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Sample records for surface-dwelling foraminifera globigerinoides

  1. Fossil and Genetic Evidence for the Polyphyletic Nature of the Planktonic Foraminifera "Globigerinoides", and Description of the New Genus Trilobatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia; Kucera, Michal; Pearson, Paul Nicholas; Wade, Bridget Susan; Rappo, Sacha; Poole, Christopher Robert; Morard, Raphaël; Stalder, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are one of the most abundant and diverse protists in the oceans. Their utility as paleo proxies requires rigorous taxonomy and comparison with living and genetically related counterparts. We merge genetic and fossil evidence of “Globigerinoides”, characterized by supplementary apertures on spiral side, in a new approach to trace their “total evidence phylogeny” since their first appearance in the latest Paleogene. Combined fossil and molecular genetic data indicate that this genus, as traditionally understood, is polyphyletic. Both datasets indicate the existence of two distinct lineages that evolved independently. One group includes “Globigerinoides” trilobus and its descendants, the extant “Globigerinoides” sacculifer, Orbulina universa and Sphaeroidinella dehiscens. The second group includes the Globigerinoides ruber clade with the extant G. conglobatus and G. elongatus and ancestors. In molecular phylogenies, the trilobus group is not the sister taxon of the ruber group. The ruber group clusters consistently together with the modern Globoturborotalita rubescens as a sister taxon. The re-analysis of the fossil record indicates that the first “Globigerinoides” in the late Oligocene are ancestral to the trilobus group, whereas the ruber group first appeared at the base of the Miocene with representatives distinct from the trilobus group. Therefore, polyphyly of the genus "Globigerinoides" as currently defined can only be avoided either by broadening the genus concept to include G. rubescens and a large number of fossil species without supplementary apertures, or if the trilobus group is assigned to a separate genus. Since the former is not feasible due to the lack of a clear diagnosis for such a broad genus, we erect a new genus Trilobatus for the trilobus group (type species Globigerina triloba Reuss) and amend Globoturborotalita and Globigerinoides to clarify morphology and wall textures of these genera. In the new

  2. The Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Mg Incorporation in Planktonic Foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white): Results from a Global Sediment Trap Mg/Ca Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, W. R.; Weldeab, S.; Lea, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber is arguably the most important proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) in tropical and sub tropical regions, and as such guides our understanding of past climatic change in these regions. However, the sensitivity of Mg/Ca to salinity is debated; while analysis of foraminifera grown in cultures generally indicates a sensitivity of 3 - 6% per salinity unit, core-top studies have suggested a much higher sensitivity of between 15 - 27% per salinity unit, bringing the utility of Mg/Ca as a SST proxy into dispute. Sediment traps circumvent the issues of dissolution and post-depositional calcite precipitation that hamper core-top calibration studies, whilst allowing the analysis of foraminifera that have calcified under natural conditions within a well constrained period of time. We collated previously published sediment trap/plankton tow G. ruber (white) Mg/Ca data, and generated new Mg/Ca data from a sediment trap located in the highly-saline tropical North Atlantic, close to West Africa. Calcification temperature and salinity were calculated for the time interval represented by each trap/tow sample using World Ocean Atlas 2013 data. The resulting dataset comprises >240 Mg/Ca measurements (in the size fraction 150 - 350 µm), that span a temperature range of 18 - 28 °C and 33.6 - 36.7 PSU. Multiple regression of the dataset reveals a temperature sensitivity of 7 ± 0.4% per °C (p < 2.2*10-16) and a salinity sensitivity of 4 ± 1% per salinity unit (p = 2*10-5). Application of this calibration has significant implications for both the magnitude and timing of glacial-interglacial temperature changes when variations in salinity are accounted for.

  3. Living planktonic foraminifera of the Wadge bank, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    Twenty three species of living planktonic Foraminifera belonging to 11 genera have been studied from the Wadge Bank area off southern tip of the Indian peninsula. The fauna is characterized by species such as Globigerinoides conglobatus, G...

  4. Low Latitude Pelagic Foraminifera Found in the Hudson River: Are They Hurricane Deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, K. M.; Abbott, D. H.; Hoenisch, B.; Breger, D.

    2011-12-01

    River sediment cores provide a record of past environmental changes through stacked layers of sediments. In core CD02-29A, recovered from the southern Hudson River, a significant number of tropical planktic foraminifer tests were found. Foraminifera were concentrated in sediment layers of low impedance, suggesting high carbonate content. Because modern planktic foraminifera are exclusively marine, their presence in Hudson sediments in the core was remarkable. We can think of only two mechanisms that could explain this observation: either living specimens are carried upriver with the daily tides, or storm surges carry large amounts of seawater and re-suspended marine sediment upriver. To test for the presence of living specimens in Hudson River water, plankton tow samples were collected during high tide at the Hudson Battery south of the sample site, and at Piermont Pier north of the sample site and no living foraminifera were found. In addition, oxygen isotope (δ18O) analyses reveal a marine composition but the large difference in δ18O between the two surface dwelling species Globigerinoides ruber (pink) and Globigerinoides sacculifer, picked from the same sediment layer, suggests re-suspension and mixing of marine sediment deposits. Because only planktic, tropical to subtropical foraminiferal assemblages were found, the Hudson River deposits differ from previously recorded storm deposits found on Long Island and in New Jersey. In particular, the foraminiferal assemblages contain up to 40% G. ruber (pink), suggesting a highly tropical signal from a location where abundances of G. ruber are very low. This data, in addition to the pulsed occurrence of tests in the sediment suggests that the introduction of planktic foraminifera into the Hudson River must be driven by rare events. We suggest that storm surges from rare high-intensity hurricanes most likely explain the presence of these tests in Hudson River sediments, possibly assisted by the Gulf Stream entraining

  5. Oxygen isotopic analyses of individual planktic foraminifera species: Implications for seasonality in the western Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.; Naik, S.S.

    The variation of stable isotopes between individual shells of planktic foraminifera of a given species and size may provide short-term seasonal insight on Paleoceanography. In this context, oxygen isotope analyses of individual Globigerinoides...

  6. Deglacial Western Equatorial Pacific pCO2 Reconstruction Using Boron Isotopes of Planktonic Foraminiferas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Sagawa, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamazaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (ca. 19 - 11 ka), partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) of the atmosphere increased by 80 μatm. Many paleoceanographers point out that the ocean had played an important role in atmospheric CO2 rise, since the ocean have 60 times larger capacity to store carbon compared to the atmosphere. However, evidence on where carbon was transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere is still lacking, hampering our understanding of global carbon cycles in glacial-interglacial timescales. Boron isotope of skeletons of marine calcifying organisms such as corals and foraminiferas can pin down where CO2 source/sink existed, because boron isotopes of marine calcium carbonates is dependent on seawater pH, from which pCO2 of the past seawater can be reconstructed. In previous studies using the boron isotope teqnique, Martinez-Boti et al. (2015, Nature) and Kubota et al. (2014, Scientific Reports) revealed that central and eastern parts of the equatorial Pacific acted as a CO2 source (i.e., CO2 emission) during the last deglaciation, suggesting the equatorial Pacific's contribution to atmospheric CO2 rise. However, some conflicting results have been confirmed in a marine sediment record from the western part of the equatorial Pacific (Palmer & Pearson, 2003, Science), making the conclusion elusive. In this presentation, we will show new results of Mg/Ca, oxygen isotope, and boron isotope measurements during the last 35 ka on two species of surface dwelling foraminiferas (Globigerinoides ruber and G. sacculifer) which was hand-picked separatedly from a well-dated marine sediment core recovered from the West Caroline Basin (KR05-15 PC01) (Yamazaki et al., 2008, GRL). From the new records, we will discuss how the equatorial Pacific behaved during the last deglaciation and how it related to the global carbon cycles.

  7. Ecology of planktonic foraminifera and their symbiotic algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrich, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of symbiotic algae occurred abundantly and persistently in the cytoplasm of several species of planktonic Foraminifera over a ten year period in different tropical and subtropical areas of the North Atlantic Ocean. These planktonic Foraminifera host species consistently harbored either dinoflagellates or a newly described minute coccoid algal type. There appeared to be a specific host-symbiont relationship in these species regardless of year, season or geographic locality. The larger ovoid dinoflagellates (Pyrrhophycophyta) occur in the spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, G. conglobatus and Orbulina universa. The smaller alga, from 1.5 to 3.5 um in diameter, occurs in one spinose species Globigerinella aequilateralis and also in the non-spinose species Globigerinita glutinata, Globoquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globorotalia cristata, Globorotalia inflata, Candeina nitida, in various juvenile specimens and at all seasons except the winter months in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalial hirsuta. Controlled laboratory studies indicated a significant C incorporation into the host cytoplasm and inorganic calcium carbonate test of Globigerinoides ruber. During incubation for up to two hours, the 14 C uptake into the cytoplasm and test in the light was significantly greater than uptake in the dark by living specimens or by dead foraminifers. There appears to be light-enhanced uptake of 14 C into the test with dinoflagellate photosynthesis contributing to host calcification. In culture, symbiotic algae were observed to survive for the duration of the lifespan of their hosts

  8. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

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    Mezger, E. M.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Reichart, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which may be reduced by application of a direct salinity proxy. Cultured benthic and planktonic foraminifera showed that Na incorporation in foraminiferal shell calcite provides a potential independent proxy for salinity. Here we present the first field calibration of such a potential proxy. Living planktonic foraminiferal specimens from the Red Sea surface waters were collected and analyzed for their Na/Ca content using laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the Red Sea as a natural laboratory, the calibration covers a broad range of salinities over a steep gradient within the same water mass. For both Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinoides sacculifer calcite Na/Ca increases with salinity, albeit with a relatively large intraspecimen and interspecimen variability. The field-based calibration is similar for both species from a salinity of 36.8 up to 39.6, while values for G. sacculifer deviate from this trend in the northernmost transect. It is hypothesized that the foraminifera in the northernmost part of the Red Sea are (partly) expatriated and hence should be excluded from the Na/Ca-salinity calibration. Incorporation of Na in foraminiferal calcite therefore provides a potential proxy for salinity, although species-specific calibrations are still required and more research on the effect of temperature is needed.

  9. Boron isotope-based seasonal paleo-pH reconstruction for the Southeast Atlantic - A multispecies approach using habitat preference of planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitzsch, Markus; Bijma, Jelle; Benthien, Albert; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Steinhoefel, Grit; Kučera, Michal

    2018-04-01

    The boron isotopic composition of planktonic foraminiferal shell calcite (δ11BCc) provides valuable information on the pH of ambient water at the time of calcification. Hence, δ11BCc of fossil surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifera can be used to reconstruct ancient aqueous pCO2 if information on a second carbonate system parameter, temperature and salinity is available. However, pH and pCO2 of surface waters may vary seasonally, largely due to changes in temperature, DIC, and alkalinity. As also the shell fluxes of planktonic foraminifera show species-specific seasonal patterns that are linked to intra-annual changes in temperature, it is obvious that δ11BCc of a certain species reflects the pH and thus pCO2 biased towards a specific time period within a year. This is important to consider for the interpretation of fossil δ11BCc records that may mirror seasonal pH signals. Here we present new Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) δ11BCc coretop data for the planktonic foraminifera species Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Trilobatus sacculifer and Orbulina universa and compare them with δ11Bborate derived from seasonally resolved carbonate system parameters. We show that the inferred season-adjusted δ11BCc /δ11Bborate relationships are similar to existing calibrations and can be combined with published δ11BCc field and culture data to augment paleo-pH calibrations. To test the applicability of these calibrations, we used a core drilled on the Walvis Ridge in the Southeast Atlantic spanning the last 330,000 years to reconstruct changes in surface-water pCO2. The reconstruction based on G. bulloides, which reflects the austral spring season, was shown to yield values that closely resemble the Vostok ice-core data indicating that surface-water pCO2 was close to equilibrium with the atmosphere during the cooler spring season. In contrast, pCO2 estimated from δ11BCc of O. universa, T. sacculifer and G. ruber that

  10. Automatic Picking of Foraminifera: Design of the Foraminifera Image Recognition and Sorting Tool (FIRST) Prototype and Results of the Image Classification Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garidel-Thoron, T.; Marchant, R.; Soto, E.; Gally, Y.; Beaufort, L.; Bolton, C. T.; Bouslama, M.; Licari, L.; Mazur, J. C.; Brutti, J. M.; Norsa, F.

    2017-12-01

    Foraminifera tests are the main proxy carriers for paleoceanographic reconstructions. Both geochemical and taxonomical studies require large numbers of tests to achieve statistical relevance. To date, the extraction of foraminifera from the sediment coarse fraction is still done by hand and thus time-consuming. Moreover, the recognition of morphotypes, ecologically relevant, requires some taxonomical skills not easily taught. The automatic recognition and extraction of foraminifera would largely help paleoceanographers to overcome these issues. Recent advances in automatic image classification using machine learning opens the way to automatic extraction of foraminifera. Here we detail progress on the design of an automatic picking machine as part of the FIRST project. The machine handles 30 pre-sieved samples (100-1000µm), separating them into individual particles (including foraminifera) and imaging each in pseudo-3D. The particles are classified and specimens of interest are sorted either for Individual Foraminifera Analyses (44 per slide) and/or for classical multiple analyses (8 morphological classes per slide, up to 1000 individuals per hole). The classification is based on machine learning using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), similar to the approach used in the coccolithophorid imaging system SYRACO. To prove its feasibility, we built two training image datasets of modern planktonic foraminifera containing approximately 2000 and 5000 images each, corresponding to 15 & 25 morphological classes. Using a CNN with a residual topology (ResNet) we achieve over 95% correct classification for each dataset. We tested the network on 160,000 images from 45 depths of a sediment core from the Pacific ocean, for which we have human counts. The current algorithm is able to reproduce the downcore variability in both Globigerinoides ruber and the fragmentation index (r2 = 0.58 and 0.88 respectively). The FIRST prototype yields some promising results for high

  11. Morphological changes during the ontogeny of Velapertina indigena (Foraminifera) from the Transylvanian Basin (Romania)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, P.; Ruman, A.; Hudackova, N.; Hermanova, Z

    2017-01-01

    Species Velapertina indigena (Luczkowska, 1955) represents common Upper Badenian planktonic foraminifera in the Western Carpathians region. Correct taxonomic determination is often precluded by the complicated ontogenetic evolution resulted into several distinguished morphological stages. In this study the inner shell structures were observed by using tomographic microscope to identify five ontogenetic stages (sensu Brummer). General morphological features of the shell, such as the chamber shape and number, the aperture position and character, the wall texture, and the chambers coiling direction were documented for each stage. The reconstructed ontogenetic model, composed of five ontogenetic stages, was correlated with the 'five stage concept' of Globigerinoides sacculifer. Our study shows potential of the tomographic microscope visualization in improvement of the correct taxonomic classification of non-adult individuals as well as the foraminifera trophic mechanisms interpretation. (authors)

  12. 2. Tertiary Foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umbgrove, J.H.F.

    1931-01-01

    In his review of the palaeozoology of Java, K. Martin could in 1919, record 49 foraminifera from tertiary strata of Java, on the strength of a critical study of the existant literature, and especially on the strength of his own studies and knowledge of the above mentioned fossils (Bibl. 49). In

  13. Lunar periodicity in the shell flux of planktonic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Lukas; Reynolds, Caitlin E.; Richey, Julie N.; Hall, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronised reproduction offers clear benefits to planktonic foraminifera – an important group of marine calcifiers – as it increases the chances of successful gamete fusion. Such synchrony requires tuning to an internal or external clock. Evidence exists for lunar reproductive cycles in some species, but its recognition in shell flux time series has proven difficult, raising questions about reproductive strategies. Using spectral analysis of a 4-year time series (mostly at weekly resolution) from the northern Gulf of Mexico, we show that the shell flux ofGloborotalia menardii, Globigerinella siphonifera, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinoides ruber (both pink and white varieties), Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerinella calida and Globigerinita glutinata is characterised by lunar periodicity. However, the lunar rhythm is not present in all size fractions of each species and tends to be more dominant in the flux of larger shells, consistent with reproduction being more prevalent in larger specimens. Lunar periodicity is superimposed on longer term/seasonal changes in the shell fluxes, but accounts for a significant part of the variance in the fluxes. The amplitude of the lunar cycle increases roughly proportional with the magnitude of the flux, demonstrating that most of the population is indeed affected by lunar-phased synchronisation. In most species peak fluxes occur predominantly around, or just after, full moon. Only G. siphonifera and G. calida show a contrasting pattern with peaks concentrated around new moon. Although the exact cause of the synchronisation remains elusive, our data considerably increase the number of species for which lunar synchronised reproduction is reported and suggest that such reproductive behaviour is common in many species of planktonic foraminifera.

  14. Boron/calcium ratios in Globigerinoides ruber from the Arabian Sea: Implications for controls on boron incorporation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    of Globigerinoides ruber from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 723A (western Arabian Sea) and Core AAS9/21 (eastern Arabian Sea) from the last 22 kyr were analysed for B/Ca, delta18O and Mg/Ca. B/Ca was compared to reconstructed salinity and sea...

  15. The effects of temperature, salinity, and the carbonate system on Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber (white): A global sediment trap calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William R.; Weldeab, Syee; Lea, David W.; Rosenthal, Yair; Gruber, Nicolas; Donner, Barbara; Fischer, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    The Mg/Ca of planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white) is a widely applied proxy for tropical and sub-tropical sea-surface temperature. The accuracy with which temperature can be reconstructed depends on how accurately relationships between Mg/Ca and temperature and the multiple secondary controls on Mg/Ca are known; however, these relationships remain poorly quantified under oceanic conditions. Here, we present new calibrations based on 440 sediment trap/plankton tow samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, including 130 new samples from the Bay of Bengal/Arabian Sea and the tropical Atlantic Ocean. Our results indicate temperature, salinity and the carbonate system all significantly influence Mg/Ca in G. ruber (white). We propose two calibration models: The first model assumes pH is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.0 ± 0.8%/°C (2σ), a salinity sensitivity of 3.3 ± 2.2%/PSU and a pH sensitivity of - 8.3 ± 7.7%/0.1 pH units; The second model assumes carbonate ion concentration ([3 2-CO]) is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.7 ± 0.8%/°C, a salinity sensitivity of 5.0 ± 3.0%/PSU and a [3 2-CO] sensitivity of - 0.24 ± 0.11%/μmol kg-1. In both models, the temperature sensitivity is significantly lower than the widely-applied sensitivity of 9.0 ± 0.6%/°C. Application of our new calibrations to down-core data from the Last Glacial Maximum, considering whole ocean changes in salinity and carbonate chemistry, indicate a cooling of 2.4 ± 1.6°C in the tropical oceans if pH is the controlling parameter and 1.5 ± 1.4°C if [3 2-CO] is the controlling parameter.

  16. An Integrated Transcriptome-Wide Analysis of Cave and Surface Dwelling Astyanax mexicanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua B.; Furterer, Allison; Carlson, Brian M.; Stahl, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous organisms around the globe have successfully adapted to subterranean environments. A powerful system in which to study cave adaptation is the freshwater characin fish, Astyanax mexicanus. Prior studies in this system have established a genetic basis for the evolution of numerous regressive traits, most notably vision and pigmentation reduction. However, identification of the precise genetic alterations that underlie these morphological changes has been delayed by limited genetic and genomic resources. To address this, we performed a transcriptome analysis of cave and surface dwelling Astyanax morphs using Roche/454 pyrosequencing technology. Through this approach, we obtained 576,197 Pachón cavefish-specific reads and 438,978 surface fish-specific reads. Using this dataset, we assembled transcriptomes of cave and surface fish separately, as well as an integrated transcriptome that combined 1,499,568 reads from both morphotypes. The integrated assembly was the most successful approach, yielding 22,596 high quality contiguous sequences comprising a total transcriptome length of 21,363,556 bp. Sequence identities were obtained through exhaustive blast searches, revealing an adult transcriptome represented by highly diverse Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Our dataset facilitated rapid identification of sequence polymorphisms between morphotypes. These data, along with positional information collected from the Danio rerio genome, revealed several syntenic regions between Astyanax and Danio. We demonstrated the utility of this positional information through a QTL analysis of albinism in a surface x Pachón cave F2 pedigree, using 65 polymorphic markers identified from our integrated assembly. We also adapted our dataset for an RNA-seq study, revealing many genes responsible for visual system maintenance in surface fish, whose expression was not detected in adult Pachón cavefish. Conversely, several metabolism-related genes expressed in cavefish were not detected in

  17. Application of individual foraminifera Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses for paleoceanographic reconstructions in the Bay of Bengal and other active depositional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz-Endres, T.; Dekens, P.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.; Stine, A.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoceanographic research traditionally focuses on regions where sediment deposition is minimally affected by transport. However, sediment fans near tectonically active regions provide an opportunity to link oceanographic climate to terrestrial processes. Sediment cores recovered during IODP Expedition 354 in the Bay of Bengal include hemipelagic sections that record the history of tectonic uplift and the development of the Indian Monsoon through the last 10 Ma. Although these cores provide a unique opportunity to link marine and terrestrial climate, the complex depositional environment requires that the source of foraminifera is carefully considered before using these proxies to reconstruct oceanographic conditions. Foraminifera in Bengal Fan sediments may have been transported via turbidity currents from the northern Bay of Bengal, where the seasonal variability of SST and SSS is larger compared to the southern Bay of Bengal. We measured single Globigerinoides sacculifer Mg/Ca and δ18O from mudline samples of IODP Site U1454 (8.4°N, 85.5°E, 3721 m water depth) near the modern active channel and Site U1449 (8.4°N, 88.7°E, 3653 m water depth) far from channel activity. We compare these sites to single G. sacculifer from the core-top sample of Site 342KL (20.6°N, 90.1°E, 1256 m water depth) located on the continental shelf. Each foraminifera lives 2-4 weeks and the distribution of 60 to 80 data points reflects the seasonal range of SST and SSS at the location where the foraminifera calcified. Measurements in foraminifera from Site U1449 (away from active channel) are statistically different from the site in the northern Bay of Bengal and more consistent with local conditions. Conversely, foraminifera from the site near the active channel reflect a combined signal of local conditions recorded from the site far from channel activity and those recorded from the continental shelf. This suggests a portion of foraminifera from the active channel site have been

  18. Foraminifera and changing pattern of monsoon rainfall

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    The palaeomonsoonal history can be reconstructed utilizing climatically sensitive properties of marine microorganisms; foraminifera. The results show a major boundary at 3500 years B.P. and periods of rather low precipitation approximately at 420...

  19. Foraminifera from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Williams, R.; Kerry, K.R.

    regarding disparity in abundance (paucity or even absence) of foraminifera in samples from identical elevations in the two transects are proposed: differential wind erosion occurred and foraminifera were deposited elsewhere; the faunas are remnants of debris...

  20. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between upwelling and non-upwelling regions in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.; Ramaswamy, V.

    stream_size 24687 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Earth_Syst_Sci_122_1153.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Earth_Syst_Sci_122_1153.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 A... Keywords. Arabian Sea; pCO2; shell weights; flux; SST. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 122, No. 4, August 2013, pp. 1153–1159 c© Indian Academy of Sciences 1153 1154 Sushant S Naik et al. calcification and further what could be the fate of planktonic foraminifera under...

  1. TOF-SIMS characterization of planktonic foraminifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vering, G.; Crone, C.; Bijma, J.; Arlinghaus, H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Oceanic sediment properties that are closely related to former environmental (e.g. climatic) parameters are called 'proxies'. Planktonic foraminifera are small protists which make up part of the plankton. Certain element concentrations, element ratios and isotopic ratios of their calcite shell found in the sediment can be used as proxies reflecting the state of the ocean during the life of the animal; they supply useful information for the reconstruction of environmental parameters. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was used to examine the inner and outer part of foraminiferal shells, as well as foraminiferal shells dissolved in HCl. High resolution elemental images and mass spectra were obtained from the foraminifera. The data show that TOF-SIMS is a useful technique for determining the elemental distribution and for measuring isotope ratios such as δ 11 B with high precision in a single foraminiferal shell

  2. TOF-SIMS characterization of planktonic foraminifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vering, G.; Crone, C.; Bijma, J.; Arlinghaus, H.F

    2003-01-15

    Oceanic sediment properties that are closely related to former environmental (e.g. climatic) parameters are called 'proxies'. Planktonic foraminifera are small protists which make up part of the plankton. Certain element concentrations, element ratios and isotopic ratios of their calcite shell found in the sediment can be used as proxies reflecting the state of the ocean during the life of the animal; they supply useful information for the reconstruction of environmental parameters. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was used to examine the inner and outer part of foraminiferal shells, as well as foraminiferal shells dissolved in HCl. High resolution elemental images and mass spectra were obtained from the foraminifera. The data show that TOF-SIMS is a useful technique for determining the elemental distribution and for measuring isotope ratios such as {delta}{sup 11}B with high precision in a single foraminiferal shell.

  3. Vertical distribution of living mangrove foraminifera from KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous intertidal foraminiferal studies have predominantly focused on assemblages in surface sediments (0–1 cm), with the rationale that surface assemblages reflect the modern-day environment. Foraminifera live infaunally and therefore there is a need to document the infaunal vertical distribution of living foraminifera to ...

  4. Intertidal foraminifera from Miramar-Caranzalem Shoreline, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Birajdar, S.M.; Nigam, R.

    Quantitative analysis of foraminifera (entire and broken) revealed that Rotalina, composed of 29 species, constituted 95.18% while Miliolina, composed of 11 species, and Textulariina, with 5 species were poorly represented. Temperature, salinity...

  5. Counts of Foraminifera from Selected North Atlantic Cores, LDEO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Counts of primarily planktonic foraminifera from Dr. W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University are included in these...

  6. Reconstruct the past thermocline circulation in the Atlantic: calcification depths and Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations for 6 deep-dwelling planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleroux, C.; deMenocal, P.; Arbuszewski, J.; Linsley, B.

    2012-04-01

    The subtropical cells are shallow meridional overturning circulations driven by the atmospheric circulation and the deep thermohaline circulation. They connect the mid-latitude and the tropic, release latten heat to the atmosphere and impact climate on decadal to longer time scale. The upper water column temperature and salinity structures of the ocean reflect this circulation. We present proxies to study these past structures. We performed stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) and trace element ratio measurements on one surface-dwelling (G. ruber)1 and six deep-dwelling planktonic foraminifera species (N. dutertrei, G. inflata, G. tumida, G. truncatulinoides, G. hirsuta and G. crassaformis) on 66 coretops spanning from 35°N to 20°S along the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Comparison between measured δ18O and predicted δ18O (using water column temperature and seawater δ18O), shows that N. dutertrei, G. tumida, G. hirsuta and G. crassaformis keep the same apparent calcification depth along the transect (respectively: 125m, 150m, 700m and 800m). Calcification at two depth levels was also tested. For the six deep-dwelling species, we establish Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations with both atlas temperature at the calcification depth and isotopic temperature. We present Mg/Ca-temperature equations for species previously very poorly calibrated. The δ18O and temperature (Mg/Ca derived) on the six planktonic foraminifera species faithfully reproduce the modern water column structure of the upper 800 m depth, establishing promising proxies for past subsurface reconstruction. 1 Arbuszewski, J. J., P. B. deMenocal, A. Kaplan, and C. E. Farmer (2010), On the fidelity of shell-derived δ18Oseawater estimates, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 300(3-4), 185-196.

  7. Benthic foraminifera as proxy for oxygen-depleted conditions off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Saraswat, R.

    In order to study the response of benthic foraminifera, especially the rectilinear bi- and tri-serial benthic foraminifera (RBF) to oxygen-depleted conditions from the Arabian Sea off central west coast of India, 103 surface sediment samples...

  8. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans; such uptake causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as ocean acidification (OA). Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50 % of biogenic

  9. Benthic foraminifera from the Adriatic Sea : principles of phenotypic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorissen, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and morphology of the benthic foraminifera in the Adriatic Sea appear to be strongly dependent on two primary controlling environmental parameters, oxygen concentration and food availability. These factors are both governed by the runoff from the Po and other Italian rivers, and

  10. On the phylogeny of the embryonic apparatus of some Foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosijn, A.J.

    1942-01-01

    In the following pages data will be given about the size of the megalospheric embryonic apparatus, and of the size of the shell, of some Foraminifera. By comparing these data for a certain species from different samples, the relative ages of which are known, it will be possible, to get an insight

  11. Ecological partitioning and diversity in tropical planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seears Heidi A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological processes are increasingly being viewed as an important mode of diversification in the marine environment, where the high dispersal potential of pelagic organisms, and a lack of absolute barriers to gene flow may limit the occurrence of allopatric speciation through vicariance. Here we focus on the potential role of ecological partitioning in the diversification of a widely distributed group of marine protists, the planktonic foraminifera. Sampling was conducted in the tropical Arabian Sea, during the southwest (summer monsoon, when pronounced environmental conditions result in a strong disparity in temperature, salinity and productivity between distinct northern and southern water masses. Results We uncovered extensive genetic diversity within the Arabian Sea planktonic foraminifera, identifying 13 morphospecies, represented by 20 distinct SSU rRNA genetic types. Several morphospecies/genetic types displayed non-random biogeographical distributions, partitioning between the northern and southern water masses, giving a strong indication of independent ecological adaptations. Conclusions We propose sea-surface primary productivity as the main factor driving the geographical segregation of Arabian Sea planktonic foraminifera, during the SW monsoon, with variations in symbiotic associations possibly playing a role in the specific ecological adaptations observed. Our findings suggest that ecological partitioning could be contributing to the high levels of 'cryptic' genetic diversity observed within the planktonic foraminifera, and support the view that ecological processes may play a key role in the diversification of marine pelagic organisms.

  12. Frequency distribution of foraminifera off Trivandrum, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Kutty, M.K.; Panikkar, B.M.

    Fifty two species belonging to 31 genera of recent foraminifera have been identified from sediment samples collected from the inshore waters. Based on relative abundance of species, it is observed that along the coast, the nearshore region up to 5 m...

  13. The evaluation of Computed Tomography hard- and software tools for micropaleontologic studies on foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loo, D.; Speijer, R.; Masschaele, B.; Dierick, M.; Cnudde, V.; Boone, M.; de Witte, Y.; Dewanckele, J.; van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.

    2009-04-01

    Foraminifera (Forams) are single-celled amoeba-like organisms in the sea, which build a tiny calcareous multi-chambered shell for protection. Their enormous abundance, great variation of shape through time and their presence in all marine deposits made these tiny microfossils the oil companies' best friend by facilitating the detection of new oil wells. Besides the success of forams in the oil and gas industry, they are also a most powerful tool for reconstructing climate change in the past. The shell of a foraminifer is a tiny gold mine of information both geometrical as chemical. However, until recently the best information on this architecture was only obtained through imaging the outside of a shell with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), giving no clues towards internal structures other than single snapshots through breaking a specimen apart. With X-ray computed tomography (CT) it is possible to overcome this problem and uncover a huge amount of geometrical information without destructing the samples. Using the last generation of micro-CT's, called nano-CT, because of the sub-micron resolution, it is now possible to perform adequate imaging even on these tiny samples without needing huge facilities. In this research, a comparison is made between different X-ray sources and X-ray detectors and the resulting image resolution. Both sharpness, noise and contrast are very important parameters that will have important effects on the accuracy of the results and on the speed of data-processing. Combining this tomography technique with specific image processing software, called segmentation, it is possible to obtain a 3D virtual representation of the entire forams shell. This 3D virtual object can then be used for many purposes, from which automatic measurement of the chambers size is one of the most important ones. The segmentation process is a combination of several algorithms that are often used in CT evaluation, in this work an evaluation of those algorithms is

  14. The evolution of test size in the Planktic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraass, A.; Huber, B. T.; Kelly, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera are vital tools for understanding paleoceanography, paleoclimate, and evolution. A dataset of measurements from all planktic foraminiferal species is used here to investigate how their size changes through the late Jurassic to Recent. The mean test size of planktic foraminifera increases in the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic, with substantial drops at the Aptian/Albian boundary, in the Coniacian and Santonian, with the end-Cretaceous extinction, and across the Paleocene/Eocene boundary. The Oligocene contains only a small drop in mean size, which is surprising given the substantial extinction of planktic foraminifera at that boundary. There is a qualitative connection between mean and median size and paleoceanographic events, but several key issues remain before rigorous quantitative interrogation of the dataset can be undertaken. In general, species that originate early in a family's range are smaller than those evolving later, though this is a weak relationship. Individual families do not always conform to that finding, however, and have both increasing and decreasing family age-size relationships. The 'three faunas' concept for foraminiferal evolution fails with respect to mean and median size; each diversification has a unique rate of increase and character. Lastly, through comparison with the Schmidt et al. (2004) population-level test size dataset, the size response to climate in the low-latitudes is at the species-level. In the high-latitude regions, however, the response to climate is at the population level. Thus, methods for uncovering climate responses in planktic foraminifera must be specific to the region. Taxonomic or macroevolutionary responses dominate the tropics and global signals, while the polar regions appear to have a unique, and more microevolutionary response.Schmidt, D., Thierstein, H., Bollmann, J., & Schiebel, R. (2004). Abiotic Forcing of Plankton Evolution in the Cenozoic. Science, 303(5655), 207-210.

  15. Planktic foraminifera form their shells via metastable carbonate phases

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Agbaje, O. B. A.; Branson, O.; Eggins, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The calcium carbonate shells of planktic foraminifera provide our most valuable geochemical archive of ocean surface conditions and climate spanning the last 100 million years, and play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. These shells are preserved in marine sediments as calcite, the stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Here, we show that shells of living planktic foraminifers Orbulina universa and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei originally form from the unstable calcium carbonate polym...

  16. MIDDLE TRIASSIC FORAMINIFERA FROM THE SECEDA CORE (DOLOMITES, NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIAN MAURER

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The assemblage of foraminifera in turbidite beds in Middle Triassic basinal deposits straddling the Anisian/Ladinian boundary interval was studied in 224 thin sections. The fauna consists mainly of shallow-water inhabitants, associated with calcareous hyaline foraminifera (Lagenina of open marine environment. Due to a well established  biostratigraphy in the studied interval, the first and last appearance of some shallow water, benthic foraminifera can be assigned to the Mid Triassic ammonoid stratigraphy. The species Meandrospira dinarica Kochansky-Devidè & Pantic and Arenovidalina chialingchiagensis Ho are limited to the Reitzi ammonoid zone. The species Variostoma alta Kristan and Hoyenella gr. sinensis both do not superate the Curionii zone in age in the studied succession.  The biostratigraphic most important event occurs at the base of the Gredleri zone,  with the appearance of the family Involutinidae Bütschli, represented by the genera Lamelliconus and Aulotortus. The faunal composition is similar to those of neighbouring paleoprovinces, but generally a lower faunistical diversification compared to foraminiferal assemblages in the Anisian or Carnian is observed.   

  17. Morphological and cytological responses of Ammonia (foraminifera) to copper contamination: Implication for the use of foraminifera as bioindicators of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cadre, Valerie; Debenay, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The effect of graded concentrations of copper was analyzed at morphological and cytological levels on two species of Ammonia (foraminifera) often found in polluted areas. The two species were sensitive to low concentration, but survived high concentration (threshold value -1 , lethal value > 200 μg l -1 ), which gives them a high potential value as bioindicators. Increasing concentrations lead to (1) increasing delay before production of new chambers, explaining dwarfism in polluted areas; (2) increasing delay before reproduction and decreasing number of juveniles, explaining low density; and (3) increasing proportion of deformed tests. Cytological modifications occurred only in deformed specimens (thickening of the organic lining, proliferation of fibrillar and of large lipidic vesicles, increased number of residual bodies). They may be responsible for anomalies in biomineralization processes. The detection of sulfur in deformed specimens suggests that foraminifers may have a detoxification mechanism with production of a metallothionein-like protein. - Results suggest a detoxification mechanism for copper in foraminifera

  18. Morphological and cytological responses of Ammonia (foraminifera) to copper contamination: Implication for the use of foraminifera as bioindicators of pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Cadre, Valerie [Universite d' Angers, UPRES-EA 2644, Laboratoire de Geologie, 2 Bd Lavoisier 49045 Angers cedex (France) and LEBIM - Laboratoire d' Etude des Bio-Indicateurs Marins, 85350 Ile d' Yeu (France)]. E-mail: val.jeje@wanadoo.fr; Debenay, Jean-Pierre [Universite d' Angers, UPRES-EA 2644, Laboratoire de Geologie, 2 Bd Lavoisier 49045 Angers cedex (France); LEBIM - Laboratoire d' Etude des Bio-Indicateurs Marins, 85350 Ile d' Yeu (France)

    2006-09-15

    The effect of graded concentrations of copper was analyzed at morphological and cytological levels on two species of Ammonia (foraminifera) often found in polluted areas. The two species were sensitive to low concentration, but survived high concentration (threshold value < 10 {mu}g l{sup -1}, lethal value > 200 {mu}g l{sup -1}), which gives them a high potential value as bioindicators. Increasing concentrations lead to (1) increasing delay before production of new chambers, explaining dwarfism in polluted areas; (2) increasing delay before reproduction and decreasing number of juveniles, explaining low density; and (3) increasing proportion of deformed tests. Cytological modifications occurred only in deformed specimens (thickening of the organic lining, proliferation of fibrillar and of large lipidic vesicles, increased number of residual bodies). They may be responsible for anomalies in biomineralization processes. The detection of sulfur in deformed specimens suggests that foraminifers may have a detoxification mechanism with production of a metallothionein-like protein. - Results suggest a detoxification mechanism for copper in foraminifera.

  19. Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT) in the Eastern Indian Ocean: a 2000 kyr planktic faunal and isotope record from DSDP site 214

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Dhingra, Hitesh

    2004-01-01

    Planktic foraminiferal faunal and isotope data from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 214 reveal a major change in surface water properties in the eastern Indian Ocean, coinciding with the mid-Pleistocene climate transition (MPT). A comparative study of Globigerinoides sacculifer (a surface dwelling, warm water, mixed layer tropical planktic foraminifera), Globorotalia menardii Complex (a deep dwelling, tropical species group), and Orbulina universa (an intermediate depth warm-water subtropical foraminifera) with the stable isotope record of Globigerinoides ruber suggests a warm, thick mixed layer in the eastern Indian Ocean during,∼ 2000 Kyr to ∼ 900 Kyr. Since,∼ 900 Kyr the surface water mass stratification weakened, and the mixed layer as well as thermocline were shallow. A decrease in the population abundance of Gs. sacculifer, together with a decrease in δ 13 C and increase in δ 18 O values suggest a continuous cool climate and increased surface productivity over the last ∼ 900 Kyr. This coincides with an increased variance in the 400 ∼Kyr component of Earth's eccentricity cycle. (author)

  20. Planktic foraminifera form their shells via metastable carbonate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D E; Wirth, R; Agbaje, O B A; Branson, O; Eggins, S M

    2017-11-02

    The calcium carbonate shells of planktic foraminifera provide our most valuable geochemical archive of ocean surface conditions and climate spanning the last 100 million years, and play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. These shells are preserved in marine sediments as calcite, the stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Here, we show that shells of living planktic foraminifers Orbulina universa and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei originally form from the unstable calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite, implying a non-classical crystallisation pathway involving metastable phases that transform ultimately to calcite. The current understanding of how planktic foraminifer shells record climate, and how they will fare in a future high-CO 2 world is underpinned by analogy to the precipitation and dissolution of inorganic calcite. Our findings require a re-evaluation of this paradigm to consider the formation and transformation of metastable phases, which could exert an influence on the geochemistry and solubility of the biomineral calcite.

  1. The relative sensitivity of benthonic foraminifera in the polluted marine environment of Cola Bay, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    . The organic carbon content in the sediment is inversely proportional to the abundance of the benthonic populations. Living foraminifera are very useful in establishing zones of effects of pollutants in a region. Correlation coefficient between TFN and TSN...

  2. Planktonic foraminifera from a quaternary deep sea core from the southern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    An investigation on planktonic foraminifera and calcium carbonate content of a box core collected at a depth of 2556 m from the southern part of the Arabian sea indicates faunal changes depicting Quaternary climatic fluctuations. Based on the study...

  3. The intriguing relationship between coiling direction and reproductive mode in benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Rao, A

    direction changes. The relationship between mode of reproduction and coiling directions in benthic foraminifera is explored. Benthic foraminiferal species Cavarotalia annectens (Paarker & Jones) in 58 samples obtained from a core off Karwar, west coast...

  4. Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera as measured with oxygen microsensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geslin, E.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Lombard, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    of the foraminiferal specimens. The results show a wide range of oxygen respiration rates for the different species (from 0.09 to 5.27 nl cell−1 h−1) and a clear correlation with foraminiferal biovolume showed by the power law relationship: R = 3.98 10−3 BioVol0.88 where the oxygen respiration rate (R) is expressed......Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera are still badly known, mainly because they are difficult to measure. Oxygen respiration rates of seventeen species of benthic foraminifera were measured using microelectrodes and calculated on the basis of the oxygen fluxes measured in the vicinity...... groups (nematodes, copepods, ostracods, ciliates and flagellates) suggests that benthic foraminifera have a lower oxygen respiration rates per unit biovolume. The total contribution of benthic foraminifera to the aerobic mineralisation of organic matter is estimated for the studied areas. The results...

  5. Relationship between benthic foraminifera and sediment in the estuarine complex of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.

    Two indices of community association were used to elucidate the relationship between changes in species composition of benthic foraminifera and changes in the grain size composition of the sediment in estuarine complex of Goa. The degree...

  6. Sediment traps as a new tool for estimation of longevity of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Sediment trap technique provides time series data of sinking particles (faunal and sediment) from surface to bottom of the sea. Besides many other applications, data can also be used to estimate life span of planktonic foraminifera. Based on rearing...

  7. Ecology and distribution of recent planktonic foraminifera in eastern part of Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    Thirty species of living planktonic foraminifera have been studied from 97 plankton tows collected from the eastern Arabian Sea with an accent on their ecological and distributional aspects. Species density is higher with less dominance in the deep...

  8. Proloculus size variation in Recent benthic foraminifera: Implications for paleoclimatic studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Rao, A.S.

    Ratios of dimorphic (microspheric/megalospheric) forms of Foraminifera are affected by temperature and hence are useful in paleoclimatic studies. In some cases, however, it is not possible to distinguish between the dimorphic forms and, therefore...

  9. Relationship between abundance and morphology of benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua: Palaeoclimatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Deopujari, A.; Nigam, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    The relationship between abundance (relative as well as absolute abundance) and morphology (size of the shell, numbers and proloculus size) of benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua has been studied in a core to understand the influence...

  10. 70 kD stress protein (Hsp70) analysis in living shallow-water benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Heinz, P.; Marten, R.A; Linshy, V.N.; Haap, T.; Geslin, E.; Kohler, H-R.

    Hsp70 is a phylogenetically highly conserved protein family present in all eukaryotic organisms tested so far. Its synthesis is induced by proteotoxic stress. The detection of Hsp70 in foraminifera is presented here. We introduce a standard...

  11. Secondary calcification of planktic foraminifera from the Indian sector of Southern ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, R.; Shetye, S.; Tiwari, M.; AnilKumar, N.

    This study focused on planktic foraminifera in plankton tows and surface sediments from the western Indian sector of Southern Ocean in order to evaluate the potential foraminiferal secondary calcification and/or dissolution in the sediment...

  12. Planktonic foraminifera in the Arctic: potentials and issues regarding modern and quaternary populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynaud, Frederique

    2011-01-01

    Calcareous microfossils are widely used by paleoceanographers to investigate past sea-surface hydrology. Among these microfossils, planktonic foraminifera are probably the most extensively used tool (e.g. [1] for a review), as they are easy to extract from the sediment and can also be used for coupled geochemical (e.g; δ 18 O, δ 13 C, Mg/Ca) and paleo-ecological investigations. Planktonic foraminifera are marine protists, which build a calcareous shell made of several chambers which reflect in their chemistry the properties of the ambient water-masses. Planktonic foraminifera are known to thrive in various habitats, distributed not only along a latitudinal gradient, but also along different water-depth intervals within surface waters (0-1000 m). Regarding their biogeographical distribution, planktonic foraminifera assemblages therefore mirror different water-masses properties, such as temperature, salinity and nutrient content of the surface water in which they live. The investigation of the specific composition of a fossil assemblage (relative abundances) is therefore a way to empirically obtain (paleo)information on past variations of sea-surface hydrological parameters. This paper focuses on the planktonic foraminifera record from the Arctic domain. This polar region records peculiar sea-surface conditions, with the influence of nearly perennial sea-ice cover development. This has strong impact on living foraminifera populations and on the preservation of their shells in the underlying sediments.

  13. Planktonic foraminifera in the Arctic: potentials and issues regarding modern and quaternary populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eynaud, Frederique, E-mail: f.eynaud@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux I, Laboratoire EPOC (Environnements et Paleoenvironnements OCeaniques), UMR CNRS 5805, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex - France (France)

    2011-05-15

    Calcareous microfossils are widely used by paleoceanographers to investigate past sea-surface hydrology. Among these microfossils, planktonic foraminifera are probably the most extensively used tool (e.g. [1] for a review), as they are easy to extract from the sediment and can also be used for coupled geochemical (e.g; {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13}C, Mg/Ca) and paleo-ecological investigations. Planktonic foraminifera are marine protists, which build a calcareous shell made of several chambers which reflect in their chemistry the properties of the ambient water-masses. Planktonic foraminifera are known to thrive in various habitats, distributed not only along a latitudinal gradient, but also along different water-depth intervals within surface waters (0-1000 m). Regarding their biogeographical distribution, planktonic foraminifera assemblages therefore mirror different water-masses properties, such as temperature, salinity and nutrient content of the surface water in which they live. The investigation of the specific composition of a fossil assemblage (relative abundances) is therefore a way to empirically obtain (paleo)information on past variations of sea-surface hydrological parameters. This paper focuses on the planktonic foraminifera record from the Arctic domain. This polar region records peculiar sea-surface conditions, with the influence of nearly perennial sea-ice cover development. This has strong impact on living foraminifera populations and on the preservation of their shells in the underlying sediments.

  14. Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, M.; Mohan, R.; Meloth, T.; Naik, S.S.; Sudhakar, M.

    , sediment cores and other physi- cal oceanographic parameters were collected. Here, we present the isotopic results obtained from planktic foraminifera from the plankton net samples and sur- face sediments. We find that, in this region too, plank- tic... characteristics in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. The δ 18 O value of planktic foraminifera is mainly governed by SST fluctuations: the samples be- come isotopically heavier polewards. Further, the plank- tic foraminifera appear to secrete...

  15. Foraminifera and Thecamoebians as hydrodynamic indicators for Amazon estuarine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laut, L. L.; Figueiredo, A. G.; Santos, V. F.; Souza-Vieira, S.

    2007-05-01

    The Amazon mangrove forest in Brazilian territory is one of the most extended in the world. It goes from Ponta do Tubarao (4S e 43W) to Cape Orange (5N e 51W) along 2,250 km of coast line. Because the Amazon River System influence, it can be divided into two regions; one with river influence toward north and the other without river influence. In order to characterize the mangrove environment hydrodynamic on both sides of the Amazon River System, foraminifera and thecamoebians assemblages were investigated in the sediment of two estuaries; Araguari to the North (1 15S - 50 30W) and Caete to the South (0 50S - 46 30W). For both estuaries forams and thecamoebians species distribution are atypical relative to other world regions. In both, there are only few calcareous forams and almost all are small and possible of being transported in suspension. Typical estuarine species were not identified. The typical mangrove forams which are agglutinated species were dominant in both estuaries. However, the Caete estuary has a large number of forams species (29), indicating better efficiency in mixing fresh and salt water in comparison to the Araguari. On the other hand, the Araguari has big richness of thecamoebians species (15) indicating fresh water prevalence. The fresh water predominance is due to the Amazon water plume being diverted to the Amapa coast where the Araguari estuary is located. The foraminifera species was also used to determine the salt water penetration in the estuary. In the Caete estuary, salt water penetrates to about 40 km while in the Araguari it does coincide with the limit of the bore tide wave "pororoca" penetration, 45 km. Based on the species succession (forams to thecamoebians species) the Araguary estuary can be divided into three regions controlled by turbidity: the outer, middle and inner estuary. The Caete species succession is not that clear and only could be divided based on salinity into outer and inner estuary. In both estuaries forams and

  16. Ecological tolerances of Miocene larger benthic foraminifera from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Vibor; Renema, Willem

    2018-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), a quantitative analysis of their assemblage composition is needed. Besides microfacies analysis which includes environmental preferences of foraminiferal taxa, statistical analyses should also be employed. Therefore, detrended correspondence analysis and cluster analysis were performed on relative abundance data of identified LBF assemblages deposited in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (MCS) systems and blue-water (BW) settings. Studied MCS system localities include ten sections from the central part of the Kutai Basin in East Kalimantan, ranging from late Burdigalian to Serravallian age. The BW samples were collected from eleven sections of the Bulu Formation on Central Java, dated as Serravallian. Results from detrended correspondence analysis reveal significant differences between these two environmental settings. Cluster analysis produced five clusters of samples; clusters 1 and 2 comprise dominantly MCS samples, clusters 3 and 4 with dominance of BW samples, and cluster 5 showing a mixed composition with both MCS and BW samples. The results of cluster analysis were afterwards subjected to indicator species analysis resulting in the interpretation that generated three groups among LBF taxa: typical assemblage indicators, regularly occurring taxa and rare taxa. By interpreting the results of detrended correspondence analysis, cluster analysis and indicator species analysis, along with environmental preferences of identified LBF taxa, a palaeoenvironmental model is proposed for the distribution of LBF in Miocene MCS systems and adjacent BW settings of Indonesia.

  17. Recent benthic foraminifera assemblages from mangrove swamp and channels of Abu Dhabi (UAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.; Odeh, Weaam A. S. Al; Paul, Andreas; Song, Jianfeng; Freeman, Mark; Michel, Françoise

    2017-04-01

    Zonation of Recent mangrove environments can be defined using benthic foraminifera, however, little is known about foraminifera from mangrove environments of the Persian/Arabian Gulf. The objective of this study is to produce a detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological analysis to identify foraminiferal associations from mangrove swamps and channels located on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island (UAE). Detailed sediment sampling collection in mangal environments of Eastern Abu Dhabi was carried out to assess the distribution of benthic foraminifera in different sedimentary facies in the mangal and in the surrounding natural environments of the upper and lower intertidal area (mud flats and channels). A 100 m transect across a natural channel in a mangal on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island was sampled in detail for sedimentological and foraminiferal analysis. Forty-seven samples were collected at 2 meter intervals along the transect in a number of different sedimentary facies including; fine sediment in areas exposed during low tide and close to mangrove trees (Avicennia marina), fine sediment rich in leaf material, coarse sediment in channels, and coarse sediments with a shell lag. At each sampling location environmental parameters were recorded, including water depth, salinity, temperature and pH. Samples collected for foraminiferal analysis were stained in rose Bengal in order to identify living specimens. Samples collected on the mud flat at the margin of the channel show a living foraminiferal assemblage characterised by abundant foraminifera belonging to the genera Ammonia, Elphidium, Cribroelphidium, Triloculina, Quinqueloculina, Sigmoilinita, Spiroloculina, Peneroplis and Spirolina. Samples collected in the lower (wet) intertidal area close to Avicennia marina roots, presented a low-diversity assemblage mostly comprising small-sized opportunistic foraminifera of the genera Ammonia and Cribroelphidium along with rare Triloculina and

  18. Geochemistry of trace elements and Sr- Nd isotopes of foraminifera shell from the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Trace elemental associations and Sr - Nd isotopic compositions are of important to recognition of biogenic material from mixed marine sediments. The foraminifera shell from the Okinawa Trough strongly enrichesSr, P, Mn andBa, enriches Li, U, Th, Sc, Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Rb, Y, Sb and light rare earth elements, slightly enriches V, Ga, Zr, Nb, Cd and middle rare earth elements,is short of Mo, In, Sn, Cs, Hf, Ta, W, Ti, Bi and heavy rare earth elements. The mechanism of elemental enrichment in forminifera is the concentrations of trace elements in sea water and selective absorption of trace elements during foraminifera living, as well as the geochemical affinity between major elements and trace elements. The REE (rare earth elements) partition pattern of foraminifera shell of the Okinawa Trough shows enrichment of middle rare earth elements with slightly negative Ce anomaly,which are different from those of foraminifera of the Pacific Ocean. The Sr, Nd isotopic ratios of the Okinawa Trough foraminifera are 0.709 769 and 0.512 162, respectively, which are different not only from those of oceanic water, but also from those of river water of China's Mainland, the former is slightly higher than those of oceanic water, but much lower than those of river water; the latter is slightly lower than those of oceanic water, but higher than those of river water, demonstrating that the Okinawa Trough sea water has been influenced by river water of China's Mainland.

  19. Presence of Foraminifera of Superfamily Komokioidea (Order Astrorhizida) in Colombian deep Caribbean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera-Martínez, Laura; Marchant, Margarita

    2017-10-20

    Research regarding deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the Colombian Caribbean requires further development given the complete lack of information related to the different groups that constitute associations and the ecological functions they fulfill. For this purpose, a taxonomic description of Superfamily Komokioidea was composed from macrofauna samples from between 1,215 m and 3,179 m depth, obtained during the research cruise ANH-COL 4 and COL 5 carried out in 2014. Results showed foraminifera belonging to the three families: Komokiidae, Baculellidae, and Normaninidae, inclu-ding five genera (Lana, Komokia, Ipoa, Normaninam, and Catena) and five species (Lana neglecta, Komokia multiramosa, Normanina conferta, Ipoa fragila, and Catena piriformis). This study presents knowledge regarding deep-sea Colombian Caribbean benthic foraminifera, which to date have not been recorded from this region. Their depth distribution when compared with other studies from the Atlantic and Pacific, allows the expansion of taxonomic inventories and the characterization of biodiversity within poorly explored regions.

  20. Effects of lead pollution on Ammonia parkinsoniana (foraminifera): ultrastructural and microanalytical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontalini, F; Curzi, D; Giordano, F M; Bernhard, J M; Falcieri, E; Coccioni, R

    2015-01-30

    The responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana (Foraminifera) exposed to different concentrations of lead (Pb) were evaluated at the cytological level. Foraminifera-bearing sediments were placed in mesocosms that were housed in aquaria each with seawater of a different lead concentration. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer analyses, it was possible to recognize numerous morphological differences between untreated (i.e., control) and treated (i.e., lead enrichment) specimens. In particular, higher concentrations of this pollutant led to numerical increase of lipid droplets characterized by a more electron-dense core, proliferation of residual bodies, a thickening of the organic lining, mitochondrial degeneration, autophagosome proliferation and the development of inorganic aggregates.  All these cytological modifications might be related to the pollutant-induced stress and some of them such as the thickening of organic lining might suggest a potential mechanism of protection adopted by foraminifera.

  1. Invertebrate shells (mollusca, foraminifera) as pollution indicators, Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mohamed; Madkour, Hashem; Mansour, Abbas; Alharbi, Wedad; El-Taher, Atef

    2017-09-01

    To assess the degree of pollution and its impact on the environment along the Red Sea Coast, the most abundant nine species of recent benthic foraminifera and three species of molluscan shells have been selected for the analysis of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Co, and Cd concentrations. The selected foraminiferal species are: Textularia agglutinans, Amphispsorus hemprichii, Sorites marginalis, Peneroplis planatus, Borelis schlumbergeri, Amphistegina lessonii, Ammonia beccarii, Operculina gaimairdi, and Operculinella cumingii. The selected molluscan shells are: Lambis truncata and Strombus tricornis (gastropods) and Tridacana gigas (bivalves). The inorganic material analysis of foraminifera and molluscs from the Quseir and Safaga harbors indicates that foraminifera tests include higher concentrations of heavy metals such as Fe and Mn than molluscan shells. These results are supported by the black tests of porcelaneous foraminifera and reflect iron selectivity. The Cd and Pb concentrations in molluscan shells are high in the El Esh Area because of oil pollution at this site. The Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in the studied invertebrates are high at Quseir Harbor and in the El Esh Area because of the strong influence of terrigenous materials that are rich in these metals. The heavy metal contamination is mostly attributed to anthropogenic sources.

  2. Pre-monsoon living planktonic foraminifera from the Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Muralinath, A.S.

    LOGICAL SoCIETY OF INDIA Vol. 36, Dec. 1990, pp. 654 to 660 Pre-Monsoon Living Planktonic Foraminifera from the Southeastern Arabian Sea M. V. S. GUPTHA.. P. DIVAKAR NAlDU AND A. S. MURALINATH Nalional Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004...

  3. Oxygen isotope fractionation and algal symbiosis in benthic foraminifera from the Gulf of Elat, Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchardt, B.; Hansen, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate possible isotopic fractionations due to algal symbiosis the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of shell carbonate from symbiont-free and symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera have been compared to that of molluscs living at the same locality. The material was collected over a depth profile in the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), Israel, covering the interval from 4 to 125 metres. After corrections variations for temperature with depth, characteristic 18 O-depletions were observed in the foraminiferal shell carbonate when compared to the molluscs. These depletions are interpreted as 1) a constant vital effect seen in all the foraminifera studied and 2) an additional, light-dependent vital effect observed in the symbiont-bearing forms only, caused by incorporation of photosynthetic oxygen formed by the symbiotic algae. This additional vital effect emphasizes the difficulties in applying foraminifera to oxygen isotope palaeotemperature analyses. No well-defined differences in carbon isotope compositions are observed between symbiont-bearing and symbiont-free foraminifera. (author)

  4. A Record of Rotaloid Foraminifera from the Upper Permian-Lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRABHAS PANDE

    INTRODUCTION. In the history of organic evolution, the end of Palaeozoic Era was marked by the conspicuous event of mass extinctions. Amongst foraminifera, as many as fourteen families became extinct. (Loeblich and Tappan, 1964) during the Permian Period and many new families evolved in the. Mesozoic. There is a ...

  5. Foraminifera as climatic indicators in the sediments of Western Indian continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    to tell, which can be unravelled by careful analysis and interpretation. Foraminifera are primarily of two kinds-planktonic and benthonic-each having a significant role to play. Therefore, in the study of a sample, the planktonic and benthonic populations...

  6. Paleoecology of benthic foraminifera from the Miocene of the San Jacinto Basin, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, John Sebastian; Fiorini, Flavia; Andres Trejos, Raul; Vallejo, Diego Felipe; Pardo, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative benthic foraminifera analysis was conducted on 34 samples collected from a borehole core (393.72m deep) drilled by Colombian Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) on 2009 in the San Jacinto basin (Northern Colombia). The aims of the research were to define a taxonomical data-bank of Miocene benthic foraminifera for this region, to use the benthic foraminifera assemblages to interpret the paleoenvironment and to identify paleoenvironmental changes. The bottom of the section was dated between lowest Burdigalian to middle Langhian (20.393-17.721 Ma) based on calcareous nannofossils bioevents: LO Helicosphaera ampliaperta, HCO Sphenolithus belemnos and LCO Sphenolithus heteromorphus. The benthic foraminifera fauna identified in the studied samples is composed for the majority of calcareous hyaline tests and is dominated by infaunal taxas. Species belonging to the genera Uvigerina and Lenticulina are commonly occurring in the studied section together with other species typical of outer-shelf upper-bathyal environment. Cibicidoides spp., abundant in the lower part of the section, abruptly decreases in abundance in the upper part. Species belonging to the opportunistic genera Bulimina and Bolivina are more abundant in the upper part of the section. Variability in the abundance of opportunistic species can be associated with tectonic disturbance on the Sinu-San Jacinto fold belt (NW of Colombia) as a result of collision of the Caribbean plate against NW of South America. The tectonics could lead a perturbation on deep ocean sedimentation and circulation.

  7. Larger foraminifera distribution on a mesotrophic carbonate shelf in SW Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renema, W.; Troelstra, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    Larger symbiont bearing foraminifera typically live in shallow tropical seas. In this study the fauna composition of patch reefs scattered over the Spermonde Shelf (SW Sulawesi, Indonesia), a mesotrophic carbonate shelf, is examined. The foraminiferal fauna of the Spermonde Shelf is characterised by

  8. Automated species-level identification and segmentation of planktonic foraminifera using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; Mitra, R.; Zhong, B.; Ge, Q.; Kanakiya, B.; Lobaton, E.

    2017-12-01

    Identification and picking of foraminifera from sediment samples is often a laborious and repetitive task. Previous attempts to automate this process have met with limited success, but we show that recent advances in machine learning can be brought to bear on the problem. As a `proof of concept' we have developed a system that is capable of recognizing six species of extant planktonic foraminifera that are commonly used in paleoceanographic studies. Our pipeline begins with digital photographs taken under 16 different illuminations using an LED ring, which are then fused into a single 3D image. Labeled image sets were used to train various types of image classification algorithms, and performance on unlabeled image sets was measured in terms of precision (whether IDs are correct) and recall (what fraction of the target species are found). We find that Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) approaches achieve precision and recall values between 80 and 90%, which is similar precision and better recall than human expert performance using the same type of photographs. We have also trained a CNN to segment the 3D images into individual chambers and apertures, which can not only improve identification performance but also automate the measurement of foraminifera for morphometric studies. Given that there are only 35 species of extant planktonic foraminifera larger than 150 μm, we suggest that a fully automated characterization of this assemblage is attainable. This is the first step toward the realization of a foram picking robot.

  9. Living planktonic foraminifera during the late summer monsoon period in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Mohan, R.; Muralinath, A.S.

    with deepening of the mixed layer, since this species preferentially dwells in nutrient-rich upwelling waters. The population density of planktonic foraminifera ranges between 31 and 185 specimens per 10@u-3@@m@u3@@. The low absolute numbers of planktonic...

  10. Effect of carbonate ion concentration and irradiance on calcification in planktonic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; da Rocha, R. E.; Bijma, J.

    2010-01-01

    rates of these two species are projected to be 6 to 13% lower than the present conditions, while the final shell weights are reduced by 20 to 27% for O. universa and by 4 to 6% for G. sacculifer. These results indicate that ocean acidification would impact on calcite production by foraminifera and may...

  11. The Foraminifera of the Saba Bank Expedition, 1972 (Cicar Cruises 34, 35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1980-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bottom samples obtained by means of a Van Veen grab during the 1972 Saba Bank Expedition (CICAR cruises 34 and 35) appeared to comprise many samples with Foraminifera. This material was kindly put at my disposal by Dr. D. van Harten of the Geological Institute of the University of

  12. Oxygen isotope fractionation and algal symbiosis in benthic foraminifera from the Gulf of Elat, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchardt, B; Hansen, H J [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate possible isotopic fractionations due to algal symbiosis the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of shell carbonate from symbiont-free and symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera have been compared to that of molluscs living at the same locality. The material was collected over a depth profile in the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), Israel, covering the interval from 4 to 125 metres. After correcting for variations of temperature with depth, characteristic /sup 18/O-depletions were observed in the foraminiferal shell carbonate when compared to the molluscs. These depletions are interpreted as 1) a constant vital effect seen in all the foraminifera studied and 2) an additional, light-dependent vital effect observed in the symbiont-bearing forms only, caused by incorporation of photosynthetic oxygen formed by the symbiotic algae. This additional vital effect emphasizes the difficulties in applying foraminifera to oxygen isotope palaeotemperature analyses. No well-defined differences in carbon isotope compositions are observed between symbiont-bearing and symbiont-free foraminifera.

  13. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye, B.

    Mass fluxes of diatom opal, planktonic foraminifera carbonate and coccolithophorid carbonate were measured with time-series sediment traps at six sites in the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Equatorial Indian Ocean (EIOT). The above fluxes were...

  14. Distribution of planktonic foraminifera in waters of the submarine coral banks in southeast Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balasubramanian, T.

    Twentyfive species of planktonic foraminifera are recorded from 36 plankton tows collected from waters of the submerged coral banks- Bassas de Pedro, Sesostris and Cora Divh-located at northern end of the Laccadive group of islands in southeastern...

  15. Benthic foraminifera distribution in high polluted sediments from Niterói Harbor (Guanabara Bay), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia G. Vilela; Daniele S. Batista; José A. Batista-Neto; Mirian Crapez; John J. Mcallister

    2004-01-01

    Dockyards and harbors are recognized as being important locations where sediment-associated pollutants can accumulate, which constitutes an environmental risk to aquatic life due to potential uptake and accumulation of heavy metals in the biota. The aim of this paper is to assess the concentrations and the effects of some heavy metals in the benthic foraminifera assemblage in Niterói Harbor. Low concentrations in the benthic foraminifera as well as the dominance of indicative species such as ...

  16. Distribution of living larger benthic foraminifera in littoral environments of the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of larger benthic foraminifera in Recent littoral environment of the United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi and Western regions) was investigated with the aim of understanding the response of those foraminifera to an increase in water salinity. For this purpose, 100 sediment samples from nearshore shelf, beach-front, channel, lagoon, and intertidal environment were collected. Sampling was undertaken at a water depth shallower than 15 m in water with a temperature of 22 to 35˚C, a salinity ranging from 40 to 60‰ and a pH of 8. Samples were stained with rose Bengal at the moment of sample collection in order to identify living specimens. The most abundant epiphytic larger benthic foraminifera in the studied area were Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus with less common Spirolina areatina, S. aciculate and Sorites marginalis. The living specimens of the above mentioned species with normal test growing were particularly abundant in the nearshore shelf and lagoonal samples collected on seaweed. Dead specimens were concentrated in the coarser sediments of the beach-front, probably transported from nearby environments. Shallow coastal ponds are located in the upper intertidal zone and have a maximum salinity of 60‰ and contain abundant detached seagrass. Samples collected from these ponds possess a living foraminifera assemblage dominated by Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus. High percentages (up to 50% of the stained assemblage) of Peneroplis presented abnormality in test growth, such as the presence of multiple apertures with reduced size, deformation in the general shape of the test, irregular suture lines and abnormal coiling. The high percentage of abnormal tests reflects natural environmental stress mainly caused by high and variable salinity. The unique presence of living epiphytic species, suggests that epiphytic foraminifera may be transported into the pond together with seagrass and continued to live in the pond. This hypothesis is supported by

  17. Benthic foraminifera in the plankton following storms: what does this mean for (palaeo)-ecological interpretations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Molina, Giulia; Smart, Christopher; Widdicombe, Claire

    2017-04-01

    The Western Channel Observatory was established by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with Plymouth Marine Laboratory managing the two autonomous buoys that are located to the south of Plymouth in the English Channel (Stations L4 and E1): see Smyth et al. (2015). These two locations are now monitored continually and there is regular sampling of the water column and the sea floor at both locations. At Station L4, despite being in waters with a depth of 50 m, benthic foraminifera are regularly found in the surface water plankton samples. Some of these benthic foraminifera contain algal symbionts, indicating that they may be living at the time of capture. If benthic foraminifera can be entrained in the water column, while still living, then this provides a mechanism for 'migration' that is much more rapid and efficient than the rate at which protists could migrate within, or on, the sediment surface. Recolonization by foraminifera, following disturbance, could well be facilitated by this mechanism which has only rarely been reported in the literature (e.g., Murray, 1965). It is clearly limited to depths impacted by fair weather ( 30 m) or storm wave base (80 - 100 m). Data gathered during winter 2015-2016 certainly indicate that, following storm events, the larger the number of benthic foraminifera in the plankton tows and the greater their overall size. Some of the individuals being observed appear to contain sediment, indicating that they have been picked up from the sediment surface and, despite their greater weight, have still been transported into the plankton. Using data from the nearby sea area, off-shore and within Plymouth Sound, we are trying to ascertain if the recorded assemblage is from the L4 area, or whether they have been transported out from shallower-water environments, possibly assisted by increased run-off caused by heavy rainfall (associated with the storms). Clearly, re-distribution of foraminifera in the environment might make

  18. REKONSTRUKSI BATIMETRI DAN IKLIM PURBA BERDASARKAN FORAMINIFERA DAERAH RALLA BARRU, SULAWESI SELATAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meutia Farida

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Daerah Ralla terletak di Kabupaten Barru Provinsi Sulawesi Selatan, tersusun atas batuan karbonat dan vulkanik. Salah satu komponen utama penyusun batuan ini adalah kandungan fosil foraminifera baik planktonik maupun bentonik yang jumlahnya melimpah. Penentuan umur dan lingkungan pengendapan purba (paleobathymetry, menggunakan foraminifera sebagai proksi iklim purba (paleoclimate yang baik. Pengambilan sampel dilakukan dengan metode Penampang Stratigrafi Terukur (Measuring Section pada singkapan napal dan batugamping dengan ketebalan mencapai 748,16 sentimeter yang terdiri dari 23 lapisan batuan. Hasil identifikasi dan determinasi fosil foraminifera menunjukkan bahwa pada sampel terdapat 46 spesies bentonik dan 28 spesies planktonik, dengan kisaran umur batuan adalah Eosen Bawah bagian atas (P9 – Eosen Tengah bagian tengah (P11, perubahan batimetri dengan siklus pengendapan inner neritic – upper bathyal - outer neritic. Jumlah spesies yang beragam dan sangat melimpah serta ukuran fosil yang besar menunjukkan nutrisi pada saat itu sangat berlimpah, dengan temperatur 0⁰– 27⁰C sebagai kondisi iklim hangat (warm water. Ralla area is located in Barru District, South Sulawesi Province which consisted of carbonate and volcanic rocks. One of the main components of these rocks is foraminifera fossils, include planktonic and bentonic which founded to be abundance. In determining the age and depositional environment (paleobathymetry, foraminifera fossils could be used as a good paleoclimate proxy. The research was conducted by Stratigraphy Measured (Measuring Section method in marl and limestone outcrop with a thickness of up to 748.16 centimeters which consists of 23 rock layers. Identification and determination of foraminifera fossils suggests that there are 46 bentonic and 28 planktonic species on samples, which are estimated the age of the rocks range from the end of lower Eocene (P9 till the middle of Middle Eocene (P11, bathymetry changes

  19. Decalcification of benthic foraminifera due to "Hebei Spirit" oil spill, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Shin; Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Jung Sick; Woo, Han Jun; Park, Min Woo; Kim, Byeong Hak; Son, Maeng Hyun; Choi, Yang Ho

    2014-10-15

    In order to determine the effects on foraminifera due to spilled crude oil in the "Herbei Spirit" incident, a study of benthic foraminiferal assemblages was carried out on sediment samples collected from the Sogeunri tidal flat, Taean Peninsula, Korea. Breakages of the chambers in the Ammonia beccarii and Elphidium subincertum species of the Sogeunri tidal flat with a low pH (6.98 on average) were marked. These chamber breakages occurred in 71.6% of A. beccarii and are thought to be caused by decalcification due to the fall in pH resulting from the "Hebei Spirit" oil spill. The factors that affect breakage of the chamber in benthic foraminifera under low pH condition may be not only deto decalcification but also to exposure duration of substrata in the tidal flat spilled crude oil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution of the Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from Recent coastline environments adjacent to the coastline of Abu Dhabi (UAE) was studied in detail with the aim to: 1) provide reliable analogs for understanding and interpreting the depositional environment of ancient shallow-marine sediments from the UAE; 2) assess any modifications in the distribution of benthic environments and sedimentary facies in an area affected by significant anthropogenic activities - particular construction and land reclamation. A total of 100 sea-floor sediment samples were collected in different shallow-marine sedimentary environments (nearshore shelf, beach-front, channels, ooid shoals, lagoon and mangals) close to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island. Where possible, we revisited the sampling sites used in several studies conducted in the middle of last century (prior to any significant anthropogenic activities) to assess temporal changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution during the last 50 years. Five foraminiferal assemblages were recognized in the studied area. Species with a porcellaneous test mainly belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita are common in all studied areas. Larger benthic foraminifera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. The species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples particularly in lagoons and mangal environments and have not been reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the ooid shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach-front and samples collected in dredged channels

  1. Foraminifera Population from South Africa Coast Line (Indian and Atlantic Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Meriç

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cape Town is the second-largest city of the Republic of South Africa. Research is conducted in 3 different stations: Maori Bay, which lies in the southwest of Cape Town, and Pyramid Rock and Partridge Points which lies in the False Bay, southeast part of Cape Town. Samples are taken from young sediments at 10.00 and 20.00 m depths, and collected by scuba-diving method. The aim of the study is to investigate the living benthic foraminifera assemblages in the Atlantic Ocean, and to compare these assemblages with the southeastern part of the Atlantic Ocean, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Western Pacific assemblages. Moreover, the aim of the study is to determine whether there are any benthic foraminifera forms reaching to the Mediterranean from Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean or Red Sea via Suez Channel.

  2. Vertical distribution and isotopic composition of living planktonic foraminifera in the western North Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbanks, R.G.; Wiebe, P.H.; Be, A.W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen species of planktonic foraminifera collected with vertically stratified zooplankton tows in the slope water, Gulf Stream cold core ring, and northern Sargasso Sea show significant differences in their vertical distributions in the upper 200 meters of these different hydrographic regimes. Gulf Stream cold core rings may be responsible for a southern displacement of the faunal boundary associated with the Gulf Stream when reconstructed from the deep-sea sediment record. Oxygen isotope analyses of seven species reveal that nonspinose species (algal symbiont-barren) apparently calcify in oxygen isotope equilibrium, whereas spinose species usually calcify out of oxygen isotope equilibrium by approximately -0.3 to -0.4 per mil in delta 18 O values. The isotope data indicate that foraminifera shells calcify in depth zones that are significantly narrower than the overall vertical distribution of a species would imply

  3. Foraminifera [Marine Microfossil] as an additional tool for archaeologists - Examples from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    or- ganisms, their presence and absence could be a deci- GLIMPSES OF MARINE ARCHAEOLOGY IN INDIA sive factor in interpreting whether any ancient water body was filled with fresh or marine (brackish) water. With this intention, the author has..., a conceptual model (Figure 4) was provided and techniques were developed for use of foraminifera as a proxy to determine the paleomonsoons. Studies on core samples off Karwar (Figure 5), west coast of India showed the clear signals of marked...

  4. Living benthic Foraminifera from the Saquarema lagoonal system (Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Belart, Pierre; Laut, Vanessa; Clemente, Iara; Raposo, Débora; Martins, Virgínia; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Lorini, Maria; Fortes, Rafael; Laut, Lazaro

    2017-01-01

    Transitional environments such as coastal lagoons with narrow connections to the sea are ecosystems very sensitive to natural or anthropogenic pressures. They are biodiversity hotspots and for this reason it should be studied and preserved. This study lists the benthic Foraminifera species from the Saquarema lagoonal system (SLS), Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. This complex ecosystem consists of four large connected lagoons, namely Urussanga, Jardim, Boqueirão, and Saquarema. A poorly diversif...

  5. Planktonic Foraminifera Proxies Calibration Off the NW Iberian Margin: Nutrients Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, E.; Castro, C. G.; Zuniga, D.; Martin, P. A.; Groeneveld, J.; de la Granda, F.; Villaceiros-Robineau, N.; Alonso-Perez, F.; Alberto, A.; Rodrigues, T.; Rufino, M. M.; Abrantes, F. F. G.; Voelker, A. H. L.

    2014-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (PF) shells preserved in marine sediments are a useful tool to reconstruct productivity conditions at different geological timescales. However, the accuracy of these paleoreconstructions depends on the data set and calibration quality. Several calibration works have been defining and improving the use of proxies for productivity and nutrient cycling parameters. Our contribution is centred on a multi-proxy calibration at a regional coastal upwelling system. To minimize the existing uncertainties affecting the use of trace elements and C stable isotopes as productivity proxy in the high productivity upwelling areas, we investigate the content and distribution of Ba/Ca and δ13C in the water column, its transference into the planktonic foraminifera shells, and, how the living planktonic foraminifera Ba/Ca and δ13C signal is related to the same planktonic foraminiferal species preserved in the sediment record. This study is based on a large data set from two stations (RAIA - 75m water depth, and CALIBERIA - 350m water depth) located off the NW Iberian margin (41.5-42.5ºN; 9-10ºW), and includes: i) two year monthly water column data (temperature, salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll a, Ba/Ca, and δ13C-DIC); ii) seasonal Ba/Ca, δ13C in several living PF species at both stations; and iii) Ba/Ca and δ13C in several PF species from a large set of core-top sediment samples in the study region. Additionally, total organic carbon and total alkenones were also measured in the sediment. Our results showed the link between productivity proxies in the surface sediment foraminifera assemblage and the processes regulating the actual phytoplankton dynamics in an upwelling area. The understanding of this relationship has special relevance since it gives fundamental information related to the past oceanic biogeochemistry and/or climate and improves the prevision of future changes against possible climate variability due to anthropogenic forcing.

  6. Addressing environmental issues through foraminifera – Case studies from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    of relict foraminifera in certain environments also helps in deciphering palaeo-sea level conditions (Mazumder, 2004; Panchang et al., communicated). Significant Results: The relative rise and fall of sea level over the time has been studied with the help... and shared or distributed, contributing to balance the economy of the country during the time of crisis. Sufficient or excess rainfall conditions will even improve relationship between the states as well as bordering countries sharing water resources...

  7. Megalodon, mako shark and planktonic foraminifera from the continental shelf off Portugal and their age

    OpenAIRE

    ANTUNES, M.; LEGOINHA, P.; BALBINO, A.

    2015-01-01

    Turbidite fragments collected by a fishing net off the central Portuguese coast (Peniche) present some fossils. The matrix is phosphatized and iron-rich with small quantities of manganese, zinc and copper. The occurrence of Megaselachus megalodon most probably excludes an age older than Middle Miocene. Its very advanced evolution stage is consistent with a Pliocene age. Based on planktonic foraminifera in depressions of cetacean skulls recovered in the same way, from the same area...

  8. Time-response of cultured deep-sea benthic foraminifera to different algal diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, P.; Hemleben, Ch; Kitazato, H.

    2002-03-01

    The vertical distribution of benthic foraminifera in the surface sediment is influenced by environmental factors, mainly by food and oxygen supply. An experiment of three different time series was performed to investigate the response of deep-sea benthic foraminifera to simulated phytodetritus pulses under stable oxygen concentrations. Each series was fed constantly with one distinct algal species in equivalent amounts. The temporal reactions of the benthic foraminifera with regard to the vertical distribution in the sediment, the total number, and the species composition were observed and compared within the three series. Additionally, oxygen contents and bacterial cell numbers were measured to ensure that these factors were invariable and did not influence foraminiferal communities. The addition of algae leads to higher population densities 21 days after food was added. Higher numbers of individuals were probably caused by higher organic levels, which in turn induced reproduction. A stronger response is found after feeding with Amphiprora sp. and Pyramimonas sp., compared to Dunaliella tertiolecta. At a constant high oxygen supply, no migration to upper layers was observed after food addition, and more individuals were found in deeper layers. The laboratory results thus agree with the predictions of the TROX-model. An epifaunal microhabitat preference was shown for Adercotryma glomerata. Hippocrepina sp. was spread over the entire sediment depth with a shallow infaunal maximum. Melonis barleeanum preferred a deeper infaunal habitat. Bacterial cell concentrations were stable during the laboratory experiments and showed no significant response to higher organic fluxes.

  9. Carbon isotopic fractionation in live benthic foraminifera -comparison with inorganic precipitate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses have been performed on live-stained aragonitic and calcitic benthic foraminifera and dissolved inorganic carbon from the Southern California Borderland to examine carbon isotopic fractionation in foraminifera. Temperature, salinity and pH data have also been collected to permit accurate determination of the delta 13 C of bicarbonate ion and thus aragonite-HCO 3 - and calcite-HCO 3 - isotopic enrichment factors (epsilonsub(ar-b) and epsilonsub(cl-b), respectively). Only species which precipitate in 18 O equilibrium have been considered. epsilonsub (ar-b) values based on Hoeglundina elegans range from 1.9 per mille at 2.7 deg C to 1.1 per mille at 9.5 deg C. The temperature dependence of epsilonsub(ar-b) is considerably greater than the equilibrium equation would predict and may be due to a vital effect. The calcitic foraminifera Cassidulina tortuosa, Cassidulina braziliensis, and Cassidulina limbata, Bank and Terrace dwellers, have similar delta 13 C values and yield an average epsilonsub(cl-b) value of -0.2 +- 0.1 per mille between 8 deg and 10 deg C. Calcitic Uvigerina curticosta, Uvigerina peregrina, and megalospheric B, argentea, Slope and Basin dwellers, are -0.7 +- 0.1 per mille enriched relative to ambient bicarbonate for 3 to 9 deg C. (author)

  10. Surface ocean metabarcoding confirms limited diversity in planktonic foraminifera but reveals unknown hyper-abundant lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Garet-Delmas, Marie-José; Mahé, Frédéric; Romac, Sarah; Poulain, Julie; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2018-02-07

    Since the advent of DNA metabarcoding surveys, the planktonic realm is considered a treasure trove of diversity, inhabited by a small number of abundant taxa, and a hugely diverse and taxonomically uncharacterized consortium of rare species. Here we assess if the apparent underestimation of plankton diversity applies universally. We target planktonic foraminifera, a group of protists whose known morphological diversity is limited, taxonomically resolved and linked to ribosomal DNA barcodes. We generated a pyrosequencing dataset of ~100,000 partial 18S rRNA foraminiferal sequences from 32 size fractioned photic-zone plankton samples collected at 8 stations in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans during the Tara Oceans expedition (2009-2012). We identified 69 genetic types belonging to 41 morphotaxa in our metabarcoding dataset. The diversity saturated at local and regional scale as well as in the three size fractions and the two depths sampled indicating that the diversity of foraminifera is modest and finite. The large majority of the newly discovered lineages occur in the small size fraction, neglected by classical taxonomy. These unknown lineages dominate the bulk [>0.8 µm] size fraction, implying that a considerable part of the planktonic foraminifera community biomass has its origin in unknown lineages.

  11. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12C- ion source current of 10-15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  12. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO 2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO 2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12 C − ion source current of 10–15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  13. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: wacker@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lippold, J. [Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Molnar, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Schulz, H. [Institute for Geosciencies, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 {mu}g for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO{sub 2} is liberated from 150 to 1150 {mu}g of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO{sub 2} is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 {mu}g (50 {mu}g C) typically gives a {sup 12}C{sup -} ion source current of 10-15 {mu}A over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 {mu}g Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 {+-} 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  14. Foraminifera Models to Interrogate Ostensible Proxy-Model Discrepancies During Late Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P.; Dowsett, H. J.; de Mutsert, K.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera faunal assemblages have been used in the reconstruction of past oceanic states (e.g. the Last Glacial Maximum, the mid-Piacenzian Warm Period). However these reconstruction efforts have typically relied on inverse modeling using transfer functions or the modern analog technique, which by design seek to translate foraminifera into one or two target oceanic variables, primarily sea surface temperature (SST). These reconstructed SST data have then been used to test the performance of climate models, and discrepancies have been attributed to shortcomings in climate model processes and/or boundary conditions. More recently forward proxy models or proxy system models have been used to leverage the multivariate nature of proxy relationships to their environment, and to "bring models into proxy space". Here we construct ecological models of key planktic foraminifera taxa, calibrated and validated with World Ocean Atlas (WO13) oceanographic data. Multiple modeling methods (e.g. multilayer perceptron neural networks, Mahalanobis distance, logistic regression, and maximum entropy) are investigated to ensure robust results. The resulting models are then driven by a Late Pliocene climate model simulation with biogeochemical as well as temperature variables. Similarities and differences with previous model-proxy comparisons (e.g. PlioMIP) are discussed.

  15. Carbon isotopic fractionation in live benthic foraminifera -comparison with inorganic precipitate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossmann, E L [University of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1984-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses have been performed on live-stained aragonitic and calcitic benthic foraminifera and dissolved inorganic carbon from the Southern California Borderland to examine carbon isotopic fractionation in foraminifera. Temperature, salinity and pH data have also been collected to permit accurate determination of the delta/sup 13/C of bicarbonate ion and thus aragonite-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and calcite-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ isotopic enrichment factors (epsilonsub(ar-b) and epsilonsub(cl-b), respectively). Only species which precipitate in /sup 18/O equilibrium have been considered. epsilonsub (ar-b) values based on Hoeglundina elegans range from 1.9 per mille at 2.7 deg C to 1.1 per mille at 9.5 deg C. The temperature dependence of epsilonsub(ar-b) is considerably greater than the equilibrium equation would predict and may be due to a vital effect. The calcitic foraminifera Cassidulina tortuosa, Cassidulina braziliensis, and Cassidulina limbata, Bank and Terrace dwellers, have s

  16. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (< 10 % of the metabarcodes can be unambiguously assigned to planktonic taxa. These organisms live exclusively in the surface ocean and the recovered barcodes thus represent an allochthonous component deposited with the rain of organic remains from the surface ocean. We take advantage of the planktonic foraminifera portion of the metabarcodes to establish to what extent the structure of the surface ocean biota is preserved in sedimentary eDNA. We show that planktonic foraminifera DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of

  17. Testing the Molecular Clock Using the Best Fossil Record: Case Studies from the Planktic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, B. A.; Kucera, M.; Darling, K.

    2004-12-01

    Criticism of molecular clock studies often centres on inadequate calibration and a perceived lack of correlation between reproductive isolation and recognisable morphological evolution. Since many major groups (e.g. birds, mammals, reptiles) have a poor fossil record, it is often difficult to test and refute these limitations. Planktic foraminifera represent an exception to this rule. Deep-sea sediments are super-abundant in foraminifera, and large numbers of specimens and occurrences are easily garnered from Ocean Drilling Programme cores. Planktic foraminifera therefore represent an ideal model group with which to test and refine molecular clock studies. Since the 1990AƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAøs, genetic sequences (principally 18S r-RNA) have been extracted from living planktic foraminifera, and a large genetic library has developed. Our study attempts to contextualise and test molecular data, particularly AƒAøAøâ_sA¬Agenetic studies have suggested that these two AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A<Å"super-speciesAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø in fact consist of a number of isolated forms, with contrasting ecologies and longevities, which in Recent and sub-Recent sediments can be distinguished either on the basis of pore ultrastructure (Gl. siphonifera) or test colouration (Gs. ruber). In both cases, molecular clock estimates are indicative of ancient (7-11 Ma) intra-species cryptic divergences, which seem to be considerably older than fossil dates. In particular, the calculated molecular split between the two forms of Gs. ruber (AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A<Å"whiteAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø and AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A<Å"pinkAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø) of around 11 Ma is considerably discordant with the fossil date of around 0.7 Ma. At first glance, this may appear to be a classic case of molecular over-estimation, often a feature of clock models, especially where, as in the foraminifera, substitution rates may vary widely. However, there is good reason to suspect that fossil range of the

  18. The response of calcifying plankton to climate change in the Pliocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. V. Davis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of anthropogenic pCO2 increases, future oceans are growing warmer and lower in pH and oxygen, conditions that are likely to impact planktic communities. Past intervals of elevated and changing pCO2 and temperatures can offer a glimpse into the response of marine calcifying plankton to changes in surface oceans under conditions similar to those projected for the future. Here we present new records of planktic foraminiferal and coccolith calcification (weight and size from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 (mid-North Atlantic and Ocean Drilling Program Site 999 (Caribbean Sea from the Pliocene, the last time that pCO2 was similar to today, and extending through a global cooling event into the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (3.3 to 2.6 million years ago. Test weights of both surface-dwelling Foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and thermocline-dwelling Foraminifera Globorotalia puncticulata vary with a potential link to regional temperature variation in the North Atlantic, whereas in the tropics Globigerinoides ruber test weight remains stable. In contrast, reticulofenestrid coccoliths show a narrowing size range and a decline in the largest lith diameters over this interval. Our results suggest no major changes in plankton calcite production during the high pCO2 Pliocene or during the transition into an icehouse world.

  19. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost W van Dam

    Full Text Available Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m, while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v/F(m, interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v/F(m and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  20. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joost W; Negri, Andrew P; Mueller, Jochen F; Altenburger, Rolf; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte) of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m)), while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures) were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v)/F(m) and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1)). The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA) described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  1. Benthic Foraminifera as ecological indicators for water quality on the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthicke, Sven; Nobes, Kristie

    2008-07-01

    Benthic foraminifera are established indicators for Water Quality (WQ) in Florida and the Caribbean. However, nearshore coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and other Pacific regions are also subjected to increased nutrient and sediment loads. Here, we investigate the use of benthic foraminifera as indicators to assess status and trends of WQ on GBR reefs. We quantified several sediment parameters and the foraminiferan assemblage composition on 20 reefs in four geographic regions of the GBR, and along a water column nutrient and turbidity gradient. Twenty-seven easily recognisable benthic foraminiferan taxa (>63 μm) were distinguished. All four geographic regions differed significantly ( p turbid inner shelf towards clearer outer shelf reefs. A RDA separated symbiotic and aposymbiotic (heterotrophic) taxa. In addition, total suspended solid and water column chlorophyll a concentrations were negatively correlated, and optical depth and distance to the mainland were positively correlated, with the abundance of symbiont-bearing taxa. Several large foraminifera were identified as indicators for offshore, clear water conditions. In contrast, heterotrophic rotaliids and a species retaining plastids ( Elphidium sp.) where highly characteristic for low light, higher nutrient conditions. Application of the FORAM index to GBR assemblage composition showed a significant increase in the value of this index with increased distance from the mainland in the Whitsunday region ( r2 = 0.75, p < 0.001), and therefore with increasing light and decreased nutrient availability. We conclude that it will be possible to apply this index to GBR and possibly other Pacific reefs after some adaptations and additional experimental work on species-specific limiting factors.

  2. Spatial and temporal distribution patterns of benthic foraminifera in the Northeast Water Polynya, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Michael J.; Graf, Gerhard; Altenbach, Alexander V.

    1997-01-01

    Abundance, biofacies and ATP content of benthic foraminifera (>63 μm) were studied in the Northeast Water (NEW) Polynya (77-81°N, 5-17°W) over the ice-free summer, 1993, to investigate how a polynya system might influence the underlying benthic community. In the living assemblage, distinguished by Rose Bengal staining, over 60 taxa could be identified. The biofacies identified was similar to that of other Arctic shelf habitats. Foraminifera were counted in 3 size fractions (63-125 μm, 125-250 μm and >250 μm), with 65% of the foraminifera occurring in the smallest size fraction (63-125 μm). Total abundances (>63 μm) in the uppermost 1 cm averaged approximately 200 ind/10 cm 3 and declined down-core, as did the number of species. Abundances and species composition correlated positively with sediment chlorophyll and ATP content, with maxima occurring in the shallower northern regions of the polynya, suggesting a general dependence on food. Foraminera biomass was estimated to be 0.1-0.3 g C org/m 2. Abundances, biomass and ATP content were comparable to ice-free, deep-sea regions in the Norwegian Sea. Temporal changes observed over a 2 month period at one location were difficult to distinguish from spatial and analytical variability. Contrary to expectations, growth was unpronounced at the community and at a species level, implying either a delayed response of the benthic foraminiferal community to food inputs from the overlying water column or the presence of biological limitations other than food, such as predation.

  3. Living Behaviors and Molecular Characterization of Benthic Foraminifera in the Arabian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Khalil, Amjad; Holzmann, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The benthic foraminifera are among the major carbonate producers in modern Arabian Gulf waters and are found living in all marine habitats. They have been recognized as proxies to assess paleoenvironmental changes, however, their biological behaviors in modern environments needs to be further studied. The current study attempts to explain the biology of benthic foraminifera in terms of their living behaviors and molecular characterization, from different regions of the western side of the Arabian Gulf. Accordingly, two major groups of benthic foraminifera, namely rotaliids and miliolids, are examined under laboratory conditions. Results illustrate that the rotaliids are more resistant to environmental changes than miliolids, as their granular reticulopodial network is stronger than among the miliolids, with high cytoplasmic streaming. The pseudopodia extend out from both primary and secondary apertures, and aid the organism in locomotion by attaching to the wall of hard substrate. As a result they drag their whole bodies toward the direction of motion. In rotaliids, the movement rate is high and is attributed to the extension of pseudopodia through all apertures, compared with miliolids in which pseudopodia extend out from the primary aperture only. The innate behavior of both groups was observed as a function of external stimulus, i.e., light, nutrients, and availability of substrate. The observation on average life span reflected that the rotaliids was able to survive longer than miliolids. Molecular analysis reveals the presence of four groups, i.e., Ammonia, Murrayinella, Glabratellina, and Elphidium which support the morphological taxonomy at the genus level. However, BLAST analysis contradicts the species level taxonomy, which challenges the classification based upon hard-shell morphology. Nevertheless, monophyletic clustering is observed among all major groups. The study concludes that the morphological taxonomy needs to be augmented by molecular analysis

  4. Diversity, distribution, and morphological deformities among living Foraminifera in hypersaline Salwa Bay, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalekan Amao, Abduljamiu; Kaminski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Arabian Gulf is considered a naturally stressed environment due to extremes of salinity and summer temperatures. Anthropogenic influences such as rapid urbanisation projects, maritime transport, and large numbers of desalination plants and oil-related activities compounds the problem. Foraminifera are known to be resilient under such stressful conditions. The purpose of our study is to document the foraminiferal diversity and abundance in the hypersaline Salwa Bay area, near the Saudi Arabian-Qatar Border. We expect the foraminiferal fauna in Salwa Bay to be adapted to extremes in salinity, and we wish to document any species that might be endemic or uniquely adapted to the area. Shannon-Wiener index, relative abundance, species richness, and the percentage of morphological deformities were determined for samples collected from the bay. Salwa Bay is the most saline extension of the Arabian Gulf with high salinity, water temperature and evaporation rate, which is attributed to slow flushing rates, coral reef barriers and higher residency time of the water. Environmental parameters measured at the time of collection were depth (10-110 cm), salinity (52.6-53.0) total dissolved solids (48.8-49.4 g/l), and temperature (27-27.6°C). The foraminiferal assemblages in Salwa Bay are dominated by porcelaneous foraminifera, which include Peneroplis pertusus, Peneroplis planatus, Coscinospira hemprichii and Coscinospira acicularis. The most common species across the sampled transect is Peneroplis pertusus. Hyaline species were also found, but agglutinated foraminifera are absent. Diversity in Salwa Bay is lower compared with localities that have "normal" salinity, and many of the foraminifera display conspicuous morphological deformities. Approximately 55% of the assemblage exhibits mild to severe deformities such as fusion of two adults or double tests, protuberance on the spiral side, abnormal arrangement of the chambers, abnormal shape of the proloculus and modification

  5. Does temperature affect dimorphic reproduction in benthic foraminifera? A culture experiment on Rosalina leei

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Caron, D.A.

    ,15 . ? For correspondence. (e - mail: nigam@csnio.ren.nic.in ) First, a preliminary survey was made for collection of benthic foraminifera from sea grasses and surface sed i- ment samples from three locations near Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA, viz. (i) Vineyar d..., 15 , 26 ? 34. 3. Rottger, R., Fladung, M., Schmaljo hann, R., Spi n dler, M. and Zacharias, H., J. Foram. Res ., 1986, 16 , 141 ? 149. 4. Harney, J. N., Hallock, P. and Jalge, H. K., J. F o ram. Res ., 1998, 28 , 141 ? 147. 5. Lee, J...

  6. Diachronous ranges of benthonic Foraminifera in the Eocene of Alabama and South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, G.D.; Fallaw, W.C.; Snipes, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen species of benthonic Foraminifera reported by Bandy (1949) from the Eocene of Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama were identified from the middle eocene Santee Limestone and the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation in Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina. Of the 17 species, seven occurred in South Carolina stratigraphically above or below the ranges listed by Bandy. Bandy made a detailed study of Foraminifera from the Claibornian and Jacksonian Tallahatta, Lisbon, Gosport, Moodys Branch, and Yazoo formations exposed on Little Stave Creek and plotted the stratigraphic ranges within the section of numerous species. The authors' samples came from well cores at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Of 13 species from the middle Eocene Santee and also reported by Bandy, four are stratigraphically below the lowest occurrence listed by Bandy, and one is stratigraphically above the highest occurrence. Of four species from the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation and also listed by Bandy, two are stratigraphically above his highest occurrence. Dockery and Nystrom (1992) and Campbell (1993) have described diachroneity among mollusks in the Eocene of South Carolina. Caution should be used in relying on a small number of species in correlating Eocene deposits in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains

  7. Response of deep-sea benthic foraminifera to Miocene paleoclimatic events, DSDP site 289

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, F.; Douglas, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in the Miocene deep-sea benthic foraminifera at DSDP Site 289 closely correlate to the climatically induced variations in deep and bottom waters in the Pacific Ocean. In early Miocene time, oxygen and carbon isotopes indicate that bottom waters were relatively warm and poorly oxygenated. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by various species inherited from the Oligocene. Expansion of the Antarctic icecap in the early middle Miocene, 14-16 m.y. ago, increased oxygen isotope values, produced cold, more oxygenated bottom waters and lead to a turnover in the benthic foraminifera. An Oligocene-early Miocene assemblage was replaced by a cibicidoid-dominated assemblage. Some species became extinct and benthic faunas became more bathymetrically restricted with the increased stratification of deep waters in the ocean. In mid-Miocene time, Epistominella exigua and E. umbonifera, indicative of young, oxygenated bottom waters, are relatively common at DSDP Site 289. Further glacial expansion 5-9 m.y. ago lowered sealevel, increased oceanic upwelling and associated biological productivity and intensified the oxygen minima. Abundant hispid and costate uvigerines become a dominant faunal element at shallow depths above 2500 m as E. umbonifera becomes common to abundant below 2500 m. By late Miocene time, benthic faunas similar in species composition and proportion to modern faunas on the Ontong-Java plateau, had become established. (Auth.)

  8. Seaweed fails to prevent ocean acidification impact on foraminifera along a shallow-water CO2 gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Laura R; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    Ocean acidification causes biodiversity loss, alters ecosystems, and may impact food security, as shells of small organisms dissolve easily in corrosive waters. There is a suggestion that photosynthetic organisms could mitigate ocean acidification on a local scale, through seagrass protection or seaweed cultivation, as net ecosystem organic production raises the saturation state of calcium carbonate making seawater less corrosive. Here, we used a natural gradient in calcium carbonate saturation, caused by shallow-water CO2 seeps in the Mediterranean Sea, to assess whether seaweed that is resistant to acidification (Padina pavonica) could prevent adverse effects of acidification on epiphytic foraminifera. We found a reduction in the number of species of foraminifera as calcium carbonate saturation state fell and that the assemblage shifted from one dominated by calcareous species at reference sites (pH ∼8.19) to one dominated by agglutinated foraminifera at elevated levels of CO2 (pH ∼7.71). It is expected that ocean acidification will result in changes in foraminiferal assemblage composition and agglutinated forms may become more prevalent. Although Padina did not prevent adverse effects of ocean acidification, high biomass stands of seagrass or seaweed farms might be more successful in protecting epiphytic foraminifera.

  9. Foraminifera, Thecamoebians and Palynomorphs as Hydrodynamic Indicators in Araguari Estuary, Amazonian Coast, Amapá State – Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odete Fátima Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araguari estuarine dynamics is singular among traditional models of estuaries under tidal regime due to influence of macrotidal and tidal bore. In order to establish estuarine zones in Araguari according foraminifera, thecamoebians, paliynomorphs and physical-chemistry parameters, sixteen sample stations were established along the estuary. Turbidity and temperature were the environmental parameters which allowed determination of the estuarine gradient. Eighteen species of foraminifera, ten of thecamoebians and fourteen of particulate organic matter types were identified. Cluster analysis in R-mode showed three microorganism assemblages and four palynomorph ones. The CCA analyze shows turbidity and total organic matter with the most influence over foraminiferal and thecamoebians distribution at Araguari. Clustering analysis in Q-mode using all data formed four groups suggesting three estuarine zones in Araguari: Zone I composed of thecamoebian species and continental palynomorphs; Zone II - composed by mangrove foraminifera, thecamoebians and all palynomorph assemblages; and Zone III – composed by mangrove and estuarine foraminifera and all palynomorph assemblages.

  10. Marine connections of Amazonia: Evidence from foraminifera and dinoflagellate cysts (early to middle Miocene, Colombia/Peru)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.; Ramos, M.I.F.; Lammertsma, E.I.; Antoine, P.-O; Hoorn, C.

    2015-01-01

    Species composition in the present-day Amazonian heartland has an imprint of past marine influence. The exact nature, timing and extent of this marine influence, however, are largely unresolved. Here we use calcareous tests of foraminifera and marine palynomorphs from Miocene sediments in

  11. Four new species of deep water agglutinated foraminifera from the Oligocene-Miocene of the Congo Fan (offshore Angola)

    OpenAIRE

    Kender, S.; Kaminski, M. A.; Jones, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Four new species of deep-water agglutinated benthic foraminifera are described from the Oligocene and Miocene of the Congo Fan, offshore Angola. Scherochorella congoensis n.sp., Paratrochamminoides goroyskiformis n.sp., Haplophragmoides nauticus n.sp. and Portatrochammina profunda n.sp. all occur in deep-sea turbiditic shales and sands from the distal section of the Congo Fan.

  12. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from mangrove swamps and channels of Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Odeh, Weaam A. S. Al; Lokier, Stephen W.; Paul, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Zonation of Recent mangrove environments can be defined using benthic foraminifera, however, little is known about foraminifera from mangrove environments of the Arabian Gulf. The objective of this study is to produce a detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological analysis to identify foraminiferal associations in several coastline environments (mangrove swamps and channels) located on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island (UAE). Detailed sediment sampling collection in mangal environments of Eastern Abu Dhabi was carried out to assess the distribution of living and dead benthic foraminifera in different sedimentary facies in the mangal and in the surrounding area comprising natural environments of the upper and lower intertidal area (mud flats and channels) and areas modified by anthropogenic activities (dredged channels). The fine-grain sediments collected near mangrove (Avicenna marina) roots presented a high abundance of living and dead foraminifera tests. The assemblages in these samples show very low diversity and are almost entirely constituted of small-sized opportunistic species belonging to the genera Ammonia and Elphidium. In particular: • Samples collected on the mud flat and in ponds at the margin of the channel show a foraminiferal assemblage characterised by abundant foraminifera belonging to the genera Ammonia, Elphidium, Triloculina, Quinqueloculina, Peneroplis and Spirolina. • Samples collected in the lower (wet) intertidal area close to Avicenna marina roots, presented a low-diversity assemblage mostly comprising opportunistic foraminifera of the genera Ammonia and Elphidium along with rare miliolidae. • Samples from the upper intertidal area (dry) close to Avicenna marina roots, produced an assemblage exclusively composed of small-sized opportunistic Ammonia and Elphidium, together with abundant specimens belonging to the genera Trochammina. Throchammina specimens have not been previously recorded from Recent sedimentary samples of

  13. Microfacies analysis of foraminifera rich sedimentary rocks from the Desert Plateau, central Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnitschar, C.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Microfacies analysis on some samples from the Thebes Group have been carried on by means of thin sections. The study area is included in the Libyan Desert Plateau (central Egypt) at following coordinates N27° 36'30.58" E29° 44'58.34", near the biggest dune of Egypt, the Ghard Abu Muharik. Because of the round shape of the rocks and the desert patina on the surface they could easily be classified as the so called "Melonstones", which are located more southwards and mainly composed by stromatolites. On the contrary, the investigated samples show a completely different fauna and therefore have been separated from the "Melonstones". Even if shape and size are very similar and the desert patina covers all surfaces the same way the differences are impressive. To investigate the samples, two thin-sections have been prepared and analyzed at the microscope. The observed fauna is composed by: agglutinated benthic foraminifera (e.g., Dictyoconus egypticus), complex larger miliolids (e.g., Pseudolacazina cf. danatae, Fabularia sp.), alveolinids (Alveolina vredenburgi), green algae (Dasycladaceae), echinoids and corals. Because of the presence of symbionts bearing larger benthic foraminifera, which need light to feed photosymbionts, the rock was formed in a shallow water environment. With the abundant rock-building benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae the limestone shows a tendency to the packstone/wackestone facies. Based on the presence of Alveolina vredenburgi, the age of the samples can be estimate as lowermost Eocene belonging to the shallow benthic zone 5 (sensu Serra-Kiel et al., 1998). According the obtained data on stratigraphy and palaeoecology, a partial palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is possible for the Libyan Desert Plateau where outcrops are largely missing. Because of the round shape of the samples and the patina which covers them all around it can be assumed that they have been transported from longer distance. According to the geological map of the

  14. Benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    (Nolet and Corliss, 1990). Differences in the abundance of oxygen-sensitive and dissolution-prone benthic foraminiferal species between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Holocene in the abyssal waters of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico were used... (2009) Deep-sea benthic diversity linked to seasonality of pelagic productivity. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers 56: 835-841. Culver S (1988) New foraminiferal depth zonation of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Palaios 3: 69...

  15. Early Miocene benthic foraminifera and biostratigraphy of the Qom Formation, Deh Namak, Central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Jahanbakhsh; Dana, Leila Ramezani

    2007-03-01

    A total of 165 samples were collected from the Qom Formation investigated in a stratigraphic section north of Deh Namak, in Central Iran. From these, 35 genera and 47 species of benthic foraminifera were identified. The age of the studied section is Early Miocene (Aquitanian to Early Burdigalian) based on the occurrence of Borelis melo curdica, Meandropsina anahensis, Meandropsina iranica, Elphidium sp. 14, Peneroplis farsensis, and Triloculina tricarinata. The thickness of the Qom Formation is 401 m of which 161.2 m is early Burdigalian in age. Foraminiferal assemblages in the Deh Namak section are referable to the Borelis melo group- Meandropsina iranica Assemblage Zone and Miogypsinoides- Archaias-Valvulinid Assemblage Zone of [Adams, T.D., Bourgeois, F., 1967. Asmari biostratigraphy. Iranian Oil Operating Companies, Geological and Exploration Division, Report1074 (unpublished) 1-37.] described originally from the Asmari Formation.

  16. Biological fractionation of oxygen and carbon isotopes by recent benthic foraminifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, F.; Douglas, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent deep-sea benthic foraminifera from five East Pacific Rise box core tops have been analyzed for oxygen and carbon isotopic composition. The five equatorial stations, with water depths of between 3200 and 4600 m, yielded fourteen specific and generic taxonomic groups. Of the taxa analyzed, Uvigerina spp. most closely approaches oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient sea water. Pyrgo spp. was next closest to isotopic equilibrium, being on the average 0.59 per thousand depleted in 18 O relative to Uvigerina spp. Oridorsalis umbonatus also has relatively high delta 18 O values. Most other taxa were depleted in 18 O by large amounts. In no taxa was the carbon in the CaCO 3 secreted in carbon isotopic equilibrium with the dissolved HCO 3 - of ambient sea water. (Auth.)

  17. Species dominance and equitability: patterns in Cenozoic foraminifera of eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T.G.; Hill, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Species dominance in benthonic foraminifera, represented by percent of the assemblage composed of the single most abundant species, shows little change in observed range of values from shallow into deep-marine waters in 1005 samples from the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic, and Arctic margins of North America. This finding contrasts with the model that species dominance is highest in shallow-marine environments and decreases offshore into deeper marine waters. Equitability, the relation of all species abundances within an assemblage, also shows little change between the values found in shallow-marine assemblages and those found in assemblages from deeper water environments. Equitability and dominance values found in 421 assemblages from Palaeocene, Eocene, Miocene, and Pleistocene strata of the Atlantic and E Gulf of Mexico coastal plains are similar to the modern values. -from Authors

  18. Burdigalian turbid water patch reef environment revealed by larger benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Renema, W.; Throughflow-project

    2012-04-01

    Ancient isolated patch reefs outcropping from siliciclastic sediments are a trademark for the Miocene carbonate deposits occurring in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. They develop in transitional shelf sediments deposited between deltaic and deep marine deposits (Allen and Chambers, 1998). The Batu Putih Limestone (Wilson, 2005) and similar outcrops in adjacent areas have been characterized as shallow water carbonates influenced by high siliciclastic input, showing low relief patch reefs in turbid waters. Larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) are excellent markers for biochronology and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This study aims to reveal age and paleoenvironment of a shallow water carbonate patch reef developed in mixed depositional system by using LBF and microfacies analysis. The studied section is located near Bontang, East Kalimantan, and is approximately 80 m long and 12 m high. It is placed within Miocene sediments in the central part of the Kutai Basin. Patch reef and capping sediments were logged through eight transects along section and divided into nine different lithological units from which samples were collected. Thin sections and isolated specimens of larger benthic foraminifera were analyzed and recognized to species level (where possible) providing age and environmental information. Microfacies analysis of thin sections included carbonate classification (textural scheme of Dunham, 1962) and assemblage composition of LBF, algae and corals relative abundance. Three environmentally indicative groups of LBF were separated based on test morphology, habitat or living relatives (Hallock and Glenn, 1986). Analysed foraminifera assemblage suggests Burdigalian age (Tf1). With use of microfacies analysis nine successive lithological units were grouped into five facies types. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of LBF fossil assemblage indicate two cycles of possible deepening recorded in the section. Based on high muddy matrix ratio in analyzed thin-sections we

  19. Rapid deterioration of sediment surface habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, as indicated by benthic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Elizabeth A; Martin, Ruth A; Martin, David E; Apple, Jude

    2015-08-15

    Foraminiferal assemblages in sediment grab samples were utilized to evaluate the impacts of anthropogenic activities on benthic habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, U.S.A. Seventy-three samples taken in 1987, 1997, 2006 and 2010 yielded 35 species of foraminifera from 28 genera. Assemblage composition and diversity data indicate a marked deterioration between 1987 and 2010, contrary to the published Chemical Index, but analogous to the situation with macrobiota. Correlation of diversity with chemical pollutants and metals did not identify any significant correlations, however, an unrelated but highly relevant study of bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH in Bellingham Bay suggests eutrophication with accompanying hypoxia and acidification may be part of the cause. Thus, the metrics of contamination alone do not adequately characterize habitat viability, and benthic foraminiferal assemblages provide insight into the health of coastal ecosystems. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Equivalent dose determination in foraminifera: analytical description of the CO2--signal dose-response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Woda, C.; Mangini, A.

    2003-01-01

    The dose-response of the CO 2 - signal (g=2.0006) in foraminifera with ages between 19 and 300 ka is investigated. The sum of two exponential saturation functions is an adequate function to describe the dose-response curve up to an additional dose of 8000 Gy. It yields excellent dating results but requires an artificial doses of at least 5000 Gy. For small additional doses of about 500 Gy the single exponential saturation function can be used to calculate a reliable equivalent dose D E , although it does not describ the dose-response for higher doses. The CO 2 - -signal dose-response indicates that the signal has two components of which one is less stable than the other

  1. Can abundance of protists be inferred from sequence data: a case study of foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A-T Weber

    Full Text Available Protists are key players in microbial communities, yet our understanding of their role in ecosystem functioning is seriously impeded by difficulties in identification of protistan species and their quantification. Current microscopy-based methods used for determining the abundance of protists are tedious and often show a low taxonomic resolution. Recent development of next-generation sequencing technologies offered a very powerful tool for studying the richness of protistan communities. Still, the relationship between abundance of species and number of sequences remains subjected to various technical and biological biases. Here, we test the impact of some of these biological biases on sequence abundance of SSU rRNA gene in foraminifera. First, we quantified the rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level of three species of foraminifera by qPCR. Then, we prepared five mock communities with these species, two in equal proportions and three with one species ten times more abundant. The libraries of rDNA and cDNA of the mock communities were constructed, Sanger sequenced and the sequence abundance was calculated. The initial species proportions were compared to the raw sequence proportions as well as to the sequence abundance normalized by rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level per species. Our results showed that without normalization, all sequence data differed significantly from the initial proportions. After normalization, the congruence between the number of sequences and number of specimens was much better. We conclude that without normalization, species abundance determination based on sequence data was not possible because of the effect of biological biases. Nevertheless, by taking into account the variation of rDNA copy number and rRNA expression level we were able to infer species abundance, suggesting that our approach can be successful in controlled conditions.

  2. Arrival and expansion of the invasive foraminifera Trochammina hadai Uchio in Padilla Bay, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Mary; Grossman, Eric E.; Takesue, Renee K.; Penttila, Dan; Walsh, John P.; Corbett, Reide

    2012-01-01

    Trochammina hadai Uchio, a benthic foraminifera native to Japanese estuaries, was first identified as an invasive in 1995 in San Francisco Bay and later in 16 other west coast estuaries. To investigate the timing of the arrival and expansion of this invasive species in Padilla Bay, Washington, we analyzed the distribution of foraminifera in two surface samples collected in 1971, in nine surface samples collected by Scott in 1972–1973, as well as in two cores (Padilla Flats 3 and Padilla V1/V2) obtained in 2004. Trochanimina hadai, originally identified as the native Trochammina pacifica Cushman in several early foraminiferal studies, dominates the assemblage of most of the surface samples. In the Padilla V1/V2 and Padilla Flats 3 cores, the species' abundance follows a pattern of absence, first appearance, rapid expansion commonly seen shortly after the arrival of a successful biological invasion, setback, and second expansion. Using Q-mode cluster analysis, pre-expansion and expansion assemblages were identified. Pb-210 dating of these cores proved unsuccessful. However, based on T. hadai's first appearance occurring stratigraphically well above sedimentological changes in the cores that reflect deposition of sediments in the bay due to previous diversions of the Skagit River, and its dominance in the early 1970s surface samples, we conclude that the species arrived in Padilla Bay somewhere between the late 1800s and 1971. Trochammina hadai may have been introduced into the bay in the 1930s when oyster culturing began there or, at a minimum, ten years prior to its appearance in San Francisco Bay.

  3. A decline in benthic foraminifera following the deepwater horizon event in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Patrick T; Romero, Isabel C; Brooks, Gregg R; Hastings, David W; Larson, Rebekka A; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from three sites (1000-1200 m water depth) in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from December 2010 to June 2011 to assess changes in benthic foraminiferal density related to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event (April-July 2010, 1500 m water depth). Short-lived radioisotope geochronologies (²¹⁰Pb, ²³⁴Th), organic geochemical assessments, and redox metal concentrations were determined to relate changes in sediment accumulation rate, contamination, and redox conditions with benthic foraminiferal density. Cores collected in December 2010 indicated a decline in density (80-93%). This decline was characterized by a decrease in benthic foraminiferal density and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rate (BFAR) in the surface 10 mm relative to the down-core mean in all benthic foraminifera, including the dominant genera (Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., and Cibicidoides spp.). Cores collected in February 2011 documented a site-specific response. There was evidence of a recovery in the benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR at the site closest to the wellhead (45 NM, NE). However, the site farther afield (60 NM, NE) recorded a continued decline in benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR down to near-zero values. This decline in benthic foraminiferal density occurred simultaneously with abrupt increases in sedimentary accumulation rates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, and changes in redox conditions. Persistent reducing conditions (as many as 10 months after the event) in the surface of these core records were a possible cause of the decline. Another possible cause was the increase (2-3 times background) in PAH's, which are known to cause benthic foraminifera mortality and inhibit reproduction. Records of benthic foraminiferal density coupled with short-lived radionuclide geochronology and organic geochemistry were effective in quantifying the benthic response and will continue to be a valuable tool in determining the long

  4. Benthic foraminifera baseline assemblages from a coastal nearshore reef complex on the central Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie; Perry, Chris; Smithers, Scott; Morgan, Kyle

    2016-04-01

    Declining water quality due to river catchment modification since European settlement (c. 1850 A.D.) represents a major threat to the health of coral reefs on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR), particularly for those located in the coastal waters of the GBR's inner-shelf. These nearshore reefs are widely perceived to be most susceptible to declining water quality owing to their close proximity to river point sources. Despite this, nearshore reefs have been relatively poorly studied with the impacts and magnitudes of environmental degradation still remaining unclear. This is largely due to ongoing debates concerning the significance of increased sediment yields against naturally high background sedimentary regimes. Benthic foraminifera are increasingly used as tools for monitoring environmental and ecological change on coral reefs. On the GBR, the majority of studies have focussed on the spatial distributions of contemporary benthic foraminiferal assemblages. While baseline assemblages from other environments (e.g. inshore reefs and mangroves) have been described, very few records exist for nearshore reefs. Here, we present preliminary results from the first palaeoecological study of foraminiferal assemblages of nearshore reefs on the central GBR. Cores were recovered from the nearshore reef complex at Paluma Shoals using percussion techniques. Recovery was 100%, capturing the entire Holocene reef sequence of the selected reef structures. Radiocarbon dating and subsequent age-depth modelling techniques were used to identify reef sequences pre-dating European settlement. Benthic foraminifera assemblages were reconstructed from the identified sequences to establish pre-European ecological baselines with the aim of providing a record of foraminiferal distribution during vertical reef accretion and against which contemporary ecological change may be assessed.

  5. Variability of the planktonic foraminifera community across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, Fuente Caldera Section, Baetic Ranges (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Lisarri, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in a massive extinction event that took place about 33.7 million years ago, the current high resolution study analyzes qualitatively and quantitatively the community structure of the planktonic foraminifera that were preserved in the hemipelagic sediments of the Tethys Sea. The sampled section of the Fuente Caldera column, located in the Baetic mountain ranges, spans a register of 396,551.7 years. Based in the identification of 27 species, that belong to 13 genera and 2 families of foraminifera, there have been found three biozones of Gonzalvo Zonation (Gonzalvo, 2002) in the studied stratigraphic interval: Turborotalia cocoaensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii Biozones (Rupelian), and Paragloborotalia increbescens (Priabonian). The planktonic foraminifera associations variability patterns are defined by paleoecologic indexes (diversity index, high and low latitude species index and planktonic and benthic foraminifera index), by geochemical proxies: δ18O and δ13C and by 'Q' Mode Factor Analysis. They prove that the deposition environment is outer platform and also, they suggest that the studied area in the Tethys Sea underwent many thermal pulses, during which some species extinct or appear. In the first extinction event the species Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis became extinct. In the second one, Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Cribrohantkenina lazzarii and Pseudohastigerina micra became extinct while a succession occured; Globigerina officinalis, Globoturborotalita anguliofficinalis and Tenuitellinata angustiumbilicata appeared. The cooling event that finished in the Lower Oligocene was the biggest of these pulses, which was extremely abrupt and corresponds to the Oi-1 event that was described by Miller (Miller, 1991). All this evidences that the planktonic foraminifera extinction in the Upper Eocene was a gradual and fast event, what is supported by the Factor Analysis application. Key

  6. Eocene sea temperatures for the mid-latitude southwest Pacific from Mg/Ca ratios in planktonic and benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, John B.; Baker, Joel A.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Morgans, Hugh E. G.; Smith, Euan G. C.

    2010-11-01

    We have used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to measure elemental (Mg/Ca, Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca) ratios of 13 species of variably preserved early to middle Eocene planktonic and benthic foraminifera from New Zealand. The foraminifera were obtained from Ashley Mudstone, mid-Waipara River, South Island, which was deposited at bathyal depth ( ca. 1000 m) on the northern margin of the east-facing Canterbury Basin at a paleo-latitude of ca. 55°S. LA-ICP-MS data yield trace element depth profiles through foraminifera test walls that can be used to identify and exclude zones of surficial contamination and infilling material resulting from diagenetic coatings, mineralisation and detrital sediment. Screened Mg/Ca ratios from 5 species of foraminifera are used to calculate sea temperatures from late Early to early Middle Eocene ( ca. 51 to 46.5 Ma), a time interval that spans the termination of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). During this time, sea surface temperatures (SST) varied from 30 to 24 °C, and bottom water temperatures (BWT) from 21 to 14 °C. Comparison of Mg/Ca sea temperatures with published δ 18O and TEX 86 temperature data from the same samples (Hollis et al., 2009) shows close correspondence, indicating that LA-ICP-MS can provide reliable Mg/Ca sea temperatures even where foraminiferal test preservation is variable. Agreement between the three proxies also implies that Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations for modern planktonic and benthic foraminifera can generally be applied to Eocene species, although some species (e.g., V. marshalli) show significant calibration differences. The Mg/Ca ratio of the Eocene ocean is constrained by our data to be 35-50% lower than the modern ocean depending on which TEX 86 - temperature calibration (Kim et al., 2008; Liu et al., 2009) - is used to compare with the Mg/Ca sea temperatures. Sea temperatures derived from δ 18O analysis of foraminifera from Waipara show

  7. The morphogroups of small agglutinated foraminifera from the Devonian carbonate complex of the Prague Synform, (Barrandian area, Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holcová, K.; Slavík, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 386, č. 5 (2013), s. 210-214 ISSN 0031-0182 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131201 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Barrandian area * Early Devonian * foraminifera * morphogroups Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.752, year: 2013

  8. Selandian-Thanetian larger foraminifera from the lower Jafnayn Formation in the Sayq area (eastern Oman Mountains)

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    Serra-Kiel, J.; Vicedo, V.; Razin, P.; Grelaud, C.

    2016-07-01

    The larger foraminifera of the lower part of the Jafnayn Formation outcropping in the Wadi Sayq, in the Paleocene series of the eastern Oman Mountains, have been studied and described in detail. The analysis have allowed us to develop a detailed systematic description of each taxa, constraining their biostratigraphic distribution and defining the associated foraminifera assemblages. The taxonomic study has permitted us to identify each morphotype precisely and describe three new taxa, namely, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. and Globoreticulinidae new family. The first assemblage is characterized by the presence of Coskinon sp., Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Anatoliella ozalpiensis Sirel, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. SerraKiel and Vicedo, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Mandanella cf. flabelliformis Rahaghi, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Dictyokathina simplex Smout and Miscellanites globularis (Rahaghi). The second assemblage is constituted by the forms Pseudofallotella persica (Hottinger and Drobne), Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Keramosphera? cf. iranica Rahaghi, Lockhartia haimei (Davies), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Sakesaria trichilata Sander, Kathina delseota Smout, Elazigina harabekayisensis Sirel, Daviesina khatiyahi Smout, and Miscellanea juliettae Leppig. The first assemblage can be considered to belong to the Shallow Bentic Zone SBZ2 (early Selandian age), and the second assemblage to the SBZ3 (late Selandian-early Thanetian age).This paper shows, for the first time in the Middle East area, a correlation between the Selandian larger foraminifera and planktonic foraminifera biozones. (Author)

  9. Selandian-Thanetian larger foraminifera from the lower Jafnayn Formation in the Sayq area (eastern Oman Mountains)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra-Kiel, J.; Vicedo, V.; Razin, P.; Grelaud, C.

    2016-01-01

    The larger foraminifera of the lower part of the Jafnayn Formation outcropping in the Wadi Sayq, in the Paleocene series of the eastern Oman Mountains, have been studied and described in detail. The analysis have allowed us to develop a detailed systematic description of each taxa, constraining their biostratigraphic distribution and defining the associated foraminifera assemblages. The taxonomic study has permitted us to identify each morphotype precisely and describe three new taxa, namely, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. and Globoreticulinidae new family. The first assemblage is characterized by the presence of Coskinon sp., Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Anatoliella ozalpiensis Sirel, Ercumentina sayqensis n. gen. n. sp. SerraKiel and Vicedo, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Mandanella cf. flabelliformis Rahaghi, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Dictyokathina simplex Smout and Miscellanites globularis (Rahaghi). The second assemblage is constituted by the forms Pseudofallotella persica (Hottinger and Drobne), Dictyoconus cf. turriculus Hottinger and Drobne, Lacazinella rogeri n. sp. Serra-Kiel and Vicedo, Azzarolina daviesi (Henson), Keramosphera? cf. iranica Rahaghi, Lockhartia haimei (Davies), Lockhartia retiata Sander, Sakesaria trichilata Sander, Kathina delseota Smout, Elazigina harabekayisensis Sirel, Daviesina khatiyahi Smout, and Miscellanea juliettae Leppig. The first assemblage can be considered to belong to the Shallow Bentic Zone SBZ2 (early Selandian age), and the second assemblage to the SBZ3 (late Selandian-early Thanetian age).This paper shows, for the first time in the Middle East area, a correlation between the Selandian larger foraminifera and planktonic foraminifera biozones. (Author)

  10. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera Ammonia sp. is caused by a decrease in carbonate ion concentration

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    N. Keul

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans; such uptake causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as ocean acidification (OA. Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50 % of biogenic calcium carbonate in the open oceans. We have compiled the state of the art literature on OA effects on foraminifera, because the majority of OA research on this group was published within the last three years. Disparate responses of this important group of marine calcifiers to OA were reported, highlighting the importance of a process-based understanding of OA effects on foraminifera. We cultured the benthic foraminifer Ammonia sp. under a range of carbonate chemistry manipulation treatments to identify the parameter of the carbonate system causing the observed effects. This parameter identification is the first step towards a process-based understanding. We argue that [CO32−] is the parameter affecting foraminiferal size-normalized weights (SNWs and growth rates. Based on the presented data, we can confirm the strong potential of Ammonia sp. foraminiferal SNW as a [CO32−] proxy.

  11. Biocenoses of benthic foraminifera of the Aveiro Continental Shelf (Portugal: influence of the upwelling events and other shelf processes

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    Maria Virgínia Alves Martins

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to compare the dimensions and composition of benthic foraminiferal biocenoses (living specimens during two summer sampling events. Forty-four sediment samples were collected on the Aveiro Continental Shelf (Center of Portugal (latitude of 40º30'N-40º50'N, longitude of 8º46'W-9º20'W for granulometry, total organic matter (TOM and living foraminiferal analyses. The sediment samples were collected during summers of 1994 and 1995, on stations located along transects (east-west direction and between the bathymetries of 10-200 m. During the sampling campaigns, measurements of salinity, temperature and density data were recorded in the water column. The results showed that the living assemblages were mainly found in stations located between 20-80 m depth. The abundance of living foraminifera was generally reduced at depths <20 m in the so-called “coastal deposits”, where the sediments are frequently remobilized and transported by the littoral drift. Living benthic foraminiferal densities were also reduced in stations at 80-200 m depth, despite the high sedimentary TOM contents. Results obtained in this work indicate that, in this marine setting, the most determinant factors for the dimension and composition of living foraminifera are not the sediments’ granulometry and organic matter content. In fact, the coastal dynamics, sediment stability, availability of quality food, among other factors, such as the bottom salinity oscillations and their combination, should better explain the abundance of living foraminifera and the biocenoses composition.

  12. Marine ecology conditions at Weda Bay, North Maluku based on statistical analysis on distribution of recent foraminifera

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    Kurniasih Anis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of foraminifera in geology,usually being used to find the age of rocks/ sediments and depositional environment. In this study, recent foraminifera was used not only to determinethe sedimentary environment,but also to estimate the ecological condition of the water through a statistical approach.Analysis was performed quantitatively in 10 surface seabed sediment samples in Weda Bay North Maluku. The analysis includes dominance (Sympson Index, diversity and evenness (Shannon Index, and the ratio of planktonic -benthic. The results were shown in the plotting diagram of M-R-T (Miliolid-Rotalid-Textularid to determine the depositional environment. Quantitative analysis was performed using Past software (paleontological version Statistic 1:29.The analysis result showed there was no domination of certain taxon with a moderate degree of evenness and stable communities and considerably a moderate diversity. The results of this analysis indicated that research area had a stable water conditions with the optimum level of carbonate content, oxygen supply, salinity, and temperature. The ratio of planktonic and benthic indicate the relative depth, which was deeper the water increased the percentage of planktonic foraminifera. Based on M-R-T diagram showed the distribution of sediment deposited on exposed carbonate (carbonate platform environment with normal saline.

  13. Late Neogene foraminifera from the northern Namibian continental shelf and the transition to the Benguela Upwelling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Eugene W.; Compton, John S.; Frenzel, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Middle Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene foraminifera provide insights into the palaeoenvironment on the northern Namibian continental shelf located at the far northern end of the present-day Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). Biostratigraphy and Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy (SIS) of the recovered basal olive-green mud unit indicate an age of 16 to 14 Ma. A sharp, erosional contact separates the basal mud from the overlying Plio-Pleistocene gravelly pelletal phosphorite sands. Grain size data, P/B ratios and benthic diversity indices indicate a change between the middle Miocene and overlying Plio-Pleistocene palaeoenvironments linked to the timing and conditions associated with the initiation of the BUS. The different lithological units and microfossil assemblages in the olive-green mud unit and the overlying pelletal phosphorite units support the late Miocene initiation of the BUS and the northwards migration of the Angola-Benguela Front. Planktic foraminifera indicate a shift from warmer surface water conditions to cooler conditions during the initiation of the BUS. Benthic palaeobathymetric ranges and P/B ratios are consistent with outer shelf water depths suggesting a deeper palaeoenvironment during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) than today. Benthic foraminifera in the middle Miocene are dominated by large (>1 mm) taxa and adapted to oligotrophic environments before the initiation of the BUS. The benthic assemblage composition indicates that bottom water conditions changed to eutrophic conditions during the Plio-Pleistocene under intensified upwelling conditions.

  14. Benthic Foraminifera and Bacterial Activity as a Proxy for Environmental Characterization in Potengi Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

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    Frederico S. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify possible zonation patterns and assess the environmental impact on the Potengi River Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte State, through the distribution of benthic foraminifera associated to bacterial activity and abiotic parameters. Six sediment samples were collected from locations that presented clear signs of pollution. The environment was predominantly anaerobic and fermentation occurred at all sites. Forty-two species of foraminifera were identified. The dominant species were Ammonia tepida and Arenoparrella mexicana, which are known to be opportunistic, and able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. CCA analyses showed that salinity and organic matter, followed by bacterial carbon, were more strongly linked to organism distribution in the Potengi River Estuary. Dissolved oxygen concentration, temperature and total organic matter were higher at the estuary mouth than at the other sites, creating favorable conditions for foraminiferal growth and allowing the faunistic succession on the upper estuary. As foraminifera assemblages when associated to environmental parameters can be used as efficient proxies for environmental diagnosis, these results suggest that the Potengi Estuary is under great stress from the surrounding urban development.

  15. The long way of planktonic Foraminifera from biostratigraphy to paleoceanography (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premoli Silva, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    The mid of the last century was a time of flourishing studies concerning the importance of planktonic foraminifera in precisely dating and correlating sedimentary successions after the publication of the first biostratigraphic schemes provided by the Suisse Group (i.e. Kugler, Bolli, Broennimann) from the Caribbean region and former Southern USSR (Subbotina). Soon after Bolli's Trinidad scheme was widespread, planktonic foraminiferal distribution from Upper Cretaceous to Miocene was investigated intensively for dating the Neogene stratotypes, whose identifications were mainly based on poorly age-diagnostic, facies-controlled macrofossils, and for calibrating Paleogene larger foraminiferal distributions. Since these early works planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy was continously ameliorated, extended in time from Early Cretaceous to Recent by several authors and from different settings and domains, reaching progressively the current higher resolution, now calibrated to calcareous nannofossil distributions. To be mentioned, the detailed biostratigraphic studies on the Gubbio section (central Italy) provided (1) the first carefull documentation of the mass extinction of Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera, the presence of tiny Cretaceous survivors, and the rapid recovery of Danian assemblages, and (2) the first calibration of the Upper Cretaceous to Eocene reversal polarity scale in which the K/Pg boundary was demonstrated to fall within the magnetic reversal C29r. A major step forward was the recovery, since 1968, of several thousand of cores from over 1000 holes drilled in all oceans by the DSDP, ODP and IODP projects. The recovery of deep-sea sediments from all latitudes opened a new research field, the paleoceanography. Based on the large knowledge acquired on modern organisms in the '60s, for the Paleogene and Cretaceous reconstructions we started from the assumption that these extinct organisms lived in the water column like their modern counterpart and were

  16. An endemic post-CTB Pseudorhapydionina (foraminifera) from the Pyrenean palaeobioprovince

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, Lorenzo; Caus, Esmeralda

    2015-04-01

    The genus Pseudorhapydionina and its allies are porcelaneous ranging from cylindrical to fan-shaped larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), with planispiral-involute chamber arrangement becoming uncoiled or flabelliform-to-cyclical in adult stages. The apertural face has pierced by multiple cribate openings. The marginal chamber lumen is partially subdivided by subepidermal plates, while the central area might or might not present pillars. They characterise latest Albian?-Cenomanian (Middle Cretaceous Global Community Maturation Cycle) shallow-water carbonate deposits from Mexico (Caribbean LBF palaeobioprovince) to the Iberian Peninsula, Italy, Greece, Middle East and North of Africa (western, central and eastern Tethyan LBF palaeobioprovinces, respectively), but they have never been found in the Pyrenean palaeobioprovince. It is widely accepted that pseudorhapydioninids and other groups of larger benthic foraminifera, such as alveolinids, with an extreme or moderate K-strategy of life disappear near the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB), when a major extinction took place in both shallow and deep marine realms. However, it seems that some Cenomanian genera, such as Cyclolina, Cyclopsinella, Dicyclina, Cuneolina, and Rotorbinella, escaped from the extinction during the CTB oceanic anoxic event (OAE2 or Bonarelli Event), but more detailed studies are needed to confirm if taxa at both sides of the boundary are actually related. New studies in the South-central Pyrenees have shown the occurrence of Pseudorhapydionina morphotypes in the shallow-water deposits of the uppermost part of the La Cova limestone, which age constrained by strontium isotope stratigraphy (SIS) is lower Santonian (Late Cretaceous GCMC). These pseudorhapydioninid morphotypes co-occur in the levels containing Martiguesia cyclamminiformis, Ramirezella montsechiensis, Lacazina pyrenaica, Pseudolacazina loeblichii, Palandroxina taxyae, Hellenalveolina tappanae, Iberorotalia reicheli, Calcarinella schaubi

  17. ENSO activity during the last climate cycle using Individual Foraminifera Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, G.; Vidal, L.; Thirumalai, K.

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the principal mode of interannual climate variability and affects key climate parameters such as low-latitude rainfall variability. Recent climate modeling experiments tend to suggest an increase in the frequency of both El Niño and La Niña events in the future, but these results remain model-dependent and require to be validated by paleodata-model comparisons. Fossil corals indicate that the ENSO variance during the 20th century is particularly high as compared to other time periods of the Holocene. Beyond the Holocene, however, little is known on past ENSO changes, which makes difficult to test paleoclimate model simulations that are used to study the ENSO sensitivity to various types of forcings. We have expanded an Individual Foraminifera Analysis (IFA) dataset using the thermocline-dwelling N. dutertrei on a marine core collected in the Panama Basin (Leduc et al., 2009), that has proven to be a skillful way to reconstruct the ENSO (Thirumalai et al., 2013). Our new IFA dataset comprehensively covers the Holocene, allowing to verify how the IFA method compares with ENSO reconstructions using corals. The dataset then extends back in time to Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS), with a special focus the last deglaciation and Termination II (MIS5/6) time windows, as well as key time periods to tests the sensitivity of ENSO to ice volume and orbital parameters. The new dataset confirms variable ENSO activity during the Holocene and weaker activity during LGM than during the Holocene, as a recent isotope-enabled climate model simulations of the LGM suggests (Zhu et al., 2017). Such pattern is reproduced for the Termination II. Leduc, G., L. Vidal, O. Cartapanis, and E. Bard (2009), Modes of eastern equatorial Pacific thermocline variability: Implications for ENSO dynamics over the last glacial period, Paleoceanography, 24, PA3202, doi:10.1029/2008PA001701. Thirumalai, K., J. W. Partin, C. S. Jackson, and T. M. Quinn (2013

  18. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemila, Olugbenga T; Langer, Martin R; Lipps, Jere H

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago). We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA). The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis) generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs

  19. Anthropogenic infilling of a Bermudian sinkhole and its impact on sedimentation and benthic foraminifera in the adjacent anchialine cave environment

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    Jacquelyn N. Cresswell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-20th century, an inland brackish pond from Bermuda, known as Eve’s Pond, was filled with marine sediment from an adjacent coastal lagoon. At this time, an eyewitness reported “…sediment billowing out of the Green Bay Cave for days…”, which is a marine-dominated anchialine cave located proximal to the former location of Eve’s Pond (~200 m. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of this infilling event on cave sedimentation and benthic meiofaunal communities, as proxied by the unicellular protists foraminifera that remain preserved in the sediment record. Eight sediment cores were collected from an underwater passage in Green Bay Cave in a transect towards the location where Eve’s Pond was surveyed in 1901 CE. The sediment cores were analyzed for visual and density changes (photography, X-radiography, textural variability, benthic foraminifera fauna and diversity, and radiocarbon dating. The recovered sediment cores mostly sampled a late Holocene carbonate mud facies that had been described during previous research in the cave, with benthic foraminiferal assemblages post-dating the onset of seawater circulating between the saline groundwater flooding the cave and the adjacent Harrington Sound ~1,900 years ago. However, two cores located further into the cave (cores 13 and 17 contain a carbonate sand layer with lagoon foraminifera that is anomalous with respect to the Holocene depositional history of the cave and is most likely related to the mid-20th century infilling of Eve’s Pond. Examination of these two cores showed that after the infilling event, the community of benthic foraminifera rapidly reverted to pre-impact assemblages with foraminiferal stygophiles (e.g., Spirophthalmidium emaciatum, Sigmoilina tenuis, which were not displaced by new colonizers introduced into the cave by the dredge spoils. We caution that the results cannot be extrapolated to the pelagic crustacean community, but the

  20. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T Fajemila

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago. We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA. The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay

  1. Disruptive selection and bet-hedging in planktonic Foraminifera: Shell morphology as predictor of extinctions

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    Manuel F. G. Weinkauf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extinction is a remarkably difficult phenomenon to study under natural conditions. This is because the outcome of stress exposure and associated fitness reduction is not known until the extinction occurs and it remains unclear whether there is any phenotypic reaction of the exposed population that can be used to predict its fate. Here we take advantage of the fossil record, where the ecological outcome of stress exposure is known. Specifically, we analyze shell morphology of planktonic Foraminifera in sediment samples from the Mediterranean, during an interval preceding local extinctions. In two species representing different plankton habitats, we observe shifts in trait state and decrease in variance in association with non-terminal stress, indicating stabilizing selection. At terminal stress levels, immediately before extinction, we observe increased growth asymmetry and trait variance, indicating disruptive selection and bet-hedging. The pre-extinction populations of both species show a combination of trait states and trait variance distinct from all populations exposed to non-terminal levels of stress. This finding indicates that the phenotypic history of a population may allow the detection of threshold levels of stress, likely to lead to extinction. It is thus an alternative to population dynamics in studying and monitoring natural population ecology.

  2. Ocean acidification induces biochemical and morphological changes in the calcification process of large benthic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Martina; Uthicke, Sven; Pandolfi, John M

    2015-03-22

    Large benthic foraminifera are significant contributors to sediment formation on coral reefs, yet they are vulnerable to ocean acidification. Here, we assessed the biochemical and morphological impacts of acidification on the calcification of Amphistegina lessonii and Marginopora vertebralis exposed to different pH conditions. We measured growth rates (surface area and buoyant weight) and Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase activities and calculated shell density using micro-computer tomography images. In A. lessonii, we detected a significant decrease in buoyant weight, a reduction in the density of inner skeletal chambers, and an increase of Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase activities at pH 7.6 when compared with ambient conditions of pH 8.1. By contrast, M. vertebralis showed an inhibition in Mg-ATPase activity under lowered pH, with growth rate and skeletal density remaining constant. While M. vertebralis is considered to be more sensitive than A. lessonii owing to its high-Mg-calcite skeleton, it appears to be less affected by changes in pH, based on the parameters assessed in this study. We suggest difference in biochemical pathways of calcification as the main factor influencing response to changes in pH levels, and that A. lessonii and M. vertebralis have the ability to regulate biochemical functions to cope with short-term increases in acidity. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Technical Note: On methodologies for determining the size-normalised weight of planktic foraminifera

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    C. J. Beer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The size-normalised weight (SNW of planktic foraminifera, a measure of test wall thickness and density, is potentially a valuable palaeo-proxy for marine carbon chemistry. As increasing attention is given to developing this proxy it is important that methods are comparable between studies. Here, we compare SNW data generated using two different methods to account for variability in test size, namely (i the narrow (50 μm range sieve fraction method and (ii the individually measured test size method. Using specimens from the 200–250 μm sieve fraction range collected in multinet samples from the North Atlantic, we find that sieving does not constrain size sufficiently well to isolate changes in weight driven by variations in test wall thickness and density from those driven by size. We estimate that the SNW data produced as part of this study are associated with an uncertainty, or error bar, of about ±11%. Errors associated with the narrow sieve fraction method may be reduced by decreasing the size of the sieve window, by using larger tests and by increasing the number tests employed. In situations where numerous large tests are unavailable, however, substantial errors associated with this sieve method remain unavoidable. In such circumstances the individually measured test size method provides a better means for estimating SNW because, as our results show, this method isolates changes in weight driven by variations in test wall thickness and density from those driven by size.

  4. Environmental Quality Assessment of Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) Using Living Foraminifera Assemblages and a Multiproxy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Martins, Maria Virgínia; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Aleya, Lotfi; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Pereira, Egberto; Miranda, Paulo; Mane, Miguel; Rocha, Fernando; Laut, Lazaro; El Bour, Monia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the environmental quality of the Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) through an integrated approach that combined environmental, biogeochemical, and living benthic foraminiferal analyses. Specifically, we analyzed the physicochemical parameters of the water and sediment. The textural, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of the sediment, including total organic carbon, total nitrogen, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), acid volatile sulfides (AVS), chlorophyll a, CaCO3, and changes in bacterial populations and carbon isotopes were measured. The SEM/AVS values indicated the presence of relatively high concentrations of toxic metals in only some areas. Foraminiferal assemblages were dominated by species such as A. parkinsoniana (20–91%), Bolivina striatula (coastal lagoons both in Mediterranean and northeast Atlantic regions. The results of this work suggest that Bizerte Lagoon is a unique setting. This lagoon is populated by typical marine species that invaded this ecosystem, attracted not only by the prevailing favorable environmental conditions but also by the abundance and quality of food. The results indicate that the metal pollution found in some areas have a negative impact on the assemblages of foraminifera. At present, however, this negative impact is not highly alarming. PMID:26372655

  5. Larger foraminifera of the Devil's Den and Blue Hole sinkholes, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Eder, Wolfgang; Floyd, James

    2018-03-01

    Shallow-water carbonate deposits are well-known from the Eocene of the US Gulf Coast and Caribbean. These deposits frequently contain abundant larger benthic foraminifera (LBF). However, whilst integrated stratigraphic studies have helped to refine the timing of LBF overturning events within the Tethys and Indo-Pacific regions with respect to global bio- and chemo-stratigraphic records, little recent work has been carried out in the Americas. The American LBF assemblages are distinctly different from those of Europe and the Indo-Pacific. It is therefore essential that the American bio-province is included in studies of LBF evolution, biodiversity and climate events to understand these processes on a global scale.Here we present the LBF ranges from two previously unpublished sections spanning 35 and 29 m of the upper Eocene Ocala limestone, as the early stages of a larger project addressing the taxonomy and biostratigraphy of the LBF of Florida. The study indicates that the lower member of the Ocala limestone may be Bartonian rather than Priabonian in age, with implications for the biostratigraphy of the region. In addition, the study highlights the need for multiple sites to assess the LBF assemblages and fully constrain ranges across Florida and the US Gulf and suggests potential LBF events for future integrated stratigraphic study.

  6. Patterns of species richness and the center of diversity in modern Indo-Pacific larger foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förderer, Meena; Rödder, Dennis; Langer, Martin R

    2018-05-29

    Symbiont-bearing Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) are ubiquitous components of shallow tropical and subtropical environments and contribute substantially to carbonaceous reef and shelf sediments. Climate change is dramatically affecting carbonate producing organisms and threatens the diversity and structural integrity of coral reef ecosystems. Recent invertebrate and vertebrate surveys have identified the Coral Triangle as the planet's richest center of marine life delineating the region as a top priority for conservation. We compiled and analyzed extensive occurrence records for 68 validly recognized species of LBF from the Indian and Pacific Ocean, established individual range maps and applied Minimum Convex Polygon (MCP) and Species Distribution Model (SDM) methodologies to create the first ocean-wide species richness maps. SDM output was further used for visualizing latitudinal and longitudinal diversity gradients. Our findings provide strong support for assigning the tropical Central Indo-Pacific as the world's species-richest marine region with the Central Philippines emerging as the bullseye of LBF diversity. Sea surface temperature and nutrient content were identified as the most influential environmental constraints exerting control over the distribution of LBF. Our findings contribute to the completion of worldwide research on tropical marine biodiversity patterns and the identification of targeting centers for conservation efforts.

  7. Magnitude of the Suess Effect in North Atlantic - a Study of Foraminifera and Transient Tracer Simulations

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    Zhou, Y.; Oppo, D.; Gebbie, G.; Thornalley, D. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Suess Effect is the decrease of δ 13C in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels. The recent decrease in δ 13C in the deep sea due to uptake of carbon has been measured in samples taken on hydrographic surveys, although these surveys only provide snapshots of deep sea δ 13C. The long-term decrease in δ 13C has been estimated using modern hydrographic properties, but there are no direct measurements. Here we present records of δ 13C from benthic and planktonic foraminifera, collected south of Iceland in the North Atlantic Ocean. The cores have high accumulation rates and, based on radiocarbon, modern core tops. We find a monotonic decreasing trend since 1850 that is significant in two out of the three benthic records we have generated. A tracer simulation, with Transit Time Distribution and Equilibrium Time Distribution generated from previous tracer modeling studies, predicts a trend that is similar to our observations at the core sites. The presence of the Suess Effect in some of the cores is consistent with previous estimates on the uptake of anthropogenic CO{}2 in the newly formed North Atlantic Deep Water.

  8. Global latitudinal species diversity gradient in deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Stephen J.; Buzas, Martin A.

    2000-02-01

    Global scale patterns of species diversity for modern deep-sea benthic foraminifera, an important component of the bathyal and abyssal meiofauna, are examined using comparable data from five studies in the Atlantic, ranging over 138° of latitude from the Norwegian Sea to the Weddell Sea. We show that a pattern of decreasing diversity with increasing latitude characterises both the North and South Atlantic. This pattern is confirmed for the northern hemisphere by independent data from the west-central North Atlantic and the Arctic basin. Species diversity in the North Atlantic northwards from the equator is variable until a sharp fall in the Norwegian Sea (ca. 65°N). In the South Atlantic species diversity drops from a maximum in latitudes less than 30°S and then decreases slightly from 40 to 70°S. For any given latitude, North Atlantic diversity is generally lower than in the South Atlantic. Both ecological and historical factors related to food supply are invoked to explain the formation and maintenance of the latitudinal gradient of deep-sea benthic foraminiferal species diversity. The gradient formed some 36 million years ago when global climatic cooling led to seasonally fluctuating food supply in higher latitudes.

  9. Environmental Quality Assessment of Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia Using Living Foraminifera Assemblages and a Multiproxy Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virgínia Alves Martins

    Full Text Available This study investigated the environmental quality of the Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia through an integrated approach that combined environmental, biogeochemical, and living benthic foraminiferal analyses. Specifically, we analyzed the physicochemical parameters of the water and sediment. The textural, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of the sediment, including total organic carbon, total nitrogen, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM, acid volatile sulfides (AVS, chlorophyll a, CaCO3, and changes in bacterial populations and carbon isotopes were measured. The SEM/AVS values indicated the presence of relatively high concentrations of toxic metals in only some areas. Foraminiferal assemblages were dominated by species such as A. parkinsoniana (20-91%, Bolivina striatula (<40%, Hopkinsina atlantica (<17%, and Bolivina ordinaria (<15% that cannot be considered typical of impacted coastal lagoons both in Mediterranean and northeast Atlantic regions. The results of this work suggest that Bizerte Lagoon is a unique setting. This lagoon is populated by typical marine species that invaded this ecosystem, attracted not only by the prevailing favorable environmental conditions but also by the abundance and quality of food. The results indicate that the metal pollution found in some areas have a negative impact on the assemblages of foraminifera. At present, however, this negative impact is not highly alarming.

  10. Agglutinated Foraminifera indicate a deep bottom current over the Hovgaard Ridge, West of Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael; Frank, Niessen

    2015-04-01

    The Hovgård Ridge is situated in Fram Strait, west of Spitsbergen. The ridge either represents a submerged fragment of continental crust or an upwarped fragmant of ocean crust within the Fram Strait. Its crest rises to a water depth of approx. 1170 m. During Expedition 87 of the Icebreaker POLARSTERN in August 2014, a sediment-echosounding profile was recorded and a boxcore station was collected from the crest of Hovgård Ridge at 1169 m water depth. The surficial sediment at this station consists of dark yellowish brown pebbly-sandy mud with a minor admixture of biogenic components in the coarse fraction. Patches of large tubular foraminifera and isolated pebbles were clearly visible on the sediment surface. The sediment surface of the boxcore was covered with patches of large (>1 mm diameter) large tubular astrorhizids belonging mostly to the species Astrorhiza crassatina Brady, with smaller numbers of Saccorhiza, Hyperammina, and Psammosiphonella. Non-tubular species consist mainly of opportunistic forms such as Psammosphaera and Reophax. The presence of large suspension-feeding tubular genera as well as opportunistic forms, as well as sediment winnowing, point to the presence of a deep current at this locality that is strong enough to disturb the benthic fauna. This is confirmed by data obtained from sediment echosounding, which exhibit lateral variation of relative sedimentation rates within the Pleistocene sedimentary drape covering the ridge indicative of winnowing in a south-easterly direction.

  11. The 'Natural Laboratory', a tool for deciphering growth, lifetime and population dynamics in larger benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    The shells of symbiont-bearing larger benthic Foraminifera (LBF) represent the response to physiological requirements in dependence of environmental conditions. All compartments of the shell such as chambers and chamberlets accommodate the growth of the cell protoplasm and are adaptations for housing photosymbiotic algae. Investigations on the biology of LBF were predominantly based on laboratory studies. The lifetime of LBF under natural conditions is still unclear. LBF, which can build >100 chambers during their lifetime, are thought to live at least one year under natural conditions. This is supported by studies on population dynamics of eulittoral foraminifera. In species characterized by a time-restricted single reproduction period the mean size of specimens increases from small to large during lifetime simultaneously reducing individual number. This becomes more complex when two or more reproduction times are present within a one-year cycle leading to a mixture of abundant small individuals with few large specimens during the year, while keeping mean size more or less constant. This mixture is typical for most sublittoral megalospheric (gamonts or schizonts) LBF. Nothing is known on the lifetime of agamonts, the diploid asexually reproducing generation. In all hyaline LBF it is thought to be significantly longer than 1 year based on the large size and considering the mean chamber building rate of the gamont/schizonts. Observations on LBF under natural conditions have not been performed yet in the deeper sublittoral. This reflects the difficulties due to intense hydrodynamics that hinder deploying technical equipment for studies in the natural environment. Therefore, studying growth, lifetime and reproduction of sublittoral LBF under natural conditions can be performed using the so-called 'natural laboratory' in comparison with laboratory investigations. The best sampling method in the upper sublittoral from 5 to 70 m depth is by SCUBA diving. Irregular

  12. Ground-truthing the Foraminifera-bound Nitrogen Isotope Paleo-proxy in the Modern Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, S.; Ren, H. A.; Fawcett, S. E.; Conte, M. H.; Rafter, P. A.; Ellis, K. K.; Weigand, M. A.; Sigman, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of planktonic foraminifera, a type of calcifying zooplankton, collected from surface ocean net tows, moored sediment traps and core-top sediments at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site in the Sargasso Sea between 2009 and 2013. Consistent with previous measurements from low-latitude core-top sediments, the annually averaged δ15N of organic matter bound within the shells of euphotic zone-dwelling foraminifera approximates that of thermocline nitrate, the dominant source of new nitrogen to Sargasso Sea surface waters. Based on net tow collections in the upper 200 m of the water column, we observe no systematic difference between the biomass δ15N and shell-bound δ15N of a given foraminifera species. For multiple species, the δ15N of net tow-collected upper ocean shells is lower than shells from sediment traps (by 0.5-2.1‰) and lower than shells from seafloor sediments (by 0.5-1.4‰). We are currently investigating whether these differences reflect actual processes affecting shell-bound δ15N or instead relate to the different time periods over which the three sample types integrate. The foraminiferal biomass δ15N time-series from the surface Sargasso Sea exhibits significant seasonal variations, with the lowest values in fall and the highest values in spring. The roles of hydrography, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem dynamics in driving these seasonal variations will be discussed. These data from the modern subtropical ocean form part of a greater effort to ground-truth the use of foram-bound δ15N to reconstruct past nutrient conditions, not only as a recorder of the isotopic composition of nitrogen supply in oligotrophic environments but also as a recorder of the degree of nitrate consumption in high-latitude regions such as the Southern Ocean.

  13. Benthic foraminifera record and geochemical studies to reconstruct the recent (~400 ya) paleoenvironment of Tomales Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, S. C.; Hill, T. M.; Russell, A. D.; Brooks, G.

    2010-12-01

    We are conducting investigations of calcareous benthic foraminifera acquired from Tomales Bay, California to reconstruct geochemical conditions of the bay for the past ~400 years, a time period of both natural and anthropogenic environmental change. Tomales Bay, located ~50km northwest of San Francisco, is a long (20.4 km), narrow (0.7 - 1.7 km) and shallow (2.0 - 6.0 m) bay that exhibits long-residence times and is stratified in the summer due to seasonal hypersalinity. Tomales Bay is a unique environment for climate and environmental change research because of the wide documented variability in carbonate parameters (pH, alkalinity, DIC) due to freshwater input from terrestrial sources that decreases aragonite and calcite saturation states. The historical record provided by benthic foraminiferal species and geochemistry, sedimentary carbon (TOC and TIC) analyses, and investigations of recent (Rose-Bengal stained) foraminifera are being utilized to constrain 3 major processes: 1) the range of temperature and salinity shifts over the past 400 years, 2) the relative dominance of marine- vs. fresh-water sources to the bay, and 3) the extent to which freshwater input and runoff may influence water chemistry (saturation state, Ω) with impacts on foraminiferal calcification. Four sediment cores were acquired in 2009 and 2010, and subsequently age-dated utilizing radiocarbon analyses (seven samples). Results indicate an increase in preservation of agglutinated versus calcareous foraminiferal tests (shells) since the mid-1900’s, and greater abundances of agglutinated tests found near freshwater sources. The major calcareous foraminifera present in the record include Elphidium hannai, Elphidium excavatum, Ammonia tepida, and Buccella frigida. Results from oxygen and carbon stable isotope analyses as well as total organic carbon (by weight) for all the cores will also be presented. These results will be compared to modern observations and instrumental records of

  14. Benthic foraminifera or Ostracoda? Comparing the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental indicators from a Pleistocene lagoon of the Romagna coastal plain (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Giulia; Vaiani, Stefano Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Integrated analyses of multiple groups of microfossils are frequently performed to unravel the palaeoenvironmental evolution of subsurface coastal successions, where the complex interaction among several palaeoecological factors can be detected with benthic assemblages. This work investigates the palaeoenvironmental resolution potential provided by benthic foraminifera and ostracoda within a Pleistocene lagoonal succession of the Romagna coastal plain (northern Italy). Quantitative approaches and statistical techniques have been applied to both groups in order to understand the main factors that controlled the composition of assemblages and compare the palaeoecological record provided by single fossil groups. The two faunal groups are characterized by the high dominance of opportunistic species (Ammonia tepida-Ammonia parkinsoniana and Cyprideis torosa); however, detailed palaeoecological information is inferred from less common taxa. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are mainly determined by the frequencies of abnormal individuals and species related to high concentrations of organic matter, showing two assemblages: a stressed assemblage, consistent with a brackish-water environment subject to salinity and oxygen fluctuations, and an unstressed assemblage, which indicates more stable conditions. Despite the lower number of species, ostracoda show more significant differences in terms of species composition and ecological structure between their three assemblages, formed in response to a salinity gradient and indicative of inner, central, and outer lagoon conditions. The stratigraphic distribution of ostracod assemblages shows a general transgressive-regressive trend with minor fluctuations, whereas benthic foraminifera highlight the presence of a significant palaeoenvironmental stress. In this case, the higher abundance along the stratigraphic succession, the higher differentiation of the assemblages, and the well-defined relationship between taxa and ecological

  15. Benthic foraminifera (Protista) as indicators of metal pollution in areas of historic mining: examples from southwest England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Smart, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Southwest England has been, from Roman times, an important mining area supplying a range of important metals, including copper, tin, tungsten, arsenic, zinc, silver, etc. This mining activity virtually disappeared in the twentieth century, although one tungsten mine near Plymouth has recently re-opened. Large areas of Cornwall and West Devon are now inscribed as the 'Cornish Mining World Heritage Site' on the cultural list of UNESCO. Many of the old mines with their spoil heaps and tailings dams are now protected and, together with the mineral-rich local geology, provide many catchments with on-going metal pollution. In January 1992, after a period of prolonged, heavy rainfall Wheal Jane mine flooded and discharged heavily polluted, acidic, water into Restonguet Creek and the Fal Estuary. This event provided the setting for a detailed investigation of the immediate impact of the pollution and the resulting environmental improvements caused by engineering interventions and natural re-adjustment. Benthic foraminifera disappeared from Restronguet Creek for a number of years and while there is now an abundant, though low diversity, estuarine assemblage of foraminifera living in the creek there are still high levels (pollution can be used to compare with the test deformity data. In other estuarine systems in southwest England, such as the River Fowey and the River Tamar, levels of deformity are less, though still significant for areas no longer being actively mined. This demonstrates that polluted sediments in all these estuaries, which can be disturbed during floods or times of stormy weather, and the background levels of metal elements in the catchments that supply these estuaries, are sufficient to maintain these levels of deformity in the long term. OLUGBODE, O.I., HART, M.B. & STUBBLES, S.J. 2005. Foraminifera from Restronguet Creek: monitoring recovery from the Wheal Jane pollution incident. Geoscience in south-west England, 11, 82-92.

  16. Benthic foraminifera distribution in high polluted sediments from Niterói Harbor (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia G. Vilela

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Dockyards and harbors are recognized as being important locations where sediment-associated pollutants can accumulate, which constitutes an environmental risk to aquatic life due to potential uptake and accumulation of heavy metals in the biota. The aim of this paper is to assess the concentrations and the effects of some heavy metals in the benthic foraminifera assemblage in Niterói Harbor. Low concentrations in the benthic foraminifera as well as the dominance of indicative species such as Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima and Bolivina lowmani can be associated with an environment under stress. In addition, the occurrence of test abnormalities among foraminifera may represent a useful biomarker for evaluating long-term environmental impacts in a coastal region.Estaleiros e portos são locais reconhecidamente importantes onde poluentes associados a sedimentos podem acumular, constituindo um risco ambiental para a vida aquática devido ao potencial de captação e acumulação de metais pesados na biota. O propósito deste trabalho é avaliar as concentrações e os efeitos de alguns metais pesados na assembléia de foraminíferos bentônicos no Porto de Niterói. Baixas concentrações de foraminíferos bentônicos bem como a dominância de espécies indicativas como Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima e Bolivina lowmani podem ser associadas a um ambiente sob estresse. A ocorrência de anormalidades entre os foraminíferos pode representar um útil biomarcador para avaliação de impactos ambientais de longo termo em uma região costeira.

  17. Response of benthic foraminifera to 4.2 ka cooling event in the Nakdong River delta, southeast Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Khim, B. K.; Cheong, D.; Shin, S.

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the change of benthic foraminifera in response to 4.2 ka cooling event in the Nakdong River delta (southeastern Korea). It has been known that this cooling event caused climatic deteriorations in the world, which is closely related to the decline/development of the civilizations (e.g., Kawahata et al., 2009). This event was also correlated to one of Bond Events in the North Atlantic. Because coastal sediment depositions have been influenced by both oceanographic and terrestrial climatic changes, the study may provide us clue to understand the possible teleconnection of the cooling event between the North Atlantic and the East Asian margin. We investigated fossil benthic foraminiferal faunas and planktonic/total foraminiferal ratio (P/T ratio) at two borehole cores, ND-01 and ND-02 (landward and seaward sites, respectively). Common constituents are taxa from bay to shelf environments in the East Asian margin. Biotic response of benthic foraminifera partly changed after 4.2 ka showing that Haynesina sp. A (opportunistic species?) decreased significantly at core ND-01. In addition, P/T ratio at both core sites showed temporal decline at 4.2 ka. This suggests the decreasing influence of the seawater relative to the coastal water. Holocene fluctuations of the Tsushima Warm Current, a branch of Kuroshio, flowing off the Nakdong River delta, have been documented. The decline pattern of P/T ratio in this area is similar to that of total sulfur content in Lake Tougou-ike, southwestern Japan at 4 ka which was interpreted as the influence of the small sea-level falling (Kato et al., 2003). According to the similar stratigraphic variation patterns between our and their studies, our finding suggests that this event was not regional but related to the fluctuations of the Tsushima Warm Current. Thus, biotic response of benthic foraminifera in the Nakdong River delta recorded 4.2 ka cooling event related to temporal weakening of the Tsushima Warm Current.

  18. Annual and seasonal distribution of intertidal foraminifera and stable carbon isotope geochemistry, Bandon Marsh, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin; Vane, Christopher; Engelhart, Simon; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.; Khan, Nicole S.; Bridgeland, William

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of inter-annual and seasonal differences on the distribution of live and dead foraminifera, and the inter-annual variability of stable carbon isotopes (d13C), total organic carbon (TOC) values and carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios in bulk sediments from intertidal environments of Bandon Marsh (Oregon, USA). Living and dead foraminiferal species from 10 stations were analyzed over two successive years in the summer (dry) and fall (wet) seasons. There were insignificant inter-annual and seasonal variations in the distribution of live and dead species. But there was a noticeable decrease in calcareous assemblages (Haynesina sp.) between live populations and dead assemblages, indicating that most of the calcareous tests were dissolved after burial; the agglutinated assemblages were comparable between constituents. The live populations and dead assemblages were dominated by Miliammina fusca in the tidal flat and low marsh, Jadammina macrescens, Trochammina inflata and M. fusca in the high marsh, and Trochamminita irregularis and Balticammina pseudomacrescens in the highest marsh to upland. Geochemical analyses (d13C, TOC and C/N of bulk sedimentary organic matter) show no significant influence of inter-annual variations but a significant correlation of d13C values (R = 20.820, p , 0.001), TOC values (R = 0.849, p , 0.001) and C/N ratios (R = 0.885, p , 0.001) to elevation with respect to the tidal frame. Our results suggest that foraminiferal assemblages and d13C and TOC values, as well as C/N ratios, in Bandon Marsh are useful in reconstructing paleosea-levels on the North American Pacific coast.

  19. Molecular evidence for Lessepsian invasion of soritids (larger symbiont bearing benthic foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gily Merkado

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is considered as one of the hotspots of marine bioinvasions, largely due to the influx of tropical species migrating through the Suez Canal, so-called Lessepsian migrants. Several cases of Lessepsian migration have been documented recently, however, little is known about the ecological characteristics of the migrating species and their aptitude to colonize the new areas. This study focused on Red Sea soritids, larger symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera (LBF that are indicative of tropical and subtropical environments and were recently found in the Israeli coast of the Eastern Mediterranean. We combined molecular phylogenetic analyses of soritids and their algal symbionts as well as network analysis of Sorites orbiculus Forskål to compare populations from the Gulf of Elat (northern Red Sea and from a known hotspot in Shikmona (northern Israel that consists of a single population of S. orbiculus. Our phylogenetic analyses show that all specimens found in Shikmona are genetically identical to a population of S. orbiculus living on a similar shallow water pebbles habitat in the Gulf of Elat. Our analyses also show that the symbionts found in Shikmona and Elat soritids belong to the Symbiodinium clade F5, which is common in the Red Sea and also present in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Our study therefore provides the first genetic and ecological evidences that indicate that modern population of soritids found on the Mediterranean coast of Israel is probably Lessepsian, and is less likely the descendant of a native ancient Mediterranean species.

  20. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  1. Distributions of Benthic Foraminifera in the Salisbury Embayment before and after the PETM Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, M. M.; Robinson, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    Abrupt climatic perturbations associated with the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) caused major disruptions to the shallow shelf ecology along the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain. Several studies examine the changes in benthic foraminiferal assemblages across the PETM in neritic sediments in New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia and describe a hydrological and sedimentological paradigm shift that marks the Paleocene-Eocene boundary. In the Salisbury Embayment, a flexural low between the South Jersey High and the Norfolk Arch, this shift is seen in the transition between the upper Paleocene Aquia Formation and the lower Eocene Marlboro Clay. Here we map the abundance of seven benthic foraminifera species from five sites within the Salisbury Embayment from both the uppermost Aquia Formation and the lowermost Marlboro Clay. In addition to the benthic foraminiferal turnover at the PETM onset, we show a geographic distribution of species that highlights a past latitudinal biogeographic zonation not unlike what is found on the modern shelf in this region. Sites document a change in the abundance of species between the late Paleocene and early Eocene, showing a decrease in biodiversity of benthic species along the U.S. Atlantic Coast. Spatial extent of the different species also changed across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary. On the modern Atlantic shelf, a biogeographic zonation is due to the path of the Gulf Stream marking a boundary between relatively cold sea-surface temperatures to the north and warmer temperatures to the south, guided by the geomorphic expression of the mid-Atlantic coastline. During the Paleocene-Eocene transition, we suspect a similar boundary likely existed between the New Jersey sites and the Maryland and Virginia sites. We speculate that with the addition of more assemblage data, we will be able to partially reconstruct the geomorphic expression of the PETM coastline and/or the path of major coastal ocean currents.

  2. Benthic Foraminifera, Food in the Deep Sea, and Limits to Bentho-Pelagic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.; Boscolo-Galazzo, F.; Arreguin-Rodrigu, G. J.; Ortiz, S.; Alegret, L.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea is the largest habitat on Earth, contains highly diverse biota, but is very little known. Many of its abundant benthic biota (e.g., nematodes) are not preserved in the fossil record. Calcareous and agglutinated benthic foraminifera (unicellular eukaryotes, Rhizaria; efficient dispersers) and ostracodes (Animalia, Crustacea; non-efficient dispersers) are the most common organisms providing a fossil record of deep-sea environments. Very little food is supplied to the deep-sea, because organic matter produced by photosynthesis is largely degraded before it arrives at the seafloor. Only a few % of organic matter is carried to the ocean bottom by 'marine snow', with its particle size and behavior in the water column controlled by surface ecosystem structure, including type of dominant primary producers (diatoms, cyanobacteria). Food supply and its seasonality are generally seen as the dominant control on benthic assemblages (combined with oxygenation), providing bentho-pelagic coupling between primary and benthic productivity. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages (composition and density) thus are used widely to estimate past productivity, especially during episodes of global climate change, ocean acidification, and mass extinction of primary producers. We show that some environmental circumstances may result in interrupting bentho-pelagic coupling, e.g. through lateral supply of organic matter along continental margins (adding more refractory organic matter), through trophic focusing and/or fine particle winnowing on seamounts (giving an advantage to suspension feeders), and through carbonate undersaturation (giving advantage to infaunal over epifaunal calcifyers). In addition, increased remineralization of organic matter combined with increased metabolic rates may cause assemblages to reflect more oligotrophic conditions at stable primary productivity during periods of global warming. As a result, benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates must be carefully

  3. Taxonomy and distribution of benthic foraminifera from the sediments of Palk Strait, Tamil Nadu, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gandhi, S.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Nigam, R.

    .la-b. - Bhalla and Nigam, 1979, p.239. pl. 1.- Nigam and Theide. 1983, pp. 148-149, pl.13, figs.l0a-b. - Mayankar, 1994, p.138, pl.15. - Rao, 1998. p.192. pl.47. figs 5-6. Hypotype : Length - 0.40 mm Breadth - 0.24 mm Remarks : The same species has also been... of western India. Contr. Cush. Found. Forain. Re\\. 7 : 15-24. Bhalia, S.B. and Bhalla, S.N. 1959. Recent foraminifera from the beach sands at Puri, Orissa. Jour. Pal. Soc. India, 4:78-81. Boltovskoy, E. 1954. Foraminiferos de la Bahia San Blas. Rivista del...

  4. Response of shallow water benthic foraminifera to a 13C-labeled food pulse in the laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Linshy, V.N.; Nigam, R; Heinz, P.

    foraminifera in deep-sea food webs and carbon cycling In: Rowe GT, Pariente V (eds) Deep-Sea food chains and global carbon cycle, Kluwer Academic publishers, The Netherlands, p.63-91 Giullard RR, Ryther JH (1962) Studies of marine planktonic diatoms. I... afterwards to avoid the lysis of cells and stored at −80°C until freeze-drying. The final 13C- concentration in the algae was 75 atom % 13C. 2.3 Experiment Set-up Two time series were incubated for these investigations: one for Ammonia tepida and one...

  5. Multiproxies (benthic foraminifera, ostracods and biopolymers approach applied to identify the environmental partitioning of the Guadiana River Estuary (Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaro Luiz Mattos Laut

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Guadiana River is the fourth longest river in Europe and is a natural frontier between southern Portugal and Spain. This river was historically used to transport minerals exploited in the region since the Roman Empire and therefore suffered human interventions that have been intensified after the industrial revolution. The Guadiana River has in its limits the Guadiana Valley Natural Park, which is of great value for the Conservation of Geobiodiversity. This study mainly aims to identify zones with the environmental characteristics in the estuarine area of the Guadiana River based on the distribution and ecology of microorganisms (ostracods and foraminifera associated with physicochemical parameters and sedimentological and geochemical (carbohydrate, lipid, protein, total organic carbon and total sulfur data. Fifty-five foraminifera taxa were identified along the estuary with dominance of Ammonia tepida and Miliammina fusca and 13 ostracods taxa with dominance Leptocythere lacertosa and Loxoconcha elliptica. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA performed using biotic and abiotic variables indicated that pH, grain size, total organic carbon (TOC and lipids were the most influent factors in the distribution of these organisms. Four zones were identified in the Guadiana River estuary: i Low estuary - region with the largest marine influence with sandy sediment, higher salinity and total sulfur and mainly represented by the dominance of estuarine species of foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Cribroelphidium vadescens and by the ostracods (Darwinula stevensoni, Semicytherura sulcata and Urocythereis oblonga; ii Intermediate estuary - region characterized by neutral pH and sandy sediment enriched in carbohydrates; this region is characterized by the presence of the ostracods species Cytherois fischeri and Neocytherideis subulata and by calcareous and agglutinated species in foraminiferal assemblages; iii Upper estuary - silt, high TOC, proteins and

  6. Methodology for single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera for studies of protist diversity and evolution

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    Agnes Katharina Maria Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell genetic analysis is an essential method to investigate the biodiversity and evolutionary ecology of marine protists. In protist groups that do not reproduce under laboratory conditions, this approach provides the only means to directly associate molecular sequences with cell morphology. The resulting unambiguous taxonomic identification of the DNA sequences is a prerequisite for barcoding and analyses of environmental metagenomic data. Extensive single-cell genetic studies have been carried out on planktonic foraminifera over the past 20 years to elucidate their phylogeny, cryptic diversity, biogeography and the relationship between genetic and morphological variability. In the course of these investigations, it has become evident that genetic analysis at the individual specimen level is confronted by innumerable challenges ranging from the negligible amount of DNA present in the single cell to the substantial amount of DNA contamination introduced by endosymbionts or food particles. Consequently, a range of methods has been developed and applied throughout the years for the genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera in order to enhance DNA amplification success rates. Yet, the description of these methods in the literature rarely occurred with equivalent levels of detail and the different approaches have never been compared in terms of their efficiency and reproducibility. Here, aiming at a standardization of methods, we provide a comprehensive review of all methods that have been employed for the single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera. We compile data on success rates of DNA amplification and use these to evaluate the effects of key parameters associated with the methods of sample collection, storage and extraction of single-cell DNA. We show that the chosen methods influence the success rates of single-cell genetic studies, but the differences between them are not sufficient to hinder comparisons between studies

  7. A transgressive Santonian-Campanian boundary sequence revisited - High resolution planktonic and benthic foraminifera stratigraphy of the Schattau section, Northern Calcareous Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgring, Erik; Wagreich, Michael; Summesberger, Herbert; Kroh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The Schattau section is part of the Austrian Gosau Group, Northern Calcareous Alps. We record a Santonian to early Campanian transgressive sequence. Previous investigations already provide a biostratigraphic framework; a multidisciplinary study to reveal the local stratigraphy and palaeoenvironmental properties: Planktonic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, ammonite, echinoid and crinoid biostratigraphy data suggest a Santonian to earliest Campanian age for this section (see Wagreich et al., 2009). This work aims at a high resolution assessment of foraminiferal assemblages recorded from a time interval that has undergone significant palaeoenvironmental changes. The Santonian Hochmoos Formation, with the Sandkalkbank Member representing it's topmost subunit, is overlain by the Santonian to Campanian Bibereck Formation. While The Hochmoos Formation records a shallowing succession that finds the Sandkalkbank Member (representing very shallow conditions, sometimes sub aerial exposure) at its top. The overlying Bibereck Formation records a distinct deepening trend displaying increasingly marine, neritic to outer neritic conditions. The stratigraphically older subunits of the Schattau sections are characterised by abundant larger benthic foraminifera (Nummofallotia cretacea), miliolid foraminifera (Quinqueloculina spp, Spiroloculina fassistomata) as well as rotaliid foraminifera (Hoeglundia spp., Gavellina spp.). The Sandkalkbank member marks the end of the shallow water sequence recorded from foraminifera assemblages at the Schattau section. Up section communities are characterised by increasing share of planktonic foraminifera. Biostratigraphic marker fossils like Dicarinella asymetrica and Sigalia sp. (decoratissima?) were identified and indicate a Santonian age for the Bibereck Formation. The appearance of Globotruncanita elevata and disappearance of D. asymetrica and Sigalia sp. Suggests an early Campanian age for the topmost part of the Schattau section

  8. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Nigam, R.

    species, including two species of Bolivina and a single species of Uvigerina, with the bathymetrical variation from the northern Gulf of Mexico. But there is no attempt to correlate the total population of any important genus of rectilinear foraminifera...–900. Malakoff D 1998 Death by suffocation in the Gulf of Mexico; Science 281 190–192. Mallon J, Glock N and Scho¨nfeld J 2012 The response of benthic foraminifera to low-oxygen conditions of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone; In: ANOXIA: Evidence for eukaryote...

  9. Benthic foraminifera and heavy metals distribution: A case study from the Naples Harbour (Tyrrhenian Sea, Southern Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, L.; Sprovieri, M.; Alberico, I.; Lirer, F.; Prevedello, L.; Marsella, E.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 90 surficial sediments from three docks of the Naples Harbour (Levante, Granili, and Diaz) permits to compare the distribution modes of heavy metals with grain sizes, total organic carbon content (TOC) and distribution patterns of benthic foraminifera. Foraminiferal density and species richness decrease with the increasing toxic elements concentrations from the Levante to the Diaz dock. Median concentrations of Ni, Pb, Zn, and Hg (medians of 21.43 mg/kg, 270.24 mg/kg, 489.65 mg/kg, and 1.18 mg/kg, respectively) were reported for the Diaz dock where foraminifera are absent, thus suggesting a possible impact of toxic elements on the benthic ecosystem balance. Compared to the unpolluted marine sediments of the Granili dock, the Levante area shows higher heavy metals levels and a quasi-oligotypic benthic assemblage. This is dominated by the tolerant species Ammonia tepida that may be used as bio-indicator of pollution of anthropised marine sediments. - Benthic foraminiferal density and species distribution may be used as pollution indicators

  10. Decalcification and survival of benthic foraminifera under the combined impacts of varying pH and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrieau, Laurie M; Filipsson, Helena L; Nagai, Yukiko; Kawada, Sachiko; Ljung, Karl; Kritzberg, Emma; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2018-04-03

    Coastal areas display natural large environmental variability such as frequent changes in salinity, pH, and carbonate chemistry. Anthropogenic impacts - especially ocean acidification - increase this variability, which may affect the living conditions of coastal species, particularly, calcifiers. We performed culture experiments on living benthic foraminifera to study the combined effects of lowered pH and salinity on the calcification abilities and survival of the coastal, calcitic species Ammonia sp. and Elphidium crispum. We found that in open ocean conditions (salinity ∼35) and lower pH than usual values for these species, the specimens displayed resistance to shell (test) dissolution for a longer time than in brackish conditions (salinity ∼5 to 20). However, the response was species specific as Ammonia sp. specimens survived longer than E. crispum specimens when placed in the same conditions of salinity and pH. Living, decalcified juveniles of Ammonia sp. were observed and we show that desalination is one cause for the decalcification. Finally, we highlight the ability of foraminifera to survive under Ω calc  salinity and [Ca 2+ ] as building blocks are crucial for the foraminiferal calcification process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of foraminifera in Chincoteague Bay and the marshes of Assateague Island and the adjacent vicinity, Maryland and Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Shaw, Jaimie; Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2017-11-28

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of estuarine, marsh, and sandy washover surface sediments from Chincoteague Bay, Tom’s Cove, and the surrounding Assateague Island and Delmarva Peninsula in March–April and October 2014, after Hurricane Sandy. Micropaleontology samples were collected as part of a complementary USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program Sea-level and Storm Impacts on Estuarine Environments and Shorelines project study. For comparison with estuarine and overwash deposited foraminifera, a group of scientists from the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center in Massachusetts collected samples offshore of Assateague Island on the inner continental shelf during a seafloor mapping study in the summer of 2014 and shipped select samples to the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. The micropaleontological subsamples analyzed for foraminifera at each site can be used to establish a foraminiferal baseline assemblage that takes into consideration the seasonal variability of the various species, regarding density and geographic extent, which are influenced by transient and stable environmental parameters. By understanding what parameters affect the various foraminiferal assemblages, researchers can delineate how alterations in salinity, temperature, or marsh-to-bay interactions, such as marsh erosion, might affect that assemblage.

  12. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-06-08

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ(18)O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time.

  13. Three dimensional morphological studies of Larger Benthic Foraminifera at the population level using micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shunichi; Eder, Wolfgang; Woeger, Julia; Hohenegger, Johann; Briguglio, Antonino; Ferrandez-Canadell, Carles

    2015-04-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic Foraminifera (LBF) are long-living marine (at least 1 year), single-celled organisms with complex calcium carbonate shells. Their morphology has been intensively studied since the middle of the nineteenth century. This led to a broad spectrum of taxonomic results, important from biostratigraphy to ecology in shallow water tropical to warm temperate marine palaeo-environments. However, it was necessary for the traditional investigation methods to cut or destruct specimens for analysing the taxonomically important inner structures. X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) is one of the newest techniques used in morphological studies. The greatest advantage is the non-destructive acquisition of inner structures. Furthermore, the running improve of microCT scanners' hard- and software provides high resolution and short time scans well-suited for LBF. Three-dimensional imaging techniques allow to select and extract each chamber and to measure easily its volume, surface and several form parameters used for morphometric analyses. Thus, 3-dimensional visualisation of LBF-tests is a very big step forward from traditional morphology based on 2-dimensional data. The quantification of chamber form is a great opportunity to tackle LBF structures, architectures and the bauplan geometry. The micrometric digital resolution is the only way to solve many controversies in phylogeny and evolutionary trends of LBF. For the present study we used micro-computed tomography to easily investigate the chamber number of every specimen from statistically representative part of populations to estimate population dynamics. Samples of living individuals are collected at monthly intervals from fixed locations. Specific preparation allows to scan up to 35 specimens per scan within 2 hours and to obtain the complete digital dataset for each specimen of the population. MicroCT enables thus a fast and precise count of all chambers built by the foraminifer from its

  14. Quantifying the effect of seasonal and vertical habitat tracking on planktonic foraminifera proxies

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    L. Jonkers

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of planktonic foraminiferal (PF calcite is routinely used to reconstruct climate variability. However, PF ecology leaves a large imprint on the proxy signal: seasonal and vertical habitats of PF species vary spatially, causing variable offsets from annual mean surface conditions recorded by sedimentary assemblages. PF seasonality changes with temperature in a way that minimises the environmental change that individual species experience and it is not unlikely that changes in depth habitat also result from such habitat tracking. While this behaviour could lead to an underestimation of spatial or temporal trends as well as of variability in proxy records, most palaeoceanographic studies are (implicitly based on the assumption of a constant habitat. Up to now, the effect of habitat tracking on foraminifera proxy records has not yet been formally quantified on a global scale. Here we attempt to characterise this effect on the amplitude of environmental change recorded in sedimentary PF using core top δ18O data from six species. We find that the offset from mean annual near-surface δ18O values varies with temperature, with PF δ18O indicating warmer than mean conditions in colder waters (on average by −0.1 ‰ (equivalent to 0.4 °C per °C, thus providing a first-order quantification of the degree of underestimation due to habitat tracking. We use an empirical model to estimate the contribution of seasonality to the observed difference between PF and annual mean δ18O and use the residual Δδ18O to assess trends in calcification depth. Our analysis indicates that given an observation-based model parametrisation calcification depth increases with temperature in all species and sensitivity analysis suggests that a temperature-related seasonal habitat adjustment is essential to explain the observed isotope signal. Habitat tracking can thus lead to a significant reduction in the amplitude of recorded environmental change

  15. Benthic foraminifera response to Holocene environmental changes in the ria de Muros (NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, P.; Francés, G.; Pena, L. D.; Nombela, M. A.; Alejo, I.

    2003-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera assemblages from the outer sector of the ría de Muros have been analyzed in order to obtain a detailed reconstruction of Holocene environmental evolution. The studied core (EUGC-3B: 42' 45.10'N; 9' 02.23'W, at 38 m.b.s.l. and 410 cm length) consists of muddy sand from the core bottom (8200 cal yr BP) to 200 cm (2700 cal yr BP) and mainly mud from 200 cm to the core top. Measurements of geochemical properties carried out by a XRF core scanner revealed different signatures in the two aforementioned intervals and an enhancing terrigenous influence during the last 2000 yr. The prevalence of Bulimina spp., Nonion fabum, Ammonia beccarii and Cibicides ungerianus along the whole core indicates high organic carbon concentration and/or low oxygenation levels into the sediment. Nevertheless, the percentage of these species shows noticeable changes, indicating the existence of five periods with different environmental conditions. The basal assemblage (8200-7500 cal yr BP) is dominated by epifaunal taxa and it can be interpreted as a low sea level assemblage. An increase of fresh water influence during the Holocene Climate Optimum (7500-5000 cal yr BP) is revealed by maxima percentages of A. beccarii. The oceanic influence increased during the Subboreal period (5000-2750 cal yr BP) leading to an active water interchange between the ría and the open ocean and a higher marine productivity. The oceanic influence is recorded by the increase of typical marine species as Elphidium advenum, Bulimina spp., N. fabum, and Nonionella turgida. The appearance of Rectuvigerina phlegeri at 4000 cal yr BP denotes full marine conditions. Environmental conditions similar to the current ones were achieved during the Subatlantic period (2750-Rec). In a first step an assemblage dominated by Bulimina spp. N. fabum, and C. ungerianus permit us to interpret a relatively stable period with episodic pulses of fluvial influence. Afterwards the appearance and the rapid increase of

  16. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable isotopic ratios of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahmad, S.M.; Patil, D.J.; Rao, P.S.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rajagopalan, G.

    ; Nature 343 549--551 Shackleton N J 1974 Attainment of isotopic equilibrium between ocean water and benthonic foraminifera genus Uvigerina: Isotopic changes in the ocean during the last glacial; In: Les Methodes quantitatives d'etude des variation du... climat au cours du pleistocene. Coll. Int. CNRS Paris 119 203--210 156 S M Ahmad et al ...

  17. Benthic foraminifera as biostratigraphical and paleoecological indicators: An example from Oligo-Miocene deposits in the SW of Zagros basin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Roozpeykar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asmari Formation is a predominantly carbonate lithostratigraphic unit that outcrops in the Zagros Basin. Micropaleontological studies of the Asmari Formation in the Dehdasht area led to the identification of 51 species of foraminifera taxa. Among the foraminifera, Nummulites cf. vascus, Operculin sp., Operculina complanata, Eulepidina dilatata, Eulepidina elephantine, Ditrupa sp., Miogypsina sp., Elphidium sp. 14, and Borelis melo curdica are the most important. The Lepidocyclina-Operculina-Ditrupa assemblage zone represents the Rupelian–Chattian age. The Aquitanian age is also defined by co-occurrence of Miogypsina sp. and Elphidium sp. 14, and finally, the first occurrence of Borelis melo curdica represents the Burdigalian. Based on faunal assemblages, the following paleoenvironmental settings are determined for the deposition of the study section: (1 the deep, offshore settings in the aphotic zone dominated by pelagic and small benthic foraminifera; (2 the low energy, turbid and low light parts of the oligophotic zone characterized by large and flat lepidocyclinids (Eulepidina and Nummulitidae; (3 the low turbidity, deeper part of the inner ramp dominated by Miogypsinoides, Neorotalia, Lepidocyclina, Operculina and Archias; (4 the shallow, marginal marine environment exposed to salinity fluctuations (short-term salinity fluctuations or fully marine conditions dominated by small benthic Foraminifera (Ammonia and Elphidium; (5 highly translucent, shallowest part of the inner ramp dominated by representatives of Borelis, Meandropsina and Peneroplis. The biotic assemblages represent warm tropical waters with oligotrophic to slightly mesotrophic conditions.

  18. Changes in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Thermocline Structure across the Last Deglaciation: Evidence from the Carnegie Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubke, R.; Schmidt, M. W.; Warner, L.; Hertzberg, J. E.; Marcantonio, F.; Bianchi, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) is an important climatological region given its influence in the modulation of the El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The current climatic mean state of the EEP is characterized by cool sea surface temperatures (SST) and a strong, shallow thermocline. Nevertheless, there remains significant uncertainty about past changes in tropical Pacific climate and how ENSO variability relates to the millennial-scale climate events of the last deglaciation. Here, we will present 21 kyrs of Mg/Ca paleotemperature data from the surface-dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber and the thermocline-dwelling foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei collected from piston core MV1014-02-17JC (00° 10.83'S, 85° 52.00'W; 2846 m depth) on the Carnegie Ridge. Initial results reveal a 1.3°C warming of the surface ocean from the early-Holocene until 6 kyrs, a trend present in other EEP SST reconstructions (Pena et al., 2008; Timmerman et al., 2014; Lea et al., 2000). The surface ocean subsequently cools from 6 kyrs and reaches present-day temperatures by 3.5 kyrs. The subsurface reveals a nearly monotonic cooling of 1.8°C from 10.8 kyrs to the present day, which suggest a gradual shoaling of the thermocline across the Holocene. Furthermore, an increase in the vertical temperature gradient occurs from the late- to mid-Holocene, with the sharpest temperature difference centered at 6 kyrs, coincident with the mid-Holocene peak in SSTs. Taken together, these data suggest a gradual shoaling of the thermocline across the Holocene, with the variations in SST primarily governing the intensity of the vertical temperature gradient. Future work includes extending this record back to the last glacial maximum (LGM) to assess tropical Pacific mean state change across the abrupt climate events that characterized the last deglaciation.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen uptake of calcareous benthic foraminifera along a depth-related oxygen gradient in the OMZ of the Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekatrin Julie Enge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera are an important faunal element of the benthos in oxygen-depleted settings such as Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs where they can play a relevant role in the processing of phytodetritus. We investigated the uptake of phytodetritus (labeled with 13C and 15N by cal-careous foraminifera in the 0-1 cm sediment horizon under different oxygen concentrations within the OMZ in the eastern Arabian Sea. The in situ tracer experiments were carried out along a depth transect on the Indian margin over a period of 4 to 10 days. The uptake of phy-todetrital carbon within 4 days by all investigated species shows that phytodetritus is a rele-vant food source for foraminifera in OMZ sediments. The decrease of total carbon uptake from 540 to 1100 m suggests a higher demand for carbon by species in the low-oxygen core region of the OMZ or less food competition with macrofauna. Especially Uvigerinids showed high uptake of phytodetrital carbon at the lowest oxygenated site. Variation in the ratio of phytodetrital carbon to nitrogen between species and sites indicates that foraminiferal carbon and nitrogen use can be decoupled and different nutritional demands are found between spe-cies. Lower ratio of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen at 540 m could hint for greater demand or storage of food-based nitrogen, ingestion or hosting of bacteria under almost anoxic condi-tions. Shifts in the foraminiferal assemblage structure (controlled by oxygen or food availabil-ity and in the presence of other benthic organisms account for observed changes in the pro-cessing of phytodetritus in the different OMZ habitats. Foraminifera dominate the short-term processing of phytodetritus in the OMZ core but are less important in the lower OMZ bounda-ry region of the Indian margin as biological interactions and species distribution of foraminif-era change with depth and oxygen levels.

  20. Benthic foraminifera cultured over a large salinity gradient: first results and comparison with field data from the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Jeroen; Filipsson, Helena L.; Austin, William E. N.; Darling, Kate; Quintana Krupinski, Nadine B.

    2015-04-01

    Some of the most significant challenges in paleoclimate research arise from the need to both understand and reduce the uncertainty associated with proxy methods for climate reconstructions. This is especially important for shelf and coastal environments where increasing numbers of high-resolution paleorecords are being generated. These challenges are further highlighted in connection with ECORD/IODP Expedition 347: Baltic Sea Paleoenvironments. This large-scale drilling operation took place in the Baltic Sea region during the autumn of 2013. At this time, there is a pressing need for proxy calibrations directly targeted at the brackish Baltic environment. Within the CONTEMPORARY project we are investigating different temperature and salinity proxy variables through a combination of field- and culture-based benthic foraminiferal samples, together with genetic characterization (genotyping) of the morphospecies. We have completed two field campaigns where we collected (living) foraminifera and water samples at several sites, ranging from fully marine to low salinity conditions. The core-top foraminifera have been analysed for trace metal/Ca, stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, and faunal composition. Living foraminifera collected from the sediment-water interface were cultured in sea water in two long-term experiments at different temperatures (5°C and 10°C) and at three different salinities (15, 25, and 35). The first experiment yielded a large number of reproduced and experimentally-grown Elphidium specimens. The second experiment resulted in growth but no reproduction. We will provide a summary of the experimentally grown material and discuss the challenges of generating new proxy calibrations for foraminiferal shell geochemistry in the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, specimens of Elphidium and Ammonia, found at two sampling sites (Anholt, Kattegat and Hanöbay) with differing salinities, were genotyped and the results indicate that the same genotype of Elphidium is

  1. Foraminifera eco-biostratigraphy of the southern Evoikos outer shelf, central Aegean Sea, during MIS 5 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinia, Hara; Antonarakou, Assimina; Tsourou, Theodora; Kontakiotis, George; Psychogiou, Maria; Anastasakis, George

    2016-09-01

    The South Evoikos Basin is a marginal basin in the Aegean Sea which receives little terrigenous supply and its sedimentation is dominated by hemipelagic processes. Late Quaternary benthic and planktonic foraminifera from core PAG-155 are investigated in order to understand their response to the glacial-interglacial cycles in this region. The quantitative analysis of planktonic foraminifera, coupled with accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) radiocarbon date measurements, provide an integrated chrono-stratigraphic time framework over the last 90 ka (time interval between late Marine Isotopic Stages 5 and 1; MIS5-MIS1). The temporary appearance and disappearance as well as several abundance peaks in the quantitative distribution of selected climate-sensitive planktonic species allowed the identification of several eco-bioevents, useful to accurately mark the boundaries of the eco-biozones widely recognized in the Mediterranean records and used for large-scale correlations. The established bio-ecozonation scheme allows a detailed palaecological reconstruction for the late Pleistocene archive in the central Aegean, and furthermore provides a notable contribution for palaeoclimatic studies, facilitating intercorrelations between various oceanographic basins. The quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifera identify four distinct assemblages, namely Biofacies: Elphidium spp., Haynesina spp. Biofacies, characterized by neritic species, dominated during the transition from MIS 5 to MIS 4; Cassidulina laevigata/carinata Biofacies dominated till 42 ka (transgressive trend from MIS 4 to MIS 3); Bulimina gibba Biofacies dominated from 42 ka to 9.5 ka (extensive regression MIS 3,2 through lowstand and early transgression; beginning of MIS 1); Bulimina marginata, Uvigerina spp. Biofacies dominated from 9.5 ka to the present (late transgression through early highstand; MIS 1)., This study showed that the South Evoikos Basin which is characterized by its critical depths and

  2. Recipe Book for Larger Benthic Foraminifera X-ray Investigation: a Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgring, E.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    During the past years X-ray microtomography (microCT) has become an essential tool in imaging procedures in micropaleontology. Apart from highest standards in accuracy, well conducted microCT scans aim to resolve the whole specimen in constant quality and free from any artifacts or visual interferences. Normally, to get used to X-ray techniques and get usable results, countless attempts are needed, resulting in enormous waste of time. This work tries to provide an insight into how best exploitable results can be obtained from the scanning process concerning Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF). As each specimen features different characteristics regarding substantial composition, density and conservation status, it is impossible and probably erroneous to give standardized guidelines even within this systematic group. Depending on the attributes of the specimen and on the desired visualization, several details have to be taken into account. Samples preparation: to get sharp images the X-ray has to cross the specimen along its shortest diameter, for LBF the equatorial view is almost always the best positioning (not for alveolinids!). The container itself has to be chosen wisely as well; it must not affect a flawless penetration of the specimen by the X-ray and has to provide a high degree of stability. Small plastic pipettes are perfect to store the specimen (or specimens) and some cardboard may help in keeping the position. The nature and quality of the paste used to fixate the object and its container are essential in ensuring a smooth rotation of the specimen which is inevitable for the consistent quality of the image and to avoid vibrations. Scan parameters: beside the correct choice of dedicated filters (which are always different depending on the working station), settings for kv, µA and resolution might have to be revised for each new object to deliver optimal results. Standard values for hyaline forms with empty chambers are normally around 80 Kv and 100 u

  3. Bone Regeneration of Rat Tibial Defect by Zinc-Tricalcium Phosphate (Zn-TCP Synthesized from Porous Foraminifera Carbonate Macrospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera carbonate exoskeleton was hydrothermally converted to biocompatible and biodegradable zinc-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP as an alternative biomimetic material for bone fracture repair. Zn-TCP samples implanted in a rat tibial defect model for eight weeks were compared with unfilled defect and beta-tricalcium phosphate showing accelerated bone regeneration compared with the control groups, with statistically significant bone mineral density and bone mineral content growth. CT images of the defect showed restoration of cancellous bone in Zn-TCP and only minimal growth in control group. Histological slices reveal bone in-growth within the pores and porous chamber of the material detailing good bone-material integration with the presence of blood vessels. These results exhibit the future potential of biomimetic Zn-TCP as bone grafts for bone fracture repair.

  4. Variation in sensitivity of large benthic Foraminifera to the combined effects of ocean warming and local impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Martina; Roberts, T Edward; Pandolfi, John M

    2017-03-23

    Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are crucial marine calcifiers in coral reefs, and sensitive to environmental changes. Yet, many species successfully colonise a wide range of habitats including highly fluctuating environments. We tested the combined effects of ocean warming, local impacts and different light levels on populations of the common LBF Amphistegina lobifera collected along a cross-shelf gradient of temperature and nutrients fluctuations. We analysed survivorship, bleaching frequency, chlorophyll a content and fecundity. Elevated temperature and nitrate significantly reduced survivorship and fecundity of A. lobifera across populations studied. This pattern was exacerbated when combined with below optimum light levels. Inshore populations showed a consistent resistance to increased temperature and nitrate levels, but all populations studied were significantly affected by light reduction. These findings demonstrated the capacity of some populations of LBF to acclimate to local conditions; nonetheless improvements in local water quality can ultimately ameliorate effects of climate change in local LBF populations.

  5. Ostracoda and foraminifera as short-term tracers of environmental changes in very polluted areas: the Odiel Estuary (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F.; Gonzalez-Regalado, M.L.; Borrego, J.; Abad, M.; Pendon, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of 17 cores collected in the Odiel Estuary (SW Spain) permits delimiting the recent evolution of this zone during the past decades and the influence of natural and anthropogenic factors on the distribution of Ostracoda and Foraminifera. In the upper estuary, the coincidence of acid waters, prolonged subaerial exposure, and coarse sediments may explain the absence or the disappearance of these microorganisms during the industrial period (1966-1985) in the major part of this area. In the lower estuary, sedimentary evolution and industrial wastes are the main factors influencing both the distribution and trends of the populations of these two groups. Finally, the main changes observed in the marine estuary are due to the sedimentary effects of the construction of two banks and the dredging of the main estuarine channel. - In a polluted estuary, the meiofaunal assemblages experience different changes even in adjacent sedimentary environments, closely related to anthropogenic and natural causes

  6. Biomonitoring polluted sediments in Arctic regions - possibilities and challenges using benthic foraminifera. Case studies from northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Kari; Dijkstra, Noortje; Junttila, Juho; Sternal, Beata; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Biomonitoring pollution in marine environments using benthic foraminifera assemblages have proven to be a valid method for many regions. Two important reasons for their suitability are their sensitivity to changes in the environment and their rapid response time due to short life cycles. In addition, they are preserved in the sedimentary record, allowing for baseline studies of conditions prior to introduction of contaminants. Species of benthic foraminifera that appear to tolerate polluted sediments are referred to as opportunistic species. This notion is in general used for species able to dominate environments that are too stressful for most species. The high latitude setting of the northern Norwegian coastal zone experience high seasonality and, hence, largely changing conditions throughout a year: variations in water mass domination, freshwater influence, temperature and current velocity. It is possible that an environment like this is inhibited by a higher amount of opportunistic species generally thriving under high stress conditions. This might make the use of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring more challenging, as the faunal compositions may be a result of a complex set of processes. Consequently, large datasets are necessary in order to make reliable conclusions, which in time may be used as generalized guidelines for biomonitoring in this geographical area. Here, we present preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from two sites in Finnmark, northern Norway, which have been exposed to pollution. The main site is Repparfjorden, where the inner parts of the fjord were used as a submarine waste deposal site for mine tailings from a local copper mine during the 1970´s. Results from four marine sediment cores (10-20 cm long) containing sediments classified to be in moderate to very bad state (according to Norwegian sediment quality criteria) are presented. The contamination is seen in intervals of elevated copper content dated to the 1970

  7. Recent Invasion of the Symbiont-Bearing Foraminifera Pararotalia into the Eastern Mediterranean Facilitated by the Ongoing Warming Trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christiane; Morard, Raphael; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Weinmann, Anna E; Titelboim, Danna; Abramovich, Sigal; Kucera, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The eastern Mediterranean is a hotspot of biological invasions. Numerous species of Indo-pacific origin have colonized the Mediterranean in recent times, including tropical symbiont-bearing foraminifera. Among these is the species Pararotalia calcariformata. Unlike other invasive foraminifera, this species was discovered only two decades ago and is restricted to the eastern Mediterranean coast. Combining ecological, genetic and physiological observations, we attempt to explain the recent invasion of this species in the Mediterranean Sea. Using morphological and genetic data, we confirm the species attribution to P. calcariformata McCulloch 1977 and identify its symbionts as a consortium of diatom species dominated by Minutocellus polymorphus. We document photosynthetic activity of its endosymbionts using Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorometry and test the effects of elevated temperatures on growth rates of asexual offspring. The culturing of asexual offspring for 120 days shows a 30-day period of rapid growth followed by a period of slower growth. A subsequent 48-day temperature sensitivity experiment indicates a similar developmental pathway and high growth rate at 28°C, whereas an almost complete inhibition of growth was observed at 20°C and 35°C. This indicates that the offspring of this species may have lower tolerance to cold temperatures than what would be expected for species native to the Mediterranean. We expand this hypothesis by applying a Species Distribution Model (SDM) based on modern occurrences in the Mediterranean using three environmental variables: irradiance, turbidity and yearly minimum temperature. The model reproduces the observed restricted distribution and indicates that the range of the species will drastically expand westwards under future global change scenarios. We conclude that P. calcariformata established a population in the Levant because of the recent warming in the region. In line with observations from other groups of organisms

  8. Recent Invasion of the Symbiont-Bearing Foraminifera Pararotalia into the Eastern Mediterranean Facilitated by the Ongoing Warming Trend.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schmidt

    Full Text Available The eastern Mediterranean is a hotspot of biological invasions. Numerous species of Indo-pacific origin have colonized the Mediterranean in recent times, including tropical symbiont-bearing foraminifera. Among these is the species Pararotalia calcariformata. Unlike other invasive foraminifera, this species was discovered only two decades ago and is restricted to the eastern Mediterranean coast. Combining ecological, genetic and physiological observations, we attempt to explain the recent invasion of this species in the Mediterranean Sea. Using morphological and genetic data, we confirm the species attribution to P. calcariformata McCulloch 1977 and identify its symbionts as a consortium of diatom species dominated by Minutocellus polymorphus. We document photosynthetic activity of its endosymbionts using Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorometry and test the effects of elevated temperatures on growth rates of asexual offspring. The culturing of asexual offspring for 120 days shows a 30-day period of rapid growth followed by a period of slower growth. A subsequent 48-day temperature sensitivity experiment indicates a similar developmental pathway and high growth rate at 28°C, whereas an almost complete inhibition of growth was observed at 20°C and 35°C. This indicates that the offspring of this species may have lower tolerance to cold temperatures than what would be expected for species native to the Mediterranean. We expand this hypothesis by applying a Species Distribution Model (SDM based on modern occurrences in the Mediterranean using three environmental variables: irradiance, turbidity and yearly minimum temperature. The model reproduces the observed restricted distribution and indicates that the range of the species will drastically expand westwards under future global change scenarios. We conclude that P. calcariformata established a population in the Levant because of the recent warming in the region. In line with observations from other

  9. Increased temperature causes different carbon and nitrogen processing patterns in two common intertidal foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wukovits

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Benthic foraminifera are highly abundant heterotrophic protists in marine sediments, but future environmental changes will challenge the tolerance limits of intertidal species. Metabolic rates and physiological processes in foraminifera are strongly dependent on environmental temperatures. Temperature-related stress could therefore impact foraminiferal food source processing efficiency and might result in altered nutrient fluxes through the intertidal food web. In this study, we performed a laboratory feeding experiment on Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica, two dominant foraminiferal species of the German Wadden Sea/Friedrichskoog, to test the effect of temperature on phytodetritus retention. The specimens were fed with 13C and 15N labelled freeze-dried Dunaliella tertiolecta (green algae at the start of the experiment and were incubated at 20, 25 and 30 °C respectively. Dual labelling was applied to observe potential temperature effects on the relation of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen retention. Samples were taken over a period of 2 weeks. Foraminiferal cytoplasm was isotopically analysed to investigate differences in carbon and nitrogen uptake derived from the food source. Both species showed a positive response to the provided food source, but carbon uptake rates of A. tepida were 10-fold higher compared to those of H. germanica. Increased temperatures had a far stronger impact on the carbon uptake of H. germanica than on A. tepida. A distinct increase in the levels of phytodetrital-derived nitrogen (compared to more steady carbon levels could be observed over the course of the experiment in both species. The results suggest that higher temperatures have a significant negative effect on the carbon exploitation of H. germanica. For A. tepida, higher carbon uptake rates and the enhanced tolerance range for higher temperatures could outline an advantage in warmer periods if the main food source consists of chlorophyte phytodetritus

  10. Increased temperature causes different carbon and nitrogen processing patterns in two common intertidal foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovits, Julia; Enge, Annekatrin Julie; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Heinz, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Benthic foraminifera are highly abundant heterotrophic protists in marine sediments, but future environmental changes will challenge the tolerance limits of intertidal species. Metabolic rates and physiological processes in foraminifera are strongly dependent on environmental temperatures. Temperature-related stress could therefore impact foraminiferal food source processing efficiency and might result in altered nutrient fluxes through the intertidal food web. In this study, we performed a laboratory feeding experiment on Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica, two dominant foraminiferal species of the German Wadden Sea/Friedrichskoog, to test the effect of temperature on phytodetritus retention. The specimens were fed with 13C and 15N labelled freeze-dried Dunaliella tertiolecta (green algae) at the start of the experiment and were incubated at 20, 25 and 30 °C respectively. Dual labelling was applied to observe potential temperature effects on the relation of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen retention. Samples were taken over a period of 2 weeks. Foraminiferal cytoplasm was isotopically analysed to investigate differences in carbon and nitrogen uptake derived from the food source. Both species showed a positive response to the provided food source, but carbon uptake rates of A. tepida were 10-fold higher compared to those of H. germanica. Increased temperatures had a far stronger impact on the carbon uptake of H. germanica than on A. tepida. A distinct increase in the levels of phytodetrital-derived nitrogen (compared to more steady carbon levels) could be observed over the course of the experiment in both species. The results suggest that higher temperatures have a significant negative effect on the carbon exploitation of H. germanica. For A. tepida, higher carbon uptake rates and the enhanced tolerance range for higher temperatures could outline an advantage in warmer periods if the main food source consists of chlorophyte phytodetritus. These conditions are

  11. Effects of short-term environmental disturbances on living benthic foraminifera during the Pacific oyster summer mortality in the Marennes-Oléron Bay (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Vincent M P; Debenay, Jean-Pierre; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Radford-Knoery, Joël; Soletchnik, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    Sediment cores were collected from April to August 2004 on tidal mudflats of the macrotidal Marennes-Oléron Bay (SW France), famous for the cultivation of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). The response of living (stained) benthic foraminifera to short-term biogeochemical disturbances in the sediment and overlying water, which may be involved in oyster summer mortality, was monitored. Short-term hypoxia occurred in early June, in conjunction with a sudden rise in temperature. In mid-June, the ammonia content of sediment porewater increased, leading to potentially maximal flux towards overlying waters. Foraminiferal assemblages, particularly in the topmost layer, were altered. Ammonia tepida was the most tolerant to temperature increase and hypoxic conditions whereas Brizalina variabilis and Haynesina germanica were sensitive to organic degradation and hypoxia. Cribroelphidium gunteri was the most opportunistic during recolonisation. Benthic foraminifera showed that short-term biochemical changes in the sediment are toxic and may be involved in the summer mortality of Pacific oysters.

  12. PFR²: a curated database of planktonic foraminifera 18S ribosomal DNA as a resource for studies of plankton ecology, biogeography and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Darling, Kate F; Mahé, Frédéric; Audic, Stéphane; Ujiié, Yurika; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Seears, Heidi A; Wade, Christopher M; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Douady, Christophe J; Escarguel, Gilles; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (Rhizaria) are ubiquitous marine pelagic protists producing calcareous shells with conspicuous morphology. They play an important role in the marine carbon cycle, and their exceptional fossil record serves as the basis for biochronostratigraphy and past climate reconstructions. A major worldwide sampling effort over the last two decades has resulted in the establishment of multiple large collections of cryopreserved individual planktonic foraminifera samples. Thousands of 18S rDNA partial sequences have been generated, representing all major known morphological taxa across their worldwide oceanic range. This comprehensive data coverage provides an opportunity to assess patterns of molecular ecology and evolution in a holistic way for an entire group of planktonic protists. We combined all available published and unpublished genetic data to build PFR(2), the Planktonic foraminifera Ribosomal Reference database. The first version of the database includes 3322 reference 18S rDNA sequences belonging to 32 of the 47 known morphospecies of extant planktonic foraminifera, collected from 460 oceanic stations. All sequences have been rigorously taxonomically curated using a six-rank annotation system fully resolved to the morphological species level and linked to a series of metadata. The PFR(2) website, available at http://pfr2.sb-roscoff.fr, allows downloading the entire database or specific sections, as well as the identification of new planktonic foraminiferal sequences. Its novel, fully documented curation process integrates advances in morphological and molecular taxonomy. It allows for an increase in its taxonomic resolution and assures that integrity is maintained by including a complete contingency tracking of annotations and assuring that the annotations remain internally consistent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Moving beyond the age-depth model paradigm in deep-sea palaeoclimate archives: dual radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis on single foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Metcalfe, Brett; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Wacker, Lukas

    2018-04-01

    Late-glacial palaeoclimate reconstructions from deep-sea sediment archives provide valuable insight into past rapid changes in ocean chemistry. Unfortunately, only a small proportion of the ocean floor with sufficiently high sediment accumulation rate (SAR) is suitable for such reconstructions using the long-standing age-depth model approach. We employ ultra-small radiocarbon (14C) dating on single microscopic foraminifera to demonstrate that the long-standing age-depth model method conceals large age uncertainties caused by post-depositional sediment mixing, meaning that existing studies may underestimate total geochronological error. We find that the age-depth distribution of our 14C-dated single foraminifera is in good agreement with existing bioturbation models only after one takes the possibility of Zoophycos burrowing into account. To overcome the problems associated with the age-depth paradigm, we use the first ever dual 14C and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) analysis on single microscopic foraminifera to produce a palaeoclimate time series independent of the age-depth paradigm. This new state of the art essentially decouples single foraminifera from the age-depth paradigm to provide multiple floating, temporal snapshots of ocean chemistry, thus allowing for the successful extraction of temporally accurate palaeoclimate data from low-SAR deep-sea archives. This new method can address large geographical gaps in late-glacial benthic palaeoceanographic reconstructions by opening up vast areas of previously disregarded, low-SAR deep-sea archives to research, which will lead to an improved understanding of the global interaction between oceans and climate.

  14. On a grain of sand - a microhabitat for the opportunistic agglutinated foraminifera Hemisphaerammina apta n. sp., from the early Eocene Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, David H.; Neville, Lisa A.

    2018-02-01

    Hemisphaerammina apta n. sp. is an attached monothalamous agglutinated foraminifera discovered in shelf sediments of the early Eocene Arctic Ocean. It is a simple yet distinctive component of the endemic agglutinated foraminiferal assemblage that colonized the Arctic Ocean after the microfaunal turnover caused by the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Associated foraminifera are characterized by a high percentage of monothalamous species (up to 60 %) and are entirely agglutinated indicating a brackish (mesohaline) early Eocene Arctic Ocean. Hemisphaerammina apta occurs exclusively as individuals attached to fine detrital grains (0.2 to 1.8 mm) of sediment. It is a small species (0.06 to 0.2 mm in diameter), fine-grained, with a low hemispherical profile, no floor across the attachment area, no substantive marginal flange, no internal structures, and no aperture. Lacking an aperture, it apparently propagated and fed through minute (micrometre-sized) interstitial pores in the test wall. Attachment surfaces vary from concave to convex and rough to smooth. Grains for attachment are diverse in shape and type but are predominantly of quartz and chert. The presence of H. apta in the early Eocene was an opportunistic response to an environment with an active hydrological system (storm events). Attachment to grains of sand would provide a more stable base on a sea floor winnowed by storm-generated currents. Active transport is indicated by the relative abundance of reworked foraminifera mixed with in situ species. Contemporaneous reworking and colonization by H. apta is suggested by its attachment to a reworked specimen of Cretaceous foraminifera.

  15. Moving beyond the age–depth model paradigm in deep-sea palaeoclimate archives: dual radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis on single foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Lougheed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Late-glacial palaeoclimate reconstructions from deep-sea sediment archives provide valuable insight into past rapid changes in ocean chemistry. Unfortunately, only a small proportion of the ocean floor with sufficiently high sediment accumulation rate (SAR is suitable for such reconstructions using the long-standing age–depth model approach. We employ ultra-small radiocarbon (14C dating on single microscopic foraminifera to demonstrate that the long-standing age–depth model method conceals large age uncertainties caused by post-depositional sediment mixing, meaning that existing studies may underestimate total geochronological error. We find that the age–depth distribution of our 14C-dated single foraminifera is in good agreement with existing bioturbation models only after one takes the possibility of Zoophycos burrowing into account. To overcome the problems associated with the age–depth paradigm, we use the first ever dual 14C and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C analysis on single microscopic foraminifera to produce a palaeoclimate time series independent of the age–depth paradigm. This new state of the art essentially decouples single foraminifera from the age–depth paradigm to provide multiple floating, temporal snapshots of ocean chemistry, thus allowing for the successful extraction of temporally accurate palaeoclimate data from low-SAR deep-sea archives. This new method can address large geographical gaps in late-glacial benthic palaeoceanographic reconstructions by opening up vast areas of previously disregarded, low-SAR deep-sea archives to research, which will lead to an improved understanding of the global interaction between oceans and climate.

  16. BIOTIC (FORAMINIFERA AND THECAMOEBIANS AND ABIOTIC PARAMETERS AS PROXIES FOR IDENTIFICATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL HETEROGENEITY IN CAETÉ RIVER ESTUARY, AMAZON COAST, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaro Luiz Mattos Laut1

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera and thecamoebians assemblages were analyzed at Caeté River Estuary in order to identify saline gradients and intensity of human impacts. In the study area, 29 species of foraminifera typically from intertidal environments and 11 species of thecamoebians were identified. The microfaunal assemblages were characterized by low diversity, averaging 1.9 at the mouth and 0.5 near Bragança City. These values are common in transitional coastal environments along de Brazilian Coast. Statistical analysis, based on the relative abundance of species, did not reveal the presence of an estuarine gradient, which was corroborated by the physical and chemical parameters measured in the field. An increasing of sedimentary fine fraction and organic matter occurs in the intermediate region of the estuary, indicating attenuation of the stream influence. The calcareous foraminifera species were associated with high salinity, temperature and pH values. The agglutinated species were associated with muddy sediment, total organic matter and lower salinity. Four environmental compartments were identified based on biotic and abiotic analysis, but they do not represent the classic estuarine gradient, instead, they represent the differences in the freshwater supply and mangrove distance.

  17. Environmental controls on the distribution of living (stained) benthic foraminifera on the continental slope in the Campos Basin area (SW Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Cintia; Mello e Sousa, Silvia Helena de; Vicente, Thaisa Marques; Martins, Maria Virgínia; Nagai, Renata Hanae; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Godoi, Sueli Susana; Napolitano, Dante; Burone, Letícia; Carreira, Renato; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; Taniguchi, Nancy Kazumi; Rezende, Carlos Eduardo de; Koutsoukos, Eduardo Apostolos Machado

    2018-05-01

    Living (stained) benthic foraminifera from deep-sea stations in the Campos Basin, southeastern Brazilian continental margin, were investigated to understand their distribution patterns and ecology, as well as the oceanographic processes that control foraminiferal distribution. Sediments were collected from 1050 m to 1950 m of water depth during the austral winter of 2003, below the Intermediate Western Boundary Current (IWBC) and the Deep Water Boundary Current (DWBC). Based on statistical analysis, vertical flux of particulate organic matter and the grain size of sediment seem to be the main factors controlling the spatial distribution of benthic foraminifera. The middle slope (1050 m deep) is characterized by relatively high foraminiferal density and a predominance of phytodetritus-feeding foraminifera such as Epistominella exigua and Globocassidulina subglobosa. The occurrence of these species seems to reflect the Brazil Current System (BCS). The above-mentioned currents are associated with the relatively high vertical flux of particulate organic matter and the prevalence of sandy sediments, respectively. The lower slope (between 1350 and 1950 m of water depth) is marked by low foraminiferal density and assemblages composed of Bolivina spp. and Brizalina spp., with low particulate organic matter flux values, muddy sediments, and more refractory organic matter. The distribution of this group seems to be related to episodic fluxes of food particles to the seafloor, which are influenced by the BCS at the surface and are deposited under low deep current activity (DWBC).

  18. Determination on the chemical composition of Ammonia beccarii shell using SEM and EDX: Preliminary study of benthic foraminifera capacity in response to anthropogenic metal contamination in coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rositasari, R.; Suratno; Yogaswara, D.

    2018-02-01

    The use of single-celled and shelled biota, such as foraminifera that lives as benthic, in coastal environmental monitoring activity is very efficient. Several species of the Ammonia have been used as a proxy of various aquatic environmental monitoring activities. Chemical constituents screening in foraminiferal shell is a step ahead to identify the capacity of benthic foraminifera in responding to anthropogenic metal contamination in coastal water areas. The initial hypothesis of this study is the calcite test of Ammonia beccarii binds the anthropogenic metal in its shell structure and triggers the deformation test. The normal and abnormal shells of Ammonia specimens from Jakarta Bay and Batam waters are used in this study. The Ponar grab was used to sample surface sediment in Jakarta Bay and Batam waters in 2015, and the short core was used to acquire substratum sediment in Jakarta Bay in 2011.The Ammonia beccarii shell was analyzed using SEM and EDX detectors (Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive X-ray). The shooting was performed three times in each test, i.e. in the first chamber (proloculus), the last chamber and the chamber between the two. The main building blocks of the foraminifera test are oxygen with an average weight range of 42.86 - 58.79% and carbon with an average weight range of 17.69 - 26.32%. There is a tendency for low levels of C and O elements in the abnormal tests.

  19. Tolerance of allogromiid Foraminifera to severely elevated carbon dioxide concentrations: Implications to future ecosystem functioning and paleoceanographic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Mollo-Christensen, Elizabeth; Eisenkolb, Nadine; Starczak, Victoria R.

    2009-02-01

    Increases in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO 2) in the atmosphere will significantly affect a wide variety of terrestrial fauna and flora. Because of tight atmospheric-oceanic coupling, shallow-water marine species are also expected to be affected by increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. One proposed way to slow increases in atmospheric pCO 2 is to sequester CO 2 in the deep sea. Thus, over the next few centuries marine species will be exposed to changing seawater chemistry caused by ocean-atmospheric exchange and/or deep-ocean sequestration. This initial case study on one allogromiid foraminiferal species ( Allogromia laticollaris) was conducted to begin to ascertain the effect of elevated pCO 2 on benthic Foraminifera, which are a major meiofaunal constituent of shallow- and deep-water marine communities. Cultures of this thecate foraminiferan protist were used for 10-14-day experiments. Experimental treatments were executed in an incubator that controlled CO 2 (15 000; 30 000; 60 000; 90 000; 200 000 ppm), temperature and humidity; atmospheric controls (i.e., ~ 375 ppm CO 2) were executed simultaneously. Although the experimental elevated pCO 2 values are far above foreseeable surface water pCO 2, they were selected to represent the spectrum of conditions expected for the benthos if deep-sea CO 2 sequestration becomes a reality. Survival was assessed in two independent ways: pseudopodial presence/absence and measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is an indicator of cellular energy. Substantial proportions of A. laticollaris populations survived 200 000 ppm CO 2 although the mean of the median [ATP] of survivors was statistically lower for this treatment than for that of atmospheric control specimens. After individuals that had been incubated in 200 000 ppm CO 2 for 12 days were transferred to atmospheric conditions for ~ 24 h, the [ATP] of live specimens (survivors) approximated those of the comparable atmospheric

  20. Variations of the paleo-productivity in benthic foraminifera records in MIS 3 from western South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y.; Du, J.; Huang, B.; Chen, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding climate change of last glacial age as the background information of climate forecasting is particularly important in climate research. Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 61-24 ka B.P.) is a relative warm and unstable period in the last glacial. Millennium scale abrupt climate changes, such as Heinrich events and Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, are identified in this period. Research topic on the variations of monsoon during the glacial cycles, especially in MIS 3, is critical for understanding low latitude climatic change and the global paleo-environment as a whole. Fortunately, high resolution sedimentary records in western South China Sea provide us valuable materials to uncover how East Asia Summer Monsoon (EASM) system acts in a highly fluctuating climate ambient like MIS 3. Core 17954 is located in the modern summer upwelling area off the Vietnam coast in western South China Sea (SCS), its sediments record the variations of upwelling generated by EASM. In this work, we carry out paleo-ecological analyses on planktonic ( Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides) and benthic foraminifera (Bulimina aculeate, Uvigerina peregrina, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, ect.) sampled from Core 17954 to investigate paleo-productivity and nutrition change of western SCS and its relation to EASM. The results show that benthic and planktonic foraminifera have similar responses to nutrition change. Various indicators of productivity on the basis of benthic foraminiferal analyses reflect an overall three stage change trend: productivity gradually increases from the beginning of MIS 3 (60-40 ka) to its maximum during 35-30 ka, and finally declines after 30 ka. There is also another important discovery, if we observe the climate change in MIS 3 as a whole, we can also find western SCS and Northern Hemisphere High latitude have strong correspondences in such changes: Heinrich events coincided with high productivity events in the western SCS. Further, the result of

  1. Benthic foraminifera as tools in interpretation of subsurface hydrocarbon fluid flow at Veslemøy High and Hola-Vesterålen areas of the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Soma; Sauer, Simone; Knies, Jochen; Chand, Shyam; Jensen, Henning; Klug, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Relatively few studies have focused on high-latitude benthic foraminifera related to hydrocarbon seeps. In this study, we present micropaleontological data from 8 gravity cores from the Veslemøy High and 4 surface sediments (0-1cm) from Hola-Vesterålen, Norway. The study of hydrocarbon impregnation and its effect on benthic foraminfera was conducted on selected sediment samples from the calcium-rich Holocene sediments of the Veslemøy High. The assemblage of foraminifera have been identified from three regional clusters. Cluster I and II are dominated by benthic foraminifera Buccella, Cassidulina, Cibicides, Discopulvinulina, Epistominella, Pullenia and Trifarina. Cluster III is distinct with an elevated abundance of Cassidulina, Cibicides and Trifarina with significant (>5 %) occurrence of Nonionella and Uvigerina. There is no apparent dissolution on the preserved foraminifera. However, there can be differential dissolution or destruction of the more fragile (thinner-walled test) species like Epistominella, Nonionella or Pullenia while leaving behind over-represented species like Cibicides or Trifarina (both preferring coarse grained, high energy areas that can withstand permanent winnowing and redeposition) with higher preservation potential. Also, Cluster III is placed right over the underlying fault line with shallow seep-indications and thus the fluids released may have induced the dissolution of the fragile species. Moreover, the significant occurrence of benthic foraminifera Nonionella auris, and Uvigerina peregrina, in Holocene deposits of Cluster III may be indicative of environments influenced by hydrocarbon migration to the seafloor. Previous studies have reported active natural hydrocarbon seepage in the Hola area and the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane in the sediments suggests a predominantly thermogenic methane source. The seep-assemblage is composed of Cibicides (~60%), Cassidulina, Discanomalina, Textularia and

  2. Glomospirella cantabrica n. sp., and other benthic foraminifera from Lower Cretaceous Urgonian-type carbonates of Cantabria, Spain: Biostratigraphic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlagintweit, F.; Rosales, I.; Najarro, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new benthic foraminifer is described as Glomospirella cantabrica n. sp. from several sections of the upper Aptian Reocín Formation and one occurrence from the lowermost Albian Las Peñosas Formation of Cantabria (northern Spain). It represents a rather large-sized Glomospirella, with up to eight planispiral whorls, observed in lagoonal wackestones and packstones. The upper Aptian (upper Gargasian–Clansayesian) age is indicated by the co-occurrence with other benthic foraminifera, i.e. orbitolinids. Further biostratigraphic data of the Aptian-p.p. Albian shallow-water carbonates of the North Cantabrian Basin is provided. The rareness of dasycladalean green algae in these deposits is also highlighted. The resulting stratigraphic and biostratigraphic scheme is integrated in a framework of depositional sequences of the North Cantabrian Basin and compared with the sequential schemes of other areas of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin and the Iberian Chain. Similitudes suggest that these depositional sequences are related to global sea-level changes. (Author)

  3. Characterizing the variability of benthic foraminifera in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon event (2010-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, P T; O'Malley, B J; Romero, I C; Martínez-Colón, M; Hastings, D W; Glabach, M A; Hladky, E M; Greco, A; Hollander, D J

    2017-01-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event in 2010 subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions (1000-1300 m) and an order of magnitude increase in flocculent hydrocarbon deposition caused increased concentrations of hydrocarbons in continental slope sediments. This study sought to characterize the variability [density, Fisher's alpha (S), equitability (E), Shannon (H)] of benthic foraminifera following the DWH event. A series of sediment cores were collected at two sites in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from 2010 to 2012. At each site, three cores were utilized for benthic faunal analysis, organic geochemistry, and redox metal chemistry, respectively. The surface intervals (∼0-10 mm) of the sedimentary records collected in December 2010 at DSH08 and February 2011 at PCB06 were characterized by significant decreases in foraminiferal density, S, E, and H, relative to the down-core intervals as well as previous surveys. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) analysis suggested that a 3-fold increase in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration in the surface interval, relative to the down-core interval, was the environmental driver of benthic foraminiferal variability. These records suggested that the benthic foraminiferal recovery time, following an event such as the DWH, was on the order of 1-2 years.

  4. Paleocene to Middle Miocene planktic foraminifera of the southwestern Salisbury Embayment, Virginia and Maryland: biostratigraphy, allostratigraphy, and sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poag, C.W.; Commeau, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Paleocene to Middle Miocene sedimentary fill of the southwestern Salisbury Embayment contains a fragmental depositional record, interrupted by numerous local diastems and regional unconformities. Using planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, 15 unconformity-bounded depositional units have been identified, assigned to six formations and seven alloformations previously recognized in the embayment. The units correlate with second- and third-order sequences of the Exxon sequence stratigraphy model, and include transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Alloformation, formation, and sequence boundaries are marked by abrupt, scoured, burrowed, erosional surfaces, which display lag deposits, biostratigraphic gaps, and intense reworking of microfossils above and below the boundaries.Paleocene deposits represent the upper parts of upper Pleocene Biochronozones P4 and P5, and rest uncomformably  on Cretaceous sedimentary beds of various ages (Maastrichtian to Albian). Lower Eocene deposits represent parts of Biochronozones P6 and P9. Middle Eocene strata represent mainly parts of Biochronozones P11, P12, and P14. Upper Eocene sediments include parts of Biochronozones P15, P16, and P17. Oligocene deposits encompass parts of Biochronozones. N4b to N7 undifferentiated, P21a, and, perhaps, N4a. Lower Miocene deposits encompass parts of Biochronozones N4b to N7 undifferentiated. Middle Miocene strata represent mainly parts of Biochronorones N8, N9, and N10.Nine plates of scanning electron micrographs illustrate the principal planktic foraminifera used to establish the biostratigraphic framework. Two new informal formine of Praeterenuitella praegemma Li, 1987, are introduced.

  5. New evidence on the origin of non-spinose pitted-cancellate species of the early Danian planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ignacio; Arz, Jose Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Intermediate forms identified in some of the most continuous lower Danian sections allow a better understanding of the origin and evolution of pitted (Globanomalina) and cancellate (Praemurica) planktonic foraminifera. Both Globanomalina and Praemurica are part of a major Paleocene lineage, namely the "non-spinose lineage", which started to diverge in the early Danian. Transitional specimens strongly suggest the evolution from Parvularugoglobigerina to Globanomalina, and then to Praemurica. These evolutionary turnovers were quite rapid (probably lasting less than 10 kyr), and seem to have begun in the time equivalent of the lower part of the E. simplicissima Subzone, namely the middle part of the standard Zone Pa. The initial evolutionary trends within this non-spinose lineage were the increase of test size and lip thickness, and the evolution from tiny pore-murals to large pore-pits, and from smooth to pitted and finally cancellate walls. Biostratigraphic data suggest that evolution of the wall texture preceded the morphological evolution within each genus. The oldest species of both Globanomalina and Praemurica, namely G. archeocompressa and Pr. taurica, initially retained the external morphology of the ancestral Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina. Since their divergence, Globanomalina and Praemurica followed a separate evolutionary path, evolving into morphologically different species.

  6. Phylogeography of the tropical planktonic foraminifera lineage globigerinella reveals isolation inconsistent with passive dispersal by ocean currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes K M Weiner

    Full Text Available Morphologically defined species of marine plankton often harbor a considerable level of cryptic diversity. Since many morphospecies show cosmopolitan distribution, an understanding of biogeographic and evolutionary processes at the level of genetic diversity requires global sampling. We use a database of 387 single-specimen sequences of the SSU rDNA of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinella as a model to assess the biogeographic and phylogenetic distributions of cryptic diversity in marine microplankton on a global scale. Our data confirm the existence of multiple, well isolated genetic lineages. An analysis of their abundance and distribution indicates that our sampling is likely to approximate the actual total diversity. Unexpectedly, we observe an uneven allocation of cryptic diversity among the phylogenetic lineages. We show that this pattern is neither an artifact of sampling intensity nor a function of lineage age. Instead, we argue that it reflects an ongoing speciation process in one of the three major lineages. Surprisingly, four of the six genetic types in the hyperdiverse lineage are biogeographically restricted to the Indopacific. Their mutual co-occurrence and their hierarchical phylogenetic structure provide no evidence for an origin through sudden habitat fragmentation and their limitation to the Indopacific challenges the view of a global gene flow within the warm-water provinces. This phenomenon shows that passive dispersal is not sufficient to describe the distribution of plankton diversity. Rather, these organisms show differentiated distribution patterns shaped by species interactions and reflecting phylogenetic contingency with unique histories of diversification rates.

  7. Phylogeography of the tropical planktonic foraminifera lineage globigerinella reveals isolation inconsistent with passive dispersal by ocean currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Agnes K M; Weinkauf, Manuel F G; Kurasawa, Atsushi; Darling, Kate F; Kucera, Michal; Grimm, Guido W

    2014-01-01

    Morphologically defined species of marine plankton often harbor a considerable level of cryptic diversity. Since many morphospecies show cosmopolitan distribution, an understanding of biogeographic and evolutionary processes at the level of genetic diversity requires global sampling. We use a database of 387 single-specimen sequences of the SSU rDNA of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinella as a model to assess the biogeographic and phylogenetic distributions of cryptic diversity in marine microplankton on a global scale. Our data confirm the existence of multiple, well isolated genetic lineages. An analysis of their abundance and distribution indicates that our sampling is likely to approximate the actual total diversity. Unexpectedly, we observe an uneven allocation of cryptic diversity among the phylogenetic lineages. We show that this pattern is neither an artifact of sampling intensity nor a function of lineage age. Instead, we argue that it reflects an ongoing speciation process in one of the three major lineages. Surprisingly, four of the six genetic types in the hyperdiverse lineage are biogeographically restricted to the Indopacific. Their mutual co-occurrence and their hierarchical phylogenetic structure provide no evidence for an origin through sudden habitat fragmentation and their limitation to the Indopacific challenges the view of a global gene flow within the warm-water provinces. This phenomenon shows that passive dispersal is not sufficient to describe the distribution of plankton diversity. Rather, these organisms show differentiated distribution patterns shaped by species interactions and reflecting phylogenetic contingency with unique histories of diversification rates.

  8. Delayed recolonization of foraminifera in a suddenly flooded tidal (former freshwater) marsh in Oregon (USA): Implications for relative sea-level reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin P.; Khan, Nicole S.; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Ewald, Michael; Brophy, Laura; Bridgeland, William T.

    2016-04-01

    Stratigraphic sequences beneath salt marshes along the U.S. Pacific Northwest coast preserve 7000 years of plate-boundary earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone. The sequences record rapid rises in relative sea level during regional coseismic subsidence caused by great earthquakes and gradual falls in relative sea level during interseismic uplift between earthquakes. These relative sea-level changes are commonly quantified using foraminiferal transfer functions with the assumption that foraminifera rapidly recolonize salt marshes and adjacent tidal flats following coseismic subsidence. The restoration of tidal inundation in the Ni-les'tun unit (NM unit) of the Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge (Oregon), following extensive dike removal in August 2011, allowed us to directly observe changes in foraminiferal assemblages that occur during rapid "coseismic" (simulated by dike removal with sudden tidal flooding) and "interseismic" (stabilization of the marsh following flooding) relative sea-level changes analogous to those of past earthquake cycles. We analyzed surface sediment samples from 10 tidal stations at the restoration site (NM unit) from mudflat to high marsh, and 10 unflooded stations in the Bandon Marsh control site. Samples were collected shortly before and at 1- to 6-month intervals for 3 years after tidal restoration of the NM unit. Although tide gauge and grain-size data show rapid restoration of tides during approximately the first 3 months after dike removal, recolonization of the NM unit by foraminifera was delayed at least 10 months. Re-establishment of typical tidal foraminiferal assemblages, as observed at the control site, required 31 months after tidal restoration, with Miliammina fusca being the dominant pioneering species. If typical of past recolonizations, this delayed foraminiferal recolonization affects the accuracy of coseismic subsidence estimates during past earthquakes because significant postseismic uplift may shortly follow

  9. Relationships Between Temperature, pH, and Crusting on Mg/Ca Ratios in Laboratory-Grown Neogloboquadrina Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Hill, Tessa M.; Russell, Ann D.; Spero, Howard J.

    2017-11-01

    Mg/Ca ratio paleothermometry in foraminifera is an important tool for the reconstruction and interpretation of past environments. However, existing Mg/Ca:temperature relationships for planktic species inhabiting middle- and high-latitude environments are limited by a lack of information about the development and impact of low-Mg/Ca ratio "crusts" and the influence of the carbonate system on Mg/Ca ratios in these groups. To address this, we cultured individual specimens of Neogloboquadrina incompta and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in seawater across a range of temperature (6°-12°C) and pH (7.4-8.2). We found by laser ablation inductively couple mass spectrometry analyses of shells that culture-grown crust calcite in N. incompta had a lower Mg/Ca ratio than ontogenetic calcite formed at the same temperature, suggesting that temperature is not responsible for the low-Mg/Ca ratio of neogloboquadrinid crusts. The Mg/Ca:temperature relationship for ontogenetic calcite in N. incompta was consistent with the previously published culture-based relationship, and no significant relationship was found between Mg/Ca ratios and pH in this species. However, the Mg/Ca ratio in laboratory-cultured N. pachyderma was much higher than that reported in previous core top and sediment trap samples, due to lack of crust formation in culture. Application of our ontogenetic calcite-specific Mg/Ca:temperature relationships to fossil N. pachyderma and N. incompta from five intervals in cores from the Santa Barbara Basin and the Bering Sea shows that excluding crust calcite in fossil specimens may improve Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates.

  10. The architecture and associated fauna of Perouvianella peruviana, an endemic larger benthic foraminifera from the Cenomanian–Turonian transition interval of central Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consorti, Lorenzo; Navarro-Ramirez, Juan Pablo; Bodin, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    -strategist foraminifera coexisted with P. peruviana. Moreover, a first description of the soritid taxa Pseudopeneroplis oyonensis n. gen., n. sp. is provided. Interestingly,the superposition of local and global environmental patterns onto the Western Peruvian shelf water masses triggered a mass development...... that were not affected by environmental conditions related to the Cenomanian–Turonian transition. A new architectural analysis of P. peruviana tests found in abundance in central Peru has permitted a detailed update on its systematic and functional morphology. The paleoenvironment associated with the P...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shell weights of planktonic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber in the size range of 300–355 μm were measured from sediment traps in the western and eastern Arabian Sea which represent upwelling and non-upwelling conditions respectively. In the Western Arabian Sea Trap (WAST), G. ruber flux ranged from 33.3 ...

  12. The functional significance of the spinose keel structure of benthic foraminifera: inferences from Miliolina cristata Millett, 1898 (Miliolida) from northeast Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriţa Dumitriu, Simina; Dubicka, Zofia; Ionesi, Viorel

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents Miocene (lower Sarmatian) benthic foraminifera from the FH3P1 Rădăuţi Core section from the northwestern part of the Moldavian Platform, Romania. Based on foraminiferal assemblages we infer sediments were deposited in shallow-water, including marine-marginal environments, of varying salinities from brackish to normal marine with some short and rather small sea-level changes. Moreover, we describe for the first time in the Moldavian Platform a very rare species, Miliolina cristata Millett, which presents a characteristic spinose keel. Based on a detailed study of the test morphology and its variability, observed in picked material as well as in thin sections, we discuss some palaeoecological aspects of these foraminifera. M. cristata probably does not constitute a distinctive species, but it is more probable that some miliolid taxa developed such an exoskeletal feature in response to new environmental conditions, such as more turbulent water. Accordingly, our study would support the thesis that one of the functions of the benthic foraminiferal spines is to stabilize foraminiferal tests found in sandy substrates from high-energy environments.

  13. Attempt of absolute dating and reconstitutions of climate changes in the Caribbean Sea: multi-proxy approaches to planktonic foraminifera and fine aragonitic fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulcre, S.

    2008-06-01

    Absolute dating of climate archives is essential to better understand climate mechanisms. A marine sediment core from the Caribbean Sea enriched in fine-grained aragonite (suitable to U/Th dating) has been studied for both planktonic foraminifera tests (≥150 μm) and fine fraction (≤63 μm) over the last one million years using mineralogical and geochemical approaches. This study aims at i) examining lead/lag of δ 18 O and radiometric ages of the different-size fractions and ii) reconstructing paleo-environment in the area. The fine fraction mineralogy is strongly influenced by glacial-interglacial sea level changes. The offset of δ 18 O and 14 C ages between the fine and foraminifera fractions during Termination I is partly explained by a bioturbation model. Attempt of U/Th dating to Termination II and V reveals that the fine fraction contains non-radiogenic Th, which needs further analytical development. Reconstructed surface water δ 18 O changes suggest a decrease in surface water salinity at the end of Mid-Pleistocene Transition related to ITCZ position over the Caribbean Sea. (author)

  14. Benthic foraminifera and bottom water evolution in the middle-southern Okinawa Trough during the last 18 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tiegang; XIANG Rong; SUN Rongtao; CAO Qiyuan

    2005-01-01

    A piston sediment core E017 from the middle-southern Okinawa Trough was investigated. A preliminary study of the deep-water evolution since 18 cal. ka BP was performed based on the quantitative census data of benthic foraminiferal fauna, together with planktonic foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope, AMS14C dating, and the previous results achieved in the southern Okinawa Trough. The result shows that the benthic fauna was dominated by Bulimina aculeata (d'Orbigny), Uvigerina peregrina (Cushman), Hispid Uvigerina and Uvigerina dirupta (Todd) during the glaciation-deglaciation before 9.2 cal. ka BP, while Epistominella exigua (Brady), Pullenia bulloides (d'Orbigny), Cibicidoides hyalina (Hofker), Sphaeroidina bulloides (d'Orbigny) and Globocassidulina subglobosa (Brady) predominated the fauna in the post-glacial period after 9.2 cal. ka BP. The benthic foraminifera accumulation rate (BFAR), paleoproductivity estimates and benthic foraminiferal assemblage conformably indicate that surface water paleoproductivity and organic matter flux during the glaciation-deglaciation were higher than those of the post-glacial period in the middle-southern Okinawa Trough, and gradually enhanced from the southern to the central Okinawa Trough during the glaciation-deglaciation, which could be caused by the discrepancy of the terrigenous nutrients supply. High abundances of E. exigua, an indicator of pulsed organic matter input, after 9.2 cal. ka BP may indicate that the intensity of seasonally riverine pulsed flux during the post-glacial period was stronger than that of the glaciation-deglaciation period, and the seasonal influx in the central trough might be stronger than in the south. The temporal distributions of the typical species indicating bottom water oxygen content and ventilation condition show that the ventilation of the bottom water during the post-glacial period is more active than the glaciation-deglaciation, which reflects that the evolution of the intermediate and

  15. New insights to ecology, ontogeny and teratology of Larger Benthic Foraminifera by biometrics based on microCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, A.; Fabienke, W.; Wolfgring, E.; Ferrández Cañadell, C.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    The main function of tests in Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) is to provide their endosymbiotic algae with enough light to obtain net photosynthetic rates and to create sufficient accommodation space. To study the relation between these two factors and to understand how the cell reacts to growth and to the environment, the newly developed technique of X-ray micro-Computer-Tomography (microCT) allows measurement of all characters of complex tests without destruction. Growth studies on 48 specimens of living and fossil species have been performed. The volumes of the lumina have been calculated as well as further 2-dimensional parameters related to volumes as chamber height, chamber width and septal distance. The volumes of chamber lumina represent cell growth in their sequence, thus demonstrating interruptions, increase/decrease or oscillations in growth rates caused by external factors affecting growth during life time (e.g. seasons). Correlations between volumes and the one-dimensional parameters have been calculated to check the form of relationship. According to our results, some parameters seem to oscillate exactly as the volume (therefore accommodating it), while others seem to oscillate constantly around a given growth function. Concerning the palaeobiology, beside the study of specimens with 'normal' growth, thus not drastically affected by external factors, some interesting morphologies have been investigated. Pluriembryonal apparati as well as secondary equatorial layers have been segmented, extracted and quantified in almost 15 specimens of Cycloclypeus carpenteri, 8 twin specimens of nummulitids tests have been also investigated to show where and how the fusion starts and volumetric quantifications of each single spiral in multispiral grown test of some large Eocene Nummulitids has also been calculated to show in which way and when (ontogenetically) a new spiral starts. The combination of all measurements allows interpretation of different biological

  16. Dinoflagellate cysts and benthic foraminifera in surface sediments from the Mar Piccolo in Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, L.; Rubino, F.; Frontalini, F.; Belmonte, M.; Di Leo, A.; Giandomenico, S.; Greco, M.; Lirer, F.; Spada, L.; Vallefuoco, M.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal areas have traditionally been places of human settlement, with the increasing development of cities, industries and other human-related activities possibly having an impact on the aquatic ecosystem. These impacts may take the form of pollution from industrial, domestic, agricultural or mining activities. For this reason, attention to marine environmental problems has recently increased and the search for new methodologies and techniques for the monitoring of coastal-marine areas become more and more active and accurate. In this context biological indicators result a useful tool to provide indication of environmental conditions including the presence or absence of contaminants; in fact biological monitoring is more directly related to the ecological health of an ecosystem than are chemical data. The increasing importance of bioindicators is also encouraged within the European Union's Water Framework Directive (WFD), which aims to achieve a good ecological status in all European water bodies (i.e., rivers, lakes and coastal waters). Among the wide range of bioindicators, 5 biological elements are listed within the WFD: phytoplankton, macroalgae, angiosperms, benthic invertebrates and fishes. Benthic invertebrates as foraminifera represent a group of protozoa widely distributed in all brackish and marine environments which are used in studies assessing the environmental quality of areas subject to intense human activity. Moreover in coastal marine environments benthic and pelagic domain present several relationships, one of these is represented by the life cycles of phytoplankton species, as Dinoflagellates, which include the production of benthic stages (cysts). These dormant stages, which accumulate in confined marine muddy areas, such as ports, lagoons or estuaries, can reach high densities, similar to the seed banks of terrestrial plants. The cysts have a high preservation potential and can rest in/on the sediments for decades. Due to this peculiar

  17. Use of the Boron partition coefficient ‘KD’ and B/Ca from planktonic foraminifera in the estimation of past seawater pCO2

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    We assess the usefulness of the empirical boron partition coefficient, KD and B/Ca measured from planktonic foraminifera in estimation of pCO2 using three different relationships between KD and temperature derived...

  18. Incorporation of Mg and Sr in calcite of cultured benthic foraminifera: impact of calcium concentration and associated calcite saturation state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raitzsch

    2010-03-01

    -sea benthic foraminifera typically used for paleostudies, the higher Ca concentrations in the past may potentially bias temperature reconstructions to a considerable degree. For instance, 25 Myr ago Mg/Ca ratios in A. tepida would have been 0.2 mmol/mol lower than today, due to the 1.5 times higher [Ca2+] of seawater, which in turn would lead to a temperature underestimation of more than 2 °C.

  19. Faunal and stable isotopic analyses of benthic foraminifera from the Southeast Seep on Kimki Ridge offshore southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Mary; Conrad, James E.

    2018-01-01

    deep infaunal species of Globobulimina, the shallow infaunal species Uvigerina peregrina, the epifaunal species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, and the shallow infaunal but aragonite-shelled species Hoeglundina elegans. The δ13C values downcore among each benthic species indicates ongoing fluid seepage through at least the last 3800 cal yr B.P. at Southeast Seep. Besides the continual local seepage, evidence from δ13C values of planktic foraminifera in the seep core suggest two pulses of methane (at 3000 and 3700 cal yr B.P.) were released that were large enough to influence much of the water column. Paired benthic and planktic foraminiferal stable oxygen isotope records provide evidence that there were no paleoenvironmental changes such as increased bottom-water temperature or changes in oxygen isotopic composition of bottom and pore waters during this 3800-year record to induce the methane releases. Instead, Southeast Seep appears to be the result of local faulting providing pathways for fluid to flow to the seafloor at a fault stepover or transpressional bend in the regional strike-slip system.

  20. Bottom water production variability in the Ross Sea slope during the Late-Pleistocene-Holocene as revealed by benthic foraminifera and sediment geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asioli, A.; Langone, L.; Tateo, F.; Giannossi, M. L.; Giglio, F.; Summa, V.; Piva, A.; Ridente, D.; Trincardi, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Antarctic area produces bottom waters that ventilate the vast majority of the deep basins in the rest of the world ocean. The rate of formation in the source area and the strength of these cold bottom waters affect their flow toward the equator and are key factors affecting the Global Thermohaline Circulation during modern and past climate conditions. We present the results of a multidisciplinary study carried out on a core collected in 2377m of water depth on the slope off the Drygalski Basin (Ross Sea), along the modern path of the bottom waters. The goal of this research is to detect a qualitative signal of possible changes in the rate of bottom water production during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene by integrating micropaleontological and geochemical proxies. The micropaleontological signal is represented by the quantitative and qualitative variations of the agglutinated benthic foraminifera assemblages, while the amount of TOC, nitrogen, δ13C, δ15N, biogenic silica, CaCO3 in the sediment, along with the bulk rock mineralogy, provide information on the paleoproductivity and allow reconstruction of changes in the paleocirculation. The chronology is supported by 14C AMS datings on organic matter. Although this study is still in progress, the results obtained allow the following observations: 1) the Holocene sequence includes a major turnover around 8-8.5 calib kyr BP, leading to reduced nutrient utilization, probably reflecting an increased nutrient supply induced by an enhanced Upper Circumpolar Deep Water upwelling; 2) within this general context, the total concentration of benthic foraminifera preserved in the fossil component records millennial scale cycles of variable amplitude after 8.5 calib kyr BP and to present time. This oscillatory trend is paralleled by other parameters, such as the magnetic susceptibility, the dry density, the sheet silicates and the δ15N; 3) minima in foraminifera concentration reflect relatively increased dissolution, weaker

  1. Seasonal Trends and Inter-Individual Heterogeneity: A multi-species record of Mg, Sr, Ba, & Mn in Planktic Foraminifera from the Modern Cariaco Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. V.; Thunell, R.; Astor, Y. M.

    2017-12-01

    The trace element to calcium ratios (TE/Ca) of planktic foraminifera shells are a valuable tool for paleoceanographic reconstructions, and represent a combination of environmental, ecological and biological signals. We present here a three-year record (2010-2013) of TE/Ca (Mg, Sr, Ba, Mn) from four species of foraminifera (Orbulina universa, Globigerina ruber, Globigerinella siphonifera, and Globorotalia menardii) collected by plankton tow in the modern Cariaco basin. Each tow is paired with in situ measurements of water column properties, allowing a direct comparison between shell geochemistry and calcification environment. A combination of Laser Ablation and solution ICP-MS analyses are used to document seasonality, primarily due to the alternating influence of wind-driven coastal upwelling and riverine inputs, in shell TE/Ca. Individual shell data further allows for the quantification of trace element heterogeneity among individual shells within single tows. All TE/Ca ratios vary temporally and show inter-individual variability within single tows. The spread in TE/Ca differs between element and species, with Mg/Ca ratios being the most variable. Despite this, Mg/Ca still tracks temperature changes in G. ruber, O. universa, and G. menardii, with G. ruber most closely reproducing sea surface temperature. Some species show chamber-to-chamber differences in trace element ratios, with G. ruber Mg/Ca and Ba/Ca decreasing in younger chambers (but not other elements) and Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca and Ba/Ca decreasing in younger chambers in G. siphonifera. We find the original Mn/Ca to be variable both temporally and between species, with G. menardii in some samples having extremely high ratios (100 μmol/mol). Assessing seasonal trends and environmental drivers of TE/Ca variability and quantifying the extent of inter-individual heterogeneity in these species will inform the use of their shells as geochemical proxies.

  2. The Chicxulub impact is synchronous with the planktonic foraminifera mass extinction at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary: new evidence from the Moncada section, Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, I.; Arz, J.A.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Melendez, A.; Rojas-Consuegra, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Moncada section, western Cuba, is one of the few sections across the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean where an Ir anomaly has been identified toward and above the top of a clastic unit, locally called the Moncada Formation (Fm.). The Moncada Fm. is enriched in ejecta (altered glass spherules, shocked quartz, melt rock fragments, etc.) and represents the local Complex Clastic Unit (CCU) linked to the Chicxulub impact event. This CCU is overlain by a 2-3cm thick bed of Ir-rich, dark, calcareous claystone which represents the “K/T Boundary Clay” at Moncada. All lowermost Danian Planktonic Foraminiferal zones and Acme-Stages (PFAS) were identified, suggesting stratigraphic continuity across the Danian and indicating that the Moncada Fm. is K/Pg boundary in age. High-resolution biostratigraphic data suggest that the mass extinction event of planktonic foraminifera at the K/Pg boundary was more severe than previously suggested. The absence of cosmopolitan, generalist Cretaceous species in the Danian deposits of Moncada supports the hypothesis that only Guembelitria survived the mass extinction triggered by the Chicxulub impact event. The high Ir-concentration and the ejecta-rich clay laminations identified in the lowermost Danian of Moncada (Ancón Fm.) are explained partly as the redeposition of ejecta material eroded and reworked from higher topographic levels, still contaminated by toxic trace elements (e.g., Cu and Ni) of meteoritic origin. These pollutants of meteoritic origin could have affected the ecological conditions of the pelagic environment for thousands of years after the K/Pg boundary, being particularly intense just after the Chicxulub impact. The ecological stress due to the pollutants partly explains the catastrophic mass extinction of planktonic foraminifera at the K/Pg boundary and their subsequent evolutionary radiation. (Author)

  3. Variation in the composition of corals, fishes, sponges, echinoderms, ascidians, molluscs, foraminifera and macroalgae across a pronounced in-to-offshore environmental gradient in the Jakarta Bay-Thousand Islands coral reef complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Renema, W; Hoeksema, B W; Rachello-Dolmen, P G; Moolenbeek, R G; Budiyanto, A; Yahmantoro; Tuti, Y; Giyanto; Draisma, S G A; Prud'homme van Reine, W F; Hariyanto, R; Gittenberger, A; Rikoh, M S; de Voogd, N J

    2016-09-30

    Substrate cover, water quality parameters and assemblages of corals, fishes, sponges, echinoderms, ascidians, molluscs, benthic foraminifera and macroalgae were sampled across a pronounced environmental gradient in the Jakarta Bay-Thousand Islands reef complex. Inshore sites mainly consisted of sand, rubble and turf algae with elevated temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and chlorophyll concentrations and depauperate assemblages of all taxa. Live coral cover was very low inshore and mainly consisted of sparse massive coral heads and a few encrusting species. Faunal assemblages were more speciose and compositionally distinct mid- and offshore compared to inshore. There were, however, small-scale differences among taxa. Certain midshore sites, for example, housed assemblages resembling those typical of the inshore environment but this differed depending on the taxon. Substrate, water quality and spatial variables together explained from 31% (molluscs) to 72% (foraminifera) of the variation in composition. In general, satellite-derived parameters outperformed locally measured parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. EMP and SIMS studies on Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca systematics in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian OMZ: a contribution to the identification of potential redox proxies and the impact of cleaning protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, N.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Hensen, C.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present an initial dataset of Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) determined with SIMS. These results are a contribution to a better understanding of the proxy potential of these elemental ratios for ambient redox conditions. Foraminiferal tests are often contaminated by diagenetic coatings, like Mn rich carbonate- or Fe and Mn rich (oxyhydr)oxide coatings. Thus, it is substantial to assure that...

  5. Core top confirmation of the carbonate ion effect in multiple species of planktic foraminifera and a reassessment of the upper water column equatorial Pacific δ13CFORAM records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera carbon (δ13CFORAM) and oxygen (δ18OFORAM) isotope records play a vital role in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18OFORAM values are typically minimally offset from equilibrium δ18O-calcite and are widely applied in oceanographic reconstructions of upper water column hydrography. In contrast, δ13CFORAM are underutilized in paleoceanographic reconstructions. δ13CFORAM are more difficult to interpret due to species-specific δ13CFORAM offsets from the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC). In this study, we analyzed the δ18OFORAM and δ13CFORAM of individual foraminifera shells from a suite of planktic foraminifer species obtained from core top (Holocene) intervals from Eastern Equatorial Pacific (TR163-19), Western Caribbean (ODP 999A), and Equatorial Indian Ocean (ODP 714A) cores. We also include published records from the Western Equatorial Pacific (MW91-9 15GGC). We find the δ13CFORAM offsets from the local water column δ13CDIC are large, variable, region specific, and are correlated to the ambient carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) of seawater. We show that the regional offsets from δ13CDIC are due to the carbonate ion effect (CIE) on δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997; Bijma et al., 1999) and variations in water column [CO32-]. More importantly, our results demonstrate that regional and/or culture based δ13CFORAM offsets from δ13CDIC are not applicable globally. Rather, owing to regional differences in water column [CO32-] and species-specific relationships between [CO32-] and δ13CFORAM, δ13CFORAM must be corrected for the regional CIE in order to infer vertical δ13CDIC gradients or to compare δ13CFORAM records from one region to another. Laboratory culture suggests the carbonate ion effect on δ18OFORAM is 1/3 that of δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997). Thus, in order to obtain correct δ18OFORAM temperatures or δ18OSW (when used in conjunction with Mg/Ca) the δ18OFORAM offsets from δ18

  6. Environmental impact of the largest petroleum terminal in SE Brazil: A multiproxy analysis based on sediment geochemistry and living benthic foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wânia Duleba

    Full Text Available The Dutos e Terminais do Centro Sul (DTCS is one of the largest petroleum terminals of the South America located in the São Sebastião Channel (SSC on the southeastern Brazilian coast. The aims of this study were to compare the sediment quality near the DTCS with that of several sites in the SSC region including the Araçá (AR domestic sewage outfall and to assess the efficiency of the DTCS wastewater treatment plant. To achieve these goals, textural, geochemical, and living benthic foraminifera results were analyzed for the DTCS, AR, and SSC regions. Sediments in the DTCS area were silty with high concentrations of total organic carbon (1.7-2.4%, total nitrogen (0.2-0.3%, total sulfur (0.4-0.6%, and total (0.12-0.18% and inorganic phosphorous (0.07-0.11%. These values were higher than those in sediments collected in the SSC and Araçá regions. The sediments' concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the SSC and AR regions were lower than their corresponding probable effect levels (PELs. However, sediments near the DTCS were enriched with As, Cu, and Ni, whose concentrations exceeded their corresponding threshold effect levels (TELs. Around the DTCS outfall diffusers, living foraminiferal densities and diversities were lower than those for the other areas studied. In the DTCS area, it was necessary to search 50 to 190 cm3 of sediment to find 100 live specimens. In the SSC and Araçá areas, a maximum of 40 cm3 of sediment was enough to locate 100 live specimens. The lower density and diversity of living foraminifera around the DTCS than around the other areas illustrates the impact of the environmental stress caused by the presence of pollutants. These results indicate that the wastewater treatment plant efficiency is low and its discharge of pollutants from petrochemical waste liquids affects the benthic fauna around the DTCS in a potentially harmful manner.

  7. Environmental impact of the largest petroleum terminal in SE Brazil: A multiproxy analysis based on sediment geochemistry and living benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleba, Wânia; Teodoro, Andreia C.; Debenay, Jean-Pierre; Gubitoso, Silas; Pregnolato, Leonardo Antônio; Lerena, Laura Misailidis; Prada, Silvio Miranda; Bevilacqua, José Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    The Dutos e Terminais do Centro Sul (DTCS) is one of the largest petroleum terminals of the South America located in the São Sebastião Channel (SSC) on the southeastern Brazilian coast. The aims of this study were to compare the sediment quality near the DTCS with that of several sites in the SSC region including the Araçá (AR) domestic sewage outfall and to assess the efficiency of the DTCS wastewater treatment plant. To achieve these goals, textural, geochemical, and living benthic foraminifera results were analyzed for the DTCS, AR, and SSC regions. Sediments in the DTCS area were silty with high concentrations of total organic carbon (1.7–2.4%), total nitrogen (0.2–0.3%), total sulfur (0.4–0.6%), and total (0.12–0.18%) and inorganic phosphorous (0.07–0.11%). These values were higher than those in sediments collected in the SSC and Araçá regions. The sediments’ concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the SSC and AR regions were lower than their corresponding probable effect levels (PELs). However, sediments near the DTCS were enriched with As, Cu, and Ni, whose concentrations exceeded their corresponding threshold effect levels (TELs). Around the DTCS outfall diffusers, living foraminiferal densities and diversities were lower than those for the other areas studied. In the DTCS area, it was necessary to search 50 to 190 cm3 of sediment to find 100 live specimens. In the SSC and Araçá areas, a maximum of 40 cm3 of sediment was enough to locate 100 live specimens. The lower density and diversity of living foraminifera around the DTCS than around the other areas illustrates the impact of the environmental stress caused by the presence of pollutants. These results indicate that the wastewater treatment plant efficiency is low and its discharge of pollutants from petrochemical waste liquids affects the benthic fauna around the DTCS in a potentially harmful manner. PMID:29432425

  8. REPLICAÇÃO DE FÓSSEIS DE FORAMINIFERA UTILIZANDO REAPROVEITAMENTO DE “ISOPOR” COM ALUNOS DO IFPB-CG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermes de Oliveira Machado Filho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Os fósseis são unidades paleontológicas preciosas e difíceis de serem coletadas para pesquisas ou principalmente para aulas práticas sobre o passado geológica da Terra. Desta forma, lançam-se mão de técnicas alternativas para se fazer réplicas dessas unidades. O presente artigo vem apresentar atividades de sistemática paleozoológica, utilizando o “isopor” como matéria prima para confecção de modelos de fósseis em aulas práticas para a comunidade escolar do Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia da Paraíba, campus de Campina Grande. Dessa forma, o instituto está iniciando a construção de um acervo visual 3D alternativo de fósseis guia do grupo dos Foraminifera, em específico, os bioindicadores de petróleo, além de contribuir para reutilização de resíduos sólidos poluidores ao meio ambiente.

  9. Late Paleocene-middle Eocene benthic foraminifera on a Pacific seamount (Allison Guyot, ODP Site 865): Greenhouse climate and superimposed hyperthermal events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreguín-Rodríguez, Gabriela J.; Alegret, Laia; Thomas, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the response of late Paleocene-middle Eocene (~60-37.5 Ma) benthic foraminiferal assemblages to long-term climate change and hyperthermal events including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 on Allison Guyot, a seamount in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Seamounts are isolated deep-sea environments where enhanced current systems interrupt bentho-pelagic coupling, and fossil assemblages from such settings have been little evaluated. Assemblages at Site 865 are diverse and dominated by cylindrical calcareous taxa with complex apertures, an extinct group which probably lived infaunally. Dominance of an infaunal morphogroup is unexpected in a highly oligotrophic setting, but these forms may have been shallow infaunal suspension feeders, which were ecologically successful on the current-swept seamount. The magnitude of the PETM extinction at Site 865 was similar to other sites globally, but lower diversity postextinction faunas at this location were affected by ocean acidification as well as changes in current regime, which might have led to increased nutrient supply through trophic focusing. A minor hyperthermal saw less severe effects of changes in current regime, with no evidence for carbonate dissolution. Although the relative abundance of infaunal benthic foraminifera has been used as a proxy for surface productivity through bentho-pelagic coupling, we argue that this proxy can be used only in the absence of changes in carbonate saturation and current-driven biophysical linking.

  10. Southern Ocean Surface and Intermediate Water Temperature from Alkenones and Mg/Ca of Infaunal Foraminifera for the last 1.5 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Aurora; McClymont, Erin; Elderfield, Harry; Kender, Sev

    2014-05-01

    The reconstruction of past surface (SST), intermediate, and deep-water temperatures is critical to our understanding of feedbacks within the ocean-climate system. Intermediate water temperature (IWT) reconstruction is particularly important since intermediate waters, including Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), are proposed to be an important driver in high-low latitude teleconnections, despite limited intermediate-depth records through the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Paleotemperature proxies have caveats, including the 'Carbonate Ion Effect' on the Magnesium to Calcium ratio (Mg/Ca) of benthic foraminifera. However, recent studies demonstrated that the infaunal species, Uvigerina peregrina, co-precipitates Mg independent of secondary effects, affording the use of U.peregrina Mg/Ca as a paleotemperature proxy (Elderfield et al., 2010). We present the first 1.5 Ma record of IWT from Mg/CaU.peregrina coupled with an alkenone- derived UK37' SST record from a sediment core in the Southwest Pacific (DSDP site 593; 1068m water depth), in the core of modern AAIW. Our new data reconstruct interglacial IWTs at ~7°C before and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), whereas values of ~5°C occur in the later Pleistocene. Glacial IWT remained fairly constant (~2°C) throughout the last 1 Ma. These results are in apparent disagreement with the typical idea that glacial-interglacial temperature fluctuations were smaller in the '41-kyr world' before the MPT, than during the '100-kyr world', after the MPT. At proximal ODP site 1123 (3290m water depth; Elderfield et al., 2012), interglacial deepwater temperatures increase by ~1°C after the MPT, with relatively constant glacial deepwater temperatures (~-2°C) over the last 1 Ma. New results from DSDP 593 therefore imply that the mechanisms that drive intermediate and deep water temperatures varied, suggesting that at least one of these watermasses has properties driven by something other than Northern Hemisphere glaciation

  11. Constraining Seasonal and Vertical Distributions of Planktonic Foraminifera for Paleoclimate Reconstruction Since MIS3 at the Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The California Current is an upwelling region with dynamic interactions between circulation, biological productivity and ecology. A 77 cm piston push core was taken from the Juan de Fuca Ridge Axial Seamount using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) (2213m, 45.55º N, 130.08º W), an active submarine volcano ~480 km off Oregon's coast. Five radiocarbon dates indicate that the sediment ranges from 42.6 ka at 77 cm to 17.6 ka at 15 cm, with an average sediment accumulation rate of 2.47 cm/ka from 77-15 cm, and an average rate of 0.85 cm/ka during the postglacial period (the core representing subtropical, subartic, and arctic fauna have been used to constrain changes in vertical and seasonal temperature since Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3). Measurements of δ18O of the upwelling species Globigerina bulloides, the thermocline dwelling species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and the warm mixed-layer species Orbulina universa are offset from each other, reflecting vertical and seasonal variation among the planktonic foraminifera. Of the three species, G. bulloides shows the least variation in δ18O, possibly indicating that marked changes in temperature are masking changes in the δ18O of seawater due to global ice volume changes. G. bulloides and O. universa δ18O values are similar in MIS 3 and diverge with time, indicating the development of strong seasonal succession of species, since the last glacial maximum. Bulk nitrogen isotopes and nitrogen flux provide additional constraints on upwelling strength and insight into local biological productivity and nutrient dynamics. Obtaining Mg/Ca data will clarify the δ 18O interpretation except deep in the core where metal-bearing authigenic precipitates affect Mg concentrations. These climatic proxies together provide insight into how global climate change and local seamount volcanism impacts regional productivity in the California Current.

  12. Ba incorporation in benthic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nooijer, L.J.; Brombacher, Anieke; Mewes, A.; Langer, Gerald; Nehrke, G.; Bijma, Jelle; Reichart, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Barium (Ba) incorporated in the calcite of many foraminiferal species is proportional to the concentration of Ba in seawater. Since the open ocean concentration of Ba closely follows seawater alkalinity, foraminiferal Ba ∕ Ca can be used to reconstruct the latter. Alternatively, Ba ∕ Ca from

  13. Recent foraminifera of the Sao Francisco river delta, Sergipe, Brazil: a proposal for the ecological and environmental diagnostic model; Foraminiferos recentes do delta do Rio Sao Francisco, Sergipe (Brasil): uma proposta de modelo ecologico e de diagnostico ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Recent foraminifera assemblages were studied to determine an ecological model of species distribution, diversity, equability and confining degree, with implications to environmental diagnosis and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The study area is inserted in a sector from Sao Francisco River delta, with interconnected channels and a lagoon connected to the ocean. Besides the biotic variables, sediment salinity and granulometry was considered. An agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) was performed and it was recognized three bio facies distributed along the sector: Miliammina/Arenoparrella in the channels, and Ammonia/Elphidium and Quinqueloculina at the lagoon. The diversity and equability values increase from the Miliammina/Arenoparrella biofacies to the Ammonia/Elphidium and Quinqueloculina biofacies. The confining indices show environments ranging from confined (channels) to different degrees of low restricted to marine influence. From the results obtained, it is possible to recognize that environments dominated by textulariines are characterized by low diversity, equability and high confining degree. Environments dominated by rotaliines and miliolines tend to be more diversified, equitable and low restricted to marine influence. The results are similar to other obtained in other Brazilian estuarine environments, differing only on dominance by some species (author)

  14. Paleomonsoon records from the western Arabian Sea: evidence of aeolian input and Red Sea water inflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, M.; Ramesh, R.; Bhushan, R.; Somayajulu, B.L.K.; Jull, A.J.T.; Burr, G.S.; Sheshshayee, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The western Arabian Sea experiences intense productivity variations due to wind-induced upwelling during the South West monsoon. Variations in calcareous productivity derived from marine sediment cores can prove to be an excellent indicator of monsoon wind strength provided that the core has been raised from water depths well above the lysocline (∼4000 m). The core was radiocarbon dated by on select planktonic foraminiferal species viz. Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei (size range chosen for dating as well as isotopic analysis is 250 μ -500 μ. Planktonic foraminifera were selected for our study because they inhabit the surface and near surface oceans (upto∼ 100 m) and, therefore, readily incorporate changes occurring in the surface ocean into their calcitic shells

  15. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500 Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300 Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior. PMID:20430090

  16. The Ecological Associations of Surface-Dwelling Lizards in Qom Province in the Northwest of Central Plateau of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mehregan; Ahmadzadeh, Faraham; Mostafavi, Hossein; Mehrabian, Aahmad Reza; Abdoli, Asghar; Mahini, Abdolrasoul Salman

    2013-01-01

    We used pitfall trapping to investigate the effects of elevation, plant density and soil structure on species diversity and the impact of these habitat factors on lizard habitat selectivity in the Qom Province in the Central Plateau of Iran. From a total of 12 1-ha plots, we captured 363 individuals of 15 species of lizards (six species of Lacertidae, five species of Agamidae, two species of Gekkonidae, one species of Varanidae and one species of Scincidae). A generalized linear model (GLM) determined that elevation was the most important factor impacting species diversity. The highest species diversity was at the intermediate elevation (1289 m). Abundance of 6 out of 15 species showed strong relationships with some habitat factors. These relationships were demonstrated by habitat selectivity index (Ivlev's index). Our result supports other surveys that showed that elevation plays an important role in determining lizard species diversity. PMID:24349557

  17. Potential contribution of surface-dwelling Sargassum algae to deep-sea ecosystems in the southern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Philip; Minzlaff, Ulrike; Schoenle, Alexandra; Schwabe, Enrico; Hohlfeld, Manon; Jeuck, Alexandra; Brenke, Nils; Prausse, Dennis; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Brix, Saskia; Frutos, Inmaculada; Jörger, Katharina M.; Neusser, Timea P.; Koppelmann, Rolf; Devey, Colin; Brandt, Angelika; Arndt, Hartmut

    2018-02-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems, limited by their inability to use primary production as a source of carbon, rely on other sources to maintain life. Sedimentation of organic carbon into the deep sea has been previously studied, however, the high biomass of sedimented Sargassum algae discovered during the VEMA Transit expedition in 2014/2015 to the southern North Atlantic, and its potential as a regular carbon input, has been an underestimated phenomenon. To determine the potential for this carbon flux, a literature survey of previous studies that estimated the abundance of surface water Sargassum was conducted. We compared these estimates with quantitative analyses of sedimented Sargassum appearing on photos taken with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) directly above the abyssal sediment during the expedition. Organismal communities associated to Sargassum fluitans from surface waters were investigated and Sargassum samples collected from surface waters and the deep sea were biochemically analyzed (fatty acids, stable isotopes, C:N ratios) to determine degradation potential and the trophic significance within deep-sea communities. The estimated Sargassum biomass (fresh weight) in the deep sea (0.07-3.75 g/m2) was several times higher than that estimated from surface waters in the North Atlantic (0.024-0.84 g/m2). Biochemical analysis showed degradation of Sargassum occurring during sedimentation or in the deep sea, however, fatty acid and stable isotope analysis did not indicate direct trophic interactions between the algae and benthic organisms. Thus, it is assumed that components of the deep-sea microbial food web form an important link between the macroalgae and larger benthic organisms. Evaluation of the epifauna showed a diverse nano- micro-, meio, and macrofauna on surface Sargassum and maybe transported across the Atlantic, but we had no evidence for a vertical exchange of fauna components. The large-scale sedimentation of Sargassum forms an important trophic link between surface and benthic production and has to be further considered in the future as a regular carbon input to the deep-sea floor in the North Atlantic.

  18. A comparison of Mg/Ca ratios in Globigerinoides ruber (white): sensu stricto versus a mixture of genotypes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    at the University of Southampton, UK, using G. ruber, sensu stricto only. Cleaned samples were dissolved in 100-300 µl 0.5M HNO3. Mg/Ca ratios were analysed on a Thermo Finnigan Element 2 ICP-MS. Long term precision for Mg/Ca is 3% (2σ) based on repeat.... Acknowledgements: I thank Jimin Yu of LDEO and Miguel Martinez-Boti of the University of Southampton for the analytical help. This work was funded by the INDOUSSTF fellowship and a DST Fast Track Project to SN. This is National Institute of Oceanography...

  19. Late Holocene hydrographic settings of the northern Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Badawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variability of the paleo-oceanographic setting of the northern Red Sea during the last 6 Ky was deduced from high-resolution faunal results and stable isotope records of planktonic foraminifera in three short cores sediment obtained by the German R/V Meteor vessel. In general, the investigated time interval is fundamentally comparable to the present day composition and distribution of planktonic foraminifera. However, interrupted short enhanced arid phase spanning the last 4–2 Ky appears to have existed in the northern Red Sea, and resulted in elevation of salinity and somehow productivity, as hypersaline, dense surface water favored vertical mixing of the water column resulting in an increase in productivity. This paleoclimatic reconstruction is revealed from the distinct gradient in the composition and distribution of planktonic foraminifera, as well as the significant distribution trend of Globigerinoides ruber versus Globigerinoides sacculifer correlated with the stable isotope records. Starting from the last 2 Ky to the present time, less strength arid conditions relative to the previous period prevailed, reflected from a gradual decrease in surface water salinity and productivity assuming that the present water conditions and consequently current climatic conditions began to develop from that time with minor fluctuations reaching the recent conditions.

  20. Remunerative role of foraminifera in coastal ecosystem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Due to the direct relationship between climate and economy (through agriculture), predictive models for climatic changes are very much needed. Climatic prediction is a delicate task and depends upon how well know the past climate. Since the direct...

  1. Distribution of foraminifera in the Cochin estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Balasubramanian, T.

    A total of 78 foraminiferal species have been identified from sediment samples collected from the estuarine area of Cochin during faunal surveys representing different seasons. Abundance and toatl number of species (live + dead) are poor during SW...

  2. Role of foraminifera in oceanographic events

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    ; however, large scale drifting does not seem to have occurred since the Lower Miocene. The inter-relationship of palaeotemperature and isotopes of @u18@@O/@u16@@O, @u13@@C/@u12@@C with salinity, temperature and depth stratification of the ancient seas...

  3. La coupe d'Ouled Haddou (Rif externe oriental) : un affleurement continu de la transition Crétacé Paléogène au Maroc, révélé par les Foraminifères planctoniquesThe Ouled Haddou section (oriental external Rif): a continuous outcrop of the Cretaceous Palaeogene transition in Morocco, revealed by planktonic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufiq, Abdelkabir; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Boutakiout, Mohamed; Feinberg, Hugues

    2002-10-01

    In the Ouled Haddou section, deposits of the Uppermost Maastrichtian correspond to the Abathomphalus mayaroensis Biozone. The index species is regularly present until the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary, which is marked by a mass extinction affecting 41 species (large and complex). Some Cretaceous small species persist in the Lowermost Danian. The first levels of the Danian are assigned to the Guembelitria cretacea Biozone, in which the species index persist without being affected, and the first species of the Tertiary appear. The upper part of the Lower Danian corresponds to the succession of Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina, Parasubbotina pseudobulloides, and Subbotina triloculinoides Biozones. From the P. eugubina Biozone, associations of Danian vary to undergo a complete renewal in the upper zones. The Ouled Haddou section, described for the first time, presents, according to planktonic Foraminifera, a complete record of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene transition. To cite this article: A. Toufiq et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 995-1001.

  4. Living (stained calcareous benthic foraminifera from recent sediments off Concepción, central-southern Chile (~36° S Foraminíferos bentónicos calcáreos vivos (teñidos en sedimentos recientes de Concepción, Chile centro-sur (~36° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAÚL TAPIA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines onshore-offshore and vertical distribution of living (Rose Bengal stained benthic foraminifera (> 180 μm fraction from three sediment stations along a bathymetric transect off Concepción, Chile (station 18 = 88 m water depth, station 26 = 120 m, station 40 = 1,030 m, within and below the oxygen minimum zone. All cores were collected in austral winter. Calcareous foraminifera dominated the three stations. The species composition, living foraminifera density, and vertical distribution patterns within the sediment changed in accordance with bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration and food availability. Onshore-offshore pattern revealed overall highest living foraminiferal densities at shelf stations 18 and 26 where bottom water dissolved oxygen was lowest (~ 0.2 mL-1 and content in labile organic matter highest. Within the sediment, maximum relative abundances (50-60 % of living organisms were found in the 0-1 cm interval at the organic-rich and oxygen-poor shelf stations 18 and 26. In the well-oxygenated (2.7 mL-1 slope station 40, 70 % of living foraminifera were observed deeper than the first centimeter. The number of species and the contribution of the > 250 μm fraction to the total fauna larger than 180 μm increased offshore. Nonionella auris (d'Orbigny dominated at stations 18 and 26 while a more diverse foraminifera fauna was found at station 40. This study provides the first quantitative data on living benthic foraminifera in the area; seasonal and interannual changes are not addressed.Este estudio examina la distribución costa-océano y vertical de los foraminíferos bentónicos calcáreos (fracción > 180 im vivos (teñidos en tres estaciones a lo largo de un transecto batimétrico frente al área de Concepción, Chile (estación 18 = 88 m, estación 26 = 120 m, estación 40 = 1.030 m de profundidad, dentro y bajo la zona mínima de oxígeno. Todos los testigos de sedimento fueron recolectados durante el per

  5. Millennial- to century-scale variability in Gulf of Mexico Holocene climate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Verardo, S.; Quinn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Proxy records from two piston cores in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provide a detailed (50-100 year resolution) record of climate variability over the last 14,000 years. Long-term (millennial-scale) trends and changes are related to the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions and movement of the average position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) related to orbital forcing. The ??18O of the surface-dwelling planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber show negative excursions between 14 and 10.2 ka (radiocarbon years) that reflect influx of meltwater into the western GOM during melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The relative abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer is related to transport of Caribbean water into the GOM. Maximum transport of Caribbean surface waters and moisture into the GOM associated with a northward migration of the average position of the ITCZ occurs between about 6.5 and 4.5 ka. In addition, abundance variations of G. sacculifer show century-scale variability throughout most of the Holocene. The GOM record is consistent with records from other areas, suggesting that century-scale variability is a pervasive feature of Holocene climate. The frequency of several cycles in the climate records is similar to cycles identified in proxy records of solar variability, indicating that at least some of the century-scale climate variability during the Holocene is due to external (solar) forcing.

  6. Oxygen and carbon isotopes of Recent calcareous nannofossils as paleoceanographic indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodney, D.E.; Margolis, S.V.; Dudley, W.C.; Kroopnick, P.; Williams, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Delta 18 O and delta 13 C values for several species of planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils from Recent deep-sea sediments have been studied in order to evaluate their paleoceanographic and paleotemperature potential. Nannofossils from Indian Ocean core-tops reflect isotopic temperatures as warm as, or warmer than, the temperatures reported for shallow-dwelling planktonic forminifera from the same samples. In general, deep-sea sediment samples from the world's major oceans indicate that nannofossil delta 18 O values are from 0.5 to 1 per thousand heavier than shallow-dwelling planktonic foraminifera. Although nannofossil delta 18 O values depart from thermodynamic equilibrium with oceanic surface water temperatures, the delta 18 O temperature trend parallels that of surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifera. Nannofossil delta 13 C values also depart equilibrium with surface water delta 13 C-ΣCO 2 values. A comparison of nannofossil delta 13 C data with that from planktonic foraminifera suggests that the rate of primary productivity in different water masses may be influencing the delta 13 C carbonate-secreting phytoplankton and zooplankton. (Auth.)

  7. Mangrove sediment core analysis of foraminiferal assemblages - a study at two sites along the western coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vidya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are an unique habitat and are largely influenced by sea level changes and wave energy. Foraminifera (Protista preserved in mangrove sediments provide an excellent proxy for deducing past conditions. One meter deep mangrove core samples at two sites on the western coast of India were collected. The foraminiferal assemblages at various depths showed significant changes in the abundance and diversity down the cores. A total of 59 species belonging to 32 genera, 24 families and five suborders were identified from the cores of these two sites. The cores showed an abundance of genus Rotalidium particularly the species Rotalidium annectans. Other species identified include Ammonia, Elphidium, Nonion, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Globigerinoides, etc. The pH, organic matter and CaCO3 also showed variations down the cores. There was a lack of correlation between sediment characteristics and the abundance of foraminifera in the cores. The low diversity and differences in distribution of foraminifera compared to surface intertidal samples may be due to intense post depositional changes or anthropogenic disturbances. The mangrove ecology thus appears disturbed by various factors.

  8. Diatoms as Proxies for Abrupt Events in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, W.; Abbott, D. H.; Recasens, C.; Breger, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Hudson River estuary has been subject to many abrupt events throughout its history including hurricanes, droughts and pluvials. Hurricanes in particular are rare, discrete events that if fingerprinted can be used to develop better age models for Hudson River sediments. Proxies use observed physical characteristics or biological assemblages (e.g. diatom and foraminiferal assemblages) as tools to reconstruct past conditions prior to the modern instrumental record. Using a sediment core taken from the Hudson River (CDO2-29A), in New York City, drought and pluvial layers were selected based on Cs-137 dating while hurricane layers were determined from occurrences of tropical to subtropical foraminifera. Contrary to previous studies (Weaver, 1970, Weiss et al, 1978), more than sixty different diatom species have been identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cosmopolitan, hurricane and drought assemblages have begun to be identified after observing multiple layers (Table 1). Tropical foraminifera dominated by Globigerinoides ruber pink were also found in a hurricane layer that we infer was deposited during Hurricane Belle in 1976. More diatom abundance analyses and cataloged SEM pictures will provide further insight into these proxies. Table 1 Diatom Genera and Species Environment Clarification Cyclotella caspia Planktonic, marine-brackish Cosmopolitan Karayevia clevei Freshwater Cosmopolitan Melosira sp Planktonic, marine Cosmopolitan Thalassiosira sp Marine, brackish Cosmopolitan Staurosirella leptostauron Benthic, freshwater Cosmopolitan Actinoptychus senarius Planktonic or benthic, freshwater to brackish Hurricane and pluvial layers Amphora aff. sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Nitzschia sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Gomphonema sp Freshwater Hurricane layers only Surirella sp Marine-brackish Drought layer only Triceratium sp Marine Drought layer only Other Genera and species Environment Clarification

  9. Environmental controls on barium incorporation into planktic foraminifer, Globorotalia truncatulinoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, J. N.; Reynolds, C. E.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Ba/Ca of planktic foraminifera in marine sediment cores has been used primarily to track changes in riverine input over time, and thus may be a potentially powerful proxy for reconstructing past changes in the terrestrial hydrologic cycle. Using Ba/Ca as a proxy for riverine freshwater input requires the assumption that Ba/Ca in foraminiferal calcite reflects the Ba/Ca of seawater, and that the partition coefficient for barium between seawater and foraminiferal calcite is independent of the influence of temperature, salinity, pH, alkalinity and light availability. Although it has been shown that this partition coefficient is nearly identical for common species of spinose planktic foraminifera (e.g., Globigerinoides ruber, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer), some non-spinose species have been demonstrated to have Ba/Ca ratios that are much higher than that of co-occurring spinose specimens. We investigate environmental controls on Ba/Ca in the tests of Globorotalia truncatulinoides, a planktic species of foraminifera with a unique life history in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). G. truncatulinoides experiences 92% of its annual flux to the sediment trap during winter (JFM) in the GoM. The Mg/Ca and ∂18O of the ontogenetic calcite suggests that primary calcification occurs within the surface mixed layer (0-150 meters), and a thick secondary crust is added at depths below the thermocline. We use LA-ICP-MS to analyze the Ba/Ca of both encrusted and non-encrusted G. truncatulinoides from a sediment trap time series in the GoM and find that the Ba/Ca in ontogenetic calcite of non-encrusted specimens varies between 10 and 200 mmol/mol, while the Ba/Ca of the secondary crust varies between 0 and 3 mmol/mol. The Ba/Ca of the non-encrusted G. truncatulinoides specimens is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of co-occurring spinose planktic foraminifera (O. universa and G. ruber) in the GoM sediment trap, while the secondary crust has Ba/Ca similar to

  10. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... of a species for isotopic analysis has forced us to select multiple species from down-core samples. Thus ... microhabitat, climatic variability, bottom and pore ...... Trends, rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 Ma.

  11. Bipolar gene flow in deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, J.; Fahrni, J.; Lecroq, B.

    2007-01-01

    Despite its often featureless appearance, the deep-ocean floor includes some of the most diverse habitats on Earth. However, the accurate assessment of global deep-sea diversity is impeded by a paucity of data on the geographical ranges of bottom-dwelling species, particularly at the genetic leve...

  12. Recent planktonic foraminifera from the sediment off Karwar and Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    Eleven samples collected from the shelf-slope regions off Karwar and mangalore transects of the Arabian Sea, yielded fifteen planktonic foraminiferal species, which are identified and described. There is a progressive increase in the percentage...

  13. Some observations on the Miocene foraminifera from Kachchh, Western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhri, A.K.; Khare, N.

    The foraminiferal species described from the Miocene sequence exposed at the village Vinjhan of Kachchh are widely distributed in the comparable successions of the Middle East and Greece. They can be used for inter-regional correlation...

  14. Potentiality of foraminifera in deciphering paleo-sea levels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indias_Exclusive_Economic_Zone_1996_225.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indias_Exclusive_Economic_Zone_1996_225.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  15. Aspects of the biodiversity of brackish water foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    of the area; however, levels were high during the premonsoon season (March and May) due to prevalence of marine conditions in the lake. Furthermore, the evaluation of different sectors in the study area showed somewhat poor diversity within the lagoon and rich...

  16. Holocene planktonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments off Kerala Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Twenty-two planktonic foraminifers were identified from a few samples collected aboard INS KISTNA at 9~'N and 76~'E, at 89 metres depth from the bottom sediment-water interface. A few of the more characteristic features of each are described. Some...

  17. Effect of oxygen manipulations on benthic foraminifera: A preliminary experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panchang, R.; Nigam, R.; Linshy, V.; Rana, S.S.; Ingole, B.S.

    . Care was taken to collect bottom sediments and the overlying water with their interface intact. Bottom water temperature was noted immediately as 11°C. In each of the box cores, a plastic liner with 8 inch INDIAN J. MAR. SCI., VOL. 35, No. 3..., SEPTEMBER 2006 236 diameter was inserted into the sediments slowly to a depth of ~10 cm (taking care the fluffy layer is not disturbed) and immediately covered with acrylic lids. These cores contained a minimum of 10 cm of bottom sediments and 20 cm...

  18. Reproductive behaviour of benthic foraminifera: A key to palaeoclimate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    in mean proloculus size in Cavarotalia annectens in a number of modern surface sediment samples from the inner shelf of the west coast of India. It is observed that mean proloculus size is inversely proportional to temperature and salinity. In view...

  19. Larger benthic foraminifera in Miocene carbonates of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novak, Vibor

    2014-01-01

    Present day Southeast Asia represents the region that supports the most diverse marine ecosystems on Earth. The origin of this biodiversity is still unresolved, but it is proposed to be present at least since the Early Miocene. Therefore, the data acquired from the fossil assemblages may contribute

  20. Statistical analysis of planktic foraminifera of the surface Continental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planktic foraminiferal assemblage recorded from selected samples obtained from shallow continental shelf sediments off southwestern Nigeria were subjected to statistical analysis. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to determine variants of planktic parameters. Values obtained for these parameters were ...

  1. Species diversity: Benthonic Foraminifera in Western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzas, M.A.; Gibson, T.G.

    1969-01-01

    Maximum species diversity occurs at abyssal depths of greater than 2500 meters. Other diversity peaks occur at depths of 35 to 45 meters and 100 to 200 meters. The peak at 35 to 45 meters is due to species equitability, whereas the other two peaks correspond to an increase in the number of species.

  2. Ecosystem recovery after hypoxia: what can foraminifera indicate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    The many resources and services provided by coastal ecosystems (e.g. food, fertile soils), make these areas valuable habitats for marine life and human occupation. Expanding human population sizes and the associated increase of human exploitation of coastal zones has made these areas prone to

  3. Paleogene reworked foraminifera in Recent sediments off Daman, Western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    The first record of reworked foraminiferal species in the Recent sediments off the coast of Daman is reported. Among others, @iQuadrimorphina advena, Uvigerina minuta, Gyroidinoides soldani, Bulimina aguafrescanensis@@ and @iAlabamina atlantisae...

  4. Planktonic foraminifera from core tops of western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    distributional pattern showing upward trend in its abundance from 38 per cent at 21 degrees S latitude to 0.8 per cent at 6 degrees N latitude. Sub-tropical fauna is sparsely distributed in the Equatorial Indian Ocean. Based on these studies it is interpreted...

  5. Frequency distribution of Foraminifera in the Chilka lake

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    -349. Clifford, H.T. and W. Stephenson. 1975. An intro- duction to numerical classification, Academic Press, New York, 225 pp. Field, J.G., K.R. Clarke and R.M. Warwick. 1982. A practical strategy for analyzing multispecies distribution patterns. Mar. Ecol...

  6. Shelf edge regime and foraminifera off Pondicherry, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Amphistegina, Borelis, Operculina, Operculinoides@@, the Peneroplidae, and the Miliolidae may be due, in part, to their survival over long periods of time and also to their continued existence even today. Some species have a wider range of distribution extending from...

  7. Pliocene benthonic foraminifera from homogeneous and laminated marls on Crete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the Pliocene, the paleogeography of central Crete consisted of a number of basins which were filled by predominantly marly sediments. In the sedimentary sequence numerous laminated sapropelic intercalations can be observed. At a higher stratigraphic level diatomaceous laminites appear.

  8. Agglutinated foraminifera from the shelf of east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Almeida, F.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    belonging to six families, in a depth zone of 35-222 m of the east-coast of India (between Visakhapatnam and Masulipatnam along the continental shelf-slope region) in terms of lithology, faunal assemblage and their percentage distribution are discussed...

  9. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY OF LARGE MILIOLID FORAMINIFERA. (R825869)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThe foraminiferal superfamily Soritacea belongs to the suborder Miliolina and is divided in two families, Peneroplidae and Soritidae, the latter one comprising two subfamilies, Archaiasinae and Soritinae. Phylogenetic relationships of 11 genera of soritid fora...

  10. Holocene benthonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments of Kerala coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    the occurrence of @iHyalinea balthica@@ found in the present material (and which marks the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary in Italy) is known to be a cool to cold water indicator. Earlier it was reported (Setty 1972) that @iGlobigerina pachyderma@@ (Ehrenberg) a...

  11. Variaciones estacionales de los foraminíferos planctónicos durante 2005-2006 frente a Iquique (20°S y Concepción (36°S, Chile Seasonal variations of planktic foraminifera during 2005-2006 off Iquique (20°S and Concepción (36°S, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Gajardo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió por primera vez las variaciones estacionales de los foraminíferos planctónicos frente a las costas de Iquique (20°S, 70°W y Concepción (36°S, 74°W, Chile. Las muestras fueron recolectadas mediante trampas de sedimentos ubicadas en dos profundidades: 1.000 y 2.300 m, entre septiembre y diciembre 2005, bajo condiciones normales (con surgencias permanentes y ausencia del evento El Niño en la zona norte, y entre enero y octubre durante el evento El Niño 2006 en la zona sur (con surgencias estacionales. Se determinó un total de 23 especies, 22 de las cuales se recolectaron frente a Iquique y 16 frente a Concepción. Además, se determinó el flujo de carbonato de calcio de foraminíferos, flujo de individuos y diversidad para definir patrones faunísticos en dichas áreas, de diferentes condiciones oceanográficas. Los resultados mostraron que en Iquique, bajo condiciones normales, se produjo un constante flujo de individuos y carbonato, con máximos en septiembre y octubre 2005, confirmando la presencia de surgencia costera en este período. Por el contrario, en Concepción, bajo condiciones El Niño (2006, el flujo de individuos y carbonato de calcio presentó máximos durante la época estival evidenciando surgencias, que sin embargo, son de menor duración (enero-febrero respecto a lo descrito en condiciones normales para esta área. La diversidad fue mayor a menor en profundidad en ambas zonas, permaneciendo constante durante todo el período en la zona norte, a diferencia de la zona sur, cuyos mayores valores se observaron durante la época estival coincidiendo con los afloramientos costeros en esta área.We studied for first time the seasonal variations of planktic foraminifera off Iquique (20°S, 70°W and Concepcion (36°S, 74°W, Chile. The samples were collected by sediment traps located at two depths: 1000 and 2300 m between September and December 2005, under normal conditions (with permanent upwelling and the

  12. Sedimentology and biostratigraphy of the Early-Middle Miocene transition in NW Transylvanian Basin (Pâglişa and Dej sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Beldean

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Early - Middle Miocene transition can be studied in several sections from the north-western Transylvanian Basin, across the boundary between the Hida and Dej Formations. The Pâglişa and Râpa Dracului (Dej locally outcrop sections offer a very good record of the changes in the sedimentary facies and micropaleontological content across the boundary. The lower parts of the sections display the upper Hida Formation with prodelta fine grained sediments covered by coarser grained sediments related to a delta front progradation. Four sedimentary facies associations have been separated based on grain size and associated sedimentary structures. Micropaleontological assemblages are moderately to poorly preserved, with a low abundance and diversity. Planktonic Streptochilus pristinum is the main taxon associated with rare (< 10% calcareous benthic foraminifera (Bulimina, Bolivina, Cibibicidoides. The Dej Formation consists of stacked channel lag deposits associated with lateral accretion bars and crevasse splays followed by fall-out tuffs and redeposited low density tuffites interbedded with low density fine siliciclastics. The deposits of Dej Formation from the investigated areas were separated in four facies associations based on grain size/petrography and primary sedimentary structures. Micropaleontological assemblages contain typical early Badenian planktonic foraminifera (species of Orbulina, Praeorbulina, Globigerinoides, and Globorotalia associated to the main phase of the marine transgresion from the beginning of the Middle Miocene.

  13. High - Resolution SST Record Based on Mg/Ca Ratios of Late Holocene Planktonic Foraminifers From the Great Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A.; Reijmer, J. J.; Roth, S.

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed five different planktic foraminifera species in the high resolution core MD 992201 off the Great Bahama Bank (79° 16.34 W; 25° 53.49 N) in 290 m water depth. This 38.05 m long core comprises a 7,000 year long Holocene record. The selected species were Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globorotalia menardii and Globigerinella aequilateralis, which live in the upper 200 m of the water column. The Mg/Ca ratios of these different foraminifers show species-specific values, which represent a distinct habitat depth. With this species-specific Mg/Ca ratios we can reconstruct a temperature profile through the water column. The lowest Mg/Ca are shown by G. menardii (2.5 - 4 mmol/mol), followed by G. sacculifer (4.2 - 5.6 mmol/mol), G. ruber (5.1 - 7.2 mmol/mol) and G. aequilateralis (5.5 - 8.7 mmol/mol). Highest are shown by O. universa (6 - 14 mmol/mol). During the Little Ice Age, the Mg/Ca ratios of all species except for the deeper dwelling G. menardii, became more variable and showed lower ratios. The shallow dwelling species like G. ruber and G. sacculifer display an increase in the Mg/Ca ratios during the Medieval Warm Period. Our data show that transferring Mg/Ca ratios into SST based calibration curves known from literature needs re-evaluation. Species-specific calibration seems to be necessary to achieve reliable results.

  14. Low planktic foraminiferal diversity and abundance observed in a spring 2013 west-east Mediterranean Sea plankton tow transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallo, Miguel; Ziveri, Patrizia; Mortyn, P. Graham; Schiebel, Ralf; Grelaud, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Planktic foraminifera were collected with 150 µm BONGO nets from the upper 200 m water depth at 20 stations across the Mediterranean Sea between 2 May and 2 June 2013. The main aim is to characterize the species distribution and test the covariance between foraminiferal area density (ρA) and seawater carbonate chemistry in a biogeochemical gradient including ultraoligotrophic conditions. Average foraminifera abundances are 1.42 ± 1.43 ind. 10 m-3 (ranging from 0.11 to 5.20 ind. 10 m-3), including 12 morphospecies. Large differences in species assemblages and total abundances are observed between the different Mediterranean sub-basins, with an overall dominance of spinose, symbiont-bearing species indicating oligotrophic conditions. The highest values in absolute abundance are found in the Strait of Gibraltar and the Alboran Sea. The western basin is dominated by Globorotalia inflata and Globigerina bulloides at slightly lower standing stocks than in the eastern basin. In contrast, the planktic foraminiferal assemblage in the warmer, saltier, and more nutrient-limited eastern basin is dominated by Globigerinoides ruber (white). These new results, when combined with previous findings, suggest that temperature-induced surface water stratification and food availability are the main factors controlling foraminiferal distribution. In the oligotrophic and highly alkaline and supersaturated with respect to calcite and aragonite Mediterranean surface water, standing stocks and ρA of G. ruber (white) and G. bulloides are affected by both food availability and seawater carbonate chemistry. Rapid warming increased surface ocean stratification impacting food availability and changes in trophic conditions could be the causes of reduced foraminiferal abundance, diversity, and species-specific changes in planktic foraminiferal calcification.

  15. Size-dependent response of foraminiferal calcification to seawater carbonate chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Evans, David; Shankle, Madison; Burke, Janet E.; Foster, Gavin L.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Chalk, Thomas B.; Stewart, Joseph A.; Alt, Claudia H. S.; Durrant, Joseph; Hull, Pincelli M.

    2017-07-01

    The response of the marine carbon cycle to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations will be determined, in part, by the relative response of calcifying and non-calcifying organisms to global change. Planktonic foraminifera are responsible for a quarter or more of global carbonate production, therefore understanding the sensitivity of calcification in these organisms to environmental change is critical. Despite this, there remains little consensus as to whether, or to what extent, chemical and physical factors affect foraminiferal calcification. To address this, we directly test the effect of multiple controls on calcification in culture experiments and core-top measurements of Globigerinoides ruber. We find that two factors, body size and the carbonate system, strongly influence calcification intensity in life, but that exposure to corrosive bottom waters can overprint this signal post mortem. Using a simple model for the addition of calcite through ontogeny, we show that variable body size between and within datasets could complicate studies that examine environmental controls on foraminiferal shell weight. In addition, we suggest that size could ultimately play a role in determining whether calcification will increase or decrease with acidification. Our models highlight that knowledge of the specific morphological and physiological mechanisms driving ontogenetic change in calcification in different species will be critical in predicting the response of foraminiferal calcification to future change in atmospheric pCO2.

  16. Orbital-scale denitrification changes in the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Khim, Boo-Keun; Ikehara, Minoru; Lee, Jongmin

    2018-05-04

    Denitrification in the Arabian Sea is closely related to the monsoon-induced upwelling and subsequent phytoplankton production in the surface water. The δ 15 N values of bulk sediments collected at Site U1456 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355 reveal the orbital-scale denitrification history in response to the Indian Monsoon. Age reconstruction based on the correlation of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) δ 18 O values with the LR04 stack together with the shipboard biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data assigns the study interval to be 1.2 Ma. Comparison of δ 15 N values during the last 800 kyrs between Site U1456 (Eastern Arabian Sea) and Site 722B (Western Arabian Sea) showed that δ 15 N values were high during interglacial periods, indicating intensified denitrification, while the opposite was observed during glacial periods. Taking 6‰ as the empirical threshold of denitrification, the Eastern Arabian Sea has experienced a persistent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to maintain strong denitrification whereas the Western Arabian Sea has undergone OMZ breakdown during some glacial periods. The results of this study also suggests that five principal oceanographic conditions were changed in response to the Indian Monsoon following the interglacial and glacial cycles, which controls the degree of denitrification in the Arabian Sea.

  17. Growth, chamber building rate and reproduction time of Palaeonummulites venosus (Foraminifera) under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shunichi; Eder, Wolfgang; Wöger, Julia; Hohenegger, Johann; Briguglio, Antonino

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifer Palaeonummulites venosus to determine the chamber building rate (CBR), test diameter increase rate (DIR), reproduction time and longevity using the `natural laboratory' approach. This is based on the decomposition of monthly obtained frequency distributions of chamber number and test diameter into normally distributed components. Test measurements were taken using MicroCT. The shift of the mean and standard deviation of component parameters during the 15-month investigation period was used to calculate Michaelis-Menten functions applied to estimate the averaged CBR and DIR under natural conditions. The individual dates of birth were estimated using the inverse averaged CBR and the inverse DIR fitted by the individual chamber number or the individual test diameter at the sampling date. Distributions of frequencies and densities (i.e., frequency divided by sediment weight) based on both CBR and DIR revealed continuous reproduction throughout the year with two peaks, a stronger one in June determined as the onset of the summer generation (generation 1) and a weaker one in November determined as the onset of the winter generation (generation 2). This reproduction scheme explains the presence of small and large specimens in the same sample. Longevity, calculated as the maximum difference in days between the individual's birth date and the sampling date, is approximately 1.5 yr, an estimation obtained by using both CBR and DIR.

  18. A note on the Pavonina flabelliformis D'Orbigny (benthic foraminifera) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.

    . flabelliformis in modern sediments off Karwar suggests and updates the lower depth limit to 33 metre as against reported from deeper regions in previous studies. This will have significant bearing in paleodepth studies of sedimentary strata having fossils...

  19. Revalidation of the genus Chiloguembelitria Hofker: Implications for the evolution of early Danian planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ignacio; Arz, José A.; Gilabert, Vicente

    2017-10-01

    Guembelitria is the only planktonic foraminiferal genus whose survival from the mass extinction event of the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary has been clearly proven. The evolution of Guembelitria after the K/Pg boundary led to the appearance of two guembelitriid lineages in the early Danian: one biserial, represented by Woodringina and culminating in Chiloguembelina, and the other trochospiral, represented by Trochoguembelitria and culminating in Globoconusa. We have re-examined the genus Chiloguembelitria, another guembelitriid descended from Guembelitria and whose taxonomic validity had been questioned, it being considered a junior synonym of the latter. Nevertheless, Chiloguembelitria differs from Guembelitria mainly in the wall texture (pustulate to rugose vs. pore-mounded) and the position of the aperture (umbilical-extraumbilical to extraumbilical vs. umbilical). Chiloguembelitria shares its wall texture with Trochoguembelitria and some of the earliest specimens of Woodringina, suggesting that it played an important role in the evolution of early Danian guembelitriids, as it seems to be the most immediate ancestor of both trochospiral and biserial lineages. Morphological and morphostatistical analyses of Chiloguembelitria discriminate at least five species: Chg. danica, Chg. irregularis, and three new species: Chg. hofkeri, Chg. trilobata and Chg. biseriata.

  20. Response of benthic foraminifera Rosalina leei to different temperature and salinity, under laboratory culture experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Saraswat, R.; Linshy, V.N.; Rana, S.S.

    . ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors are thankful to the Director, National Institute of Oceanography, Goa for his support and permission to publish this work. We are also thankful to the Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi for the financial support (SR/S4/ ES...-74/2003) to the RN and ‘Women Scientist Scholarship’ (WOS–B) to L.V.N. Two of the authors (S.R.K.) and (S.S.R.) are thankful to the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi for granting a Senior Research Fellowship. The authors...

  1. Benthic foraminifera as pollution indices in the marine environment of west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    the discharge point; miliolids in the transitional zone and dominantly smaller-sized @iNonionella, Fursenkoina pontoni, Bulimina marginata@@ at the distal zone quite far from the discharge point where pollutants are diluted and dissipated. In the Karwar area...

  2. Morphological deformities of benthic foraminifera in response to nearshore pollution of the Red Sea, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kahawy, R; El-Shafeiy, M; Helal, S A; Aboul-Ela, N; El-Wahab, M Abd

    2018-04-28

    The Red Sea encompasses a wide range of tropical marine habitats that are stressed due to anthropogenic activities. The main anthropogenic activities are hydrocarbon exploration and important trading harbors. This work aims to assess the influence of the Red Sea coastal heavy metal contamination on the marine meiofauna along three sites (Ras Gharib, Safaga, and Quseir). Eight heavy metal (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni, and Mn) contents are considered in four benthic foraminiferal species (Elphidium striatopunctatum, Amphistegina lobifera, Amphisorus hemprichii, and Ammonia beccarii). Quseir Harbor showed the highest level of pollution followed by Safaga and Ras Gharib sites. The analyzed benthic foraminiferal tests displayed noteworthy high concentrations of Cd, Zn, and Pb in Quseir Harbor which could be attributed to the anthropogenic activities in the nearshore areas. Some foraminiferal tests exhibited abnormalities in their apertures, coiling, and shape of chambers. A comparison between normal and deformed foraminiferal tests revealed that the deformed ones are highly contaminated with elevated heavy metal contents such as Fe, Mn, Ni, and Cd. Statistics in addition to geo-accumulation and pollution load indices reveal a whistling alarm for the Quseir harbor. The present data are necessary to improve conservation and management of the Red Sea ecosystem in the near future.

  3. Modern planktonic foraminifera. By Ch Hemleben, M. Spindler and O.R. Anderson

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_304.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_304.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  4. LEPINOCONUS CHIOCCHINII GEN. N., N. SP., A CONICAL AGGLUTINATED FORAMINIFERA FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS OF ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERZIKA CRUZ-ABAD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A new conical agglutinated foraminifer, Lepinoconus chiocchinii gen n., n. sp. from the lower Campanian shallow-water platform deposits of the Lepini Mountains (central Apennines, Italy, is described. It has a pseudo-keriothecal wall structure, uniserial arrangement of the adult chambers and multiple apertures. The exoskeleton is constituted by beams (main and intercalary continuous from one chamber to the next, while the endoskeleton bears pillars. The new taxon is included in the Coskinolinidae family. Lepinoconus chiocchinii gen. n., n. sp. is known from southern Italy, Greece and Albania.

  5. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    . Acknowledgements I am thankful to B.N. Desai, Director, National Institute of Oceanography and R.R. Nair for their encouragement. My sincere thanks go to James L. Cullen, Wolfgang H. Berger and William F. Ruddi- man for their valuable suggestions on an earlier...

  6. Foraminifera from the tidal zone in the Netherlands Antilles and other West Indian Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1964-01-01

    Through the kindness of Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK the author was enabled to study a number of samples from localities in the tidal zone of several West Indian islands. Previously, by courtesy of Dr. T. MORTENSEN, abundant material from some deepwater samples collected off Santa Cruz, Virgin

  7. Does carbonate ion control planktonic foraminifera shell calcification in upwelling regions?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.

    are still debated and to utilize shell weights of a particular species as a surface water carbonate ion proxy, it is important to understand whether [CO = 3 ] controls shell calcification in that species over a period of time. We therefore utilize...

  8. Some aberrant foraminifera from the shelf sediments of central east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A; Almeida, F.

    A rich foraminiferal outer shelf assemblage has yielded some aberrant forms in the case of @iUvigerina@@ sp. @iSiphonoperta@@ sp., and @iNodosaria@@ sp. The aberration is (1) in the development of two terminal apertures with parallel necks...

  9. Appraisal of laboratory culture experiments on benthic foraminifera to assess/develop paleoceanographic proxies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Linshy, V.N.; Rana, S.S.; Kurtarkar, S.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    physico-chemical conditions in the laboratory. Such studies helped to refine the differences in the foraminiferal characteristics from physico-chemically different environments, as observed in the field. As it was proposed that the amount and type of food...

  10. Effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity changes on benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Kouthanker, M.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Nigam, R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Linshy, V.N.

    of adverse effect of such seasonal salinity changes on calcite secreting organisms is, however not clear. The seasonal fresh water influx from the estuaries also affects the pH and alkalinity of the coastal seawater. Therefore, to understand the effect...

  11. The Impact of Ocean Acidification on the Functional Morphology of Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Nikki; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Austin, William E. N.; Paterson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Culturing experiments were performed on sediment samples from the Ythan Estuary, N. E. Scotland, to assess the impacts of ocean acidification on test surface ornamentation in the benthic foraminifer Haynesina germanica. Specimens were cultured for 36 weeks at either 380, 750 or 1000 ppm atmospheric CO2. Analysis of the test surface using SEM imaging reveals sensitivity of functionally important ornamentation associated with feeding to changing seawater CO2 levels. Specimens incubated at high CO2 levels displayed evidence of shell dissolution, a significant reduction and deformation of ornamentation. It is clear that these calcifying organisms are likely to be vulnerable to ocean acidification. A reduction in functionally important ornamentation could lead to a reduction in feeding efficiency with consequent impacts on this organism's survival and fitness. PMID:24358253

  12. Distribution of upwelling index planktonic foraminifera in the sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Current to the south, and a moderately developed anticyclonic gyre in the Bay of Bengal (Cullen and PrelL 1984; Fig. I B). ~.75° 9Q· roS· 12r 30.,=-----'fTT-----l.:..-..--T----T---~--~~--~30' lS AUGUST ,-' " ,5 ,5' 30· 45' 60' 75· 90' lOS· IS' 30' 7S' 90...' lOS· 120' 30 I i 3D' Figure I Surjcwe circulatjon patterns in Ihe norlhem Indian OO!Wl. A) AUf(llst, the !"'li/ll or Ihe svulJllveJ( mon.IOon period (Mar-O(·lohe r ). B) Fehrllarr. ihe heiK!l1 of Ihe norrheasl monsoO/1 period (.!Iiol'l'mher April...

  13. Foraminifera from the Chilka Lake on the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Venugopal, P.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    and neretic region of the Gulf of Mexico. Of these common species, 3 forms - Gaudryina exilis, Ammo- nia pauciloculata and Asterorotalia inflata are found only in the Gulf of Mexico. Another 2 species, Jadammina macrescens and Elphidium mexicanum are present...

  14. Pollution effects monitoring with foraminifera as indices in the Thana creek, Bombay area

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    In the study area, the pollution effect on the foraminiferids is intense, hence highly reliable and measurable. The relative sensitivity of tolerance of the biota is sharply variable and dependent upon the nature of the pollutants discharged...

  15. Assessing the effect of calcein incorporation on physiological processes of benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.; Banerjee, B.; Mallick R.; Naik, Dinesh K.; Singh, D.P.

    temperatures. The growth of Rosalina sp. is not affected by any of the calcein concentrations within the first 4–5 weeks of exposure. Additionally, no distinct difference in abnormality, mortality and reproduction was observed in the control and treatment...

  16. Distribution of foraminifera in the lagoons of certain Islands of the Lakshadweep Archipelago, Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K; Sivadas, P.; Narayanan, B.; Jayalakshmy, K; Kutty, M.K

    , but arenaceous forms are very rare due to coarse nature of the deposits. Of the families observed, Miliolidae, Calcarinidae, and Amphisteginidae are most abundant and 2 species, Calcarina calcar and Amphistegina radiata are the most dominant. Planktonic...

  17. Zinc and Cadmium in Benthic Foraminifera as Tracers of Ocean Paleochemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marchitto, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    .... Zn/Ca is introduced as an important aid toward this goal. Benthic (Hoeglundina elegans) Cd/Ca ratios from the Bahama Banks indicate that the North Atlantic subtropical gyre was greatly depleted in nutrients during the last glacial maximum...

  18. Laboratory experiment to record rate of movement of cultured benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Nigam, R.

    the Inverted Microscope. In this way, the foraminiferal specimen do not have to be disturbed. While viewing these culture dish under the microscope, one must be careful that the microscope light does not overheat the water and the cover should be removed from... time to time to allow aeration. The sea water of the dishes was changed daily. While changing the medium (sea water), care was taken to maintain the salinity by adjusting the loss due to evaporation through addition of distilled water. In addition...

  19. A note on the laboratory culture of benthic foraminifera collected from nearshore region off Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Koli, N.Y.

    these culture dish under the microscope one must be careful thatthe microscope light does not overheat the water and the cover should be removed from time to time to allow aeration. The sea water of the dishes was changed alternative- ly and food (diatoms... to be utilized for various experiments under phase 2. How- ever, in phase 1 we changed half of the medium on alternate days and supplied food (diatoms) weekly. While changing the medium, care was taken to maintain the salinity by adjusting the loss due...

  20. Living benthonic foraminifera in a tidal environment: Gulf of Khambhat (India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    . These two features are indicative of a possibly mobile substrate. The high tidal range and the high concentration of suspended matter and thus low penetration of light might also be the cause for the absence of living individuals in the samples from...

  1. The reciprocity between coiling direction and dimorphic reproduction in benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    region off Karwar, west coast of India. The results indicate an inverse relationship between mean proloculus size and dextrality (% of dextral forms), which is statistically confirmed. The correlation value (r = 0.57) between the two parameters is above...

  2. Distribution of living planktonic foraminifera in the coastal upwelling region of Kenya, Africa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Paulinose, V.T.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    met with in waters near the equator. The faunal characteristics as related to hydrology and the role of some ecological parameters like temperature and salinity have been delineated.The evidence obtained from statistical analysis of the data of most...

  3. Recent foraminifera along west coast of India: Restrospect, perspect and prospect

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    helf to check repetition of the work and to guide workers to decide the thrust areas and take up multi directional approaches to such studies. In view of this a review of the foraminiferal studies carried out exclusively off the west coast of India...

  4. Significance of correspondence between river discharge and proloculus size of benthic foraminifera in paleomonsoonal studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    that the MPS is inversely related to salinity. The correspondence between MPS and rainfall shows a high potential in generating proximity data for the reconstruction of a paleo-precipitational history...

  5. Neogene and Quaternary foraminifera and paleoenvironments of a corehole from Horn Island, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    The only semipermanent surface water available on the Southern High Plains plateau of Texas and New Mexico is contained in saline lakes and in the playa lakes that form in shallow depressions, called playa basins, following heavy rainfall. The playas generally are accepted as the main source of recharge to the underlying High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer of the region, and they constitute the major wildlife habitat on the Southern High Plains. Their use as water sources, holding ponds, and waste-disposal sites by agricultural and industrial operations may potentially lead to ground-water contamination and habitat degradation. Therefore, playa lakes will play an essential role in the collection of surface-water quality and ecological data for the Southern High Plains study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Size analysis of planktic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea: Marine Micropaleontology,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, F.J.C.; Ivanova, E.; Conan, S.M.H.; Brummer, G.J.A.; Ganssen, G.M.; Troelstra, S.R.; van Weering, T.; van Hinte, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Planktic foraminiferal faunas from different environments in the Arabian Sea were size fractionated using 14 sieves with meshes between 100 and 710 μm, to assess the effect of the sieve mesh size cut off level on the faunal composition and to determine the size frequency distribution of individual

  7. Discovery of Orbitolinids (Foraminifera) at Lebyin, Thazi Township, Myanmar: Its Stratigraphic and Paleogeographic Significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw Win; Pe Maung Than; Min Swe

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of preliminary assessment on the orbitolinids discovered for the first time from an isolated hillock (locally known as Peinyoin Hill) situated at just northwest of Lebyin village (lying on the Thazi-Shwenyaung Rail Road), and from the limestone lenses embedded within a sequence of tuffaceous sandstone, mudstone and conglomerates that is exposed on the west of the Myit-thar Stream. The present preliminary examination reveals that the orbitolinid fauna at the limestone hillock consists of Paracoskinolina cf. sunnilandensis Iraqia sp., and Simplorbitolina spp., indicating an early Cretaceous age (probably Aptian-Albian). On the other hand, the limestone lenses exposed on the west of the Myit-thar Stream bear Iraqia thailandensis (=Haurania thailandensis Kemper]. From this faunal evidence and prevailing lithostratigraphic characteristics, it has reached to the final conclusion that these controversial outcrops are no longer needed to be lumped in the Late Paleozoic Lebyin Group in the Plateau Limestone Group, but must be designated as a southern continuation of the Pan Laung Formation of Jurassic-Cretaceous age. (author)

  8. Distribution of benthic foraminifera within oxygen minima zone, off central west coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Nigam, R.

    of benthic foraminiferal species abundance in OMZ of Arabian Sea with other parts of the world oceans reveals some interesting facts. Bulimina marginata, which has been reported to be present in considerable number within the OMZ in other regions of the world...

  9. Larger foraminifera from a relict structure off Karwar western Indian continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    of such water masses having been present in the region. Among the larger forms, @iAmphistegina bicirculata, A. radiata@@ var. @ipapillosa@@ and @iOperculina ammonoides@@ indicate mixing, while @iNummulites cumingii@@ and @iBorelis schlumbergeri@@ were relict...

  10. Addressing environmental issues through foraminifera - Case studies from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    stream_size 9 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_Workshop_IGCP-514_42.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_Workshop_IGCP-514_42.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  11. Widespread occurrence of nitrate storage and denitrification among Foraminifera and Gromiida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochoa, Elisa Pina; Høgslund, Signe; Geslin, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    Benthic foraminifers inhabit a wide range of aquatic environments including open marine, brackish, and freshwater environments. Here we show that several different and diverse foraminiferal groups (miliolids, rotaliids, textulariids) and Gromia, another taxon also belonging to Rhizaria, accumulat...

  12. Inducement of heterochronic variation in a species of planktic foraminifera by a Late Eocene impact event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, N.; Kitchell, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    While it is well known that the cosmic impact event at or near the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary coincides with an interval of mass extinction, a similar impact (or series of impacts) near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary presents a more complex picture, in terms of associated fluctuations in marine biotic diversity. Tektites, microtektites, and mineral grains exhibiting features of shock metamorphism found in Eocene sediments of the western N. Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico (comprising the North American microtektite strewn field) offer compelling evidence for a catastrophic impact event. Despite the magnitude of this event, however, few extinctions in the planktic marine fauna are known to have occurred coincident with this event. Instead, changes in relative abundance, morphology, and development occurred. Cosmic impacts generally have been interpreted as influencing the course of evolution through the wholesale elimination of significant portions of standing biotic diversity. Indeed, extinction traditionally has been viewed as the negative side of evolution. In some instances, it is suggested such impact events can serve instead to increase, rather than decrease, morphological and ecological diversity, by altering the developmental programs within species at the level of the local population.

  13. Influence of monsoon upwelling on the planktonic foraminifera off Oman during Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Planktonic foraminifer abundances, fluxes, test sizes, and coiling properties are influenced in various ways by the southwest monsoon winds and associated upwelling in the western Arabian Sea. The influence of monsoon driven upwelling...

  14. Indian Monsoon and denitrification change in the Laxmi Basin (IODP Exp. 355 Site U1456) of the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. E.; Khim, B. K.; Ikehara, M.; Lee, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Arabian Sea is a famous site for the basin-wide denitrification in the globe. The Western Arabian Sea has been acknowledged by its upwelling-induced denitrification related to the Indian Monsoon system (Altabet et al., 1999). It was recently reported that the denitrification in the Eastern Arabian Sea (IODP Exp. 355 Site U1456) has been persistent and consistent during the mid-Pleistocene as reflected in the bulk sediment δ15N values (Tripathi et al., 2017). Based on the age model reconstructed by δ18O stratigraphy of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) together with shipboard biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data at Site U1456 drilled in the Laxmi Basin of the Eastern Arabian Sea, the glacial-interglacial fluctuations of denitrification in association with the development of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) were resolved in the context of Indian Monsoon activity. One of striking features in the Eastern Arabian Sea is that the δ15N values of bulk sediment show clear and consistent denitrification with minimum δ15N values exceeding 6‰ even during glacial periods, when its western counterpart experienced a temporal collapse of OMZ and denitrification. The Eastern Arabian Sea is fed not only by the upwelling-induced productivity in the western margin during the summer monsoon but also by the high productivity during the winter monsoon, both of which maintain the increased productivity affecting the OMZ through the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the degradation of sinking organic particles. The Eastern Arabian Sea is further influenced by the clockwise surface currents, intermediate water ventilation change by the blockage of Antarctic Intermediate Water, limited inflow from the Red Sea/Persian Gulf, and the freshwater salinity stratification due to nearby riverine discharges, all of which make the denitrification process more complicated than the Western Arabian Sea. Nonetheless, the glacial-interglacial denitrification change in the Eastern

  15. Biogenic CaCO3 and Opal Depositions and Their Latitudinal Comparison During the Past 600 ka in the Central Equatorial Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boo-Keun Khim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbital-scale variations in biogenic CaCO3 and opal abundance in two piston cores collected in the central equatorial Pacific (core PC5101 from a southern site at _ and core PC5103 from a northern site at _ were compared to assess latitudinal differences. The correlation between the oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides sacculifer of PC5103 with the LR04 stacks provides the age of PC5103 to be approximately 950 ka. The age of PC5103 was further refined by correlating the CaCO3 content with the well-dated core RC11-210. The age of PC5101 was also constrained by the same CaCO3 chronostratigraphic correlation with RC11-210, resulting in an age of approximately 650 ka. Distinct orbital-scale series of CaCO3 and opal variations appear to be parallel between the two cores during the past 600 ka, which are controlled mainly by eccentricity with an approximate periodicity of 100 ka. It is worth noting that the biogenic CaCO3 and opal deposition patterns in the two cores differ between interglacial and glacial periods. During interglacial periods the biogenic opal content is higher in the southern core than in the northern core, which corresponds with the present-day condition. In contrast the CaCO3 content is higher in the northern core, which is contradictory to the present-day northward decreasing CaCO3 deposition pattern from the Equator. The collection site of PC5101 is approximately 350 m deeper than that of PC5103, which significantly promotes CaCO3 dissolution and causes unexpectedly high CaCO3 content at the northern site in contrast to the biogenic opal content.

  16. AMS 14 C dating controlled records of monsoon and Indonesian throughflow variability from the eastern Indian Ocean of the past 32,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. Y.; Chen, M. T.; Shi, X.; Liu, S.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Zi-Ye Li a, Min-Te Chen b, Hou-Jie Wang a, Sheng-Fa Liu c, Xue-Fa Shi ca College of Marine Geosciences, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, P.R. Chinab Institute of Applied Geosciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan 20224, ROCc First Institute of Oceanography, SOA, Qingdao 266100, P.R. China Indonesian throughflow (ITF) is one of the most important currents responsible for transporting heat and moisture from the western Pacific to the Indian Oceans. The ITF is also well-known as effectively in modulating the global climate change with the interactions among ENSO and Asian monsoons. Here we present an AMS 14C dating controlled sea surface temperature (SST) record from core SO184-10043 (07°18.57'S, 105°03.53'E), which was retrieved from 2171m water depth at a north-south depression located at the southeastern offshore area of Sumatera in the eastern Indian Ocean. Based on our high-resolution SST using Mg/Ca analyses based on planktonic foraminifera shells of Globigerinoides ruber and alkenone index, U k'37-SST, oxygen isotope stratigraphy, and AMC 14C age-controls, our records show that, during the past 32,000 years, the SSTs were decreased which imply weaker ITF during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and 3. The weaker UTF may respond to strengthened northeast monsoon during the boreal winter. During 21 to 15ka, the southeast monsoon had been stronger and the northeast monsoon was relatively weaker. During 15 to 8ka, rapid sea level rising may allow the opening of the gateways in the Makassar Strait and Lombok Strait that may have further strengthened the ITF. During the early Holocene, the northeast and southeast monsoons seem to be both strengthened. We will discuss the implications of the hydrographic variability and their age uncertainties in this paper during the meeting.

  17. Late Quaternary Palaeoceanographic Changes in Sea Surface Conditions in the Tropical Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischel, Andrea; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Kuijpers, Antoon; Nürnberg, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Palaeoceanographic changes and the variability in surface water mass hydrography are reconstructed in order to track tropical ocean and climate variability and inter-hemispheric heat exchange through the last 42,000 year BP. Our studies are based on the relative abundance of planktonic foraminifera combined with sea surface temperature approximation based Mg/Ca measurements, XRF scanning and stable oxygen isotope analyses in a 5 m long gravity core Ga307-Win-12GC (17°50.80N, 64°48.7290W), retrieved in the Virgin Island Basin in approx. 3,960 m water depth. The Virgin Island Basin is the deepest part of the Anegada-Jungfern Passage in the northeast Caribbean, one of the most important pathways for water mass exchange between the Central Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. Due to its bathymetry surface waters as well as deep water mass strata from the northern and southern hemisphere enter the basin, comprising Caribbean Surface Water (CSW), Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), Atlantic Intermediate Water (AIW) and North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). The planktonic foraminiferal assemblage suggests rather stable sea-surface conditions during the Holocene in the NE Caribbean. However, major changes in the hydrographic setting could be identified within the glacial period. During the glacial period, clear millennial-scale variability in sea-surface temperature and productivity are present. Fluctuations in the relative abundance of Globigerinoides ruber in the sediment core may be correlated to Dansgaard-Oeschger events in the northern North Atlantic. Furthermore an increase in relative abundance of Globorotalia rubescens occurs synchronous with ice rafted debris layers described from the North Atlantic. The faunal changes in the tropical Atlantic may thus be correlated to major climate changes in the North Atlantic, mainly D-O cyclicity as well as Heinrich events. Thus, the synchronous change in water mass distribution and hydrographic cyclicity suggests a possible linkage

  18. Increased Amazon freshwater discharge during late Heinrich Stadial 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellari, Stefano; Chiessi, Cristiano Mazur; Kuhnert, Henning; Häggi, Christoph; da Costa Portilho-Ramos, Rodrigo; Zeng, Jing-Ying; Zhang, Yancheng; Schefuß, Enno; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Hefter, Jens; Alexandre, Felipe; Sampaio, Gilvan; Mulitza, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    The temporal succession of changes in Amazonian hydroclimate during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) (ca. 18-14.7 cal ka BP) is currently poorly resolved. Here we present HS1 records based on isotope, inorganic and organic geochemistry from a marine sediment core influenced by the Amazon River discharge. Our records offer a detailed reconstruction of the changes in Amazonian hydroclimate during HS1, integrated over the basin. We reconstructed surface water hydrography using stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca-derived paleotemperatures from the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber, as well as salinity changes based on stable hydrogen isotope (δD) of palmitic acid. We also analyzed branched and isoprenoid tetraether concentrations, and compared them to existing bulk sediment ln(Fe/Ca) data and vegetation reconstruction based on stable carbon isotopes from n-alkanes, in order to understand the relationship between continental precipitation, vegetation and sediment production. Our results indicate a two-phased HS1 (HS1a and HS1b). During HS1a (18-16.9 cal ka BP), a first sudden increase of sea surface temperatures (SST) in the western equatorial Atlantic correlated with the slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the associated southern hemisphere warming phase of the bipolar seesaw. This phase was also characterized by an increased delivery of terrestrial material. During HS1b (16.9-14.8 cal ka BP), a decrease in terrestrial input was, however, associated with a marked decline of seawater δ18O and palmitic acid δD. Both isotopic proxies independently indicate a drop in sea surface salinity (SSS). A number of records under the influence of the North Brazil Current, in contrast, indicate increases in SST and SSS resulting from a weakened AMOC during HS1. Our records thus suggest that the expected increase in SSS due to the AMOC slowdown was overridden by a two-phased positive precipitation anomaly in Amazonian hydroclimate.

  19. Evaluating controls on planktonic foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kelly Ann; Thunell, Robert C.; Machain-Castillo, Maria Luisa; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Spero, Howard J.; Wejnert, Kate; Nava-Fernández, Xinantecatl; Tappa, Eric J.

    2016-10-01

    To explore relationships between water column hydrography and foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, we present δ18O and Mg/Ca records from three species of planktonic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerina bulloides, and Globorotalia menardii, collected from a sediment trap mooring maintained in the Gulf of Tehuantepec from 2006-2012. Differences in δ18O between mixed-layer species G. ruber and G. bulloides and thermocline-dweller G. menardii track seasonal changes in upwelling. The records suggest an increase in upwelling during the peak positive phase of El Niño, and an overall reduction in stratification over the six-year period. For all three species, Mg/Ca ratios are higher than what has been reported in previous studies, and show poor correlations to calcification temperature. We suggest that low pH (7.6-8.0) and [3 2-CO] values (∼70-120 μmol/kg) in the mixed layer contribute to an overall trend of higher Mg/Ca ratios in this region. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry analyses of G. bulloides with high Mg/Ca ratios (>9 mmol/mol) reveal the presence of a secondary coating of inorganic calcite that has Mg/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios up to an order of magnitude higher than these elemental ratios in the primary calcite, along with elevated Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. Some of the samples with abnormally high Mg/Ca are found during periods of high primary productivity, suggesting the alteration may be related to changes in carbonate saturation resulting from remineralization of organic matter in oxygen-poor waters in the water column. Although similar shell layering has been observed on fossil foraminifera, this is the first time such alteration has been studied in shells collected from the water column. Our results suggest a role for seawater carbonate chemistry in influencing foraminiferal calcite trace element:calcium ratios prior to deposition on the seafloor, particularly in high-productivity, low

  20. Sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, B. K.; Horikawa, K.; Asahara, Y.; Kim, J. E.; Ikehara, M.; Lee, J.

    2017-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 355 conducted to drill 1109.4 m penetration at Site U1456 in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea. Four lithologic units are defined onboard at Site U1456 (Pandey et al., 2016). Unit I is 121 m long, consisting mostly of pelagic carbonates (nannofossil ooze and/or foraminifera-rich nannofossil ooze) interbedded with thin terrigenous (clay, silt, and sand) turbidite layers. The age model of Unit I was determined by the correlation of δ18O fluctuations of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) to LR04 stacks, estimating 1.2 Ma. A total of 60 samples, collected in the context of magnetic susceptibility (MS) changes at a discrete interval from a composite section (Holes U1456A and U1456C) of Unit I, were analyzed to measure Nd and Sr isotopes of detrital fraction. Based on Nd and Sr isotopes, the sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin during the last 800 kyrs was traced in response to the monsoon activity between the interglacial and glacial periods. ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr vary in a range from -12.4 to -8.0 and from 0.712 to 0.727, respectively. The correlation between ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr is quite linear, indicating that the sediments were provided mainly by two dominant sources. Considering the ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr end-members of sediment sources (i.e., river sediments), the Tapi River and Narmada River are the main contributors of sediments to Site U1456 with a little influence by the modern Indus River. However, the glacial sediments from the Indus River and the Mahi River may supply an additional fraction, leading to less ɛNd and more 87Sr/86Sr at Site U1456. Judged by the sediment sources, the sediments in the Laxmi Basin are characterized by the mixture of different provenances. In addition, it should be noted that the low ɛNd and high 87Sr/86Sr values coincide largely with high MS and vice versa, irrespectively of the glacial-interglacial change. Thus, rather than the sediment provenances, ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr

  1. Late Pliocene History of Mediterranean Outflow Water in the Gulf of Cadiz (IODP Expedition 339, Site U1389)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, P.; Balestra, B.; Flores, J. A.; Sierro, F. J.; García Gallardo, Á.; Piller, W. E.; Aubry, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The opening and closure of ocean gateways play an important role amongst climate forcing mechanisms: surface and deep-water circulation are altered, and hence global heat transport. An important component of North Atlantic circulation patterns is the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) that enters the North Atlantic via the Gibraltar Strait. Its onset and early history after the opening of the Gibraltar Strait at 5.3 Ma are poorly constrained and its impact on oceanography and climate in the Pliocene are largely unexplored. Current research efforts in the scope of projects funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF-P25831-N29) and the Max Kade Foundation aim to improve our knowledge about this early phase of MOW. Research focuses on Sites U1387C (upper Miocene-lower Pliocene; ~5.8-3.8 Myrs) and U1389E (middle-upper Pliocene; ~3.7-2.8) drilled during IODP Expedition 339 in the northern Gulf of Cádiz close to the source area of MOW. At IODP Site U1389E, a 280m-thick sequence of upper Pliocene contourites is studied to reconstruct MOW behavior and potential paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic feedback mechanisms during the Mid-Pliocene Thermal Optimum. Currently, a reliable age model is developed for the studied interval based on bio-, chemo-, and cyclostratigraphy. Several biostratigraphic datums have been identified from analyses of calcareous nannoplankton and planktic foraminifera which indicate a depositional age between 3.65 Ma and 2.87 Ma. In some intervals of the record a further refinement of the age model at the millenial scale is complicated by poor recovery. However, preliminary results from high-resolution geochemical analyses of the bulk sediment (TOC, CaCO3 and S) and shells of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (δ18O, δ13C) reveal distinct cyclic patterns in several well recovered intervals. Based on an average sedimentation rate of ~25cm/ka, these cycles most likely reflect precessional forcing. Current paleoceanographic

  2. Paleoclimatic changes occurred during the last two centuries in the Gulf of Gaeta (central-eastern Tyrrhenian Sea): a contribution of NEXTDATA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirer, Fabrizio; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Albertazzi, Sonia; Anzalone, Erlisiana; Bellucci, Luca; Bonomo, Sergio; Capotondi, Lucilla; Cascella, Antonio; Di Rita, Federico; Ferraro, Luciana; Florindo, Fabio; Giuliani, Silvia; Domenica Insinga, Donatella; Lurcock, Pont; Magri, Donatella; Margaritelli, Giulia; Marsella, Ennio; Petrosino, Paola; Sprovieri, Mario; Sorgato, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution integrated study, which includes tephrochronology (tefra layer associated to 1906 AD Vesuvius event) and radionuclide dating method (210Pb and 137Cs), has been performed in a super-expanded marine record (sedimentation rate of 0.47 cm/yr) from the continental shelf of the Gulf of Gaeta (central eastern Tyrrhenian Sea). Planktonic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, pollens and oxygen stable isotope data performed on Globigerinoides ruber, revealed environmental changes occurred during the last two centuries. In detail we recognise four paleoclimatic changes. From ca. 1800 to ca. 1865 AD, d18O G. ruber signal combined with evidences of abundance increase of planktonic foraminifera Globoratialia inflata and G. truncatulinoides and of calcareous nannofossils Emiliana huxley document cold-temperate phase. Between ca. 1865 and ca. 1882 AD, d18O G. ruber record document a short warm interval associated with a turnover from carnivorous to herbivorous-opportunistic planktonic foraminiferal species and an increase in abundance of calcareous nannofossil Florisphaera profunda. At ca. 1935 AD, d18O G. ruber data indicate a gradually warming, concomitant an evident turnover from carnivorous to herbivorous-opportunistic planktonic foraminiferal species, and associated to the increase of calcareous nannofossil F. profunda. From ca. 1950 AD to the present day the warm phase documents a further strong increase in G. ruber alba, G. quadrilobatus and F. profunda abundances. The pollen analysis carried out on the same core revealed a two-step increase in arboreal vegetation, this is mostly related to a rise of Olea, Quercus evergreen and riparian trees (Alnus and Salix) from ca. 1882 AD, and increase in conifers (Pinus and Cupressaceae) from ca. 1980 AD. The short lived warm interval documented by d18O between ca. 1865 and ca. 1882 AD may triggered the increase in Olea and the coeval general decrease in deciduous trees. Among herbs, Cyperaceae, along with ferns

  3. Growing need to study foraminifera in the laboratory culture experiments: An attempt from the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Koli, N.Y.

    . No doubt these proxies were well tested in the modern environmental setup, prior to be considered as climate indicators. Nevertheless, if the same effect is studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory, it will definitely enhance the reliability...

  4. Effect of temperature and salinity on stable isotopic composition of shallow water benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Linshy, V.N.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    in the laboratory. In the present work, shallow water benthic foraminiferal species, Rosalina sp. and Pararotalia nipponica were subjected to different combinations of seawater temperature (25�C to 35�C) and salinity (25 psu to 37 psu) in the laboratory to assess...

  5. First record of Tethyan Ladinian involutinid foraminifera-rich beds in thè Betic Internai Zone (SE Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Somma, Roberta; Martín Rojas, Iván; Zamparelli, Valeria; Delgado, Francisco; Estévez, Antonio; lannace, Alessandro; Perrone, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Generalmente se acepta la idea de que los dominios que actualmente constituyen las Zonas Interna y Externa de la Cordillera Bética estaban muy próximos, si no adyacentes, durante el Triásico. Sin embargo, los modelos geodinámicos propuestos en los últimos años indican que ambos dominios pertenecían, durante el Jurásico y el Cretácico, a dos placas tectónicas diferentes, que llegaron a distar varios cientos de kilómetros. Si se considera además que entre ambas placas tuvo lugar una colisión ob...

  6. Evolution and variation of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary: Evidence from planktonic foraminifera, oxygen and carbon isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The evolution and variation history of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary was reconstructed based on the quantitative census data of planktonic foraminiferal fauna, together with oxygen and carbon isotope records of mixed layer dweller G. ruber and thermocline dweller N. dutertrei in piston core CSH1 and core DGKS9603 collected separately from the Tsushima warm current and the Kuroshio dominated area. The result showed that the Tsushima warm current vanished in the lowstand period during 40―24 cal ka BP, while the Kuroshio still flowed across the Okinawa Trough, arousing strong upwelling in the northern Trough. Meanwhile, the influence of freshwater greatly increased in the northern Okinawa Trough, as the broad East China Sea continental shelf emerged. The freshwater reached its maximum during the last glacial maximum (LGM), when the upwelling obviously weakened for the lowest sea-level and the depression of the Kuroshio. The modern Tsushima warm current began its development since 16 cal ka BP, and the impact of the Kuroshio increased in the middle and north- ern Okinawa Trough synchronously during the deglaciation and gradually evolved as the main water source of the Tsushima current. The modern Tsushima current finally formed at about 8.5 cal ka BP, since then the circulation structure has been relatively stable. The water of the modern Tsushima cur- rent primarily came from the Kuroshio axis. A short-term wiggle of the current occurred at about 3 cal ka BP, probably for the influences from the enhancement of the winter monsoon and the depression of the Kuroshio. The cold water masses greatly strengthened during the wiggle.

  7. Evolution of subpolar North Atlantic surface circulation since the early Holocene inferred from planktic foraminifera faunal and stable isotope records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staines-Urias, Francisca; Kuijpers, Antoon; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    of the Faroe Islands, are located in the transitional area where surface waters of subpolar and subtropical origin mix before entering the Arctic Mediterranean. In these areas, large-amplitude millennial variability in the characteristics of the upper-water column appears modulated by changes in the intensity...

  8. Distribution and morphological abnormalities of recent foraminifera in the Marano and Grado Lagoon (North Adriatic Sea, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. MELIS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Marano and Grado Lagoon, is a northern Adriatic wetland system of relevant naturalistic and economic value, that is constantly under quality control in accordance with the current environmental directives. Benthic foraminifers community with its morphological abnormalities were investigated in the recent sediments (about 10 years old of 21 stations collected in the framework of the “MIRACLE” Project which aimed at testing the coexistence of clam farming with high Hg contamination. Euryhaline foraminifers, well known in Mediterranean brackish-waters, mainly characterizes the total assemblage. A. tepida dominates in areas characterized by low salinity, high clay and Corg content, but also to anthropogenic pressure. E. gunteri and H. germanica are recorded in the western sector of the lagoon, which is more affected by salinity variations and agricultural activities. Slightly higher values of assemblage diversity appear in less restricted areas of the lagoon or, at least, where physical parameters such as temperature and salinity are less variable. The test abnormalities, carried out on total assemblage, shows that the FAI (Foraminiferal Abnormality Index values always exceed 1% of the total assemblage, with clear decreasing gradients from inland to the sea (from N to S and from W to E in the studied area.

  9. Regional reduction in paleogroundwater discharge and rainfall in the Late Holocene Yucatan Peninsula reconstructed from trace metals in benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broach, K. H.; Chapman, B. L.; Paytan, A.; Street, J.

    2017-12-01

    As climate change progresses, droughts are predicted to become more common in regions dominated by seasonal precipitation, a problem compounded where precipitation provides significant freshwater resources. The Yucatan Peninsula relies on rain-recharged groundwater for potable water, and regional development due to tourism will further strain supply. Historical and geochemical evidence suggest extensive droughts harmed Mayan Civilization and may again impact the Yucatan in the near future, but proxies around the Yucatan and Caribbean region are complicated by variability and even opposing interpretations. An integrated rainfall signal is needed to smooth variability and separate local aberrations from long-term regional trends that can be used for risk assessment. Here we present a 5,000 year record of rainfall sourced from a broad swath of the peninsula and recorded as trace metal ratios in the foram Ammonia parkinsoniana. Rainwater percolation across the western peninsula forms a groundwater lens that discharges as brackish springs in our field site Celestun Lagoon resulting in trace metal gradients (Li, B, Sr, Ba, Nd) along the lagoon that oscillate with discharge. Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios in the forams suggest a long-term decrease in spring water discharge for the western Yucatan during the last 2,500 years with notable drops coinciding with known droughts (e.g. 800-950 CE) and more variability on a regional scale to 5,000 years. B/Ca ratios appear to depend on proximity to springs and may respond to low-pH discharge water while Nd/Ca ratios suggest sporadic incursions of seawater into the lagoon, possibly related to severely reduced spring water discharge or large hurricane events. We interpret these results to mean that periods of decreased rainfall broadly affect the western peninsula which may pose problems for large population centers like Merida. Future work will focus on periodicity of such rainfall changes and impact on the ecological environment of Celestun Lagoon.

  10. A first look at past sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Indian Ocean from Mg/Ca in foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.; Weldeab, S.; Mackensen, A.; Naidu, P.D.

    . 0094-8276/05/2005GL024093$05.00 L24605 1of4 is based on monospecific (Globorotalia menardii) acceler- ator mass spectroscopy (AMS) and conventional radiocar- bon dates (Table 1). Radiocarbon ages are calibrated to calendar years before present (1950...-depth curve are the tie-points used to develop chronology. The tie points with asterisks are the reservoir corrected radiocarbon dates. The Mg/Ca values (mmol/mol) are also given in order to assess the relative timings of d 18 O and Mg/Ca variation. Figure 2...

  11. Relict benthic foraminifera in surface sediments off central east coast of India as indicator of sea level changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rana, S.S.; Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.

    surface samples is characteristic of coral reef environment and has been inferred as evidence for past low sea levels. Based on extrapolation of previously published radiocarbon dates from the region, we propose a pliable sea level curve for the period...

  12. Seasonal variability in the surface sediments of Mobile Bay, Alabama, recorded by geochemistry and foraminifera, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umberger, D.K.; Osterman, L.E.; Smith, C.G.; Frazier, J.; Richwine, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to document and quantify recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The study was part of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility project, a regional project funded by the Coastal and Marine Geology Program to understand how natural forcings and anthropogenic modifications influence coastal ecosystems and their susceptibility to coastal hazards. Mobile Bay is a large drowned-river estuary that has been modified significantly by humans to accommodate the Port of Mobile. Examples include repeated dredging of a large shipping channel down the central axis of the bay and construction of a causeway across the head of the bay and at the foot of the bayhead delta. In addition to modifications, the bay is also known to have episodic periods of low oxygen (hypoxia) that result in significant mortality to fish and benthic organisms (May, 1973). For this study a series of surface sediment samples were collected. Surface benthic foraminiferal and bulk geochemical data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference to changing environmental parameters in the past (Osterman and Smith, in press) and into the future. This report archives data collected as part of the Mobile Bay Study that may be used in future environmental change studies.

  13. Forward Modeling of Carbonate Proxy Data from Planktonic Foraminifera using Oxygen Isotope Tracers in a Global Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and variation of oxygen isotopes in seawater are calculated using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies global ocean model. Simple ecological models are used to estimate the planktonic foraminiferal abundance as a function of depth, column temperature, season, light intensity, and density stratification. These models are combined to forward model isotopic signals recorded in calcareous ocean sediment. The sensitivity of the results to the changes in foraminiferal ecology, secondary calcification, and dissolution are also examined. Simulated present-day isotopic values for ecology relevant for multiple species compare well with core-top data. Hindcasts of sea surface temperature and salinity are made from time series of the modeled carbonate isotope values as the model climate changes. Paleoclimatic inferences from these carbonate isotope records are strongly affected by erroneous assumptions concerning the covariations of temperature, salinity, and delta (sup 18)O(sub w). Habitat-imposed biases are less important, although errors due to temperature-dependent abundances can be significant.

  14. Additions to the annotated list of marine alien biota in the Mediterranean with special emphasis on Foraminifera and Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ZENETOS

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work is an update of the annotated list (ZENETOS et al., 2006 based on literature up to April 2008. Emphasis is given to ecofunctional/taxonomic groups poorly addressed in the annotated list, such as the foraminiferan and parasites, while macrophytes are critically reviewed following the CIESM Atlas (VERLAQUE et al., in press. Moreover, in this update the bio-geographic area addressed includes the Sea of Marmara. The update yields a further 175 alien species in the Mediterranean bringing the total to 903. As evidenced by recent findings, more and more previously known ‘casual’ aliens, are becoming established. Approximately 100 more species have become well established in the region, raising the number of established species to 496 versus 385 until 2005. In the period from January 2006 to April 2008 more than 80 published papers have resulted in the recording of 94 new aliens, which is interpreted as a new introduction every 9 days, a rate beyond the worst scenario.

  15. Carbon and oxygen isotope time series records of planktonic and benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea: Implications on upwelling processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.

    changes associated with the calci¢cation depth of these twospecies. Ingeneral, Globigerina bulloides exhibitsgreater N 18 O amplitude £uctuations compared to Pulle- niatina obliquiloculata and Uvigerina excellens (Fig.3).TherangeofN 18 Ochangesin...,thelocalbottomwatertem- perature changes associated with monsoon circu- lationwouldaccountforthe0.4xhighershiftin N 18 Onoticed atODPSite723. 4.3. Carbon isotopes The N 13 Cvaluesof Globigerina bulloides, Pulle- niatina obliquiloculata and Uvigerina excellens vary from 31.13 to 32...

  16. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ~ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ~ 9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinant recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors including deep water CaCO3-corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood-events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3%, hematite%, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, as well as calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an overall arid climate, characterized by strong winds and intense upwelling, with an overall humid climate, with abundant rains and high sediment delivery (including refractory organic carbon) from land. Precessionally paced marl-limestone couplets occur throughout the recovery interval of the CIE and up to ten meters above it, suggesting that these wet-dry cycles persisted, though at declining intensity, after the peak PETM. Enhanced climate extremes at mid-latitudes might have been a direct response to the massive CO2 input in the ocean atmosphere system at the Paleocene-Eocene transition, and may have had a primary role in restoring the Earth system to steady state.

  17. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  18. Ostracoda and Foraminifera associated with macrofauna of marginal marine origin in continental sabkha sediments of Tayma (NW Saudi Arabia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pint, Anna; Frenzel, Peter; Engel, Max; Plessen, Birgit; Melzer, Sandra; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The oasis Tayma in northwestern Saudi Arabia (27°38'N, 38°33'E) is well known for its rich archaeological heritage and also hosts a key sedimentary record of Holocene environmental change.The palaeontologically investigated material comes from two 5.5 m long sediment cores taken in the northeastern and central part of the sabkha and two outcrops of shoreline deposits at the northeastern and southwestern margin of a large lake. Microfossil-rich layers have an age of about 9.2-ca. 8 ka BP. The sandy and carbonate-dominated sediments contain autochthonous balanids, the gastropods Melanoides tuberculatus and hydrobiids as well as the foraminifers Ammonia tepida (Cushman, 1926), Quinqueloculina seminula (Linnaeus, 1758), and Flintionoides labiosa (d'Orbigny, 1839). This brackish water association is completed by partially mass-occurrence of Cyprideis torosa (JONES, 1850), an euryhaline and generally widely tolerant ostracod species. Only the smooth shelled morphotype littoralis occurs. The association indicates a large brackish water lake with temporary freshwater inflows. All species documented originate in the marginal marine environment of the Red or Mediterranean Sea within the intertidal zone and hence they are adapted for strong environmental changes. We assume negative water balance under arid climatic conditions as cause for the high salinity of this athalassic lake. Sieve-pore analyses and shell chemistry suppose a trend of increasing salinity towards the top of the studied microfossil-bearing sections. This pattern is confirmed by increasing test malformation ratios of foraminifers. The marine origin of the fauna is surprising in this area 250 km away from the sea in an altitude of about 800 m a.s.l. We assume an avian-mediated transport of eggs, larvae or even adult animals to this site. The brackish water character of the lake enabled a permanent settling of marginal marine foraminifers, ostracods and even macrofauna as gastropods and balanids. The studied microfauna, morphological and shell chemistry analyses reveal the athalassic but saline character of the palaeo-lake and indicate a more humid climate phase in the early Holocene of northwestern Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the increasing salinity at the younger part of the sections confirms a climatic shift to drier conditions during the mid-Holocene. This study is a contribution to the research project "CLEAR - Holocene CLimatic Events of Northern ARabia" (https://clear2018.wordpress.com/).

  19. Benthic Foraminifera as bio-indicators of anthropogenic impacts in coastal environments: Acqua dei Corsari area case study (Palermo, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musco, Marianna; Cuttitta, Angela; Bicchi, Erica; Quinci, Enza Maria; Sprovieri, Mario; Tranchida, Giorgio; Giaramita, Luigi; Traina, Anna; Salvagio Manta, Daniela; Gherardi, Serena; Mercurio, Pietro; Siragusa, Angelo; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2017-04-15

    This study investigates living benthic foraminiferal assemblages as bio-indicators of anthropogenic activities in a coastal area within the Gulf of Palermo (Sicily, Italy), affected by industrial and urban activities, and evaluates the environmental quality through the calibration of a Tolerant Species index (%TS std ). Sediments from 6 stations were sampled along a bathymetric transect from the coast to offshore. Sediment grain size, TOC, major, minor and trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were compared to benthic foraminiferal assemblages and species at each station. Diversity and density of benthic foraminiferal assemblages were not affected by the presence of pollutants, while tolerant species increased with organic (TOC and PAHs) or chemical (As and Pb) concentrations. Moreover, the calibration of the %TS std formula to >125μm foraminiferal assemblage, gives a detailed description of environmental quality along the transect, representing a good and sensitive tool to evaluate marine coastal environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution, factor analysis and ecology of benthic foraminifera within inner shelf regime of Vengurla-Bhatkal sector, West Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    in original data matrix. The assemblages are - @iNonion@@ - @iBulimina ammobaculites, Bolivina@@. @iBulimina@@ - @iNonionella@@ - @iA. nonionella@@ - @iBulimina@@ and @iAmmonia. Based on the ecology of the fauna it is concluded that a general hyposalinal...

  1. Deep-sea foraminifera from the Cassidaigne Canyon (NW Mediterranean): Assessing the environmental impact of bauxite red mud disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Fabri, M.-C.; Buscail, R.; Biscara, L.; Koho, K.A.; Reichart, G.-J.; Cossa, D.; Galaup, S.; Chabaud, G.; Pigot, L.

    2012-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages were investigated from two sites along the axis of the Cassidaigne Canyon (NW Mediterranean Sea). Both areas are contaminated by bauxite red mud enriched in iron, titanium, vanadium and chromium. These elemental enrichments are related to bauxite-derived

  2. Paleoenvironmental evolution based on benthic foraminifera biofacies of the Paraíba do Sul Deltaic Complex, eastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Sarah Pereira; Vilela, Claudia Gutterres

    2017-12-01

    The paleoecology and distribution of benthic foraminiferal assemblages were analyzed in the core 2-MU-1-RJ well, drilled in the Paraíba do Sul Deltaic Complex, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). An abundant assemblage was found in the upper portion of the well core, inferred to be pleistocenic deposits. The coastal dynamic was recognized from five biofacies based on clusters, the Planktonic/Benthic (P/B) ratios and indicator species distribution in the core. Several biofacies were identified along the core depending on the species dominance. From the bottom to the top of the core, the biofacies succession represents the environmental changes in the coastal area associated to sea-level oscillations. The biofacies ABP dominated by Ammonia parkinsoniana and Bolivina spp. and Pararotalia cananeiaensis represents an inner shelf environment; biofacies QP dominated by shelf miliolids species; biofacies PGH, dominated by P. cananeiaensis, Gavelinopsis praegeri, and Hanzawaia nitidula, represents the estuary complex with middle or outer shelf influence; biofacies QL represents hypersaline waters dominated by lagoonal miliolids; and biofacies HP characterized by Haynesina germanica and P. cananeiaensis is associated with paralic environments. Marine ingressions are recorded and those biofacies show the pleistocenic coastal hydrodinamic in the deltaic complex. The foraminiferal biofacies contribute with detailed information to sedimentary facies previously characterized in the study area by the reconstruction of paleoenvironment succession.

  3. Foraminifera in surface sediments of Mandovi River Estuary: Indicators for mining pollution and high sea stand in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.; Banerjee, P.

    .W., and AUSTIN, R.L., 1991. Benthic foraminiferids as pollution indicators in Southampton Water, southern England, U.K. Journal of Micropalaeontology, 10, 109– 113. YANKO, V.; AHMAD, M., and KAMINISKI, M., 1998. Morphological deformities of benthic foraminiferal...

  4. Foraminifera isotopic records... with special attention to high northern latitudes and the impact of sea-ice distillation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude, E-mail: hillaire-marcel.claude@uqam.ca [GEOTOP, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, PO Box 8888, succursale ' centre ville' Montreal, Qc, H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Since the reassessment of oxygen isotope paleotemperatures by N. Shackleton in the late 60s, most papers using isotopic records from planktic or benthic foraminifers imply a direct relationship between oxygen isotopes in seawater and the ice/ocean volume, thus some linkage with salinity, sea level, etc. Such assumptions are also made when incorporating 'isotopic modules' in coupled models. Here, we will further examine the linkages between salinity and oxygen isotope ratios of sea-water recorded by foraminifers, and their potential temporal and spatial variability, especially in the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. If temporal and spatial changes in the isotopic composition of precipitations and ice meltwaters tune the isotopic properties of the fresh water end-member that dilutes the ocean, rates of sea-ice formation and evaporation at the ocean surface play a further role on the salt and oxygen isotope contents of water masses. Thus, the oxygen 18-salinity relationship carries a specific isotopic signature for any given water mass. At the ocean scale, residence time and mixing of these water masses, as well as the time dependent-achievement of proxy-tracer equilibrium, will also result in variable recordings of mass transfers into the hydrosphere, notable between ice-sheets and ocean. Since these records in water mass may vary in both amplitude and time, direct correlations of isotopic records will potentially be misleading. Implications of such issues on the interpretation of oxygen isotope records from the sub-arctic seas will be discussed, as well as the inherent flaws of such records due to sedimentological and or ecological parameters.

  5. Seasonal variation in the flux of planktic foraminifera: Sediment trap results from the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V; Curry; Ittekkot, V; Muralinath, A.S.

    stream_size 15 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Foramin_Res_27_5.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Foramin_Res_27_5.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  6. Coastal lagoon sediments and benthic foraminifera as indicator for Holocene sea-level change: Samsø, southern Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Morigi, Caterina; Pejrup, Morten

    The island of Samsø is located in the southern Kattegat region of Denmark, a relatively sheltered micro-tidal environment. The area experienced a period of rapid transgression during the early Altantic period, reaching its maximum approx. 7,600 yr BP. Since then, isostatic uplift gradually caused....... Over time, an extensive beach ridge system formed, which eventually connected the islands, giving Samsø its characteristic shape. Ephemeral shallow-water lagoons evolved in topographic depressions along the shores of the island, most of which became inactive until today. A semi-enclosed coastal lagoon......-level and to investigate associated geomorphic responses in coastal lagoon and beach ridge systems. Vibracorings will be carried out in these sedimentary environments and will be supplemented with manual auger corings and ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys to assess vertical variations in the deposited sediments...

  7. Carbon isotopic changes in benthic foraminifera from the western South Atlantic: Reconstruction of glacial abyssal circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, W. B.; Lohmann, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Oxygen- and carbon-isotopic analyses have been performed on the benthic foraminifer Planulina wuellerstorfi in seven Late Quaternary cores from the Vema Channel-Rio Grande Rise region. The cores are distributed over the water-depth interval of 2340 to 3939 m, which includes the present transition from North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) to Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). The carbon-isotopic records in the cores vary as a function of water depth. The shallowest and deepest cores show no significant glacial-interglacial difference in δ 13C. Four of the five cores presently located in the NADW have benthic foraminiferal δ 13C that is lower during glacial isotopic stages. Based on bathymetric gradients in δ 13C, we conclude that, like today, there were two water masses present in the Vema Channel during glacial intervals: a water mass enriched in 13C overlying another water mass depleted in 13C. The largest gradient of change of δ 13C with depth, however, occurred at 2.7 km, ˜ 1 km shallower than the present position of this gradient. On the basis of paleontologic and sedimentologic evidence, we consider it unlikely that the NADW:AABW transition shallowed to this level. Reduced carbon-isotopic gradients between the deep basins of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans during the last glaciation suggest that production of NADW was reduced. Lower production of NADW may have modified the local abyssal circulation pattern in the Vema Channel region.

  8. Estimates of Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures During the Pliocene From Carbonate 'Clumped Isotope' Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, N.; Tripati, A.; Eiler, J.

    2007-12-01

    The early Pliocene (5 to 3 Ma) was an interval in Earth history that was globally warmer than the present; thus, study of the details of Pliocene climate can provide insights into the dynamics of warm climates. There are two competing models of the temperature structure of the tropical Pacific upper-ocean during the early Pliocene: the dynamical 'ocean thermostat' model [1,2] and the 'El Padre' (or permanent 'El Nino') model [3], each of which predict zonal temperature gradients and mean conditions in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), and which differ markedly from one another in these predictions. The dynamical 'ocean thermostat' model predicts an increased temperature contrast between the Western Equatorial Pacific (WEP) and EEP, enhanced thermocline tilt and intensified upwelling under warmer conditions. In contrast, the 'El Padre' model postulates a collapse of the zonal temperature gradient, reduced thermocline tilt and a reduction in upwelling and/or warmer temperatures of upwelled waters. Existing reconstructions of tropical temperatures produce WEP sea surface temperatures which agree with each other, but yield very different results in the EEP [4,5]. We have reconstructed EEP sea surface temperatures at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 847 using a few samples spanning key intervals of the last 6 million years using carbonate clumped isotope thermometer [6,7,8]. This technique is based on the temperature dependence of the abundances of 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals. Initial measurements of planktonic foraminifera and coccoliths from ODP Site 847 indicate cool EEP sea surface temperatures, supporting models of Pliocene climate that have enhanced zonal temperature gradients, relative to modern. Analyses of Globigerinoides sacculifer (with sac) from sediments indicate calcification temperatures of 20.3°C ± 0.1°C and seawater δ18O values of -0.8‰ ± 0.1‰ from ~6.1 to 5.1 million years ago. Measurements of a mixed coccolith assemblage from the

  9. Modelling planktic foraminifer growth and distribution using an ecophysiological multi-species approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; Labeyrie, L.; Michel, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an eco-physiological model reproducing the growth of eight foraminifer species (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinella siphonifera and Orbulina universa...... in the marine carbon cycle....... ocean (PISCES) instead of satellite images as forcing variables gives also good results, but with lower efficiency (58.9%). Compared to core tops observations, the model also correctly reproduces the relative worldwide abundance and the diversity of the eight species when using either satellite data...

  10. Late Pleistocene shallow water sand transported to the slope at IODP Sites U1484 and U1485 off the north coast of Papua New Guinea: how, when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, G. S.; Browning, J. V.; Bova, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Exp 363 drilled two sites on a gently seaward-dipping terrace 18 and 21 km north of Papua New Guinea, enabling the study of mechanisms that bring shallow water sediment to the deep sea. We expect past changes in sea level and precipitation / fluvial run-off dominated this record, but additional processes may have been important. We examined Hole U1484B (1031 m water depth; 223 m drilled; 99.8% recovered) and detected 339 sharp-based sand layers 0.5 cm or more thick. In contrast to the background hemipelagic nanno-bearing silty clay, sand layers are graded or massive turbidites containing detrital grains, shallow-water benthic foraminifera, shell fragments and/or wood. δ18O values of Globigerinoides ruber tied to the isotopic curve of Lisiecki and Raymo (2004) show the densest concentration of sand layers in the last 310 ka occurred during the cooling trend of MIS stage 6. Stage 2 contains significantly fewer discrete sand beds, even during the coldest part of the LGM. Other times of glacial intensification show a similarly modest correlation to peak sand deposition. Sand layers strongly correlate with high values of magnetic susceptibility (MS) measured on unsplit cores, and when mapped to the MIS time scale, MS increases match times of ice growth / falling sea level more consistently than does the density of sand layers. We attribute this to reworking of discrete sand layers by bioturbation, indicating the need for caution tying the absence of sharp-based sands to times of transgression or low precipitation / fluvial run-off. Packages of especially thick and closely-spaced sharp-based sands match seismic reflections at Site U1484. Tracing these reflections throughout the grid of hi-res MCS site survey profiles reveals the areal distribution and transport path of sand as well as a direct tie to similar sharp-based sands in the more distal Hole U1485A (1145 m water depth; 301 m drilled; 103.8% recovered.) The distribution of sands through time might be

  11. Investigation of Possible Tsunami Events on the Eastern Coast of Taiwan: Case Studies of Lu-Ye, Changping, and Tulan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksono, A. T., Jr.; Tsai, L. L. Y., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Major earthquakes had occurred in eastern Taiwan for many times. According to an Amis folklore originated in Chengkong City, there was a big sea wave struck their settlement in 1850 AD. Several studies had been conducted, however, the evidence which indicates the tsunami was very weak. There is also a possibility that big sea waves had occurred due to typhoons which take place 3-4 times a year in Taiwan. The purpose of this study is to prove the possibility of tsunami events on the eastern coast of Taiwan based on sedimentological features. The methods in this study are facies analysis including observation of the marine terrace along Lu-Ye, Changping, and Tulan, identification of lithology, sedimentary structure, and fossil content. Lithology analysis is conducted by using point counting of 12 sandstone samples from marine terrace outcrops. Based on the field observation, we found a thin sand marine deposit included in the beach gravel at a height of 10 meters at the Changping marine terrace. It contains coral and some Mollusca shells and does not display any particular sedimentary structure. Sediments that have similar characteristics were also found in the Tulan marine terrace with a height of 5 m. In addition, fossil analysis of marine sand in Tulan exhibits the presence of several planktonic foraminifera fossils such as Orbulina bilobata and Globigerinoides ruber. Temporary interpretation indicates that there is a "super" event which transports shallow marine and beach materials subsequently deposit them on top of an alluvial fan. A 10 cm thin layer of sediment serves as an early tsunami indicator. In addition, the absence of deposits with the same characteristics further indicates that the event occurred only once. Since the eastern coast of Taiwan is an uplift zone with an uplift rate between 5-8 mm/year, the estimated wave height of tsunami should take into account both the tsunami age and the uplift rate. Furthermore, based on the distance from the

  12. Moving beyond the age-depth model paradigm in deep sea palaeoclimate archives: dual radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis on single foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Metcalfe, Brett; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Wacker, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Late-glacial palaeoclimate reconstructions from deep-sea sediment archives provide valuable insight into past rapid changes in ocean chemistry, but only a small proportion of the ocean floor is suitable for such reconstructions using the existing state-of-the-art using the age-depth approach. We

  13. Biology of Pelosina arborescens PEARCEY, 1914, with comparative notes on Astrorhiza limicola SANDAHL, 1857 (Foraminifera: Astrorhizidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1993-01-01

    earlier caused uncertainty about the identity of the species. "It was studied on the Swedish west coast, where it may reach 60 mm in length. It occurs below the halocline on bottoms with little bioturbation. It is a suspension feeder. The granuloreticulopodia are extended in the water, where they collect...... of the test are adaptations that also protect against bioturbation and predation but may restrict the respiratory surface. Field observations and laboratory experiments under anoxic conditions show that P arborescens can live anaerobically. Histological analysis of the protoplasm revealed large amounts...

  14. Stratigraphy of Neogene deposits in the Khania province, Crete, with special reference to foraminifera of the family Planorbulinidae and the genus Heterostegina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, T.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper the stratigraphy of the Neogene deposits in the Khania Province, Crete, Greece, is described. Special attention is paid to the evolution and taxonomy of foraminiferal genera assigned previously to the family Planorbulinidae. This partial revision of the Planorbulinidae is based not

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of foraminifera in sediments off the central west coast of India and use of their test morphologies for the reconstruction of paleomonsoonal precipitation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    in this region, quantitative spatial distribution data was generated for morpho-groups (angular-asymmetrical and rounded-symmetrical). The distribution revealed less abundance of angular-asymmetrical forms at the river mouth thus indicating an inverse...

  16. Mean proloculus size, delta super(13) C and delta super(18) O variations in recent benthic foraminifera from the west coast of India and their climatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Sarkar, A.

    The interrelationship between mean proloculus size (MPS), delta super(18) O and delta super(13) C vatiations in benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens and their relation with temperature (T) and salinity (S) have been studied in samples...

  17. Distribution of foraminifera and calcareous nannoplankton in quaternary sediments of the Eastern Angola Basin in response to climatic and oceanic fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachariasse, W.J.; Schmidt, R.R.; Leeuwen, R.J.W. van

    1984-01-01

    The impact of the Zaire River on the oceanic environment is clearly illustrated in the surface sediments by anomalously high carbonate dissolution rates over a large area off the river mouth. This anomaly results from the high supply of terrestrial organic matter brought into the Angola Basin by the

  18. Evaluation of I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone as proxy for redox conditions in the ambient water masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, N.; Liebetrau, V.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are most important areas of oxygen depletion in today´s oceans and nutrient cycling in these regions has a large socio-economic impact because they account for about 17% of the global commercial fish catches(1). Possibly increasing magnitude and area of oxygen depletion in these regions, might endanger rich pelagic fish habitats in the future threatening the global marine food supply. By the use of a quantitative redox proxy in OMZs, reconstruction of the temporal variation in OMZ extension eventually providing information about past and future changes in oxygenation and the anthropogenic role in the recent trend of expanding OMZs(2). Recent work has shown that iodine/calcium (I/Ca) ratios in marine carbonates are a promising proxy for ambient oxygen concentration(3). Our study explores the correlation of I/Ca ratios in four benthic foraminiferal species (three calcitic, one aragonitic) from the Peruvian OMZ to bottom water oxygen concentrations ([O2]BW) and evaluates foraminiferal I/Ca ratios as a possible redox proxy for the ambient water masses. Our results show that all species have a positive trend in the I/Ca ratios as a function of [O2]BW. Only for the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans this trend is not significant. The highest significance has been found for Uvigerina striata (I/Ca = 0.032(±0.004).[O2]BW + 0.29(±0.03), R² = 0.61, F = 75, P solutions, (ii) a species dependency of the I/Ca-[O2]BW relationship which is either related to a strong vital effect or toa species dependency on the calcification depth within sediment, and (iii) the inter-test variability of I/Ca between different specimens from the same species and habitat. (1): FAO FishStat: Fisheries and aquaculture software. In: FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department[online]. Rome. Updated 28 Nov. 2013. (2): Stramma et al.: Expanding Oxygen-Minimum Zones in the Tropical Oceans, Science, 320, 655-658, 2008. (3): Lu et al.: Iodine to calcium ratios in marine carbonate as a paleo-redox proxy during oceanic anoxic events, Geology, 38, 1107-1110, 2010.

  19. Foraminifera and paleoenvironment of the Plio-Pleistocene Kallithea Bay section, Rhodes, Greece: Evidence for cyclic sedimentation and shallow-water sapropels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Thomsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    meters to more than 400 m. Superimposed on this large-scale subsidence was a series of rapid environmental fluctuations. The fluctuations are shown by repeated shifts between fine-grained, laminated marls and coarse-grained calcarenites, and by parallel shifts in the benthic and planktonic assemblages...

  20. Mid-Eocene (Bartonian) larger benthic foraminifera from southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt: New evidence for the palaeobiogeography of the Tethyan carbonate platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Emad S.; Erdem, Nazire Özgen; Sinanoğlu, Derya; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2018-05-01

    Larger benthic foraminiferal assemblages from the mid-Eocene (Bartonian) sedimentary successions of the Tethyan carbonate platforms have been studied in southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt. In the Hazro-Diyarbakir section (SE Turkey), small-medium miliolids and textularinids are identified from the lower intervals of the Hoya Formation, whereas alveolinids and soritids (porcellaneous) and orbitolinids (agglutinated) increase in diversity and abundance in the upper intervals. The Dictyoconus aegyptiensis (Chapman) and Somalina stefaninii Silvestri are recorded for the first time from the Hoya Formation. The larger benthic foraminiferal assemblage from the Hoya Formation shows a significant similarity to those reported from the Observatory Formation (coeval with the Sannor Formation) in the Cairo-Suez district (NE Egypt). The studied foraminiferal assemblages imply restricted lagoonal-tidal flat palaeoenvironments. Palaeobiogeographically, the larger benthic foraminiferal assemblages recorded in southeastern Turkey and northeastern Egypt carbonate platforms display a strong affinity to the Arabian, Middle East and African platforms. The position of the global sea-level and the plate tectonic organization of the studied region during the Bartonian were the main factors that facilitated faunal exchange within the carbonate platforms.

  1. High resolution stable isotopes and elemental analysis on benthic foraminifera: a 4000 yr BP record from the ria de Muros (NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, L. D.; Francés, G.; Diz, P.; Nombela, M. A.; Alejo, I.

    2003-04-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotopes and ICP-OES elemental ratio concentrations (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) from core EUGC-3B (42 45.10'N; 9 02.23'W, at 38 m.b.s.l. and 410 cm length) were measured over monospecific benthic foraminiferal samples (Nonion fabum) ranging over the last 4500 yr BP. From the oldest analysed sample (289 cm) to the core top, stable isotopes signal shows that the whole record can be separated into 4 intervals lasting each of them about 1000 yr. The lowermost interval (4300-3000 yr BP) is characterized by relatively stable delta 18O values (mean 1.77 per mil). Delta 13C is relatively low except for a maximum around 3300 cal BP (-1.50 per mil). An abrupt decrease down to the minimum value in delta 13C (-4.41 per mil) is accomplished in approximately 200 yr. Mg/Ca and Ba/Ca match perfectly this event, both of them showing the respective maxima values. Sr/Ca has a very similar behaviour to that of delta 13C but with smoother fluctuations. We attribute high values of delta 13C, Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca to periods of enhanced coastal productivity, probably due to reinforced upwelling events in the region. According to Mg/Ca signal this reinforcement took place during a relatively warmer period. The most remarkable feature during the two next periods (3000-1900 yr BP and 1900-1000 yr BP) consists of a stepwise increase of delta 13C values punctuated by a sharp decrease at the end of each interval. All the remaining proxies exhibit a nearly constant trend over these intervals. Each period can be interpreted as a weak enhance of marine productivity that the system does not hold up and finally aborts. The most recent interval represents the establishment of current conditions in the coastal system. The most conspicuous event from this interval consists of an abrupt decrease of the delta 18O that lasted for 300 yr. This event could be correlated with the well recognized warm climatic event known as the Medieval Warm Period. However the Mg/Ca ratio does not show high values at this moment. Therefore a salinity decrease caused by enhanced run off can be also invoked to explain low delta 18O values. A hypothetical warmer and wetter period could support both interpretations. Acknowledgements to EU HOLSMEER Project (EVK2-CT-2000-00060) and Paleostudies Program. Contribution 269 of EX-1.

  2. Reconstructing Sea Surface Conditions in the Bay of Bengal during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, A. D.; Dekens, P.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Savian, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, 0.8-1.2Ma) Earth's glacial cycles transitioned from responding primarily to 41kyr obliquity cycles to responding to 100kyr eccentricity cycles. In the tropics, sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern tropical Pacific cooled through the MPT, suggesting a strengthening of the equatorial Pacific zonal temperature gradient (Medina-Elizalde & Lea, 2005). The strong SST gradient would have intensified Walker Cell convection during the MPT and built up latent heat in the western Pacific, which could cause cold SST anomalies in the northern Indian Ocean (Liu et al., 2015). Due to a scarcity of records, it is unclear how climate and oceanic conditions evolved in the Indian Ocean during the MPT. A set of recent IODP expeditions, including 353 and 354, cored sediment from the Bay of Bengal. Several sites recovered by expedition 353 will be ideal for reconstructing monsoon intensity through time, while the expedition 354 cores from a longitudinal transect at 8°N are in a region not directly impacted by changes in freshwater input due to direct precipitation or run off. The sites are influenced by the northeastern migration of equatorial Indian Ocean water via the Southwest Monsoon Current, which supplies significant moisture to the monsoon. Expedition 354's southern Bay of Bengal sites are well situated for better understanding the link between the tropical Indian Ocean and the northern Bay of Bengal. We reconstructed sea surface conditions at IODP site 1452 (8°N, 87°E, 3670m water depth) in the distal Bengal Fan. A 3 meter long section of the core has been identified as the MPT using the Bruhnes/Matuyama, Jaramillo, and Cobb Mountain paleomagnetic reversals (France-Lanord et al., 2016). This section of site 1452 was sampled every 2cm ( 2kyr resolution). Approximately 30 G. sacculifer, a surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera, were picked from the 355-425μm size fraction. We measured Mg/Ca and δ18O on splits of the same

  3. Benthic foraminiferal biocoenoses in the estuarine regimes of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Benthic Foraminifera are highly responsive to subtle changes in the estuarine environment. Keeping this in view, a qualitative analysis of living benthic Foraminifera was made of the samples collected from the Mandovi-Zuari estuaries...

  4. Ocean currents generate large footprints in marine palaeoclimate proxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sebille, E.; Scussolini, P.; Durgadoo, J.V.; Peeters, F.J.C.; Biastoch, A.; Weijer, W.; Turney, C.; Paris, C.B.; Zahn, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fossils of marine microorganisms such as planktic foraminifera are among the cornerstones of palaeoclimatological studies. It is often assumed that the proxies derived from their shells represent ocean conditions above the location where they were deposited. Planktic foraminifera, however, are

  5. Evidence of climatic change during Holocene in the nearshore regions of Konkan (central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gujar, A.R.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    grains, variation in the stability index and significantly poor diversity and scarcity of benthic foraminifera. In contrast, during the mid Holocene humid phase, the number of benthic foraminifera was very high. It is also remarked that Ammonia beccarii...

  6. Predicting and testing resource partitioning in a tropical fish assemblage of zooplanktivorous 'barbs': an ecomorphological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejen, E.; Vijverberg, J.; de Graaf, M.; Sibbing, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Morphometrics on 25 critical feeding structures predicted conspicuous specializations in Barbus tanapelagius (pursuit hunting for zooplankton), Labeobarbus brevicephalus (surface dwelling pump-filter-feeder on zooplankton) and Barbus pleurogramma (particulate feeding on tough, benthic food), whereas

  7. Miocene phosphorites from the Murray Ridge, northwestern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Hegner, E.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Ahmad, S.M.; Raju, D.S.

    .F., Charlou, J.L., 1983. Rare- earth elements and uranium in high-temperature solutions from East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent field (13 degree N). Nature 303, 795–797. Minshull, T.A., White, R.S., Barton, P.J., Collier, J.S., 1992. Deformation at plate..., 1951 (base of zone N9 to Recent), Praeorbulina sicana De Stefani, 1950 (base of zone N8 to lower of zone N9), Globigerinoides trilobus (Reuss), 1850 (Zone N5 to Recent), Globigerinoides cf. bisphericus (lower N7 to lower N9), Globorotalia archeomenardii...

  8. Paleoclimatic and diagenetic history of the Late Quaternary sediments in a core from the southeastern Arabian Sea: Geochemical and magnetic signals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P; Kessarkar, P; Thamban, M.; Patil, S.K.

    the last 35 kaBP. The delta sup(18)O values of Globigerinoides ruber are heaviest during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and appear unaffected by low-saline waters transported from the Bay of Bengal by the strong northeast monsoon and West Indian coastal...

  9. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of a Late Quaternary core in the Zaire (Congo) fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olausson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses have been carried out on samples from a core of the Angola Basin (6 0 50'S, 10 0 45'E, depth 2100 m). The pelagic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber, a species with a shallow water habitat, and two benthic species Uvigerina peregrina and Bulimina aculeata have been analysed. The data are given relative to PDB. (Auth.)

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene 180 amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased ...

  11. Sub-Milankovitch cycles in periplatform carbonates from the early Pliocene Great Bahama Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Reuning, Lars; Reijmer, John; Betzler, C.; Timmermann, A.; Steph, Silke

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution bulk sediment (magnetic susceptibility and aragonite content) and δ18O records from two different planktonic foraminifera species were analyzed in an early Pliocene core interval from the Straits of Florida (Ocean Drilling Program site 1006). The δ18O record of the shallow-dwelling foraminifera G. sacculifer and the aragonite content are dominated by sub-Milankovitch variability. In contrast, magnetic susceptibility and the δ18O record of the deeper-dwelling foraminifera G. me...

  12. Sistemática de Foraminíferos Bentónicos de playa Gómez isla Gorgona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Londoño de Hoyos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred species of benthonic Foraminifera grouped in 46 genera, 22 families, 9 superfamilies and 3 suborders were identified. The total number of individuals studied was 1.445; according to the data repported by the literature on benthonic Foraminifera, 77% of the individuals studied could be considered as in sifu fauna, the rernaining 23% are considered as displaced tests.

  13. Evidence for complete denitrification in a benthic foraminifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Langezaal, A. M.; Ingvardsen, S.

    2006-01-01

    zone of the continental shelf off Chile. Given the high abundance of foraminifera in anoxic marine environments1–3, these new findings suggest that foraminifera may play an important role in global nitrogen cycling and indicate that our understanding of the complexity of the marine nitrogen cycle...

  14. A Monograph on the Orbitoididae, occurring in the Tertiary of America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geyn, van de W.A.E.; Vlerk, van der I.M.

    1935-01-01

    Some years ago we received a collection of foraminifera-bearing samples from Dr. H. K. Kugler and Dr. E. Lehner for examination, in sequence to the collection of larger foraminifera already examined from Central Falcon (Venezuela). (See Nettie E. Gorter and I. M. van der Vlerk, L.G.M., Dl. IV, afl.

  15. Evaluation of the CaCO3 dissolution proxies in sediment cores from above the lysocline

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    and the total CaCO sub(3) content shows that the total carbonate variations are controlled by the finer fraction composed of juvenile foraminifera, foraminifera fragments and coccolithophores. This further confirms the observed variations of CaCO sub(3) content...

  16. Eocene to Oligocene benthic foraminiferal isotopic record in the Bay of Biscay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.G.; Curry, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopic records of Eocene to Oligocene benthic foraminifera from two Bay of Biscay Deep Sea Drilling Project sites are presented. The delta 18 O figures for benthic foraminifera are significantly higher than those previously reported from deeper North Atlantic sites, the differences arising it is believed from diagenetic alteration of the sediments in the deeper-buried sites. (U.K.)

  17. Diversity and dynamics of potentially toxic cyanobacteria and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bloom–forming freshwater cyanobacteria pose human and livestock health problems due to their ability to produce toxins and other bioactive compounds. Some non-toxic cyanobacteria accumulate as buoyant surface dwelling scums and thick mats which affect the benthic fauna by degrading aquatic habitats and giving ...

  18. Ripple Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, R. Stimson

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how surface-dwelling animals use the water surface as a mode of communication by making ripple signals while they swim about. Provides information about surfaces and surface waves, ripple communication in water striders, ripple signal characteristics, sensing and orienting, other modes of communication, and evolution of ripple…

  19. Can benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups be used as indicators of paleomonsoonal precipitation?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Borole, D.V.

    A technique is proposed for the quick and easy assessment of paleomonsoonal precipitation through the study of morphological groups of foraminifera in a shallow water (20 m water depth) sediment core collected off Karwar, near Kali river mouth...

  20. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Food availability, as estimated from organic carbon abundance in sediments, has comparatively less influence on faunal .... procedure was followed for the processing of sedi- ...... Microhabitat selection of benthic foraminifera in sedi- ments off ...

  1. Analysis of the gut contents of the needlefish, Hyporhamphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food items were identified as far as possible. Amphipods and isopods were usually broken up and difficult to separate, and consequently grouped together in the .... Protozoa. Foraminifera. Filamentous algae. Aquatic macrophytes. Ruppia spiralis +. Potamogeton pectinatus. Polychaeta. Crustacea. Ostracoda. Copepoda.

  2. Palaeoceanographic implications of abundance and mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal variation in abundance and mean proloculus diameter of the benthic foraminiferal species. Epistominella ... sediments, ice cores, tree rings, corals, etc. are used. ..... Deep-sea foraminifera in the South Atlantic Ocean: Eco- logy and ...

  3. A Late Pleistocene clockwise rotation phase of Zakynthos (Greece) and implications for the evolution of the western Aegean arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duermeijer, C.E.; Krijgsman, W.; Langereis, C.G.; Meulenkamp, J.E.; Triantaphyllou, M.V.; Zachariasse, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on Eocene to Pleistocene sediments on the Ionian island of Zakynthos, NW Greece. Magnetostratigraphic constraints, biostratigraphic analyses of planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils provide a reliable time frame for these deposits.

  4. Contrasting responses of coral reef fauna and foraminiferal assemblages to human influence in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reef biota including stony corals, sponges, gorgonians, fish, benthic macroinvertebrates and foraminifera were surveyed in coastal waters near La Parguera, in southwestern Puerto Rico. The goal was to evaluate sensitivity of coral reef biological indicators to human distur...

  5. The long-term impact of magnesium in seawater on foraminiferal mineralogy: Mechanism and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, I.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Hart, M.B.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Foraminifera are unicellular protists, primarily known for their calcium carbonate shells thatprovide an extensive fossil record. This record, ranging from Cambrian to present shows both major shiftsand gradual changes in the relative occurrence of taxa producing different polymorphs of carbonate.

  6. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manasa, M.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    into rounded symmetrical (RSBF) and angular asymmetrical benthic foraminifera (AABF). Additionally, a few other dominant groups were also identified based on test composition (agglutinated, calcareous) and abundance (Asterorotalids and Nonions). The relative...

  7. Hydrographic changes in the Agulhas Recirculation Region during the late Quaternary.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, Dinesh K.; Saraswat, R.; Khare, N.; Pandey, A.C.; Nigam, R.

    glacial–interglacial cycle, here we reconstruct hydrographic changes in the southwestern Indian Ocean from temporal variation in planktic foraminiferal abundance, stable isotopic ratio (delta 18O) and trace elemental ratio (Mg/Ca) of planktic foraminifera...

  8. Sedimentation and paleoecology of Pliocene lagoonal-shallow marine deposits on the island of Rhodes (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the depositional and paleontological characteristics of a section of the Pliocene Kritika Formation on the island of Rhodos is presented. The environmental significance of sedimentary structures, the paleoecology of benthonic Foraminifera, and the sequentional

  9. Seasonal sea surface temperature contrast between the Holocene and last glacial period in the western Arabian Sea (Ocean Drilling Project Site 723A): Modulated by monsoon upwelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Malmgren, B.A.

    Annual, summer, and winter sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Arabian Sea were reconstructed through the last 22 kyr using artificial neural networks (ANNs) based on quantitative analyses of planktic foraminifera. Down-core SST estimates...

  10. Link between western Arabian sea surface temperature and summer monsoon strength and high-latitude abrupt climate events

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) based on quantitative analyses of planktic foraminifera. High seasonal SST contrast between winter and summer during the last glacial period indicates weak upwelling and strong cold northeasterly winds. Minimum seasonal SST...

  11. Benthic communities associated with ferromanganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Pavithran, S.; Goltekar, R.

    for grazers, shelter for burrowers and sessile organisms as well as protection for mobile fauna. It is concluded that benthic organisms like nematodes, polychaetes and foraminiferas may have strong influence on nodule formation and growth....

  12. Foraminiferal constituent in marine sediments - A parameter in some coastal engineering problems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Foraminifera, among other microorganisms, form a major constituent of marine sediments and their composition is directly related to the nature of the substrate in which they are entombed. Past and the present data indicate that the size, test...

  13. Foraminiferal production and monsoonal upwelling in the Arabian sea: evidence from sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Curry, W.B.; Ostermann, D.R.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Ittekkot, V.

    Planktonic foraminifera collected in sediment traps in the Arabian Sea during 1986 and 1987 responded to the southern Asian monsoon with changes in productivity, relative abundance of species and isotopic shell chemistry. Most species...

  14. Calcite dissolution along a transect in the western tropical Indian Ocean: A multiproxy approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    Three paleocarbonate ion proxies, size index, planktonic foraminifera shell weight, and calcite crystallinity, have been employed here to a set of core top samples from the western tropical Indian Ocean in the water depth ranges from 1086 to 4730 m...

  15. Benthic fauna of Kakinada bay and backwaters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    . Nematodes, polychaetes, foraminifera and turbellarians were the major groups constituting the bulk of meiofauna, both in the backwaters and near-shore region. Macrofaunal diversity was higher in the near-shore region. Impoverishment of fauna...

  16. paleoenvironmental settings and assemblage changes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kasanzu

    shallow borehole drilled in the southern coastal basin of Tanzania with the aim of characterizing foraminifera and palynomorphs assemblage changes aiming at reconstructing ..... decline in temperature at EOT which caused the extinction of ...

  17. Double Trouble Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, I.E.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Within the project ‘Double Trouble: Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean’, I tried to illuminate mechanisms determining element incorporation in foraminifera with different calcification strategies. In particular, I aimed to assess the interplay between ocean acidification and

  18. Double Trouble : Foraminiferal calcification in a changing ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, I.E.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Within the project ‘Double Trouble: Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean’, I tried to illuminate mechanisms determining element incorporation in foraminifera with different calcification strategies. In particular, I aimed to assess the interplay between ocean acidification and

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5 ... pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna–Godavari basin and Peru offshore to ... Department of Applied Geology, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of ...

  20. Sub-littoral meiobenthos of the northeastern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, C.L.; Harkantra, S.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Of the 11 taxonomic groups represented, Nematoda followed by foraminifera and harpacticoida were dominant Meiofaunal abundance was more related to the texture of the sediment than variation in depth Population density varied from nil to 534.65 x 10...

  1. Preliminary report on diatoms from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold Hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Kellogg, D.E.; Kellogg, T.B.

    with fragments of pyroxenite, quartzite, permatite, gneiss, and glacial debris. Halite and mirabilite crystals are common. A general study of foraminifera of the lake sediments of the Vestfold Hills was made and the results are presented here...

  2. Preface to: Marine micropaleontological studies from the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.

    -pollens, ostracodes, etc. The objective is to provide a comprehensive review of the developments in the oron. micropaleontological st~dies'throu~h ages, with examples from the northern Indian Ocean re,' Micropaleontological studies have experienced a sea-drift over... based foraminifera1 proxies for paleoclimatic/paleoceanographic reconstruction. The paper by Liilshy et al. provides the comprehensive details of the laboratory culture studies on benthic foraminifera carried out with the aim to refine field based...

  3. Late Holocene changes in hypoxia off the west coast of India: Micropalaeontological evidences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Prasad, V.; Mazumder, A.; Garg, R.; Saraswat, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    . and Turner, R. E., Hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico: description, causes and change. In Coastal Hypoxia: Consequences for Living Resources and Ecosystems (eds Rabalais, N. N. and Turner, R. E.), American Geophysical Union, New York, 2001, pp. 1.... In Modern Foraminifera (ed. Sen Gupta, B. K.), Kluwer, Great Britain, 1999, pp. 201–216. 30. Osterman, L. E., Benthic foraminifera from the continental shelf and slope of the Gulf of Mexico: an indicator of shelf hypoxia. Estuarine Coastal Shelf Sci...

  4. DAGMARITA SHHREZAENSIS N. SP. GLOBIVALVULINID FORAMINIFER, (WUCHIAPINGIAN, LATE PERMIAN, CENTRAL IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARVIN MOHTAT-AGHAI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of an investigation on the major mass extintion event near the P/T boundary, in the vicinity of Shahreza (South Isfahan in Iran, a stratigraphically significant new species of foraminifera (Dagmarita shahreaensis n. sp. has been discovered in the Wuchiapingian/Dzhulfian (Late Permian of central Iran (Hambast Formation. This new species is described and emplaced in the phylogeny of the globivalvulinid foraminifera, which evolved rapidly during the Middle/Late Permian. 

  5. Metabolic adaptations and reduced respiration of the copepod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results reveal a reduction by 96% of metabolic rate in deep-living, diapausing C5s relative to surface-dwelling, active individuals. Only 14.4% of this metabolic reduction is explained by the lower ambient temperature at depth and a Q10 value of 2.34. Therefore, the major fraction (81.6%) of the metabolic reduction is ...

  6. Vision in hydrothermal vent shrimp.

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, S C

    2000-01-01

    Bresiliid shrimp from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge have non-imaging eyes adapted for photodetection in light environments of very low intensity. Comparison of retinal structures between both vent shrimp and surface-dwelling shrimp with imaging eyes, and between juvenile and adult vent shrimp, suggests that vent shrimp have evolved from ancestors that lived in a light environment with bright cyclic lighting. Whether the vent shrimp live in swarms and have large dorsal eyes or l...

  7. Acclimation responses to temperature vary with vertical stratification: implications for vulnerability of soil-dwelling species to extreme temperature events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Berg, Matty P; Ellers, Jacintha

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of summer heat waves is predicted to increase in amplitude and frequency in the near future, but the consequences of such extreme events are largely unknown, especially for belowground organisms. Soil organisms usually exhibit strong vertical stratification, resulting in more frequent exposure to extreme temperatures for surface-dwelling species than for soil-dwelling species. Therefore soil-dwelling species are expected to have poor acclimation responses to cope with temperature changes. We used five species of surface-dwelling and four species of soil-dwelling Collembola that habituate different depths in the soil. We tested for differences in tolerance to extreme temperatures after acclimation to warm and cold conditions. We also tested for differences in acclimation of the underlying physiology by looking at changes in membrane lipid composition. Chill coma recovery time, heat knockdown time and fatty acid profiles were determined after 1 week of acclimation to either 5 or 20 °C. Our results showed that surface-dwelling Collembola better maintained increased heat tolerance across acclimation temperatures, but no such response was found for cold tolerance. Concordantly, four of the five surface-dwelling Collembola showed up to fourfold changes in relative abundance of fatty acids after 1 week of acclimation, whereas none of the soil-dwelling species showed a significant adjustment in fatty acid composition. Strong physiological responses to temperature fluctuations may have become redundant in soil-dwelling species due to the relative thermal stability of their subterranean habitat. Based on the results of the four species studied, we expect that unless soil-dwelling species can temporarily retreat to avoid extreme temperatures, the predicted increase in heat waves under climatic change renders these soil-dwelling species more vulnerable to extinction than species with better physiological capabilities. Being able to act under a larger thermal

  8. Insights into the Social Behavior of Surface and Cave-Dwelling Fish (Poecilia mexicana in Light and Darkness through the Use of a Biomimetic Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bierbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic robots (BRs are becoming more common in behavioral research and, if they are accepted as conspecifics, allow for new forms of experimental manipulations of social interactions. Nevertheless, it is often not clear which cues emanating from a BR are actually used as communicative signals and how species or populations with different sensory makeups react to specific types of BRs. We herein present results from experiments using two populations of livebearing fishes that differ in their sensory capabilities. In the South of Mexico, surface-dwelling mollies (Poecilia mexicana successfully invaded caves and adapted to dark conditions. While almost without pigment, these cave mollies possess smaller but still functional eyes. Although previous studies found cave mollies to show reduced shoaling preferences with conspecifics in light compared to surface mollies, it is assumed that they possess specialized adaptations to maintain some kind of sociality also in their dark habitats. By testing surface- and cave-dwelling mollies with RoboFish, a BR made for use in laboratory experiments with guppies and sticklebacks, we asked to what extent visual and non-visual cues play a role in their social behavior. Both cave- and surface-dwelling mollies followed the BR as well as a live companion when tested in light. However, when tested in darkness, only surface-dwelling fish were attracted by a live conspecific, whereas cave-dwelling fish were not. Neither cave- nor surface-dwelling mollies were attracted to RoboFish in darkness. This is the first study to use BRs for the investigation of social behavior in mollies and to compare responses to BRs both in light and darkness. As our RoboFish is accepted as conspecific by both used populations of the Atlantic molly only under light conditions but not in darkness, we argue that our replica is providing mostly visual cues.

  9. Seasonal and annual variation in planktonic foraminiferal fluxes including warm period related El Niño in the northwestern North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; Kawahata, H.; Nishi, H.; Honda, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera provide a record of the upper ocean environment through their species assemblage and individual tests. To investigate the relationship between foraminifera and oceanographic conditions and the impact of El Niño on foraminifera, we analyzed foraminiferal fluxes and relative abundances by using sediment trap samples collected biweekly at three sites in the northwestern North Pacific: Site 40N (39 °60'N, 165 °00'E), Site KNOT (43 °58'N, 155 °03'E), and Site 50N (50 °01'N, 165 °02'E) from 1998- 2001, a period that included an El Niño effect. Based on foraminiferal production and assemblage composition, we divided the sampling duration into several periods during which certain characteristic oceanographic properties were observed. These sampling periods were classified into five types (I-V) based upon four factors: 1) the predominant foraminiferal group, 2) total foraminiferal fluxes (TFFs), 3) organic matter (OM) fluxes, and 4) hydrographic conditions, which included sea surface temperature (SST) and thermal structure. Our results suggest that seasonal changes in foraminifera were closely related to water mass properties in addition to SST. If species compositions were the same, then water mass properties were the most important factors affecting the seasonal variation of foraminiferal abundance in the northwestern North Pacific. Although one of the major controlling factors for foraminiferal fluxes is food availability, the controlling factors for each type (types I-V) are different because of specific oceanographic situations, such as phytoplankton blooms, which result in an excess food supply for foraminifera. At Site KNOT in 1998, SST was remarkably high because of El Niño, and high surface temperatures and weak winds would have lowered nutrient supply and intensified water column stratification, resulting in the relatively low fluxes of total foraminifera, N. pachyderma, and G. bulloides, and the high fluxes of N. dutertrei that

  10. Biostratigraphy, facies and sequence stratigraphy of the Sarvak Formation in the Ahwaz Oil Field, North Dezful Embayment Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kazemzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paleontological studies lead to recognition of 21 genera and 16 species of benthic foraminifera, 5 genera and 6 species of planktonic foraminifera and 3 genera and 3 species of oligosteginids. The vertical distribution of fauna lead to identification of 5 biozones including: Favusella washitensis Range Zone, Oligostegina Assemblage Zone, Rudist debris Zone, Nezzazata-Alveolinids Assemblage Zone, Nezzazatinella-Dicyclina Assemblage Zone. Based on the indicated biozones, the age of the Sarvak Formation is Late Albian to Early Turonian in the study area. Eleven carbonate facies belonging to four environments including tidal flat, restricted and semi-restricted lagoon, shoal and open marine are recognized. The identified facies are deposited on the homoclinal ramp setting. Based on the vertical changes of facies and recognized depositional environments, four third-order depositional sequences are represented. The transgressive systems tracts mainly comprises of open marine facies including sponge spicule, oligosteginid, echinoid and benthic foraminifera, while the highstand systems tracts mainly consists of shoal facies rich in bioclast, and restricted and semi-restricted lagoon facies rich in porcellaneous and hyaline benthic foraminifera and peloid. The maximum flooding surface represented by open marine facies including echinoid and planktonic foraminifera

  11. Deep-sea benthic foraminiferal record of the paleoceanography in the southern Okinawa Trough over the last 20 000 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翦知湣; 陈荣华; 李保华

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative analyses have been carried out on benthic foraminifera from 66 samples of Core 255 in the southern Okinawa Trough, in combination with the stable isotopic analyses of planktonic and benthic foraminifera and AMS 14C dating, in order to reconstruct the history of change under deep water conditions and surface paleoproduclivity over the last 20 000 years. The variations in the ratio of agglutinants in benthic foraminiferal fauna and the ratio of fragments in planktonic foraminifera] fauna indicate higher carbonate dissolution during the postglacial stage than during the glacial stage. The distribution of species and the results of Q-mode factor analysis show that there are three distinctly different benthic foraminiferal assemblages during the glacial, deglacial and postglacial stages in the Okinawa Trough over the last 20000 years: the glacial Bulimina aculeata assemblage (especially the dominant species Uvigerina pereyrina) is associated with high surface primary productivity and organic mat

  12. lower and Middle Miocene Foraminiferal Paleoecology of Southwest Sinai Area, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashwah, A.A.E.; Mandur, M.M.; Obeid, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    The planktonic and benthonic foraminifera content of the lower and middle miocene successions exposed at southwest Sinai in Egypt have been studied. One hundred and thirty three foraminifera species were identified (30 planktonic species and 103 benthonic species). This study aims to contribute in the understanding of the paleoecology, paleobathymetry and tectonic history of these sedimentary sequences. These sediments are subdivided into four rock units, from base to top, as follow: Nukhul, Rudeis, Kareem and Balayim formations. According to the foraminifera content the studied successions are subdivided into five eco zones. The environment of each ec ozone is deduced. These environments point to outer neritic for the Nukhul formation, middle to inner neritic for the Rudeis formation, inner to littoral neritic for the Kareem formation and littoral neritic for the Belayim formation. A proposed paleobathymetric curve is presented. The interpretation of this curve helped to deduce the tectonic history of the lower and Middle Miocene sediments in the studied area

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Neogene Foraminfera in the Central Niger Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, A. O.; Salami, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    A ranking and Scaling (RASC) computer programme for zonation and normality testing of paleontological events was employed to identify assemblages of foraminifera species in the sections studied. The emphasis is on ease of zonal recognition and reliability in correlation. A four fold interval zonation of benthonic and some planktonic foraminifera were established. Two distinct temporal and four depositional environments are recognizable. A few benthonic foraminifera appear to have biostratigraphic significance. Bulumina elegans is present in the early Miocene. Cyclammina cancellata, in the middle-late Miocene, while Brizalina beyrichi and Bolivina variabilis are restricted to late Miocene in the studied samples. However, these distributions may be environmentally controlled and therefore may be tell zones. The presence and abundance of neritic fauna with lignitic materials indicate alternating shallow marine and non-marine conditions during deposition in parts of the Niger-delta

  14. Biostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy of the Sarvak Formation at Fahliyan Anticline (South of Yasuj)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, A.; Vaziri-Moghaddam, A.; Sayrafian, A.; Taheri, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bio stratigraphy, depositional environment and sequence stratigraphy of the Sarvak Formation at Fahliyan Anticline was studied. 8 species of benthic foraminifera (4 genera) and 8 species of planktonic foraminifera (11 genera) in the study area were recognized. 6 biozones have been recognized by distribution of the foraminifera, which in stratigraphic order are: Favusella washitensis Zone, Orbitolina-Alveolinids Assemblage Zone, Rudist debris Zone, Oligostegina flood Zone, Whiteinella archaeocretacea Zone and Helvetoglobotruncana helvetica Zone. On the basis of these, the age of Albian–Turonian was considered for the Sarvak Formation. Based on petrography and analysis of microfacies features 9 different microfacies types have been recognized, which can be grouped into 3 depositional environments: lagoon, shoal and open marine. The Sarvak Formation represents sedimentation on a carbonate ramp. Sequence stratigraphy analysis led to identification of 4 third-order sequences.

  15. Reconstructing Oceanographic Conditions From the Holocene to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.

    2015-12-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 354 drilled 7 sites in the Bay of Bengal, providing a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the link between glacial cycles, tropical oceanographic changes, and monsoon strength. Deep-sea sediment cores of the Bengal Fan fluctuate between sand, hemipelagic and terrestrial sediment layers. All but one of the sites (U1454) contain a layer of calcareous clay in the uppermost part of the core that is late Pleistocene in age. During Expedition 354 site U1452C was sampled at high resolution (every 2cm) by a broad group of collaborators with the goal of reconstructing monsoon strength and oceanographic conditions using a variety of proxies. The top 480 cm of site U1452C (8ºN, 87ºE, 3671m water depth) contains primarily nannofossil rich calcareous clay. The relatively high abundance of foraminifera will allow us to generate a high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) using standard foraminifera proxies. We will present oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca data of mixed layer planktonic foraminifera from the top 70cm of the core, representing the Holocene to the last glacial maximum. δ18O of planktonic foraminifera records global ice volume and local SST and SSS, while Mg/Ca of foraminifera is a proxy for SST. The paired Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements on the same samples of foraminifera, together with published estimates with global ocean δ18O, can be used to reconstruct both SST and local δ18O of seawater, which is a function of the evaporation/precipitation balance. In future work, the local SSS and SST during the LGM will be paired with terrestrial and other oceanic proxies to increase our understanding of how global climate is connected to monsoon strength.

  16. Temperature and Productivity Variability Along the Southwestern Portuguese Margin During the Onset of the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, E.; Voelker, A. H. L.; Abrantes, F. F. G.; Rodrigues, T.; Sierro, F. J.; Hodell, D. A.; Alberto, A.; Freitas, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southwest Portuguese Margin sedimentary record is influenced by the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW), with a strong thermohaline signature occurring between 500 and 1500m water depth. Variations of MOW intensity during the Late Quaternary (±750ky) are related to changes in the global climate and in the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. To validate the sedimentary climate records on the Southwestern Portuguese Margin we performed a regional core-top multi-proxy study (Corg, CaCO3, grain size, foraminifera abundances, stable isotopes) to distinguish the MOW effects in recent sediments. The influence of this high velocity bottom current is marked in sediments by a strong increase of the sand content at both, the upper and lower, MOW boundaries. An increase of fine sediments is due to winnowing by the current, resulting in a drastic change in the accumulation rates of any sand-sized biogenic particle. For this reason, some of the traditional productivity proxies used such as Corg, planktonic and benthic foraminifera total abundances, should not be used at sites under the influence of contour currents. However, we demonstrate that the planktonic foraminifera relative abundances can be used with confidence because they are independent of the action of the MOW. Based on the planktonic foraminifera assemblages in two IODP Sites, U1387 recovered from the MOW influenced Faro Drift, and U1385 recovered at 2578m, we reconstruct the sea surface temperature (SST) and export productivity (Pexp) during the beginning of the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, Marine Isotope Stages 36 and 35. At Site U1387: i) foraminifera-derived SST was compared with biomarkers SST and foraminiferal δ18O data; ii) foraminifera-derived Pexp was compared with the Corg; and iii) the influence of the MOW on the sediments was deducted from the weight percent of the sand fraction, indicating contourite layers, and the benthic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C data.

  17. Coralgal facies of the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestones in Letca-Rastoci area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Prica

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are described the coralgal facies identified in the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestone succession (Cozla Formation outcropping in two quarries at Letca and Rastoci (Sălaj district, Romania. In the studied profiles the coral and algae limestones are interlayered with bioclastic limestones with foraminifera. On the top of relatively deep water deposits, coral and algae crusts and dendritic corals coated by algae were deposited. The environment registered a gradual deepening, the deposits being completely immersed, while bioclastic limestones with foraminifera were recurrently formed. This cycle is repeated, the whole succession being caracterized by several such “parasequences”.

  18. Mg and Ca isotope fractionation during CaCO3 biomineralisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Veronica T.-C.; Williams, R.J.P.; Makishima, Akio; Belshawl, Nick S.; O'Nions, R. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The natural variation of Mg and Ca stable isotopes of carbonates has been determined in carbonate skeletons of perforate foraminifera and reef coral together with Mg/Ca ratios to assess the influence of biomineralisation processes. The results for coral aragonite suggest its formation, in terms of stable isotope behaviour, approximates to inorganic precipitation from a seawater reservoir. In contrast, results for foraminifera calcite suggest a marked biological control on Mg isotope ratios presumably related to its low Mg content compared with seawater. The bearing of these observations on the use of Mg and Ca isotopes as proxies in paleoceanography is considered

  19. Application of foraminifers in ecotoxicology: Retrospect, perspect and prospect

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Panchang, R.

    :112-123; 1964a. Bandy, O.; Ingle Jr., J.C.; Resig, J.M. Foraminifera, Los Angeles County outfall area, California. Limnol. Oceanogra. 9:124-137; 1964b. Bandy, O.; Ingle Jr., J.C.; Resig, J.M. Modification of foraminiferal trends, Hyperion Outfall, California.... Micropal. 10:109-113; 1991. Stott, L.D.; Hayden, T.P.; Griffith, J. Benthic foraminifera at the Los Angeles county Whites Point outfall revisited. J. Foram. Res. 26:357-368; 1996. Stouff, V.; Geslin, E.; Debenay, J.-P.; Lesourd, M. Origin...

  20. Latest paleocene benthic extinction event on the southern tethyan shelf (Egypt): Foraminiferal stable isotopic (delta C-13,delta O-18) records

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, B; Speijer, Robert; Aubry, MP

    1996-01-01

    The dramatic global extinction of 35%-50% of benthic foraminifera species in the deep sea in the latest Paleocene and associated negative excursions in delta(13)C and delta(18)O may be related to spreading of warm, saline bottom water from subtropical Tethyan shallow regions over the sea floor worldwide, Our study of neritic sections in Egypt shows that in the southern shallow Tethys, a prominent long-term change in bottom-water chemistry, sedimentation, and benthic foraminifera fauna was ini...

  1. Late-Holocene environment and climatic changes in Ameralik Fjord, southwest Greenland: evidence from the sedimentary record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik S.; Jensen, Karin G.; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2006-01-01

      Sedimentological and geochemical (XRF) data together with information from diatom and benthic foraminifera records of a 3.5 m long gravity core from Ameralik fjord, southern West Greenland, is used for reconstructing late Holocene environmental changes in this area. The changes are linked...... to large-scale North Atlantic ocean and climate variability. AMS 14C-dating of benthic foraminifera indicates that the sediment core covers the last 4400 years and may include the termination of the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM). The late HTM (4.4-3.2 ka BP) is characterized by high accumulation rates...

  2. Eocene and miocene rocks off the northeastern coast of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T.G.

    1965-01-01

    A grab sample from a depth of 1675 m at a point south of Cape Cod contains early Eocene planktonic Foraminifera and is correlated with the Globorotalia rex zone of Trinidad. The assemblage indicates a depth comparable to that existing today. Regional relations suggest that the Cretaceous and Eocene deposits deepen to the west toward New Jersey. Two mollusk-bearing blocks dredged from the northern side of Georges Bank are correlative with the Miocene Yorktown Formation. Rocks from two other stations are probably Miocene. Benthonic Foraminifera in one sample indicate deposition in cool temperate waters of less than 60 m depth. ?? 1965.

  3. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from ‘old' and ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  4. ANIMAL MANURE – REDUCED QUALITY BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion may reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, but we know little about its impact on soil fertility. Reduced concentrations of easily degradable C in the manure may imply less food for the soil fauna and microflora. A field experiment to study its effect on crop yields and soil...... caused the death of both surface-dwelling and soil-living earthworms shortly after application, but the long-term effect of manure application seemed more positive, especially at low application levels. So far, we have observed only small differences in the effects of digested and undigested manure...

  5. Nervus terminalis projection to the retina in the 'four-eyed' fish, Anableps anableps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D L; Malz, C R; Jadhao, A G

    1996-08-02

    The eye of the surface dwelling 'four-eyed' fish, Anableps possesses an aquatic and an aerial optical system. The aerial system is strongly hyperopic when the animal dives, i.e. during mating, and the dorsal pupil is submerged. We studied the retino-petal nervus terminals projection to the aerial and to the aquatic retina by Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 (FMRF) immunocytochemistry and found both to be equally innervated. This finding sheds doubt on the proposed functional significance of this projection for reproductive behaviour.

  6. Quaternary carbonate record from the equatorial Indian Ocean and its relationship with productivity changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Malmgren, B.A.

    Globigerinoides ruber. This indicates that CaCO fluctuations at this site do not show either a 3 y2 y1 .Pacific or an Atlantic pattern of CaCO fluctuations. Fluxes of CaCO 0.38 to 2.46 g cm ka in total sediment and 33 y2 y1 .BarAl ratios 0.58 to 3.93 g cm ka... show six-fold variability through the last 1370 ka, which points out that productivity changes are significant at this site. Fluxes of the fine CaCO component demonstrate a 26-fold change 0.02 to 3 y2 y1 . y2 y1 .0.52 g cm ka , whereas the coarse Ca...

  7. Modelling planktic foraminifer growth and distribution using an ecophysiological multi-species approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lombard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an eco-physiological model reproducing the growth of eight foraminifer species (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinella siphonifera and Orbulina universa. By using the main physiological rates of foraminifers (nutrition, respiration, symbiotic photosynthesis, this model estimates their growth as a function of temperature, light availability, and food concentration. Model parameters are directly derived or calibrated from experimental observations and only the influence of food concentration (estimated via Chlorophyll-a concentration was calibrated against field observations. Growth rates estimated from the model show positive correlation with observed abundance from plankton net data suggesting close coupling between individual growth and population abundance. This observation was used to directly estimate potential abundance from the model-derived growth. Using satellite data, the model simulate the dominant foraminifer species with a 70.5% efficiency when compared to a data set of 576 field observations worldwide. Using outputs of a biogeochemical model of the global ocean (PISCES instead of satellite images as forcing variables gives also good results, but with lower efficiency (58.9%. Compared to core tops observations, the model also correctly reproduces the relative worldwide abundance and the diversity of the eight species when using either satellite data either PISCES results. This model allows prediction of the season and water depth at which each species has its maximum abundance potential. This offers promising perspectives for both an improved quantification of paleoceanographic reconstructions and for a better understanding of the foraminiferal role in the marine carbon cycle.

  8. What is the Right Temperature Sensitivity for Foraminiferal Mg/ca Paleothermometry in Ancient Oceans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, S.; Holland, K.; Hoenisch, B.; Spero, H. J.; Allen, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mg/Ca seawater thermometry has become a cornerstone of modern paleoceanography. Laboratory experiments, seafloor core-top samples, plankton trap and tow collected materials all indicate consistent temperature sensitivity (9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C) for a full range of modern planktic foraminifer species. While these results demonstrate the overall robustness of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for the modern ocean, it is an empirical tool for which there is limited understanding of its bio-physio-chemical basis and its applicability to ancient oceans. We have undertaken experimental cultures of Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber (pink) across a range of seawater compositions (temperature, carbonate chemistry and Mg/Casw) that encompass modern and ancient Paleogene and Cretaceous ocean compositions (Mg/Casw 0.25x to 2x modern and pCO2 = 200 to 1500 ppmv). Our results reveal that the sensitivity of the Mg/Ca-thermometer for planktic foraminifers reduces significantly with Mg/Casw, rather than remaining constant as has been widely assumed or, increasing at lower Mg/Casw as proposed recently by Evans and Müller (2012). These results indicate that the modern sensitivity of 9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C cannot yet be applied to obtain reliable relative temperature change estimates to ancient oceans. These results further suggest that variations in foraminiferal Mg/Ca compositions in ancient oceans with lower Mg/Casw may correspond to larger temperature variations than in the modern ocean. Evans D. and Müller W., Paleoceanography, vol. 27, PA4205, doi:10.1029/2012PA002315, 2012

  9. Late Quaternary record of pteropod preservation from the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sijinkumar, A.V.; Nath, B.N.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    , temperature and one atmosphere total pressure. American Journal of Science 283, 780-799. Naqvi, W.A., Charles, C.D., Fairbanks, R.G., 1994. Carbon and oxygen isotopic records of benthic foraminifera from the Northeast Indian Ocean: implications on glacial...

  10. Late Miocene to early Pliocene climate variability off NW Africa (ODP Site 659)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, C.; Siani, G.; Liu, Z.; Blamart, D.; Skonieczny, C.; Zhao, Y.; Bory, A.; Frank, N.; Duchamp-Alphonse, S.; Thil, F.; Richter, T.; Kissel, C.; Gargani, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution delta O-18 record obtained on benthic foraminifera (Cibicides wuellerstorfi) combined with clay mineralogy, major element concentrations and Sr-Nd isotopes have been investigated for the ODP Site 659 located off North Africa in order to reconstruct African monsoon intensity between

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-28

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The environmental interpretation of each species is based on the ecology of recent deep-sea benthic foraminifera. The faunal record indicates fluctuating deep-sea conditions including changes in surface productivity, organic food supply and deep-sea oxygenation linked to changing wind intensities.

  12. Direct dating of the oxygen-isotope record of the last deglaciation by 14C accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplessy, J.C.; Arnold, Maurice; Maurice, Pierre; Bard, Edouard; Duprat, Josette; Moyes, Jean

    1986-01-01

    The authors have measured 14 C for various species of foraminifera to produce a reliable timescale for the oxygen-isotope record. The results show that, at the end of the last ice age, continental ice sheets began to melt more than 4,000 yr before the Northern Hemisphere maximum of summer calorific radiation. (author)

  13. Cytological Observations of the Large Symbiotic Foraminifer Amphisorus kudakajimensis Using Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshikazu; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nakamaura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Large benthic foraminifera are unicellular calcifying reef organisms that can form symbiotic relationships with a range of different microalgae. However, the cellular functions, such as symbiosis and calcification, and other aspects of cellular physiology in large benthic foraminifera are not fully understood. Amphisorus kudakajimensis was used as a model to determine the detailed cellular characteristics of large benthic foraminifera. We used calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein AM) as a fluorescent indicator for live confocal imaging. We demonstrated that calcein AM is a useful fluorescent indicator to stain the fine network of reticulopodia and the cytoplasm in living A. kudakajimensis. We showed that at least two types of reticulopodia exist in A. kudakajimensis: the straight bundle of reticulopodia that spreads from the aperture and the fine reticulopodia along the surface of the aperture and chamber walls. The cytoplasm in outer chambers was highly branched and contained a few dinoflagellates. In contrast, the inner chamberlets contained condensed cytoplasm and many dinoflagellates, suggesting that the cytoplasm of A. kudakajimensis performs different functions based on its location within the large test. Our confocal detailed image analysis provides real-time cellular morphology and cell physiology of living foraminifera. PMID:27812157

  14. Fluctuation in glacial and interglacial sediment discharge of the River Indus as seen in the core from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Sediment core from the upper continental slope off Saurashtra Coast has been analysed for CaCO sub(3) and coarse fraction contents in addition to planktonic foraminifera and clay mineralogy. Based on CaCO sub(3) and planktonic foraminiferal data a...

  15. Productivity modes in the Mediterranean Sea during Dansgaard–Oeschger (20,000–70,000 yr ago) oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Incarbona, A.; Sprovieri, M.; di Stefano, A.; di Stefano, E.; Salvagio Manta, D.; Pelosi, N.; d’ Alcalà, M.R.; Sprovieri, R.; Ziveri, P.

    2013-01-01

    The study of planktonic organisms during abrupt climatic variations of the last glacial period (Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations, D-O) may reveal important insights on climatic, oceanographic and biological interactions. Here we present planktic foraminifera and coccolithophore data collected at the

  16. Benthic foraminiferal Mn / Ca ratios reflect microhabitat preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Fontanier, C.; Toyofuku, T.; Oguri, K.; Kitazato, H.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mn / Ca of calcium carbonate tests of living (rose-Bengal-stained) benthic foraminifera (Elphidium batialis, Uvigerina spp., Bolivina spissa, Nonionellina labradorica and Chilostomellina fimbriata) were determined in relation to pore water manganese (Mn) concentrations for the first time along a

  17. Structure, diversity and environmental role of foraminiferal assemblages from reefal settings of Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajemila, Olugbenga; Langer, Martin R.

    2015-04-01

    Reefal and shallow lagoonal environments around the island Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia) offer a spectacular variety of microhabitats providing a multitude niches and ideal settings for rich assemblages of tropical benthic foraminifera. The Society Islands are located near the hotspot of tropical marine diversity and represent a transitional location between the high diversity assemblages of the coral triangle and the low diversity biotas of the eastern Pacific. This area constitutes an important biogeographic link and stepping stone between the eastern and western biotas of the tropical Pacific Ocean. We have analyzed the structure, diversity and composition of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from around Moorea to document the composition, species richness and environmental role of larger and smaller benthic foraminifera from within the lagoonal system, the mangrove habitats and fore-reef sites. Foraminifera are prominent producers of calcium carbonate and contribute significantly to structures in reefal settings of the tropical Pacific. We evaluate the potential of larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera as environmental engineers and apply the FORAM-Index as proxy to assess the conditions around Moorea Island. We also evaluate the role of the Society Islands as stepping stone between biogeographic regions of the Pacific Ocean.

  18. Foraminiferal survival after long-term in situ experimentally induced anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    Anoxia was successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed at 24 m depth on the northern Adriatic seafloor from 9 days to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerTM Green method was applied and calcareous and agglutinated foraminifera were analyzed. Numerous individuals were found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths (to 5 cm), supported by a ribosomal RNA analysis that revealed that certain benthic foraminifera were active after 10 months of anoxia. The results show that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulfides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular manner. A large difference in standing stock between two cores sampled under initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after one month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in cores sampled after 2 months of anoxia to then attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulfides but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  19. Fadiya and Adebambo (16)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    determining the crucial factors of source, seal, ... Nigeria were made available by the Nigerian ... allow water molecules to penetrate the samples, thus ... scale. RESULT AND DISCUSSION. Biostratigraphic results revealed a fairly abundant ... microphotographs of index foraminifera species .... the calcium carbonate tests.

  20. Benthos of the Narmada estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varshney, P.K.; Govindan, K.; Desai, B.N.

    . Chaetopods formed the most dominant component of macro fauna, while foraminifera predominated the meiofauna. The mean ratio between macro and meio fauna in terms of population density and biomass (dry wt.) were 1:90 and 1:3 respectively. Sediments were...

  1. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous (Campanian - Maastrichtian) sequences in the Peri-Tethys basin; Moghan area, NW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, Mahboobeh; Safari, Amrollah; Vaziri-Moghaddam, Hossain; Ghalavand, Hormoz

    2018-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous sediments in the Moghan area, NW Iran, contain diverse planktonic and benthic foraminifera, with a total of 33 genera and 53 species (17 genera and 38 species of planktonic foraminifera and 16 genera and 15 species from benthic foraminifera), which led to the identification of six biozones spanning the middle Campanian to late Maastrichtian. A detailed paleontological study and biostratigraphic zonation of these sequences has been carried out in four surface sections. This study shows that there are two different facies in the Moghan area, based on the faunal content. A deep open marine condition exists in the Molok, Selenchai and Nasirkandi sections. In these sections, Upper Cretaceous sequences have diverse planktonic foraminiferal species including the Globotruncana ventricosa (middle to late Campanian), Globotruncanella havanensis (late Campanian), Globotruncana aegyptiaca (latest Campanian), Gansserina gansseri (latest Campanian to early Maastrichtian), Contusotruncana contusa- Racemiguembelina fructicosa (early to late Maastrichtian) and Abathomphalus mayaroensis (late Maastrichtian) zones. This deep open marine setting grades laterally into shallower marine condition dominated by large benthic foraminifera such as Orbitoides media, Orbitoides gruenbachensis, Orbitoides cf. apiculata, Lepidorbitoides minor, Pseudosiderolites sp., Siderolites praecalcitrapoides, Siderolites aff. calcitrapoides and Siderolites calcitrapoides. This facies is mainly recorded in the Hovay section. A detailed biostratigraphic zonation scheme is presented for the studied sections and correlated with the results of other studies in the Tethyan realm. This is the first biozonation scheme for Upper Cretaceous sequences of the Moghan area that can be used as a basis for ongoing studies in this area and other parts of Tethys basin.

  2. Fluctuating monsoonal precipitation as revealed by foraminiferal variations in a core from shelf regime off Karwar (India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    in this area. The percentage abundance of C. annectens in the total benthic foraminifera obtained for each sample and plotted against depth in core varied from 0 to 4.88%. In coastal areas, abundance of this species is inversely proportional to freshwater...

  3. Survival under stress : benthic foraminiferal patterns and Cenozoic biotic crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    A principal conclusion of this thesis is, that benthic foraminifera are excellent recorders of paleoenvironments and paleoenvironmental change. Insight in their community structure, and changes in this through time, is still increasing and will add to their usefulness in the reconstruction of past

  4. Survival under stress : benthic foraminiferal patterns and Cenozoic biotic crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    A principal conclusion of this thesis is, that benthic foraminifera are excellent recorders of paleoenvironments and paleoenvironmental change. Insight in their community structure, and changes in this through time, is still increasing and will add to their usefulness in the reconstruction of

  5. IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, Paula J.; Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Buck, Caitlin E.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatté, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.; Hogg, Alan G.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Kaiser, K. Felix; Kromer, Bernd; Manning, Sturt W.; Niu, Mu; Reimer, Ron W.; Richards, David A.; Scott, E. Marian; Southon, John R.; Staff, Richard A.; Turney, Christian S.M.; Plicht, Johannes van der; Reimer, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    The IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon calibration curves have been revised utilizing newly available and updated data sets from C-14 measurements on tree rings, plant macrofossils, speleothems, corals, and foraminifera. The calibration curves were derived from the data using the random walk model

  6. Aptian – Albian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    The latest Aptian was identified in holes by very small size planktonic ... Black shales and Oligostegenid limestone were deposited on the crest of ... No benthic foraminifera were recorded within all samples analyzed. Hole MK 1. • Interval 2600 m – 2615 m: Latest Albian. The last occurrences (LO) of index taxa Hedbergella ...

  7. Seasonality, biodiversity and microhabitats in benthic foraminiferal communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, N.T.

    2001-01-01

    Benrhic foraminifera (Protista: Sarcodina) are ol1l'-ceUed organisms that are widely spread over the worlds' oceans. Most of the species can be distinguished by the morphology of their sheJl, and the high preservation potential of these shells makes them a lIseful tool to date sediment layers

  8. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.

    2011-01-01

    +, indicating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammo- nium (DNRA). DNRA is an anaerobic respiration process that is known mainly from prokaryotic organisms, and here shown as dis- similatory nitrate reduction pathway used by a eukaryotic photo- troph. Similar to large sulfur bacteria and benthic foraminifera...

  9. Evidence of slumping/sliding in Krishna-Godavari offshore basin due to gas/fluid movements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.; Dewangan, P.; Ramana, M.V.; Mazumdar, A.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Ramya, E.R.; Sriram, G.

    lithology of mid-slope deposits is comprised of nannofossil-rich clay, nannofossil-bearing clay and foraminifera bearing clay. The HRS records and bathymetry reveal evidence of slumping and sliding of the upper and mid-slope sediments, which result in mass...

  10. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate

  11. Species diversity variations in Neogene deep-sea benthic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some species of benthic foraminifera are sensitive to changes in water mass properties whereas others are sensitive to organic fluxes and deep-sea oxygenation. Benthic faunal diversity has been found closely linked to food web, bottom water oxygen levels, and substrate and water mass stability. The present study is ...

  12. Foraminiferal abundance in the modified marine environment of Cola Bay region of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Narayanan, V.

    perforate foraminifera are found to be very abundant over all other types in the living populations. In the Cola Bay region of Goa, where the marine environment is affected by the industrial effluents, the foraminiferal distribution shows that @iAmmonia...

  13. Impact of seawater [Ca2+] on the calcification and calcite Mg / Ca of Amphistegina lessonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; Thoms, S.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G. J.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Bijma, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mg / Ca ratios in foraminiferal tests are routinely used as paleotemperature proxies, but on long timescales, they also hold the potential to reconstruct past seawater Mg / Ca. The impact of both temperature and seawater Mg / Ca on Mg incorporation in Foraminifera has been quantified by a number of

  14. Impact of seawater [Ca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; Thoms, S.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.J.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mg / Ca ratios in foraminiferal tests are routinely used as paleotemperature proxies, but on long timescales, they also hold the potential to reconstruct past seawater Mg / Ca. The impact of both temperature and seawater Mg / Ca on Mg incorporation in Foraminifera has been quantified by a number of

  15. The biodiversity and biogeography of komokiaceans and other enigmatic foraminiferan-like protists in the deep Southern Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gooday, A.J.; Cedhagen, Tomas; Kamenskaya, O.E.

    2007-01-01

    We present a survey of komokiaceans and other relatively large, stercomata-bearing testate protists, presumed to be foraminifera, based on extensive ship-board sorting of samples collected at 13 sites (depth range 1820-4930 m) in the Weddell Sea and two sites in the SE Atlantic (Cape and Aguilas...

  16. Middle to Late Eocene paleoenvironmental changes in a marine transgressive sequence from the northern Tethyan margin (Adelholzen, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GEBHARDT, Holger; ĆORIĆ, Stjepan; DARGA, Robert; BRIGUGLIO, Antonino; SCHENK, Bettina; WERNER, Winfried; ANDERSEN, Nils; SAMES, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The northern Tethyan margin is a key region for determining environmental changes associated with the collision of continental and oceanic tectonic plates and Alpine orogeny. Herein we investigated Middle to Late Eocene neritic to bathyal sediments deposited during an interval of unstable climatic conditions. In order to quantify paleoenvironmental changes, we developed a detailed age model based on biozonations of planktic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, and larger benthic foraminifera. The section at Adelholzen covers the almost complete Lutetian Stage (calcareous nannoplankton zones NP15a-16, planktic foraminifera zones E8-11, shallow benthic (foraminifera) zones SBZ13-15) and large parts of the Priabonian Stage (NP18-20, E14/15), while the intermediate Bartonian Stage (NP17) is completely missing. Foraminiferal, calcareous nannoplankton, and macrofossil assemblages were analyzed for changes in paleo-water depth, mixing and stratification, paleo-primary productivity (pPP), food supply, and bottom water oxygenation. Paleo-water depth estimates range from 50 m (middle neritic, early Lutetian) to nearly 500 m (upper bathyal, late Priabonian). The combination of assemblage composition, planktic and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, and derived parameters (carbon-flux to sea floor, pPP) enabled us to identify a series of distinct paleoceanographic events of at least regional significance. Such events are characterized by considerable changes in primary productivity or reduced bottom water ventilation. Calculated pPP-values indicate oligotrophic conditions throughout. PMID:26346423

  17. Isotopic evidence of a rapid cooling and continuous sedimentation across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary of Wagapadhar and Waior, Kutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarangi, S.; Sarkar, A.; Bhattacharya, S.K.; Ray, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    High resolution oxygen isotope analysis of samples from two different Eocene Oligocene Boundary (EOB) sections of Wagapadhar and Waior of Kutch area and their correlation with DSDP sites indicate continuity of sedimentation at these sites. A rapid cooling of ∼ 6 degC across the EOB, synchronous with extinction of Eocene larger benthic foraminifera is also observed. (author)

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G Rajagopalan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 153-156. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera · S M Ahmad D J ...

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    acteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable isotopic ratios of planktonic foraminifera. 153. Ameenulla S see Bhat G S. 221, 229 see Venkataramana M. 239. Babu Ramesh V. Thermohaline structure and circulation in the upper layers of the southern Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-. Pilot (October-November 1998).

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B N Nath. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 153-156. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera · S M Ahmad D J Patil P S ...

  1. Refinement of stratigraphy according to the first finds of planktonic species of Orbulina and Praeorbulina from the Guri Limestone of the Mishan Formation in northwest of Bandar Abbas, South Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, J.; Moallemi, S. A.; Derakhshani, M.

    2016-05-01

    The Zagros Basin is one of the most universal oil and gas basins that is located in the west to south of Iran and in north of the Arabian Plate. The Guri Member at the bottom of the Mishan Formation, in some areas such as Bandar Abbas hinterland, contains a significant amount of gas. The Bandar Abbas hinterland is located in the southeast of Zagros. The Guri Limestone is the youngest hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Zagros Sedimentary Basin. In this study, a total of 178 samples from the Guri Limestone in the Handun section are investigated for foraminiferal biostratigraphy. The study of foraminifers led to a recognition of 43 genera and 57 species of benthic and planktonic foraminifera. For the first time, planktonic foraminiferal species including Praeorbulina glomerosa, Praeorbulina transitoria, Orbulina suturalis, and Orbulina universa are reported, and based on the identified benthic and planktonic foraminifera taxa, the age of the Guri Member at Handun section is estimated as late Burdigalian to Langhian.

  2. Results of the study of a new Groznensky Field with fissured reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedinets, N P; Merkulov, A V; Pristanskii, G T; Postash, M F

    1970-06-01

    Geological information on the Eldarovsky field, situated in the central part of Tersky anticlinal zone and discovered in 1964, is given. Commercial quantities of oil were discovered in the foraminifera (thickness 40 to 70 m) and Upper Cretaceous (305 to 330 m thickness) deposits, consisting of fissured limestones and marls. Both the foraminifera and Upper Cretaceous deposits are divided into various zones which are hydrodynamically connected with each other and constitute a single pool. No hydrodynamical connection was observed between the Eldarovsky pools and surrounding oil fields. The secondary porosity of the Upper Cretaceous and forammifera deposits is 0.49% and 0.2%, respectively, and is responsible for most of the oil reserves. The analysis of the pressure buildup curves shows that the field has an elastic water drive.

  3. Survey of the marine benthic infauna collected from the United States radioactive waste disposal sites off the Farallon Islands, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reish, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Benthic biological samples were taken in 1977 from the vicinity of the Farallon Islands radioactive waste disposal sites for characterization of the infaunal macroinvertebrates and foraminifera. A total of 120 invertebrate species were collected, of which 75 species (63 percent) were polychaetes. Forty-three of these polychaete species have not previously been reported from depths greater than 1000m. A total of 1044 macroinvertebrate specimens were collected of which 54 percent were polychates. Only the nematods were present at all six benthic stations, but the community structure was dominated by the polychaetes Tauberia gracilis, Allia pulchra, Chaetozone setosa, and Cossura candida. Living and dead foraminifera were reported. The possible role of polychaetes in bioturbation and in the marine food chain is briefly discussed with respect to the various polychaete feeding mechanisms

  4. Stable-isotope paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuser, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    Seasonal variations of temperature and salinity in the surface waters of large parts of the oceans are well established. Available data on seasonal distributions of planktonic foraminifera show that the abundances of different species groups peak at different times of the year with an apparent succession of abundance peaks through most of the year. This evidence suggests that a measure of seasonal contrast is recorded in the isotope ratios of oxygen, and perhaps carbon, in the tests of different foraminiferal species. The evaluation of this potential paleoclimatologic tool awaits planned experiments with recent foraminifera in well-known settings, but a variety of available data is consistent with the idea that interspecies differences in 18 O content contain a seasonal component.(auth.)

  5. Late-Holocene environment and climatic changes in Ameralik Fjord, southwest Greenland: evidence from the sedimentary record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik S.; Jensen, Karin G.; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2006-01-01

      Sedimentological and geochemical (XRF) data together with information from diatom and benthic foraminifera records of a 3.5 m long gravity core from Ameralik fjord, southern West Greenland, is used for reconstructing late Holocene environmental changes in this area. The changes are linked...... to large-scale North Atlantic ocean and climate variability. AMS 14C-dating of benthic foraminifera indicates that the sediment core covers the last 4400 years and may include the termination of the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM). The late HTM (4.4-3.2 ka BP) is characterized by high accumulation rates...... conditions were further characterised by limited sea ice probably related to a mild and relatively windy winter climate. After 3.2 ka BP lower fine-grained sedimentation rates, but a larger input from sea-ice rafted or aeolian coarse material prevailed. This can be related to colder atmospheric conditions...

  6. Reduced ENSO Variability at the LGM Revealed by an Isotope-Enabled Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Zhengyu; Brady, Esther; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Zhang, Jiaxu; Noone, David; Tomas, Robert; Nusbaumer, Jesse; Wong, Tony; Jahn, Alexandra; hide

    2017-01-01

    Studying the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the past can help us better understand its dynamics and improve its future projections. However, both paleoclimate reconstructions and model simulations of ENSO strength at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka B.P.) have led to contradicting results. Here we perform model simulations using the recently developed water isotope-enabled Community Earth System Model (iCESM). For the first time, model-simulated oxygen isotopes are directly compared with those from ENSO reconstructions using the individual foraminifera analysis (IFA). We find that the LGM ENSO is most likely weaker comparing with the preindustrial. The iCESM suggests that total variance of the IFA records may only reflect changes in the annual cycle instead of ENSO variability as previously assumed. Furthermore, the interpretation of subsurface IFA records can be substantially complicated by the habitat depth of thermocline-dwelling foraminifera and their vertical migration with a temporally varying thermocline.

  7. Regeneration and abnormality in benthic foraminifer Rosalina leei: Implications in reconstructing past salinity changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Linshy, V.N.

    water, especially in regions where rivers meet the ocean. Benthic foraminifera, preferentially marine microorganisms with a hard calcareous or agglutinated exoskeleton known as the test, are one of the most abundant groups of microorganisms... temperature under incubators and under 12 hour light -12 hour dark condition throughout the experiment. In order to avoid evaporation, culture trays were wrapped in thin polythene film, immediately after changing the culture media. Culture media was changed...

  8. Late Holocene evolution of the Northeast intertidal region of Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Fernandes Souza Pinto; Maria Virgínia Alves Martins; Maria Antonieta da Conceição Rodrigues; Leandro Nogueira; Lazaro Luiz Mattos Laut; Egberto Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This work is based on the study of the core T1 collected in the Guaratiba Mangrove, located on the northeastern margin of Sepetiba Bay. Few studies dealing with the application of benthic foraminifera to study sea level changes during the Holocene have been conducted in Sepetiba Bay, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In order to fill this gap, the core T1 was studied using textural, geochemical (carbonate, total organic carbon, total sulfur and stable isotopes evaluated in Ammonia tepida) and ...

  9. Parameters Controlling Sediment Composition of Modern and Pleistocene Jamaican Reefs

    OpenAIRE

    Boss, Stephen K.

    1985-01-01

    Recent carbonate sediments from Jamaican north coast fringing reefs display variation in constituent composition, texture, and mineralogy related to their location on the reef. Samples were collected along lines which traversed the back reef and fore reef (0.5m to 70m). The sediment is dominated by highly comminuted coral fragments, plates of the calcareous green alga, Halimeda, coralline algae, and the encrusting Foraminifera, Homotrema rubrum, with lesser amounts of other taxonomic group...

  10. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  11. Deterioration of Early Holocene coral reef due to sea level rise along west coast of India: Benthic foraminiferal testimony

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Nigam, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    and constituting the main components of the carbonate beach sands: Examples from Ryukyu archipelago, in: Proceeding FORAMS’98 – International Symposium on Foraminifera. Monterrey, Mexico. Kaminski, M.A., Aksu, A., Box, M., Hiscott, R.N., Filipescu, S., Al..., B., 1991. Climatic trends and variability, in: Jager, J., Ferguson, H.L. (Eds.), Climate change, Science, Impact and Policy. Proc. II World Climate Conference, pp. 71-82. Daniel, A., 1972. Marine intertidal barnacles in the Indian Ocean. Proceeding...

  12. Monsoonal and fertility contols on recent marginal sea and continental shelf coccolith assemblages from the western Pacific and northern Indian Oceans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Houghton, S.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    Gill, 1973). These nutrient-enriched surface waters support large blooms of the diatom Rhizo- solenia (Nair et al., 1989). High fluxes of carbonate, mainly coccolithophorids with some foraminifera, are associated with the monsoons. High levels.... In the low-latitude Pacific Ocean, high abun- dances of E. huxleyi (>40%) are generally re- stricted to assemblages beneath waters of low to medium fertility; these areas include the East Pacific Rise (near the Galapogos Islands), and below the central...

  13. Abundance and composition of benthic fauna in Penaeus monodon Fabricius culture pond on the west coast of Malaysia peninsular

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Hena, M.K.; Hishamuddin, O.; Misri, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the benthic faunal abundance and diversity of tiger shrimp P. monodon culture ponds in Perak, west coast of Malaysia Peninsular. Sampling was carried out at three weeks interval throughout the 116 days culture period. In addition, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, transparency, pH and organic matter of soil were also measured. Results showed that the major groups of macro-benthos comprised of gastropod, foraminifera, polychaetes, bivalve and insects;...

  14. Globanomalina luxorensis, a Tethyan biostratigraphic marker of latest Paleocene global events

    OpenAIRE

    Speijer, Robert; Samir, AM

    1997-01-01

    The lowest common occurrence (LCO) of the planktonic foraminifera Globanomalina luxorensis marks the level of the latest Paleocene global benthic extinction event (BEE) and associated negative delta(13) C excursion in various bathyal and neritic successions in the Mediterranean region. Below the BEE level, G. luxorensis is extremely rare and subordinate in abundance relative to its precursor G, chapmani. From this level onwards, G. luxorensis generally constitutes a large proportion of the pl...

  15. Quaternary palaeoceanography and palaeogeography in Northern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Karen Luise; Conradsen, Keld; Heier‐Nielsen, Susanne

    1996-01-01

    Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions from the Skagen record contribute to the understanding of Late Quaternary climatic changes and variations in the oceanographic circulation pattern in the entire North Atlantic region. The Skagen cores penetrated c. 192 m of Quaternary sediments comprising two...... the Holocene, including the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Results from the study of lithology, foraminifera, stable isotope measurements and radiocarbon dates are reviewed while emphasizing the most important contributions to the general understanding of the North Atlantic Quaternary history....

  16. Life spans of planktonic foraminifers: New sight through sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Mazumder, A.

    ), indicated by black arrows are remarkably present for all three trap locations. (Modified after Curry et l.t 1992). 2002; Eguchi, Ujiie, Kawahata and Taira 2003), (ii) all the traps can not stop functioning simultaneously and that for the same time... estimates of the life spans of planktonic foraminifera based on extrapolation of lab culture observations. According to Be et al (1981), an inverse relationship exists between feeding frequency and survival time, and that planktonic foraminifers under...

  17. Early-Middle Pleistocene benthic turnover and oxygen isotope stratigraphy from the Central Mediterranean (Valle di Manche, Crotone Basin, Italy): Data and trends

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Azzarone; Patrizia Ferretti; Veronica Rossi; Daniele Scarponi; Luca Capraro; Patrizia Macrì; John W. Huntley; Costanza Faranda

    2018-01-01

    Ostracod faunal turnover and oxygen isotope data (foraminifera) along the Valle di Manche (VdM) section are herein compiled. Specifically, the material reported in this work includes quantitative palaeoecological data and patterns of ostracod fauna framed within a high-resolution oxygen isotope stratigraphy (δ18O) from Uvigerina peregrina. In addition, the multivariate ostracod faunal stratigraphic trend (nMDS axis-1 sample score) is calibrated using bathymetric distributions of extant mollus...

  18. La plate-forme jurassienne et sa bordure subalpine au Berriasien-Valanginien ( Chartreuse-Vercors). Analyse et corrélations avec les séries de bassin. Sédimentologie, stratigraphie, micropaléontologie, magnétostratigraphie.

    OpenAIRE

    Boisseau , Thierry

    1987-01-01

    The study of the Berriasian-Valanginian carbonate platform of the Chartreuse massif (the subalpine chain, France) was detailed and the major stages of progradation and submersion were defined and dated. Micropaleontology: 65 benthic foraminifera species are identified. A detailed statistic analysis is given to the genus Trocholina, Neotrocholina, Gaudryina and Dorothia. Sedimentology: Five different order sequences are described. They mainly correspond to eustatic variations of sea leve!, mod...

  19. Isotopic evidences of past upwelling intensity in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and understand the history of upwelling as it is recorded in deep-sea sediments. The southwest (SW) monsoon strongly influences the climatic conditions in South and Southeast Asia and biological productivity in the Arabian Sea. ability at the ODP Site 728... climatic change and ocean history (McCrea, 1950; Epstein et al., 1953; Emiliani, 1955). The isotopic role of planktic forami- nifera expanded, it was recognized that foraminifera did not secret their shells in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water (Be...

  20. Microfaunal evidence of age and depositional environments of the Cerro Prieto section (Plio-Pleistocene), Baja California, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingle, J.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Microfossils including benthic and planktic foraminifera, ostracodes, calcareous algae, fish skeletal material, and fragments of pelecypods were found in 14 core samples from depths of 185 to 1952 m in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, providing evidence of both the age and depositional history of sediments comprising the 3000-m-thick Pliocene and Pleistocene section in this area. Ostracodes of brackish water and marine origin constitute the most common microfossils present in this sequence occurring in 8 samples; in situ littoral and neritic species of benthic foraminifera occur in 5 samples with planktic species present in 2 samples. Distributional patterns of ostracodes and foraminifera together with previously analyzed lithofacies (Lyons and van de Kamp, 1980) indicate that the Cerro Prieto section represents an intertonguing complex of alluvial, deltaic, estuarine, and shallow marine environments deposited along the front of the Colorado River delta as it prograded across the Salton Trough during Pliocene and Pleistocene time. Foraminiferal evidence indicates that a sand and shale unit commonly present at depths between 700 and 1100 m represents a significant mid-Pleistocene marine incursion in the Cerro Prieto area. Tentative correlation of the Cerro Prieto section with the well dated Palm Springs Formation of the Imperial Valley, California area suggests that the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary occurs at a depth of approximately 2000 m in the area of well M-93. Reworked specimens of Cretaceous foraminifera and fragments of the Cretaceous pelecypod Inoceramus were found in five samples further substantiating the Colorado Plateau provenance of a significant portion of the Colorado River deltaic sediments in the Cerro Prieto area.

  1. El límite Cretácico/Terciario con foraminíferos planctónicos en Osinaga y Músquiz (Navarra, Pirineos)

    OpenAIRE

    Arenillas, J. I.; Arz, José Antonio; Molina, Eustoquio

    1996-01-01

    High resolution planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy across the K/T boundary at Osinaga and Musquiz (Navarre, Pyrenees) allows us to recognise a small hiatus located just at the boundary. The hiatus affects the uppermost part of the P. hariaensis Bizone, the Cb. cretacea Biozone and the lo wermost part of the Pv. eugubina Biozone, being smaller at Osinaga than at Musquiz. Due to the hiatus the planktic foraminifera extintion model seems to be more catastrophic than in other more continuous ...

  2. "Soft-shelled" monothalamid foraminifers as a modern analogue of early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Nina; Gooday, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    According to the fossil record, the earliest undoubted foraminifers are found in the Early Cambrian, where they are represented by tubular agglutinated forms, thought to be the most primitive foraminiferal morphotypes. The numerous foraminifers with single-chambered, organic-walled tests (i.e. 'soft-shelled' monothalamids) exist in the deep sea and are difficult to preserve as fossils. Molecular phylogenetic data tell us that these 'primitive' taxa include the deepest foraminiferal clades, originating around 600 - 900 Ma. We found many soft-shelled monothalamids in sediment samples from deep trenches, including the Challenger Deep (Marianas Trench) and the Horizon Deep (Tonga Trench). Both deeps exceed 10,000 m water depth, well below the carbonate compensation depth, which represents an environmental barrier for calcareous foraminifera. The foraminifera at these extreme hadal sites include tubular and globular forms with organic walls, among which species of the genera Nodellum and Resigella are particularly abundant. Some forms selectively agglutinate minute flakes of clay minerals on the surface of the organic test. Many soft-shelled monothalamids, including most of those in deep tranches, contain stercomata, the function of which is currently unknown. Gromiids (a rhizarian group related to foraminifera) also accumulate stercomata in their sack-shaped tests. This suggests the possibility that the function of these waste particles is to add bulk, like the filling of soft bags or pillows. We suggest that the monothalamid foraminifera that dominate small-sized eukaryotes in extreme hadal settings may provide clues to understanding the biology and ecology of early life in Neoproterozoic sedimented habitats.

  3. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieskes, Joris; Rathburn, Anthony E.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Perez, M. Elena; Mahn, Chris; Bernhard, Joan M.; Day, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. → The geochemical data are compared with the δ 13 C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. → Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low δ 13 C (DIC) in the clam bed. → This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. → Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH 4 seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH 4 are observed, but values of δ 13 C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths ( 4 , which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the δ 13 C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  4. Radionuclide distribution of Holocene sediments and its effects on the habitat of recent foraminifers: A case study from the Western Marmara Sea (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Murat Kılıc, Ali

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Radionuclides cause radioactive contamination in aquatic environments just as other non-biodegradable pollutants, such as heavy metals, sink to the seafloor and accumulate in the sediments. These radioactive pollutants especially affect benthic foraminifera living on the sediment surface or in the sediments in the seafloor. Foraminifera were used as bioindicators to analyze the effect of radioactivity pollution on ecosystems. In this study, we have investigated natural and artificial radionuclide (232Th, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs) distribution in sediment samples taken in the living areas of benthic foraminifera in the Western Marmara Sea by means of gamma spectrometry. Accordingly, 29 core samples taken in 2016 from depths of about 20-35 m close to the shores of the Marmara Sea were used. Core samples representing the pollution of the study area were collected at locations such as discharge points for domestic and industrial areas, port locations, and others. Other samples were taken from areas unaffected or less affected by pollution. The radionuclide concentration activity values in the sediment samples obtained from the locations, in Bq/kg, were 137Cs, 0.9-9.4; 232Th, 18.9-86; 226Ra, 10-50; 40K, 24.4-670. These values were compared with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) data, and an environmental analysis was carried out. The 226Ra series, the 232Th series, and the 40K radionuclides accumulate naturally, and they are also increasing continuously due to anthropogenic pollution. Although the 226Ra values obtained throughout the study areas remained within normal limits according to the UNSCEAR values, the 40K and 232Th series values were found to be higher in almost all locations. According to these results, the main causes of radioactive pollution in the investigation area are agricultural and mining activities. Keywords: Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, Cs-137, radionuclide, Western Marmara Sea, Foraminifera

  5. Avaliação da Poluição Antrópica Usando Padrão de Distribuição deEspécies de Foraminíferos Provenientes de Testemunhos da Baía de Guanabara, RJ.

    OpenAIRE

    Brígida Orioli Figueira; Claudia Gutterres Vilela; José Antônio Baptista Neto

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a study of benthic foraminifera recovered from three cores collected near the Paquetá island, in the Guanabara bay, Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. The cores have different sizes and were subsampled in centimetric intervals. The recovered benthic foraminiferal assemblages were thoroughly identified, in order to carry out an ecological study towards reconstructing the environmental evolution of the studied area during the recent historical period and assessing the respo...

  6. The impacts of the Samarco mine tailing spill on the Rio Doce estuary, Eastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luiz Eduardo de Oliveira; Correa, Lucas Barreto; Sá, Fabian; Neto, Renato Rodrigues; Bernardino, Angelo Fraga

    2017-07-15

    Over 50 million cubic meters of mining tailings were released in the Rio Doce basin after the collapse of the Fundão dam (Samarco) in November 2015. Predicting significant impacts on the Rio Doce estuary, we sampled sediments to investigate short-term impacts on the benthic assemblages and trace metal accumulation on estuarine sediments. With the arrival of the tailing plumes in the estuary, we detected a predominance of clay particles and increased trace metal concentrations of up to 5 times in some areas. The rapid sedimentation after the impact also impacted estuarine macrofaunal assemblages through loss surface-dwelling taxa. As expected, the impacts on benthic assemblages observed up to 3days after the arrival of tailings were not clearly associated with trace metal concentrations, but long-term effects need to be studied. We recommend that the high spatial variability within the estuary be considered in future impact assessment studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphology and neurophysiology of tarsal vibration receptors in the water strider Aquarius paludum (Heteroptera: Gerridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Goodwyn, Pablo; Katsumata-Wada, Ayako; Okada, Koutaroh

    2009-09-01

    Substrate vibratory information receptors are extensively studied in insects and spiders, however for water surface dwelling species little data is available. We studied the vibration receptive organs in tarsi of the water strider Aquarius paludum, using light, transmission and scanning electron microscopes, and recorded the neural activity of the organs in response to vibrational stimuli, which were afterwards analysed with a custom made spike sorting program. We found that the tarsal chordotonal organ has one set of three scoloparia: one in the tarsomere I and two in the tarsomere II, all of which consisted of a few scolopidia. The chordotonal organ clearly responded to vibratory stimulation. Furthermore, we found that a pair of large subapical emergent dorsal setae, which had been deemed mechanosensory by previous authors, are not so. In turn, four ventral subapical trichobothria that are in direct contact with the water surface during locomotion, proved to be mechanosensory. The anatomical and ultrastructural observations support these electro-physiological results.

  8. Taste bud development and patterning in sighted and blind morphs of Astyanax mexicanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharasan, Nirupa; Croll, Roger P; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara

    2009-12-01

    In the blind cave-dwelling morph of A. mexicanus, the eye degenerates while other sensory systems, such as gustation, are expanded compared to their sighted (surface-dwelling) ancestor. This study compares the development of taste buds along the jaws of each morph. To determine whether cavefish have an altered onset or rate of taste bud development, we fluorescently labeled basal and receptor cells within taste buds over a developmental series. Our results show that taste bud number increases during development in both morphs. The rate of development is, however, accelerated in cavefish; a small difference in taste bud number exists at 5 dpf reaching threefold by 22 dpf. The expansion of taste buds in cavefish is, therefore, detectable after the onset of eye degeneration. This study provides important insights into the timing of taste bud expansion in cavefish as well as enhances our understanding of taste bud development in teleosts in general. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Environmental Adaptation from the Origin of Life to the Last Universal Common Ancestor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantine, Marjorie D.; Fournier, Gregory P.

    2018-03-01

    Extensive fundamental molecular and biological evolution took place between the prebiotic origins of life and the state of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Considering the evolutionary innovations between these two endpoints from the perspective of environmental adaptation, we explore the hypothesis that LUCA was temporally, spatially, and environmentally distinct from life's earliest origins in an RNA world. Using this lens, we interpret several molecular biological features as indicating an environmental transition between a cold, radiation-shielded origin of life and a mesophilic, surface-dwelling LUCA. Cellularity provides motility and permits Darwinian evolution by connecting genetic material and its products, and thus establishing heredity and lineage. Considering the importance of compartmentalization and motility, we propose that the early emergence of cellularity is required for environmental dispersal and diversification during these transitions. Early diversification and the emergence of ecology before LUCA could be an important pre-adaptation for life's persistence on a changing planet.

  10. Late Holocene evolution of the Northeast intertidal region of Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Fernandes Souza Pinto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is based on the study of the core T1 collected in the Guaratiba Mangrove, located on the northeastern margin of Sepetiba Bay. Few studies dealing with the application of benthic foraminifera to study sea level changes during the Holocene have been conducted in Sepetiba Bay, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In order to fill this gap, the core T1 was studied using textural, geochemical (carbonate, total organic carbon, total sulfur and stable isotopes evaluated in Ammonia tepida and microfaunal (benthic foraminifera data, unveiling paleoecological relationships of these organisms and the evolutionary scenario of Guaratiba Mangrove. Radiocarbon results indicate an estimated age of about 2400 yrs cal BP for the core base. Textural, geochemical and benthic foraminifera data suggest that the study area changed significantly during the last 2400 yrs cal BP. It experienced coastal waves action and shoreface processes in the period between ≈2.400-1.400 yrs cal BP; then, this phase gave place to a shallow marine environment similar to that found currently in internal and protected areas of Sepetiba Bay, between ≈1.400-350 yrs cal BP. Thenceforth, the study area evolved to the present mangrove environment. Factors related to climatic oscillations and the formation, evolution and events of rupture of Marambaia sand ridge influenced the late Holocene evolution of the northeast intertidal area of Sepetiba Bay.

  11. Common species link global ecosystems to climate change: dynamical evidence in the planktonic fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannisdal, Bjarte; Haaga, Kristian Agasøster; Reitan, Trond; Diego, David; Liow, Lee Hsiang

    2017-07-12

    Common species shape the world around us, and changes in their commonness signify large-scale shifts in ecosystem structure and function. However, our understanding of long-term ecosystem response to environmental forcing in the deep past is centred on species richness, neglecting the disproportional impact of common species. Here, we use common and widespread species of planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments to track changes in observed global occupancy (proportion of sampled sites at which a species is present and observed) through the turbulent climatic history of the last 65 Myr. Our approach is sensitive to relative changes in global abundance of the species set and robust to factors that bias richness estimators. Using three independent methods for detecting causality, we show that the observed global occupancy of planktonic foraminifera has been dynamically coupled to past oceanographic changes captured in deep-ocean temperature reconstructions. The causal inference does not imply a direct mechanism, but is consistent with an indirect, time-delayed causal linkage. Given the strong quantitative evidence that a dynamical coupling exists, we hypothesize that mixotrophy (symbiont hosting) may be an ecological factor linking the global abundance of planktonic foraminifera to long-term climate changes via the relative extent of oligotrophic oceans. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Sedimentary facies and Holocene depositional processes of Laura Island, Majuro Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Toru; Kayanne, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yamano, Hiroya

    2014-10-01

    The depositional processes that formed Laura Island, Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, were reconstructed based on a facies analysis of island sediments and spine ratios, and radiocarbon ages of foraminifera. Sedimentary facies were analyzed from trenches and drill cores excavated on the island and its adjacent reef flat. Depositional ages were obtained using benthic foraminifera (Calcarina) whose spines had not been abraded. The facies were classified into two types: gravelly and sandy. The initial sediments of these sites consisted of gravelly facies in the lower horizon and sandy facies in the upper horizon. Their ages were approximately 2000 cal BP and coincident with the onset of a 1.1-m decline in regional relative sea level, which enabled deposition of the gravelly facies. Half of the sand fraction of the sediment was composed of larger benthic foraminifera. The spine ratio showed that their supply source on the reef flat was located oceanside of the island. The supply source appears to have been caused by the relative sea-level fall. This indicates that the studied island was formed by a relative reduction in wave energy and enhanced foraminiferal supply, both of which were triggered by the late Holocene relative sea-level fall.

  13. Annual changes in Arctic fjord environment and modern benthic foraminiferal fauna: Evidence from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernas, Patrycja; Klitgaard-Kristensen, Dorthe; Husum, Katrine; Koç, Nalan; Tverberg, Vigdis; Loubere, Paul; Prins, Maarten; Dijkstra, Noortje; Gluchowska, Marta

    2018-04-01

    The relationships between modern Arctic benthic foraminifera and their ecological controls, along with their sensitivity to rapid environmental changes, is still poorly understood. This study examines how modern benthic foraminifera respond to annual environmental changes in the glaciated Arctic fjord Kongsfjorden, western Svalbard. Large environmental gradients due to the inflow of warm and saline Atlantic Water and the influence of tidewater glaciers characterise the fjord hydrography. A transect of six multi-corer stations, from the inner to the outer fjord, was sampled in the late summers of 2005 to 2008 to study the distribution of living (rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera. Physical properties of the water masses were measured concurrently. In general, nearly the entire Kongsfjorden region was dominated by ubiquitous N. labradorica foraminiferal assemblage that successfully exploited the local food resources and thrived particularly well in the presence of Atlantic-derived Transformed Atlantic Water (TAW). Further, the annual investigation revealed that Kongsfjorden underwent large interannual hydrological changes during the studied years related to variable inflow of warm and saline Atlantic Water. This led to a strong fauna variability particularly at the two marginal sites: the glacially influenced inner fjord and marine influenced shelf region. We also observed significant species shift from the 'cold' to 'warm' years and an expansion of widespread and sub-arctic to boreal species into the fjord.

  14. Actin and ubiquitin protein sequences support a cercozoan/foraminiferan ancestry for the plasmodiophorid plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, John M; Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    The plasmodiophorids are a group of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that cause disease in a variety of economically significant crops. Plasmodiophorids have traditionally been considered fungi but have more recently been suggested to be members of the Cercozoa, a morphologically diverse group of amoeboid, flagellate, and amoeboflagellate protists. The recognition that Cercozoa constitute a monophyletic lineage has come from phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. Protein sequence data have suggested that the closest relatives of Cercozoa are the Foraminifera. To further test a cercozoan origin for the plasmodiophorids, we isolated actin genes from Plasmodiophora brassicae, Sorosphaera veronicae, and Spongospora subterranea, and polyubiquitin gene fragments from P. brassicae and S. subterranea. We also isolated actin genes from the chlorarachniophyte Lotharella globosa. In protein phylogenies of actin, the plasmodiophorid sequences consistently branch with Cercozoa and Foraminifera, and weakly branch as the sister group to the foraminiferans. The plasmodiophorid polyubiquitin sequences contain a single amino acid residue insertion at the functionally important processing point between ubiquitin monomers, the same place in which an otherwise unique insertion exists in the cercozoan and foraminiferan proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that plasmodiophorids are indeed related to Cercozoa and Foraminifera, although the relationships amongst these groups remain unresolved.

  15. Variability in north tropical atlantic over the last 20 000 years and holocene gulf stream activity; Variabilite au cours des derniers 20 000 ans de l'hydrologie de l'atlantique tropical nord et de l'activite du gulf stream a partir de la composition isotopique de l'oxygene et de la composition en elements trace des foraminferes planctoniques profonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleroux, C

    2007-10-15

    Modern oceanographical studies shown that most of the ocean heat content in the North Atlantic Western Boundary Current region is stored in the upper 400 meters. To study past heat content and Gulf Stream activity, we performed coupled analyses of oxygen isotopic and trace elemental composition on several foraminifera species to reconstruct upper water column temperature and salinity. Calcification depths of Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia truncatulinoides and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata have been constrain by correlating modern hydrographic data to oxygen isotopic measurement of North Atlantic core-top samples. We found that the three deep-dwelling foraminifera species have a preferred habitat at the base of the seasonal thermocline (Cleroux et al, 2007). The same set of North Atlantic core-tops has been used to define relationships between trace elemental compositions and temperature. We established calibrations between Mg/Ca ratio or Sr/Ca ratio and temperature for the three deep-dwelling foraminifera (Cleroux et al, submitted). We apply this strategy on the core MD99-2203 located off Cape Hatteras where the Gulf Stream separate from the United States coast. High-resolution surface reconstructions over the Holocene show low amplitude periodic temperature and salinity changes that could be related to NAO type mechanisms. Large hydrological changes in sub-surface reflect variations of Labrador current and Mode Water influences. Using recent studies on Mode Water formation and Gulf Stream heat advection, we interpret our results in term of ocean heat content and Gulf Stream activity. (author)

  16. Variability in north tropical atlantic over the last 20 000 years and holocene gulf stream activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleroux, C.

    2007-10-01

    Modern oceanographical studies shown that most of the ocean heat content in the North Atlantic Western Boundary Current region is stored in the upper 400 meters. To study past heat content and Gulf Stream activity, we performed coupled analyses of oxygen isotopic and trace elemental composition on several foraminifera species to reconstruct upper water column temperature and salinity. Calcification depths of Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia truncatulinoides and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata have been constrain by correlating modern hydrographic data to oxygen isotopic measurement of North Atlantic core-top samples. We found that the three deep-dwelling foraminifera species have a preferred habitat at the base of the seasonal thermocline (Cleroux et al, 2007). The same set of North Atlantic core-tops has been used to define relationships between trace elemental compositions and temperature. We established calibrations between Mg/Ca ratio or Sr/Ca ratio and temperature for the three deep-dwelling foraminifera (Cleroux et al, submitted). We apply this strategy on the core MD99-2203 located off Cape Hatteras where the Gulf Stream separate from the United States coast. High-resolution surface reconstructions over the Holocene show low amplitude periodic temperature and salinity changes that could be related to NAO type mechanisms. Large hydrological changes in sub-surface reflect variations of Labrador current and Mode Water influences. Using recent studies on Mode Water formation and Gulf Stream heat advection, we interpret our results in term of ocean heat content and Gulf Stream activity. (author)

  17. Microfossil measures of rapid sea-level rise: Timing of response of two microfossil groups to a sudden tidal-flooding experiment in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, B.P.; Milker, Yvonne; Dura, T.; Wang, Kelin; Bridgeland, W.T.; Brophy, Laura S.; Ewald, M.; Khan, Nicole; Engelhart, S.E.; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons of pre-earthquake and post-earthquake microfossils in tidal sequences are accurate means to measure coastal subsidence during past subduction earthquakes, but the amount of subsidence is uncertain, because the response times of fossil taxa to coseismic relative sea-level (RSL) rise are unknown. We measured the response of diatoms and foraminifera to restoration of a salt marsh in southern Oregon, USA. Tidal flooding following dike removal caused an RSL rise of ∼1 m, as might occur by coseismic subsidence during momentum magnitude (Mw) 8.1–8.8 earthquakes on this section of the Cascadia subduction zone. Less than two weeks after dike removal, diatoms colonized low marsh and tidal flats in large numbers, showing that they can record seismically induced subsidence soon after earthquakes. In contrast, low-marsh foraminifera took at least 11 months to appear in sizeable numbers. Where subsidence measured with diatoms and foraminifera differs, their different response times may provide an estimate of postseismic vertical deformation in the months following past megathrust earthquakes.

  18. Constraints on the adult-offspring size relationship in protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caval-Holme, Franklin; Payne, Jonathan; Skotheim, Jan M

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between adult and offspring size is an important aspect of reproductive strategy. Although this filial relationship has been extensively examined in plants and animals, we currently lack comparable data for protists, whose strategies may differ due to the distinct ecological and physiological constraints on single-celled organisms. Here, we report measurements of adult and offspring sizes in 3888 species and subspecies of foraminifera, a class of large marine protists. Foraminifera exhibit a wide range of reproductive strategies; species of similar adult size may have offspring whose sizes vary 100-fold. Yet, a robust pattern emerges. The minimum (5th percentile), median, and maximum (95th percentile) offspring sizes exhibit a consistent pattern of increase with adult size independent of environmental change and taxonomic variation over the past 400 million years. The consistency of this pattern may arise from evolutionary optimization of the offspring size-fecundity trade-off and/or from cell-biological constraints that limit the range of reproductive strategies available to single-celled organisms. When compared with plants and animals, foraminifera extend the evidence that offspring size covaries with adult size across an additional five orders of magnitude in organism size. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. A Transcriptomic Analysis of Cave, Surface, and Hybrid Isopod Crustaceans of the Species Asellus aquaticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Stahl

    Full Text Available Cave animals, compared to surface-dwelling relatives, tend to have reduced eyes and pigment, longer appendages, and enhanced mechanosensory structures. Pressing questions include how certain cave-related traits are gained and lost, and if they originate through the same or different genetic programs in independent lineages. An excellent system for exploring these questions is the isopod, Asellus aquaticus. This species includes multiple cave and surface populations that have numerous morphological differences between them. A key feature is that hybrids between cave and surface individuals are viable, which enables genetic crosses and linkage analyses. Here, we advance this system by analyzing single animal transcriptomes of Asellus aquaticus. We use high throughput sequencing of non-normalized cDNA derived from the head of a surface-dwelling male, the head of a cave-dwelling male, the head of a hybrid male (produced by crossing a surface individual with a cave individual, and a pooled sample of surface embryos and hatchlings. Assembling reads from surface and cave head RNA pools yielded an integrated transcriptome comprised of 23,984 contigs. Using this integrated assembly as a reference transcriptome, we aligned reads from surface-, cave- and hybrid- head tissue and pooled surface embryos and hatchlings. Our approach identified 742 SNPs and placed four new candidate genes to an existing linkage map for A. aquaticus. In addition, we examined SNPs for allele-specific expression differences in the hybrid individual. All of these resources will facilitate identification of genes and associated changes responsible for cave adaptation in A. aquaticus and, in concert with analyses of other species, will inform our understanding of the evolutionary processes accompanying adaptation to the subterranean environment.

  20. Late Neogene marine incursions and the ancestral Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, K.

    2008-01-01

    The late Neogene section in the Salton Trough, California, and along the lower Colorado River in Arizona is composed of marine units bracketed by nonmarine units. Microfossils from the marine deposits indicate that a marine incursion inundated the Salton Trough during the late Miocene. Water depths increased rapidly in the Miocene and eventually flooded the region now occupied by the Colorado River as far north as Parker, Arizona. Marine conditions were restricted in the Pliocene as the Colorado River filled the Salton Trough with sediments and the Gulf of California assumed its present configuration. Microfossils from the early part of this incursion include a diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers (Amphistegina gibbosa, Uvigerina peregrina, Cassidulina delicata, and Bolivina interjuncta), planktic foraminifers (Globigerinoides obliquus, G. extremus, and Globigerina nepenthes), and calcareous nannoplankton (Discoaster brouweri, Discoaster aff. Discoaster surculus, Sphenolithus abies, and S. neoabies), whereas microfossils in the final phase contain a less diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers that are diagnostic of marginal shallow-marine conditions (Ammonia, Elphidium, Bolivina, Cibicides, and Quinqueloculina). Evidence of an earlier middle Miocene marine incursion comes from reworked microfossils found near Split Mountain Gorge in the Fish Creek Gypsum (Sphenolithus moriformis) and near San Gorgonio Pass (Cyclicargolithus floridanus and Sphenolithus heteromorphus and planktic foraminifers). The middle Miocene incursion may also be represented by the older marine sedimentary rocks encountered in the subsurface near Yuma, Arizona, where rare middle Miocene planktic foraminifers are found. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.