in the size range of 300–355 μm were measured from sediment traps in the western and eastern Arabian Sea which represent upwelling and non-upwelling conditions respectively. In the Western Arabian Sea Trap (WAST), G. ruber flux ranged from 33.3 ...

  1. Attempt of absolute dating and reconstitutions of climate changes in the Caribbean Sea: multi-proxy approaches to planktonic foraminifera and fine aragonitic fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulcre, S.

    2008-06-01

    Absolute dating of climate archives is essential to better understand climate mechanisms. A marine sediment core from the Caribbean Sea enriched in fine-grained aragonite (suitable to U/Th dating) has been studied for both planktonic foraminifera tests (≥150 μm) and fine fraction (≤63 μm) over the last one million years using mineralogical and geochemical approaches. This study aims at i) examining lead/lag of δ 18 O and radiometric ages of the different-size fractions and ii) reconstructing paleo-environment in the area. The fine fraction mineralogy is strongly influenced by glacial-interglacial sea level changes. The offset of δ 18 O and 14 C ages between the fine and foraminifera fractions during Termination I is partly explained by a bioturbation model. Attempt of U/Th dating to Termination II and V reveals that the fine fraction contains non-radiogenic Th, which needs further analytical development. Reconstructed surface water δ 18 O changes suggest a decrease in surface water salinity at the end of Mid-Pleistocene Transition related to ITCZ position over the Caribbean Sea. (author)

  2. Application of large benthic foraminifera as a tool for interpretation of paleoclimate and water depth, in the Ziyarat Formation, Alborz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi Mehr, M.; Adabi, M. H.

    2009-04-01

    The Ziyarat Formation, with a total thickness of 213 m, is a shallow warm water limestone, overlies the Fajan conglomerate and is overlain by tufaceous siltstone of the Karj Formation. The age of late Paleocene- Middle Eocene was considered for the Ziyarat Formation at the type section. From late Paleocene towards Middle Eocene, temperature has increased (Scheibner et al., 2005). This rising temperature has intensified and giving way to an unprecedented expansion of Large Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) dominating Tethyan platform during Middle Eocene (Scheibner et al., 2005). δ18O paleotemperature calculation based on heaviest oxygen isotope value of micrite and δ18Ow of Eocene seawater of 0.85 SMOW shows that temperature was around 39˚C in the study area. In response to continued global warming during Paleocene-Eocene Termal Maximum (PETM), some organisms (such as corals) has been declined, while at the same time, L.B.F. were increasingly favored as dominant carbonate producing organisms in oligotrophic environment (Scheibner et al., 2008). For the even warmer period of PTEM a transient rise in sea-surface temperature of 4-5˚C in low latitudes and 8 to 10˚ C in high latitudes has been proposed based on Mg/Ca ratios of planktic foraminifera (Zachos et al., 2003; Tripati and Elderfield, 2004). Thus, L.B.F was able to exploit their niche as evidenced by their increase in size, species diversity and their overwhelming abundance. In the Ziyarat Formation, 11 microfacies were recognized from the shallower to deeper part of the platform. The lack of evidence of resedimentation, e.g. turbidite, related to steep slop, and absence of reefal facies and widespread tidal flat deposits indicate that the Ziyarat Formation was deposited in a homocline carbonate ramp environment. The evaporite facies, dolomicrite, intraclast ooid packstone to grainstone, Miliolid wackestone, and Alveolina nummulite packstone belong to inner ramp sub-environment; middle ramp microfacies composed

  3. The importance of large benthic foraminifera to reef island sediment budget and dynamics at Raine Island, northern Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, John L.; Smithers, Scott G.; Hua, Quan

    2014-10-01

    Low-lying reef islands are among the most vulnerable environments on earth to anthropogenic-induced climate change and sea-level rise over the next century because they are low, composed of unconsolidated sediment that is able to be mobilised by waves and currents, and depend on sediments supplied by reef organisms that are particularly sensitive to environmental changes (e.g. ocean temperatures and chemistry). Therefore, the spatial and temporal links between active carbonate production and island formation and dynamics are fundamental to predicting future island resilience, yet remain poorly quantified. In this paper we present results of a detailed geomorphological and sedimentological study of a reef and sand cay on the northern Great Barrier Reef. We provide an empirical investigation of the temporal linkages between sediment production and reef island development using a large collection of single grain AMS 14C dates. Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are the single most important contributor to contemporary island sand mass (47%; ranging from 36% to 63%) at Raine Island, reflecting rapid rates of sediment production and delivery. Standing stock data reveal extremely high production rates on the reef (1.8 kg m- 2 yr- 1), while AMS 14C dates of single LBF tests indicate rapid rates of sediment transferral across the reef. We also demonstrate that age is statistically related to preservation and taphonomic grade (severely abraded tests > moderately abraded tests > pristine tests). We construct a contemporary reef and island sediment budget model for Raine Island that shows that LBF (Baculogypsina, Marginopora and Amphistegina) contribute 55% of the sediment produced on the reef annually, of which a large proportion (54%) contribute to the net annual accretion of the island. The tight temporal coupling between LBF growth and island sediment supply combined with the sensitivity of LBF to bleaching and ocean acidification suggests that islands dominated by LBF are

  4. The ecology and distribution of benthic foraminifera at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (SW Barents Sea slope)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenburg, J. E.; Mackensen, A.

    2009-08-01

    To investigate a possible influence of submarine methane seepage on benthic foraminiferal communities, Rose Bengal stained ("live") and empty tests of benthic foraminifera were studied from the sediment surface down to 15 cm sub-bottom depth of 12 sites at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV). In addition, one reference site well away from the seep sites, but from similar water depths and the same general hydrographic setting was occupied for comparison. The HMMV is located at 1265 m water depth on the SW Barents Sea continental slope. Distinct living foraminiferal associations at the HMMV are linked to specific sedimentary, microbial, and macrofaunal habitats. In the center of the crater, and in crater areas completely covered by bacterial mats, Cassidulina reniforme is the only, albeit rare, living species. Below the top few millimeters, sediments are anoxic and devoid of living specimens. At the rim of the mud volcano, at sites densely populated by pogonophoran tube worms, three benthic foraminiferal associations are found; (i) a Fontbotia wuellerstorfi-Lobatula lobatula association living attached to the upper parts of pogonophoran tubes, which protrude into oxic water, (ii) a diverse Cassidulina neoteretis association populating dysoxic sediments of the surface centimeter, and (iii) a species-poor Bolivina pseudopunctata association colonizing the subsurface sediments down to four centimeters. Generally, we did not find endemic or seep indicative species or associations at the HMMV. However, the HMMV live faunas dominated by B. pseudopunctata are not found at the reference site nor are they described from comparable water depths and environments without gas seepages from the Norwegian-Greenland Seas. In the center and outer rim of the mud volcano, a C. neoteretis-Reophax guttifer dead association, similar to the one at the reference site, characterizes an assemblage of strongly corroded and partly displaced tests. At bacterial mat sites, a C. reniforme dead

  5. The effect of carbonate chemistry and light levels on calcification and photosynthesis in the larger benthic foraminifera Operculina ammonoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Shai; Abramovich, Sigal; Evans, David; Erez, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    We present data on metabolic measurements and growth experiments conducted on Operculina ammonoides, a symbiont bearing larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) of the family Nummulitidae, which is the closest living descendant of the Eocene Nummulites. The large size, the high abundance and wide distribution of Nummulitids and other LBF make them a vital archive for ancient and recent oceanic environments. LBF are also an important component of the ocean tropical and subtropical benthic ecosystem, where they have a significant contribution to primary production, and are major calcium carbonate producers. Their symbiosis, calcification physiology, and ecological response to environmental changes are poorly understood. The present study is part of an ongoing research effort focused on those topics. Calcification, respiration and symbiont photosynthesis were measured during long-term experiments that included manipulation of carbonate chemistry parameters and light levels. The experiments were done with large number of individuals (1500 in total) divided into incubation groups of 60-100. Diurnal and nocturnal data was obtained, along with cumulative incubations on a time span of a few days. The metabolic rates were estimated from measurements of dissolved oxygen, total alkalinity and pH before and after the incubations. This technique does not interfere with the experimental populations and allow a series of measurements to be performed on the same specimens. In all experiments, both for the diurnal cycles and for the long incubations, we observed significantly higher photosynthesis rates than respiration (positive O2 budget) for the holobiont. This oxygen excess has increased with light intensity, suggesting a significant growth of the symbionts within their host. Calcification was enhanced during the day compared to the night but did not increase with light intensity or with photosynthesis. In normal seawater, higher calcification rates were observed during the cumulative

  6. Mg/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera: the potential to reconstruct past variations in temperature and hypoxia in shelf regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Groeneveld

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Shelf and coastal regions are exceptionally important for many countries as they provide the main habitat for many economically important fish and shellfish species. With ongoing climate change and human-induced eutrophication the shelf regions are especially affected, resulting in increased temperatures and stratification as well as oxygen depletion of the bottom waters. In order to be able to predict the magnitude of these changes in the future, it is necessary to study how they varied in the past. Commonly used foraminiferal climate and environmental proxies, e.g., stable isotopes and trace metal/Ca ratios, that are applied in open-ocean settings are not necessarily applicable in shelf regions, either as faunas are significantly different or as conditions can change much faster compared to the open ocean. In this study we explore the use of Mg/Ca as paleothermometer and Mn/Ca as a potential proxy for changing dissolved oxygen conditions in bottom water on the benthic foraminifera Bulimina marginata and Globobulimina turgida. Living specimens were collected from the Skagerrak and the Gullmar Fjord (SW Sweden; the latter is hypoxic for several months a year. As the specimens were alive when collected, we assume it unlikely that any diagenetic coatings have already significantly affected the trace metal/Ca ratios. The Mg/Ca ratios are similar to previously published values but display much larger variation than would be expected from the annual temperature change of less than 2 °C. An additional impact of the difference in the calcite saturation state between the Skagerrak and the Gullmar Fjord could explain the results. Mn/Ca ratios from G. turgida can potentially be related to variations in dissolved oxygen of the habitat where the foraminifera calcify. Samples from the Skagerrak display increased Mn/Ca in specimens that lived deeper in the sediment than those that lived near the surface. G. turgida samples from the low-oxygen Gullmar Fjord

  7. Incorporation of Mg and Sr in calcite of cultured benthic foraminifera: impact of calcium concentration and associated calcite saturation state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raitzsch

    2010-03-01

    -sea benthic foraminifera typically used for paleostudies, the higher Ca concentrations in the past may potentially bias temperature reconstructions to a considerable degree. For instance, 25 Myr ago Mg/Ca ratios in A. tepida would have been 0.2 mmol/mol lower than today, due to the 1.5 times higher [Ca2+] of seawater, which in turn would lead to a temperature underestimation of more than 2 °C.

  8. Coccolithophore and benthic foraminifera distribution patterns in the Gulf of Cadiz and Western Iberian Margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B.; Grunert, P.; Ausin, B.; Hodell, D.; Flores, J.-A.; Alvarez-Zarikian, C. A.; Hernandez-Molina, F. J.; Stow, D.; Piller, W. E.; Paytan, A.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time during an Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition (Exp. 339, Mediterranean Outflow) water samples for living coccolithophore distributions and mudline samples for coccoliths, benthic foraminifera, and geochemical analyses in the underlying surface sediments were collected. In total, 14 water samples (from 5 to 20 m water depth) and 7 mudline samples were gathered at the drill sites. Coccolithophore distributions show spatial variations in species diversity. In particular, assemblages that characterize the Western Iberian Margin differ from those in the Gulf of Cadiz, indicative of oceanographic and environmental controls on the community in the upper ocean (0-20 m depth). Comparison of the living assemblages to those in surface sediments shows differences in the presence of some species, suggesting the influence of post deposition sedimentary processes. Other factors such as the season of sampling and the limited sampling depth may also have a role in the differences recorded. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages seem to be primarily determined by source, quantity and quality of available food. Sites in the Gulf of Cadiz are bathed by Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) and characterized by a considerable amount of advected food particles. Elevated epibenthic foraminifera exploit this niche, while arborescent epifaunal and infaunal taxa thrive on food particles falling out of MOW. The combined data suggest different flow speeds and settling of MOW suspension load in the Gulf of Cadiz. In contrast, assemblages from the Western Iberian Margin located farthest from or outside of MOW are determined by local export productivity and mirror trophic conditions in the surface waters. Both assemblages reveal variation in the composition at intermediate and deep water depths along the southern and western Iberian Margins with distance from the Strait of Gibraltar.

  9. The Chicxulub impact is synchronous with the planktonic foraminifera mass extinction at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary: new evidence from the Moncada section, Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, I.; Arz, J.A.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Melendez, A.; Rojas-Consuegra, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Moncada section, western Cuba, is one of the few sections across the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean where an Ir anomaly has been identified toward and above the top of a clastic unit, locally called the Moncada Formation (Fm.). The Moncada Fm. is enriched in ejecta (altered glass spherules, shocked quartz, melt rock fragments, etc.) and represents the local Complex Clastic Unit (CCU) linked to the Chicxulub impact event. This CCU is overlain by a 2-3cm thick bed of Ir-rich, dark, calcareous claystone which represents the “K/T Boundary Clay” at Moncada. All lowermost Danian Planktonic Foraminiferal zones and Acme-Stages (PFAS) were identified, suggesting stratigraphic continuity across the Danian and indicating that the Moncada Fm. is K/Pg boundary in age. High-resolution biostratigraphic data suggest that the mass extinction event of planktonic foraminifera at the K/Pg boundary was more severe than previously suggested. The absence of cosmopolitan, generalist Cretaceous species in the Danian deposits of Moncada supports the hypothesis that only Guembelitria survived the mass extinction triggered by the Chicxulub impact event. The high Ir-concentration and the ejecta-rich clay laminations identified in the lowermost Danian of Moncada (Ancón Fm.) are explained partly as the redeposition of ejecta material eroded and reworked from higher topographic levels, still contaminated by toxic trace elements (e.g., Cu and Ni) of meteoritic origin. These pollutants of meteoritic origin could have affected the ecological conditions of the pelagic environment for thousands of years after the K/Pg boundary, being particularly intense just after the Chicxulub impact. The ecological stress due to the pollutants partly explains the catastrophic mass extinction of planktonic foraminifera at the K/Pg boundary and their subsequent evolutionary radiation. (Author)

  10. Planktonic foraminifera as bio-indicators for monitoring the climatic changes that have occurred over the past 2000 years in the southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirer, Fabrizio; Sprovieri, Mario; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Ferraro, Luciana; Pelosi, Nicola; Giordano, Laura; Capotondi, Lucilla

    2014-08-01

    A high-resolution integrated study has been performed in a super-expanded marine record (sedimentation rate spanning from 11 cm/100 years to 20 cm/100 years) from the continental shelf area of the southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea. Planktonic foraminiferal distribution illustrates 6 major environmental changes during the past 2000 years: (i) the Roman Period-Dark Age transition (from herbivorous-opportunistic to carnivorous species); (ii) the Dark Age-MCA transition (from carnivorous to herbivorous-opportunistic species); (iii) the Medieval Classic Anomaly-Little Ice Age transition (a further and definitive change from carnivorous to herbivorous-opportunistic species); (iv) the period during the Maunder event between approximately 1720 AD and 1740 AD (turnover from the carnivorous planktonic foraminifer Globigerinodes ruber to the herbivorous-opportunistic planktonic foraminifer Turborotalita quinqueloba); (v) the Industrial Period (dominance of herbivorous-opportunistic planktonic foraminifera); and (vi) the Modern Warm Period at approximately 1940 AD (the last turnover in favor of herbivorous-opportunistic planktonic foraminifers, associated with an increase in benthic foraminifera). Our studies lead us to link this latter feature to an anthropogenic impact associated with the damming of Sele River (Salerno Gulf) at 1934 AD, which induced a change in the sediment input with a strong decrease in coarse-grained fraction and a probable alteration in nutrient supply. The δ(18) OG. ruber record of the past 2000 years shows the alternation of warm/wet and cold/dry events related to the Roman Period, the Dark Age, the Medieval Classic Anomaly, the Little Ice Age, the Industrial Period and the Modern Warm Period. The 5 evident δ(18) OG. ruber oscillations (between approximately 1325 AD and 1940 AD) coincide with the 5 minima in the solar activity record (Wolf, Spörer, Maunder, Dalton and Damon events). © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of

  11. Late Quaternary climate change from δ18O records of multiple species of planktonic foraminifera: High-resolution records from the Anoxic Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ling; Peterson, Larry C.; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Murray, David W.

    1997-06-01

    Seasonal trade wind-induced upwelling along the southern margin of the Caribbean Sea occurs in response to the annual migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Laminated, high deposition rate sediments of the Cariaco Basin, a small anoxic basin on the Venezuelan continental shelf, clearly record large changes in the past intensity of this upwelling. Because sediments of the Cariaco Basin are largely unbioturbated, they offer a natural opportunity to study the stable isotopic records of multiple planktonic foraminiferal taxa and to evaluate their sensitivity to both the modern hydrography and temporal changes in upwelling intensity and climate. Oxygen isotope data (δ18O) from four dominant foraminiferal taxa are presented for the time period covering the last 28 kyr. The δ18O data from Globigerina bulloides, after correction for nonequilibrium precipitation, are used as a monitor of sea surface conditions during the winter-spring upwelling season. The δ18O data from white Globigerinoides ruber are used as a measure of annual-average conditions in the near surface, while pink G. ruber data are consistent with use as an index of endmember conditions during the summer-fall nonupwelling season. Data from the deeper dwelling Neogloboquadrina dutertrei yield information on conditions near the base of the local thermocline. During the last glacial, δ18O data from G. ruber and generally reduced interspecific differences indicate cooling of surface waters over the Cariaco Basin by up to 4°C. This longer-term cooling does not appear to be related to changes in upwelling intensity along the coast but may instead reflect more regional cooling of the larger Caribbean. Superimposed on this pattern, between 12.6 and ˜10 ka, is a convergence of δ18O data between G. bulloides and N. dutertrei, implying much stronger upwelling during the last deglaciation. This scenario is consistent with other evidence for high productivity at this time. At ˜14 ka, a sharp δ18O

  12. Variation in the composition of corals, fishes, sponges, echinoderms, ascidians, molluscs, foraminifera and macroalgae across a pronounced in-to-offshore environmental gradient in the Jakarta Bay-Thousand Islands coral reef complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Renema, W; Hoeksema, B W; Rachello-Dolmen, P G; Moolenbeek, R G; Budiyanto, A; Yahmantoro; Tuti, Y; Giyanto; Draisma, S G A; Prud'homme van Reine, W F; Hariyanto, R; Gittenberger, A; Rikoh, M S; de Voogd, N J

    2016-09-30

    Substrate cover, water quality parameters and assemblages of corals, fishes, sponges, echinoderms, ascidians, molluscs, benthic foraminifera and macroalgae were sampled across a pronounced environmental gradient in the Jakarta Bay-Thousand Islands reef complex. Inshore sites mainly consisted of sand, rubble and turf algae with elevated temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and chlorophyll concentrations and depauperate assemblages of all taxa. Live coral cover was very low inshore and mainly consisted of sparse massive coral heads and a few encrusting species. Faunal assemblages were more speciose and compositionally distinct mid- and offshore compared to inshore. There were, however, small-scale differences among taxa. Certain midshore sites, for example, housed assemblages resembling those typical of the inshore environment but this differed depending on the taxon. Substrate, water quality and spatial variables together explained from 31% (molluscs) to 72% (foraminifera) of the variation in composition. In general, satellite-derived parameters outperformed locally measured parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EMP and SIMS studies on Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca systematics in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian OMZ: a contribution to the identification of potential redox proxies and the impact of cleaning protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, N.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Hensen, C.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present an initial dataset of Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) determined with SIMS. These results are a contribution to a better understanding of the proxy potential of these elemental ratios for ambient redox conditions. Foraminiferal tests are often contaminated by diagenetic coatings, like Mn rich carbonate- or Fe and Mn rich (oxyhydr)oxide coatings. Thus, it is substantial to assure that...

  14. Environmental impact of the largest petroleum terminal in SE Brazil: A multiproxy analysis based on sediment geochemistry and living benthic foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wânia Duleba

    Full Text Available The Dutos e Terminais do Centro Sul (DTCS is one of the largest petroleum terminals of the South America located in the São Sebastião Channel (SSC on the southeastern Brazilian coast. The aims of this study were to compare the sediment quality near the DTCS with that of several sites in the SSC region including the Araçá (AR domestic sewage outfall and to assess the efficiency of the DTCS wastewater treatment plant. To achieve these goals, textural, geochemical, and living benthic foraminifera results were analyzed for the DTCS, AR, and SSC regions. Sediments in the DTCS area were silty with high concentrations of total organic carbon (1.7-2.4%, total nitrogen (0.2-0.3%, total sulfur (0.4-0.6%, and total (0.12-0.18% and inorganic phosphorous (0.07-0.11%. These values were higher than those in sediments collected in the SSC and Araçá regions. The sediments' concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the SSC and AR regions were lower than their corresponding probable effect levels (PELs. However, sediments near the DTCS were enriched with As, Cu, and Ni, whose concentrations exceeded their corresponding threshold effect levels (TELs. Around the DTCS outfall diffusers, living foraminiferal densities and diversities were lower than those for the other areas studied. In the DTCS area, it was necessary to search 50 to 190 cm3 of sediment to find 100 live specimens. In the SSC and Araçá areas, a maximum of 40 cm3 of sediment was enough to locate 100 live specimens. The lower density and diversity of living foraminifera around the DTCS than around the other areas illustrates the impact of the environmental stress caused by the presence of pollutants. These results indicate that the wastewater treatment plant efficiency is low and its discharge of pollutants from petrochemical waste liquids affects the benthic fauna around the DTCS in a potentially harmful manner.

  15. Environmental impact of the largest petroleum terminal in SE Brazil: A multiproxy analysis based on sediment geochemistry and living benthic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleba, Wânia; Teodoro, Andreia C; Debenay, Jean-Pierre; Alves Martins, Maria Virgínia; Gubitoso, Silas; Pregnolato, Leonardo Antônio; Lerena, Laura Misailidis; Prada, Silvio Miranda; Bevilacqua, José Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    The Dutos e Terminais do Centro Sul (DTCS) is one of the largest petroleum terminals of the South America located in the São Sebastião Channel (SSC) on the southeastern Brazilian coast. The aims of this study were to compare the sediment quality near the DTCS with that of several sites in the SSC region including the Araçá (AR) domestic sewage outfall and to assess the efficiency of the DTCS wastewater treatment plant. To achieve these goals, textural, geochemical, and living benthic foraminifera results were analyzed for the DTCS, AR, and SSC regions. Sediments in the DTCS area were silty with high concentrations of total organic carbon (1.7-2.4%), total nitrogen (0.2-0.3%), total sulfur (0.4-0.6%), and total (0.12-0.18%) and inorganic phosphorous (0.07-0.11%). These values were higher than those in sediments collected in the SSC and Araçá regions. The sediments' concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the SSC and AR regions were lower than their corresponding probable effect levels (PELs). However, sediments near the DTCS were enriched with As, Cu, and Ni, whose concentrations exceeded their corresponding threshold effect levels (TELs). Around the DTCS outfall diffusers, living foraminiferal densities and diversities were lower than those for the other areas studied. In the DTCS area, it was necessary to search 50 to 190 cm3 of sediment to find 100 live specimens. In the SSC and Araçá areas, a maximum of 40 cm3 of sediment was enough to locate 100 live specimens. The lower density and diversity of living foraminifera around the DTCS than around the other areas illustrates the impact of the environmental stress caused by the presence of pollutants. These results indicate that the wastewater treatment plant efficiency is low and its discharge of pollutants from petrochemical waste liquids affects the benthic fauna around the DTCS in a potentially harmful manner.

  16. Core top confirmation of the carbonate ion effect in multiple species of planktic foraminifera and a reassessment of the upper water column equatorial Pacific δ13CFORAM records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera carbon (δ13CFORAM) and oxygen (δ18OFORAM) isotope records play a vital role in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18OFORAM values are typically minimally offset from equilibrium δ18O-calcite and are widely applied in oceanographic reconstructions of upper water column hydrography. In contrast, δ13CFORAM are underutilized in paleoceanographic reconstructions. δ13CFORAM are more difficult to interpret due to species-specific δ13CFORAM offsets from the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC). In this study, we analyzed the δ18OFORAM and δ13CFORAM of individual foraminifera shells from a suite of planktic foraminifer species obtained from core top (Holocene) intervals from Eastern Equatorial Pacific (TR163-19), Western Caribbean (ODP 999A), and Equatorial Indian Ocean (ODP 714A) cores. We also include published records from the Western Equatorial Pacific (MW91-9 15GGC). We find the δ13CFORAM offsets from the local water column δ13CDIC are large, variable, region specific, and are correlated to the ambient carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) of seawater. We show that the regional offsets from δ13CDIC are due to the carbonate ion effect (CIE) on δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997; Bijma et al., 1999) and variations in water column [CO32-]. More importantly, our results demonstrate that regional and/or culture based δ13CFORAM offsets from δ13CDIC are not applicable globally. Rather, owing to regional differences in water column [CO32-] and species-specific relationships between [CO32-] and δ13CFORAM, δ13CFORAM must be corrected for the regional CIE in order to infer vertical δ13CDIC gradients or to compare δ13CFORAM records from one region to another. Laboratory culture suggests the carbonate ion effect on δ18OFORAM is 1/3 that of δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997). Thus, in order to obtain correct δ18OFORAM temperatures or δ18OSW (when used in conjunction with Mg/Ca) the δ18OFORAM offsets from δ18

  17. HIGH-RESOLUTION ACOUSTIC MAPPING OF GAS CHARGED SEDIMENTS AND LIVING BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA ASSEMBLAGES FROM THE NE REGION OF THE GUANABARA BAY (RJ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielli Paula Delavy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed in the NE region of the Guanabara Bay, a highly impacted Brazilian coastal system, located in Rio de Janeiro State. It aimed to: i identify and map the areas with occurrence of gas in the sediment, as well as its acoustic signature; ii characterize the physical properties of the sediments and; iii document the response of microbenthic organisms (living benthic foraminifera to changes in quantity and quality of organic matter. Seismic surveys at the frequency of 12 kHz identified a large area with about 50% gas charged sediments in the study area. The main acoustic signatures of the shallow gas were black shadow and gas blanket. In addition, features related to gas seepages to the water column (acoustic plumes and pockmarks and gas percolation within the sediments (intra-sedimentary plumes, turbidity pinnacles were also identified. The gas has a biogenic origin and results from the high sedimentation rate between 0.03 to 0.9 cm.year-1 and from the decomposition of large amount of organic matter (10-20%. Vertical distribution of gas ranges from few centimeters to 9 m below the water-sediments interface. These occurrences are related to both gas migration from lower sedimentary layers to Holocene muds above, and to recent generation in near-surface sediments as the area display favorable conditions for gas production. Cores ranging from 150-240 cm in length have predominantly muddy sediments and variations in the P-wave velocity followed the changes in sediment density, controlled mainly by the presence of gas in sediments, bioclasts accumulation, textural variation and percentage of organic matter. The TOC content and Rock-Eval pyrolysis parameters evaluated in nine surface sediment samples indicate that good to excellent amount of organic matter associated with moderate to good source potential for gas production is present in the study area. In these areas living benthic foraminifera are of reduced diversity and density

  18. Late Pliocene Norwegian Greenland Overflow based on benthic stable isotopEs, Mg/Ca, and foraminifera assemblages at ODP Site 984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinelt, M.; Bartoli, G.; Erlenkeuser, H.

    2003-04-01

    Increased surface salinity in the Carribean and generally enhanced North Atlantic lower intermediate water ventilation after 4.2 Ma suggest that the closure of the Panama Isthmus favored enhanced heat, salt, and moisture supply to the northern high latitudes and in turn, favored the built up of ice in Greenland and the production of North Atlantic deepwater (Haug &Tiedemann, 1998). The Sediment record of ODP Site 984 (1700m) may serve to test the response and role of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow as key component of NADW over these changing scenarios. Carbonate dissolution cycles at the site were interpreted as a result of corrosive Norwegian Greenland Sea overflow water (Jansen et al., 2000). Though absence of foraminifera over wide parts of glacial stages prevents fully continuous records, high-resolution sampling enabled us to establish benthic stable isotopes records, Mg/Ca temperatures, and faunal assemblages for two time windows, prior (Stages G16-G11) and subsequent (Stages 101-99) to the onset of "Quaternary-style" glaciations at 2.75 Ma. In general, glacial-to-interglacial d18O amplitudes and absolute levels only slightly increase from 0.8‰ (3.8-3‰) in the older window to 1.0‰ (4.2-3.2‰) in the younger window. These amplitudes equal the amplitudes found for planktonic foraminifera at Site 984 and may be attributed to both ice volume and temperature changes. Benthic d13C values suggest a distinct increase in bottom water ventilation from older to younger interglacials (from -0.5 to 1‰). Faunas dominated by Bolivina, Uvigerina, Melonis, and Stilostomella suggest high carbon fluxes during the older interglacials. In the younger window, a fauna dominated by Elphidium suggets low oxygen conditions during glacial stage 100. Ma/Ca concentrations of Uvigerina suggest intermediate water temperatures ranging from 4 to 6°C during interglacial stages 101 and 99. If true, Late Pliocene intermediate water was considerably warmer than today (the Norwegian

  19. Linkages between rapid climate variability and deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the deep Subantarctic South Atlantic during the last 95 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Paula; Barker, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-resolution record of benthic foraminifera fauna from a sediment core retrieved from the South Cape Basin (Subantarctic South Atlantic) spanning the last glacial cycle (95 kyr). Information provided by benthic foraminiferal assemblages together with paleoclimate proxies from the same core allow us to interpret changes in the style of primary production (episodic versus sustained) in relation to abrupt climate oscillations. Our results indicate that fluctuations in the abundance of the phytodetritus-related species, Epistominella exigua, are concomitant with millennial-scale high-latitude climate perturbations. Episodic phytoplankton blooms increased during a negative mode of the bipolar seesaw, irrespective of the magnitude of the perturbation (i.e., Heinrich stadial versus non-Heinrich stadial events). We provide a hypothesis linking the frequency and intensity of these events to atmospheric perturbations, interhemispheric climate variability, and millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2. A notable exception to the overall pattern is the generally high abundance of E. exigua across the globally synchronous onset of glacial marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 4, a period generally characterized by increased dustiness and low-quality organic carbon as inferred by the percentage of the nonphytodetritus species. This highlights the special characteristics governing the onset of MIS 4 in the Subantarctic.

  20. What do SST proxies really tell us? A high-resolution multiproxy (UK‧37, TEXH86 and foraminifera δ18O) study in the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauel, Anna-Lena; Leider, Arne; Goudeau, Marie-Louise S.; Müller, Inigo A.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; de Lange, Gert J.; Zonneveld, Karin A. F.; Versteegh, Gerard J. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a multiproxy reconstruction of sea surface temperatures (SST) and coastal environmental changes covering the last 600 years on sediments from the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean Sea. The reconstruction is based on UK'37 (alkenones from haptophytes), TEXH86 (membrane lipids of marine crenarchaeota), and δ18O and δ13C of Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink) and of Uvigerina mediterranea. The amplitudes of the temperature signals reconstructed from δ18O of G. ruber (white), TEXH86 and UK'37 exceed the amplitudes observed in other reconstructions of local and Northern Hemisphere temperature. UK'37-based SSTs reflect mainly winter/spring conditions with an additional influence of changing nutrient supplies related to water column mixing and runoff. TEXH86-based temperatures reflect SSTs of the oligotrophic summer season, while influences from near-coastal areas may complicate its interpretation. Co-variation between both lipid-based SST records suggests a common environmental mechanism during the last 600 years. δ18O of G. ruber (white) also reflects summer conditions and is amplified by changes in salinity and nutrient availability, which are caused by variations in the relative influence of the Western Adriatic Current (WAC) and of the Ionian Surface Waters (ISW). The combination of SST and δ18O of G. ruber (white) shows that the circulation in the Gulf of Taranto underwent significant changes during the last 600 years.

  1. Temporal changes of environmental impact in the coastal marine area in front of a former mining zone, detected by means of benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Elena; Bergamin, Luisa; Maggi, Chiara; Ausili, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera are increasingly used to assess environmental quality of present and past marine environments. They are suitable for the study of ancient environments because their hard and small shells are preserved and abundant in sediment and an adequate number of them can be collected by small samples of sediment cores, supplying reliable data for a statistical approach. The study of foraminiferal assemblages, associated to sediment abiotic parameters, allows to define the anthropogenic impact along the time; reference conditions may be recognized in deep uncontaminated levels. The Sulcis Iglesiente Guspinese area (SW Sardinia, Italy) was affected in past times by intensive mining, which started in mid 19th century and ceased in 1990s. The marine area of Cala Domestica is located few kilometers from the mining district, where mainly galena and sphalerite were exploited. The area houses buildings for storage of minerals receives drainage material from mineral dumps determining a strong enrichment for several metals in the coastal sediments. Sediment core SI/69 was collected by means of vibrocorer in front of Cala Domestica beach, during a vast sampling survey aimed to environmental characterization of marine sediments. The core was subsampled in the laboratory, and a total of 28 levels were collected. Microfaunal, grain size and chemical (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) analyses were carried out on different aliquots of the same level. The quantitative analysis on benthic foraminifera was based on the count of at least 300 specimens per sample. Faunal parameters such as Foraminiferal Number (FN i.e. number of specimens / 1 g dry sediment) and species diversity (- index and H-index) were considered as potential indicators of environmental status. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed a group of strongly correlated metals (Ba, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb and Zn), associated to the superficial samples. These elements displayed a typical profile along

  2. Constraining Seasonal and Vertical Distributions of Planktonic Foraminifera for Paleoclimate Reconstruction Since MIS3 at the Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The California Current is an upwelling region with dynamic interactions between circulation, biological productivity and ecology. A 77 cm piston push core was taken from the Juan de Fuca Ridge Axial Seamount using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) (2213m, 45.55º N, 130.08º W), an active submarine volcano ~480 km off Oregon's coast. Five radiocarbon dates indicate that the sediment ranges from 42.6 ka at 77 cm to 17.6 ka at 15 cm, with an average sediment accumulation rate of 2.47 cm/ka from 77-15 cm, and an average rate of 0.85 cm/ka during the postglacial period (the core representing subtropical, subartic, and arctic fauna have been used to constrain changes in vertical and seasonal temperature since Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3). Measurements of δ18O of the upwelling species Globigerina bulloides, the thermocline dwelling species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and the warm mixed-layer species Orbulina universa are offset from each other, reflecting vertical and seasonal variation among the planktonic foraminifera. Of the three species, G. bulloides shows the least variation in δ18O, possibly indicating that marked changes in temperature are masking changes in the δ18O of seawater due to global ice volume changes. G. bulloides and O. universa δ18O values are similar in MIS 3 and diverge with time, indicating the development of strong seasonal succession of species, since the last glacial maximum. Bulk nitrogen isotopes and nitrogen flux provide additional constraints on upwelling strength and insight into local biological productivity and nutrient dynamics. Obtaining Mg/Ca data will clarify the δ 18O interpretation except deep in the core where metal-bearing authigenic precipitates affect Mg concentrations. These climatic proxies together provide insight into how global climate change and local seamount volcanism impacts regional productivity in the California Current.

  3. Southern Ocean Surface and Intermediate Water Temperature from Alkenones and Mg/Ca of Infaunal Foraminifera for the last 1.5 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Aurora; McClymont, Erin; Elderfield, Harry; Kender, Sev

    2014-05-01

    The reconstruction of past surface (SST), intermediate, and deep-water temperatures is critical to our understanding of feedbacks within the ocean-climate system. Intermediate water temperature (IWT) reconstruction is particularly important since intermediate waters, including Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), are proposed to be an important driver in high-low latitude teleconnections, despite limited intermediate-depth records through the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Paleotemperature proxies have caveats, including the 'Carbonate Ion Effect' on the Magnesium to Calcium ratio (Mg/Ca) of benthic foraminifera. However, recent studies demonstrated that the infaunal species, Uvigerina peregrina, co-precipitates Mg independent of secondary effects, affording the use of U.peregrina Mg/Ca as a paleotemperature proxy (Elderfield et al., 2010). We present the first 1.5 Ma record of IWT from Mg/CaU.peregrina coupled with an alkenone- derived UK37' SST record from a sediment core in the Southwest Pacific (DSDP site 593; 1068m water depth), in the core of modern AAIW. Our new data reconstruct interglacial IWTs at ~7°C before and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), whereas values of ~5°C occur in the later Pleistocene. Glacial IWT remained fairly constant (~2°C) throughout the last 1 Ma. These results are in apparent disagreement with the typical idea that glacial-interglacial temperature fluctuations were smaller in the '41-kyr world' before the MPT, than during the '100-kyr world', after the MPT. At proximal ODP site 1123 (3290m water depth; Elderfield et al., 2012), interglacial deepwater temperatures increase by ~1°C after the MPT, with relatively constant glacial deepwater temperatures (~-2°C) over the last 1 Ma. New results from DSDP 593 therefore imply that the mechanisms that drive intermediate and deep water temperatures varied, suggesting that at least one of these watermasses has properties driven by something other than Northern Hemisphere glaciation

  4. Comparison of different proxies using in situ measurements in the benthic foraminifera genus Uvigerina: an example from the Santa Monica Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B.; Orland, I. J.; White, S. M.; Fessenden-Rahn, J.; Rahn, T. A.; Paytan, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Mg/Ca ratios and oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of foraminiferal calcite are two of the most used geochemical proxies for paleoceanographic reconstructions. The constraint of seawater temperature and salinity from the Mg/Ca and δ18O compositions of foraminiferal calcite present the possibility of reconstructing past changes in glacial ice volume, local precipitation/evaporation, temperature and water mass density. Implementing spatial and temporal changes in these variables is necessary to understand linked paleo-oceanographic and paleo-climate events, and to predict the nature and rate of future climate change. We performed two sets of analysis: (1) δ18O using a CAMECA 1280 at WiscSIMS (10 µm spot) and (2) Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca using Laser Ablation (LA) ICP (at University California Santa Cruz, (13 and 50 µm spot) on the same individuals belonging to the benthic foraminifera genus Uvigerina. We analyzed several specimens from Site ODP 1015 in the California Margin, a region characterized by strong seasonal upwelling. In particular, we have analyzed individuals from three different time slices within the last 2000 years (industrial time) and three within the Younger Dryas (YD) (pre-industrial time). Comparisons between different individuals and within the same individual in the different chambers were made. δ18O values range between 0.1 and 2.6 ‰ PDB in the last 2000 years and between 0.8 and 3.4 ‰ in the YD. Mg/Ca values range between 0.65 and 1.40 in the last 2000 and between 0.60 and 1.65 in the YD. These preliminary results show significant variability without clear patterns. The implication of these results and methodology related advantages and limitations will be discussed.

  5. Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of foraminifera and growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study from a Pb and Zn mining region in western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, C.; Asmund, G.; Elberling, B.; Frei, D.; Knudsen, C.; Rasmussen, P.

    2011-12-01

    Annual monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in the fjords (sea water, seaweed, lichens, blue mussels, shorthorn sculpin and Northern prawn) adjacent to the Black Angel lead-zinc mine (active 1973-1990) at Maarmorilik, western Greenland was initiated during operation of the mine and continues through to today. This pilot study tests whether the calcareous shells of bivalves and foraminifera register these known variations in heavy metal concentrations. Live individuals of Mytilus edulis were collected through a transect of monitoring stations in 2009 and PB-Zn concentrations were measured at multiple points within the yearly increments using LA-ICP-MS. Individuals aged between 12 and 28 years were measured and demonstrated a clear signal of mine closure even at 40 km distance from the plant. Foraminifera (Melonis barleeanus) from a sediment core dating from 1880 AD to present have previously been shown to display a greater percentage of deformities during the period of mining activity (Elberling et al. 2003) possibly suggesting a correlation between heavy metal concentrations in sea water and morphological development. LA-ICP-MS analysis of individual foraminifera confirms an increase in Pb-Zn uptake during mining operations. Although it could therefore be expected that Pb-Zn concentrations would be enhanced in the 'deformed' foraminifera relative to the 'non-deformed', no difference in Pb-Zn was concentrations was detected. This short pilot study (Jessen et al.2010) demonstrates the potential of calcareous material as indicators of environmental pollution and their applicability as a monitoring tool in remote regions. Jessen CA, Asmund G, Elberling B, Frei D, Knudsen C and Rasmussen P. 2010 Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study. Danmarks og Grønlands Geologiske Undersøgelse Rapport 2010/86. 1-20 Elberling, B., Knudsen, K. L., Kristensen, P. H., and Asmund, G. (2003) Applying

  6. Ecological response of benthic foraminifera to the acid drainage from mine areas. An example from the Gromolo torrent mouth (Eastern Ligurian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, Luisa; Capello, Marco; Carbone, Cristina; Magno, Maria Celia; Consani, Sirio; Cutroneo, Laura; Ferraro, Luciana; Pierfranceschi, Giancarlo; Romano, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages react in short time to natural and anthropogenic environmental changes and, for this, they are considered as reliable indicators of environmental quality. An interesting application of these indicators is the study of their response to environmental changes in coastal marine areas, affected by dismissed mines and dump areas. The Libiola Fe-Cu sulphide mine was intensively exploited in 19th and 20th centuries, and the activity ended in 1962. The sulphide mineral assemblages consist of pyrite and chalcopyrite, with minor sphalerite and pyrrhotite, in a gangue of quartz and chlorite. The sulphide ore occurs within the Jurassic ophiolites of the Northern Apennines which were subjected to metamorphic and tectonic processes during the subsequent Apennine orogenesis. Waters circulating in the Libiola mine area, and discharging in the adjacent streams and creeks, are strongly polluted due to the diffuse occurrence of Acid Mine Drainage processes. The Gromolo torrent collects these acidic waters enriched of heavy metals which flow into Ligurian Sea. The study area is characterised by a shelf with a gentle slope, mainly constituted by sediment supplied by Entella torrent. The general circulation has trend from East to West and the coastal drift is generally eastwards. A total of 15 marine sediment samples (upper 2 cm) were collected by means of Van Veen grab in the coastal zone close to the Gromolo mouth and analyzed for living (rose Bengal stained) and dead benthic foraminifera, together with grain size, metals and trace elements, and metal fractioning. Quantitative foraminiferal parameters, like as abundance, species diversity, heterogeneity and assemblage composition, were determined and evaluated for environmental purpose. Additionally, possible increase above the natural background level of deformed specimens was considered as indicative of metal contamination. The grain-size analyses highlighted mainly sandy sediments, characterized by

  7. Can Foraminifera be used to Identify Storm Deposits in Shallow-Water Tropical Reef Settings?: Examining the Impact of Cyclone Hamish on the Foraminiferal Assemblages of Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotz, L. C.; Mamo, B. L.

    2009-12-01

    Foraminifera (marine microfossils) represent a valuable tool in identifying significant storm events in the geological past. Much of the previous work in this area however, has concentrated on temperate settings and marsh deposits. Little work has focused on tropical marine settings and no studies have looked to identify distinct foraminiferal assemblages associated with cyclone events in tropical reef settings in the South-West Pacific. In April 2008, samples were collected from the reef flat surrounding Heron Island as part of a study of foraminiferal biodiversity. On March 9th 2009, Cyclone Hamish, a Category 5 cyclone and the most significant cyclone event, in terms of impact and damage, to occur in the southern Great Barrier Reef region in over 30 years, passed in close proximity to Heron Island. With a pre-cyclone baseline collected less than 1 year previous, this presented an ideal opportunity to recollect, with the aim to determining if a discernable cyclone generated deposit could be identified. A distinct difference in composition or character of the foraminiferal assemblage identified in the pre- and post-cyclone samples could be directly attributed to the cyclone and would represent a ‘fingerprint assemblage’. This would provide a mechanism for determining cyclonic activity in the sub-recent and geological past for both the Great Barrier Reef region as well as throughout the South-west Pacific. Analysis of the total foraminiferal assemblage in the two sample lots reveals little difference between the pre- and post-cyclone assemblage. In both cases, the assemblage is dominated by the same two epiphytic taxa, Calcarina hispida Brady and Baculogypsina sphaerulata (Parker and Jones). No taxa are restricted to either pre- or post-cyclone samples and the post-cyclone assemblage bears no resemblance to the assemblage recovered from samples collected in the inter-reef channels. This suggests that the cyclone is only mobilising and redepositing material on

  8. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500 Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300 Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior. PMID:20430090

  9. Recent foraminifera of the Sao Francisco river delta, Sergipe, Brazil: a proposal for the ecological and environmental diagnostic model; Foraminiferos recentes do delta do Rio Sao Francisco, Sergipe (Brasil): uma proposta de modelo ecologico e de diagnostico ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Recent foraminifera assemblages were studied to determine an ecological model of species distribution, diversity, equability and confining degree, with implications to environmental diagnosis and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The study area is inserted in a sector from Sao Francisco River delta, with interconnected channels and a lagoon connected to the ocean. Besides the biotic variables, sediment salinity and granulometry was considered. An agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) was performed and it was recognized three bio facies distributed along the sector: Miliammina/Arenoparrella in the channels, and Ammonia/Elphidium and Quinqueloculina at the lagoon. The diversity and equability values increase from the Miliammina/Arenoparrella biofacies to the Ammonia/Elphidium and Quinqueloculina biofacies. The confining indices show environments ranging from confined (channels) to different degrees of low restricted to marine influence. From the results obtained, it is possible to recognize that environments dominated by textulariines are characterized by low diversity, equability and high confining degree. Environments dominated by rotaliines and miliolines tend to be more diversified, equitable and low restricted to marine influence. The results are similar to other obtained in other Brazilian estuarine environments, differing only on dominance by some species (author)

  10. Constraints on Paleocene and Eocene Tropical Sea-Surface Temperatures and Meridional Temperature Gradients From Mg/Ca and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Foraminifera in Sediments Recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, A.; Elderfield, H.; Wade, B.; Kelly, D. C.; Anderson, L. D.; Sindrey, C.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate reconstructions of tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) during the Paleocene and Eocene are needed to understand the contribution of greenhouse gases to past climate variability. When combined with constraints on high-latitude SST, tropical SST can be used to estimate past meridional temperature gradients. The traditional tool applied to reconstructing surface temperatures utilizes the temperature-dependant incorporation of oxygen isotopes into calcium carbonate. However, changes in the oxygen isotope composition of foraminiferal calcite also record variations in the isotopic composition of seawater, complicating temperature reconstructions. The magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) ratio of foraminiferal carbonate provides an alternative method for reconstructing temperatures in the past that is insensitive to variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater. Here, we present constraints on tropical temperatures from Mg/Ca ratios of planktonic foraminifera in cores recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program during intervals characterized by large changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum and the middle to late Eocene "greenhouse-icehouse" transition. Records are for mixed-layer dwellers belonging to the genus Morozovella and Acaranina, and for the thermocline dwelling taxa Subbotina. We combine these results with constraints on high-latitude SST from other proxies, including foraminiferal Mg/Ca and oxygen isotope ratios, to reconstruct changes in the pole-to-equator temperature gradient during these major climate transitions.

  11. Late Holocene hydrographic settings of the northern Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Badawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variability of the paleo-oceanographic setting of the northern Red Sea during the last 6 Ky was deduced from high-resolution faunal results and stable isotope records of planktonic foraminifera in three short cores sediment obtained by the German R/V Meteor vessel. In general, the investigated time interval is fundamentally comparable to the present day composition and distribution of planktonic foraminifera. However, interrupted short enhanced arid phase spanning the last 4–2 Ky appears to have existed in the northern Red Sea, and resulted in elevation of salinity and somehow productivity, as hypersaline, dense surface water favored vertical mixing of the water column resulting in an increase in productivity. This paleoclimatic reconstruction is revealed from the distinct gradient in the composition and distribution of planktonic foraminifera, as well as the significant distribution trend of Globigerinoides ruber versus Globigerinoides sacculifer correlated with the stable isotope records. Starting from the last 2 Ky to the present time, less strength arid conditions relative to the previous period prevailed, reflected from a gradual decrease in surface water salinity and productivity assuming that the present water conditions and consequently current climatic conditions began to develop from that time with minor fluctuations reaching the recent conditions.

  12. Remunerative role of foraminifera in coastal ecosystem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Due to the direct relationship between climate and economy (through agriculture), predictive models for climatic changes are very much needed. Climatic prediction is a delicate task and depends upon how well know the past climate. Since the direct...

  13. Distribución de foraminíferos bentónicos (Protozoa: Foraminiferida en la ensenada Quillaipe (41°32' S; 72°44' O, Chile: Implicaciones para el estudio del nivel del mar Distribution of benthic foraminifera (Protozoa: Foraminiferida in the Quillaipe Inlet (41°32' S; 72°44' W, Chile: Implications for sea level studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONARDO D FERNÁNDEZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los foraminíferos de las marismas salobres son utilizados como indicadores del cambio producido en el nivel del mar durante el Holoceno. No obstante, los foraminíferos de las marismas de Chile han sido escasamente estudiados por lo que se desconoce la factibilidad de utilizarlos para este fin. Para subsanar esto se desarrolló una investigación en el intermareal de la ensenada de Quillaipe, Chile, con los objetivos de determinar los foraminíferos y su distribución vertical; analizar los parámetros que explican su distribución y determinar las especies que son útiles como indicadoras del nivel del mar. Los resultados revelaron 18 especies (nueve aglutinadas y nueve calcáreas distribuidas en dos grandes Zonas (I y II. La Zona I se restringió a la parte más alta y vegetada del intermareal (marisma y estuvo habitada solo por taxa aglutinados. Aquí se registraron bajos valores de diversidad (H' = 0.567, pH (6.6 y salinidad (18.7 y un dominio de la especie aglutinada Haplophragmoides manilaensis. En cambio, la Zona II se limitó a la zona menos elevada y sin vegetación del intermareal (llanura de marea y estuvo habitada por una comunidad calcárea-aglutinada. Contrariamente, los valores de diversidad (H' = 0.909, pH (7.7 y salinidad (32.8 fueron más altos, y la especie dominante fue la calcárea Ammonia beccarii. Por otro lado, la asociación aglutinada Trochamminita salsa-Jadammina macrescens se restringió a la parte más alta de la marisma y a los valores más bajos de salinidad y pH. Estos antecedentes permiten concluir que la distribución de los foraminíferos está controlada por la salinidad, el pH y la elevación del intermareal y que la asociación Trochamminita salsa-Jadammina macrescens son indicadoras del máximo nivel del mar en la ensenada de Quillaipe.Saltmarsh foraminifera are used as indicators of sea-level change which occurs during the Holocene. In Chile however, the saltmarsh foraminifera have been poorly studied, so

  14. Millennial- to century-scale variability in Gulf of Mexico Holocene climate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Verardo, S.; Quinn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Proxy records from two piston cores in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provide a detailed (50-100 year resolution) record of climate variability over the last 14,000 years. Long-term (millennial-scale) trends and changes are related to the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions and movement of the average position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) related to orbital forcing. The ??18O of the surface-dwelling planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber show negative excursions between 14 and 10.2 ka (radiocarbon years) that reflect influx of meltwater into the western GOM during melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The relative abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer is related to transport of Caribbean water into the GOM. Maximum transport of Caribbean surface waters and moisture into the GOM associated with a northward migration of the average position of the ITCZ occurs between about 6.5 and 4.5 ka. In addition, abundance variations of G. sacculifer show century-scale variability throughout most of the Holocene. The GOM record is consistent with records from other areas, suggesting that century-scale variability is a pervasive feature of Holocene climate. The frequency of several cycles in the climate records is similar to cycles identified in proxy records of solar variability, indicating that at least some of the century-scale climate variability during the Holocene is due to external (solar) forcing.

  15. Consideraciones morfotaxonómicas sobre "Orbulina universa" d'Orbigny (foraminiferida Consideraciones morfotaxonómicas sobre "Orbulina universa" d'Orbigny (foraminiferida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parada Ruffinatti Carmen

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Se examinan 1.072 ejemplares de Orbulina universa d'Orbigny. En el interior de un 12% de ellos se identifica un foraminífero planctónico, adherido mediante espinas y perteneciente a alguno de los géneros Globigerina, Globigerinoides y Hastigerina. Se plantea una hipótesis sobre el papel que desempeña esta cámara esférica en el ciclo vital de estos foraminíferos y se concluye que Orbulina no es un género, sino una forma transitoria en varios foraminíferos de vida planctónica. 1.072 specimens of Orbulina universa d'Orbigny are examined.  A planktonic foraminifer, with adherent spines, belonging to the genera Gfobigerina, Globigerinoides and Hastigerina is identified inside of a 12% of the shells.  An hypothesis about the roll of performance of this sphaerical chamber, in the vital cycle of this planktonic foraminifera, is stablished.   The final conclusion is that Orbulina is not a genus but a transitory form in various foraminifera of planktonic life.

  16. Environmental controls on barium incorporation into planktic foraminifer, Globorotalia truncatulinoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, J. N.; Reynolds, C. E.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Ba/Ca of planktic foraminifera in marine sediment cores has been used primarily to track changes in riverine input over time, and thus may be a potentially powerful proxy for reconstructing past changes in the terrestrial hydrologic cycle. Using Ba/Ca as a proxy for riverine freshwater input requires the assumption that Ba/Ca in foraminiferal calcite reflects the Ba/Ca of seawater, and that the partition coefficient for barium between seawater and foraminiferal calcite is independent of the influence of temperature, salinity, pH, alkalinity and light availability. Although it has been shown that this partition coefficient is nearly identical for common species of spinose planktic foraminifera (e.g., Globigerinoides ruber, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer), some non-spinose species have been demonstrated to have Ba/Ca ratios that are much higher than that of co-occurring spinose specimens. We investigate environmental controls on Ba/Ca in the tests of Globorotalia truncatulinoides, a planktic species of foraminifera with a unique life history in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). G. truncatulinoides experiences 92% of its annual flux to the sediment trap during winter (JFM) in the GoM. The Mg/Ca and ∂18O of the ontogenetic calcite suggests that primary calcification occurs within the surface mixed layer (0-150 meters), and a thick secondary crust is added at depths below the thermocline. We use LA-ICP-MS to analyze the Ba/Ca of both encrusted and non-encrusted G. truncatulinoides from a sediment trap time series in the GoM and find that the Ba/Ca in ontogenetic calcite of non-encrusted specimens varies between 10 and 200 mmol/mol, while the Ba/Ca of the secondary crust varies between 0 and 3 mmol/mol. The Ba/Ca of the non-encrusted G. truncatulinoides specimens is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of co-occurring spinose planktic foraminifera (O. universa and G. ruber) in the GoM sediment trap, while the secondary crust has Ba/Ca similar to

  17. Pliocene benthonic foraminifera from homogeneous and laminated marls on Crete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the Pliocene, the paleogeography of central Crete consisted of a number of basins which were filled by predominantly marly sediments. In the sedimentary sequence numerous laminated sapropelic intercalations can be observed. At a higher stratigraphic level diatomaceous laminites appear.

  18. Recent planktonic foraminifera from the sediment off Karwar and Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    Globigerina pachyderma@@ (Ehrenberg) is present in the slope sediment off Mangalore area but not in the Karwar region, which is very significant since it delineates its northern extension beyond the equator...

  19. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Unconventional Resources Group, Keshav Dev Malviya Institute of Petroleum Exploration, Oil and Natural Gas. Corporation Ltd., 9, Kaulagarh Road, Dehradun 248 195, India. 6. Gas-Hydrate Group, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, India. *Corresponding ...

  20. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mezger, E.M.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G.-J.A.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which

  1. Statistical analysis of planktic foraminifera of the surface Continental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planktic foraminiferal assemblage recorded from selected samples obtained from shallow continental shelf sediments off southwestern Nigeria were subjected to statistical analysis. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to determine variants of planktic parameters. Values obtained for these parameters were ...

  2. Larger benthic foraminifera in Miocene carbonates of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novak, Vibor

    2014-01-01

    Present day Southeast Asia represents the region that supports the most diverse marine ecosystems on Earth. The origin of this biodiversity is still unresolved, but it is proposed to be present at least since the Early Miocene. Therefore, the data acquired from the fossil assemblages may contribute

  3. Li partitioning in the benthic foraminifera Amphistegina lessonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gerald; Sadekov, Aleksey; Thoms, Silke; Mewes, Antje; Nehrke, Gernot; Greaves, Mervyn; Misra, Sambuddha; Bijma, Jelle; Elderfield, Henry

    2015-12-01

    The shallow water benthic foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii was grown in seawater of variable Li and Ca concentration and shell Li/Ca was determined by means of LA-ICPMS. Shell Li/Ca is positively correlated to seawater Li/Ca only when the Li concentration of seawater is changed. If the seawater Ca concentration is changed, shell Li/Ca remains constant. This indicates that Li does not compete with Ca for incorporation in the shell of A. lessonii. A recently proposed calcification model can be applied to divalent cations (e.g., Mg and Sr), which compete for binding sites of ion transporters and positions in the calcite lattice. By contrast, the transport pathway of monovalent cations such as Li is probably diffusion based (e.g., ion-channels), and monovalent cations do not compete with Ca for a position in the calcite lattice. Here we present a new model for Li partitioning into foraminiferal calcite which predicts our experimental results and should also be applicable to other alkali metals.

  4. Some observations on the Miocene foraminifera from Kachchh, Western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhri, A.K.; Khare, N.

    The foraminiferal species described from the Miocene sequence exposed at the village Vinjhan of Kachchh are widely distributed in the comparable successions of the Middle East and Greece. They can be used for inter-regional correlation...

  5. Reproductive behaviour of benthic foraminifera: A key to palaeoclimate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Many benthic foraminiferal species exhibit dimorphism associated with reproduction. The two resultant forms are known as microspheric and megalospheric forms. Culture studies, though limited in number, show that ratios of these forms are affected...

  6. Agglutinated foraminifera from the shelf of east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Almeida, F.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    , they are rare in the near shore (upto 55 m depth) from the coast. They also indicate the evidence of slumping in deeper waters. These forms also have a wide range in the composition of the material making up their test which is attributed to the selective power...

  7. Benthic foraminifera and environmental changes in Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.; Gapotchenko, T.; Varekamp, J.C.; Mecray, E.I.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.

    2000-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal faunas in Long Island Sound (LIS) in the 1940s and 1960s were of low diversity, and dominated by species of the genus Elphidium, mainly Elphidium excavatum clavatum, with common Buccella frigida and Eggerella advena. The distribution of these species was dominantly correlated with depth, but it was not clear which depth-related environmental variable was most important. Differences between faunas collected in 1996 and 1997, and in the 1940s and 1960s include a strong decrease in relative abundance of Eggerella advena over all LIS, an increase in relative abundance of Ammonia beccarii in western LIS, and a decrease in species diversity. The decreased diversity suggests that environmental stress caused the faunal changes. Oxygen isotope data for E. excavatum clavatum indicate that a change in salinity is not a probable cause. Carbon isotope data suggest that the supply of organic matter to the benthos increased since the early 1960s, with a stronger increase in western LIS where algal blooms have occurred since the early 1970s, possibly as a result of nutrient input by waste water treatment plants. These blooms or the resulting episodes of anoxia/hypoxia may have played a role in the increased relative abundance of A. beccarii. There is no clear explanation for the decreased abundance of E. advena, but changes in the phytoplankton composition (thus food supply) are a possible cause. Benthic foraminiferal faunal and stable isotope data have excellent potential as indicators of physicochemical environmental changes and their effects on the biota in LIS.

  8. Evolution and molecular phylogeny of Cibicides and Uvigerina (Rotaliida, Foraminifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Foraminifers are a group of unicellular organisms present in all the oceans and seas, in fresh water and even in soil. An important number of foraminifers build a shell, often called a 'test' that can be preserved in the fossil record. These tests are extensively used in the field of

  9. Aspects of the biodiversity of brackish water foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    Foraminiferal fauna of the Chilka lake situated between 19 degrees 25 minutes and 19 degrees 54 minutes N and 85 degrees 6 minutes and 85 degrees 38 minutes E in Orissa state on the east coast of India during different seasons was studied using...

  10. Frequency distribution of Foraminifera in the Chilka lake

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    A total of sixtynine foraminiferal species have been identified from the sediment samples collected from the Chilka Lake during November 1997 and March, May 1998. These species have been quantitatively studied in regard to their relative abundance...

  11. Potentiality of foraminifera in deciphering paleo-sea levels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indias_Exclusive_Economic_Zone_1996_225.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indias_Exclusive_Economic_Zone_1996_225.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  12. Foraminifera from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Williams, R.; Kerry, K.R.

    Neogloboquadrina pachyderma@@ is significantly absent from all samples. Several of the species in the Deep Lake terraces were previously reported from the Ross Sea, McMurdo Sound, South Georgia, and the Falkland Islands sectors of Antarctica. Three possible explanations...

  13. Ecosystem recovery after hypoxia: what can foraminifera indicate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    The many resources and services provided by coastal ecosystems (e.g. food, fertile soils), make these areas valuable habitats for marine life and human occupation. Expanding human population sizes and the associated increase of human exploitation of coastal zones has made these areas prone to

  14. Paleogene reworked foraminifera in Recent sediments off Daman, Western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    @@ which are characteristic of Paleogene are encountered as earthy coloured, highly polished, rounded grains in well preserved state, and filled with some secondary material. Their ratio to total foraminiferids is highest along the eastern flank of the sand...

  15. Effect of oxygen manipulations on benthic foraminifera: A preliminary experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panchang, R.; Nigam, R.; Linshy, V.; Rana, S.S.; Ingole, B.S.

    to changed oxygen conditions. After a fortnight, the experimental cores were sub-sectioned and analyzed for their live foraminiferal content. This data was compared with background field data obtained from the non-experimental core. The data indicate that any...

  16. Frequency distribution of foraminifera off Trivandrum, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Kutty, M.K.; Panikkar, B.M.

    abundant form is Ammonia beccarii (Linne) tepida and other species include Operculina ammonoides, Nonion asterizans and Hanzawaia concentrica. Comparison of the fauna of the Trivandrum area with that of Cochin Region, Kerala, India shows 14 common species...

  17. Holocene planktonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments off Kerala Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    of the species have a geologic range from Miocene to late Pleistocene and Recent also. @iGlobigerina hexagona@@ and @iGloboquadrina conglomerata@@ which disappeared from the Atlantic earlier (50,000 to one million years ago) are seen to be living today...

  18. Shelf edge regime and foraminifera off Pondicherry, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Amphistegina, Borelis, Operculina, Operculinoides@@, the Peneroplidae, and the Miliolidae may be due, in part, to their survival over long periods of time and also to their continued existence even today. Some species have a wider range of distribution extending from...

  19. Variaciones estacionales de los foraminíferos planctónicos durante 2005-2006 frente a Iquique (20°S y Concepción (36°S, Chile Seasonal variations of planktic foraminifera during 2005-2006 off Iquique (20°S and Concepción (36°S, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Gajardo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió por primera vez las variaciones estacionales de los foraminíferos planctónicos frente a las costas de Iquique (20°S, 70°W y Concepción (36°S, 74°W, Chile. Las muestras fueron recolectadas mediante trampas de sedimentos ubicadas en dos profundidades: 1.000 y 2.300 m, entre septiembre y diciembre 2005, bajo condiciones normales (con surgencias permanentes y ausencia del evento El Niño en la zona norte, y entre enero y octubre durante el evento El Niño 2006 en la zona sur (con surgencias estacionales. Se determinó un total de 23 especies, 22 de las cuales se recolectaron frente a Iquique y 16 frente a Concepción. Además, se determinó el flujo de carbonato de calcio de foraminíferos, flujo de individuos y diversidad para definir patrones faunísticos en dichas áreas, de diferentes condiciones oceanográficas. Los resultados mostraron que en Iquique, bajo condiciones normales, se produjo un constante flujo de individuos y carbonato, con máximos en septiembre y octubre 2005, confirmando la presencia de surgencia costera en este período. Por el contrario, en Concepción, bajo condiciones El Niño (2006, el flujo de individuos y carbonato de calcio presentó máximos durante la época estival evidenciando surgencias, que sin embargo, son de menor duración (enero-febrero respecto a lo descrito en condiciones normales para esta área. La diversidad fue mayor a menor en profundidad en ambas zonas, permaneciendo constante durante todo el período en la zona norte, a diferencia de la zona sur, cuyos mayores valores se observaron durante la época estival coincidiendo con los afloramientos costeros en esta área.We studied for first time the seasonal variations of planktic foraminifera off Iquique (20°S, 70°W and Concepcion (36°S, 74°W, Chile. The samples were collected by sediment traps located at two depths: 1000 and 2300 m between September and December 2005, under normal conditions (with permanent upwelling and the

  20. Planktonic and benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the Middle Eocene–Lower Miocene successions from the Sivas Basin (Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakyemez Aynur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic and benthic foraminifera are described from the Middle Eocene-Lower Miocene successions in the Sivas Basin, Central Anatolia. An integrated foraminiferal zonation provides new age assignments in terms of a great number of taxa for the studied sections. Four biostratigraphical intervals are first recorded based on the concurrent ranges of sporadically occurring but well preserved planktonic foraminiferal assemblages. The first interval characterized by the co-occurrences of Acarinina bullbrooki, Truncorotaloides topilensis and Turborotalia cerroazulensis is referable to the E11 Zone of late Lutetian–early Bartonian. An assemblage yielding Paragloborotalia opima accompanied by Globigerinella obesa forms a basis for the late Chattian O5 Zone. The successive interval corresponds to the late Chattian O6 Zone indicated by the presence of Globigerina ciperoensis and Globigerinoides primordius along with the absence of Paragloborotalia opima. The early Aquitanian M1 Zone can be tentatively defined based mainly on the assemblage of Globigerina, Globigerinella, Globoturborotalita and Tenuitella. The biostratigraphical data obtained from the benthic foraminifera assign the studied sections to the SBZ 21–22, SBZ 23 and SBZ 24 ranging in age from Rupelian to Aquitanian. The SBZ 23 and 24 are well constrained biozones by the occurrences of Miogypsinella complanata and Miogypsina gunteri, respectively, whereas the SBZ 21–22 defined by nummulitids and lepidocylinids in the Tethyan Shallow Benthic Zonation is characterized dominantly by peneroplids, soritids and miliolids in the studied sections. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages suggest different paleoenvironments covering lagoon, algal reef and shallow open marine whereas planktonic foraminifera provides evidence for relatively deep marine settings on the basis of assemblages characterized by a mixture of small-sized simple and more complex morphogroups indicative for intermediate depths of

  1. Drivers of foraminiferal and bulk-sedimentary 10Be/9Be ratios in a marine sediment record offshore of sub-tropical Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M. H.; Abrajevitch, A.; Srncik, M.; Fifield, L. K.; De Deckker, P.; Heslop, D.; Roberts, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be (half-life of ~1.5 My) is produced in the atmosphere via cosmic ray spallation of 16O, following which it is quickly transported to Earth's surface by precipitation. This process concentrates 10Be in the ocean, where it is thought to remain with a residence time of ~500-1000 years prior to export to the marine sedimentary record largely associated with sorption to the surface of settling clay particles. The bulk beryllium isotopic composition of marine clays hence reflects the convoluted factors of 10Be production and varying scavenging efficiency/terrigenous input. However, measurements of meteoric 10Be/9Be incorporated in the calcium carbonate tests of foraminifera (and hence presumably isolated from the dilution effects of sediment-bound terrigenous 9Be) may have the potential to provide useful chronological control for marine sediment records. Here we present 10Be/9Be results from a ~42 m-long sediment core collected off the NW coast of Australia (MD00-2361: 113°28.63‧E, 22°04.92‧S, 1805 m water depth). Measurements of δ18O on Globigerinoides ruber, supported by magnetostratigraphy, indicate that the record extends back >1.2 Ma. This independent chronology, in conjunction with excellent carbonate preservation at this site, allows preliminary evaluation of foraminiferal 10Be as a chronometer. We also evaluate the relationship between sedimentary 10Be/9Be ratios, regional surface ocean conditions as inferred from the δ18O stratigraphy and low-resolution Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca ratios, as well as large-scale changes in regional fluvial input as reconstructed from high-resolution XRF scanning profiles.

  2. Relationship between weights of planktonic foraminifer shell and surface water CO sub(3) sup(=) concentration during the Holocene and Last Glacial Period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Govil, P.; Godad, S.

    Shell weights of Globigerinoides sacculifer and the elemental concentration of magnesium and calcium (Mg/Ca) from Globigerinoides ruber measured from an Arabian Sea sediment core, AAS9/21, exhibit an inverse relationship with each other, which...

  3. A High-Resolution Oxygen Isotope Record for the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Over the Last 6000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, K.; Thunell, R.; Tappa, E.

    2001-12-01

    Oxygen isotope records of three species of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber (pink), Globigerina bulloides and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei) from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela were used to construct a high-resolution climate record for the Caribbean region for the mid to late Holocene. Our results indicate decreases in sea surface temperatures and/or increases in salinity in the basin at least four times over the last 4000 years (at ~3800-3200, 2800-2500, 2200-2000, and after 650 cal. yrs. B.P.). These events are coincident with high stands of Lake Titicaca, Bolivia/Peru suggesting a similar forcing mechanism. Paleoclimate records from the circum-Caribbean indicate arid conditions commenced in this region between about 3600-3200 cal. yrs. B.P.. This corresponds to a decrease in the δ 18O of G. ruber (pink) and decreases in the δ 18O differences between G. bulloides - G. ruber (pink) and N. dutertrei - G. ruber (pink). In addition, the deep dwelling planktonic foraminifera species Globorotalia crassaformis migrates into Cariaco Basin at about 3500 cal. yrs. B.P.. Taken together these data indicate colder sea surface temperatures and a shallow thermocline, possibly due to increased upwelling. Increased evaporation at this site would also result in higher G. ruber (pink) δ 18O values. Dry conditions in the circum-Caribbean tropics and wetter conditions in the Altiplano of Bolivia and Peru and the Amazon basin during the mid to late Holocene are consistent with a southward displacement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) resulting in decreased precipitation and increased trade wind intensity in the Cariaco Basin.

  4. Low planktic foraminiferal diversity and abundance observed in a spring 2013 west-east Mediterranean Sea plankton tow transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallo, Miguel; Ziveri, Patrizia; Mortyn, P. Graham; Schiebel, Ralf; Grelaud, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Planktic foraminifera were collected with 150 µm BONGO nets from the upper 200 m water depth at 20 stations across the Mediterranean Sea between 2 May and 2 June 2013. The main aim is to characterize the species distribution and test the covariance between foraminiferal area density (ρA) and seawater carbonate chemistry in a biogeochemical gradient including ultraoligotrophic conditions. Average foraminifera abundances are 1.42 ± 1.43 ind. 10 m-3 (ranging from 0.11 to 5.20 ind. 10 m-3), including 12 morphospecies. Large differences in species assemblages and total abundances are observed between the different Mediterranean sub-basins, with an overall dominance of spinose, symbiont-bearing species indicating oligotrophic conditions. The highest values in absolute abundance are found in the Strait of Gibraltar and the Alboran Sea. The western basin is dominated by Globorotalia inflata and Globigerina bulloides at slightly lower standing stocks than in the eastern basin. In contrast, the planktic foraminiferal assemblage in the warmer, saltier, and more nutrient-limited eastern basin is dominated by Globigerinoides ruber (white). These new results, when combined with previous findings, suggest that temperature-induced surface water stratification and food availability are the main factors controlling foraminiferal distribution. In the oligotrophic and highly alkaline and supersaturated with respect to calcite and aragonite Mediterranean surface water, standing stocks and ρA of G. ruber (white) and G. bulloides are affected by both food availability and seawater carbonate chemistry. Rapid warming increased surface ocean stratification impacting food availability and changes in trophic conditions could be the causes of reduced foraminiferal abundance, diversity, and species-specific changes in planktic foraminiferal calcification.

  5. Western Pacific Warm Pool expansion event during 2.0-1.5 Ma and its implications to global climate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, L.; Chuang, C. K.; Wei, K. Y.; Shen, C. C.; Mii, H. S.; Chang, Y. P.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we reconstruct surface and upper thermocline seawater temperatures by using planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides sacculifer and Neogloboquadrina deutertrei in the southern Western Pacific Warm Pool (S-WPWP, ODP Site 1115B, 9o11'S, 151o34'E, water depth 1149 m) during past 2.2-1.1 million years (Ma). Significant S-WPWP surface warming in both glacial and interglacial periods during 1.86-1.55 Ma is accompanied with gradual upper thermocline cooling. S-WPWP sea surface temperature dropped 2.1oC from 1.50-1.21 Ma but upper thermocline temperature further decreased 1.1oC at this time period. WPWP expansion event is also supported by vertical foraminiferal Mg/Ca-derived temperature profile records in the central WPWP (ODP Site 806, Ford et al. 2015). Although foraminiferal Mg/Ca-derived temperature records from Eastern Equatorial Pacific suggests long-term cooling trend (Wara et al. 2005), alkenone undersaturation index (UK'37)-inferred surface temperature records suggest 1oC warming during 2.0-1.5 Ma (Fedorov et al. 2013). We argue that seasonal expansion of WPWP may be attributable to the meridional thermocline gradient increasing (Martinez-Garcia et al. 2010) during 2.0-1.5 Ma. Long-term extent variability of WPWP could have impact on cross-equatorial energy transportation and meridional precipitation belt movements (Lo et al., 2014).

  6. Study of spectro-temporal variation in paleo-climatic marine proxy records using wavelet transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chhavi P.

    2017-10-01

    Wavelet analysis is a powerful mathematical and computational tool to study periodic phenomena in time series particu-larly in the presence of potential frequency changes in time. Continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) provides localised spectral information of the analysed dataset and in particular useful to study multiscale, nonstationary processes occurring over finite spatial and temporal domains. In the present work, oxygen-isotope ratio from the plantonic foraminifera species (viz. Globigerina bul-loides and Globigerinoides ruber) acquired from the broad central plateau of the Maldives ridge situated in south-eastern Arabian sea have been used as climate proxy. CWT of the time series generated using both the biofacies indicate spectro-temporal varia-tion of the natural climatic cycles. The dominant period resembles to the period of Milankovitch glacial-interglacial cycle. Apart from that, various other cycles are present in the time series. The results are in good agreement with the astronomical theory of paleoclimates and can provide better visualisation of Indian summer monsoon in the context of climate change.

  7. Size-dependent response of foraminiferal calcification to seawater carbonate chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Evans, David; Shankle, Madison; Burke, Janet E.; Foster, Gavin L.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Chalk, Thomas B.; Stewart, Joseph A.; Alt, Claudia H. S.; Durrant, Joseph; Hull, Pincelli M.

    2017-07-01

    The response of the marine carbon cycle to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations will be determined, in part, by the relative response of calcifying and non-calcifying organisms to global change. Planktonic foraminifera are responsible for a quarter or more of global carbonate production, therefore understanding the sensitivity of calcification in these organisms to environmental change is critical. Despite this, there remains little consensus as to whether, or to what extent, chemical and physical factors affect foraminiferal calcification. To address this, we directly test the effect of multiple controls on calcification in culture experiments and core-top measurements of Globigerinoides ruber. We find that two factors, body size and the carbonate system, strongly influence calcification intensity in life, but that exposure to corrosive bottom waters can overprint this signal post mortem. Using a simple model for the addition of calcite through ontogeny, we show that variable body size between and within datasets could complicate studies that examine environmental controls on foraminiferal shell weight. In addition, we suggest that size could ultimately play a role in determining whether calcification will increase or decrease with acidification. Our models highlight that knowledge of the specific morphological and physiological mechanisms driving ontogenetic change in calcification in different species will be critical in predicting the response of foraminiferal calcification to future change in atmospheric pCO2.

  8. Foraminifera as climatic indicators in the sediments of Western Indian continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    and geological time factors. Thus, they are indicative of various parameters like the environmental conditions of deposition, latitudinal zonation, type of the geosynclinal structural, distance from the shore, rate of sedimentation etc. In fact, they have a story...

  9. The reciprocity between coiling direction and dimorphic reproduction in benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    , an attempt is made to study the relationship between mode of reproduction (sexual/asexual) and coiling direction (dextral / sinistral) in the benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens (Parker and Jones). Proloculus (initial chamber) size is taken...

  10. Widespread occurrence of nitrate storage and denitrification among Foraminifera and Gromiida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochoa, Elisa Pina; Høgslund, Signe; Geslin, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    acceptors are absent from the environment, may be one of the reasons for their successful colonization of diverse marine sediment environments. The contribution of eukaryotes to the removal of fixed nitrogen by respiration may equal the importance of bacterial denitrification in ocean sediments....

  11. Modern planktonic foraminifera. By Ch Hemleben, M. Spindler and O.R. Anderson

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_304.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_304.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  12. Planktonic foraminifera – Geochemical variability, eddies and seasonality in the Mozambique Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhardt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Ocean circulation is generally considered as one of the main players in the climate system. How certain ocean current systems have varied over time has a profound impact on climateand also the future climate is expected to be strongly affected by changes in ocean circulation. Specific parts of the

  13. The impact of ocean acidification on the functional morphology of foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Nikki; Godbold, Jasmin A; Austin, William E N; Paterson, David M

    2013-01-01

    Culturing experiments were performed on sediment samples from the Ythan Estuary, N. E. Scotland, to assess the impacts of ocean acidification on test surface ornamentation in the benthic foraminifer Haynesina germanica. Specimens were cultured for 36 weeks at either 380, 750 or 1000 ppm atmospheric CO2. Analysis of the test surface using SEM imaging reveals sensitivity of functionally important ornamentation associated with feeding to changing seawater CO2 levels. Specimens incubated at high CO2 levels displayed evidence of shell dissolution, a significant reduction and deformation of ornamentation. It is clear that these calcifying organisms are likely to be vulnerable to ocean acidification. A reduction in functionally important ornamentation could lead to a reduction in feeding efficiency with consequent impacts on this organism's survival and fitness.

  14. Revalidation of the genus Chiloguembelitria Hofker: Implications for the evolution of early Danian planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ignacio; Arz, José A.; Gilabert, Vicente

    2017-10-01

    Guembelitria is the only planktonic foraminiferal genus whose survival from the mass extinction event of the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary has been clearly proven. The evolution of Guembelitria after the K/Pg boundary led to the appearance of two guembelitriid lineages in the early Danian: one biserial, represented by Woodringina and culminating in Chiloguembelina, and the other trochospiral, represented by Trochoguembelitria and culminating in Globoconusa. We have re-examined the genus Chiloguembelitria, another guembelitriid descended from Guembelitria and whose taxonomic validity had been questioned, it being considered a junior synonym of the latter. Nevertheless, Chiloguembelitria differs from Guembelitria mainly in the wall texture (pustulate to rugose vs. pore-mounded) and the position of the aperture (umbilical-extraumbilical to extraumbilical vs. umbilical). Chiloguembelitria shares its wall texture with Trochoguembelitria and some of the earliest specimens of Woodringina, suggesting that it played an important role in the evolution of early Danian guembelitriids, as it seems to be the most immediate ancestor of both trochospiral and biserial lineages. Morphological and morphostatistical analyses of Chiloguembelitria discriminate at least five species: Chg. danica, Chg. irregularis, and three new species: Chg. hofkeri, Chg. trilobata and Chg. biseriata.

  15. Benthic foraminifera as proxy for oxygen-depleted conditions off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Saraswat, R.

    collected from a water depth of 15 m to 3300 m were studied for the benthic foraminiferal content. A total of 383 recent benthic foraminiferal species were identified. Out of the total 383 benthic foraminiferal species identified in the study area, 65...

  16. Distribution of living planktonic foraminifera in the coastal upwelling region of Kenya, Africa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Paulinose, V.T.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    met with in waters near the equator. The faunal characteristics as related to hydrology and the role of some ecological parameters like temperature and salinity have been delineated.The evidence obtained from statistical analysis of the data of most...

  17. Significance of correspondence between river discharge and proloculus size of benthic foraminifera in paleomonsoonal studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    Variations in the mean proloculus size (MPS) of the benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens were studied in a core collected off Karwar (20 m water depth), on the west coast of India. Comparison of downcore variations in the MPS...

  18. Shallow water benthic foraminifera as proxy for natural versus human-induced environmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijer, L.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Ecosystem composition and functioning is not only subjected to human-induced alterations, ecosystems also subjected to natural (e.g. climate-induced) variability. To quantify human impacts on ecosystems, these natural fluctuations must be accounted for. Since long-term biological monitoring programs

  19. Biology of Pelosina arborescens PEARCEY, 1914, with comparative notes on Astrorhiza limicola SANDAHL, 1857 (Foraminifera: Astrorhizidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of Pelosina arborescens Pearcey, 1914 is amended: only the Scottish specimens of the original description are now included in the species. Factors like water current, aquarium conditions, bioturbation and rough sampling and handling may cause a wide morphological variation which...... planktonic algae and detritus. It adapts its form according to the prevailing water current. The erect form allows it to penetrate the viscous sublayer and reach the turbulent boundary layer, where food is more plentiful. Studies of the functional biology of P arborescens suggest that the shape and size...... of the test are adaptations that also protect against bioturbation and predation but may restrict the respiratory surface. Field observations and laboratory experiments under anoxic conditions show that P arborescens can live anaerobically. Histological analysis of the protoplasm revealed large amounts...

  20. An Ecological Tipping Point Defined by Shallow Marine Foraminifera in the latest Paleocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. M.; Spivey, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is recognized in marine sediments by a carbonate dissolution zone, the extinction or turnover of benthic taxa, and a radiation of planktic excursion taxa, all accompanied by a rapid-onset, negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). We present foraminiferal evidence from shallow marine sediments in southeastern Maryland, USA, where accumulation rates are high, for a minor ocean acidification event in the latest Paleocene that coincides with a relatively small (-2‰) CIE. This pre-onset excursion (POE) precedes the larger (-4‰) PETM CIE onset and dissolution event. During the POE, the benthic assemblage is reconfigured toward agglutinated species in order to adapt to increased acidity, and the planktic assemblage begins to speciate due to perturbed mixed layer conditions. The benthic assemblage returns to normal, without interruption, as the POE recovers, but planktic excursion taxa continue to appear in very low numbers. This is contrasted to the major ocean acidification event associated with the PETM CIE onset that results in a zone of complete dissolution followed by distinctive benthic and planktic foraminiferal assemblages. Our microfossil evidence documents a biotic response to bottom water and mixed layer perturbations that illustrates how coastal ecosystems react to both moderate and severe ocean acidification events, bracketing the ecological tipping point of shallow marine ecosystems. The POE, roughly half the magnitude of the CIE onset, provides insight into the nature of the initial effects of climate perturbation as well as an example of one that is fully recoverable. It is here that research aimed to better understand the long-term effects and reversibility of modern deteriorating oceanic conditions should focus. This study provides an initial metric by which to measure modern ecosystem disturbances and will help to define the tipping point for the shallow marine environment.

  1. Discovery of Orbitolinids (Foraminifera) at Lebyin, Thazi Township, Myanmar: Its Stratigraphic and Paleogeographic Significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw Win; Pe Maung Than; Min Swe

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of preliminary assessment on the orbitolinids discovered for the first time from an isolated hillock (locally known as Peinyoin Hill) situated at just northwest of Lebyin village (lying on the Thazi-Shwenyaung Rail Road), and from the limestone lenses embedded within a sequence of tuffaceous sandstone, mudstone and conglomerates that is exposed on the west of the Myit-thar Stream. The present preliminary examination reveals that the orbitolinid fauna at the limestone hillock consists of Paracoskinolina cf. sunnilandensis Iraqia sp., and Simplorbitolina spp., indicating an early Cretaceous age (probably Aptian-Albian). On the other hand, the limestone lenses exposed on the west of the Myit-thar Stream bear Iraqia thailandensis (=Haurania thailandensis Kemper]. From this faunal evidence and prevailing lithostratigraphic characteristics, it has reached to the final conclusion that these controversial outcrops are no longer needed to be lumped in the Late Paleozoic Lebyin Group in the Plateau Limestone Group, but must be designated as a southern continuation of the Pan Laung Formation of Jurassic-Cretaceous age. (author)

  2. Response of benthic foraminifera Rosalina leei to different temperature and salinity, under laboratory culture experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Saraswat, R.; Linshy, V.N.; Rana, S.S.

    Live specimens of benthic foraminiferal species Rosalina leei were subjected to a combination of temperature (25 degrees C, 30 degrees C and 35 degrees C) and salinity (25 ppt, 30 ppt, and 35 ppt) to assess its differential response to the annual...

  3. Does temperature affect dimorphic reproduction in benthic foraminifera? A culture experiment on Rosalina leei

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Caron, D.A.

    Calvez, J., Arch. Zool. Exp. Gen. , 1950, 87 , 211 ? 243. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. We are grateful to Dr Elain Lim for her help in the laboratory and the Department of Science and Techno l- ogy, Govt. of India for providing financial assistance to R...

  4. Addressing environmental issues through foraminifera – Case studies from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    for not more than past 100-150 years, beyond which we would need proxies to give us information about the past climate. During the past few decades, microfossils, especially foraminifers have become the prime source to address environmental issues. Extreme...

  5. Foraminifera [Marine Microfossil] as an additional tool for archaeologists - Examples from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    or- ganisms, their presence and absence could be a deci- GLIMPSES OF MARINE ARCHAEOLOGY IN INDIA sive factor in interpreting whether any ancient water body was filled with fresh or marine (brackish) water. With this intention, the author has...

  6. Effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity changes on benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Kouthanker, M.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Nigam, R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Linshy, V.N.

    smaller and turned opaque within two days of lowering the salinity and later on their tests dissolved within 24 and 43 days, respectively. No specimen reproduced at 10 psu and 15 psu salinity, while only a few specimens (3%) reproduced at 20 psu salinity...

  7. Foraminifera from the Chilka Lake on the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Venugopal, P.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    in the water (Patnaik, 1971). The most important hydrological fea- ture of the lake is salinity which governs the distribution of a large plethora of aquatic flora and fauna in the habitat. The salinity value of the lake varies con- siderably from month... these months in the outer channel (101.24% (November) to 181.08% (May)), while in the central sec- tor, it is minimum in May (74.81%) and maximum in March (122.78%). In con- trast, in the northern sector, there is a decrease in the c% value from November...

  8. Distribution of upwelling index planktonic foraminifera in the sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    d'UllC zone d'upwelling, marge continentale de I'Indc I Les foraminifcrcs planctoniques. radiolaires. carhonates et Ie carhone organique. ont etc analyses dans vingt et un cchantillons de sediments. La repartition de ces parame tres revcle que les... sediments contienncnt la signature d'un upwelling. L'ahondance relative des foraminitcres planctoniques, des radiolaires et les teneurs en carbonates et en c

  9. Laboratory experiment to record rate of movement of cultured benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Nigam, R.

    structures, pre water chemistry (Yingst and Alter, 1982 and, Aller and Aller, 1986), stratigraphy (Mc Cave, 1985) and transport of sediment (Jumars et al., 1981; Grant et al., 1982 and, Rhoads and Boyer, 1982). Foraminiferal movement in and on the sediment... investigators, who observed the movement on the glass surface of the petridishes (Arnold, 1953 and, Banner and Williams, 1973) and through sediments (Severin and Erskian, 1981; Severin et al., 1982; Severin, 1987; Kitazato, 1988 and Weinberg, 1991). Although...

  10. Assessing the effect of calcein incorporation on physiological processes of benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.; Banerjee, B.; Mallick R.; Naik, Dinesh K.; Singh, D.P.

    temperatures. The growth of Rosalina sp. is not affected by any of the calcein concentrations within the first 4–5 weeks of exposure. Additionally, no distinct difference in abnormality, mortality and reproduction was observed in the control and treatment...

  11. Appraisal of laboratory culture experiments on benthic foraminifera to assess/develop paleoceanographic proxies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Linshy, V.N.; Rana, S.S.; Kurtarkar, S.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    revealed presence of morphologically different stages in the life cycle of single species. Thus the forms that were earlier recognized as different species were later on clubbed as developmental or ontogenetic stages of single species. Interesting...

  12. Some aberrant foraminifera from the shelf sediments of central east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Almeida, F.

    -specialisation; the twinning in @iUvigerina@@ sp., as due to an accidental coalescence of two tests in the early stages of growth, and @iNodosaria@@ sp., showing a 'bend' as a result of damaged last chamber being recalcified with the terminal aperture shifting to an angle...

  13. Benthic foraminifera for heavy metal pollution monitoring: A case study from Burullus Lagoon of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orabi, O H; El-Badry, A A; Badr-ElDin, A M

    2017-08-15

    Sources of heavy metals pollution in the Burullus Lagoon include phosphate fertilizers, sewage and oil spills from fishing boats. The benthic species identified in this lagoon are Adelosina carinata striata (Wiesner), Quinqueloculina bosciana (d'Orbigny), Quinqueloculina seminulum (Linnaeus), Ammonia tepida (Cushman), Elphidium excavatum (Terquem). A. tepida is the most dominant species in the lagoon. It constitutes more than 97% of the total benthic foraminiferal assemblages reflecting tolerance to the very low salinity in the Burullus Lagoon. The intensity of deformation was severe exhibiting a peculiar change in the coiling direction in A. tepida with increase in cadmium concentration. A. tepida exhibited a great morphological variability and the recorded morphological abnormalities show high spire giving the spiroconvex test, additional chamber, aberrant chamber shape and size, twisted tests with elongated axes of rotation and complex deformities, whereas E. excavatum showed additional calcite secretion (tumors). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. LEPINOCONUS CHIOCCHINII GEN. N., N. SP., A CONICAL AGGLUTINATED FORAMINIFERA FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS OF ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERZIKA CRUZ-ABAD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A new conical agglutinated foraminifer, Lepinoconus chiocchinii gen n., n. sp. from the lower Campanian shallow-water platform deposits of the Lepini Mountains (central Apennines, Italy, is described. It has a pseudo-keriothecal wall structure, uniserial arrangement of the adult chambers and multiple apertures. The exoskeleton is constituted by beams (main and intercalary continuous from one chamber to the next, while the endoskeleton bears pillars. The new taxon is included in the Coskinolinidae family. Lepinoconus chiocchinii gen. n., n. sp. is known from southern Italy, Greece and Albania.

  15. Environmental changes during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum in Spitsbergen as reflected by benthic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenö Nagy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with environmental changes during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM and its background conditions in Spitsbergen through analysis of benthic foraminiferal assemblages (FA in a section drilled in the Paleogene Central Basin. The impact of this extreme global warming occurs here in prodelta shelf mudstones composing the lower part of the Gilsonryggen Member (Frysjaodden Formation. The start of the PETM perturbation is marked by a faunal turnover, in which the medium-diversity circumpolar Reticulophragmium assemblage was replaced by a low-diversity Trochammina fauna. During the hyperthermal period, benthic foraminiferal diversity decreased severely, while the dominance of small-sized taxa with epifaunal morphology strongly increased. This low-diversity fauna occurs in sediments with a reduced thorium/uranium ratio (proxy for oxygenation and kaolinite enrichment (proxy for high humidity. The faunal changes were thus caused by the combined effects of hypoxic and hyposaline conditions in a stratified water column, due to extreme warming with its accompanying intensified hydrologic cycle. The PETM acme coincides with the maximum flooding surface (MFS of the Gilsonryggen depositional sequence, composed of the Gilsonryggen Member and the overlying Battfjellet and Aspelintoppen formations. The transgressive phase of the sequence was initiated by local tectonics, while the eustatic sea-level rise of the PETM was superimposed on this transgression.To access the supplementary material for this article, please see supplementary files under Article Tools online.

  16. Larger foraminifera from a relict structure off Karwar western Indian continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    of such water masses having been present in the region. Among the larger forms, @iAmphistegina bicirculata, A. radiata@@ var. @ipapillosa@@ and @iOperculina ammonoides@@ indicate mixing, while @iNummulites cumingii@@ and @iBorelis schlumbergeri@@ were relict...

  17. Pollution effects monitoring with foraminifera as indices in the Thana creek, Bombay area

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    In the study area, the pollution effect on the foraminiferids is intense, hence highly reliable and measurable. The relative sensitivity of tolerance of the biota is sharply variable and dependent upon the nature of the pollutants discharged...

  18. Addressing environmental issues through foraminifera - Case studies from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    stream_size 9 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_Workshop_IGCP-514_42.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_Workshop_IGCP-514_42.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  19. The relative sensitivity of benthonic foraminifera in the polluted marine environment of Cola Bay, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    on the one hand and between TFN with the nature of the substrate in relation to the radial distance from the mouth of the discharge point on the other, appears to be very erratic. The relative sensitivity of the benthonics nearer the outfall area is more...

  20. A note on the Pavonina flabelliformis D'Orbigny (benthic foraminifera) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.

    . flabelliformis in modern sediments off Karwar suggests and updates the lower depth limit to 33 metre as against reported from deeper regions in previous studies. This will have significant bearing in paleodepth studies of sedimentary strata having fossils...

  1. Foraminifera from the tidal zone in the Netherlands Antilles and other West Indian Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1964-01-01

    Through the kindness of Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK the author was enabled to study a number of samples from localities in the tidal zone of several West Indian islands. Previously, by courtesy of Dr. T. MORTENSEN, abundant material from some deepwater samples collected off Santa Cruz, Virgin

  2. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    derived from organisms living as benthos on the seafloor, and shells of organisms which once had lived as plankton in the surface waters (Diester-Haass et al., 1973). Thus the sedi- ments of continental margins show features typical 0025... surface waters contrast sharply with low salinity waters along the south Indian coast and in the Bay of Bengal (Fig. 3A). The North Equato- rial Current sets-in during the northeastern mon- soon period and it penetrates into the southern Arabian Sea...

  3. Living benthonic foraminifera in a tidal environment: Gulf of Khambhat (India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    of the study area is a high energy environment, it is deep and it is bounded by a narrow, long shallow (at a submerged depth of 7-20 m) sand bar (Eastern Bank) which rises from 40-43 m depth and is separated from the coast by the parallel Sutherland Channel...

  4. 70 kD stress protein (Hsp70) analysis in living shallow-water benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Heinz, P.; Marten, R.A.; Linshy, V.N.; Haap, T.; Geslin, E.; Kohler, H-R.

    ) the monoclonal antibody “mouse anti-human Hsp70 (MA3-006)”; Dianova, Hamburg, Germany, dilution 1:5000, or, alternatively, (b) the monoclonal antibody “mouse anti-chicken Hsp70/Hsc70 (SPA-822)”; Dianova, dilution 1:1000 (experiment II), or (c) a combination... anti-chicken Hsp70/Hsc70 (SPA- 822)” did not detect any band, also no standard was visible here. To check if there was a major loss of Hsp70 during ultrafiltration, the filtrate (containing proteins <30 kD) was also analyzed. No Hsp70 could...

  5. Influence of monsoon upwelling on the planktonic foraminifera off Oman during Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    , these sediments provide an integrated information of the upwelling process and Asian monsoon strengths over geological time. The monsoon system is one of the Earth's most dynamic features, which interacts with global atmospheric circulation that controls... the heat budget in the Arabian Sea. Hence changes in the monsoon system may play an essential role on global climate. The southwest (SW) monsoon system in the Arabian Sea exerts a strong influence upon the climatic conditions in south and southeast...

  6. Planktic foraminiferal shell thinning in the Arabian Sea due to anthropogenic ocean acidification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. de Moel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available About one third of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 released into the atmosphere in the past two centuries has been taken up by the ocean. As CO2 invades the surface ocean, carbonate ion concentrations and pH are lowered. Laboratory studies indicate that this reduces the calcification rates of marine calcifying organisms, including planktic foraminifera. Such a reduction in calcification resulting from anthropogenic CO2 emissions has not been observed, or quantified in the field yet. Here we present the findings of a study in the Western Arabian Sea that uses shells of the surface water dwelling planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber in order to test the hypothesis that anthropogenically induced acidification has reduced shell calcification of this species. We found that light, thin-walled shells from the surface sediment are younger (based on 14C and δ13C measurements than the heavier, thicker-walled shells. Shells in the upper, bioturbated, sediment layer were significantly lighter compared to shells found below this layer. These observations are consistent with a scenario where anthropogenically induced ocean acidification reduced the rate at which foraminifera calcify, resulting in lighter shells. On the other hand, we show that seasonal upwelling in the area also influences their calcification and the stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O signatures recorded by the foraminifera shells. Plankton tow and sediment trap data show that lighter shells were produced during upwelling and heavier ones during non-upwelling periods. Seasonality alone, however, cannot explain the 14C results, or the increase in shell weight below the bioturbated sediment layer. We therefore must conclude that probably both the processes of acidification and seasonal upwelling are responsible for the presence of light shells in the top of the sediment and the age

  7. The Impact of the Latest Danian Event on Planktic Foraminiferal Faunas at ODP Site 1210 (Shatsky Rise, Pacific Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehle, Sofie; Bornemann, André; Deprez, Arne; Speijer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The marine ecosystem has been severely disturbed by several transient paleoenvironmental events (ocean perspective. Here we present new foraminiferal isotope (δ13C, δ18O) and faunal data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1210 at Shatsky Rise (Pacific Ocean) in order to reconstruct the prevailing paleoceanographic conditions. The studied five-meter-thick succession covers ~900 kyr and includes the 200-kyr-lasting LDE. All groups surface dwelling, subsurface dwelling and benthic foraminifera show a negative δ13C excursion of >0.6‰, similar in magnitude to the one previously reported from neighboring Site 1209 for benthic foraminifera. δ18O-inferred warming by 1.6 to 2.8°C (0.4-0.7‰ δ18O measured on benthic and planktic foraminiferal tests) of the entire water column accompanies the negative δ13C excursion. A well stratified upper ocean directly before and during the LDE is proposed based on the stable isotope gradients between surface and subsurface dwellers. The gradient is less well developed, but still enhanced after the event. Isotope data are supplemented by comprehensive planktic foraminiferal faunal analyses revealing a dominance of Morozovella species together with Parasubbotina species. Subsurface-dwelling Parasubbotina shows high abundances during the LDE tracing changes in the strength of the isotope gradients and, thus, may indicate optimal living conditions within a well stratified surface ocean for this taxon. In addition, distinct faunal changes are reported like the disappearance of Praemurica species right at the base of the LDE and the continuous replacement of M. praeangulata with M. angulata across the LDE.

  8. Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation since the last glacial maximum: A view from the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.; Brown, E. A.; Hastings, D. W.; Hendricks, J.; Goddard, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of ice sheet meltwater on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) since the last glacial maximum represents an important issue in abrupt climate change. Comparison of Greenland and Antarctic ice core records has revealed a complex interhemispheric linkage and led to different models of ocean circulation including the “bipolar seesaw.” Meltwater input from the Laurentide Ice Sheet has been invoked as a cause of proximal sea-surface temperature (SST) and salinity change in the North Atlantic, and of regional to global climate change via its influence on the AMOC. We present published and new Mg/Ca, Ba/Ca, and δ18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from northern Gulf of Mexico sediment cores that provide detailed records of SST, δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), and inferred salinity for the 20-8 ka interval. Age control for Orca Basin core MD02-2550 is based on >40 AMS 14C dates on Globigerinoides ruber and documents continuous sedimentation at rates >35 cm/kyr. Early meltwater input is inferred from δ18Osw and Ba/Ca data prior to and during the Mystery Interval, consistent with a high sensitivity to solar insolation and greenhouse forcing. New bulk sediment δ18O data show major spikes reaching -5.5‰ ca. 14.6 and 12.6 ka. We speculate that these excursions represent fine carbonate sediment from Canadian Paleozoic marine carbonates, analogous to detrital carbonate in the North Atlantic which has a δ18O value of -5‰. Partial support for our hypothesis comes from SEM photomicrographs of bulk sediment from this section, which show no coccoliths or foraminifera in contrast to other intervals. The biogenic carbonate flux seems to have been greatly reduced by fine sediment input. Inferred peak meltwater flow appears to have been associated with the Bolling warming and meltwater pulse 1a. Finally, meltwater reduction at the start of the Younger Dryas supports models for a diversion to North Atlantic outlets and AMOC

  9. The formation placement and palaeoenvironment of the Middle Miocene Los Atajos Member, Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brent; Farfan, Philip; Hughes, Chantelle

    2017-07-01

    The age, palaeoenvironment and formation placement of the conglomeratic Los Atajos Member of central Trinidad have long been unclear. Seven samples (four from calcareous silts near the member's base exposed by building work at the Los Atajos Community Centre, and three from the underlying calcareous claystones of the Brasso Formation) were examined for calcareous microfossils. These indicate a conformable succession encompassing an overall regression. The oldest of the claystone samples, of uppermost early Middle Miocene Globorotalia fohsi fohsi Zone age (N11), contained an upper bathyal benthic foraminiferal assemblage, while the younger claystone samples yielded abundant, shallow neritic Hanzawaia carstensi. The recovery of the planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia mayeri but absence of Globigerinoides subquadratus suggest a Middle Miocene age (Globorotalia mayeri planktonic foraminiferal Zone; N14) for both the uppermost Brasso claystone sample and the Los Atajos Member. The benthic foraminiferal fauna in the Los Atajos is dominated by Rosalina subaraucana, with subdominant Cibicides ex gr. aknerianus and C. floridanus sensu Galloway and Heminway, and common Elphidium spp. This faunal succession has a close affinity with that of parts of the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation, especially the N10 Guaracara Limestone Member and the clays on which it sits. However, the Los Atajos Member assemblage differs markedly from that of the overlying Late Miocene San José Calcareous Silt Member of the Manzanilla Formation, from which the Los Atajos is separated by an unconformity of Globorotalia menardii (N15) Zone age. On these grounds, the Los Atajos Member is here placed within the Brasso Formation. The low diversity, high dominance benthic foraminiferal fauna and the associated ostracod assemblage in the Los Atajos are indicative of inner to shallower middle neritic palaeodepths in a carbonate-prone palaeoenvironment with marine vegetation and strong current action

  10. On the influence of sea level and monsoon climate on the southern South China Sea freshwater budget over the last 22,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Stephan; Chiu, Han-Yi; Yu, Pai-Sen; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Erlenkeuser, Helmut; Löwemark, Ludvig; Chen, Min-Te

    2006-07-01

    Changes in the local freshwater budget over the last 22,000 years have been estimated from a sediment core located in the southern South China Sea (SCS) using a combined approach of Mg/Ca and oxygen isotopes on the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white) sensu stricto (s.s.). Core MD01-2390 (06°28,12N, 113°24,56E; water depth 1591 m) is located near the glacial paleo-river mouths of the Baram, Rajang and North Sunda/Molengraaff Rivers that drained the exposed Sunda Shelf. The δ18O seawater record reveals lower average values (-0.96±0.18‰) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) when compared with modern values (-0.54±0.18‰). Low salinity during the LGM is interpreted to reflect a higher freshwater contribution due to a greater proximity of the core site to the mouths of the Baram, Rajang and North Sunda/Molengraaff Rivers at that time. A general deglacial increasing trend in salinity due to the progressive landward displacement of the coastline during deglacial shelf flooding is punctuated by several short-term shifts towards higher and lower salinity that are likely related to abrupt changes in the intensity of the East Asian summer monsoon. Thus, the deglacial δ18O seawater changes reflect the combined effects of sea-level-induced environmental changes on the shelf (e.g. phases of retreat and breakdown of the shelf drainage systems) and East Asian monsoon climate change. Lower salinity than at present during the Early Holocene may be attributed to an increase in summer monsoonal precipitation that is corroborated by previous marine and terrestrial studies that report a Preboreal-Early Holocene monsoon optimum in the Asian monsoon region.

  11. Indian Monsoon and denitrification change in the Laxmi Basin (IODP Exp. 355 Site U1456) of the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. E.; Khim, B. K.; Ikehara, M.; Lee, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Arabian Sea is a famous site for the basin-wide denitrification in the globe. The Western Arabian Sea has been acknowledged by its upwelling-induced denitrification related to the Indian Monsoon system (Altabet et al., 1999). It was recently reported that the denitrification in the Eastern Arabian Sea (IODP Exp. 355 Site U1456) has been persistent and consistent during the mid-Pleistocene as reflected in the bulk sediment δ15N values (Tripathi et al., 2017). Based on the age model reconstructed by δ18O stratigraphy of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) together with shipboard biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data at Site U1456 drilled in the Laxmi Basin of the Eastern Arabian Sea, the glacial-interglacial fluctuations of denitrification in association with the development of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) were resolved in the context of Indian Monsoon activity. One of striking features in the Eastern Arabian Sea is that the δ15N values of bulk sediment show clear and consistent denitrification with minimum δ15N values exceeding 6‰ even during glacial periods, when its western counterpart experienced a temporal collapse of OMZ and denitrification. The Eastern Arabian Sea is fed not only by the upwelling-induced productivity in the western margin during the summer monsoon but also by the high productivity during the winter monsoon, both of which maintain the increased productivity affecting the OMZ through the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the degradation of sinking organic particles. The Eastern Arabian Sea is further influenced by the clockwise surface currents, intermediate water ventilation change by the blockage of Antarctic Intermediate Water, limited inflow from the Red Sea/Persian Gulf, and the freshwater salinity stratification due to nearby riverine discharges, all of which make the denitrification process more complicated than the Western Arabian Sea. Nonetheless, the glacial-interglacial denitrification change in the Eastern

  12. Increased Amazon freshwater discharge during late Heinrich Stadial 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellari, Stefano; Chiessi, Cristiano Mazur; Kuhnert, Henning; Häggi, Christoph; da Costa Portilho-Ramos, Rodrigo; Zeng, Jing-Ying; Zhang, Yancheng; Schefuß, Enno; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Hefter, Jens; Alexandre, Felipe; Sampaio, Gilvan; Mulitza, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    The temporal succession of changes in Amazonian hydroclimate during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) (ca. 18-14.7 cal ka BP) is currently poorly resolved. Here we present HS1 records based on isotope, inorganic and organic geochemistry from a marine sediment core influenced by the Amazon River discharge. Our records offer a detailed reconstruction of the changes in Amazonian hydroclimate during HS1, integrated over the basin. We reconstructed surface water hydrography using stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca-derived paleotemperatures from the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber, as well as salinity changes based on stable hydrogen isotope (δD) of palmitic acid. We also analyzed branched and isoprenoid tetraether concentrations, and compared them to existing bulk sediment ln(Fe/Ca) data and vegetation reconstruction based on stable carbon isotopes from n-alkanes, in order to understand the relationship between continental precipitation, vegetation and sediment production. Our results indicate a two-phased HS1 (HS1a and HS1b). During HS1a (18-16.9 cal ka BP), a first sudden increase of sea surface temperatures (SST) in the western equatorial Atlantic correlated with the slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the associated southern hemisphere warming phase of the bipolar seesaw. This phase was also characterized by an increased delivery of terrestrial material. During HS1b (16.9-14.8 cal ka BP), a decrease in terrestrial input was, however, associated with a marked decline of seawater δ18O and palmitic acid δD. Both isotopic proxies independently indicate a drop in sea surface salinity (SSS). A number of records under the influence of the North Brazil Current, in contrast, indicate increases in SST and SSS resulting from a weakened AMOC during HS1. Our records thus suggest that the expected increase in SSS due to the AMOC slowdown was overridden by a two-phased positive precipitation anomaly in Amazonian hydroclimate.

  13. Seasonal Variability of Seawater Salinity and the Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Seawater in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, M. C.; Thunell, R. C.; Tappa, E. J.; Wright, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    Monthly seawater oxygen isotope measurements (δ18Osw) were collected between May 1996- February 1997 and in May 2005 at various water depths in the Cariaco Basin, offshore Venezuela. The δ18Osw values are compared with concurrent salinity measurements to assess the δ18Osw:salinity relationship in this tropical region and to determine if there is significant seasonal variability in the relationship. The δ18Osw values range from 0.83‰ - 1.27‰ smow. The climatology of the region is driven by the seasonal migration of the ITCZ. During the winter and early spring, precipitation is low and upwelling is intense causing salinity to increase to ~37 psu. In contrast, during the Summer and early Fall when the ITCZ migrates to the north, upwelling ceases and precipitation increases causing surface salinities to decrease to ~36.2 psu. Preliminary results indicate that the strongest positive correlation between δ18Osw and salinity in the upper 400m occurred during May 2005 (R2= 0.93). However, the salinity:oxygen isotope relationship varies significantly over the course of the year. For example, the lightest δ18Osw values occurred during November 1996 possibly due to increased input of Orinoco River water into the Cariaco Basin. The relationships determined from our study will aid our understanding of paleosalinity variations in this region. Magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios and the oxygen isotope composition (δ18Oc) were also measured in two surface dwelling planktonic foraminiferal species Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink variety) and Globigerina bulloides from bi-weekly sediment trap samples collected in the Cariaco Basin between 2003 and 2005. The Mg/Ca ratios range from 3.9-6.9 mmol/mol for G. ruber and 4.7-6.4mmol/mol for G. bulloides. The range in δ18Oc is 0.96‰ for G. ruber over ~5°C change in sea surface temperature (SST) and 0.50‰ for G. bulloides over ~2.5°C change in SST.

  14. Holocene Summer Monsoon Variability- Evidence from Marine Sediment of western Continental Shelf of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghage, P. N.; Ratnayake, K. M.; Dassanayake, D. M. K. K.; Mohtadi, M.; Hewawasam, T.; Jinadasa, S. U. P.; Jayawardena, S.; Siriwardana, S.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding long term variability of Indian monsoon system is essential for better climate forecasting which is a prerequisite for agricultural development and disaster management. Yet, it has been a least attended scientific question in Sri Lanka Therefore, this study was carried out to understand the monsoonal variability during the Holocene using multiple proxies on a sediment core, representing unmixed summer monsoonal record. A 390 cm long piston core was obtained from the continental shelf off Negombo by National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency , was used for this study. This site mainly receives sediment from rivers fed by summer monsoon. Colour reflectance and chemical composition of the sediments, and δ18O and δ13C of Globigerinoides ruber foraminifera, extracted from the sediments were measured at 0.1-2.0 cm resolutions. Principal component analysis of chemical compositional data and colour reflectance data was performed to extract important components that represent climate variability. Benthic and planktonic foraminifera species that indicate upwelling were counted at 2 cm resolution. Radiocarbon dating was carried out using intact micro-shells. Results indicate that upwelling proxies (δ13C, foraminiferal proxies, and colour reflectance-Chlorophyll) and δ18O, which indicates evaporation-precipitation (E-P), increased during 8000-10000 cal yrs BP, 2000-4000 cal yrs BP and again after 1000 cal yrs BP. This increase in upwelling and E-P indicates strengthening of summer monsoon during these periods. However, terrestrial proxies, (XRF-PC1-Terrestrial, Ti, and DSR-PC3-iron oxides)indicate decrease in terrestrial influx which represents rainfall, from 6000-1000 cal yrs BP followed by an increase after 1000 cal yrs BP. Gradual decrease in precipitation has been observed locally as well as regionally after around 6000 cal yrs BP followed by an increase after 1000 cal yrs BP. The contrast behavior of strengthening monsoonal winds and

  15. Sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, B. K.; Horikawa, K.; Asahara, Y.; Kim, J. E.; Ikehara, M.; Lee, J.

    2017-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 355 conducted to drill 1109.4 m penetration at Site U1456 in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea. Four lithologic units are defined onboard at Site U1456 (Pandey et al., 2016). Unit I is 121 m long, consisting mostly of pelagic carbonates (nannofossil ooze and/or foraminifera-rich nannofossil ooze) interbedded with thin terrigenous (clay, silt, and sand) turbidite layers. The age model of Unit I was determined by the correlation of δ18O fluctuations of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) to LR04 stacks, estimating 1.2 Ma. A total of 60 samples, collected in the context of magnetic susceptibility (MS) changes at a discrete interval from a composite section (Holes U1456A and U1456C) of Unit I, were analyzed to measure Nd and Sr isotopes of detrital fraction. Based on Nd and Sr isotopes, the sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin during the last 800 kyrs was traced in response to the monsoon activity between the interglacial and glacial periods. ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr vary in a range from -12.4 to -8.0 and from 0.712 to 0.727, respectively. The correlation between ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr is quite linear, indicating that the sediments were provided mainly by two dominant sources. Considering the ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr end-members of sediment sources (i.e., river sediments), the Tapi River and Narmada River are the main contributors of sediments to Site U1456 with a little influence by the modern Indus River. However, the glacial sediments from the Indus River and the Mahi River may supply an additional fraction, leading to less ɛNd and more 87Sr/86Sr at Site U1456. Judged by the sediment sources, the sediments in the Laxmi Basin are characterized by the mixture of different provenances. In addition, it should be noted that the low ɛNd and high 87Sr/86Sr values coincide largely with high MS and vice versa, irrespectively of the glacial-interglacial change. Thus, rather than the sediment provenances, ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr

  16. Evaluating controls on planktonic foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kelly Ann; Thunell, Robert C.; Machain-Castillo, Maria Luisa; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Spero, Howard J.; Wejnert, Kate; Nava-Fernández, Xinantecatl; Tappa, Eric J.

    2016-10-01

    To explore relationships between water column hydrography and foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, we present δ18O and Mg/Ca records from three species of planktonic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerina bulloides, and Globorotalia menardii, collected from a sediment trap mooring maintained in the Gulf of Tehuantepec from 2006-2012. Differences in δ18O between mixed-layer species G. ruber and G. bulloides and thermocline-dweller G. menardii track seasonal changes in upwelling. The records suggest an increase in upwelling during the peak positive phase of El Niño, and an overall reduction in stratification over the six-year period. For all three species, Mg/Ca ratios are higher than what has been reported in previous studies, and show poor correlations to calcification temperature. We suggest that low pH (7.6-8.0) and [3 2-CO] values (∼70-120 μmol/kg) in the mixed layer contribute to an overall trend of higher Mg/Ca ratios in this region. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry analyses of G. bulloides with high Mg/Ca ratios (>9 mmol/mol) reveal the presence of a secondary coating of inorganic calcite that has Mg/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios up to an order of magnitude higher than these elemental ratios in the primary calcite, along with elevated Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. Some of the samples with abnormally high Mg/Ca are found during periods of high primary productivity, suggesting the alteration may be related to changes in carbonate saturation resulting from remineralization of organic matter in oxygen-poor waters in the water column. Although similar shell layering has been observed on fossil foraminifera, this is the first time such alteration has been studied in shells collected from the water column. Our results suggest a role for seawater carbonate chemistry in influencing foraminiferal calcite trace element:calcium ratios prior to deposition on the seafloor, particularly in high-productivity, low

  17. Late Pliocene History of Mediterranean Outflow Water in the Gulf of Cadiz (IODP Expedition 339, Site U1389)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, P.; Balestra, B.; Flores, J. A.; Sierro, F. J.; García Gallardo, Á.; Piller, W. E.; Aubry, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The opening and closure of ocean gateways play an important role amongst climate forcing mechanisms: surface and deep-water circulation are altered, and hence global heat transport. An important component of North Atlantic circulation patterns is the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) that enters the North Atlantic via the Gibraltar Strait. Its onset and early history after the opening of the Gibraltar Strait at 5.3 Ma are poorly constrained and its impact on oceanography and climate in the Pliocene are largely unexplored. Current research efforts in the scope of projects funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF-P25831-N29) and the Max Kade Foundation aim to improve our knowledge about this early phase of MOW. Research focuses on Sites U1387C (upper Miocene-lower Pliocene; ~5.8-3.8 Myrs) and U1389E (middle-upper Pliocene; ~3.7-2.8) drilled during IODP Expedition 339 in the northern Gulf of Cádiz close to the source area of MOW. At IODP Site U1389E, a 280m-thick sequence of upper Pliocene contourites is studied to reconstruct MOW behavior and potential paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic feedback mechanisms during the Mid-Pliocene Thermal Optimum. Currently, a reliable age model is developed for the studied interval based on bio-, chemo-, and cyclostratigraphy. Several biostratigraphic datums have been identified from analyses of calcareous nannoplankton and planktic foraminifera which indicate a depositional age between 3.65 Ma and 2.87 Ma. In some intervals of the record a further refinement of the age model at the millenial scale is complicated by poor recovery. However, preliminary results from high-resolution geochemical analyses of the bulk sediment (TOC, CaCO3 and S) and shells of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (δ18O, δ13C) reveal distinct cyclic patterns in several well recovered intervals. Based on an average sedimentation rate of ~25cm/ka, these cycles most likely reflect precessional forcing. Current paleoceanographic

  18. Carbon and oxygen isotope time series records of planktonic and benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea: Implications on upwelling processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.

    . Paleoceanographic record of thelastglacial/interglacialcycleintheRedSeaandGulfof Aden. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 64, 163^ 187. Manghnani, V., Morrison, J.M., Hopkins, T.S., Bohm, E., 1998. Advection of upwelled waters in the form of plumes o¡ Oman... of 18 Oin precipitation with temperature and altitude. Nature 285, 314^317. Shi,W.,Morrison,J.M.,Bohm,E.,Manghnani,V.,2000.The Omanupwellingzoneduring1993,1994and1995.Deep-Sea Res.II47,1227^1247. Sirocko, F., Sarnthein, M., Erlenkeuser, H., Lange, H., Ar...

  19. Relict benthic foraminifera in surface sediments off central east coast of India as indicator of sea level changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rana, S.S.; Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.

    of micropaleontologists, in: Recent developments in Indian micropaleontology, Special Volume no. 6, edited by P. Kundal, (Gondwana Geological Magazine, Nagpur) 2003, pp. 1-3. 3 Bruckner H, Late Quaternary shorelines in India, in: Late Quaternary sea level correlation...

  20. The dynamic balance between food abundance and habitat instability: benthic foraminifera of Portuguese margin canyons. Geologica Ultraiectina (286)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Submarine canyons are dynamic sedimentary environments influenced by sediment transport, erosion and deposition. Gravity flows can scour and erode the canyon floor, thus redistributing sediment to distal locations. In addition, submarine canyons can act as sedimentary traps where sediment

  1. Additions to the annotated list of marine alien biota in the Mediterranean with special emphasis on Foraminifera and Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ZENETOS

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work is an update of the annotated list (ZENETOS et al., 2006 based on literature up to April 2008. Emphasis is given to ecofunctional/taxonomic groups poorly addressed in the annotated list, such as the foraminiferan and parasites, while macrophytes are critically reviewed following the CIESM Atlas (VERLAQUE et al., in press. Moreover, in this update the bio-geographic area addressed includes the Sea of Marmara. The update yields a further 175 alien species in the Mediterranean bringing the total to 903. As evidenced by recent findings, more and more previously known ‘casual’ aliens, are becoming established. Approximately 100 more species have become well established in the region, raising the number of established species to 496 versus 385 until 2005. In the period from January 2006 to April 2008 more than 80 published papers have resulted in the recording of 94 new aliens, which is interpreted as a new introduction every 9 days, a rate beyond the worst scenario.

  2. First record of Tethyan Ladinian involutinid foraminifera-rich beds in thè Betic Internai Zone (SE Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Somma, Roberta; Martín Rojas, Iván; Zamparelli, Valeria; Delgado, Francisco; Estévez, Antonio; lannace, Alessandro; Perrone, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Generalmente se acepta la idea de que los dominios que actualmente constituyen las Zonas Interna y Externa de la Cordillera Bética estaban muy próximos, si no adyacentes, durante el Triásico. Sin embargo, los modelos geodinámicos propuestos en los últimos años indican que ambos dominios pertenecían, durante el Jurásico y el Cretácico, a dos placas tectónicas diferentes, que llegaron a distar varios cientos de kilómetros. Si se considera además que entre ambas placas tuvo lugar una colisión ob...

  3. Regional reduction in paleogroundwater discharge and rainfall in the Late Holocene Yucatan Peninsula reconstructed from trace metals in benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broach, K. H.; Chapman, B. L.; Paytan, A.; Street, J.

    2017-12-01

    As climate change progresses, droughts are predicted to become more common in regions dominated by seasonal precipitation, a problem compounded where precipitation provides significant freshwater resources. The Yucatan Peninsula relies on rain-recharged groundwater for potable water, and regional development due to tourism will further strain supply. Historical and geochemical evidence suggest extensive droughts harmed Mayan Civilization and may again impact the Yucatan in the near future, but proxies around the Yucatan and Caribbean region are complicated by variability and even opposing interpretations. An integrated rainfall signal is needed to smooth variability and separate local aberrations from long-term regional trends that can be used for risk assessment. Here we present a 5,000 year record of rainfall sourced from a broad swath of the peninsula and recorded as trace metal ratios in the foram Ammonia parkinsoniana. Rainwater percolation across the western peninsula forms a groundwater lens that discharges as brackish springs in our field site Celestun Lagoon resulting in trace metal gradients (Li, B, Sr, Ba, Nd) along the lagoon that oscillate with discharge. Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios in the forams suggest a long-term decrease in spring water discharge for the western Yucatan during the last 2,500 years with notable drops coinciding with known droughts (e.g. 800-950 CE) and more variability on a regional scale to 5,000 years. B/Ca ratios appear to depend on proximity to springs and may respond to low-pH discharge water while Nd/Ca ratios suggest sporadic incursions of seawater into the lagoon, possibly related to severely reduced spring water discharge or large hurricane events. We interpret these results to mean that periods of decreased rainfall broadly affect the western peninsula which may pose problems for large population centers like Merida. Future work will focus on periodicity of such rainfall changes and impact on the ecological environment of Celestun Lagoon.

  4. Living (stained) deep-sea foraminifera off Hachinohe (NE Japan, Western Pacific): environmental interplay in oxygen-depleted ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Duros, P.; Toyofuku, T.; Oguri, K.; Koho, K.A.; Buscail, R.; Grémare, A.; Radakovitch, O.; Deflandre, B.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bichon, S.; Goubet, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Chabaud, G.; Menniti, C.; Reichart, G.-J.; Kitazato, H.

    2014-01-01

    Live (Rose-Bengal stained) deep-sea foraminiferal faunashave been studied at five stations between 500–2000-m depthalong the NE Japanese margin (western Pacific) tounderstand how complex environmental conditions (e.g.,oxygen depletion, organic matter) control their structure(i.e., diversity,

  5. Benthic foraminifera assemblages as elemental pollution bioindicator in marine sediments around fish farm (Vrgada Island, Central Adriatic, Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidović, Jelena; Dolenec, Matej; Dolenec, Tadej; Karamarko, Vatroslav; Žvab Rožič, Petra

    2014-06-15

    Effects on sediments of fish farming activity near Vrgada Island was analysed through living and total foraminiferal assemblages and concentration of major, minor and trace elements from three sediment cores. Elemental concentrations of sediments are in accordance with carbonate characteristics of the surrounding area and show mostly natural element variations between sampling locations and throughout the cores, with no significant increases due to fish farming activity. Only phosphorus concentration shows elevate values below the fish cage, assigned to fish pellets. Foraminiferal communities are dominated by epifaunal and stress tolerant species, while diversity indices point to normal marine conditions. The type of substrate and phosphorus content in sediments principally influence foraminiferal community composition, while other elemental concentrations have no perceptible effect on the assemblages. Some foraminiferal species Ammoniatepida, Ammoniabeccarii, Elphidiumcrispum, Elphidiummacellum and genus Haynesina are confirmed to be tolerant to elevated nutrient (phosphorus) content, while Ammonia parkinsoniana shows sensitivity to pollution. Postmortem processes cause decrease of foraminiferal density and species richness with core depth. All results point to negligible influence of fish farming and relatively stable environmental conditions at all sampling locations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolution of subpolar North Atlantic surface circulation since the early Holocene inferred from planktic foraminifera faunal and stable isotope records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staines-Urias, Francisca; Kuijpers, Antoon; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    of the Faroe Islands, are located in the transitional area where surface waters of subpolar and subtropical origin mix before entering the Arctic Mediterranean. In these areas, large-amplitude millennial variability in the characteristics of the upper-water column appears modulated by changes in the intensity...

  7. Late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial shell-size-isotope variability in planktonic foraminifera as a function of local hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, B.; Feldmeijer, W.; de Vringer-Picon, M.; Brummer, G.-J. A.; Peeters, F. J. C.; Ganssen, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    So-called "vital effects" are a collective term for a suite of physiologically and metabolically induced variability in oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios of planktonic foraminifer shells that hamper precise quantitative reconstruction of past ocean parameters. Correction for potential isotopic offsets from equilibrium or the expected value is paramount, as too is the ability to define a comparable life stage for each species that allows for direct comparison. Past research has focused upon finding a specific size range for individual species in lieu of other identifiable features, thus allowing ocean parameters from a particular constant (i.e. a specific depth or season) to be reconstructed. Single-shell isotope analysis of fossil shells from a mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean piston core covering Termination III (200 to 250 ka) highlight the advantage of using a dynamic size range, i.e. utilising measurements from multiple narrow sieve size fractions spanning a large range of total body sizes, in studies of palaeoclimate. Using this methodology, we show that isotopic offsets between specimens in successive size fractions of Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides are not constant over time, contrary to previous findings. For δ18O in smaller-sized globorotalids (212-250 μm) it is suggested that the offset from other size fractions may reflect a shallower habitat in an early ontogenetic stage. A reduction in the difference between small and large specimens of G. inflata between insolation minima and maxima is interpreted to relate to a prolonged period of reduced water column stratification. For the shallow-dwelling species Globigerina bulloides, no size-isotope difference between size fractions is observed, and the variability in the oxygen isotopic values is shown to correlate well with the seasonal insolation patterns. As such, patterns in oxygen isotope variability of fossil populations may be used to reconstruct past seasonality changes.

  8. Forward Modeling of Carbonate Proxy Data from Planktonic Foraminifera using Oxygen Isotope Tracers in a Global Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and variation of oxygen isotopes in seawater are calculated using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies global ocean model. Simple ecological models are used to estimate the planktonic foraminiferal abundance as a function of depth, column temperature, season, light intensity, and density stratification. These models are combined to forward model isotopic signals recorded in calcareous ocean sediment. The sensitivity of the results to the changes in foraminiferal ecology, secondary calcification, and dissolution are also examined. Simulated present-day isotopic values for ecology relevant for multiple species compare well with core-top data. Hindcasts of sea surface temperature and salinity are made from time series of the modeled carbonate isotope values as the model climate changes. Paleoclimatic inferences from these carbonate isotope records are strongly affected by erroneous assumptions concerning the covariations of temperature, salinity, and delta (sup 18)O(sub w). Habitat-imposed biases are less important, although errors due to temperature-dependent abundances can be significant.

  9. Carbon isotopic changes in benthic foraminifera from the western South Atlantic: Reconstruction of glacial abyssal circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, W. B.; Lohmann, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Oxygen- and carbon-isotopic analyses have been performed on the benthic foraminifer Planulina wuellerstorfi in seven Late Quaternary cores from the Vema Channel-Rio Grande Rise region. The cores are distributed over the water-depth interval of 2340 to 3939 m, which includes the present transition from North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) to Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). The carbon-isotopic records in the cores vary as a function of water depth. The shallowest and deepest cores show no significant glacial-interglacial difference in δ 13C. Four of the five cores presently located in the NADW have benthic foraminiferal δ 13C that is lower during glacial isotopic stages. Based on bathymetric gradients in δ 13C, we conclude that, like today, there were two water masses present in the Vema Channel during glacial intervals: a water mass enriched in 13C overlying another water mass depleted in 13C. The largest gradient of change of δ 13C with depth, however, occurred at 2.7 km, ˜ 1 km shallower than the present position of this gradient. On the basis of paleontologic and sedimentologic evidence, we consider it unlikely that the NADW:AABW transition shallowed to this level. Reduced carbon-isotopic gradients between the deep basins of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans during the last glaciation suggest that production of NADW was reduced. Lower production of NADW may have modified the local abyssal circulation pattern in the Vema Channel region.

  10. Distribution and morphological abnormalities of recent foraminifera in the Marano and Grado Lagoon (North Adriatic Sea, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. MELIS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Marano and Grado Lagoon, is a northern Adriatic wetland system of relevant naturalistic and economic value, that is constantly under quality control in accordance with the current environmental directives. Benthic foraminifers community with its morphological abnormalities were investigated in the recent sediments (about 10 years old of 21 stations collected in the framework of the “MIRACLE” Project which aimed at testing the coexistence of clam farming with high Hg contamination. Euryhaline foraminifers, well known in Mediterranean brackish-waters, mainly characterizes the total assemblage. A. tepida dominates in areas characterized by low salinity, high clay and Corg content, but also to anthropogenic pressure. E. gunteri and H. germanica are recorded in the western sector of the lagoon, which is more affected by salinity variations and agricultural activities. Slightly higher values of assemblage diversity appear in less restricted areas of the lagoon or, at least, where physical parameters such as temperature and salinity are less variable. The test abnormalities, carried out on total assemblage, shows that the FAI (Foraminiferal Abnormality Index values always exceed 1% of the total assemblage, with clear decreasing gradients from inland to the sea (from N to S and from W to E in the studied area.

  11. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye

    species. r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Northern Indian Ocean; Particle flux; Calcium carbonate; Biogenic opal; Sediment traps; Temporal and spatial variability 1. Introduction northern Indian Ocean V. Ramaswamy a,C3 , B. Gaye b a... coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the 271–293 www.elsevier.com/locate/dsr ARTICLE IN PRESS V. Ramaswamy, B. Gaye / Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 271–293272 lesser extent pteropods. Diatom frustules are made up of opal while coccolithophorids...

  12. Ecological and evolutionary response of Tethyan planktonic foraminifera to the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (Alano di Piave section, NE Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, V.; Agnini, C.; Fornaciari, E.; Giusberti, L.; Rio, D.; Spofforth, D. J. A.; Pälike, H.

    2009-04-01

    The transient (ca. 500 kyr) climatic warming event at ca. 40 Ma, known as Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), significantly interrupted the overall cooling trend of the Middle Eocene. Originally documented in several deep sea sites at the Southern Ocean (Bohaty and Zachos, 2003), now it appears to be recorded worldwide by pronounced changes of the ^13C and ^18O values and coeval oscillations in global CCD (Tripati et al, 2005). Information on the planktonic foraminiferal response to this event is so far lacking. Here we present a detailed planktonic foraminiferal analysis of the MECO interval from a marginal basin of the central-western Tethys (Alano di Piave section, northeastern Italy). The expanded and continuous Alano section provides an excellent record of this event and offers an unique opportunity to better understand the role of climate upon calcareous plankton evolution. The initiation of the MECO occurs within magnetochron C18r at ca. 40.5 Ma with minimum ^18O and ^13C values achieved at the base of C18n.2n ca. 40.13 Ma, which are interpreted to represent peak warming conditions. Two sapropel-like, organic-rich intervals coincide with the major change in ^13C record at Alano (Agnini et al., 2007a; Spofforth et al., 2008). The MECO event correlates the E12 (P13) and lower E3 (P14) planktonic foraminiferal zones. The high-resolution quantitative planktonic foraminiferal analysis performed on both >38 m and >63 m fraction reveals pronounced and complex changes indicating a strong environmental perturbation that parallels the variations of the stable isotope curves. These changes are primarily represented by the marked increase in abundance of the eutrophic subbotinids and of the small, low-oxygen tolerant Streptochilus, Chiloguembelina and Pseudohastigerina, by the consistent and significant entrance of the eutrophic opportunist triserial Jenkynsina and of Pseudoglobigerinella bolivariana, typical species of high-productivity, upwelling areas. The environmental variations related to the MECO thus induced a pronounced shift from oligotrophic to eutrophic, opportunist, low-oxygen tolerant planktonic foraminiferal assemblages suggesting increased nutrient input and surface ocean productivity. These results are supported by the increase of calcareous nannofossil eutrophic indicators and by the occurrence of radiolarians as well. These observed changes show certain analogies with the PETM event recorded in the same area (Agnini et al., 2007b; Luciani et al., 2007). Our data indicate that the definitive decline in abundance of the large acarininids occurs within the MECO just following the major ^18O negative excursion. These warm-indices muricate forms dominated the Eocene greenhouse planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and became extinct near the middle/late Eocene boundary. Remarkably, our data highlight that the evolutionary appearances of two species belonging to the Turborotalia cerroazulensis lineage (T . cerroazulensis and T . cocoaensis) occur in correspondence to the MECO event. Furthermore, the total range of the marker Orbulinoides beckmanni at Alano is almost perfectly coincident with the major oxygen isotope excursion corroborating the hypothesis that this peculiar species might represent for the MECO an equivalent of the PETM excursion taxa (see also Edgar et al., 2007). References Agnini, C., D. J. A. Spofforth, E. Fornaciari, L. Giusberti, L. Lanci, V. Luciani, G. Muttoni, P, and D. Rio, 2007a. Is the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) recorded in the central-western Tethys? Eos Trans. AGU, 88(52) Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract OS11A-0188. Agnini,C., Fornaciari, E., Rio, D., Tateo, F., Backman, J., Giusberti, L., 2007b. Responses of calcareous nannofossil assemblages, mineralogy and geochemistry to the environmental perturbations across the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in the Venetian Pre-Alps. Marine Micropaleontology 63, 19-38. Bohaty, S. M., and J. C. Zachos, 2003. Significant Southern Ocean warming event in the late middle Eocene. Geology, 31(11), 1017-1020. Edgar, K.M., Sexton, P.F., Norris

  13. Rapid diversification of planktonic foraminifera in the tropical Pacific (ODP Site 865) during the late Paleocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D. Clay; Bralower, Timothy J.; Zachos, James C.; Premoli Silva, Isabella; Thomas, Ellen

    1996-05-01

    The planktonic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina rapidly (in ˜10 k.y.) diversified during the late Paleocene thermal maximum (LPTM), giving rise to such morphotypes as M. allisonensis (new species), M. africana, and A. sibaiyaensis. Single-specimen isotopic analysis confirms that M. allisonensis and A. sibaiyaensis are restricted to the LPTM carbon isotope excursion recorded at Ocean Drilling Program Site 865 (equatorial Pacific Ocean). The short-lived (50 to several 100 k.y.) “excursion” taxa attest to the ephemeral effects of the LPTM on the calcareous plankton. Single-specimen oxygen isotope data show that evolution of M. allisonensis and A. sibaiyaensis was accompanied by migration to deeper water depths. Ancestral M. velascoensis and A. soldadoensis were extremely rare or absent during the early stages of the LPTM, but immigrated back into the study area to coexist with their descendants in later LPTM horizons. Photosymbiosis may have facilitated the morozovellid and acarininid diversifications during the oligotrophic conditions of the LPTM.

  14. Foraminifera in surface sediments of Mandovi River Estuary: Indicators for mining pollution and high sea stand in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.; Banerjee, P.

    -level fluctuations (NIGAM, 1996; SCOTT and MEDIOLI, 1986, quoted by PIRAZZOLI, 1991) and that the sea level was higher than the present sea level at about 6000 years BP (HASHIMI et al., 1995) along the west coast of India. Probably during this period, the sediments...

  15. Response of shallow water benthic foraminifera to a 13C-labeled food pulse in the laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Linshy, V.N.; Nigam, R.; Heinz, P.

    studied to analyze their response. Marked green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta were added at the beginning of the experiment and the foraminiferal reaction was followed for 42 days. In order to assess the uptake of labeled material with time, foraminiferal...

  16. Foraminifera isotopic records... with special attention to high northern latitudes and the impact of sea-ice distillation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude, E-mail: hillaire-marcel.claude@uqam.ca [GEOTOP, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, PO Box 8888, succursale ' centre ville' Montreal, Qc, H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Since the reassessment of oxygen isotope paleotemperatures by N. Shackleton in the late 60s, most papers using isotopic records from planktic or benthic foraminifers imply a direct relationship between oxygen isotopes in seawater and the ice/ocean volume, thus some linkage with salinity, sea level, etc. Such assumptions are also made when incorporating 'isotopic modules' in coupled models. Here, we will further examine the linkages between salinity and oxygen isotope ratios of sea-water recorded by foraminifers, and their potential temporal and spatial variability, especially in the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. If temporal and spatial changes in the isotopic composition of precipitations and ice meltwaters tune the isotopic properties of the fresh water end-member that dilutes the ocean, rates of sea-ice formation and evaporation at the ocean surface play a further role on the salt and oxygen isotope contents of water masses. Thus, the oxygen 18-salinity relationship carries a specific isotopic signature for any given water mass. At the ocean scale, residence time and mixing of these water masses, as well as the time dependent-achievement of proxy-tracer equilibrium, will also result in variable recordings of mass transfers into the hydrosphere, notable between ice-sheets and ocean. Since these records in water mass may vary in both amplitude and time, direct correlations of isotopic records will potentially be misleading. Implications of such issues on the interpretation of oxygen isotope records from the sub-arctic seas will be discussed, as well as the inherent flaws of such records due to sedimentological and or ecological parameters.

  17. Seasonal variation in the flux of planktic foraminifera: Sediment trap results from the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Curry, W.B.; Ittekkot, V.; Muralinath, A.S.

    stream_size 15 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Foramin_Res_27_5.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Foramin_Res_27_5.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  18. Living deep-sea benthic foraminifera from the Cap de Creus Canyon (western Mediterranean): Faunal–geochemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras-Rosales, L.A.; Koho, K.A.; Duijnstee, I.A.P.; Stigter, H.C. de; García, R.; Koning, E.; Epping, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained benthicforaminifera were sampled along a depth transect from the Cap de Creus Canyon and the adjacent slope. Well-stained individuals were studied in the top 5 cm of sediment and the faunal abundances and assemblages were compared against pore-water geochemistry and biochemical

  19. A first look at past sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Indian Ocean from Mg/Ca in foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.; Weldeab, S.; Mackensen, A.; Naidu, P.D.

    between the equatorial Indian Ocean SST and the equatorial Pacific SST suggests the possibility of a common mechanism controlling the SSTs in both the equatorial Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. Citation: Saraswat, R., R. Nigam, S. Weldeab, A. Mackensen...

  20. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ~ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ~ 9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinant recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors including deep water CaCO3-corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood-events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3%, hematite%, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, as well as calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an overall arid climate, characterized by strong winds and intense upwelling, with an overall humid climate, with abundant rains and high sediment delivery (including refractory organic carbon) from land. Precessionally paced marl-limestone couplets occur throughout the recovery interval of the CIE and up to ten meters above it, suggesting that these wet-dry cycles persisted, though at declining intensity, after the peak PETM. Enhanced climate extremes at mid-latitudes might have been a direct response to the massive CO2 input in the ocean atmosphere system at the Paleocene-Eocene transition, and may have had a primary role in restoring the Earth system to steady state.

  1. Distribution, factor analysis and ecology of benthic foraminifera within inner shelf regime of Vengurla-Bhatkal sector, West Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    in original data matrix. The assemblages are - @iNonion@@ - @iBulimina ammobaculites, Bolivina@@. @iBulimina@@ - @iNonionella@@ - @iA. nonionella@@ - @iBulimina@@ and @iAmmonia. Based on the ecology of the fauna it is concluded that a general hyposalinal...

  2. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  3. Coastal lagoon sediments and benthic foraminifera as indicator for Holocene sea-level change: Samsø, southern Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Morigi, Caterina; Pejrup, Morten

    relative sea-level to drop. Originally, two Pleistocene elevations existed as separated islands, which were high enough to reach above sea-level during the transgressions. Proceeding coastal erosion produced material that was transported longshore and that was successively accommodated in a shallow sound....... Over time, an extensive beach ridge system formed, which eventually connected the islands, giving Samsø its characteristic shape. Ephemeral shallow-water lagoons evolved in topographic depressions along the shores of the island, most of which became inactive until today. A semi-enclosed coastal lagoon...... remained in the NE part of the island, which developed around an archipelago of submerged moraine hills. In the scope of this project we will study the evolution of the coastal landscape from the mid-Holocene to present day. We use a multi-proxy approach to resolve local variations in sea...

  4. Growing need to study foraminifera in the laboratory culture experiments: An attempt from the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Koli, N.Y.

    culture programme is studied. Initially, the effect of different media (like plain sea water and Erdschreiber medium), food and antibiotic drug on the growth of foraminiferal tests are monitored. The results suggest that Erdschreiber medium is condusive...

  5. A Significant Warming Event in the Southern Ocean During the Late Middle Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaty, S. M.; Zachos, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    The late middle-to-late Eocene (~45 to 34 Ma) is a critical period of Cenozoic climatic evolution, characterized by long-term cooling of deep waters and small-scale growth of ice sheets on Antarctica. This time interval, however, is poorly represented in deep-sea sediment archives, and high-resolution paleoceanographic records have not been developed for many of the sections that are available. Several Southern Ocean sites have adequate stratigraphic coverage through the middle-to-late Eocene and provide an opportunity to investigate regional paleoceanographic change through this time interval. In order to supplement the existing database, we have generated high-resolution stable isotope records from fine-fraction carbonates and foraminifera at Site 748, located on the southern Kerguelen Plateau. Integration of middle-to-late Eocene oxygen isotope records from Sites 748 and 738 (Kerguelen Plateau) and Site 689 (Maud Rise) reveals a prominent, short-term warming event at ~41.5 Ma, designated as the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO). At Site 748, both surface-dwelling (Acarinina spp.) and benthic (Cibicidoides spp.) exhibit two δ 18O minima, indicating that this event is characterized by two brief intervals of peak warming in both surface and deep waters. Benthic foraminiferal δ 18O data further indicate that middle-bathyal waters warmed ~ 4°C on both the Kerguelen Plateau and Maud Rise during the MECO. Accordingly, this transient event (isotope excursion, as observed during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, suggests that this event was not triggered by methane dissociation. Instead, the MECO may possibly be linked to increased pCO2 associated with the Chron C20-19 plate reorganization. Possible sources of CO2 during this period of global tectonic change are metamorphic decarbonation in the Himalayan orogen and inter-plate volcanism.

  6. Organic carbon in sediments of the southwestern margin of India: Influence of productivity and monsoon variability during the Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kessarkar, P.M.; Rao, V.P.

    Globigerinoides ruber was separated from >63?m fraction of three selected samples and measured their age by the accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS) method at the Leibniz-Labor of University of Kiel, Germany. Two bulk (mixed carbonate plus organic carbon...

  7. Investigation of Possible Tsunami Events on the Eastern Coast of Taiwan: Case Studies of Lu-Ye, Changping, and Tulan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksono, A. T., Jr.; Tsai, L. L. Y., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Major earthquakes had occurred in eastern Taiwan for many times. According to an Amis folklore originated in Chengkong City, there was a big sea wave struck their settlement in 1850 AD. Several studies had been conducted, however, the evidence which indicates the tsunami was very weak. There is also a possibility that big sea waves had occurred due to typhoons which take place 3-4 times a year in Taiwan. The purpose of this study is to prove the possibility of tsunami events on the eastern coast of Taiwan based on sedimentological features. The methods in this study are facies analysis including observation of the marine terrace along Lu-Ye, Changping, and Tulan, identification of lithology, sedimentary structure, and fossil content. Lithology analysis is conducted by using point counting of 12 sandstone samples from marine terrace outcrops. Based on the field observation, we found a thin sand marine deposit included in the beach gravel at a height of 10 meters at the Changping marine terrace. It contains coral and some Mollusca shells and does not display any particular sedimentary structure. Sediments that have similar characteristics were also found in the Tulan marine terrace with a height of 5 m. In addition, fossil analysis of marine sand in Tulan exhibits the presence of several planktonic foraminifera fossils such as Orbulina bilobata and Globigerinoides ruber. Temporary interpretation indicates that there is a "super" event which transports shallow marine and beach materials subsequently deposit them on top of an alluvial fan. A 10 cm thin layer of sediment serves as an early tsunami indicator. In addition, the absence of deposits with the same characteristics further indicates that the event occurred only once. Since the eastern coast of Taiwan is an uplift zone with an uplift rate between 5-8 mm/year, the estimated wave height of tsunami should take into account both the tsunami age and the uplift rate. Furthermore, based on the distance from the

  8. Late Pleistocene shallow water sand transported to the slope at IODP Sites U1484 and U1485 off the north coast of Papua New Guinea: how, when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, G. S.; Browning, J. V.; Bova, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Exp 363 drilled two sites on a gently seaward-dipping terrace 18 and 21 km north of Papua New Guinea, enabling the study of mechanisms that bring shallow water sediment to the deep sea. We expect past changes in sea level and precipitation / fluvial run-off dominated this record, but additional processes may have been important. We examined Hole U1484B (1031 m water depth; 223 m drilled; 99.8% recovered) and detected 339 sharp-based sand layers 0.5 cm or more thick. In contrast to the background hemipelagic nanno-bearing silty clay, sand layers are graded or massive turbidites containing detrital grains, shallow-water benthic foraminifera, shell fragments and/or wood. δ18O values of Globigerinoides ruber tied to the isotopic curve of Lisiecki and Raymo (2004) show the densest concentration of sand layers in the last 310 ka occurred during the cooling trend of MIS stage 6. Stage 2 contains significantly fewer discrete sand beds, even during the coldest part of the LGM. Other times of glacial intensification show a similarly modest correlation to peak sand deposition. Sand layers strongly correlate with high values of magnetic susceptibility (MS) measured on unsplit cores, and when mapped to the MIS time scale, MS increases match times of ice growth / falling sea level more consistently than does the density of sand layers. We attribute this to reworking of discrete sand layers by bioturbation, indicating the need for caution tying the absence of sharp-based sands to times of transgression or low precipitation / fluvial run-off. Packages of especially thick and closely-spaced sharp-based sands match seismic reflections at Site U1484. Tracing these reflections throughout the grid of hi-res MCS site survey profiles reveals the areal distribution and transport path of sand as well as a direct tie to similar sharp-based sands in the more distal Hole U1485A (1145 m water depth; 301 m drilled; 103.8% recovered.) The distribution of sands through time might be

  9. Sea-surface salinity variations in the northern Caribbean Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available By reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and their influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 ka, we seek to document climate changes in this tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern, and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides rube (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the area studied are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record obtained from core MD03-2628 exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 ka, indicating increased SSS. A long-term trend was also observed in the Δδ18O values that exhibited a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 ka, as compared to interglacial stages older than 650 ka. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper cross-equator temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross-equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 ka. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicated a northernmost ITCZ location that was forced by changes in the cross-equator temperature gradient and that was associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplify the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to the amplification of the

  10. Mid to late Holocene Leeuwin Current variability offshore southern Australia linked to ENSO state changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Kerstin; Moros, Matthias; De Deckker, Patrick; Blanz, Thomas; Siegel, Herbert; Wacker, Lukas; Schneider, Ralph; Jansen, Eystein

    2015-04-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a key aspect of the Earth's climate, drives regional to global oceanic and climate changes on various time-scales. Differences in the temporal coverage of Holocene records for the more general state in El Niño frequency, however, restrict a comprehensive overview. Oceanic variability offshore southern Australia is linked to the Leeuwin Current (LC), an eastern boundary current, transporting tropical waters from the Indo Pacific Warm Pool region towards higher latitudes. Instrumental data, spanning the last few decades, document that ENSO modulates LC variability. Here we present new, well-dated time series from two marine sediment cores (MD03-2611 and SS0206-GC 15)of past LC variability, based on alkenone-derived sea-surface temperatures (SST) and planktonic foraminifera offshore southern Australia, an area affected by recent El Niño and La Niña events. Our reconstructions of ENSO-state changes cover the last 7,400 years. With transition into the mid Holocene [dates], we find clear evidence that oceanic conditions prevailed under the dominant influence of a persistent La Niña mode. A strong LC produces a stratified water column and establishes a permanent thermocline as seen in the high abundance of the 'tropical fauna' (Globoturborotalita rubescens, Globoturborotalita tenella and Globigerinella sacculifer (including G. trilobus)) and maximum SST offshore southern Australia. During this La Niña-state dominated period, we record at c. 5000 years BP the first short period of a strong El Niño-like-state, by a pronounced drop in abundance of the subtropical species Globigerinoides ruber and a reduced SST gradient between the two core sites. The Late Holocene (from 3,500 years BP onwards) period is characterized by centennial to millennial scale variability in the LC strength, which is accompanied by an overall decrease of SSTs offshore southern Australia. We link this LC variability to Late Holocene centennial

  11. Subtropical freshwater event at the onset of Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinelt, M.; Repschläger, J.; Balmer, S.; Schwab, C.; Andersen, N.; Blanz, T.; Sarnthein, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) (12.79-11.6 ka BP) cold spell during the last deglaciation is associated with a major breakdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), the details of which are still controversial. Catastrophic events like a bolide impact or a major outflow of meltwater stored in the proglacial Lake Agassiz, which led to the capping of North Atlantic deep water convection sites, have been suggested to trigger the AMOC shutdown. However the geomorphological evidence for such a meltwater flood is not in agreement with the timing of the YD. Also, the YD was postulated to be part of a deglacial sequence of events generally characteristic of glacial terminations involving the displacement of major climatic zones and oceanographic fronts. We present detailed paleoceanographic records from sediment cores MD08-3180/ GEOFAR KF16 (38°N; 31.13°W, 3050 m w.d.) retrieved immediately east of the Mid Atlantic ridge south of the Azores Islands. At present, this site is located at the northern rim of the Azores Current, which delineates the subtropical gyre, recirculating warm waters of the North Atlantic Current. Due to its position at the boundary between temperate North East Atlantic waters and subtropical gyre waters, the site is ideally suited to trace past changes in the alternating influence of both water masses. Parallel stable-oxygen isotope records of surface water dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber w. (habitat depth 0-25m) and Globigerina bulloides (habitat depth 0-300m) may document the structure of surface waters. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) were derived from the UK'37 index and from planktonic foraminifera (PF) assemblages using transfer functions. d18Ow-ice and Sea Surface Salinities were estimated using the d18O G.ruber w. record corrected for SST and changes in global ice volume. The d18O records of G.ruber w. and G.bulloides diverge between 13.4 ka and 12.95 ka BP. d18Ow data show a gradual increase in the freshening of

  12. Reassessing transfer-function performance in sea-level reconstruction based on benthic salt-marsh foraminifera from the Atlantic coast of NE North America.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.; Edwards, R.J.; van de Plassche, O.

    2011-01-01

    The need to increase the number and distribution of sea-level records spanning the last few hundred years has led to particular interest in developing high-precision, geologically based sea-level reconstructions that capture decimetre and multi-decadal scale changes. Transfer functions for tide

  13. Reassessing transfer-function performance in sea-level reconstruction based on benthic salt-marsh foraminifera from the Atlantic Coast of NE North America

    OpenAIRE

    EDWARDS, ROBIN JAMES

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The need to increase the number and distribution of sea-level records spanning the last few hundred years has led to particular interest in developing high-precision, geologically based sea-level reconstructions that capture decimetre and multi-decadal scale changes. Transfer functions for tide level are statistical tools that quantify the vertical relationship between inter-tidal microfossils and elevation within the tidal frame and their use in sea-level reconstruction is growi...

  14. Monitoring heavy metal pollution in foraminifera from the Gulf of Edremit (northeastern Aegean Sea) between Izmir, Balıkesir and Çanakkale (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal; Önce, Melike

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the populations and abnormal shell structures of Quaternary foraminifers in the sediments of the North-eastern Aegean Sea were examined. For this purpose, offshore drilling was carried out at three locations, and core samples were collected from 13 locations at Küçükkuyu (Çanakkale), Güre (Edremit-Balıkesir) and Dikili (İzmir). At these points, drilling reached depths ranging from 3.00 to 22.00 m beneath the seafloor; recent sediments were observed, but the bedrock was not reached. Examination of the faunal and sedimentological properties of the samples showed that the Gulf of Edremit is completely influenced by the sea and has rich foraminifers and ostracod populations. The abnormalities observed in the foraminifer shells, as well as the yellow- and/or black-coloured shells seen in both the foraminifer and ostracod populations, are due to natural and anthropogenic ecological pollution. The vertical (chronological) and horizontal (spatial) distributions of heavy metal concentrations in both the core and drill core samples were investigated to determine the causes of the morphological abnormalities observed in the foraminifers. In the present study, pollution index (PI) values were calculated to assess the degree of heavy metal pollution (Yümün 2017). The current land use status of the coastal areas corresponding to the measured PI values was investigated to identify the sources of the pollution. Especially in the Güre region, a large number of genera and species of benthic foraminifers showed overgrowth in the shell sizes of individuals, and the coloration of the shells is noteworthy. These changes in the shells are a result of thermal sources and agricultural activities in the region. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to perform an elemental analysis of the surfaces of dark yellow-orange foraminifers (Ammonia compacta and Elphidium crispum). The S, Fe and Mn concentrations in the shells were found to be high, based on the SEM analyses. This is similar to the high S and Fe contents of thermal waters. Thus, the main causes of the coloration of the shells have been accepted to be both thermal waters and fertilizers and pesticides that are used in agricultural activities.

  15. Ba/Ca in Planktonic Foraminifera as a Recorder of Freshwater Input to the Ocean: Proxy Refinement in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of paleoclimate, the past several decades have seen large strides in the advancement of proxies designed to reconstruct changes in sea surface temperature (SST); however, techniques for reconstructing ocean salinity are less well developed. The ratio of Ba/Ca in planktic foraminiferal tests has shown initial promise as a tool for reconstructing salinity in continental margin sites near river mouths. In these environments, Ba/Ca shows an inverse correlation with salinity, and often a less clear correlation to nutrients or indicators of productivity, as is more typical in open-ocean settings. An ideal area in which to apply and test foraminiferal Ba/Ca as a proxy for freshwater input is the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), where temperatures are relatively stable, but large variations in precipitation are today driven by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and strength of the Australian-Indonesian monsoon. Foraminiferal Ba/Ca in sediments proximal to a river mouth should therefore reflect changes in riverine input, which in turn reflect variations in precipitation on different timescales. We present here planktic foraminiferal δ18O, Ba/Ca, and Mg/Ca records spanning the last glacial-interglacial transition from marine sediment cores in the Gulf of Papua, located in the WPWP. The δ18O records show an increase in the magnitude of glacial-interglacial (G-IG) δ18O change (Δ18O) moving away from the coastline and the mouth of the primary local freshwater source, the Fly River. The reduced amplitude in G-IG Δ18O in the cores closer to shore, manifested by more negative δ18O values before ~20 kyr ago, is likely due to freshwater input from the Fly River, with the effects diminishing with distance from the Fly River source. Temperature and sea level are also changing over the deglaciation, however, contributing to the signal recorded in the calcite δ18O. We use planktic Mg/Ca analyses and independent records of sea level change to isolate the component of foraminiferal δ18O that is due to salinity, which we then compare to the Ba/Ca records. With continued work toward proxy development, Ba/Ca has the potential to provide insight into past changes in precipitation in the WPWP in response to large or rapid climate change.

  16. Moving beyond the age-depth model paradigm in deep sea palaeoclimate archives: dual radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis on single foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Metcalfe, Brett; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Wacker, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Late-glacial palaeoclimate reconstructions from deep-sea sediment archives provide valuable insight into past rapid changes in ocean chemistry, but only a small proportion of the ocean floor is suitable for such reconstructions using the existing state-of-the-art using the age-depth approach. We

  17. Mean proloculus size, delta super(13) C and delta super(18) O variations in recent benthic foraminifera from the west coast of India and their climatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Sarkar, A.

    The interrelationship between mean proloculus size (MPS), delta super(18) O and delta super(13) C vatiations in benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens and their relation with temperature (T) and salinity (S) have been studied in samples...

  18. Drill cutting release in Ingøydjupet, SW Barents Sea from a well drilled in 1987, and its impact on benthic foraminifera

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In the nearby areas of the SW Barents Sea, large hydrocarbon reserves have been identified. During drilling procedures, drill cuttings are produced and some are released to sea. The disposal of drill cuttings may cause environmental degradation to the marine environment. Increasing petroleum activities, therefore requires further knowledge of ocean current transportation of fine sediment particles (clay and silt) related to cuttings and their effect on the marine environment and fauna includi...

  19. Stratigraphy of Neogene deposits in the Khania province, Crete, with special reference to foraminifera of the family Planorbulinidae and the genus Heterostegina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, T.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper the stratigraphy of the Neogene deposits in the Khania Province, Crete, Greece, is described. Special attention is paid to the evolution and taxonomy of foraminiferal genera assigned previously to the family Planorbulinidae. This partial revision of the Planorbulinidae is based not

  20. Millennial-scale glacial variability versus Holocene stability: changes in planktic and benthic foraminifera faunas and ocean circulation in the North Atlantic during the last 60000 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Thomsen, E.; Troelstra, S.R.; Kuijpers, A.; Prins, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Two piston cores, DS97-2P from the Reykjanes Ridge in the central North Atlantic Ocean (1685 m water depth) and ENAM33 from southwest of the Faeroe Islands in the NE Atlantic (1217 m water depth), have been investigated for their planktic and benthic foraminiferal content. DS97-2P is situated near

  1. Intertidal foraminifera and stable isotope geochemistry from world's largest mangrove, Sundarbans: Assessing a multiproxy approach for studying changes in sea-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Areen; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2017-06-01

    Recent changes in sea level have appeared as a major threat to the existence of coastal habitats like mangroves and to the biodiversity characterizing such habitats. In this study benthic foraminifer analysis along with carbon isotopes (δ13C‰) and ratio between organic Carbon and Nitrogen (C/N) were analyzed from five intertidal stations in Sundarbans, the world's largest mangrove ecosystem to test the efficiency of these signatures toward tracking relative rise in sea level. The stability of these signatures with respect to gap of twenty months across varying elevations of the targeted stations has been tested. Benthic foraminifer abundance ranged from 0 to 118 individuals per 10 g and the assemblage was found to be mostly dominated by agglutinated species. The δ13C‰ values (-26.6 to -23.8) reflected that the origin of carbon is majorly from vascular land plants in some inputs from estuarine phytoplankton that are known to characterize tidal water of Sundarbans. The values of C/N (0.48-1.43) represented a microbially degraded total organic carbon (TOC) pool and thus were not a suitable proxy. Out of three signatures, δ13C‰ showed a strong co-relation with elevation and thus could be used as a reliable proxy to track relative sea level rise in mangrove environments.

  2. A History of Warming Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Acidification Recorded by Planktonic Foraminifera Geochemistry from the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, E.; Thunell, R.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Chartier, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry of foraminiferal shells has been widely used to reconstruct past conditions of the ocean and climate. Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenically produced CO2 has resulted in an increase in global temperatures and a decline in the mean pH of the world's oceans. The California Current System is a particularly susceptible region to ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes that also cause a reduction in seawater pH. The trace element concentration of magnesium and boron in planktonic foraminiferal shells are used here as proxies for temperature and carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), respectively. Newly developed calibrations relating Mg/Ca ratios to temperature (R2 0.91) and B/Ca ratios to [CO32-] (R2 0.84) for the surface-mixed layer species Globogerina bulloides were generated using material collected in the Santa Barbara Basin sediment trap time-series. Using these empirical relationships, temperature and [CO32-] are reconstructed using a 0.5 meter long multi-core collected within the basin. 210Pb activities were used to determine a sedimentation rate for the core to estimate ages for core samples (sedimentation rate: 0.341 cm/yr). A spike in 137Cs activity is used as a tie-point to the year 1965 coinciding with the peak of nuclear bomb testing. Our down-core record extends through the mid-19th century to create a history of rising sea surface temperatures and declining [CO32-] as a result of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  3. Evaluation of I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone as proxy for redox conditions in the ambient water masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, N.; Liebetrau, V.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are most important areas of oxygen depletion in today´s oceans and nutrient cycling in these regions has a large socio-economic impact because they account for about 17% of the global commercial fish catches(1). Possibly increasing magnitude and area of oxygen depletion in these regions, might endanger rich pelagic fish habitats in the future threatening the global marine food supply. By the use of a quantitative redox proxy in OMZs, reconstruction of the temporal variation in OMZ extension eventually providing information about past and future changes in oxygenation and the anthropogenic role in the recent trend of expanding OMZs(2). Recent work has shown that iodine/calcium (I/Ca) ratios in marine carbonates are a promising proxy for ambient oxygen concentration(3). Our study explores the correlation of I/Ca ratios in four benthic foraminiferal species (three calcitic, one aragonitic) from the Peruvian OMZ to bottom water oxygen concentrations ([O2]BW) and evaluates foraminiferal I/Ca ratios as a possible redox proxy for the ambient water masses. Our results show that all species have a positive trend in the I/Ca ratios as a function of [O2]BW. Only for the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans this trend is not significant. The highest significance has been found for Uvigerina striata (I/Ca = 0.032(±0.004).[O2]BW + 0.29(±0.03), R² = 0.61, F = 75, P solutions, (ii) a species dependency of the I/Ca-[O2]BW relationship which is either related to a strong vital effect or toa species dependency on the calcification depth within sediment, and (iii) the inter-test variability of I/Ca between different specimens from the same species and habitat. (1): FAO FishStat: Fisheries and aquaculture software. In: FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department[online]. Rome. Updated 28 Nov. 2013. (2): Stramma et al.: Expanding Oxygen-Minimum Zones in the Tropical Oceans, Science, 320, 655-658, 2008. (3): Lu et al.: Iodine to calcium ratios in marine carbonate as a paleo-redox proxy during oceanic anoxic events, Geology, 38, 1107-1110, 2010.

  4. Coherent pattern and timing of the carbon isotope excursion and warming during Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 as recorded in planktic and benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stap, Lucy; Lourens, Lucas; van Dijk, Arnold; Schouten, Stefan; Thomas, Ellen

    2010-11-01

    Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; ˜53.7 Ma) occurred approximately 2 Myr after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (˜55.5 Ma) and was characterized by a deep-sea warming of >3°C, associated with massive release of carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. We performed single-specimen stable isotope analyses of the planktic foraminiferal genera Acarinina (surface dweller) and Subbotina (thermocline dweller) from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1265, 1267, and 1263 (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic Ocean) and compared high-resolution planktic and benthic stable isotope records to constrain the surface warming and the bathymetric pathway of the carbon isotope excursion during ETM2. Tests of the thermocline dweller Subbotina are absent from sediment deposited during the peak of ETM2. The Acarinina carbon and oxygen isotope records of Sites 1263, 1265, and 1267 are strikingly similar, despite some test recrystallization and large differences in burial depths. Sea surface temperature (SST) estimates based on δ18O isotope values of Acarinina indicate a SST increase of ˜2°C, significantly less than the >3°C estimated for bottom water warming. The maximum negative carbon isotope excursion for Acarinina was ˜1.7‰, slightly more than in the deep sea (˜1.4‰). The planktic and benthic isotope records do not show time lags, indicating that during ETM2 the isotopically depleted carbon injected into the ocean-atmosphere system was rapidly mixed within all oceanic carbon reservoirs.

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of foraminifera in sediments off the central west coast of India and use of their test morphologies for the reconstruction of paleomonsoonal precipitation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    in this region, quantitative spatial distribution data was generated for morpho-groups (angular-asymmetrical and rounded-symmetrical). The distribution revealed less abundance of angular-asymmetrical forms at the river mouth thus indicating an inverse...

  6. A holistic monitoring of terrigenous effluents and their impacts on shaping the biological diversity of Chilika lagoon, Mahanadi River basin with benthic foraminifera as a biotic proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Bhadury, P.

    2016-12-01

    Mahanadi river basin situated in the eastern coast of India is characterized in having Asia's largest lagoon, Chilika, as one of the major reservoirs of its outflow during monsoon. The present study investigated sedimentological and hydrological parameters along with benthic foraminiferal abundance for a period of twelve months to understand the effect of terrigenous effluents on the lagoon. Salinity and pH at the sediment-water interface, to some extent co-varied with the amount of precipitation, while dissolved oxygen concentrations displayed a gradual increase irrespective of monsoon. Dissolved nutrient concentrations displayed source specific responses as terrigeneous silicate concentration was found to increase with increased freshwater inflow, while other dissolved nutrients displayed limited variability. Concentrations of rare earth elements in the water column were found to be extremely low with four elements (Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn) displaying seasonal variation. The sediment composition of the lagoon bottom was found to be relatively conserved across temporal scale with certain stations having higher content of fine-sized particles. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content of the sediment across the lagoon was found to be low during monsoon months. Determination of the source of TOC in the sediment was performed by analyzing the ratio of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C‰) and carbon content was revealed to be mostly originating from surface water primary producers with certain stations having terrestrial carbon influx. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage studied as a proxy of the biota, was dominated by the stress tolerant taxa, Ammonia spp. which displayed little to no variation. The study thus revealed the estuarine lagoon to be devoid of pollution with respect to the presence of rare earth elements, however the biota reflected a stressed water quality which may stem from high surface primary production shaped my monsoonal effluence of nutrients.

  7. Mid-Eocene (Bartonian) larger benthic foraminifera from southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt: New evidence for the palaeobiogeography of the Tethyan carbonate platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Emad S.; Erdem, Nazire Özgen; Sinanoğlu, Derya; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2018-05-01

    Larger benthic foraminiferal assemblages from the mid-Eocene (Bartonian) sedimentary successions of the Tethyan carbonate platforms have been studied in southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt. In the Hazro-Diyarbakir section (SE Turkey), small-medium miliolids and textularinids are identified from the lower intervals of the Hoya Formation, whereas alveolinids and soritids (porcellaneous) and orbitolinids (agglutinated) increase in diversity and abundance in the upper intervals. The Dictyoconus aegyptiensis (Chapman) and Somalina stefaninii Silvestri are recorded for the first time from the Hoya Formation. The larger benthic foraminiferal assemblage from the Hoya Formation shows a significant similarity to those reported from the Observatory Formation (coeval with the Sannor Formation) in the Cairo-Suez district (NE Egypt). The studied foraminiferal assemblages imply restricted lagoonal-tidal flat palaeoenvironments. Palaeobiogeographically, the larger benthic foraminiferal assemblages recorded in southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt carbonate platforms display a strong affinity to the Arabian, Middle East and African platforms. The position of the global sea-level and the plate tectonic organization of the studied region during the Bartonian were the main factors that facilitated faunal exchange within the carbonate platforms.

  8. Reconstructing Sea Surface Conditions in the Bay of Bengal during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, A. D.; Dekens, P.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Savian, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, 0.8-1.2Ma) Earth's glacial cycles transitioned from responding primarily to 41kyr obliquity cycles to responding to 100kyr eccentricity cycles. In the tropics, sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern tropical Pacific cooled through the MPT, suggesting a strengthening of the equatorial Pacific zonal temperature gradient (Medina-Elizalde & Lea, 2005). The strong SST gradient would have intensified Walker Cell convection during the MPT and built up latent heat in the western Pacific, which could cause cold SST anomalies in the northern Indian Ocean (Liu et al., 2015). Due to a scarcity of records, it is unclear how climate and oceanic conditions evolved in the Indian Ocean during the MPT. A set of recent IODP expeditions, including 353 and 354, cored sediment from the Bay of Bengal. Several sites recovered by expedition 353 will be ideal for reconstructing monsoon intensity through time, while the expedition 354 cores from a longitudinal transect at 8°N are in a region not directly impacted by changes in freshwater input due to direct precipitation or run off. The sites are influenced by the northeastern migration of equatorial Indian Ocean water via the Southwest Monsoon Current, which supplies significant moisture to the monsoon. Expedition 354's southern Bay of Bengal sites are well situated for better understanding the link between the tropical Indian Ocean and the northern Bay of Bengal. We reconstructed sea surface conditions at IODP site 1452 (8°N, 87°E, 3670m water depth) in the distal Bengal Fan. A 3 meter long section of the core has been identified as the MPT using the Bruhnes/Matuyama, Jaramillo, and Cobb Mountain paleomagnetic reversals (France-Lanord et al., 2016). This section of site 1452 was sampled every 2cm ( 2kyr resolution). Approximately 30 G. sacculifer, a surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera, were picked from the 355-425μm size fraction. We measured Mg/Ca and δ18O on splits of the same

  9. Predicting and testing resource partitioning in a tropical fish assemblage of zooplanktivorous 'barbs': an ecomorphological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejen, E.; Vijverberg, J.; de Graaf, M.; Sibbing, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Morphometrics on 25 critical feeding structures predicted conspicuous specializations in Barbus tanapelagius (pursuit hunting for zooplankton), Labeobarbus brevicephalus (surface dwelling pump-filter-feeder on zooplankton) and Barbus pleurogramma (particulate feeding on tough, benthic food), whereas

  10. Evidence of climatic change during Holocene in the nearshore regions of Konkan (central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gujar, A.R.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    grains, variation in the stability index and significantly poor diversity and scarcity of benthic foraminifera. In contrast, during the mid Holocene humid phase, the number of benthic foraminifera was very high. It is also remarked that Ammonia beccarii...

  11. Benthic foraminiferal biocoenoses in the estuarine regimes of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Benthic Foraminifera are highly responsive to subtle changes in the estuarine environment. Keeping this in view, a qualitative analysis of living benthic Foraminifera was made of the samples collected from the Mandovi-Zuari estuaries...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene 180 amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased ...

  13. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of a Late Quaternary core in the Zaire (Congo) fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olausson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses have been carried out on samples from a core of the Angola Basin (6 0 50'S, 10 0 45'E, depth 2100 m). The pelagic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber, a species with a shallow water habitat, and two benthic species Uvigerina peregrina and Bulimina aculeata have been analysed. The data are given relative to PDB. (Auth.)

  14. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene 180 amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased ...

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene s180 amplitude of. 2.1%o which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased ...

  16. Biostratigraphy and assemblage evolution in Planktic Foraminifera across the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition in low latitude, northern and southern Tethys realm: El Kef GSSP, Elles (Tunisia) and Agost, Caravaca (Betic Cordillera, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallala, N.; Zaghbib-Turki, D.; Turki, M. M.; Arenillas, I.; Arz, J. A.; Molina, E.

    2009-04-01

    The detailed planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphic and quantitative study from the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) transition interval of the most expanded and continuous sections located in Spanish (Agost, Caravaca) and Tunisian sections (El Kef and Ellès), allows us to establish the zonation and subzonation of this interval and to distinguish four Acme-stages across the K/Pg transition interval of these low latitude sections. The uppermost Maastrichtian in Tunisian and Spanish sections, is characterized by standard planktic foraminiferal zones: Abathomphalus mayaroensis subdivided into Plummerita hantkeninoides Subzones. This index species is absent at middle and high-latitude twice in Atlantic and Antarctic oceans. Consequently, this species is considered to be restricted to the tropical and subtropical deep seawater. The lower Danian is characterized by Guembelitria cretacea, Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina, and Parasubbotina pseudobulloides biozones. The Guembelitria cretacea Zone was subdivided into the Hedbergella holmdelensis and Parvularugoglobigerina longiapertura Subzones; the Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina Zone into the Parvularugoglobigerina sabina and Eoglobigerina simplicissima Subzones; and the Parasubbotina pseudobulloides Zone into the Eoglobigerina trivialis and Subbotina triloculinoides Subzones. These zones and subzones are less expanded at the Caravaca and Agost sections than in Tunisian sections: El Kef (Global Stratotype Section and Point for the K/Pg) and Ellès, but it is sufficiently expanded to analyze correctly the planktic foraminiferal assemblage evolution across the K-Pg transition. Across this transition, at the Tethys area, we have identified four Acme-stages: Acme-stage 0: is typical of the upper Maastrichtian interval is dominated by cosmopolitan species dwelling surface and intermediate seawater. Acme-stage 1: is typical of the G. cretacea Zone and is dominated by Guembelitria species belonging to "Cretaceous survivors" species. Acme-stage 2: spans the Pv. eugubina Zone dominated mainly by specimens belonging to Palaeoglobigerina and Parvularugoglobigerina genera. Acme-stage 3: It spans the Ps. pseudobulloides Zone and dominated by biserial species belonging to Chiloguembelina and Woodringina genera. The turnover in Tethys realms after the K/Pg mass extinction, characterized the lower Danian interval and occurred in three episodes, recorded as planktic foraminiferal acme-stages (1 to 3). This succession of distinct Acme-stages is comparable with those recognized at Atlantic realms.

  17. Reconstruction of a latest Paleocene shallow-marine eutrophic paleoenvironment at Sidi Nasseur (Central Tunisia) based on foraminifera, ostracoda, calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes (δ13C, δ18O)

    OpenAIRE

    Stassen, Peter; Dupuis, Christian; Morsi, A.M.; Steurbaut, Etienne; Speijer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In order to unravel faunal and paleoenvironmental parameters in shallow marine settings prior to the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum, we investigated the Sidi Nasseur section (NAS) in Central Tunisia. This section exposes Paleocene to lower Eocene shales and marls of the El Haria Formation. The uppermost Paleocene part of the Sidi Nasseur section is marked by poor to moderately rich, but fairly diversified nannofossil associations, containing the typical latest Paleocene taxa of the top of N...

  18. Reconstruction of a latest Paleocene shallow-marine eutrophic paleoenvironment at Sidi Nasseur (Central Tunisia) based on foraminifera, ostracoda, calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes (delta13C delta18O)

    OpenAIRE

    Stassen, P.; Dupuis, C.; Morsi, A.-M.M.; Steurbaut, E.; Speijer, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    In order to unravel faunal and paleoenvironmental parameters in shallow marine settings prior to the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum, we investigated the Sidi Nasseur section (NAS) in Central Tunisia. This section exposes Paleocene to lower Eocene shales and marls of the El Haria Formation. The uppermost Paleocene part of the Sidi Nasseur section is marked by poor to moderately rich, but fairly diversified nannofossil associations, containing the typical latest Paleocene taxa of the top of N...

  19. Reconstruction of a latest Paleocene shallow-marine eutrophic paleoenvironment at Sidi Nasseur (Central Tunisia) based on foraminifera, ostracoda, calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes (d13C, d18O)

    OpenAIRE

    Stassen, P.

    2009-01-01

    In order to unravel faunal and paleoenvironmental parameters in shallow marine settings prior to the Paleocene- Eocene thermal maximum, we investigated the Sidi Nasseur section (NAS) in Central Tunisia. This section exposes Paleocene to lower Eocene shales and marls of the El Haria Formation. The uppermost Paleocene part of the Sidi Nasseur section is marked by poor to moderately rich, but fairly diversified nannofossil associations, containing the typical latest Paleocene taxa of the top of ...

  20. Use of the Boron partition coefficient ‘KD’ and B/Ca from planktonic foraminifera in the estimation of past seawater pCO2

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    borate/bicarbonate ratios ([B(OH)4-]/[HCO3-]) and reproduce two glacial–interglacial cycles of pCO2. In the modern seawater, [B(OH)4-]/[HCO3-]seawater is proportional to pH as the concentration of B(OH)4- increases and HCO3- decreases with increasing.../mol and in Core AAS9/21 they ranged from 117 to 132 µmol/mol for the last 22 kyr (Naik and Naidu, 2014). By using B/Ca data, reconstructed salinity and temperature from the cores ODP723A and AAS9/21 and different KD relationships, we calculated borate/bicarbonate...

  1. What do SST proxies really tell us? A high-resolution multiproxy (UK`37, TEXH86 and foraminifera δ18O) study in the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauel, A.-L.; Leider, A.; Goudeau, M.S.; Müller, I.A.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Hinrichs, K.U.; Lange, G.J. de; Zonneveld, K.A.F.; Versteegh, G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multiproxy reconstruction of sea surface temperatures (SST) and coastal environmental changes covering the last 600 years on sediments from the Gulf of Taranto, central Mediterranean Sea. The reconstruction is based on UK0 37 (alkenones from haptophytes), TEXH 86 (membrane lipids of

  2. Sub-Milankovitch cycles in periplatform carbonates from the early Pliocene Great Bahama Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Reuning, Lars; Reijmer, John; Betzler, C.; Timmermann, A.; Steph, Silke

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution bulk sediment (magnetic susceptibility and aragonite content) and δ18O records from two different planktonic foraminifera species were analyzed in an early Pliocene core interval from the Straits of Florida (Ocean Drilling Program site 1006). The δ18O record of the shallow-dwelling foraminifera G. sacculifer and the aragonite content are dominated by sub-Milankovitch variability. In contrast, magnetic susceptibility and the δ18O record of the deeper-dwelling foraminifera G. me...

  3. Diversity and dynamics of potentially toxic cyanobacteria and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bloom–forming freshwater cyanobacteria pose human and livestock health problems due to their ability to produce toxins and other bioactive compounds. Some non-toxic cyanobacteria accumulate as buoyant surface dwelling scums and thick mats which affect the benthic fauna by degrading aquatic habitats and giving ...

  4. paleoenvironmental settings and assemblage changes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kasanzu

    formed during the breakup of Gondwana and after the drifting of ..... high peak from NAM 05. On the overall, the identified foraminifera types .... Vol. 43(1), 2017. 75. Plate 1(continuing):. Examples of observed palynomorphs at different sample intervals across the TDP 11 borehole. DISCUSSIONS. Foraminifera assemblages.

  5. Deep-sea palaeoceanography of the Maldives Islands (ODP Hole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    2009-10-28

    Oct 28, 2009 ... Deep-sea benthic foraminifera have widely been used in palaeoceanographic reconstructions throughout the world ocean including the Arabian Sea owing to availability of knowledge on modern ecology of benthic foraminifera. (Gupta 1994 1997; Jannink et al. 1998; Dickens and Owen. 1999; Gupta and ...

  6. A Monograph on the Orbitoididae, occurring in the Tertiary of America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geyn, van de W.A.E.; Vlerk, van der I.M.

    1935-01-01

    Some years ago we received a collection of foraminifera-bearing samples from Dr. H. K. Kugler and Dr. E. Lehner for examination, in sequence to the collection of larger foraminifera already examined from Central Falcon (Venezuela). (See Nettie E. Gorter and I. M. van der Vlerk, L.G.M., Dl. IV, afl.

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Species diversity of benthic foraminifera is examined in terms of number of species (S), information function (H), equitability (E) and Sanders' rarefied values, which were combined with relative abundances of high and low productivity benthic foraminifera at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 730A, Oman margin, western ...

  8. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    salinity, suggesting a preference for high energy environment, whereas AABF dominate relatively cold, hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglu- tinated foraminifera ...... 1998 Living (Rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera from the Pakistan continental margin ...

  9. Prey-handling and the evolutionary ecology of sand-swimming lizards (Lerista : Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pough, F Harvey; Preest, Marion R; Fusari, Margaret H

    1997-10-01

    Fossorial lizards differ in morphology from their surface-dwelling relatives. The Australian sphenomorphine skink genus Ctenotus consists of surface-dwelling species, and is closely related to the genus Lerista, which includes both surface-dwelling and fossorial species. Sand-swimming represents the derived condition and has evolved independently in several lineages of Lerista. The heads of lizards in the two genera differ in shape (blunt snout for Ctenotus versus wedge-shaped for Lerista) and in length relative to the body (approximately 20% of snout-vent length for Ctenotus versus 12% for sand-swimming Lerista). Do these specializations affect the sizes or types of prey that can be consumed by Lerista? We compared prey-handling by Ctenotus and Lerista to correlate morphological differences with differences in prey-handling ability, and to distinguish the effects of snout shape and head length. Feeding trials included three categories of insect prey that the lizards normally eat: soft-bodied larvae (Lepidoptera), hard-bodied larvae (Coleoptera), and roaches (Blatoidea). In comparisons based on the mass of a prey item relative to the mass of a lizard, Lerista had longer handling times for all prey categories and were limited to smaller prey than were Ctenotus. However, when comparisons were based on the length of prey relative to the length of a lizard's head, Lerista ate some elongate prey as fast or faster than did Ctenotus, and both genera successfully swallowed prey more than twice the length of their own head. Thus, the differences in prey-handling performance of Ctenotus and Lerista probably result from the fact that Lerista have a relatively shorter head than Ctenotus. All Lerista species, surface-dwelling and fossorial, have short heads compared to primitive sphenomorphine lizards. Fossorial species of Lerista have elongate trunks, and consequently their heads are shorter in proportion to trunk length than those of surface-dwelling Lerista. However, most

  10. Metabolic adaptations and reduced respiration of the copepod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results reveal a reduction by 96% of metabolic rate in deep-living, diapausing C5s relative to surface-dwelling, active individuals. Only 14.4% of this metabolic reduction is explained by the lower ambient temperature at depth and a Q10 value of 2.34. Therefore, the major fraction (81.6%) of the metabolic reduction is ...

  11. Comparative Genome Analysis Reveals Adaptation to the Ectophytic Lifestyle of Sooty Blotch and Flyspeck Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Rong; Sun, Guangyu; Gleason, Mark L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) fungi are a distinctive group of plant pathogens which, although phylogenetically diverse, occupy an exclusively surface-dwelling niche. They cause economic losses by superficially blemishing the fruit of several tree crops, principally apple, in moist temperate regions worldwide. In this study, we performed genome-wide comparative analyses separately within three pairs of species of ascomycete pathogens; each pair contained an SBFS species as well as...

  12. Insights into the Social Behavior of Surface and Cave-Dwelling Fish (Poecilia mexicana in Light and Darkness through the Use of a Biomimetic Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bierbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic robots (BRs are becoming more common in behavioral research and, if they are accepted as conspecifics, allow for new forms of experimental manipulations of social interactions. Nevertheless, it is often not clear which cues emanating from a BR are actually used as communicative signals and how species or populations with different sensory makeups react to specific types of BRs. We herein present results from experiments using two populations of livebearing fishes that differ in their sensory capabilities. In the South of Mexico, surface-dwelling mollies (Poecilia mexicana successfully invaded caves and adapted to dark conditions. While almost without pigment, these cave mollies possess smaller but still functional eyes. Although previous studies found cave mollies to show reduced shoaling preferences with conspecifics in light compared to surface mollies, it is assumed that they possess specialized adaptations to maintain some kind of sociality also in their dark habitats. By testing surface- and cave-dwelling mollies with RoboFish, a BR made for use in laboratory experiments with guppies and sticklebacks, we asked to what extent visual and non-visual cues play a role in their social behavior. Both cave- and surface-dwelling mollies followed the BR as well as a live companion when tested in light. However, when tested in darkness, only surface-dwelling fish were attracted by a live conspecific, whereas cave-dwelling fish were not. Neither cave- nor surface-dwelling mollies were attracted to RoboFish in darkness. This is the first study to use BRs for the investigation of social behavior in mollies and to compare responses to BRs both in light and darkness. As our RoboFish is accepted as conspecific by both used populations of the Atlantic molly only under light conditions but not in darkness, we argue that our replica is providing mostly visual cues.

  13. Acclimation responses to temperature vary with vertical stratification: implications for vulnerability of soil-dwelling species to extreme temperature events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Berg, Matty P; Ellers, Jacintha

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of summer heat waves is predicted to increase in amplitude and frequency in the near future, but the consequences of such extreme events are largely unknown, especially for belowground organisms. Soil organisms usually exhibit strong vertical stratification, resulting in more frequent exposure to extreme temperatures for surface-dwelling species than for soil-dwelling species. Therefore soil-dwelling species are expected to have poor acclimation responses to cope with temperature changes. We used five species of surface-dwelling and four species of soil-dwelling Collembola that habituate different depths in the soil. We tested for differences in tolerance to extreme temperatures after acclimation to warm and cold conditions. We also tested for differences in acclimation of the underlying physiology by looking at changes in membrane lipid composition. Chill coma recovery time, heat knockdown time and fatty acid profiles were determined after 1 week of acclimation to either 5 or 20 °C. Our results showed that surface-dwelling Collembola better maintained increased heat tolerance across acclimation temperatures, but no such response was found for cold tolerance. Concordantly, four of the five surface-dwelling Collembola showed up to fourfold changes in relative abundance of fatty acids after 1 week of acclimation, whereas none of the soil-dwelling species showed a significant adjustment in fatty acid composition. Strong physiological responses to temperature fluctuations may have become redundant in soil-dwelling species due to the relative thermal stability of their subterranean habitat. Based on the results of the four species studied, we expect that unless soil-dwelling species can temporarily retreat to avoid extreme temperatures, the predicted increase in heat waves under climatic change renders these soil-dwelling species more vulnerable to extinction than species with better physiological capabilities. Being able to act under a larger thermal

  14. Evaporation-precipitation changes in the eastern Arabian Sea for the last 68 ka: Implications on monsoon variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Govil, P.; Naidu, P.D.

    of the planktic foraminifera G. ruber using the Tandem Accelerator at Leibniz Labor fur Altersbestimmung und Isotopenforschung, Christian-Alberchts- Universitat, Kiel, Germany. Measured 14 C ages were converted to sediment ages using the online CalPal version...

  15. Evaluation of the CaCO3 dissolution proxies in sediment cores from above the lysocline

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    an attempt has been made to study the calcite dissolution above the lysocline by using an indirect and less labor intensive method of Broecker and Clark (1999) for determining progressive breakup of foraminifera shells. This method is based on measuring...

  16. Double Trouble : Foraminiferal calcification in a changing ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, I.E.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Within the project ‘Double Trouble: Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean’, I tried to illuminate mechanisms determining element incorporation in foraminifera with different calcification strategies. In particular, I aimed to assess the interplay between ocean acidification and

  17. Evidence for complete denitrification in a benthic foraminifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Langezaal, Alexandra; Ingvardsen, Signe

    2006-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera are unicellular eukaryotes found abundantly in many types of marine sediments. Many species survive and possibly reproduce in anoxic habitats1, but sustainable anaerobic metabolism has not been previously described. Here we demonstrate that the foraminifer Globobulimina pseud...

  18. Analysis of the gut contents of the needlefish, Hyporhamphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food items were identified as far as possible. Amphipods and isopods were usually broken up and difficult to separate, and consequently grouped together in the .... Protozoa. Foraminifera. Filamentous algae. Aquatic macrophytes. Ruppia spiralis +. Potamogeton pectinatus. Polychaeta. Crustacea. Ostracoda. Copepoda.

  19. A Late Pleistocene clockwise rotation phase of Zakynthos (Greece) and implications for the evolution of the western Aegean arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duermeijer, C.E.; Krijgsman, W.; Langereis, C.G.; Meulenkamp, J.E.; Triantaphyllou, M.V.; Zachariasse, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on Eocene to Pleistocene sediments on the Ionian island of Zakynthos, NW Greece. Magnetostratigraphic constraints, biostratigraphic analyses of planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils provide a reliable time frame for these deposits.

  20. The long-term impact of magnesium in seawater on foraminiferal mineralogy: Mechanism and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, I.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Hart, M.B.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Foraminifera are unicellular protists, primarily known for their calcium carbonate shells thatprovide an extensive fossil record. This record, ranging from Cambrian to present shows both major shiftsand gradual changes in the relative occurrence of taxa producing different polymorphs of carbonate.

  1. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO

  2. Foraminiferal abundance in the modified marine environment of Cola Bay region of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Narayanan, V.

    perforate foraminifera are found to be very abundant over all other types in the living populations. In the Cola Bay region of Goa, where the marine environment is affected by the industrial effluents, the foraminiferal distribution shows that @i...

  3. Calcite dissolution along a transect in the western tropical Indian Ocean: A multiproxy approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    Three paleocarbonate ion proxies, size index, planktonic foraminifera shell weight, and calcite crystallinity, have been employed here to a set of core top samples from the western tropical Indian Ocean in the water depth ranges from 1086 to 4730 m...

  4. On the nature of the calcareous substrate of a ferromanganese crust from the Vityaz Fracture Zone, Central Indian Ridge: Inferences on palaeoceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Banerjee, R.; Mergulhao, L.

    Pliocene age has been assigned to the calcareous substrate. Among the nannoplankton, discoasters outnumber coccoliths and show signs of dissolution. The presence of certain species of benthic Foraminifera such as Uvigerina, Lenticulina, Bulimina...

  5. ZOOPLANKTON SPECIES IDENTITIES and Other Data from WEATHERBIRD From North Atlantic Ocean and Others from 19780406 to 19840517 (NODC Accession 9100038)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Time series data on fluxes, average weight, and isotopic compilation of perennially abundant plantonic foraminifera of the Sargasso sea, near Bermuda, North...

  6. Sedimentation and paleoecology of Pliocene lagoonal-shallow marine deposits on the island of Rhodes (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the depositional and paleontological characteristics of a section of the Pliocene Kritika Formation on the island of Rhodos is presented. The environmental significance of sedimentary structures, the paleoecology of benthonic Foraminifera, and the sequentional

  7. Contrasting responses of coral reef fauna and foraminiferal assemblages to human influence in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reef biota including stony corals, sponges, gorgonians, fish, benthic macroinvertebrates and foraminifera were surveyed in coastal waters near La Parguera, in southwestern Puerto Rico. The goal was to evaluate sensitivity of coral reef biological indicators to human distur...

  8. Stratification of zooplankton in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paulinose, V.T.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Nair, K.K.C.; Aravindakshan, P.N.

    August, 1983. In most of the samples, the dominant groups in the order of their numerical abundance were copepods, chaetognaths, foraminifera, ostracods and decapods. The study has revealed a pronounced diurnal vertical migration in almost all areas...

  9. Fluctuating monsoonal precipitation as revealed by foraminiferal variations in a core from shelf regime off Karwar (India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Variations in the percentage frequency of the foraminifera Cavarotalia annectens in the sediments collected by box core in the shelf region of Karwar, infront of the mouth of the Kalinadi river, India were used to map paleomonsoonal variations...

  10. Testing the alkenone D/H ratio as a paleo indicator of sea surface salinity in a coastal ocean margin (Mozambique Channel)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasper, S.; der Meer, M.T.J.; Castañeda, I.S.; Tjallingii, R.; Brummer, G.J.A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing past ocean salinity is important for assessing paleoceanographic change and therefore past climatic dynamics. Commonly, sea water salinity reconstruction is based on planktonic foraminifera oxygen isotope values combined with sea surface temperature reconstruction. However, the

  11. Microenvironments and anomalous benthic foraminiferal distribution within the neritic regime of the Dabhol-Vengurla sector (Arabian Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    An anomalous distribution of benthic Foraminifera within the neritic regime at a few stations indicates the existence of microenvironments. The vertical distribution is marked by the restricted occurrence of @iCibicides@@ group at only one station...

  12. Can benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups be used as indicators of paleomonsoonal precipitation?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Borole, D.V.

    A technique is proposed for the quick and easy assessment of paleomonsoonal precipitation through the study of morphological groups of foraminifera in a shallow water (20 m water depth) sediment core collected off Karwar, near Kali river mouth...

  13. Foraminiferal constituent in marine sediments - A parameter in some coastal engineering problems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Foraminifera, among other microorganisms, form a major constituent of marine sediments and their composition is directly related to the nature of the substrate in which they are entombed. Past and the present data indicate that the size, test...

  14. Deterioration of Early Holocene coral reef due to sea level rise along west coast of India: Benthic foraminiferal testimony

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Nigam, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    of the barnacle and increase in the abundance of Textularia. After summarizing the distribution of relict benthic foraminifera off central west coast of India and the ecological preferences of the modern day counterparts of the relict benthic foraminifera... (Pilsbury) has been reported within tidemarks on rock (Daniel, 1972). However, this species is totally absent in the modern environment of the west coast of India (Wagh, 1972). The relict presence of T. squamosa can be explained by the fact...

  15. Tsunami induced transportation of the coastal marine sediments to distant onshore regions: Some indications from foraminiferal and microbenthic studies of new Wandoor region (Andaman & Nicobar)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Ingole, B.S.

    with Rose Bengal and preserved in 10% formalin to differentiate living specimens of benthic foraminifera. The presence of living benthic foraminifera at various stations suggests modern ambient conditions. These sediment / soil samples were processed as per... standard procedures. The sediment samples were soaked in water and subsequently treated with sodium hexametaphosphate and hydrogen peroxide in order to dissociate clay lumps and to oxidize the organic matter respectively. The treated sediments were sieved...

  16. DAGMARITA SHHREZAENSIS N. SP. GLOBIVALVULINID FORAMINIFER, (WUCHIAPINGIAN, LATE PERMIAN, CENTRAL IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARVIN MOHTAT-AGHAI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of an investigation on the major mass extintion event near the P/T boundary, in the vicinity of Shahreza (South Isfahan in Iran, a stratigraphically significant new species of foraminifera (Dagmarita shahreaensis n. sp. has been discovered in the Wuchiapingian/Dzhulfian (Late Permian of central Iran (Hambast Formation. This new species is described and emplaced in the phylogeny of the globivalvulinid foraminifera, which evolved rapidly during the Middle/Late Permian. 

  17. Integrated biostratigraphy and sealevel dynamics at the Santonian - early Campanian Schattau section - Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgring, Erik; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Schattau section displays a Santonian to early Campanian transgressive sequence with a rich micro- and macro fossil fauna. A framework based on planktonic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, ammonite, echinoid and crinoid biostratigraphy provides the foundation for a high resolution assessment of palaeoecologic changes in planktonic and benthic foraminiferal communities and local biostratigraphy (see Wagreich et al., 2009). The Santonian Hochmoos Formation (representing shallow water environments with the Sandkalkbank Member at the top of this unit) is overlain by the Santonian to Campanian Bibereck Formation (recording a distinct increase in water depth). The stratigraphically older subsections of the outcrop yield abundant miliolids and some rotaliid foraminiferal taxa (Quinqueloculina sp., Spiroloculina fassistomata, Hoeglundia spp., Gavellina spp.) and the larger benthic foraminifer Nummofallotia cretacea. A transgressive episode is recorded in the uppermost Hochmoos Formation's Sandkalkbank Member - consequently larger benthic foraminifera disappear and miliolids become a rare -, planktonic foraminifera an abundant element in deposits assigning to the stratigraphically youngest part of the Schattau section, the Bibereck Formation. Globotruncanids and marginotruncanids are frequently found. The planktonic/benthic foraminifera ratio rises from zero to ~50%. The benthic foraminiferal fauna is characterised by tubular and bi- and triserial agglutinated foraminifera (e.g. Ammobaculites spp., Dorothia spp., Gaudryina spp., Tritaxia spp.) as well as spiral calcareous benthic foraminifera (Gavellina spp., Lenticulina spp.). Accordingly, the younger deposits at the Schattau section record an outer neritic to upper slope environment. Planctonic foraminifera indicate the Dicarinella asymetrica and the lowest Globotruncanita elevata biozone: The top of the Schattau section records the last appearance of the planktonic foraminifera Dicarinella asymetrica and

  18. Biostratigraphy, facies and sequence stratigraphy of the Sarvak Formation in the Ahwaz Oil Field, North Dezful Embayment Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kazemzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paleontological studies lead to recognition of 21 genera and 16 species of benthic foraminifera, 5 genera and 6 species of planktonic foraminifera and 3 genera and 3 species of oligosteginids. The vertical distribution of fauna lead to identification of 5 biozones including: Favusella washitensis Range Zone, Oligostegina Assemblage Zone, Rudist debris Zone, Nezzazata-Alveolinids Assemblage Zone, Nezzazatinella-Dicyclina Assemblage Zone. Based on the indicated biozones, the age of the Sarvak Formation is Late Albian to Early Turonian in the study area. Eleven carbonate facies belonging to four environments including tidal flat, restricted and semi-restricted lagoon, shoal and open marine are recognized. The identified facies are deposited on the homoclinal ramp setting. Based on the vertical changes of facies and recognized depositional environments, four third-order depositional sequences are represented. The transgressive systems tracts mainly comprises of open marine facies including sponge spicule, oligosteginid, echinoid and benthic foraminifera, while the highstand systems tracts mainly consists of shoal facies rich in bioclast, and restricted and semi-restricted lagoon facies rich in porcellaneous and hyaline benthic foraminifera and peloid. The maximum flooding surface represented by open marine facies including echinoid and planktonic foraminifera

  19. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from ‘old' and ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  20. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-08-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from 'old' and 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Neogene Foraminfera in the Central Niger Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, A. O.; Salami, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    A ranking and Scaling (RASC) computer programme for zonation and normality testing of paleontological events was employed to identify assemblages of foraminifera species in the sections studied. The emphasis is on ease of zonal recognition and reliability in correlation. A four fold interval zonation of benthonic and some planktonic foraminifera were established. Two distinct temporal and four depositional environments are recognizable. A few benthonic foraminifera appear to have biostratigraphic significance. Bulumina elegans is present in the early Miocene. Cyclammina cancellata, in the middle-late Miocene, while Brizalina beyrichi and Bolivina variabilis are restricted to late Miocene in the studied samples. However, these distributions may be environmentally controlled and therefore may be tell zones. The presence and abundance of neritic fauna with lignitic materials indicate alternating shallow marine and non-marine conditions during deposition in parts of the Niger-delta

  2. Foraminiferal assemblage in the coral-bearing limestones of the Vršatec area (Pieniny Klippen Belt, Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morycowa, Elżbieta; Olszewska, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    The paper deals with benthic foraminifera occurring with the scleractinian corals in the Jurassic biohermal and peribiohermal coral-bearing limestones of the Vršatec area (Czorsztyn Succession, Slovak Pieniny Klippen Belt). The coral community is dominated by branching forms of the genus Thecosmilia. Co-occurring abundant benthic foraminifera belong to the species Rumanolina seiboldi, R. elevata, Paalzowella turbinella and Troglotella incrustans. The coral-bearing limestones were initially assigned to the Oxfordian on the basis of the microfacies analyses and bivalve and scleractinian faunas. In recent papers they are assigned to the Bajocian on the basis of ammonites found in the neptunic dykes and stratigraphic superimposition criteria. However, the stratigraphic distribution of the majority of the identified foraminifera indicates that like most scleractinian coral taxa they are not known earlier than in the Late Jurassic. The Late Jurassic age of these coral-bearing limestones is also suggested by an encrusting microproblematic organism Iberopora bodeuri.

  3. Neorotalia omanensis and Operculina musawaensis from the Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razak Siddiq Al-Sayigh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of larger benthic foraminifera, Neorotalia omanensis n. sp. and Operculina musawaensis n. sp. are described and illustrated from the eastern Oman Mountains. N. omanensis n. sp. occurs in the Musawa Formation in association with the planktonic foraminifera Morozovella edgari and Truncarotaloides topilensis indicating an early to middle Eocene age (P10-P13. Operculina musawaensis n. sp. occurs in the Abat Formation in association with the planktonic foraminifera Acarinina esnaensis and A. soldadensis indicating an early Eocene age (P6.  This is the first known record showing the presence of genus Neorotalia in the Middle East. Representatives of the larger foraminiferal genus Linderina sp. are also described and illustrated from the Musawa Formation and compared with the published Linderina species in the surrounding countries.

  4. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Operation and In Situ Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albyn, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) are commonly used to measure the rate of deposition of molecular species on a surface. The measurement is often used to select materials with a low outgassing rate for applications where the material has a line of sight to a contamination-sensitive surface. A quantitative, in situ calibration of the balance, or balances, using a pure material for which the enthalpy of sublimation is known, is described in this Technical Memorandum. Supporting calculations for surface dwell times of deposited materials and the effusion cell Clausing factor are presented along with examples of multiple QCM measurements of outgassing from a common source.

  5. Micropalaeontological evidence of the EECO and MECO events in southern England and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) and Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) are two, well-documented, warming events in the Paleogene prior to the general cooling trend of the late Eocene. Investigation of the classic succession of Whitecliff Bay (Isle of Wight, UK) and other locations on the English Channel coastline (e.g., Alum Bay, Bracklesham, Bognor Regis), around Jersey (Channel Islands) and the Cotentin Peninsula (France) have shown the limited, intermittent, presence of climatically-sensitive, larger foraminifera. The distribution of taxa, such as Nummulites spp., Alveolina spp. and other rotaliids, appear to be indicative of warmer waters, many of the species being at the northern limit of their distribution. Whitecliff Bay, and the other locations, also record fluctuations in sea level, which modify the facies and the microfossil distributions. In the early Eocene, the London Clay Formation contains no 'larger' foraminifera but there is a limited occurrence of planktic foraminifera associated with palaeobotanical evidence of warm conditions. The stable isotope data are equivocal, with work still in progress. Within the upper part of the Bracklesham Group and the lower part of the Barton Clay Formation, however, there is an interval characterised by the presence of distinctive, larger foraminifera. The main concentration of warm-water indicators is within the 'Brook Bed' and this assemblage is also recorded at Bracklesham, off-shore Jersey and near Vallognes (Cotentin Peninsula). Just above the disappearance of the N. prestwichianus and N. rectus, in the Barton Clay Formation, Dawber et al. (2011) have recorded an isotope excursion - which could be MECO - although their data do not extend into the interval with the larger foraminifera. Both EECO and MECO are potentially longer than the other Paleogene hyperthermal events and could, thererfore, include time for migration of larger foraminifera at the northern limits of latitudinal ranges. Dawber, C

  6. The potential of sedimentary foraminiferal rare earth element patterns to trace water masses in the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Anne H.; Hathorne, Ed C.; Schijf, Johan; Plancherel, Yves; Böning, Philipp; Frank, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved rare earth element (REE) concentration data from intermediate and deep seawater form an array characterized by higher middle-REE enrichments (MREE/MREE*) in the North Atlantic and a progressive increase in heavy-to-light REE ratios (HREE/LREE) as water masses age. The REEs in foraminifera are fractionated toward higher MREE/MREE* and lower HREE/LREE relative to seawater. Calculations based on a scavenging model show that the REE patterns in uncleaned core-top foraminifera resemble those adsorbed onto calcite, particulate organic material, and hydrous ferric oxides but the full extent of the REE fractionation measured in foraminifera was not reproduced by the model. However, differences in the HREE/LREE and MREE/MREE* ratios and the cerium anomaly between ocean basins are preserved and are in agreement with the seawater REE distribution. Under oxic conditions, the HREE/LREE and MREE/MREE* compositions of uncleaned foraminifera at the sediment/seawater boundary are preserved during burial but the cerium anomaly is sensitive to burial depth. In suboxic sedimentary environments, all uncleaned foraminiferal REE concentrations are elevated relative to core-top values indicating addition of REEs from pore waters. The HREE/LREE ratio is highest when sedimentation rates were greatest and when high Fe/Ca ratios in the uncleaned foraminifera indicate that Fe was mobile. In sediments that have not experienced suboxic conditions during burial, uncleaned foraminifera preserve the seawater signal taken up at the sediment/seawater interface and are therefore suggested to be a suitable archive of changes in the REE signal of past bottom waters.

  7. Coralgal facies of the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestones in Letca-Rastoci area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Prica

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are described the coralgal facies identified in the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestone succession (Cozla Formation outcropping in two quarries at Letca and Rastoci (Sălaj district, Romania. In the studied profiles the coral and algae limestones are interlayered with bioclastic limestones with foraminifera. On the top of relatively deep water deposits, coral and algae crusts and dendritic corals coated by algae were deposited. The environment registered a gradual deepening, the deposits being completely immersed, while bioclastic limestones with foraminifera were recurrently formed. This cycle is repeated, the whole succession being caracterized by several such “parasequences”.

  8. Mg and Ca isotope fractionation during CaCO3 biomineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Veronica T-C; Williams, R J P; Makishima, Akio; Belshawl, Nick S; O'Nions, R Keith

    2004-10-08

    The natural variation of Mg and Ca stable isotopes of carbonates has been determined in carbonate skeletons of perforate foraminifera and reef coral together with Mg/Ca ratios to assess the influence of biomineralisation processes. The results for coral aragonite suggest its formation, in terms of stable isotope behaviour, approximates to inorganic precipitation from a seawater reservoir. In contrast, results for foraminifera calcite suggest a marked biological control on Mg isotope ratios presumably related to its low Mg content compared with seawater. The bearing of these observations on the use of Mg and Ca isotopes as proxies in paleoceanography is considered. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Nanoscale characterization of dynamic cellular viscoelasticity by atomic force microscopy with varying measurement parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xu, Xinning; Xing, Xiaojing; Dang, Dan; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2018-03-27

    Cell mechanics plays an important role in regulating the physiological activities of cells. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a novel powerful instrument for quantifying the mechanics of single cells at the nanoscale. The applications of AFM in single-cell mechanical assays in the past decade have significantly contributed to the field of cell and molecular biology. However, current AFM-based cellular mechanical studies are commonly carried out with fixed measurement parameters, which provides limited information about the dynamic cellular mechanical behaviors in response to the variable external stimuli. In this work, we utilized AFM to investigate cellular viscoelasticity (portrayed as relaxation time) with varying measurement parameters, including ramp rate and surface dwell time, on both cell lines and primary cells. The experimental results show that the obtained cellular relaxation times are remarkably dependent on the parameter surface dwell time and ramp rate during measurements. Besides, the dependencies to the measurement parameters are variable for different types of cells, which can be potentially used to indicate cell states. The research improves our understanding of single-cell dynamic rheology and provides a novel idea for discriminating different types of cells by AFM-based cellular viscoelastic assays with varying measurement parameters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of salinity on Mg/Ca in planktic foraminifers - Evidence from cultures, core-top sediments and complementary δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönisch, Bärbel; Allen, Katherine A.; Lea, David W.; Spero, Howard J.; Eggins, Stephen M.; Arbuszewski, Jennifer; deMenocal, Peter; Rosenthal, Yair; Russell, Ann D.; Elderfield, Henry

    2013-11-01

    The Mg/Ca ratio in foraminiferal calcite is one of the principal proxies used for paleoceanographic temperature reconstructions, but recent core-top sediment observations suggest that salinity may exert a significant secondary control on planktic foraminifers. This study compiles new and published laboratory culture experiment data from the planktic foraminifers Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber, in which salinity was varied but temperature, pH and light were held constant. Combining new data with results from previous culture studies yields a Mg/Ca-sensitivity to salinity of 4.4 ± 2.3%, 4.7 ± 1.2%, and 3.3 ± 1.7% per salinity unit (95% confidence), respectively, for the three foraminifer species studied here. Comparison of these sensitivities with core-top data suggests that the much larger sensitivity (27 ± 4% per salinity unit) derived from Atlantic core-top sediments in previous studies is not a direct effect of salinity. Rather, we suggest that the dissolution correction often applied to Mg/Ca data can lead to significant overestimation of temperatures. We are able to reconcile culture calibrations with core-top observations by combining evidence for seasonal occurrence and latitude-specific habitat depth preferences with corresponding variations in physico-chemical environmental parameters. Although both Mg/Ca and δ18O yield temperature estimates that fall within the bounds of hydrographic observations, discrepancies between the two proxies highlight unresolved challenges with the use of paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses to reconstruct paleo-salinity patterns across ocean basins. The first step towards resolving these challenges requires a better spatially and seasonally resolved δ18Osw archive than is currently available. Nonetheless, site-specific reconstructions of salinity change through time may be valid.

  11. Modelling planktic foraminifer growth and distribution using an ecophysiological multi-species approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lombard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an eco-physiological model reproducing the growth of eight foraminifer species (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinella siphonifera and Orbulina universa. By using the main physiological rates of foraminifers (nutrition, respiration, symbiotic photosynthesis, this model estimates their growth as a function of temperature, light availability, and food concentration. Model parameters are directly derived or calibrated from experimental observations and only the influence of food concentration (estimated via Chlorophyll-a concentration was calibrated against field observations. Growth rates estimated from the model show positive correlation with observed abundance from plankton net data suggesting close coupling between individual growth and population abundance. This observation was used to directly estimate potential abundance from the model-derived growth. Using satellite data, the model simulate the dominant foraminifer species with a 70.5% efficiency when compared to a data set of 576 field observations worldwide. Using outputs of a biogeochemical model of the global ocean (PISCES instead of satellite images as forcing variables gives also good results, but with lower efficiency (58.9%. Compared to core tops observations, the model also correctly reproduces the relative worldwide abundance and the diversity of the eight species when using either satellite data either PISCES results. This model allows prediction of the season and water depth at which each species has its maximum abundance potential. This offers promising perspectives for both an improved quantification of paleoceanographic reconstructions and for a better understanding of the foraminiferal role in the marine carbon cycle.

  12. What is the Right Temperature Sensitivity for Foraminiferal Mg/ca Paleothermometry in Ancient Oceans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, S.; Holland, K.; Hoenisch, B.; Spero, H. J.; Allen, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mg/Ca seawater thermometry has become a cornerstone of modern paleoceanography. Laboratory experiments, seafloor core-top samples, plankton trap and tow collected materials all indicate consistent temperature sensitivity (9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C) for a full range of modern planktic foraminifer species. While these results demonstrate the overall robustness of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for the modern ocean, it is an empirical tool for which there is limited understanding of its bio-physio-chemical basis and its applicability to ancient oceans. We have undertaken experimental cultures of Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber (pink) across a range of seawater compositions (temperature, carbonate chemistry and Mg/Casw) that encompass modern and ancient Paleogene and Cretaceous ocean compositions (Mg/Casw 0.25x to 2x modern and pCO2 = 200 to 1500 ppmv). Our results reveal that the sensitivity of the Mg/Ca-thermometer for planktic foraminifers reduces significantly with Mg/Casw, rather than remaining constant as has been widely assumed or, increasing at lower Mg/Casw as proposed recently by Evans and Müller (2012). These results indicate that the modern sensitivity of 9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C cannot yet be applied to obtain reliable relative temperature change estimates to ancient oceans. These results further suggest that variations in foraminiferal Mg/Ca compositions in ancient oceans with lower Mg/Casw may correspond to larger temperature variations than in the modern ocean. Evans D. and Müller W., Paleoceanography, vol. 27, PA4205, doi:10.1029/2012PA002315, 2012

  13. Paleoceanographical development off Sisimiut, West Greenland, during the mid- and late Holocene. A multiproxy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs-Hansen, D.R.; Knudsen, K.L.; Olsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    from the East Greenland Current. A seismic profile illustrates the general development in the area since the deglaciation, and analyses of benthic foraminifera, stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C), and X-ray fluorescence elemental counts in two cores, covering ca. 6650 and 1100years, respectively, provide...

  14. Profiling planktonic foraminiferal crust formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhardt, Juliane; de Nooijer, Lennart; Brummer, Geert Jan; Reichart, Gert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera migrate vertically through the water column during their life, thereby growing and calcifying over a range of depth-associated conditions. Some species form a calcite veneer, crust, or cortex at the end of their lifecycle. This additional calcite layer may vary in structure,

  15. Foraminiferal assemblages and organic carbon relationship in benthic marine ecosystem of Western Indian Continental Shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    . The coefficient values become significant (at 0.1 level) only for ammobaculites spp at Karwar, miliolids at Bombay-Daman, and for Florilus-Nonion at Karwar and Bombay-Daman areas. Total foraminifera and organic carbon are inversely correlated in the Cola Bay...

  16. Sedimenty karpatu a spodního badenu na ulici Kopečná v Brně

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubík, M.; Petrová, P.; Brzobohatý, R.; Hladilová, Š.; Mikuláš, Radek; Losos, Z. (ed.); Slobodník, M. (ed.)

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12 /2004/, - (2005), s. 20-24 ISSN 1212-6209 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK3012103 Keywords : Miocene * Karpatian * Foraminifera Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.sci.muni.cz/gap/casop/

  17. Fadiya et al (8)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 265 (Geologia. 20), 3-140, pls 1-21. Petters, S. W. 1979. Some Late Tertiary. Foraminifera from Parabe-1 well, Western. Niger Delta. Rev. Esp. De Micropaleontologia. 11: 119-133. Pijpers, P. J. 1933. Geology and Paleontology of. Bonaire (D.W.I). Univ. Utrecht Geogr. Geol. Med., Phy. – Geol.

  18. Palaeoceanographic implications of abundance and mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    climate, different parameters of marine microfossils are used. Among various microfossils, characteristics of foraminifera, a majority thriving in marine envi- ronments and very sensitive to climatic changes, ..... Sea; In: Oceanography and Marine Biology: an Annual. Review, A D Ansell, R N Gibson and M Barnes (eds).

  19. Fluctuation in glacial and interglacial sediment discharge of the River Indus as seen in the core from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Sediment core from the upper continental slope off Saurashtra Coast has been analysed for CaCO sub(3) and coarse fraction contents in addition to planktonic foraminifera and clay mineralogy. Based on CaCO sub(3) and planktonic foraminiferal data a...

  20. Carbonate mineralogy and faunal relationship in tropical shallow water marine sediments: Cape Comorin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.; Kidwai, R.M.; Rao, V.P.

    foraminifera are the most abundant component, as on the extreme western side and on a narrow strip between the depths of 40 and 50 m, on the eastern side (Gulf of Mannar), the carbonate mineralogy is dominated by high magnesium calcite. In sediments where...

  1. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglu- tinated foraminifera, Asterorotalids and Nonions dominate shallow water, low salinity regions, whereas the calcareous benthic foraminiferal abundance increases away from the riverine influx regions. Food availability, as ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G Rajagopalan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 153-156. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera · S M Ahmad D J ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera: Implication for microhabitat preferences and interspecies correlation. Ajoy K Bhaumik Shiv Kumar Shilpi Ray G K Vishwakarma Anil K Gupta Pushpendra Kumar Kalachand Sain. Volume ...

  4. Species diversity variations in Neogene deep-sea benthic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    climatic turnovers. Some species of benthic foraminifera are sensitive to changes in water mass proper- ties whereas others are sensitive to organic fluxes and deep-sea oxygenation. Benthic faunal diversity has been found closely linked to food web, bottom water oxygen levels, and substrate and water mass sta- bility.

  5. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to observe and compare the spatial variation of a few important genera of rectilinear ben- thic foraminifera between the shallow- and deep- water OMZ off central west coast of India to define the generic importance in detecting the characterization of oxygen-depleted environ- ment in accordance to the bathymetric depth of.

  6. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate

  7. Fadiya et al (8)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    the upper part, while the predominantly shaly lower part corresponded to the Akata Formation. A Middle - Late ... area. His division was based on the abundance and depth distribution as well as last appearance of bathyal benthic foraminifera from deep-water samples. ...... 2720 m, the depth of the deepest sample studied.

  8. Survival under stress : benthic foraminiferal patterns and Cenozoic biotic crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    A principal conclusion of this thesis is, that benthic foraminifera are excellent recorders of paleoenvironments and paleoenvironmental change. Insight in their community structure, and changes in this through time, is still increasing and will add to their usefulness in the reconstruction of past

  9. Productivity modes in the Mediterranean Sea during Dansgaard–Oeschger (20,000–70,000 yr ago) oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Incarbona, A.; Sprovieri, M.; di Stefano, A.; di Stefano, E.; Salvagio Manta, D.; Pelosi, N.; d’ Alcalà, M.R.; Sprovieri, R.; Ziveri, P.

    2013-01-01

    The study of planktonic organisms during abrupt climatic variations of the last glacial period (Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations, D-O) may reveal important insights on climatic, oceanographic and biological interactions. Here we present planktic foraminifera and coccolithophore data collected at the

  10. Survival under stress : benthic foraminiferal patterns and Cenozoic biotic crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    A principal conclusion of this thesis is, that benthic foraminifera are excellent recorders of paleoenvironments and paleoenvironmental change. Insight in their community structure, and changes in this through time, is still increasing and will add to their usefulness in the reconstruction of

  11. IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, Paula J.; Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Buck, Caitlin E.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatté, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.; Hogg, Alan G.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Kaiser, K. Felix; Kromer, Bernd; Manning, Sturt W.; Niu, Mu; Reimer, Ron W.; Richards, David A.; Scott, E. Marian; Southon, John R.; Staff, Richard A.; Turney, Christian S.M.; Plicht, Johannes van der; Reimer, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    The IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon calibration curves have been revised utilizing newly available and updated data sets from C-14 measurements on tree rings, plant macrofossils, speleothems, corals, and foraminifera. The calibration curves were derived from the data using the random walk model

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-28

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The environmental interpretation of each species is based on the ecology of recent deep-sea benthic foraminifera. The faunal record indicates fluctuating deep-sea conditions including changes in surface productivity, organic food supply and deep-sea oxygenation linked to changing wind intensities.

  13. Foraminiferal survival after long-term in situ experimentally induced anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    Anoxia was successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed at 24 m depth on the northern Adriatic seafloor from 9 days to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerTM Green method was applied and calcareous and agglutinated foraminifera were analyzed. Numerous individuals were found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths (to 5 cm), supported by a ribosomal RNA analysis that revealed that certain benthic foraminifera were active after 10 months of anoxia. The results show that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulfides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular manner. A large difference in standing stock between two cores sampled under initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after one month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in cores sampled after 2 months of anoxia to then attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulfides but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  14. Galatheids, chirostylids and porcellanids (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura) from the Eocene and Oligocene of Vicenza (northern Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angeli, De Antonio; Garassino, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    At Monte Magrè a series of calcarenites of Ypresian and Lutetian age is exposed. The anomuran faunas were collected from the lower strata in this succession, along the road from Monte MagrË to Monte di Malo. These levels, indurated and white in color, contain nummulitid foraminifera, nodules and

  15. Benthic foraminiferal Mn / Ca ratios reflect microhabitat preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Fontanier, C.; Toyofuku, T.; Oguri, K.; Kitazato, H.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mn / Ca of calcium carbonate tests of living (rose-Bengal-stained) benthic foraminifera (Elphidium batialis, Uvigerina spp., Bolivina spissa, Nonionellina labradorica and Chilostomellina fimbriata) were determined in relation to pore water manganese (Mn) concentrations for the first time along a

  16. Structure, diversity and environmental role of foraminiferal assemblages from reefal settings of Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemila, Olugbenga; Langer, Martin R.

    2015-04-01

    Reefal and shallow lagoonal environments around the island Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia) offer a spectacular variety of microhabitats providing a multitude niches and ideal settings for rich assemblages of tropical benthic foraminifera. The Society Islands are located near the hotspot of tropical marine diversity and represent a transitional location between the high diversity assemblages of the coral triangle and the low diversity biotas of the eastern Pacific. This area constitutes an important biogeographic link and stepping stone between the eastern and western biotas of the tropical Pacific Ocean. We have analyzed the structure, diversity and composition of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from around Moorea to document the composition, species richness and environmental role of larger and smaller benthic foraminifera from within the lagoonal system, the mangrove habitats and fore-reef sites. Foraminifera are prominent producers of calcium carbonate and contribute significantly to structures in reefal settings of the tropical Pacific. We evaluate the potential of larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera as environmental engineers and apply the FORAM-Index as proxy to assess the conditions around Moorea Island. We also evaluate the role of the Society Islands as stepping stone between biogeographic regions of the Pacific Ocean.

  17. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 3. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India. Abhijit Mazumder Rajiv Nigam. Volume 123 Issue 3 April 2014 pp 633-639 ...

  18. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract PDF · Vol 16, No 1 (2014) - Articles Foraminifera biostratigraphy and paleoenvironment of sediments from Well AM-2, Niger Delta Abstract PDF · Vol 16, No 1 (2014) - Articles Palynological and paleoenvironmental analyses of selected shale samples from Orange basin, South Africa Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0794-4896.

  19. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fadiya, S. L.. Vol 16, No 1 (2014) - Articles Foraminifera biostratigraphy and paleoenvironment of sediments from Well AM-2, Niger Delta Abstract PDF · Vol 16, No 1 (2014) - Articles Palynological and paleoenvironmental analyses of selected shale samples from Orange basin, South Africa Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0794-4896.

  20. Bericht 2007 über biostratigraphische, paläobotanische und fazielle Arbeiten in der Gosau-Gruppe von Russbach am Pass Gschütt auf Blatt 95 St. Wolfgang im Salzkammergut

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradecká, L.; Kvaček, J.; Lobitzer, H.; Schlagintweit, F.; Svobodová, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 147, 3-4 (2007), s. 684-686 ISSN 0016-7800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Gosau Group * biostratigraphy * palaeobotany * palynology * foraminifera Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geologie.ac.at/filestore/download/JB1473_684_B.pdf