WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface-coated hierarchically nanoporous

  1. Nanopore surface coating delivers nanopore size and shape through conductance-based sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frament, Cameron M; Bandara, Nuwan; Dwyer, Jason R

    2013-10-09

    The performance of nanopore single-molecule sensing elements depends intimately on their physical dimensions and surface chemical properties. These factors underpin the dependence of the nanopore ionic conductance on electrolyte concentration, yet the measured, or modeled, dependence only partially illuminates the details of geometry and surface chemistry. Using the electrolyte-dependent conductance data before and after selective surface functionalization of solid-state nanopores, however, introduces more degrees of freedom and improves the performance of conductance-based nanopore characterizations. Sets of representative nanopore profiles were used to generate conductance data, and the nanopore shape and exact dimensions were identified, through conductance alone, by orders-of-magnitude reductions in the geometry optimization metrics. The optimization framework could similarly be used to evaluate the nanopore surface coating thickness.

  2. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Molin, Soeren; Yang, Liang; Ndoni, Sokol

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment in short-term (3 h) and significantly reduce biofilm formation in long-term (1 week) by gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Tuning the thickness or surface morphology of the nanoporous polymer films allowed to extent the anti-biofilm capability. PMID:23377015

  3. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol Ndoni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment in short-term (3 h and significantly reduce biofilm formation in long-term (1 week by gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Tuning the thickness or surface morphology of the nanoporous polymer films allowed to extent the anti-biofilm capability.

  4. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Molin, Søren; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene...

  5. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...... and products of catalytic reactions can freely diffuse through open mesopores (2–40 nm). The formation mechanism of hierarchically structured porous bioactive glasses, the immobilization mechanism of enzyme and the catalysis mechanism of immobilized enzyme are then discussed. The novel nanostructure...

  6. Intrinsically Hierarchical Nanoporous Polymers via Polymerization-Induced Microphase Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Michael B.; Van Horn, J. David; Wu, Fei; Hillmyer, Marc A. (UMKC); (UMM)

    2017-05-17

    The synthesis of microporous polymers generally requires postpolymerization modification via hyper-cross-linking to trap the polymeric network in a state with high void volume. An alternative approach utilizes rigid, sterically demanding monomers to inhibit efficient packing, thus leading to a high degree of free volume between polymer side groups and main chains. Herein we combine polymers of intrinsic microporosity with polymerization-induced microphase separation (PIMS), a versatile methodology for the synthesis of nanostructured materials that can be rendered mesoporous. Copolymerization of various styrenic monomers with divinylbenzene in the presence of a poly(lactide) terminated with a chain-transfer agent (PLA-CTA) results in kinetic trapping of a microphase-separated state. Subsequent etching of PLA provides a bicontinuous mesoporous network. Using equilibrium and kinetic nitrogen sorption experiments as well as positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), we demonstrate that variations in the steric characteristics of the styrenic monomer impart the network with microporosity, resulting in hierarchically (meso and micro) porous materials. Additionally, structure–property relationships of the styrenic monomer with total surface area and pore volume indicate that the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the corresponding styrenic homopolymers provides a reasonable measure of the steric interactions and resultant microporosity in these systems. Finally, PALS provides insight into micro- and mesoscopic void volume differences between porous monoliths containing either tert-butyl or TMS-modified styrenic monomers compared to the parent, unmodified styrene.

  7. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of hierarchical nanoporous graphenic carbon against human glioblastoma grade IV cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Biniecka, Paulina; Bugajska, Żaneta

    2017-01-01

    A newly produced hierarchical, nanoporous carbon (HNC) material is studied for the first time in a biological model. The material consists of uniform particles and is characterized by a mean diameter well-developed porosity, and high electrical...... with the U87 cells can also lead to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activate apoptotic mechanisms in cancer cells. The investigation was performed using U87 human glioblastoma and PCS-201–010 normal fibroblast cell lines, where cell morphology and ultrastructure, viability, ROS...

  8. Hierarchically self-organized monolithic nanoporous membrane for excellent virus enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gumhye; Jee, Minhyeok; Yang, Seung Yun; Lee, Bom-Yi; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Jin Kon

    2014-01-22

    Enrichment of viruses is essential for making high dose viral stocks for vaccines and virus-related research. Since the widely used ultracentrifugation for concentrating viral stock requires ultra-high speed rotation, it easily destroys the activity of some viruses, for instance, hepatitis c virus (HCV), which has a fragile structure and low virus titer. We introduce a novel method to concentrate HCV virus in stock by using a hierarchically self-organized monolithic nanoporous membrane made by stepwise anodization. The pores at the top part of the membrane have very regular sizes that are suitable for the perfect filtration of the virus particles in the stock. On the other hand, the remaining part has large pores that maintain high flux and mechanical strength of the membrane under the high pressure (up to 10 bar). The enrichment efficiency of HCV in crude stocks by using the membrane became over 91%, which is four times higher than that (∼22%) obtained by conventionally used centrifugation. A very high efficiency results from the perfect filtration and no damage to the virion particles during the enrichment process, whereas significant damage to the HCV occurs during centrifugation. The hierarchically self-organized monolithic nanoporous membrane could be effectively employed for concentrating various fragile viruses in stocks, for instance, rabies virus and human immunodeficiency virus in addition to HCV virus.

  9. Renewable Wood Pulp Paper Reactor with Hierarchical Micro/Nanopores for Continuous-Flow Nanocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hirotaka; Namba, Naoko; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Nogi, Masaya; Nishina, Yuta

    2017-06-22

    Continuous-flow nanocatalysis based on metal nanoparticle catalyst-anchored flow reactors has recently provided an excellent platform for effective chemical manufacturing. However, there has been limited progress in porous structure design and recycling systems for metal nanoparticle-anchored flow reactors to create more efficient and sustainable catalytic processes. In this study, traditional paper is used for a highly efficient, recyclable, and even renewable flow reactor by tailoring the ultrastructures of wood pulp. The "paper reactor" offers hierarchically interconnected micro- and nanoscale pores, which can act as convective-flow and rapid-diffusion channels, respectively, for efficient access of reactants to metal nanoparticle catalysts. In continuous-flow, aqueous, room-temperature catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-anchored paper reactor with hierarchical micro/nanopores provided higher reaction efficiency than state-of-the-art AuNP-anchored flow reactors. Inspired by traditional paper materials, successful recycling and renewal of AuNP-anchored paper reactors were also demonstrated while high reaction efficiency was maintained. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Hierarchical nanoporous platinum-copper alloy for simultaneous electrochemical determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dianyun; Fan, Dawei; Wang, Jinping; Xu, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical nanoporous PtCu alloy was fabricated by two-step dealloying of a PtCuAl precursor alloy followed by annealing. The new alloy possesses interconnected hierarchical network architecture with bimodal distributions of ligaments and pores. It exhibits high electrochemical activity towards the oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) at working potentials of 0.32, 0.47 and 0.61 V (vs. a mercury sulfate reference electrode), respectively. The new alloy was placed on a glassy carbon electrode and then displayed a wide linear response to AA, DA, and UA in the concentration ranges from 25 to 800 μM, 4 to 20 μM, and 10 to 70 μM, respectively. The lower detection limits are 17.5 μM, 2.8 µM and 5.7 μM at an S/N ratio of 3. (author)

  11. A three-dimensional hierarchical nanoporous PdCu alloy for enhanced electrocatalysis and biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Aihua [Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, and Key Laboratory for Biofuels, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Geng Haoran [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Xu Caixia, E-mail: chm_xucx@ujn.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Qiu Huajun, E-mail: qiuhuajun@gmail.com [Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, and Key Laboratory for Biofuels, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China)

    2011-10-10

    Highlights: {yields} Nanotubular mesoporous PdCu (NM-PdCu) alloy is facilely fabricated via one-step metal replacement reaction between nanoporous Cu and H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4}. {yields} The NM-PdCu exhibits remarkably improved structure stability and electrocatalytic activity towards formic acid and hydrogen peroxide oxidation compared with NP-Pd. {yields} When coupled with GOx, the GOx/NM-PdCu electrode can be used for sensitive detection of glucose over a wide concentration range. - Abstract: Nanoporous copper (NPC) obtained by dealloying CuAl alloy is used as both three-dimensional template and reducing agent for the fabrication of nanoporous PdCu alloy with hollow ligaments by a simple galvanic replacement reaction with H{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} aqueous solution. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterizations demonstrate that after the replacement reaction, the ligaments become hollow tubular structure and the ligament shell is also comprised of small pores and nanoparticles with a typical size of {approx}4 nm (third order porosity). The as-prepared nanotubular mesoporous PdCu alloy (NM-PdCu) structure exhibits remarkably improved electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of formic acid and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} compared with nanoporous Pd (NP-Pd), and can be used for sensitive electrochemical sensing applications. After coupled with glucose oxidase (GOx), the enzyme modified NM-PdCu electrode can sensitively detect glucose over a wide linear range (0.5-20 mM).

  12. Nature Inspired Surface Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Materials Scientists more and more are looking to nature for clues on how to create highly functional surface coatings with exceptional properties. The fog harvesting capabilities of the Namib Desert beetle, the beautiful iridescent colors of the hummingbird, and the super water repellant abilities of the Lotus leaf are but a few examples of the amazing properties developed over many years in the natural world. Nature also makes extensive use of the pH-dependent behavior of weak functional groups such as carboxylic acid and amine functional groups. This presentation will explore synthetic mimics to the nano- and microstructures responsible for these fascinating properties. For example, we have demonstrated a pH-induced porosity transition that can be used to create porous films with pore sizes that are tunable from the nanometer scale to the multiple micron scale. The pores of these films, either nano- or micropores, can be reversibly opened and closed by changes in solution pH. The ability to engineer pH-gated porosity transitions in heterostructured thin films has led to the demonstration of broadband anti-reflection coatings that mimic the anti-reflection properties of the moth eye and pH-tunable Bragg reflectors with a structure and function similar to that found in hummingbird wings and the Longhorn beetle. In addition, the highly textured honeycomb-like surfaces created by the formation of micron-scale pores are ideally suited for the creation of superhydrophobic surfaces that mimic the behavior of the self-cleaning lotus leaf. The development of synthetic "backbacks" on immune system cells that may one day ferry drugs to disease sites will also be discussed.

  13. Formation of highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells by hierarchical pore generation with nanoporous TiO{sub 2} spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Joo; Lee, Mi Hyeon; Kim, Hark Jin; Lim, Gooil; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Wan In [Nano Materials and Devices Lab., Department of Chemistry, Inha University Incheon 402-751 (Korea); Park, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Kyungkon [Center for Energy Materials Materials Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute Science and Technology (KIST) Seoul 136-791 (Korea)

    2009-09-25

    Nanoporous TiO{sub 2} structures were successfully applied for the fabrication of DSC electrodes, providing high surface areas and large pore sizes at the same time. High photocurrent was induced in these DSCs by great adsorption of dye molecules and efficient electrolyte diffusion, caused by the generated hierarchical pore structures in the TiO{sub 2} layer. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. PS-b-PMMA/PLA blends for nanoporous templates with hierarchical and tunable pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Hoa; Vayer, Marylène; Sinturel, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Blends of poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) and poly(lactide) (PLA) were deposited in the form of thin films on the surface of modified silicon wafers and exposed to tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor annealing. It was shown that in specific experimental conditions, a core-shell morphology consisting in cylinders with a PMMA shell and a PLA core, within a continuous matrix of PS, was formed. In this case, PLA naturally segregated in the core of the PMMA cylinders, minimizing the PS/PLA interaction, which constitutes the most incompatible pair (the interaction strength between the various components was confirmed in thin films of the corresponding polymer blends). Compared to other block copolymer/homopolymer blends described in the literature, this system exhibits unexpected high increase of the characteristic lengths of the system (center-to-center distance and diameter). This was attributed to a partial solubilization of the PLA in the PMMA corona (the two polymers are highly compatible), inducing an enhanced level of PS and PLA stretching caused by the strong repulsion between these two polymers. The selective extraction of the PLA yielded to porous domains with small dimensions (6 ± 2.5 nm), reaching the performances that are currently attained in highly incompatible block polymers with low molecular weight. Further PMMA removal revealed a second porosity level, with higher pores diameter and center-to-center distance compared to the neat PS-b-PMMA system. This work highlights how PS-b-PMMA, that currently represents one of the industrial standards nanoporous template precursors, can be modified in an easy and costless approach using PLA homopolymer addition.

  15. Ta3N5-Pt nonwoven cloth with hierarchical nanopores as efficient and easily recyclable macroscale photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijie; Zhang, Lisha; Wang, Huanli; Chen, Zhigang; Hu, Junqing; Xu, Kaibing; Liu, Jianshe

    2014-02-05

    Traditional nanosized photocatalysts usually have high photocatalytic activity but can not be efficiently recycled. Film-shaped photocatalysts on the substrates can be easily recycled, but they have low surface area and/or high production cost. To solve these problems, we report on the design and preparation of efficient and easily recyclable macroscale photocatalysts with nanostructure by using Ta3N5 as a model semiconductor. Ta3N5-Pt nonwoven cloth has been prepared by an electrospinning-calcination-nitridation-wet impregnation method, and it is composed of Ta3N5 fibers with diameter of 150-200 nm and hierarchical pores. Furthermore, these fibers are constructed from Ta3N5 nanoparticles with diameter of ~25 nm which are decorated with Pt nanoparticles with diameter of ~2.5 nm. Importantly, Ta3N5-Pt cloth can be used as an efficient and easily recyclable macroscale photocatalyst with wide visible-light response, for the degradation of methylene blue and parachlorophenol, probably resulting in a very promising application as "photocatalyst dam" for the polluted river.

  16. Surface Coating of Plastic Parts for Business Machines (Industrial Surface Coating): New Source Performance Standards (NSPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about the new source performance standards (NSPS) for surface coating of plastic parts for business machines by reading the rule summary and history and finding the code of federal regulations as well as related rules.

  17. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  18. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-24

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation is disclosed. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface. 5 figs.

  19. The use of a hierarchically platinum-free electrode composed of tin oxide decorated polypyrrole on nanoporous copper in catalysis of methanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asghari, Elnaz, E-mail: elnazasghari@yahoo.com; Ashassi-Sorkhabi, Habib; Vahed, Akram; Rezaei-Moghadam, Babak; Charmi, Gholam Reza

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanoparticles were synthesized through a galvanostatic pathway on polypyrrole, PPy, coated nanoporous copper. The morphology and surface analysis of the assemblies were evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, FESEM, and energy dispersive X-ray, EDX, analysis, respectively. The electrocatalytic behavior of electrodes was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests in methanol solution. FESEM results showed that uniformly distributed nanoparticles with diameters of about 20–30 nm have been dispersed on PPy matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests in methanol solution showed a significant enhancement in the catalytic action of PPy after decoration of tin oxide nanoparticles. Porous Cu/PPy/SnO{sub x} electrodes showed enhanced anodic peak current density for methanol oxidation compared to smooth Cu/PPy/SnO{sub x} and porous Cu/PPy. The effects of synthesis current density and time on the electrocatalytic behavior of the electrodes were evaluated. The significant enhancement of electrocatalytic behavior of the Cu/PPy electrode after decoration of SnO{sub x} overlayer was attributed to the effect of tin oxide on the adsorption of intermediates of methanol oxidation as well as oxidation of bi-products such as CO; huge tendency of tin oxides for dehydrogenation of the alcohols and the increase in microscopic surface area of the electrodes were introduced as other affecting factors. - Highlights: • Nanoporous copper–zinc substrates were formed by chemical leaching of zinc. • Polypyrrole thin film was electrodeposited on nanoporous copper. • Thin oxide nanoparticles were synthesized electrochemically on polypyrrole layer. • The catalytic performance of the electrodes was evaluated for methanol oxidation.

  20. Quantitation of Surface Coating on Nanoparticles Using Thermogravimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongargaonkar, Alpana A; Clogston, Jeffrey D

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles are critical components in nanomedicine and nanotherapeutic applications. Some nanoparticles, such as metallic nanoparticles, consist of a surface coating or surface modification to aid in its dispersion and stability. This surface coating may affect the behavior of nanoparticles in a biological environment, thus it is important to measure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) can be used to determine the amount of coating on the surface of the nanoparticle. TGA experiments run under inert atmosphere can also be used to determine residual metal content present in the sample. In this chapter, the TGA technique and experimental method are described.

  1. Performance of waterborne acrylic surface coatings on wood ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1, February 2011, pp. 113–119. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Performance of waterborne acrylic surface coatings on wood impregnated with Cu-ethanolamine preservatives. M HUMAR, M PAVLI ˇC, D ŽLINDRA†, M TOMAŽI ˇC†† and M PETRI ˇC. ∗. Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Ljubljana, ...

  2. Current Developments in Antimicrobial Surface Coatings for Biomedical Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, J. J. T. M.; Sharma, P. K.; van Kooten, T. G.; van der Mei, H. C.; Mahmoudi, M.; Busscher, H. J.; Rochford, E. T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on material surfaces represent a serious problem in society from both an economical and health perspective. Surface coating approaches to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are of increased importance due to the increasing prevalence

  3. LANTHANUM STAINING OF THE SURFACE COAT OF CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Stephen M.

    1971-01-01

    Among the techniques which have been reported to stain the surface coat of cells, for electron microscopy, is lanthanum staining en bloc. Similarly, the presence of the cationic dye, Alcian blue 8GX, in a primary glutaraldehyde fixative has been reported to improve the preservation of the surface coat of cells of many types; however, the preserved coat is not very electron opaque unless thin sections are counterstained. The present paper shows that for several rat tissues lanthanum staining en bloc is an effective electron stain for the cell surface, giving excellent contrast, if combined sequentially with prefixation in an aldehyde fixative containing Alcian blue. The cationic substance cetylpyridinium chloride was found to have a similar effect to that of Alcian blue in enhancing the lanthanum staining of the surface coat material of the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. The patterns of lanthanum staining obtained for the tissues studied strikingly resemble those reported in the literature where tissues are stained by several standard methods for demonstrating mucosubstances at the ultrastructural level. This fact and the reproduction of the effect of Alcian blue by cetylpyridinium chloride constitute a persuasive empirical argument that the material visualized is a mucopolysaccharide or mucopolysaccharide-protein complex. PMID:4108476

  4. Current Developments in Antimicrobial Surface Coatings for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartjes, J J T M; Sharma, P K; van Kooten, T G; van der Mei, H C; Mahmoudi, M; Busscher, H J; Rochford, E T J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on material surfaces represent a serious problem in society from both an economical and health perspective. Surface coating approaches to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are of increased importance due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. Effective antimicrobial surface coatings can be based on an anti-adhesive principle that prevents bacteria to adhere, or on bactericidal strategies, killing organisms either before or after contact is made with the surface. Many strategies, however, implement a multifunctional approach that incorporates both of these mechanisms. For anti-adhesive strategies, the use of polymer chains, or hydrogels is preferred, although recently a new class of super-hydrophobic surfaces has been described which demonstrate improved anti-adhesive activity. In addition, bacterial killing can be achieved using antimicrobial peptides, antibiotics, chitosan or enzymes directly bound, tethered through spacer-molecules or encased in biodegradable matrices, nanoparticles and quaternary ammonium compounds. Notwithstanding the ubiquitous nature of the problem of microbial colonization of material surfaces, this review focuses on the recent developments in antimicrobial surface coatings with respect to biomaterial implants and devices. In this biomedical arena, to rank the different coating strategies in order of increasing efficacy is impossible, since this depends on the clinical application aimed for and whether expectations are short- or long term. Considering that the era of antibiotics to control infectious biofilms will eventually come to an end, the future for biofilm control on biomaterial implants and devices is likely with surface-associated modifications that are non-antibiotic related.

  5. Cobalt Porphyrin-Polypyridyl Surface Coatings for Photoelectrosynthetic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiler, A M; Khusnutdinova, D; Wadsworth, B L; Moore, G F

    2017-10-16

    Hybrid materials that link light capture and conversion technologies with the ability to drive reductive chemical transformations are attractive as components in photoelectrosynthetic cells. We show that thin-film polypyridine surface coatings provide a molecular interface to assemble cobalt porphyrin catalysts for hydrogen evolution onto a visible-light-absorbing p-type gallium phosphide semiconductor. Spectroscopic techniques, including grazing angle attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confirm that the cobalt centers of the porphyrin macrocycles coordinate to pyridyl nitrogen sites of the organic surface coating. The cobalt porphyrin surface concentration and fraction of pyridyl sites coordinated to a cobalt center are quantified using complementary methods of ellipsometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In aqueous solutions under simulated solar illumination the modified cathode is photochemically active for hydrogen production, generating the product gas with near-unity Faradaic efficiency at a rate of ≈10 μL min -1 cm -2 when studied in a three-electrode configuration and polarized at the equilibrium potential of the H + /H 2 couple. This equates to a photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction activity of 17.6 H 2 molecules s -1 Co -1 , the highest value reported to date for a molecular-modified semiconductor. Key features of the functionalized photocathode include (1) the relative ease of synthetic preparation made possible by application of an organic surface coating that provides molecular recognition sites for immobilizing the cobalt porphyrin complexes at the semiconductor surface and (2) the use of visible light to drive cathodic fuel-forming reactions in aqueous solutions with no added organic acids or sacrificial chemical reductants.

  6. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  7. Characterization of magnetron sputtered surface coatings by AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, C.; Endstrasser, N.; Jaksch, S.; Scheier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Surface coatings produced by magnetron sputtering are investigated by STM and AES. Thin films of silicon nanoparticles are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by magnetron sputtering. These silicon nanoparticle films are manipulated by means of a variable temperature UHV-STM, to realize lithography on the nanometer scale. Several factors affect the stability of the films and thereby the lifetime of the produced surface structures. To investigate the influence of these parameters, various methods like AFM, AES and XPS have to be applied. The dependence of the surface stability on the grade of oxidation is determined from the ratio between silicon and oxygen. This can be achieved by Auger electron spectroscopy. Our Auger spectrometer was modified in order to allow measuring the time development of the Auger spectrum during the oxidation process. Chemical images are generated by collecting an Auger spectrum at every spot as the primary electron beam is rastered across the sample surface. (author)

  8. Enhanced propellant performance via environmentally friendly curable surface coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating of granular propellants is widely used in a multiplicity of propellants for small, medium and large caliber ammunition. All small caliber ball propellants exhibit burning progressivity due to application of effective deterrent coatings. Large perforated propellant grains have also begun utilizing plasticizing and impregnated deterrent coatings with the purpose of increasing charge weights for greater energy and velocity for the projectile. The deterrent coating and impregnation process utilizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs which results in propellants that need to be forced air dried which impacts air quality. Propellants undergo temperature fluctuations during their life. Diffusion coefficients vary exponentially with variations in temperature. A small temperature increase can induce a faster migration, even over a short period of time, which can lead to large deviations in the concentration. This large concentration change in the ammunition becomes a safety or performance liability. The presence of both polymeric deterrents and nitroglycerin(NG in the nitrocellulose matrix and organic solvents leads to higher diffusion rates. This results in continued emissions of VOCs and HAPs. Conventional polymers tend to partition within the propellant matrix. In other words, localized mixing can occur between the polymer and underlying propellant. This is due to solvent induced softening of the polymer vehicle over the propellant grain. In effect this creates a path where migration can occur. Since nitrate esters, like NG, are relatively small, it can exude to the surface and create a highly unstable and dangerous situation for the warfighter. Curable polymers do not suffer from this partitioning due to “melting” because no VOC solvents are present. They remain surface coated. The small scale characterization testing, such as closed bomb testing, small scale sensitivity, thermal stability, and

  9. Thermal repellent properties of surface coating using silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Halim, M. S.; Aminudin, E.; Guntor, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    Extensive land development in urban areas is completely altering the surface profile of human living environment. As cities growing rapidly, impervious building and paved surfaces are replacing the natural landscape. In the developing countries with tropical climate, large masses of building elements, such as brick wall and concrete members, absorb and store large amount of heat, which in turn radiate back to the surrounding air during the night time. This bubble of heat is known as urban heat island (UHI). The use of high albedo urban surfaces is an inexpensive measure that can reduce surrounded temperature. Thus, the main focus of this study is to investigate the ability of silica, SiO2, with high albedo value, to be used as a thermal-repelled surface coating for brick wall. Three different silica coatings were used, namely silicone resin, silicone wax and rain repellent and one exterior commercial paint (jota shield paint) that commercially available in the market were applied on small-scale brick wall models. An uncoated sample also had been fabricated as a control sample for comparison. These models were placed at the outdoor space for solar exposure. Outdoor environment measurement was carried out where the ambient temperature, surface temperature, relative humidity and UV reflectance were recorded. The effect of different type of surface coating on temperature variation of the surface brick wall and the thermal performance of coatings as potential of heat reduction for brick wall have been studied. Based on the results, model with silicone resin achieved the lowest surface temperature which indicated that SiO2 can be potentially used to reduce heat absorption on the brick wall and further retains indoor passive thermal comfortability.

  10. Reflectance variability of surface coatings reveals characteristic eigenvalue spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.; Barros, Rui

    2012-10-01

    We have examined the trial-to-trial variability of the reflectance spectra of surface coatings containing effect pigments. Principal component analysis of reflectances was done at each detection angle separately. A method for classification of principal components is applied based on the eigenvalue spectra. It was found that the eigenvalue spectra follow characteristic power laws and depend on the detection angle. Three different subsets of principal components were examined to separate the relevant spectral features related to the pigments from other noise sources. Reconstruction of the reflectance spectra by taking only the first subset indicated that reflectance variability was higher at near-specular reflection, suggesting a correlation with the trial-to-trial deposition of effect pigments. Reconstruction by using the second subset indicates that variability was higher at short wavelengths. Finally, reconstruction by using only the third subset indicates that reflectance variability was not totally random as a function of the wavelength. The methods employed can be useful in the evaluation of color variability in industrial paint application processes.

  11. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian [Wheat Ridge, CO; Nguyen, Vinh [Wheat Ridge, CO

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  12. 40 CFR 63.5743 - What standards must I meet for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recreational boat surface coating operations? 63.5743 Section 63.5743 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5743 What standards must I meet for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations? (a) For aluminum wipedown solvent...

  13. Single-molecule nanopore enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wloka, Carsten; Maglia, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Biological nanopores are a class of membrane proteins that open nanoscale water-conduits in biological membranes. When they are reconstituted in artificial membranes and a bias voltage is applied across the membrane, the ionic current passing through individual nanopores can be used to monitor chemical reactions, to recognize individual molecules and, of most interest, to sequence DNA. More recently, proteins and enzymes have started being analysed with nanopores. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with nanopores, i.e. nanopore enzymology, has the unique advantage that it allows long-timescale observations of native proteins at the single-molecule level. Here we describe the approaches and challenges in nanopore enzymology. PMID:28630164

  14. Surface Coating of Wood Building Products National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Applicability Flowchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a January 2005 document that has a flow chart to help you determine if this National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) rule for Surface Coating of Wood Building Products applies to your facility.

  15. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  16. Hydrophilic nanoporous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present application discloses a method for preparing and rendering hydrophilic a nanoporous material of a polymer matrix which has a porosity of 0.1-90 percent (v/v), such that the ratio between the final water absorption (percent (w/w)) and the porosity (percent (v/v)) is at least 0.05, the ......The present application discloses a method for preparing and rendering hydrophilic a nanoporous material of a polymer matrix which has a porosity of 0.1-90 percent (v/v), such that the ratio between the final water absorption (percent (w/w)) and the porosity (percent (v/v)) is at least 0.......05, the method comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a precursor material comprising at least one polymeric component and having a first phase and a second phase; (b) removal of at least a part of the first phase of the precursor material prepared in step (a) so as to leave behind a nanoporous material...... of the polymer matrix; (c) irradiating at least a part of said nanoporous material with light of a wave length of in the range of 250-400 nm (or 200-700 nm) in the presence of oxygen and/or ozone. Corresponding hydrophilic nanoporous materials are also disclosed. L...

  17. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  18. Building membrane nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Membrane nanopores--hollow nanoscale barrels that puncture biological or synthetic membranes--have become powerful tools in chemical- and biosensing, and have achieved notable success in portable DNA sequencing. The pores can be self-assembled from a variety of materials, including proteins, peptides, synthetic organic compounds and, more recently, DNA. But which building material is best for which application, and what is the relationship between pore structure and function? In this Review, I critically compare the characteristics of the different building materials, and explore the influence of the building material on pore structure, dynamics and function. I also discuss the future challenges of developing nanopore technology, and consider what the next-generation of nanopore structures could be and where further practical applications might emerge.

  19. Solid-State Nanopore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishan Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solid-state nanopore has captured the attention of many researchers due to its characteristic of nanoscale. Now, different fabrication methods have been reported, which can be summarized into two broad categories: “top-down” etching technology and “bottom-up” shrinkage technology. Ion track etching method, mask etching method chemical solution etching method, and high-energy particle etching and shrinkage method are exhibited in this report. Besides, we also discussed applications of solid-state nanopore fabrication technology in DNA sequencing, protein detection, and energy conversion.

  20. Water in nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koefinger, J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of single-file water in narrow nanopores. The quasi one-dimensional confinement changes the dynamical and structural properties of nanopore water compared to bulk water and new properties emerge. To explore these properties, which depend on the length of the pore, we develop a one-dimensional dipole lattice model and derive three mathematically equivalent representations. These pictures form the basis of our theoretical considerations and allow the simulation of pores from nanoscopic to macroscopic lengths. Parameterized with results from atomically detailed simulations, this model reproduces the free energetics and structure of nanopore water quantitatively. We investigate the filling transition of carbon nanotubes and explore the order properties of hydrogen bonded chains of water molecules within the pore. We find that narrow carbon nanotubes, which are in contact with a water bath at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, fill completely with an essentially continuous chain of water molecules, that is predominately dipole ordered up to a tube length of ∼ 0.1 mm. We explore the consequences of these order properties for the dielectric behavior by determining the linear response of a single chain of water molecules to a time-dependent electric field in direction of the tube axis. To this end, we include the kinetics of orientational defects in the dipole lattice model. At all chain lengths, nanopore water shows Debye relaxation due to the diffusion of essentially uncorrelated defects. We derive simple expressions for the static dielectric susceptibility and the relaxation time in the limits of short, ordered and long, disordered chains and suggest how dielectric loss spectroscopy can be used to determine the order properties and to measure the fundamental quantities that determine the behavior of nanopore water. (author) [de

  1. Controlling molecular transport through nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2011-01-01

    Nanopores are emerging as powerful tools for the detection and identification of macromolecules in aqueous solution. In this review, we discuss the recent development of active and passive controls over molecular transport through nanopores with emphasis on biosensing applications. We give an overview of the solutions developed to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the resistive-pulse technique based on biological and solid-state nanopores. PMID:21715402

  2. Controlling molecular transport through nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2011-01-01

    Nanopores are emerging as powerful tools for the detection and identification of macromolecules in aqueous solution. In this review, we discuss the recent development of active and passive controls over molecular transport through nanopores with emphasis on biosensing applications. We give an overview of the solutions developed to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the resistive-pulse technique based on biological and solid-state nanopores.

  3. Nanopore sensors for DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Venkatesan, B.M.; Shim, Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene-based, and functionali......Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene...

  4. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  5. Cytotoxicity of organic surface coating agents used for nanoparticles synthesis and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Newton, Brandon; Lewis, Eybriunna; Fu, Peter P; Kafoury, Ramzi; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2015-06-01

    Impact on health by nanomaterials has become a public concern with the great advances of nanomaterials for various applications. Surface coating agents are an integral part of nanoparticles, but not enough attention has been paid during toxicity tests of nanoparticles. As a result, there are inconsistent toxicity results for certain nanomaterials. In this study, we explored the cytotoxicity of eleven commonly used surface coating agents in two cell lines, human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT) and lung fibroblast (CRL-1490) cells, at surface coating agent concentrations of 3, 10, 30, and 100 μM. Two exposure time points, 2 h and 24 h, were employed for the study. Six of the eleven surface coating agents are cytotoxic, especially those surfactants with long aliphatic chains, both cationic (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, oleylamine, tetraoctylammonium bromide, and hexadecylamine) and anionic (sodium dodecylsulfate). In addition, exposure time and the use of different cell lines also affect the cytotoxicity results. Therefore, factors such as cell lines used and exposure times must be considered when conducting toxicity tests or comparing cytotoxicity results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755... surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? You must demonstrate compliance with the aluminum coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards by meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) or...

  7. 16 CFR 1145.2 - Paint (and other similar surface-coating materials) containing lead; toys, children's articles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paint (and other similar surface-coating materials) containing lead; toys, children's articles, and articles of furniture bearing such paint (or... TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.2 Paint (and other similar surface-coating...

  8. Single-molecule nanopore enzymology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Kherim; Van Meervelt, Veerle; Wloka, Carsten; Maglia, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Biological nanopores are a class of membrane proteins that open nanoscale water conduits in biological membranes. When they are reconstituted in artificial membranes and a bias voltage is applied across the membrane, the ionic current passing through individual nanopores can be used to monitor

  9. The evolution of nanopore sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Qiuping; Wang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The “$1000 Genome” project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the “$1000 Genome” while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards. PMID:25610451

  10. The Evolution of Nanopore Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The $1,000 Genome project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the $1,000 Genome while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

  11. Transport of Proteins through Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan

    In biological cells, a malfunctioned protein (such as misfolded or damaged) is degraded by a protease in which an unfoldase actively drags the protein into a nanopore-like structure and then a peptidase cuts the linearized protein into small fragments (i.e. a recycling process). Mimicking this biological process, many experimental studies have focused on the transport of proteins through a biological protein pore or a synthetic solid-state nanopore. Potentially, the nanopore-based sensors can provide a platform for interrogating proteins that might be disease-related or be targeted by a new drug molecule. The single-profile of a protein chain inside an extremely small nanopore might even permit the sequencing of the protein. Here, through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, I will show various types of protein transport through a nanopore and reveal the nanoscale mechanics/energetics that plays an important role governing the protein transport.

  12. Protein conducting nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsman, Anke; Krueger, Vivien; Bartsch, Philipp; Honigmann, Alf; Wagner, Richard; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Meisinger, Christof

    2010-01-01

    About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40 SC as well as a mutant Tom40 SC (S 54 →E) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40 SC corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40 SC S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with t-bar off ≅1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40 SC S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution ( t-bar off 1 ≅0.4 ms; t-bar off 2 ≅4.6 ms).

  13. TiO2 Surface Coating of Mn-Zn Dopped Ferrites Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solný, Tomáš; Ptacek, Petr; Másilko, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with TiO2 coating of powder Mn-Zn ferrite in order to recieve photocatalytic layer on the top of these particles, forming core-shell catalyst. Powder catalysts are of great advance over the world due to the high surface area, considering the kinetics proceeds through heterogenous...... phase boundary catalysis. However their withdrawal from cleaning systems often requires energetically and economically demanding processes such as filtration and ultrafiltration. Since the ferrite is magnetic, the advantage of such formed core-shell photocatalyst is easibility of removing from...... photocatalytic decomposition system using external magnetic field. In this study the surface coating is performed, using Ti alkoxides mixtures with nanosized TiO2 particles and C and Au coating to form film layer of TiO2 on the surface of ferrite. XRD, SEM – EDS analyses are employed to study surface coating....

  14. Supramolecular polymers as surface coatings: rapid fabrication of healable superhydrophobic and slippery surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Schlaich, Christoph; Prévost, Sylvain; Schulz, Andrea; Böttcher, Christoph; Gradzielski, Michael; Qi, Zhenhui; Haag, Rainer; Schalley, Christoph A

    2014-11-19

    Supramolecular polymerization for non-wetting surface coatings is described. The self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs) with perfluorinated side chains can be utilized to rapidly construct superhydrophobic, as well as liquid-infused slippery surfaces within minutes. The lubricated slippery surface exhibits impressive repellency to biological li-quids, such as human serum and blood, and very fast self-healing. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Sustained Drug Release on Temperature-responsive Polymer Hybrid Nanoporous Silica Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Kyung Ja; Shin, Young Kook

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the potential bio-application of hierarchically ordered nanoporous materials for the smart drug delivery system that involves a self-assembly process at the molecular level based upon thermo-responsive polymers. Thermosensitive polymer hybrid nano-porous materials were developed based on tailoring network of PNIPAm for smart drug release, and showed a sustained positive thermoresponsive drug release profile in which the overall release amount was controlled by change of the pore channel size. The use of biodegradable/thermo-responsive polymers in hierarchically ordered nanoporous structure can be useful for smart drug delivery applications. The discovery of ordered nanoporous materials using a surfactant-templated approach has opend a new era in the synthesis of ordered nanoscale materials. Many investigations have been explored on the preparation of nanoporous materials with novel chemical composition, on the fundamental understanding of the reaction processes, and on the potential applications such as catalysis, and separation technology expected to open up further application possibilities. Interest in the structure of the pore network is necessarily concomitant with the formation of different structures including a hexagonal, cubic, and lamellar structure

  16. Surface coatings of unsaturated polyester resin Kamper wood (Dry obalan ops spp.) by using UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiarto Danu; Yusuf Sudo Hadi; Novi Eka Putri

    1999-01-01

    Kamper wood (Dryobalanops spp.) has high contribution in wood working industry and most of them need surface coating process. Radiation curing of surface coating, especially the use of ultra-violet (UV) light have potential to give contribution in the wood finishing. The experiment on surface coating of kamper wood has been conducted by using UV-radiation. Unsaturated polyester resin with the commercial name of Yucalac type 157 was used as coating materials after being added with styrene monomer, some fillers and radical photoinitiator of 2-hydroxy-2-2-methyl-l- phenyl propanone. Four photoinitiator concentration levels of 1.5 ; 2 ; 2.5 and 3 % by weight of resin were used. The coating materials were coated onto the wood panel samples by using high pressure sprayer. The wood samples were then exposed to irradiation by using 80 Watts/cm UV-source with variable conveyor speed of 3 ; 4 ; 5 and 5.8 m/min. Formulation of coating materials, pendulum hardness, adhesion, and gloss of cured films were evaluated

  17. Behavior of Ag nanoparticles in soil: Effects of particle surface coating, aging and sewage sludge amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, Annie R.; Levard, Clément; Oostveen, Emily; Bertsch, Paul M.; Matocha, Chris J.; Kammer, Frank von der; Unrine, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the relative importance of particle coating, sewage sludge amendment, and aging on aggregation and dissolution of manufactured Ag nanoparticles (Ag MNPs) in soil pore water. Ag MNPs with citrate (CIT) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coatings were incubated with soil or municipal sewage sludge which was then amended to soil (1% or 3% sludge (w/w)). Pore waters were extracted after 1 week and 2 and 6 months and analyzed for chemical speciation, aggregation state and dissolution. Ag MNP coating had profound effects on aggregation state and partitioning to pore water in the absence of sewage sludge, but pre-incubation with sewage sludge negated these effects. This suggests that Ag MNP coating does not need to be taken into account to understand fate of AgMNPs applied to soil through biosolids amendment. Aging of soil also had profound effects that depended on Ag MNP coating and sludge amendment. -- Highlights: •Silver nanoparticle coating affects fate in unamended soils. •Citrated coated silver nanoparticles could be found in pore water for up to six months. •Pre-incubation of silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge negated effects of surface coating. •Weathered or reprecipitated particles found in pore water for up to two months in sludge amended soils. •Particle surface coating, sewage sludge amendment and aging all have important impacts. -- Behavior of manufactured silver nanoparticles in soil depends on surface coating, contact with sewage sludge, and aging

  18. Conformal surface coatings to enable high volume expansion Li-ion anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Leah A; Cavanagh, Andrew S; George, Steven M; Jung, Yoon Seok; Yan, Yanfa; Lee, Se-Hee; Dillon, Anne C

    2010-07-12

    An alumina surface coating is demonstrated to improve electrochemical performance of MoO(3) nanoparticles as high capacity/high-volume expansion anodes for Li-ion batteries. Thin, conformal surface coatings were grown using atomic layer deposition (ALD) that relies on self-limiting surface reactions. ALD coatings were tested on both individual nanoparticles and prefabricated electrodes containing conductive additive and binder. The coated and non-coated materials were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling. Importantly, increased stability and capacity retention was only observed when the fully fabricated electrode was coated. The alumina layer both improves the adhesion of the entire electrode, during volume expansion/contraction and protects the nanoparticle surfaces. Coating the entire electrode also allows for an important carbothermal reduction process that occurs during electrode pre-heat treatment. ALD is thus demonstrated as a novel and necessary method that may be employed to coat the tortuous network of a battery electrode.

  19. Conical Nanopore PC Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clochard, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Template synthesis can be considered an alternative to conventional lithography methods. It is one way of providing a panel of nanoscale metallic wires, tubes or organic polymeric devices. Our interest is focused on track-etched membranes produced from swift heavy ions bombardment of polymer films. In comparison with self-assembly of block copolymers, this bottom-up approach has the advantage of being economic, it is not time-consuming and it allows track formation of diverse geometries. Tailoring of the conical nanopore tip opening would have a tremendous impact on sensing domain, as well as on fundamental understanding of perpendicular giant magneto Resistance properties observed in metallic multilayered cylindrical nanowires. By combining low-energy heavy ion beam radiation effects with asymmetric etching, the etching temperature and time can be tuned to prepare conical nanopores of controlled geometry from 0.5 to 1μm at the base to a few nanometers at the top. Asymmetric etching onto PC films was pH-monitored at various temperatures in the range of 65 degree to 80 degree. Fluence impact onto track etch pores was also investigated. The pore shape characterization was achieved by electronic microscopy measurements on membrane surfaces and on electrodeposited nanowires. We have also observed a difference in the conical shape of replicated nanowires. Some showed sting shapes and others displayed shell shapes depending on whether a neutralizing agent was used during etching or not

  20. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2004 fact sheet with information regarding the final NESHAP for Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products. This document provides a summary of the information for the information for this regulation.

  1. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  2. Impact of nanosilver on various DNA lesions and HPRT gene mutations - effects of charge and surface coating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huk, A.; Izak-Nau, E.; el Yamani, N.; Uggerud, H.; Vadset, M.; Zasońska, Beata Anna; Duschl, A.; Dusinska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, 24 July (2015), 25_1-25_20 ISSN 1743-8977 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : silver nanomaterials * surface charge * surface coating Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.649, year: 2015

  3. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  4. Photoresistance switching of plasmonic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Nicoli, Francesca; Chen, Chang; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Zandbergen, Henny W; Dekker, Cees; Van Dorpe, Pol; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2015-01-14

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼ 1-2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification.

  5. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.; Van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate

  6. Microfluidic multiplexing of solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tarun; Rasera, Benjamin C.; Guerrero, Ricardo Jose S.; Lim, Jong-Min; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-12-01

    Although solid-state nanopores enable electronic analysis of many clinically and biologically relevant molecular structures, there are few existing device architectures that enable high-throughput measurement of solid-state nanopores. Herein, we report a method for microfluidic integration of multiple solid-state nanopores at a high density of one nanopore per (35 µm2). By configuring microfluidic devices with microfluidic valves, the nanopores can be rinsed from a single fluid input while retaining compatibility for multichannel electrical measurements. The microfluidic valves serve the dual purpose of fluidic switching and electric switching, enabling serial multiplexing of the eight nanopores with a single pair of electrodes. Furthermore, the device architecture exhibits low noise and is compatible with electroporation-based in situ nanopore fabrication, providing a scalable platform for automated electronic measurement of a large number of integrated solid-state nanopores.

  7. Influence of Nanopore Shapes on Thermal Conductivity of Two-Dimensional Nanoporous Material

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Cong-Liang; Huang, Zun; Lin, Zi-Zhen; Feng, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The influence of nanopore shapes on the electronic thermal conductivity (ETC) was studied in this paper. It turns out that with same porosity, the ETC will be quite different for different nanopore shapes, caused by the different channel width for different nanopore shapes. With same channel width, the influence of different nanopore shapes can be approximately omitted if the nanopore is small enough (smaller than 0.5 times EMFP in this paper). The ETC anisotropy was discovered for triangle n...

  8. Surface coating influence on elastic properties of spruce wood by means of holographic vibration mode visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongova, M.; Urgela, Stanislav

    1999-07-01

    Physicoacoustical properties of wood influenced by surface coating are studied by modal analysis. Resonant spruce plates were coated by stain, nitrocellulose varnish, special violin paint and shellac. The modal testing was performed by electronic speckle pattern interferometry. For this purpose, equipment called VIBROVIZER was used. The collected values of physicoacoustical characteristics (density, Young's modulus, acoustic constant) were compared using the graphic plots of data. The 3D plots help to evaluate wooden plates from a viewpoint of the quality control. This fact offers new opportunity for musical instrument manufacturers.

  9. Creep of MDF panels under constant load and cyclic environmental conditions. Influence of surface coating

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Golfín Seco, J. I.; Díez Barra, M. Rafael

    1997-01-01

    Four different strategies of surface coating (based on 80 g m2 melamin impregnated papers) were used on 19 mm thick commercial MDF panels to assess its reological behaviour under cyclic humidity conditions (20ºC 30 % rh-20ºC 90 % rh). Three different levels of stress (20 %, 30 % and 40 %), based on the ultimate load in bending, were used. Tests were conducted by means of the three points load system. For the same stress level, the relative creep of MDF panels was higher than that in par...

  10. Cytotoxicity Induced by Engineered Silver Nanocrystallites Is Dependent on Surface Coatings and Cell Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, Anil K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Pelletier, Dale A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Wang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Doktycz, Mitchel J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS)

    2012-01-04

    Due to their unique antimicrobial properties silver nanocrystallites have garnered substantial recognition and are used extensively in biomedical applications such as wound dressing, surgical instruments and as bone substitute material. They are also released into unintended locations such as the environment or biosphere. Therefore it is imperative to understand the potential interactions, fate and transport of nanoparticles with environmental biotic systems. Although numerous factors including the composition, size, shape, surface charge and capping molecule of nanoparticles are known to influence the cell cytotoxicity, our results demonstrate for the first time that surface coatings are a major determinant in eliciting the potential cytotoxicity and cell interactions of silver nanoparticles. In the present investigation, silver nanocrystallites with nearly uniform size and shape distribution but with different surface coatings, imparting overall high negativity to high positivity, were synthesized. These nanoparticles were poly (diallyldimethylammonium) chloride-Ag, biogenic-Ag, colloidal-Ag (uncoated) and oleate-Ag with zeta potentials +45±5 mV, -12± 2 mV, -42±5 mV and -45±5 mV respectively; the particles were thoroughly purified so as to avoid false cytotoxicity interpretations. A systematic investigation on the cytotoxic effects, cellular response and membrane damage caused by these four different silver nanoparticles were evaluated using multiple toxicity measurements on mouse macrophage (RAW-264.7) and lung epithelial (C-10) cell lines. From a toxicity perspective, our results clearly indicated that the cytotoxicity was depend on various factors such as synthesis procedure, surface coat or surface charge and the cell-type for the different silver nanoparticles that were investigated. Finally, poly (diallyldimethylammonium) chloride -Ag was found to be the most toxic, followed by biogenic-Ag and oleate-Ag, whereas uncoated-Ag was found to be least toxic

  11. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  12. Characterization of nanopores ordering in anodic alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2008-01-01

    A simple characterization method of the ordering of the nanopores is described for nanoporous anodized aluminium oxides. The method starts with image analysis on scanning electron microscopy representations for the purpose to find repetitive shapes and their centres, i.e. nanopores. Then triangles...

  13. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao

    has also been generated to obtain nanoporous polymers with functional coatings on pore walls. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole is performed to incorporate an ultra thin film of polypyrrole into nanoporous 1,2-PB. The preliminary test shows that nanoporous 1,2-PB gains conductivity. Generally...

  14. Analyzing surface coatings in situ: High-temperature surface film analyzer developed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have devised a new instrument that can analyze surface coatings under operating conditions. The High-Temperature Surface Film Analyzer is the first such instrument to analyze the molecular composition and structure of surface coatings on metals and solids under conditions of high temperature and pressure in liquid environments. Corrosion layers, oxide coatings, polymers or paint films, or adsorbed molecules are examples of conditions that can be analyzed using this instrument. Film thicknesses may vary from a few molecular layers to several microns or thicker. The instrument was originally developed to study metal corrosion in aqueous solutions similar to the cooling water systems of light-water nuclear reactors. The instrument may have use for the nuclear power industry where coolant pipes degrade due to stress corrosion cracking, which often leads to plant shutdown. Key determinants in the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking are the properties and composition of corrosion scales that form inside pipes. The High-Temperature Surface Analyzer can analyze these coatings under laboratory conditions that simulate the same hostile environment of high temperature, pressure, and solution that exist during plant operations. The ability to analyze these scales in hostile liquid environments is unique to the instrument. Other applications include analyzing paint composition, corrosion of materials in geothermal power systems, integrity of canisters for radioactive waste storage, corrosion inhibitor films on piping and drilling systems, and surface scales on condenser tubes in industrial hot water heat exchangers. The device is not patented

  15. Impact of surface coated magnetite used in magnetic drug delivery system on immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaku, Yoshihiro; Tamada, Junya; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is a technique to effectively accumulate drugs, which are combined with ferromagnetic particles, into the affected area using magnetic force control. This study intends to apply MDDS for immunotherapy by enhancing immune responses by a surface treatment of a ferromagnetic particle. The objective of this study is to give the adjuvant effect to a ferromagnetic particle by the surface treatment with alum, which is known as one of the common adjuvants that activates inflammasome pathway. First, magnetite was prepared as a ferromagnetic particle and coated with alum. Alum-coated magnetite increased the expression of caspase-1, which is an activated indicator of inflammasome, in the culture of human monocyte cell (THP-1 cell). To evaluate the potential of the surface coated particles, the particles were subcutaneously injected to mice with a peptide vaccine. As a result, the antibody titer was increased by the surface coated particles as assessed by ELISA. Although a magnetic force has not yet applied in this study, the administration experiment to mice using magnetic force control is our next step. In conclusion, we modified the immune response to magnetite by coating the surface with alum. This can lead to a clinical application for vaccine therapy in future.

  16. Determination of elastic mechanical characteristics of surface coatings from analysis of signals obtained by impulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaguly, E.; Craştiu, I.; Deac, S.; Gozman-Pop, C.; Drăgănescu, G.; Bereteu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Most of the surface coatings are based on the synthetic polymers, which are substances composed from very large molecules that form tough, flexible, adhesive films when applied to surfaces. The other components of surface coverings materials are pigments that provide colour, opacity, gloss and other properties. Surface coatings are two-phase composite materials: constitute a polymer matrix on the one side, and on the other side of the pigments and additives dispersed in the matrix. Their role is not only aesthetically but also to ensure anticorrosive protection or even improve some mechanical properties of coated surfaces. In this paper it will follow, starting from the mechanical properties of the substrate, the metallic sheet in general, to determine the new properties of the assembly of substrate and the two coating layers, also the determination of mechanical properties of the layers. From the analysis of vibroacoustic signals obtained by the impulse excitation of the sample, one can determine the elasticity modulus. These results come to validate the results based on finite element analysis (FEA) of the same samples.

  17. Surface Coating Constraint Induced Self-Discharging of Silicon Nanoparticles as Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Zhao, Peng; Yang, Hui; Liu, Borui; Zhang, Jiguang; Cui, Yi; Yu, Guihua; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-10-01

    One of the key challenges of Si-based anodes for lithium ion batteries is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which commonly leads to electrochemo-mechanical degradation and subsequent fast capacity fading. Recent studies have shown that applying nanometer-thick coating layers on Si nanoparticle (SiNPs) enhances cyclability and capacity retention. However, it is far from clear how the coating layer function from the point of view of both surface chemistry and electrochemo-mechanical effect. Herein, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy to investigate the lithiation/delithiation kinetics of SiNPs coated with a conductive polymer, polypyrrole (PPy). We discovered that this coating layer can lead to “self-delithiation” or “self-discharging” at different stages of lithiation. We rationalized that the self-discharging is driven by the internal compressive stress generated inside the lithiated SiNPs due to the constraint effect of the coating layer. We also noticed that the critical size of lithiation-induced fracture of SiNPs is increased from ~ 150 nm for bare SiNPs to ~ 380 nm for the PPy-coated SiNPs, showing a mechanically protective role of the coating layer. These observations demonstrate both beneficial and detrimental roles of the surface coatings, shedding light on rational design of surface coatings for silicon to retain high-power and high capacity as anode for lithium ion batteries.

  18. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  19. Rescalable solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balčytis, Armandas; Briosne-Fréjaville, Cleménce; Mau, Adrien; Li, Xijun; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2017-09-01

    Nanopores in 10-30 nm thickness Si4N3 membranes were milled using Ga+ ions. Dose dependence of the hole diameter and shape was established and explained as resulting from the intensity distribution of the focused ion beam. The initial diameter of the milled pore is dependent on the full-width half-maximum of the axial portion of the beam, whereas shape variations with dose are related to characteristics of the beam periphery. Membrane milling can thereby yield information on the FIB system itself, since obfuscating re-deposition is effectively eliminated. Gradual closure of the nanopore can be realized through raster scan exposure to an electron beam. This simple method provides shape control of the milled nano-pores as well as of more complex patterns milled in membranes.

  20. Nanoporous microscale microbial incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhifei; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-07

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals abundant microbial diversity that has not been cultured in the laboratory. Many attribute this so-called 'great plate count anomaly' to traditional microbial cultivation techniques, which largely facilitate the growth of a single species. Yet, it is widely recognized that bacteria in nature exist in complex communities. One technique to increase the pool of cultivated bacterial species is to co-culture multiple species in a simulated natural environment. Here, we present nanoporous microscale microbial incubators (NMMI) that enable high-throughput screening and real-time observation of multi-species co-culture. The key innovation in NMMI is that they facilitate inter-species communication while maintaining physical isolation between species, which is ideal for genomic analysis. Co-culture of a quorum sensing pair demonstrates that the NMMI can be used to culture multiple species in chemical communication while monitoring the growth dynamics of individual species.

  1. Dynamics of polymer translocation through kinked nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfang; Wang, Yilin; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-02-28

    Polymer translocation through nanopore has potential technological applications for DNA sequencing, where one challenge problem is to slow down translocation speed. Inspired by experimental findings that kinked nanopores exhibit a large reduction in translocation velocity compared with their straight counterparts, we investigate the dynamics of polymer translocation through kinked nanopores in two dimensions under an applied external field. With increasing the tortuosity of an array of nanopores, our analytical results show that the translocation probability decreases. Langevin dynamics simulation results support this prediction and further indicate that with increasing the tortuosity, translocation time shows a slow increase followed by a rapid increase after a critical tortuosity. This behavior demonstrates that kinked nanopores can effectively reduce translocation speed. These results are interpreted by the roles of the tortuosity for decreasing the effective nanopore diameter, increasing effective nanopore length, and greatly increasing the DNA-pore friction.

  2. Nanopore stochastic detection: diversity, sensitivity, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Liang; Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Guan, Xiyun

    2013-12-17

    Nanopore sensors have emerged as a label-free and amplification-free technique for measuring single molecules. First proposed in the mid-1990s, nanopore detection takes advantage of the ionic current modulations produced by the passage of target analytes through a single nanopore at a fixed applied potential. Over the last 15 years, these nanoscale pores have been used to sequence DNA, to study covalent and non-covalent bonding interactions, to investigate biomolecular folding and unfolding, and for other applications. A major issue in the application of nanopore sensors is the rapid transport of target analyte molecules through the nanopore. Current recording techniques do not always accurately detect these rapid events. Therefore, researchers have looked for methods that slow molecular and ionic transport. Thus far, several strategies can improve the resolution and sensitivity of nanopore sensors including variation of the experimental conditions, use of a host compound, and modification of the analyte molecule and the nanopore sensor. In this Account, we highlight our recent research efforts that have focused on applications of nanopore sensors including the differentiation of chiral molecules, the study of enzyme kinetics, and the determination of sample purity and composition. Then we summarize our efforts to regulate molecular transport. We show that the introduction of various surface functional groups such as hydrophobic, aromatic, positively charged, and negatively charged residues in the nanopore interior, an increase in the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution, and the use of ionic liquid solutions as the electrolyte instead of inorganic salts may improve the resolution and sensitivity of nanopore stochastic sensors. Our experiments also demonstrate that the introduction of multiple functional groups into a single nanopore and the development of a pattern-recognition nanopore sensor array could further enhance sensor resolution. Although we have

  3. Microstructures of friction surfaced coatings. A TEM study; Gefuege durch Reibauftragschweissen aufgetragener Beschichtungen. Eine TEM-Untersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Javed; Kalvala, Prasad Rao; Misra, Mano [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Dilip, J. John Samuel [Louisville Univ., KY (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering; Pal, Deepankar; Stucker, Brent [Louisville Univ., KY (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering; 3D Sim, Park City, UT (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The microstructures of dissimilar metal welds between 9Cr-1Mo (Modified) (P91) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) with Ni-based alloy interlayers (Inconel 625, Inconel 600 and Inconel 800H) are reported. These interlayers were deposited by the friction surfacing method one over the other on P91 alloy, which was finally friction welded to AISI 304. In this paper, the results of microstructural evolution in the friction surfaced coated interlayers (Inconel 625, 600, 800H) are reported. For comparative purposes, the microstructures of consumable rods (Inconel 625, 600, 800H) and dissimilar metal base metals (P91 and AISI 304) were also reported. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited dynamic recrystallization. In friction surfaced coatings, the carbide particles were found to be finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix, compared to their rod counterparts.

  4. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Younger, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests

  5. PPS-PEG surface coating to reduce thrombogenicity of small diameter ePTFE vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrer, L; Duwe, J; Zisch, A H; Khabiri, E; Cikirikcioglu, M; Napoli, A; Goessl, A; Schaffner, T; Hess, O M; Carrel, T; Kalangos, A; Hubbell, J A; Walpoth, B H

    2005-10-01

    Patency failure of small vascular synthetic grafts is still a major problem for coronary and peripheral revascularization. Thus, three new surface coatings of small synthetic grafts were tested in an acute pig model to evaluate their thrombogenicity (extracorporeal arterio-venous shunt) and in a chronic rat model to evaluate the tissue reaction they induced (subcutaneous implantation). In five domestic pigs (25-30 kg) an extracorporeal femoro-femoral arterio-venous shunt model was used. The study protocol included first a non-heparinized perfusion sequence followed by graft perfusion after 10,000 UI iv heparin. Grafts were perfused for 3 and 9 minutes. The following coatings were tested on ePTFE grafts: poly-propylene sulphide (PPS)--poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) (wet and dry applications) as well as carbon. Two sets of control were used, one dry and one wet (vehicle only). After perfusion grafts were examined by scanning electron microscopy for semi-quantitative assessment (score 0-3) of cellular and microthrombi deposition. To assess tissue compatibility, pieces of each material were implanted subcutaneously in 16 Wistar rats. At 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks four animals each were sacrificed for semi-quantitative (score 0-3) histologic evaluation of tissue reaction. In the pig model, cellular deposition and microthrombi formation increased over time. In non- heparinized animals, the coatings did not improve the surface characteristics, since they did not prevent microthrombi formation and cellular deposition. In heparinized animals, thrombogenicity was lowest in coated grafts,especially in PPS -PEG dry (pPPS-PEG dry, but this difference was not statistically significant vs.controls. In the rat model,no significant differences of the tissue reaction could be shown between materials. While all coatings failed to add any benefit for lowering tissue reaction, surface coating with PPS -PEG (dry application) reduced thrombogenicity significantly (in heparinized animals) and thus

  6. Bacteriomimetic poly-γ-glutamic acid surface coating for hemocompatibility and safety of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Kim, Jinyoung; Suh, Min Sung; Kim, Youn Kyu; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2017-08-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA), a major component of the bacterial capsule, is known to confer hydrophilicity to bacterial surfaces and protect bacteria from interactions with blood cells. We tested whether applying a bacteriomimetic surface coating of PGA modulates interactions of nanomaterials with blood cells or affects their safety and photothermal antitumor efficacy. Amphiphilic PGA (APGA), prepared by grafting phenylalanine residues to PGA, was used to anchor PGA to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets, a model of hydrophobic nanomaterials. Surface coating of rGO with bacterial capsule-like APGA yielded APGA-tethered rGO nanosheets (ArGO). ArGO nanosheets remained stable in serum over 4 weeks, whereas rGO in plain form precipitated in serum within 5 minutes. Moreover, ArGO did not interact with blood cells, whereas rGO in plain form or as a physical mixture with PGA formed aggregates with blood cells. Mice administered ArGO at a dose of 50 mg/kg showed 100% survival and no hepatic or renal toxicity. No mice survived exposure at the same dose of rGO or a PGA/rGO mixture. Following intravenous administration, ArGO showed a greater distribution to tumors and prolonged tumor retention compared with other nanosheet formulations. Irradiation with near-infrared light completely ablated tumors in mice treated with ArGO. Our results indicate that a bacteriomimetic surface modification of nanomaterials with bacterial capsule-like APGA improves the stability in blood, biocompatibility, tumor distribution, and photothermal antitumor efficacy of rGO. Although APGA was used here to coat the surfaces of rGO, it could be applicable to coat surfaces of other hydrophobic nanomaterials.

  7. Applied electric field enhances DRG neurite growth: influence of stimulation media, surface coating and growth supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Matthew D.; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2009-08-01

    Electrical therapies have been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. This enhanced neural growth existed even after the electric field (EF) or stimulation was removed, but the factors that may influence the enhanced growth, such as stimulation media or surface coating, have not been fully investigated. This study characterized neurite outgrowth and branching under various conditions: EF magnitude and application time, ECM surface coating, medium during EF application and growth supplements. A uniform, low-magnitude EF (24 or 44 V m-1) was applied to dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglia seeded on collagen or laminin-coated surfaces. During the growth period, cells were either exposed to NGF or N2, and during stimulation cells were exposed to either unsupplemented media (Ca2+) or PBS (no Ca2+). Parallel controls for each experiment included cells exposed to the chamber with no stimulation and cells remaining outside the chamber. After brief electrical stimulation (10 min), neurite length significantly increased 24 h after application for all conditions studied. Of particular interest, increased stimulation time (10-100 min) further enhanced neurite length on laminin but not on collagen surfaces. Neurite branching was not affected by stimulation on any surface, and no preferential growth of neurites was noted after stimulation. Overall, the results of this report suggest that short-duration electric stimulation is sufficient to enhance neurite length under a variety of conditions. While further data are needed to fully elucidate a mechanism for this increased growth, these data suggest that one focus of those investigations should be the interaction between the growth cone and the substrata.

  8. Optically Transparent Nanoporous Glasspolymer Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, D. J; Juliano, T. F; Patel, P. J; McKnight, S. H

    2006-01-01

    .... This transparent nanocomposite is created by infiltrating nanoporous glass (Vycor, Corning Inc.) with different polymers. The Vycor pores (4-6 nm) are much smaller than the wavelength of light, thus refractive index matching with the polymer is not necessary for transparency.

  9. Graphene Nanopores for Protein Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James; Sloman, Leila; He, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    An inexpensive, reliable method for protein sequencing is essential to unraveling the biological mechanisms governing cellular behavior and disease. Current protein sequencing methods suffer from limitations associated with the size of proteins that can be sequenced, the time, and the cost of the sequencing procedures. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that investigated the feasibility of using graphene nanopores for protein sequencing. We focus our study on the biologically significant phenylalanine-glycine repeat peptides (FG-nups)—parts of the nuclear pore transport machinery. Surprisingly, we found FG-nups to behave similarly to single stranded DNA: the peptides adhere to graphene and exhibit step-wise translocation when subject to a transmembrane bias or a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Reducing the peptide’s charge density or increasing the peptide’s hydrophobicity was found to decrease the translocation speed. Yet, unidirectional and stepwise translocation driven by a transmembrane bias was observed even when the ratio of charged to hydrophobic amino acids was as low as 1:8. The nanopore transport of the peptides was found to produce stepwise modulations of the nanopore ionic current correlated with the type of amino acids present in the nanopore, suggesting that protein sequencing by measuring ionic current blockades may be possible. PMID:27746710

  10. Manipulation of Protein Translocation through Nanopores by Flow Field Control and Application to Nanopore Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2016-09-20

    The control of biomolecule translocation through nanopores is important in nanopore protein detection. Improvement in current nanopore molecule control is desired to enhance capture rates, extend translocation times, and ensure the effective detection of various proteins in the same solutions. We present a method that simultaneously resolves these issues through the use of a gate-modulated conical nanopore coupled with solutions of varying salt concentration. Simulation results show that the presence of an induced reverse electroosmotic flow (IREOF) results in inlet flows from the two ends of the nanopore centerline entering into the nanopore in opposite directions, which simultaneously elevates the capture rate and immobilizes the protein in the nanopore, thus enabling steady current blockage measurements for a range of proteins. In addition, it is shown that proteins with different size/charge ratios can be trapped by a gate modulation intensified flow field at a similar location in the nanopore in the same solution conditions.

  11. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid)

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Myoung Jin; Yamaguchi, Tokutaro; Han, Chul Hee; Oh, Sae-Joong; In Kim, Sung; Yoo, Jung Ho; Park, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Yong-Sang; Park, Nam Kyou

    2016-01-01

    There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer ...

  12. Nanoporous Polymeric Grating-Based Biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Tieyu

    2012-05-02

    We demonstrate the utilization of an interferometrically created nanoporous polymeric gratings as a platform for biosensing applications. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-functionalized nanoporous polymeric gratings was fabricated by combining holographic interference patterning and APTES-functionalization of pre-polymer syrup. The successful detection of multiple biomolecules indicates that the biofunctionalized nanoporous polymeric gratings can act as biosensing platforms which are label-free, inexpensive, and applicable as high-throughput assays. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  13. A nanoporous gold membrane for sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swe Zin Oo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Design and fabrication of three-dimensionally structured, gold membranes containing hexagonally close-packed microcavities with nanopores in the base, are described. Our aim is to create a nanoporous structure with localized enhancement of the fluorescence or Raman scattering at, and in the nanopore when excited with light of approximately 600 nm, with a view to provide sensitive detection of biomolecules. A range of geometries of the nanopore integrated into hexagonally close-packed assemblies of gold micro-cavities was first evaluated theoretically. The optimal size and shape of the nanopore in a single microcavity were then considered to provide the highest localized plasmon enhancement (of fluorescence or Raman scattering at the very center of the nanopore for a bioanalyte traversing through. The optimized design was established to be a 1200 nm diameter cavity of 600 nm depth with a 50 nm square nanopore with rounded corners in the base. A gold 3D-structured membrane containing these sized microcavities with the integrated nanopore was successfully fabricated and ‘proof of concept’ Raman scattering experiments are described. Keywords: Nanopore, Polymer sphere, Gold membrane, Plasmons, Sensing, SERS

  14. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  15. Threading DNA through nanopores for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyta, Maria

    2015-07-01

    This review outlines the recent achievements in the field of nanopore research. Nanopores are typically used in single-molecule experiments and are believed to have a high potential to realize an ultra-fast and very cheap genome sequencer. Here, the various types of nanopore materials, ranging from biological to 2D nanopores are discussed together with their advantages and disadvantages. These nanopores can utilize different protocols to read out the DNA nucleobases. Although, the first nanopore devices have reached the market, many still have issues which do not allow a full realization of a nanopore sequencer able to sequence the human genome in about a day. Ways to control the DNA, its dynamics and speed as the biomolecule translocates the nanopore in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the reading-out process are examined in this review. Finally, the advantages, as well as the drawbacks in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, i.e., the genetic information, are presented in view of their importance in the field of nanopore sequencing.

  16. Surface coating-modulated toxic responses to silver nanoparticles in Wolffia globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaoyan; Li, Penghui; Lou, Jie; Zhang, Hongwu

    2017-08-01

    With the omnipresence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in our daily consumer products, their release has raised serious concerns. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which plants counteract the toxicity of nanoparticles are largely unknown. This study investigated the exposure of aquatic Wolffia globosa to ATP-nAg (AgNPs coated with adenosine triphosphate), cit-nAg (AgNPs coated with citrate), and Ag + . Hill reaction activity was basically lost in W. globosa treated with 10mg/L ATP-nAg and Ag + , while the activity was still maintained at 38.7%-38.9% of the respective controls at 10mg/L cit-nAg. The reduction of amounts of chlorophyll and soluble protein were shown in response to the Ag stresses. This was accompanied by the accumulation of sugar in W. globosa treated with cit-nAg. By contrast, the depletion of sugar was recorded after 10mg/L ATP-nAg and Ag + treatments. The superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities were significantly increased after exposure to 10mg/L ATP-nAg and Ag + , which did not occurred in W. globosa treated with cit-nAg. The ratio between NADPH/NADP + was higher after cit-nAg and Ag + stresses than the respective controls. The accumulation of Ag was found to increase in a concentration-dependent manner. Ag + and ATP-nAg inhibited the uptake of P and K, and promoted the uptake of Fe and Cu. In contrast, cit-nAg only promoted the uptake of Cu. Our results implied that surface coating induced different physiological responses of W. globosa to AgNPs. Based on above results, we speculated that after exposure to cit-nAg, citrate possibly could serve as the substrate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle and accumulated sugar may promote pentose phosphate pathways. For ATP-nAg treatments, ATP would act as an exogenous energy source of plant metabolisms. Our findings demonstrate that surface coating regulates the physiological responses of plants to AgNPs through distinct mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Electrokinetic phenomena in nanopore transport

    OpenAIRE

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are apertures of nanometric dimensions in an insulating matrix. They are routinely used to sense and measure properties of single molecules such as DNA. This sensing technique relies on the process of translocation, whereby a molecule in aqueous solution moves through the pore under an applied electric field. The presence of the molecule modulates the ionic current through the pore, from which information can be obtained regarding the molecule's properties. Whereas the electrical pr...

  18. Surface Coating of Oxide Powders: A New Synthesis Method to Process Biomedical Grade Nano-Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Palmero

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite and nanocomposite ceramics have achieved special interest in recent years when used for biomedical applications. They have demonstrated, in some cases, increased performance, reliability, and stability in vivo, with respect to pure monolithic ceramics. Current research aims at developing new compositions and architectures to further increase their properties. However, the ability to tailor the microstructure requires the careful control of all steps of manufacturing, from the synthesis of composite nanopowders, to their processing and sintering. This review aims at deepening understanding of the critical issues associated with the manufacturing of nanocomposite ceramics, focusing on the key role of the synthesis methods to develop homogeneous and tailored microstructures. In this frame, the authors have developed an innovative method, named “surface-coating process”, in which matrix oxide powders are coated with inorganic precursors of the second phase. The method is illustrated into two case studies; the former, on Zirconia Toughened Alumina (ZTA materials for orthopedic applications, and the latter, on Zirconia-based composites for dental implants, discussing the advances and the potential of the method, which can become a valuable alternative to the current synthesis process already used at a clinical and industrial scale.

  19. Influence of Surface Coating of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Mechanical Properties of Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarar, Ecem; Karakas, Gizem; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi; Malta, Seyda

    Polymer nanocomposites have emerged as promising materials due to improved properties when compared with conventional bulk polymers. Nanofillers are natural or synthetic organic/inorganic particles that are less than 100 nm in at least one dimension. Even the addition of trace amounts of nanofillers to polymers may lad to unique combinations of properties. Among variety of inorganic nanofillers, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are of great interest due to their unique physical and chemical properties, such as low toxicity, biocompatibility, large magnetization and conductivity, owing to their extremely small size and large specific surface area. In this study, approximately 8-10 nm magnetic nanoparticles coated with either citric acid or oleic acid are synthesized and blended with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The hydrophobicity/hydrophillicity of the polymer and the surface coating on the iron oxide nanoparticles are exploited to control the dispersion state of nanoparticles, and the effect of dispersion on mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposite are investigated via experimental methods such as dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730 and TUBITAK 112M666.

  20. Antisoiling technology: Theories of surface soiling and performance of antisoiling surface coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P. B.

    1984-11-01

    Physical examination of surfaces undergoing natural outdoor soiling suggests that soil matter accumulates in up to three distinct layers. The first layer involves strong chemical attachment or strong chemisorption of soil matter on the primary surface. The second layer is physical, consisting of a highly organized arrangement of soil creating a gradation in surface energy from a high associated with the energetic first layer to the lowest possible state on the outer surfce of the second layer. The lowest possible energy state is dictated by the physical nature of the regional atmospheric soiling materials. These first two layers are resistant to removal by rain. The third layer constitutes a settling of loose soil matter, accumulating in dry periods and being removed during rainy periods. Theories and evidence suggest that surfaces that should be naturally resistant to the formation of the first two-resistant layers should be hard, smooth, hydrophobic, free of first-period elements, and have the lowest possible surface energy. These characteristics, evolving as requirements for low-soiling surfaces, suggest that surfaces or surface coatings should be of fluorocarbon chemistry. Evidence for the three-soil-layer concept, and data on the positive performance of candidate fluorocarbon coatings on glass and transparent plastic films after 28 months of outdoor exposure, are presented.

  1. Cyclic fatigue comparison among endodontic instruments with similar cross section and different surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, Eugenio; Plotino, Gianluca; Scibilia, Mauro; Grande, Nicola M; DE Santis, Daniele; Pardo, Alessia; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-11-09

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of rotary instruments' geometry and surface titanium-nitride (TiN) treatment on the fatigue fracture, through the comparison of cyclic fatigue resistance of two endodontic systems that have similar cross-sectional design and different surface coating. 130 Mtwo (10/.04; 15/.05; 20/.06; 25/.06; 30/.05; 35/.04; 40/.04) and Easy Shape (15/.04; 20/.05; 25/.06; 30/.05; 35/.04; 40/.04) were tested for cyclic fatigue resistance. Time to fracture (TtF) was determined by counting the seconds of continuous rotation until final fracture in an artificial canal with 60° angle and a 5 mm radius of curve. The fracture surface of each fragment was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests. Mtwo perform a significantly (P0,05). Mtwo exhibit a higher NCF thanks to the smaller metal volume contained in their core. Titanium-nitride coating doesn't influence the performance of Easy Shape instruments on static test of cyclic fatigue.

  2. Effect of Anti-Sticking Nanostructured Surface Coating on Minimally Invasive Electrosurgical Device in Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han-Yi; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Lin, Li-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent of thermal injury in the brain after the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a nanostructured copper-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) surface coating. To effectively utilize an electrosurgical device in clinical surgery, it is important to decrease the thermal injury to the adjacent tissues. The surface characteristics and morphology of DLC-Cu thin film was evaluated using a contact angle goniometer, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Three-dimensional biomedical brain models were reconstructed using magnetic resonance images to simulate the electrosurgical procedure. Results indicated that the temperature was reduced significantly when a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a DLC-Cu thin film coating (DLC-Cu-SS) was used. Temperatures decreased with the use of devices with increasing film thickness. Thermographic data revealed that surgical temperatures in an animal model were significantly lower with the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device compared to an untreated device. Furthermore, the DLC-Cu-SS device created a relatively small region of injury and lateral thermal range. As described above, the biomedical nanostructured film reduced excessive thermal injury with the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device in the brain.

  3. Physisorbed surface coatings for poly(dimethylsiloxane) and quartz microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viefhues, M.; Manchanda, S.; Chao, T.-C.; Anselmetti, D.; Regtmeier, J.; Ros, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surface modifications of microfluidic devices are of essential importance for successful bioanalytical applications. Here, we investigate three different coatings for quartz and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. We employed a triblock copolymer with trade name F108, poly (l-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-PEG), as well as the hybrid coating n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside and methyl cellulose (DDM/MC). The impact of these coatings was characterized by measuring the electroosmotic flow (EOF), contact angle, and prevention of protein adsorption. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of static coatings, i.e., the incubation with the coating agent prior to measurements, and dynamic coatings, where the coating agent was present during the measurement. We found that all coatings on PDMS as well as quartz reduced EOF, increased reproducibility of EOF, reduced protein adsorption, and improved the wettability of the surfaces. Among the coating strategies tested, the dynamic coatings with DDM/MC and F108 demonstrated maximal reduction of EOF and protein adsorption and simultaneously best long-term stability concerning EOF. For PLL-PEG, a reversal in the EOF direction was observed. Interestingly, the static surface coating strategy with F108 proved to be as effective to prevent protein adsorption as dynamic coating with this block copolymer. These findings will allow optimized parameter choices for coating strategies on PDMS and quartz microfluidic devices in which control of EOF and reduced biofouling are indispensable. PMID:21847528

  4. Controlling nanopore size, shape and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Hout, Michiel; Hall, Adam R; Wu Mengyue; Zandbergen, Henny W; Dekker, Cees; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores are considered a promising tool for the study of biological polymers such as DNA and RNA, due largely to their flexibility in size, potential in device integration and robustness. Here, we show that the precise shape of small nanopores (∼5 nm diameter in 20 nm SiN membranes) can be controlled by using transmission electron microscope (TEM) beams of different sizes. However, when some of these small nanopores are immersed in an aqueous solution, their resistance is observed to decrease over time. By comparing nanopores of different shapes using (scanning) TEM both before and after immersion in aqueous solution, we demonstrate that the stability of small nanopores is related to their three-dimensional geometry, which depends on the TEM beam size employed during pore fabrication. Optimal stability is obtained using a TEM beam size of approximately the same size as the intended nanopore diameter. In addition, we show that thermal oxidation can serve as a means to independently control nanopore size following TEM fabrication. These observations provide key guidelines for the fabrication of stable solid-state nanopores on the scale of nucleic acids and small proteins.

  5. UV Defined Nanoporous Liquid Core Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ndoni, Sokol

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous liquid core waveguides, where both core and cladding are made from the same material, are presented. The nanoporous polymer used is intrinsically hydrophobic, but selective UV exposure enables it to infiltrate with an aqueous solution, thus raising the refractive index from 1.26 to 1...

  6. Nanopore sensors : From hybrid to abiotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocer, Armagan; Tauk, Lara; Dejardin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The use of nanopores of well controlled geometry for sensing molecules in solution is reviewed. Focus is concentrated especially on synthetic track-etch pores in polymer foils and on biological nanopores, i.e. ion channels. After a brief section about multipore sensors, specific attention is

  7. Gyroid nanoporous scaffold for conductive polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Zhang, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanoporous polymers with interconnected large surface area have been prepared by depositing polypyrrole onto nanocavity walls of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene films with gyroid morphology. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole was used to generate ultrathin films and prevent pore blocking...

  8. Nanopores formed by DNA origami: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2014-10-01

    Nanopores have emerged over the past two decades to become an important technique in single molecule experimental physics and biomolecule sensing. Recently DNA nanotechnology, in particular DNA origami, has been used for the formation of nanopores in insulating materials. DNA origami is a very attractive technique for the formation of nanopores since it enables the construction of 3D shapes with precise control over geometry and surface functionality. DNA origami has been applied to nanopore research by forming hybrid architectures with solid state nanopores and by direct insertion into lipid bilayers. This review discusses recent experimental work in this area and provides an outlook for future avenues and challenges. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanoporous metals for advanced energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art research in nanoporous metals for potential applications in advanced energy fields, including proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Li batteries (Li ion, Li-S, and Li-O2), and supercapacitors. The related structural design and performance of nanoporous metals as well as possible mechanisms and challenges are fully addressed. The formation mechanisms of nanoporous metals during dealloying, the microstructures of nanoporous metals and characterization methods, as well as miscrostructural regulation of nanoporous metals through alloy design of precursors and surface diffusion control are also covered in detail. This is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, graduate students, and government/industry officers who are in charge of R&D investments and strategy related to energy technologies.

  10. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Satarifard, Vahid; Foroutan, Masumeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assesse...

  11. Single-Molecule Study of Proteins by Biological Nanopore Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongmei; Bi, Sheng; Zhang, Liyu; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nanopore technology has been developed for detecting properties of proteins through monitoring of ionic current modulations as protein passes via a nanosize pore. As a real-time, sensitive, selective and stable technology, biological nanopores are of widespread concern. Here, we introduce the background of nanopore researches in the area of α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopores in protein conformation detections and protein–ligand interactions. Moreover, several original biological nanopores are also introduced with various features and functions. PMID:25268917

  12. Single-Molecule Study of Proteins by Biological Nanopore Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanopore technology has been developed for detecting properties of proteins through monitoring of ionic current modulations as protein passes via a nanosize pore. As a real-time, sensitive, selective and stable technology, biological nanopores are of widespread concern. Here, we introduce the background of nanopore researches in the area of α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopores in protein conformation detections and protein–ligand interactions. Moreover, several original biological nanopores are also introduced with various features and functions.

  13. Feasibility of Cathode Surface Coating Technology for High-Energy Lithium-ion and Beyond-Lithium-ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Sujith; Yoon, Moonsu; Jo, Minki; Liu, Hua Kun; Dou, Shi Xue; Cho, Jaephil; Guo, Zaiping

    2017-12-01

    Cathode material degradation during cycling is one of the key obstacles to upgrading lithium-ion and beyond-lithium-ion batteries for high-energy and varied-temperature applications. Herein, we highlight recent progress in material surface-coating as the foremost solution to resist the surface phase-transitions and cracking in cathode particles in mono-valent (Li, Na, K) and multi-valent (Mg, Ca, Al) ion batteries under high-voltage and varied-temperature conditions. Importantly, we shed light on the future of materials surface-coating technology with possible research directions. In this regard, we provide our viewpoint on a novel hybrid surface-coating strategy, which has been successfully evaluated in LiCoO 2 -based-Li-ion cells under adverse conditions with industrial specifications for customer-demanding applications. The proposed coating strategy includes a first surface-coating of the as-prepared cathode powders (by sol-gel) and then an ultra-thin ceramic-oxide coating on their electrodes (by atomic-layer deposition). What makes it appealing for industry applications is that such a coating strategy can effectively maintain the integrity of materials under electro-mechanical stress, at the cathode particle and electrode- levels. Furthermore, it leads to improved energy-density and voltage retention at 4.55 V and 45 °C with highly loaded electrodes (≈24 mg.cm -2 ). Finally, the development of this coating technology for beyond-lithium-ion batteries could be a major research challenge, but one that is viable. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Evaluation of four surface coating treatments for resin to zirconia bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Pow, Edmond H N; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2014-04-01

    To compare the effects of four surface coating methods on resin to zirconia shear bond strength. Eighty pre-sintered zirconia discs were prepared and randomly divided into five study groups according to the corresponding methods of surface treatments as follows: group C (control group, fully sintered without any surface treatment), group S (fully sintered and then sandblasted with silica coated alumina powder), group G (fully sintered and then coated with glazing porcelain followed by acid etching), group Si (pre-coated with silica slurry then fully sintered), and group Z (coated with zirconia particles and then fully sintered). The observation of surface morphology and elemental composition analysis were conducted by SEM and EDX. Self-adhesive resin cement stubs (diameter 3.6mm and height 3mm) were then bonded on the zirconia discs with a cylindrical shape. Both initial and artificial aged (including 30-day water storage, thermal cycling for 3000 and 6000 cycles) shear bond strengths were then evaluated. All the tested coating methods showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than the control group, in both dry and aged conditions. Group S produced the strongest initial zirconia/resin bonding (19.7MPa) and the control group had the lowest value (8.8MPa). However, after thermal cycling, group Z exhibited the highest mean value. All the samples in the control group failed in the thermal cycling. Both different coating methods (ptreatments (pcoating might be a reliable way in enhancing adhesion between resin and zirconia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress response of a clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolate subjected to a novel antimicrobial surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss-Lendzian, Emanuel; Vaishampayan, Ankita; de Jong, Anne; Landau, Uwe; Meyer, Carsten; Kok, Jan; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2018-03-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, paired with their ability to form biofilms on medical and technical devices, represents a serious problem for effective and long-term decontamination in health-care environments and gives rise to an urgent need for new antimicrobial materials. Here we present the impact of AGXX ® , a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial surface coating consisting of micro-galvanic elements formed by silver and ruthenium, on the transcriptome of Enterococcus faecalis. A clinical E. faecalis isolate was subjected to metal stress by growing it for different periods in presence of the antimicrobial coating or silver-coated steel meshes. Subsequently, total RNA was isolated and next-generation RNA sequencing was performed to analyze variations in gene expression in presence of the antimicrobial materials with focus on known stress genes. Exposure to the antimicrobial coating had a large impact on the transcriptome of E. faecalis. After 24min almost 1/5 of the E. faecalis genome displayed differential expression. At each time-point the cop operon was strongly up-regulated, providing indirect evidence for the presence of free Ag + -ions. Moreover, exposure to the antimicrobial coating induced a broad general stress response in E. faecalis. Genes coding for the chaperones GroEL and GroES and the Clp proteases, ClpE and ClpB, were among the top up-regulated heat shock genes. Differential expression of thioredoxin, superoxide dismutase and glutathione synthetase genes indicates a high level of oxidative stress. We postulate a mechanism of action where the combination of Ag + -ions and reactive oxygen species generated by AGXX ® results in a synergistic antimicrobial effect, superior to that of conventional silver coatings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of Different Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Coatings for Single-Particle Tracking Applications in Biological Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Godin, Antoine Guillaume; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-11-16

    Fluorescence imaging of biological systems down to the single-molecule level has generated many advances in cellular biology. For applications within intact tissue, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are emerging as distinctive single-molecule nanoprobes, due to their near-infrared photoluminescence properties. For this, SWCNT surfaces must be coated using adequate molecular moieties. Yet, the choice of the suspension agent is critical since it influences both the chemical and emission properties of the SWCNTs within their environment. Here, we compare the most commonly used surface coatings for encapsulating photoluminescent SWCNTs in the context of bio-imaging applications. To be applied as single-molecule nanoprobes, encapsulated nanotubes should display low cytotoxicity, and minimal unspecific interactions with cells while still being highly luminescent so as to be imaged and tracked down to the single nanotube level for long periods of time. We tested the cell proliferation and cellular viability of each surface coating and evaluated the impact of the biocompatible surface coatings on nanotube photoluminescence brightness. Our study establishes that phospholipid-polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube is the best current choice for single nanotube tracking experiments in live biological samples.

  17. Nanoporous carbon for electrochemical capacitors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Michael P.; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Limmer, Steven J.; Yelton, William Graham

    2010-05-01

    Nanoporous carbon (NPC) is a purely graphitic material with highly controlled densities ranging from less than 0.1 to 2.0 g/cm3, grown via pulsed-laser deposition. Decreasing the density of NPC increases the interplanar spacing between graphene-sheet fragments. This ability to tune the interplanar spacing makes NPC an ideal model system to study the behavior of carbon electrodes in electrochemical capacitors and batteries. We examine the capacitance of NPC films in alkaline and acidic electrolytes, and measure specific capacitances as high as 242 F/g.

  18. Nanoporous carbon for electrochemical capacitors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Limmer, Steven J.; Yelton, William Graham

    2010-04-01

    Nanoporous carbon (NPC) is a purely graphitic material with highly controlled densities ranging from less than 0.1 to 2.0 g/cm3, grown via pulsed-laser deposition. Decreasing the density of NPC increases the interplanar spacing between graphene-sheet fragments. This ability to tune the interplanar spacing makes NPC an ideal model system to study the behavior of carbon electrodes in electrochemical capacitors and batteries. We examine the capacitance of NPC films in alkaline and acidic electrolytes, and measure specific capacitances as high as 242 F/g.

  19. DNA Translocation in Nanometer Thick Silicon Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Puster, Matthew; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent; Drndić, Marija

    2015-06-23

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that detect changes in ionic conductance (ΔG) when individual molecules pass through them. Producing high signal-to-noise ratio for the measurement of molecular structure in applications such as DNA sequencing requires low noise and large ΔG. The latter is achieved by reducing the nanopore diameter and membrane thickness. While the minimum diameter is limited by the molecule size, the membrane thickness is constrained by material properties. We use molecular dynamics simulations to determine the theoretical thickness limit of amorphous Si membranes to be ∼1 nm, and we designed an electron-irradiation-based thinning method to reach that limit and drill nanopores in the thinned regions. Double-stranded DNA translocations through these nanopores (down to 1.4 nm in thickness and 2.5 nm in diameter) provide the intrinsic ionic conductance detection limit in Si-based nanopores. In this regime, where the access resistance is comparable to the nanopore resistance, we observe the appearance of two conductance levels during molecule translocation. Considering the overall performance of Si-based nanopores, our work highlights their potential as a leading material for sequencing applications.

  20. Thermal conductivity model for nanoporous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Zhao, Xinpeng; Regner, Keith; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous thin films have attracted great interest because of their extremely low thermal conductivity and potential applications in thin thermal insulators and thermoelectrics. Although there are some numerical and experimental studies about the thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films, a simplified model is still needed to provide a straightforward prediction. In this paper, by including the phonon scattering lifetimes due to film thickness boundary scattering, nanopore scattering and the frequency-dependent intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering, a fitting-parameter-free model based on the kinetic theory of phonon transport is developed to predict both the in-plane and the cross-plane thermal conductivities of nanoporous thin films. With input parameters such as the lattice constants, thermal conductivity, and the group velocity of acoustic phonons of bulk silicon, our model shows a good agreement with available experimental and numerical results of nanoporous silicon thin films. It illustrates that the size effect of film thickness boundary scattering not only depends on the film thickness but also on the size of nanopores, and a larger nanopore leads to a stronger size effect of the film thickness. Our model also reveals that there are different optimal structures for getting the lowest in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities.

  1. Nanoporous silica membranes with high hydrothermal stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Magnacca, Giualiana; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Despite the use of sol-gel derived nanoporous silica membranes in substitution of traditional separation processes is expected leading to vast energy savings, their intrinsic poor steam-stability hampers their application at an industrial level. Transition metal ions can be used as dopant...... to improve the stability of nanoporous silica structure. This work is a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions on the microporous structure and stability of amorphous silica-based membranes, which provides information on how to design chemical compositions...... and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile nanoporous structure...

  2. Biological effects of carbon black nanoparticles are changed by surface coating with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Karina; Ströbele, Michael; Schlick, Sandra; Webering, Sina; Jenckel, André; Kopf, Johannes; Danov, Olga; Sewald, Katherina; Buj, Christian; Creutzenberg, Otto; Tillmann, Thomas; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Ernst, Heinrich; Ziemann, Christina; Hüttmann, Gereon; Heine, Holger; Bockhorn, Henning; Hansen, Tanja; König, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2017-03-21

    Carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) are mainly composed of carbon, with a small amount of other elements (including hydrogen and oxygen). The toxicity of CBNP has been attributed to their large surface area, and through adsorbing intrinsically toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is not clear whether a PAH surface coating changes the toxicological properties of CBNP by influencing their physicochemical properties, through the specific toxicity of the surface-bound PAH, or by a combination of both. Printex ® 90 (P90) was used as CBNP; the comparators were P90 coated with either benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) or 9-nitroanthracene (9NA), and soot from acetylene combustion that bears various PAHs on the surface (AS-PAH). Oxidative stress and IL-8/KC mRNA expression were determined in A549 and bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-, Calu-3), mouse intrapulmonary airways and tracheal epithelial cells. Overall toxicity was tested in a rat inhalation study according to Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) criteria. Effects on cytochrome monooxygenase (Cyp) mRNA expression, cell viability and mucociliary clearance were determined in acute exposure models using explanted murine trachea. All particles had similar primary particle size, shape, hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-potential. All PAH-containing particles had a comparable specific surface area that was approximately one third that of P90. AS-PAH contained a mixture of PAH with expected higher toxicity than BaP or 9NA. PAH-coating reduced some effects of P90 such as IL-8 mRNA expression and oxidative stress in A549 cells, granulocyte influx in the in vivo OECD experiment, and agglomeration of P90 and mucus release in the murine trachea ex vivo. Furthermore, P90-BaP decreased particle transport speed compared to P90 at 10 μg/ml. In contrast, PAH-coating induced IL-8 mRNA expression in bronchial epithelial cell lines, and Cyp mRNA expression and apoptosis in tracheal epithelial

  3. Creep of MDF panels under constant load and cyclic environmental conditions. Influence of surface coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Golfín, J. I.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Four different strategies of surface coating (based on 80 g m2 melamin impregnated papers were used on 19 mm thick commercial MDF panels to assess its reological behaviour under cyclic humidity conditions (20ºC 30 % rh-20ºC 90 % rh. Three different levels of stress (20 %, 30 % and 40 %, based on the ultimate load in bending, were used. Tests were conducted by means of the three points load system. For the same stress level, the relative creep of MDF panels was higher than that in particle boards with similar characteristics. This behaviour was just the opposite than the one exhibited by the panels when the comparison is made based on the same level of load (kg Melamin coating seems to strongly influence the creep behaviour of the raw material, especially when surface and edge coating were combined.

    Cuatro tipos de acabados superficiales distintos, aplicados sobre tableros MDF comerciales de 19 mm de espesor, son empleados en el estudio del comportamiento reológico de los tableros MDF ante condiciones alternantes de humedad relativa (20ºC/30 % hr-20ºC/90 % hr. Para el análisis del comportamiento reológico de los tableros se consideran tres niveles de tensión distintos (20 %, 30 %y 40 %, calculados en función de la carga última de rotura a flexión. Los ensayos son efectuados aplicando la carga en punto medio. La fluencia relativa de los tableros MDF resulta ser superior a la exhibida por los tableros de partículas de similares características, observándose que los revestimientos melamínicos aplicados superficialmente influyen eficazmente en la mejora de su comportamiento reológico. Cuando la comparación entre tableros MDF y de partículas se efectúa considerando idénticos niveles de carga aplicada en vez de tensión, el resultado de la comparación resulta ser, justamente, el contrario.

  4. Watching Single Proteins Using Engineered Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movileanu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in the area of single-molecule detection of proteins with nanopores show a great promise in fundamental science, bionanotechnology and proteomics. In this mini-review, I discuss a comprehensive array of examinations of protein detection and characterization using protein and solid-state nanopores. These investigations demonstrate the power of the single-molecule nanopore measurements to reveal a broad range of functional, structural, biochemical and biophysical features of proteins, such as their backbone flexibility, enzymatic activity, binding affinity as well as their concentration, size and folding state. Engineered nanopores in organic materials and in inorganic membranes coupled with surface modification and protein engineering might provide a new generation of sensing devices for molecular biomedical diagnosis. PMID:24370252

  5. Nanoporous Polymers Based on Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugger, Jody; Mulder, Dirk Jan; Sijbesma, Rint; Schenning, Albert

    2018-01-11

    In the present review, we discuss recent advances in the field of nanoporous networks based on polymerisable liquid crystals. The field has matured in the last decade, yielding polymers having 1D, 2D, and 3D channels with pore sizes on the nanometer scale. Next to the current progress, some of the future challenges are presented, with the integration of nanoporous membranes in functional devices considered as the biggest challenge.

  6. Nanoporous Polymers Based on Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Lugger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, we discuss recent advances in the field of nanoporous networks based on polymerisable liquid crystals. The field has matured in the last decade, yielding polymers having 1D, 2D, and 3D channels with pore sizes on the nanometer scale. Next to the current progress, some of the future challenges are presented, with the integration of nanoporous membranes in functional devices considered as the biggest challenge.

  7. Super-Diffusive Gas Recovery from Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Haiyi; He, Yadong; Qiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the recovery of gas from reservoirs featuring pervasive nanopores is essential for effective shale gas extraction. Classical theories cannot accurately predict such gas recovery and many experimental observations are not well understood. Here we report molecular simulations of the recovery of gas from single nanopores, explicitly taking into account molecular gas-wall interactions. We show that, in very narrow pores, the strong gas-wall interactions are essential in determining ...

  8. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  9. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Alexis L; Workman, Rachael E; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring.

  10. Effect of hierarchical pore structure on ALP expression of MC3T3-E1 cells on bioglass films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuixia; Zhuang, Junjun; Dong, Lingqing; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian

    2017-08-01

    Hierarchical porous bioglass films on the tantalum were designed to enhance osteointegration of metallic implants. The films were prepared by a sol-gel method using P123 as the mesopore template and polystyrene microsphere as the nanopore template. The films with 5.4nm mesopores and 100nm nanopores (MBG-100) elicited an obviously elongated morphology of the cultured MC3T3-E1 cells, as a result, a higher alkaline phosphatase level was expressed. It is suggested that the nanopores play an important role in regulating cellular behavior by initial protein adsorption through nanopore curvatures. The mesopores were proven very effective for loading rhBMP-2, and the rhBMP-2 loaded on MBG-100 films showed a better function of enhancing osteogenic differentiation, which is attributed to that the nanopore structure could expedite rhBMP-2 release and provide a microenvironment for intensifying the interaction of rhBMP-2 with the cells. Hence, the cell osteogenic differentiation can be enhanced by hierarchical porous bioglass films through both the porous structure and rhBMP-2 induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Won; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Park, Young-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI) and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  12. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Jong-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  13. The Influence of Nanopore Dimensions on the Electrochemical Properties of Nanopore Arrays Studied by Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the electrochemical properties of nanopores is the key factor for better understanding their performance and applications for nanopore-based sensing devices. In this study, the influence of pore dimensions of nanoporous alumina (NPA membranes prepared by an anodization process and their electrochemical properties as a sensing platform using impedance spectroscopy was explored. NPA with four different pore diameters (25 nm, 45 nm and 65 nm and lengths (5 μm to 20 μm was used and their electrochemical properties were explored using different concentration of electrolyte solution (NaCl ranging from 1 to 100 μM. Our results show that the impedance and resistance of nanopores are influenced by the concentration and ion species of electrolytes, while the capacitance is independent of them. It was found that nanopore diameters also have a significant influence on impedance due to changes in the thickness of the double layer inside the pores.

  14. Optimization of photoelectrochemical water splitting performance on hierarchical TiO 2 nanotube arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2012-02-10

    In this paper, we show that by varying the voltages during two-step anodization the morphology of the hierarchical top-layer/bottom-tube TiO 2 (TiO 2 NTs) can be finely tuned between nanoring/nanotube, nanopore/nanotube, and nanohole-nanocave/nanotube morphologies. This allows us to optimize the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting performance on the hierarchical TiO 2 NTs. The optimized photocurrent density and photoconversion efficiency in this study, occurring on the nanopore/nanotube TiO 2 NTs, were 1.59 mA cm -2 at 1.23 V vs. RHE and 0.84% respectively, which are the highest values ever reported on pristine TiO 2 materials under illumination of AM 1.5G. Our findings contribute to further improvement of the energy conversion efficiency of TiO 2-based devices.

  15. Ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Li-Hsien; Zhang, Mingkan; Qian, Shizhi

    2013-08-06

    Fundamental understanding of ion transport phenomena in nanopores is crucial for designing the next-generation nanofluidic devices. Due to surface reactions of dissociable functional groups on the nanopore wall, the surface charge density highly depends upon the proton concentration on the nanopore wall, which in turn affects the electrokinetic transport of ions, fluid, and particles within the nanopore. Electrokinetic ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore, taking into account both multiple ionic species and charge regulation on the nanopore wall, is theoretically investigated for the first time. The model is verified by the experimental data of nanopore conductance available in the literature. The results demonstrate that the spatial distribution of the surface charge density at the nanopore wall and the resulting ion transport phenomena, such as ion concentration polarization (ICP), ion selectivity, and conductance, are significantly affected by the background solution properties, such as the pH and salt concentration.

  16. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  17. Mechanical properties of sorbents depending on nanopore sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the nanopore size on the mechanical properties of a porous carbon material with the density of 1.4 g/cm3 is discussed. The atomistic models of porous carbon materials depending on the nanopore size are constructed. The numerical experiments are implemented with using the molecular mechanical method based on the Brenner potential. The Young's moduli are evaluated for porous carbon structures at certain nanopore dimensions and are found to decrease with the enlarging nanopores.

  18. Electrically facilitated translocation of protein through solid nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lingzhi; Liu, Hang; Zhao, Wenyuan; Wang, Lei; Hou, Chuanrong; Liu, Quanjun; Lu, Zuhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanopores have been proven as versatile single-molecule sensors for individual unlabeled biopolymer detection and characterization. In the present work, a relative large nanopore with a diameter of about 60 nm has been used to detect protein translocation driven by a series of applied voltages. Compared with previous studied small nanopores, a distinct profile of protein translocation through a larger nanopore has been characterized. First, a higher threshold voltage is required to drive prot...

  19. A nanopore-nanofiber mesh biosensor to control DNA translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Squires, Allison; Hersey, Joseph S.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Meller, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores show promise as single-molecule sensors for biomedical applications, but to increase their resolution and efficiency analyte molecules must remain longer in the nanopore sensing volume. Here we demonstrate a novel, facile, and customizable nanopore sensor modification that reduces double stranded DNA translocation velocity by two orders of magnitude or more via interactions outside the nanopore. This is achieved by electrospinning a copolymer nanofiber mesh (NFM) directl...

  20. TiO2 nanowire-templated hierarchical nanowire network as water-repelling coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Xiao, Shuai; Yang, Chengduan; Chen, Meiwan; Tao, Jun; Shieh, Han-ping; Yang, Bo-ru; Liu, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Extraordinary water-repelling properties of superhydrophobic surfaces make them novel candidates for a great variety of potential applications. A general approach to achieve superhydrophobicity requires low-energy coating on the surface and roughness on nano- and micrometre scale. However, typical construction of superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-nano structure through top-down fabrication is restricted by sophisticated fabrication techniques and limited choices of substrate materials. Micro-nanoscale topographies templated by conventional microparticles through surface coating may produce large variations in roughness and uncontrollable defects, resulting in poorly controlled surface morphology and wettability. In this work, micro-nanoscale hierarchical nanowire network was fabricated to construct self-cleaning coating using one-dimensional TiO2 nanowires as microscale templates. Hierarchical structure with homogeneous morphology was achieved by branching ZnO nanowires on the TiO2 nanowire backbones through hydrothermal reaction. The hierarchical nanowire network displayed homogeneous micro/nano-topography, in contrast to hierarchical structure templated by traditional microparticles. This hierarchical nanowire network film exhibited high repellency to both water and cell culture medium after functionalization with fluorinated organic molecules. The hierarchical structure templated by TiO2 nanowire coating significantly increased the surface superhydrophobicity compared to vertical ZnO nanowires with nanotopography alone. Our results demonstrated a promising strategy of using nanowires as microscale templates for the rational design of hierarchical coatings with desired superhydrophobicity that can also be applied to various substrate materials. PMID:29308265

  1. TiO2 nanowire-templated hierarchical nanowire network as water-repelling coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Xiao, Shuai; Yang, Chengduan; Chen, Meiwan; Tao, Jun; Shieh, Han-ping; Yang, Bo-ru; Liu, Chuan; Xie, Xi

    2017-12-01

    Extraordinary water-repelling properties of superhydrophobic surfaces make them novel candidates for a great variety of potential applications. A general approach to achieve superhydrophobicity requires low-energy coating on the surface and roughness on nano- and micrometre scale. However, typical construction of superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-nano structure through top-down fabrication is restricted by sophisticated fabrication techniques and limited choices of substrate materials. Micro-nanoscale topographies templated by conventional microparticles through surface coating may produce large variations in roughness and uncontrollable defects, resulting in poorly controlled surface morphology and wettability. In this work, micro-nanoscale hierarchical nanowire network was fabricated to construct self-cleaning coating using one-dimensional TiO2 nanowires as microscale templates. Hierarchical structure with homogeneous morphology was achieved by branching ZnO nanowires on the TiO2 nanowire backbones through hydrothermal reaction. The hierarchical nanowire network displayed homogeneous micro/nano-topography, in contrast to hierarchical structure templated by traditional microparticles. This hierarchical nanowire network film exhibited high repellency to both water and cell culture medium after functionalization with fluorinated organic molecules. The hierarchical structure templated by TiO2 nanowire coating significantly increased the surface superhydrophobicity compared to vertical ZnO nanowires with nanotopography alone. Our results demonstrated a promising strategy of using nanowires as microscale templates for the rational design of hierarchical coatings with desired superhydrophobicity that can also be applied to various substrate materials.

  2. A review on the importance of surface coating of micro/nano-mold in micro/nano-molding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Biswajit; Lee, Junghoon; Toh, Wei Quan; Liu, Erjia; Tor, Shu Beng; Hardt, David E

    2016-01-01

    Micro/nano hot-embossing and injection molding are two promising manufacturing processes for the mass production of workpieces bearing micro/nanoscale features. However, both the workpiece and micro/nano-mold are susceptive to structural damage due to high thermal stress, adhesion and friction, which occur at the interface between the workpiece and the mold during these processes. Hence, major constraints of micro/nano-molds are mainly attributed to improper replication and their inability to withstand a prolonged sliding surface contact because of high sidewall friction and/or high adhesion. Consequently, there is a need for proper surface coating as it can improve the surface properties of micro/nano-molds such as having a low friction coefficient, low adhesion and low wear rate. This review deals with the physical, mechanical and tribological properties of various surface coatings and their impact on the replication efficiency and lifetime of micro/nano-molds that are used in micro/nano hot-embossing and injection molding processes. (topical review)

  3. Sealing-free fast-response paraffin/nanoporous gold hybrid actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xing-Long; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Paraffin-based actuators can deliver large actuation strokes and high actuation stress, but often suffer from a low response rate and leaking problems. Here, we report a new paraffin/metal hybrid actuator, which was fabricated by infiltrating nanoporous gold with paraffin. It exhibits a fast actuation rate owing to the high thermal conductivity of the inter-connected metal phase, and requires no external sealing because liquid paraffin can be well confined in nanoscale channels, due to the large capillarity. We found that in this hybrid actuator, the stress generated by actuation is negligibly small when the characteristic size of the nanoporous gold (L) is above ˜70 nm, and increases dramatically with a decreasing size when L paraffin wax—the paraffin in smaller pores can sustain larger tensile stress, and thus the contraction of paraffin during cooling can be translated into larger compression stress and strain energy in a metal framework, leading to a larger actuation stress and energy. We also demonstrate that complex actuation motions can be achieved by incorporating hierarchical-structured nanoporous metal with paraffin.

  4. SDS-assisted protein transport through solid-state nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restrepo Perez, L.; John, Shalini; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Joo, C.; Dekker, C.

    2017-01-01

    Using nanopores for single-molecule sequencing of proteins – similar to nanopore-based sequencing of DNA – faces multiple challenges, including unfolding of the complex tertiary structure of the proteins and enforcing their unidirectional translocation through nanopores. Here, we combine molecular

  5. Plasmonic properties of gold-coated nanoporous anodic alumina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here a simple technique to align the nanopores in a linear fashion along lines by using an aluminium surface with linear scratch marks made on it prior to the anodization process. The nanopores tend to preferentially form along the scratch marks resulting in a linear organization of the nanopores to form an ...

  6. Nanoporous Mo2C functionalized 3D carbon architecture anode for boosting flavins mediated interfacial bioelectrocatalysis in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Long; Lu, Zhisong; Huang, Yunhong; Long, Zhong-er; Qiao, Yan

    2017-08-01

    An efficient microbial electrocatalysis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) needs both high loading of microbes (biocatalysts) and robust interfacial electron transfer from microbes to electrode. Herein a nanoporous molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) functionalized carbon felt electrode with rich 3D hierarchical porous architecture is applied as MFC anode to achieve superior electrocatalytic performance. The nanoporous Mo2C functionalized anode exhibits strikingly improved microbial electrocatalysis in MFCs with 5-fold higher power density and long-term stability of electricity production. The great enhancement is attributed to the introduction of rough Mo2C nanostructural interface into macroporous carbon architecture for promoting microbial growth with great excretion of endogenous electron shuttles (flavins) and rich available nanopores for enlarging electrochemically active surface area. Importantly, the nanoporous Mo2C functionalized anode is revealed for the first time to have unique electrocatalytic activity towards redox reaction of flavins with more negative redox potential, indicating a more favourable thermodynamic driving force for anodic electron transfer. This work not only provides a promising electrode for high performance MFCs but also brings up a new insight into the effect of nanostructured materials on interfacial bioelectrocatalysis.

  7. Self-supported metallic nanopore arrays with highly oriented nanoporous structures as ideally nanostructured electrodes for supercapacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaping; Wang, Chengliang; Vellacheri, Ranjith; Zhou, Min; Xu, Yang; Fu, Qun; Wu, Minghong; Grote, Fabian; Lei, Yong

    2014-12-03

    Self-supported metallic nanopore arrays with highly oriented nanoporous structures are fabricated and applied as ideally nanostructured electrodes for supercapacitor applications. Their large specific surface area can ensure a high capacitance, and their highly oriented and stable nanoporous structure can facilitate ion transport. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Ultrafast ion sieving using nanoporous polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Mao; Liu, Feng; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Xue; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Jie; Apel, Pavel; Kluth, Patrick; Trautmann, Christina; Wang, Yugang

    2018-02-08

    The great potential of nanoporous membranes for water filtration and chemical separation has been challenged by the trade-off between selectivity and permeability. Here we report on nanoporous polymer membranes with an excellent balance between selectivity and permeability of ions. Our membranes are fabricated by irradiating 2-μm-thick polyethylene terephthalate Lumirror® films with GeV heavy ions followed by ultraviolet exposure. These membranes show a high transport rate of K + ions of up to 14 mol h -1  m -2 and a selectivity of alkali metal ions over heavy metal ions of >500. Combining transport experiments and molecular dynamics simulations with a polymeric nanopore model, we demonstrate that the high permeability is attributable to the presence of nanopores with a radius of ~0.5 nm and a density of up to 5 × 10 10  cm -2 , and the selectivity is ascribed to the interaction between the partially dehydrated ions and the negatively charged nanopore wall.

  9. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  10. Inequality contrained hierarchical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    In multilevel research, the data structure in the population is hierarchical, and the sample data are viewed as a multistage sample from this hierarchical population. For instance in educational research, the population consists of schools and pupils within these schools. In this scenario, pupils

  11. Hierarchical quantum communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Pathak, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    A general approach to study the hierarchical quantum information splitting (HQIS) is proposed and the same is used to systematically investigate the possibility of realizing HQIS using different classes of 4-qubit entangled states that are not connected by stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). Explicit examples of HQIS using 4-qubit cluster state and 4-qubit |Ω〉 state are provided. Further, the proposed HQIS scheme is generalized to introduce two new aspects of hierarchical quantum communication. To be precise, schemes of probabilistic hierarchical quantum information splitting and hierarchical quantum secret sharing are obtained by modifying the proposed HQIS scheme. A number of practical situations where hierarchical quantum communication would be of use, are also presented.

  12. Dynamic crack propagation through nanoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Wilkerson, Justin

    2015-06-01

    The deformation and failure of nanoporous metals may be considerably different than that of more traditional bulk porous metals. The length scales in traditional bulk porous metals are typically large enough for classic plasticity and buckling to be operative. However, the extremely small length scales associated with nanoporous metals may inhibit classic plasticity mechanisms. Here, we motivate an alternative nanovoid growth mechanism mediated by dislocation emission. Following an approach similar to Lubarda and co-workers, we make use of stability arguments applied to the analytic solutions of the elastic interactions of dislocations and voids to derive a simple stress-based criterion for emission activation. We then propose a dynamic nanovoid growth law that is motivated by the kinetics of dislocation emission. The resulting failure model is implemented into a commercial finite element software to simulate dynamic crack growth. The simulations reveal that crack propagation through a nanoporous media proceeds at somewhat faster velocities than through the more traditional bulk porous metal.

  13. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPOROUS CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nigu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical double layer and electrochemical characteristics at the nanoporous carbon | (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface have been studied by the cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy methods. The value of zero charge potential (0.23 V vs. SCE in H2O, the region of ideal polarizability and other characteristics have been established. Analysis of complex plane plots shows that the nanoporous carbon | x M (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface can be simulated by the equivalent circuit, in which the two parallel conduction parts in the solid and liquid phases are interconnected by the double layer capacitance in parallel with the complex admittance of hindered reaction of the charge transfer process. The values of the characteristic frequency depend on the electrolyte concentration and on the electrode potential, i.e. on the nature of ions adsorbed at the surface of nanoporous carbon electrode.

  14. Hierarchical Estimation as Basis for Hierarchical Forecasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbosch, L.W.G.; Heuts, R.M.J.; Moors, J.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In inventory management, hierarchical forecasting (HF) is a hot issue : families of items are formed for which total demand is forecasted; total forecast then is broken up to produce forecasts for the individual items.Since HF is a complicated procedure, analytical results are hard to obtain;

  15. Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-12

    Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Polyelectrolyte Threading through a Nanopore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Yi Hsiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Threading charged polymers through a nanopore, driven by electric fields E, is investigated by means of Langevin dynamics simulations. The mean translocation time 〈 τ 〉 is shown to follow a scaling law Nα, and the exponent α increases monotonically from 1.16 (4 to 1.40 (3 with E. The result is double-checked by the calculation of mean square displacement of translocation coordinate, which asserts a scaling behavior tβ (for t near τ with β complying with the relation αβ = 2. At a fixed chain length N, 〈τ〉 displayed a reciprocal scaling behavior E−1 in the weak and also in the strong fields, connected by a transition E−1.64(5 in the intermediate fields. The variations of the radius of gyration of chain and the positions of chain end are monitored during a translocation process; far-from-equilibrium behaviors are observed when the driving field is strong. A strong field can strip off the condensed ions on the chain when it passes the pore. The total charges of condensed ions are hence decreased. The studies for the probability and density distributions reveal that the monomers in the trans-region are gathered near the wall and form a pancake-like density profile with a hump cloud over it in the strong fields, due to fast translocation.

  17. SDS-assisted protein transport through solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Pérez, Laura; John, Shalini; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Joo, Chirlmin; Dekker, Cees

    2017-08-17

    Using nanopores for single-molecule sequencing of proteins - similar to nanopore-based sequencing of DNA - faces multiple challenges, including unfolding of the complex tertiary structure of the proteins and enforcing their unidirectional translocation through nanopores. Here, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single-molecule experiments to investigate the utility of SDS (Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate) to unfold proteins for solid-state nanopore translocation, while simultaneously endowing them with a stronger electrical charge. Our simulations and experiments prove that SDS-treated proteins show a considerable loss of the protein structure during the nanopore translocation. Moreover, SDS-treated proteins translocate through the nanopore in the direction prescribed by the electrophoretic force due to the negative charge impaired by SDS. In summary, our results suggest that SDS causes protein unfolding while facilitating protein translocation in the direction of the electrophoretic force; both characteristics being advantageous for future protein sequencing applications using solid-state nanopores.

  18. DNA translocations through solid-state plasmonic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Francesca; Verschueren, Daniel; Klein, Misha; Dekker, Cees; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2014-12-10

    Nanopores enable label-free detection and analysis of single biomolecules. Here, we investigate DNA translocations through a novel type of plasmonic nanopore based on a gold bowtie nanoantenna with a solid-state nanopore at the plasmonic hot spot. Plasmonic excitation of the nanopore is found to influence both the sensor signal (nanopore ionic conductance blockade during DNA translocation) and the process that captures DNA into the nanopore, without affecting the duration time of the translocations. Most striking is a strong plasmon-induced enhancement of the rate of DNA translocation events in lithium chloride (LiCl, already 10-fold enhancement at a few mW of laser power). This provides a means to utilize the excellent spatiotemporal resolution of DNA interrogations with nanopores in LiCl buffers, which is known to suffer from low event rates. We propose a mechanism based on plasmon-induced local heating and thermophoresis as explanation of our observations.

  19. Nanoporous Gold: Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Reed

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous gold (np-Au has intriguing material properties that offer potential benefits for many applications due to its high specific surface area, well-characterized thiol-gold surface chemistry, high electrical conductivity, and reduced stiffness. The research on np-Au has taken place on various fronts, including advanced microfabrication and characterization techniques to probe unusual nanoscale properties and applications spanning from fuel cells to electrochemical sensors. Here, we provide a review of the recent advances in np-Au research, with special emphasis on microfabrication and characterization techniques. We conclude the paper with a brief outline of challenges to overcome in the study of nanoporous metals.

  20. Fabrication method of low f-number microlens arrays by using surface coating and epoxy dispensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Pei, Jing; Pan, Long-fa; Zappe, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We describe a fabrication method for arrays of microlenses of low f-number by using a surface coating and dispensing technology. We demonstrate how to achieve a low f-number by selectively changing the surface wettability, as well as how to precisely control the f-number through control of the dispensing time. This advance enables the fabrication of arrays of microlenses with diameters varying from 400 to 1400 μm, f-number as low as 0.95. In addition, the optical performance tests indicate that this method is suitable for high performance microlens array fabrication. This dispensing technology may be low cost and allow fast fabrication of high-speed microlens arrays, and may thus be particularly useful for biologically inspired advanced optical systems.

  1. The immobilization of a direct thrombin inhibitor to a polyurethane as a nonthrombogenic surface coating for extracorporeal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jane; Brisbois, Elizabeth; Handa, Hitesh; Annich, Gail; Meyerhoff, Mark; Bartlett, Robert; Major, Terry

    2016-01-01

    A biomaterial with both antithrombin and antiplatelet properties is the ideal surface for use in extracorporeal circulation (ECC) as it targets both fibrin generation and platelet adhesion. A hemocompatible surface coating avoids the need for systemic anticoagulation by providing a local anticoagulant effect at the polymer-blood interface. Previous work has demonstrated the potential use of argatroban, a direct thrombin inhibitor, as a nonthrombogenic material for extracorporeal devices. The work reported here focuses on the characterization of argatroban linked to a polyurethane-silicone polymer, CarboSil®. Chemical immobilization, the amount of argatroban, incubation times, and saturation point were evaluated to achieve maximal antithrombin activity at the polymer surface. Cross-linked polymer coatings reacted with 10 and 30 µmole of argatroban were prepared and tested. These coatings resulted in argatroban activity levels of 0.131 µM and 0.446 µM, respectively. After refining the cross-linking process, argatroban activity increased by approximately 3.6 fold. Maintenance of activity and leaching from the polymer surface were also evaluated. Using the refined process for linking argatroban to polymer, the resulting polymer was applied as a surface coating to the inner lumen of poly(vinyl chloride) ECC circuit tubing and its antithrombin effect evaluated using a 4 h rabbit ECC model. Following 4 h of blood exposure, the argatroban circuit demonstrated significantly less thrombus formation compared to the control CarboSil® coating with a 4.1 cm2 thrombus average area for the control coating compared to 1.2 cm2 for the argatroban coating (n=4). There was no significant change in thrombin time from baseline in plasma from animals in which the argatroban coated circuit was used, with a thrombin time of 16.2 s at t=0 and 14.5 s after 4 h. These results demonstrate the potential efficacy of immobilized argatroban as a hemocompatible biomaterial for extracorporeal

  2. Impact of surface coating and environmental conditions on the fate and transport of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Laura-Jayne A; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lead, Jamie R; Baalousha, Mohammed

    2016-10-15

    The role of surface coating (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate) and water chemistry on the fate and behavior of AgNPs in aquatic microcosms is reported in this study. The migration and transformation of the AgNPs was examined in low (ultrapure water-UPW) and high ionic strength (moderately hard water - MHW) preparations, and in the presence of modeled natural organic matter (NOM) of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). The migration and fate of the AgNPs in the microcosms was validated using a sedimentation-diffusion model and the aggregation behavior was monitored by UV-visible spectrometry (UV-vis). Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (% Ag) were analyzed by ultrafiltration methods. Imaging of the AgNPs was captured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) remained stable for 28days with similarly distributed concentrations of the PVP-AgNPs throughout the columns in each of the water conditions after approximately 96h (4days). The sedimentation-diffusion model confirmed PVP-AgNP stability in each condition, by showing diffusion dominated transport by using the original unaltered AgNP sizes to fit the parameters. In comparison, citrate AgNPs were largely unstable in the more complex water preparations (MHW). In MHW, aggregation dominated behavior followed by sedimentation/dissolution controlled transport was observed. The addition of SRFA to MHW resulted in small stabilizing effects, to the citrate coated AgNPs, producing smaller sized AgNPs (TEM) and mixed sedimentation and diffusion migration compared the studies absent of SRFA. The results suggest that surface coating and solution chemistry has a major impact on AgNP stability, furthermore the corresponding modeling will support the experimental understanding of the overall fate of AgNPs in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rutile TiO₂ particles exert size and surface coating dependent retention and lesions on the murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Bai, Ru; Li, Bai; Ge, Cuicui; Du, Jiangfeng; Liu, Ying; Le Guyader, Laurent; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Yanchuan; He, Shida; Ma, Yongmei; Chen, Chunying

    2011-11-10

    The rising commercial use and large-scale production of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) may lead to unintended exposure to humans. The central nervous system (CNS) is a potential susceptible target of the inhaled NPs, but so far the amount of studies on this aspect is limited. Here, we focus on the potential neurological lesion in the brain induced by the intranasally instilled titanium dioxide (TiO₂) particles in rutile phase and of various sizes and surface coatings. Female mice were intranasally instilled with four different types of TiO₂ particles (i.e. two types of hydrophobic particles in micro- and nano-sized without coating and two types of water-soluble hydrophilic nano-sized particles with silica surface coating) every other day for 30 days. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to determine the titanium contents in the sub-brain regions. Then, the pathological examination of brain tissues and measurements of the monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the sub-brain regions were performed. We found significant up-regulation of Ti contents in the cerebral cortex and striatum after intranasal instillation of hydrophilic TiO₂ NPs. Moreover, TiO₂ NPs exposure, in particular the hydrophilic NPs, caused obvious morphological changes of neurons in the cerebral cortex and significant disturbance of the monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the sub-brain regions studied. Thus, our results indicate that the surface modification of the NPs plays an important role on their effects on the brain. In addition, the difference in neurotoxicity of the two types of hydrophilic NPs may be induced by the shape differences of the materials. The present results suggest that physicochemical properties like size, shape and surface modification of the nanomaterials should be considered when evaluating their neurological effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device. Keywords: Electron beam irradiation, Surface diffusion, Carbon contamination, Au cluster, Ostwald ripening

  5. Conductance-based profiling of nanopores: Accommodating fabrication irregularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Y M N D Y; Nichols, Jonathan W; Iroshika Karawdeniya, Buddini; Dwyer, Jason R

    2018-02-01

    Solid-state nanopores are nanoscale channels through otherwise impermeable membranes. Single molecules or particles can be passed through electrolyte-filled nanopores by, e.g. electrophoresis, and then detected through the resulting physical displacement of ions within the nanopore. Nanopore size, shape, and surface chemistry must be carefully controlled, and on extremely challenging nanopores from the time-dependent changes in their conductance as they are being formed through solution-phase nanofabrication processes with the appeal of ease and accessibility. We revisited this simulation work, confirmed the suitability of the basic conductance equation using the results of time-dependent experimental conductance measurements during nanopore fabrication by Yanagi et al., and then deliberately relaxed the model constraints to allow for (i) the presence of defects; and (ii) the formation of two small pores instead of one larger one. Our simulations demonstrated that the time-dependent conductance formalism supports the detection and characterization of defects, as well as the determination of pore number, but with implementation performance depending on the measurement context and results. In some cases, the ability to discriminate numerically between the correct and incorrect nanopore profiles was slight, but with accompanying differences in candidate nanopore dimensions that could yield to post-fabrication conductance profiling, or be used as convenient uncertainty bounds. Time-dependent nanopore conductance thus offers insight into nanopore structure and function, even in the presence of fabrication defects. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Gassmann Theory Applies to Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Gurevich, Boris

    2018-01-01

    Recent progress in extraction of unconventional hydrocarbon resources has ignited the interest in the studies of nanoporous media. Since many thermodynamic and mechanical properties of nanoscale solids and fluids differ from the analogous bulk materials, it is not obvious whether wave propagation in nanoporous media can be described using the same framework as in macroporous media. Here we test the validity of Gassmann equation using two published sets of ultrasonic measurements for a model nanoporous medium, Vycor glass, saturated with two different fluids, argon, and n-hexane. Predictions of the Gassmann theory depend on the bulk and shear moduli of the dry samples, which are known from ultrasonic measurements and the bulk moduli of the solid and fluid constituents. The solid bulk modulus can be estimated from adsorption-induced deformation or from elastic effective medium theory. The fluid modulus can be calculated according to the Tait-Murnaghan equation at the solvation pressure in the pore. Substitution of these parameters into the Gassmann equation provides predictions consistent with measured data. Our findings set up a theoretical framework for investigation of fluid-saturated nanoporous media using ultrasonic elastic wave propagation.

  7. 1/f noise in graphene nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerema, S J; Schneider, G F; Rozemuller, M; Vicarelli, L; Zandbergen, H W; Dekker, C

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanopores are receiving great attention due to their atomically thin membranes and intrinsic electrical properties that appear greatly beneficial for biosensing and DNA sequencing. Here, we present an extensive study of the low-frequency 1/f noise in the ionic current through graphene nanopores and compare it to noise levels in silicon nitride pore currents. We find that the 1/f noise magnitude is very high for graphene nanopores: typically two orders of magnitude higher than for silicon nitride pores. This is a drawback as it significantly lowers the signal-to-noise ratio in DNA translocation experiments. We evaluate possible explanations for these exceptionally high noise levels in graphene pores. From examining the noise for pores of different diameters and at various salt concentrations, we find that in contrast to silicon nitride pores, the 1/f noise in graphene pores does not follow Hooge’s relation. In addition, from studying the dependence on the buffer pH, we show that the increased noise cannot be explained by charge fluctuations of chemical groups on the pore rim. Finally, we compare single and bilayer graphene to few-layer and multi-layer graphene and boron nitride (h-BN), and we find that the noise reduces with layer thickness for both materials, which suggests that mechanical fluctuations may be the underlying cause of the high 1/f noise levels in monolayer graphene nanopore devices. (paper)

  8. SANS investigation of nanoporous alumina membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryukhtin, Vasyl; Šaroun, Jan; Turkevych, I.

    -, č. 6 (2007), s. 35-36 ISSN 0344-9629 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/06/P198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : nanopor * alumina membrane * netron scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  9. Nanopores: A journey towards DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanunu, Meni

    2013-01-01

    Much more than ever, nucleic acids are recognized as key building blocks in many of life's processes, and the science of studying these molecular wonders at the single-molecule level is thriving. A new method of doing so has been introduced in the mid 1990's. This method is exceedingly simple: a nanoscale pore that spans across an impermeable thin membrane is placed between two chambers that contain an electrolyte, and voltage is applied across the membrane using two electrodes. These conditions lead to a steady stream of ion flow across the pore. Nucleic acid molecules in solution can be driven through the pore, and structural features of the biomolecules are observed as measurable changes in the trans-membrane ion current. In essence, a nanopore is a high-throughput ion microscope and a single-molecule force apparatus. Nanopores are taking center stage as a tool that promises to read a DNA sequence, and this promise has resulted in overwhelming academic, industrial, and national interest. Regardless of the fate of future nanopore applications, in the process of this 16-year-long exploration, many studies have validated the indispensability of nanopores in the toolkit of single-molecule biophysics. This review surveys past and current studies related to nucleic acid biophysics, and will hopefully provoke a discussion of immediate and future prospects for the field. PMID:22658507

  10. Micromechanics of hierarchical materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A short overview of micromechanical models of hierarchical materials (hybrid composites, biomaterials, fractal materials, etc.) is given. Several examples of the modeling of strength and damage in hierarchical materials are summarized, among them, 3D FE model of hybrid composites...... with nanoengineered matrix, fiber bundle model of UD composites with hierarchically clustered fibers and 3D multilevel model of wood considered as a gradient, cellular material with layered composite cell walls. The main areas of research in micromechanics of hierarchical materials are identified, among them......, the investigations of the effects of load redistribution between reinforcing elements at different scale levels, of the possibilities to control different material properties and to ensure synergy of strengthening effects at different scale levels and using the nanoreinforcement effects. The main future directions...

  11. Introduction into Hierarchical Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Hierarchical matrices allow us to reduce computational storage and cost from cubic to almost linear. This technique can be applied for solving PDEs, integral equations, matrix equations and approximation of large covariance and precision matrices.

  12. Hierarchical Network Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Communication networks are immensely important today, since both companies and individuals use numerous services that rely on them. This thesis considers the design of hierarchical (communication) networks. Hierarchical networks consist of layers of networks and are well-suited for coping...... with changing and increasing demands. Two-layer networks consist of one backbone network, which interconnects cluster networks. The clusters consist of nodes and links, which connect the nodes. One node in each cluster is a hub node, and the backbone interconnects the hub nodes of each cluster and thus...... the clusters. The design of hierarchical networks involves clustering of nodes, hub selection, and network design, i.e. selection of links and routing of ows. Hierarchical networks have been in use for decades, but integrated design of these networks has only been considered for very special types of networks...

  13. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  14. Hierarchical Communication Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Marcin Szpyrka; Piotr Matyasik; Jerzy Biernacki; Agnieszka Biernacka; Michał Wypych; Leszek Kotulski

    2016-01-01

    Formal modelling languages range from strictly textual ones like process algebra scripts to visual modelling languages based on hierarchical graphs like coloured Petri nets. Approaches equipped with visual modelling capabilities make developing process easier and help users to cope with more complex systems. Alvis is a modelling language that combines possibilities of formal models verification with flexibility and simplicity of practical programming languages. The paper deals with hierarchic...

  15. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  16. Recent Advances in Nanoporous Membranes for Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuqing Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous materials exhibit wide applications in the fields of electrocatalysis, nanodevice fabrication, energy, and environmental science, as well as analytical science. In this review, we present a summary of recent studies on nanoporous membranes for water purification application. The types and fabrication strategies of various nanoporous membranes are first introduced, and then the fabricated nanoporous membranes for removing various water pollutants, such as salt, metallic ions, anions, nanoparticles, organic chemicals, and biological substrates, are demonstrated and discussed. This work will be valuable for readers to understand the design and fabrication of various nanoporous membranes, and their potential purification mechanisms towards different water pollutants. In addition, it will be helpful for developing new nanoporous materials for quick, economic, and high-performance water purification.

  17. Optofluidic devices with integrated solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Aaron R.; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    This review (with 90 refs.) covers the state of the art in optofluidic devices with integrated solid-state nanopores for use in detection and sensing. Following an introduction into principles of optofluidics and solid-state nanopore technology, we discuss features of solid-state nanopore based assays using optofluidics. This includes the incorporation of solid-state nanopores into optofluidic platforms based on liquid-core anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguides (ARROWs), methods for their fabrication, aspects of single particle detection and particle manipulation. We then describe the new functionalities provided by solid-state nanopores integrated into optofluidic chips, in particular acting as smart gates for correlated electro-optical detection and discrimination of nanoparticles. This enables the identification of viruses and λ-DNA, particle trajectory simulations, enhancing sensitivity by tuning the shape of nanopores. The review concludes with a summary and an outlook. PMID:27046940

  18. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinyaev, Yurii V., E-mail: grn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Chertova, Nadezhda V., E-mail: chertova@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergei G., E-mail: sp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  19. Electrical pulse fabrication of graphene nanopores in electrolyte solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Szalay, Tamas [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Lu, Bo [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Xie, Ping [Oxford Nanopore Technologies, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Golovchenko, Jene A., E-mail: golovchenko@physics.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Nanopores in graphene membranes can potentially offer unprecedented spatial resolution for single molecule sensing, but their fabrication has thus far been difficult, poorly scalable, and prone to contamination. We demonstrate an in-situ fabrication method that nucleates and controllably enlarges nanopores in electrolyte solution by applying ultra-short, high-voltage pulses across the graphene membrane. This method can be used to rapidly produce graphene nanopores with subnanometer size accuracy in an apparatus free of nanoscale beams or tips.

  20. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchenko, Jene A; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H

    2015-03-03

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  1. Studies of RNA Sequence and Structure Using Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Robert Y.; Carson, Spencer; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    Nanopores are powerful single-molecule sensors with nanometer scale dimensions suitable for detection, quantification, and characterization of nucleic acids and proteins. Beyond sequencing applications, both biological and solid-state nanopores hold great promise as tools for studying the biophysical properties of RNA. In this review, we highlight selected landmark nanopore studies with regards to RNA sequencing, microRNA detection, RNA/ligand interactions, and RNA structural/conformational analysis. PMID:26970191

  2. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchenko, Jene A.; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H.

    2013-03-12

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  3. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchenko, Jene A.; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H.

    2010-12-07

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  4. Impact of surface coating and environmental conditions on the fate and transport of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Laura-Jayne A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lead, Jamie R., E-mail: Jlead@mailbox.sc.edu [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk (CENR), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208 (United States); Baalousha, Mohammed, E-mail: Mbaalous@mailbox.sc.edu [Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk (CENR), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The role of surface coating (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate) and water chemistry on the fate and behavior of AgNPs in aquatic microcosms is reported in this study. The migration and transformation of the AgNPs was examined in low (ultrapure water-UPW) and high ionic strength (moderately hard water – MHW) preparations, and in the presence of modeled natural organic matter (NOM) of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). The migration and fate of the AgNPs in the microcosms was validated using a sedimentation-diffusion model and the aggregation behavior was monitored by UV–visible spectrometry (UV–vis). Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (% Ag) were analyzed by ultrafiltration methods. Imaging of the AgNPs was captured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) remained stable for 28 days with similarly distributed concentrations of the PVP-AgNPs throughout the columns in each of the water conditions after approximately 96 h (4 days). The sedimentation-diffusion model confirmed PVP-AgNP stability in each condition, by showing diffusion dominated transport by using the original unaltered AgNP sizes to fit the parameters. In comparison, citrate AgNPs were largely unstable in the more complex water preparations (MHW). In MHW, aggregation dominated behavior followed by sedimentation/dissolution controlled transport was observed. The addition of SRFA to MHW resulted in small stabilizing effects, to the citrate coated AgNPs, producing smaller sized AgNPs (TEM) and mixed sedimentation and diffusion migration compared the studies absent of SRFA. The results suggest that surface coating and solution chemistry has a major impact on AgNP stability, furthermore the corresponding modeling will support the experimental understanding of the overall fate of AgNPs in the environment. - Highlights: • Aquatic microcosms were used to study the transport and behavior of AgNPs • Experiments were conducted in low

  5. Impact of surface coating and environmental conditions on the fate and transport of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Laura-Jayne A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lead, Jamie R.; Baalousha, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The role of surface coating (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate) and water chemistry on the fate and behavior of AgNPs in aquatic microcosms is reported in this study. The migration and transformation of the AgNPs was examined in low (ultrapure water-UPW) and high ionic strength (moderately hard water – MHW) preparations, and in the presence of modeled natural organic matter (NOM) of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). The migration and fate of the AgNPs in the microcosms was validated using a sedimentation-diffusion model and the aggregation behavior was monitored by UV–visible spectrometry (UV–vis). Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (% Ag) were analyzed by ultrafiltration methods. Imaging of the AgNPs was captured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) remained stable for 28 days with similarly distributed concentrations of the PVP-AgNPs throughout the columns in each of the water conditions after approximately 96 h (4 days). The sedimentation-diffusion model confirmed PVP-AgNP stability in each condition, by showing diffusion dominated transport by using the original unaltered AgNP sizes to fit the parameters. In comparison, citrate AgNPs were largely unstable in the more complex water preparations (MHW). In MHW, aggregation dominated behavior followed by sedimentation/dissolution controlled transport was observed. The addition of SRFA to MHW resulted in small stabilizing effects, to the citrate coated AgNPs, producing smaller sized AgNPs (TEM) and mixed sedimentation and diffusion migration compared the studies absent of SRFA. The results suggest that surface coating and solution chemistry has a major impact on AgNP stability, furthermore the corresponding modeling will support the experimental understanding of the overall fate of AgNPs in the environment. - Highlights: • Aquatic microcosms were used to study the transport and behavior of AgNPs • Experiments were conducted in low

  6. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  7. Nanoporous Polymeric Grating-Based Optical Biosensors (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hsiao, Vincent K; Waldeisen, John R; Lloyd, Pamela F; Bunning, Timothy J; Huang, Tony J

    2007-01-01

    .... The fabrication process of the nanoporous polymeric grating involves holographic interference patterning and a functionalized pre-polymer syrup that facilitates the immobilization of biomolecules...

  8. Nanoporous Cyclic Brush Polymers for Selective Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop advanced synthetic methodologies that afford nanoporous materials with selective uptake affinity towards carbon...

  9. DNA translocation through single-layer boron nitride nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zonglin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-21

    Ultra-thin nanopores have become promising biological sensors because of their outstanding signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Here, we show that boron nitride (BN), which is a new two-dimensional (2D) material similar to graphene, could be utilized for making a nanopore with an atomic thickness. Using an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the dynamics of DNA translocation through the BN nanopore. The results of our simulations demonstrated that it is possible to detect different double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sequences from the recording of ionic currents through the pore during the DNA translocation. Surprisingly, opposite to results for a graphene nanopore, we found the calculated blockage current for poly(A-T)40 in a BN nanopore to be less than that for poly(G-C)40. Also in contrast with the case of graphene nanopores, dsDNA models moved smoothly and in an unimpeded manner through the BN nanopores in the simulations, suggesting a potential advantage for using BN nanopores to design stall-free sequencing devices. BN nanopores, which display several properties (such as being hydrophilic and non-metallic) that are superior to those of graphene, are thus expected to find applications in the next generation of high-speed and low-cost biological sensors.

  10. Tetramethylammonium-filled protein nanopore for single-molecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yao, Fujun; Kang, Xiao-feng

    2015-10-06

    Nanopore technology, as the simplest and most inexpensive single-molecule tool, is being intensively developed. In nanopore stochastic sensing, KCl and NaCl have traditionally been employed as pore-filled electrolytes for recording the change of ion conductance in nanopores triggered by analyte translocation through the pore. However, some challenges limit its further advance. Here we used tetramethylammonium (TMA) chloride, instead of KCl, as a novel analysis system for nanopores. Some unique nanopore characteristics were observed: (1) The stability of the planar lipid bilayer for embedding the protein pores was elevated at least 6 times. (2) The TMA-Cl system could effectively reduce the noise of single-channel recording. (3) It was easy to control the insertion of protein pores into the lipid bilayer, and the formed single nanopore could last for a sufficiently long time. (4) TMA-Cl could be used as a DNA speed bump in the nanopore to slow DNA translocation speed. (5) The capacity of the nanopore capture of DNA (capture rate) increased significantly and simultaneously increased the translocation time of DNA in the pore. (6) The TMA-filled nanopore could discriminate between various polynucleotides.

  11. Nanoporous Membrane Technologies for Pathogen Collection, Separation, and Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sang W; Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U; Griffin, Matthew T; Fulton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Partial contents: Nanoporous Membranes, Membrane Chemistries, Characterization of Membrane Chemistries,Protein Fouling, Collector,Gas and Liquid Permeabilities, Membrane Permeabilities in the Presence of Water...

  12. Solid-state nanopores and nanopore arrays optimized for optical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawafta, Furat; Clancy, Bason; Carlsen, Autumn T; Huber, Martin; Hall, Adam R

    2014-06-21

    While conventional solid-state nanopore measurements utilize ionic current, there is a growing interest in alternative sensing paradigms, including optical detection. However, a limiting factor in the application of optical schemes in particular is the inherent background fluorescence created by the solid-state membrane itself, which can interfere with the desired signal and place restrictions on the fluorophores that can be employed. An ideal device would incorporate a localized reduction in membrane fluorescence using a method that can be integrated easily with the nanopore fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to forming nanopores and nanopore arrays, a focused helium ion beam can be used to reduce the fluorescence of a conventional silicon nitride membrane controllably. The reduction in background produces low-fluorescence devices that can be used for optical detection of double-strand DNA, as well as for conventional resistive pulse sensing. This approach is used to identify the translocation of short single-strand DNA through individual nanopores within an array, creating potential for a massively-parallel detection scheme.

  13. Slowing single-stranded DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore by decreasing the nanopore diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, Rena; Haga, Takanobu; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Itaru; Ohura, Takeshi; Hamamura, Hirotaka; Iwasaki, Tomio; Yokoi, Takahide; Anazawa, Takashi

    2014-07-11

    To slow the translocation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) through a solid-state nanopore, a nanopore was narrowed, and the effect of the narrowing on the DNA translocation speed was investigated. In order to accurately measure the speed, long (5.3 kb) ssDNA (namely, ss-poly(dA)) with uniform length (±0.4 kb) was synthesized. The diameters of nanopores fabricated by a transmission electron microscope were controlled by atomic-layer deposition. Reducing the nanopore diameter from 4.5 to 2.3 nm slowed down the translocation of ssDNA by more than 16 times (to 0.18 μs base(-1)) when 300 mV was applied across the nanopore. It is speculated that the interaction between the nanopore and the ssDNA dominates the translocation speed. Unexpectedly, the translocation speed of ssDNA through the 4.5 nm nanopore is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) through a nanopore of almost the same size. The cause of such a faster translocation of ssDNA can be explained by the weaker drag force inside the nanopore. Moreover, the measured translocation speeds of ssDNA and dsDNA agree well with those calculated by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation predicted that reducing the nanopore diameter to almost the same as that of ssDNA (i.e. 1.4 nm) decreases the translocation speed (to 1.4 μs base(-1)). Narrowing the nanopore is thus an effective approach for accomplishing nanopore DNA sequencing.

  14. Effects of surface coating process conditions on the water permeation and salt rejection properties of composite polyamide reverse osmosis membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Louie, Jennifer Sarah

    2011-02-01

    The application of polymer surface coatings to improve the fouling resistance of reverse osmosis membranes tends to increase flow resistance across the membrane. This paper presents a systematic analysis on how membrane properties and performance are impacted by the coating process steps, and investigates how such effects could contribute to lower water flux. On one hand, simply pre-soaking dry aromatic polyamide composite membranes in aliphatic alcohols results in a significant increase in water flux, which is attributed to wetting of pores in the selective polyamide layer and to changes in the polymer structure. This flux increase was not readily reversible, based on a 300-h water permeation test. Conversely, drying a wetted membrane led to a decrease in water flux, which we hypothesize is caused by increased interchain hydrogen-bonding in the selective layer. This drop in water flux was not permanent; higher flux was observed if the same wetted/dried membrane was then re-soaked in ethanol prior to the water permeation experiment. An ethanol pre-soaking step also increased water flux of a PEBAX-coated membrane by nearly 70%. In contrast to the reduction in water flux caused by the specific treatment sequence of ethanol-swelling followed by drying, this same sequence actually increased gas transport. The eight- to ten-fold increase in Knudsen diffusion-based gas permeance after this pre-treatment was attributed to an increase in the number or size of membrane defects. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vogt

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  16. Osseoconductivity of a Specific Streptavidin-Biotin-Fibronectin Surface Coating of Biotinylated Titanium Implants - A Rabbit Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämmerer, Peer W; Lehnert, Michael; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kumar, Vinay V; Hagmann, Sebastien; Alshihri, Abdulmonem; Frerich, Bernhard; Veith, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Biofunctionalized implant surfaces may accelerate bony integration and increase long-term stability. The aim of the study was to evaluate the osseous reaction toward biomimetic titanium implants surfaces coated with quasicovalent immobilized fibronectin in an in vivo animal model. A total of 84 implants (uncoated [control 1, n = 36], streptavidin-biotin coated [test 1, n = 24], streptavidin-biotin-fibronectin coated [test 2, n = 24]) were inserted 1 mm supracortically in the proximal tibia of 12 rabbits. The samples were examined after 3 and 6 weeks. Total bone-implant contact (tBIC; %), bone-implant contact in the cortical (cBIC; %) and in the spongious bone (sBIC; %) as well as the percentage of linear bone fill (PLF; %) were evaluated. After 3 weeks, streptavidin-biotin-fibronectin implants had a significant higher sBIC (p = .043) and PLF (p = .007) compared with the uncoated samples. After 6 weeks, this difference was significant for tBIC (p = .016) and cBIC (p biotin-coated implants showed less bone growth at both time points of all examined parameters when compared with their counterparts (all p biotin-fibronectin system on smooth surface titanium shows a beneficial faster osseous healing in vivo. Besides, an antifouling effect of the streptavidin-biotin coating was proven. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of particle size and surface coating on cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles for oral delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Yin; Feng, Si-Shen

    2005-05-01

    This study evaluated cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles by using Caco-2 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, as an in vitro model with the aim to apply nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers for oral chemotherapy. The feasibility was demonstrated by showing the localization and quantification of the cell uptake of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles of standard size and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or vitamin E TPGS. Coumarin-6 loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a modified solvent extraction/evaporation method and characterized by laser light scattering for size and size distribution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for surface morphology, zeta-potential for surface charge, and spectrofluorometry for fluorescent molecule release from the nanoparticles. The effects of particle size and particle surface coating on the cellular uptake of the nanoparticles were quantified by spectrofluorometric measurement. Cellular uptake of vitamin E TPGS-coated PLGA nanoparticles showed 1.4 folds higher than that of PVA-coated PLGA nanoparticles and 4-6 folds higher than that of nude polystyrene nanoparticles. Images of confocal laser scanning microscopy, cryo-SEM and transmission electron microscopy clearly evidenced the internalization of nanoparticles by the Caco-2 cells, showing that surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles with vitamin E TPGS notably improved the cellular uptake. It is highly feasible for nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers to be applied to promote oral chemotherapy.

  18. Microstructural studies on friction surfaced coatings of Ni-based alloys; Gefuegeuntersuchungen an reibgeschweissten Beschichtungen von Ni-Basislegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Javed; Puli, Ramesh; Kalvala, Prasad Rao; Misra, Mano [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Inconel 625, Inconel 600, Inconel 800H were friction surfaced on steel and Inconel substrates. The interface between steel and Ni-based alloys showed intermixing of two alloys while the interface between two Ni-based alloys showed no such intermixing. The XRD results confirmed that this intermixed zone consisted of mechanical mix two separate metals and no intermetallics were noticed. Friction surfaced Inconel coatings were metallurgically bonded to steel and Inconel substrates with out any physical defects such as voids or cracks. Friction surfaced coatings showed equiaxed fine grained microstructures (4-18 μm) compared with their consumable rod counterparts (12 - 85 μm). Scanning electron microscope electron backscattered diffraction results showed that the coatings consisted of mainly high angle grain boundaries indicative of dynamic recrystallization mechanism. The temperatures recorded using Infra Red camera showed that the temperature attained at the interface between rod and the substrate is about 1100 C. The grain size of the consumable rod was relatively fine near the coating/substrate interface and relatively coarser away from interface indicating the change in strain and temperature the rod experienced at or away from the interface.

  19. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Gyroid Membranes made from Nanoporous Blck Copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szewczykowski, Piotr Plzemystaw; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Ndoni, Sokol

    2007-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are interesting and exciting materials in view of their many potential applications, especially as ultrafiltration membranes. One way of preparing nanoporous polymeric materials is to use block copolymers. Block copolymers have the great advantage that they organize them......-selves into different morphologies on the nano scale. Block copolymer synthesis controls the molecular weight and volume fraction of blocks, which determine the resulting nano-structures. From a membrane application point of view one very suitable morphology is the bicontinuous gyroid. Mechanical stability...... of the membrane and its nanoporosity is e.g. obtained by cross-linking the majority blocks and selectively etching the minority blocks. Here we report on ultrafiltration membranes prepared from a 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane diblock copolymer with gyroid structure. Different experimental methods...

  1. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-21

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.

  2. Broadband Spectroscopy of Nanoporous-Gold Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Nakatani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of UV photocatalysis on TiO2 particles was increased by mixing TiO2 particles with nanoporous gold (NPG with pore diameters of 10–40 nm. This means that NPG acts as a promoter in the photocatalytic reaction of TiO2. Broadband spectroscopic results from millimeter wave to ultra violet of NPG membrane are discussed to estimate plasmonic effect on the catalysis.

  3. Electroosmotic flow rectification in conical nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental work has suggested that electroosmotic flows (EOF) through conical nanopores exhibit rectification in the opposite sense to the well-studied effect of ionic current rectification. A positive bias voltage generates large EOF and small current, while negative voltages generate small EOF and large current. Here we systematically investigate this effect using finite-element simulations. We find that inside the pore, the electric field and salt concentration are inversely corre...

  4. Nanopore sensors for nucleic acid analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Jonathan J; Akeson, Mark; Marziali, Andre

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade, nanometre-scale pores have been explored as the basis for technologies to analyse and sequence single nucleic acid molecules. Most approaches involve using such a pore to localize single macromolecules and interact with them to garner some information on their composition. Though nanopore sensors cannot yet claim success at deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing, nanopore-based technologies offer one of the most promising approaches to single molecule detection and analysis. The majority of experimental work with nanopore detection of nucleic acids has involved the α-haemolysin (alpha-HL) ion channel a heptameric protein with a ∼2 nm diameter inner pore which allows translocation of single-stranded DNA. Analysis of externally induced ion current through the pore during its interaction with DNA can provide information about the DNA molecule, including length and base composition. This review focuses on alpha-HL and its applications to single-molecule detection. Modified alpha-HL and other biological and synthetic pores for macromolecule detection are also discussed, along with a brief summary of relevant theoretical work and numerical modelling of polymer-pore interaction. (topical review)

  5. Surface tectonics of nanoporous networks of melamine-capped molecular building blocks formed through interface Schiff-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Control over the assembly of molecules on a surface is of great importance for the fabrication of molecule-based miniature devices. Melamine (MA) and molecules with terminal MA units are promising candidates for supramolecular interfacial packing patterning, owing to their multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. Herein, we report the formation of self-assembled structures of MA-capped molecules through a simple on-surface synthetic route. MA terminal groups were successfully fabricated onto rigid molecular cores with 2-fold and 3-fold symmetry through interfacial Schiff-base reactions between MA and aldehyde groups. Sub-molecular scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of the resultant adlayer revealed the formation of nanoporous networks. Detailed structural analysis indicated that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the MA groups persistently drove the formation of nanoporous networks. Herein, we demonstrate that functional groups with strong hydrogen-bond-formation ability are promising building blocks for the guided assembly of nanoporous networks and other hierarchical 2D assemblies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hierarchical Porous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Materials Design is often at the forefront of technological innovation. While there has always been a push to generate increasingly low density materials, such as aero or hydrogels, more recently the idea of bicontinuous structures has gone more into play. This review will cover some of the methods and applications for generating both porous, and hierarchically porous structures.

  7. Catalysis with hierarchical zeolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Martin Spangsberg; Taarning, Esben; Egeblad, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    zeolites that have been reported hitherto. Prototypical examples from some of the different categories of catalytic reactions that have been studied using hierarchical zeolite catalysts are highlighted. This clearly illustrates the different ways that improved performance can be achieved with this family...

  8. The Hierarchical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sofron

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the hierarchical perspective, one of the methods for representing space that was used before the discovery of the Renaissance linear perspective. The hierarchical perspective has a more or less pronounced scientific character and its study offers us a clear image of the way the representatives of the cultures that developed it used to perceive the sensitive reality. This type of perspective is an original method of representing three-dimensional space on a flat surface, which characterises the art of Ancient Egypt and much of the art of the Middle Ages, being identified in the Eastern European Byzantine art, as well as in the Western European Pre-Romanesque and Romanesque art. At the same time, the hierarchical perspective is also present in naive painting and infantile drawing. Reminiscences of this method can be recognised also in the works of some precursors of the Italian Renaissance. The hierarchical perspective can be viewed as a subjective ranking criterion, according to which the elements are visually represented by taking into account their relevance within the image while perception is ignored. This paper aims to show how the main objective of the artists of those times was not to faithfully represent the objective reality, but rather to emphasize the essence of the world and its perennial aspects. This may represent a possible explanation for the refusal of perspective in the Egyptian, Romanesque and Byzantine painting, characterised by a marked two-dimensionality.

  9. Optimal design of graphene nanopores for seawater desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwu; Qiu, Yinghua; Li, Kun; Sha, Jingjie; Li, Tie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are employed to optimize nanopore size and surface charge density in order to obtain high ionic selectivity and high water throughput for seawater desalination systems. It is demonstrated that with the help of surface charge exclusion, nanopores with diameter as large as 3.5 nm still have high ionic selectivity. The mechanism of the salt rejection in a surface-charged nanopore is mainly attributed to the ion concentration difference between the cations and anions induced by the surface charges. Increasing surface charge density is beneficial to enhance ionic selectivity. However, there exists a critical value for the surface charge density. Once the surface charge density exceeds the critical value, charge inversion occurs inside a nanopore. Further increasing the surface charge density will deteriorate the ionic selectivity because the highly charged nanopore surface will allow more coions to enter the nanopore in order to keep the whole system in charge neutrality. Besides the surface charge density, the nanopore length also affects the ionic selectivity. Based on our systematic simulations, nanopores with surface charge density between -0.09 C/m2 and -0.12 C/m2, diameters smaller than 3.5 nm, and membrane thickness ranging between 8 and 10 graphene layers show an excellent performance for the ionic selectivity.

  10. UV patterned nanoporous solid-liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous Solid-Liquid core waveguides were prepared by UV induced surface modification of hydrophobic nanoporous polymers. With this method, the index contrast (delta n = 0.20) is a result of selective water infiltration. The waveguide core is defined by UV light, rendering the exposed part...

  11. DNA and ion transport through solid-state nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental work on a novel type of devices capable of detecting single-(bio)molecules; nanometer-sized pores, or nanopores. Individual nanopores are placed in between two electrolyte-filled liquid compartments and (bio)molecules are electrophoretically driven through them.

  12. Plasmonic properties of gold-coated nanoporous anodic alumina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Anodization of aluminium surfaces containing linearly oriented scratches leads to the formation of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) with the nanopores arranged preferentially along the scratch marks. NAA, when coated with a thin gold film, support plasmonic resonances. Dark-field spectroscopy revealed that ...

  13. Direct laser writing for nanoporous liquid core laser sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Peterson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous liquid core lasers via direct laser writing based on two-photon absorption in combination with thiolene-chemistry. As gain medium Rhodamine 6G was embedded in the nanoporous polybutadiene matrix. The lasing devices with thresholds of 19 µJ/mm2 were measured...

  14. Hierarchical models and functional traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, E.E.; Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Sierdsema, H.; Bouten, W.; Cramer, W.; Badeck, F.; Krukenberg, B.; Klotz, S.; Kühn, I.; Schweiger, O.; Böhning-Gaese, K.; Schaefer, H.-C.; Kissling, D.; Brandl, R.; Brändle, M.; Fricke, R.; Leuschner, C.; Buschmann, H.; Köckermann, B.; Rose, L.

    2006-01-01

    Hierarchical models for animal abundance prediction are conceptually elegant. They are generally more parsimonous than non-hierarchical models derived from the same data, give relatively robust predictions and automatically provide consistent output at multiple (spatio-temporal) scales. Another

  15. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  16. Effect of Surface Coating with Magnesium Stearate via Mechanical Dry Powder Coating Approach on the Aerosol Performance of Micronized Drug Powders from Dry Powder Inhalers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qi (Tony); Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J.; Morton, David A. V.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of particle surface coating with magnesium stearate on the aerosolization of dry powder inhaler formulations. Micronized salbutamol sulphate as a model drug was dry coated with magnesium stearate using a mechanofusion technique. The coating quality was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Powder bulk and flow properties were assessed by bulk densities and shear cell measurements. The aerosol performance was studied by las...

  17. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  18. Surface coating changes the physiological and biochemical impacts of nano-TiO2 in basil (Ocimum basilicum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenjuan; Du, Wenchao; Barrios, Ana C; Armendariz, Raul; Zuverza-Mena, Nubia; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Zink, Jeffrey I; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of surface coating on the interaction of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) with plants. In this study, basil (Ocimum basilicum) was cultivated for 65 days in soil amended with unmodified, hydrophobic (coated with aluminum oxide and dimethicone), and hydrophilic (coated with aluminum oxide and glycerol) titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) at 125, 250, 500, and 750 mg nano-TiO 2 kg -1 soil. ICP-OES/MS, SPAD meter, and UV/Vis spectrometry were used to determine Ti and essential elements in tissues, relative chlorophyll content, carbohydrates, and antioxidant response, respectively. Compared with control, hydrophobic and hydrophilic nano-TiO 2 significantly reduced seed germination by 41% and 59%, respectively, while unmodified and hydrophobic nano-TiO 2 significantly decreased shoot biomass by 31% and 37%, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). Roots exposed to hydrophobic particles at 750 mg kg -1 had 87% and 40% more Ti than the pristine and hydrophilic nano-TiO 2 ; however, no differences were found in shoots. The three types of particles affected the homeostasis of essential elements: at 500 mg kg - 1 , unmodified particles increased Cu (104%) and Fe (90%); hydrophilic increased Fe (90%); while hydrophobic increased Mn (339%) but reduced Ca (71%), Cu (58%), and P (40%). However, only hydrophobic particles significantly reduced root elongation by 53%. Unmodified, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic particles significantly reduced total sugar by 39%, 38%, and 66%, respectively, compared with control. Moreover, unmodified particles significantly decreased reducing sugar (34%), while hydrophobic particles significantly reduced starch (35%). Although the three particles affected basil plants, coated particles impacted the most its nutritional quality, since they altered more essential elements, starch, and reducing sugars. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of surface coating and particle size on the uptake of small and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Tsugeno, Mana; Koto, Daichi; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Nohara, Satoshi; Murase, Kenya

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using contrast agents like superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) is an extremely versatile technique to diagnose diseases and to monitor treatment. This study tested the relative importance of particle size and surface coating for the optimization of MRI contrast and labeling efficiency of macrophages migrating to remote inflammation sites. We tested four SPIO and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO), alkali-treated dextran magnetite (ATDM) with particle sizes of 28 and 74 nm, and carboxymethyl dextran magnetite (CMDM) with particle sizes of 28 and 72 nm. Mouse macrophage RAW264 cells were incubated with SPIOs and USPIOs, and the labeling efficiency of the cells was determined by the percentage of Berlin blue-stained cells and by measuring T(2) relaxation times with 11.7-T MRI. We used trypan blue staining to measure cell viability. Analysis of the properties of the nanoparticles revealed that ATDM-coated 74 nm particles have a lower T(2) relaxation time than the others, translating into a higher ability of MRI negative contrast agent. Among the other three candidates, CMDM-coated particles showed the highest T(2) relaxation time once internalized by macrophages. Regarding labeling efficiency, ATDM coating resulted in a cellular uptake higher than CMDM coating, independent of nanoparticle size. None of these particle formulations affected macrophage viability. This study suggests that coating is more critical than size to optimize the SPIO labeling of macrophages. Among the formulations tested in this study, the best MRI contrast and labeling efficiency are expected with ATDM-coated 74 nm nanoparticles.

  20. Effects on cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties of the incorporations of silver nanoparticles into the surface coating of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Yan-Zhen; Xiao, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Zheng, Xiao-Dong

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to research the changes in cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties after silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were incorporated into the surface coating of dental alloys. AgNPs were attached to cobalt chromium alloys and pure titanium using a hydrothermal method, according to the reaction: AgNO 3 +NaBH 4 → Ag+1/2H 2 +1/2B 2 H 6 +NaNO 3 . A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the alloys when in contact with osteogenic precursor cells (MC3T3-E1) from mice and mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) from rats. The antibacterial properties of dental alloys incorporating three different concentrations (10, 4, and 2 μmol/L) of AgNPs were tested on Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Streptococcus mutans (MS). High cytotoxicity values were observed for all dental alloys that contained 0% of AgNPs (the control groups). The incorporation of AgNPs reduced cytotoxicity values. No significant difference was observed for antibacterial performance when comparing dental alloys containing AgNPs to the respective control groups. The results demonstrated that the cobalt chromium alloys and pure titanium all had cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 and BMSC and that the incorporation of AgNPs could reduce this cytotoxicity. The concentrations of AgNPs adopted in this study were found to have no antibacterial action against SA or MS.

  1. Entropic cages for trapping DNA near a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Skanata, Mirna Mihovilovic; Stein, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Nanopores can probe the structure of biopolymers in solution; however, diffusion makes it difficult to study the same molecule for extended periods. Here we report devices that entropically trap single DNA molecules in a 6.2-femtolitre cage near a solid-state nanopore. We electrophoretically inject DNA molecules into the cage through the nanopore, pause for preset times and then drive the DNA back out through the nanopore. The saturating recapture time and high recapture probability after long pauses, their agreement with a convection-diffusion model and the observation of trapped DNA under fluorescence microscopy all confirm that the cage stably traps DNA. Meanwhile, the cages have 200 nm openings that make them permeable to small molecules, like the restriction endonuclease we use to sequence-specifically cut trapped DNA into fragments whose number and sizes are analysed upon exiting through the nanopore. Entropic cages thus serve as reactors for chemically modifying single DNA molecules.

  2. Synthesis of single-crystal-like nanoporous carbon membranes and their application in overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-01-04

    Nanoporous graphitic carbon membranes with defined chemical composition and pore architecture are novel nanomaterials that are actively pursued. Compared with easy-to-make porous carbon powders that dominate the porous carbon research and applications in energy generation/conversion and environmental remediation, porous carbon membranes are synthetically more challenging though rather appealing from an application perspective due to their structural integrity, interconnectivity and purity. Here we report a simple bottom–up approach to fabricate large-size, freestanding and porous carbon membranes that feature an unusual single-crystal-like graphitic order and hierarchical pore architecture plus favourable nitrogen doping. When loaded with cobalt nanoparticles, such carbon membranes serve as high-performance carbon-based non-noble metal electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  3. Bayesian nonparametric hierarchical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, David B

    2009-04-01

    In biomedical research, hierarchical models are very widely used to accommodate dependence in multivariate and longitudinal data and for borrowing of information across data from different sources. A primary concern in hierarchical modeling is sensitivity to parametric assumptions, such as linearity and normality of the random effects. Parametric assumptions on latent variable distributions can be challenging to check and are typically unwarranted, given available prior knowledge. This article reviews some recent developments in Bayesian nonparametric methods motivated by complex, multivariate and functional data collected in biomedical studies. The author provides a brief review of flexible parametric approaches relying on finite mixtures and latent class modeling. Dirichlet process mixture models are motivated by the need to generalize these approaches to avoid assuming a fixed finite number of classes. Focusing on an epidemiology application, the author illustrates the practical utility and potential of nonparametric Bayes methods.

  4. Hierarchical species distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefley, Trevor J.; Hooten, Mevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the distribution pattern of a species is important to increase scientific knowledge, inform management decisions, and conserve biodiversity. To infer spatial and temporal patterns, species distribution models have been developed for use with many sampling designs and types of data. Recently, it has been shown that count, presence-absence, and presence-only data can be conceptualized as arising from a point process distribution. Therefore, it is important to understand properties of the point process distribution. We examine how the hierarchical species distribution modeling framework has been used to incorporate a wide array of regression and theory-based components while accounting for the data collection process and making use of auxiliary information. The hierarchical modeling framework allows us to demonstrate how several commonly used species distribution models can be derived from the point process distribution, highlight areas of potential overlap between different models, and suggest areas where further research is needed.

  5. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous polypyrrole thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mei; Yuan Jinying; Shi Gaoquan

    2008-01-01

    Polypyrrole thin films with pores in nanometer scale were synthesized by direct electrochemical oxidation of pyrrole in a mixed electrolyte of isopropyl alcohol, boron trifluoride diethyl etherate, sodium dodecylsulfonate and poly(ethylene glycol) using well-aligned ZnO nanowires arrays as templates. The thin films exhibit high conductivity of ca. σ rt ∼ 20.5 s/cm and can be driven to bend during redox processes in 1.0 M lithium perchlorate aqueous solution. The movement rate of an actuator based on this nanoporous film was measured to be over 90 o /s at a driving potential of 0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl)

  6. Fabrication of nanoporous nuclear track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Liangqiang; Wang Shicheng; Ju Xin; Masaru Yoshida; Yasunari Maekawa

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) films were irradiated by S, Kr and Xe ions and were illuminated with ultraviolet light. The normalized track etch rate for PET and PC films etched in different conditions were measured by conductometric experiments. It is shown that normalized track etch rate can be over 1000 for PET films, 2000 for PC films under optimized condition. TEM photographs of copper nanowires electroplated into nanoporous nuclear track membranes show that the narrowest wire diameter of copper nanowires is 20 nm and that the pore diameter calculated by conductometric experiments is in agreement with the wire diameter measured by TEM when the pore diameter is over 30 nm

  7. Retroreflection from nanoporous InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prislopski, S.Ya.; Naumenko, E.K.; Gaponenko, S.V.; Tiginyanu, I.M.; Ghimpu, L.; Sirbu, L.; Monaico, E.

    2013-01-01

    Pronounced retroreflection behavior is reported for a fishnet nanoporous strongly absorbing semiconductor material. Retroreflection appears with diffusive specular reflection for all angles of incidence. Retroreflection is apparent by the naked eye with day light illumination and exhibits no selectivity with respect to wavelength and polarization of incident light featuring minor depolarization of retroreflected light. The phenomenon can be classified neither as coherent backscattering nor as Anderson localization of light. The primary model includes light scattering from strongly absorptive and refractive super-wavelength clusters existing within the porous fishnet structure. We found that retroreflection vanishes for wavelength where absorption becomes negligible. (authors)

  8. Rapid resistome mapping using nanopore sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Imamovic, Lejla; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim

    2017-01-01

    of bacterial infections. Yet, rapid workflows for resistome characterization are lacking. To address this challenge we developed the poreFUME workflow that deploys functional metagenomic selections and nanopore sequencing to resistome mapping. We demonstrate the approach by functionally characterizing the gut...... resistome of an ICU (intensive care unit) patient. The accuracy of the poreFUME pipeline is with >97% sufficient for the annotation of antibiotic resistance genes. The poreFUME pipeline provides a promising approach for efficient resistome profiling that could inform antibiotic treatment decisions...

  9. Hydrogen storage in spherical nanoporous carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrés, E.; Panella, B.; Hayashi, T.; Kim, Y. A.; Endo, M.; Dominguez, J. M.; Hirscher, M.; Terrones, H.; Terrones, M.

    2005-02-01

    We report H 2 storage capacities up to 2.7 wt% at 77 K in spherical nanoporous carbons exhibiting periodic arrays of pores and surface areas between 946 and 1646 m 2/g. The materials were produced via the pyrolysis of sucrose (C 12H 22O 11) embedded inside a spherical form of MCM-48 at 1000 °C in an inert atmosphere. Our results open up new possibilities for producing carbon nanomaterials with large surface areas, which are able to store hydrogen with attractive yields.

  10. Thermally stable antireflective coatings based on nanoporous organosilicate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jinhan; Char, Kookheon

    2007-06-05

    Thermally stable nanoporous organosilicate thin films were realized by the microphase separation of pore-generating polymers mixed with an organosilicate matrix to be antireflective coatings (ARCs), for which a thin film with a refractive index (n) of 1.23 for zero reflection is required. The refractive index of such nanoporous organosilicate films can be tuned from 1.39 down to 1.23 by incorporating nanopores within the films. With a nanoporous single layer with n approximately 1.23, the light transmittance of the glass above 99.8% was achieved in the visible range (lambda approximately 550 nm). To overcome the limitation on the narrow wavelength for high transmittance imposed by a single antireflective nanoporous thin film, bilayer thin films with different refractive indices were prepared by placing a high refractive index layer with a refractive index of 1.45 below the nanoporous thin film. UV-vis transmittance of a glass coated with the bilayer films was compared with nanoporous single-layer films and it is demonstrated that the novel broadband antireflection coatings in a wide range of visible wavelength can be easily obtained by the organosilicate bilayer thin films described in this study. Also, ARCs developed in this study demonstrate excellent AR durability owing to the hydrophobic nature of the organosilicate matrix.

  11. Modulation of Molecular Flux Using a Graphene Nanopore Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2017-04-20

    Modulation of ionic current flowing through nanoscale pores is one of the fundamental biological processes. Inspired by nature, nanopores in synthetic solid-state membranes are being developed to enable rapid analysis of biological macromolecules and to serve as elements of nanofludic circuits. Here, we theoretically investigate ion and water transport through a graphene-insulator-graphene membrane containing a single, electrolyte-filled nanopore. By means of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the charge state of such a graphene nanopore capacitor can regulate both the selectivity and the magnitude of the nanopore ionic current. At a fixed transmembrane bias, the ionic current can be switched from being carried by an equal mixture of cations and anions to being carried almost exclusively by either cationic or anionic species, depending on the sign of the charge assigned to both plates of the capacitor. Assigning the plates of the capacitor opposite sign charges can either increase the nanopore current or reduce it substantially, depending on the polarity of the bias driving the transmembrane current. Facilitated by the changes of the nanopore surface charge, such ionic current modulations are found to occur despite the physical dimensions of the nanopore being an order of magnitude larger than the screening length of the electrolyte. The ionic current rectification is accompanied by a pronounced electro-osmotic effect that can transport neutral molecules such as proteins and drugs across the solid-state membrane and thereby serve as an interface between electronic and chemical signals.

  12. Characterization of protein unfolding with solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiali; Fologea, Daniel; Rollings, Ryan; Ledden, Brad

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we review the process of protein unfolding characterized by a solid-state nanopore based device. The occupied or excluded volume of a protein molecule in a nanopore depends on the protein's conformation or shape. A folded protein has a larger excluded volume in a nanopore thus it blocks more ionic current flow than its unfolded form and produces a greater current blockage amplitude. The time duration a protein stays in a pore also depends on the protein's folding state. We use Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a model protein to discuss this current blockage amplitude and the time duration associated with the protein unfolding process. BSA molecules were measured in folded, partially unfolded, and completely unfolded conformations in solid-state nanopores. We discuss experimental results, data analysis, and theoretical considerations of BSA protein unfolding measured with silicon nitride nanopores. We show this nanopore method is capable of characterizing a protein's unfolding process at single molecule level. Problems and future studies in characterization of protein unfolding using a solid-state nanopore device will also be discussed.

  13. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas sensor applications are introduced. The advantages of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides are also presented, taking into account the crystallinity and ordered/disordered porous structures. Second, the synthesis methods of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides including the soft-template, hard-template, and temple-free methods are introduced, in which the advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are figured out. Third, the applications of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides as gas sensors are presented. The gas nanosensors are designed based on meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for effective detection of toxic gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the meso-/nanoporous gas nanosensors are also discussed. Finally, some conclusions and an outlook are presented.

  14. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P.; Tavares, C.J.; Azeredo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO 2 ) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO 2 coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light – fluorescent and incandescent – and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO 2 coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 10 6 CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 10 7 on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO 2 coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly effective against foodborne

  15. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland); Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo [Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Wood Materials Science, ETH Zürich, Stefano-Franscini-Platz 3, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Applied Wood Materials Laboratory, Empa − Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Österberg, Monika, E-mail: monika.osterberg@aalto.fi [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A facile sonication route to produce aqueous wax dispersions is developed. • The wax dispersion is naturally stable and free of surfactants or stabilizers. • Wax and ZnO particles are coated onto wood using layer-by-layer assembly. • The coating brings superhydrophobicity while preserving moisture buffering. • ZnO improves the color stability of wood to UV light. - Abstract: Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering

  16. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P. [Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Tavares, C.J. [Center of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); Azeredo, J., E-mail: jazeredo@deb.uminho.pt [Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO{sub 2}) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO{sub 2} coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light – fluorescent and incandescent – and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO{sub 2} coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 10{sup 6} CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 10{sup 7} on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO{sub 2} coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly

  17. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with 50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  18. Buckling Causes Nonlinear Dynamics of Filamentous Viruses Driven through Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Angus; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Tang, Jay X.; Stein, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Measurements and Langevin dynamics simulations of filamentous viruses driven through solid-state nanopores reveal a superlinear rise in the translocation velocity with driving force. The mobility also scales with the length of the virus in a nontrivial way that depends on the force. These dynamics are consequences of the buckling of the leading portion of a virus as it emerges from the nanopore and is put under compressive stress by the viscous forces it encounters. The leading tip of a buckled virus stalls and this reduces the total viscous drag force. We present a scaling theory that connects the solid mechanics to the nonlinear dynamics of polyelectrolytes translocating nanopores.

  19. Electrically tunable solid-state silicon nanopore ion filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracheva Maria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe show that a nanopore in a silicon membrane connected to a voltage source can be used as an electrically tunable ion filter. By applying a voltage between the heavily doped semiconductor and the electrolyte, it is possible to invert the ion population inside the nanopore and vary the conductance for both cations and anions in order to achieve selective conduction of ions even in the presence of significant surface charges in the membrane. Our model based on the solution of the Poisson equation and linear transport theory indicates that in narrow nanopores substantial gain can be achieved by controlling electrically the width of the charge double layer.

  20. Catalytic Rapid Pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis over Nanoporous Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Hyeon Koo Kang; In-Gu Lee; Kyong-Hwan Lee; Beom-Sik Kim; Tae Su Jo; Kwang-Seok Chea; Sung Hoon Park; Sang-Chul Jung; Young-Kwon Park

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic rapid pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis, a Korean native tree species, was carried out using Py-GC/MS. Mesoporous MFI, which has both nanopores and micropores, and three nanoporous materials, Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and γ-Al2O3, were used as the catalyst. The acid sites of mesoporous MFI were strong Brønsted acid sites, whereas those of nanoporous materials were mostly weak acid sites. The composition of the product bio-oil varied greatly depending on the acid characteristics of the cat...

  1. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of hierarchical nanoporous graphenic carbon against human gliblastoma grade IV cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Biniecka, Paulina; Bugajska, Zaneta

    2017-01-01

    with the U87 cells can also lead to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activate apoptotic mechanisms in cancer cells. The investigation was performed using U87 human glioblastoma and PCS-201–010 normal fibroblast cell lines, where cell morphology and ultrastructure, viability, ROS...... pathway, without inducing necrosis. Our research indicates the potential applicability of HNC in cancer therapy....

  2. Context updates are hierarchical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Karl Ingason

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This squib studies the order in which elements are added to the shared context of interlocutors in a conversation. It focuses on context updates within one hierarchical structure and argues that structurally higher elements are entered into the context before lower elements, even if the structurally higher elements are pronounced after the lower elements. The crucial data are drawn from a comparison of relative clauses in two head-initial languages, English and Icelandic, and two head-final languages, Korean and Japanese. The findings have consequences for any theory of a dynamic semantics.

  3. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Woignier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical durability, silica glass optimizes the properties of a suitable host matrix. According to an easy sintering stage, nanoporous glasses such as xerogels, aerogels, and composite gels are alternative ways to synthesize silica glass at relatively low temperatures (≈1,000–1,200°C. Nuclear wastes exist as aqueous salt solutions and we propose using the open pore structure of the nanoporous glass to enable migration of the solution throughout the solid volume. The loaded material is then sintered, thereby trapping the radioactive chemical species. The structure of the sintered materials (glass ceramics is that of nanocomposites: actinide phases (~100 nm embedded in a vitreous silica matrix. Our results showed a large improvement in the chemical durability of glass ceramic over conventional nuclear glass.

  4. Nanoporous ultrahigh specific surface polyacrylonitrile fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lifeng; Hsieh, Y-L

    2006-01-01

    The concept of phase separation was coupled with electrospinning to generate polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) bicomponent fibres that, upon removal of the phase-separated PEO domains, became nanoporous. Electrospinning of PAN (150 kDa) with 15-50% w/w PEO (10 kDa) at a 8% w/w total concentration in N,N-dimethylformamide produced fibres with decreasing averaged diameters from 390 to 130 nm. Evidence of phase separation between PAN and PEO in the bicomponent fibres was indicated by the characteristic PAN and PEO peaks by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, and confirmed by the co-existence of PAN cyclization and PEO melting by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the presence of PEO crystalline diffraction by wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS). Removal of PEO by dissolution in water was confirmed by the matched mass loss to PEO fraction and the absence of PEO by FTIR and DSC. The water-treated bicomponent fibres appeared slightly larger in diameter and contained internal pores of nanometre scale. The nanoporous fibres generated from 50/50 PAN/PEO bicomponent precursor contained internal pores of a few nanometres to tens of nanometres in size and had 50% higher pore volume and 2.5-fold higher specific surface

  5. Nanopore-Based Target Sequence Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor J Morin

    Full Text Available The promise of portable diagnostic devices relies on three basic requirements: comparable sensitivity to established platforms, inexpensive manufacturing and cost of operations, and the ability to survive rugged field conditions. Solid state nanopores can meet all these requirements, but to achieve high manufacturing yields at low costs, assays must be tolerant to fabrication imperfections and to nanopore enlargement during operation. This paper presents a model for molecular engineering techniques that meets these goals with the aim of detecting target sequences within DNA. In contrast to methods that require precise geometries, we demonstrate detection using a range of pore geometries. As a result, our assay model tolerates any pore-forming method and in-situ pore enlargement. Using peptide nucleic acid (PNA probes modified for conjugation with synthetic bulk-adding molecules, pores ranging 15-50 nm in diameter are shown to detect individual PNA-bound DNA. Detection of the CFTRΔF508 gene mutation, a codon deletion responsible for ∼66% of all cystic fibrosis chromosomes, is demonstrated with a 26-36 nm pore size range by using a size-enhanced PNA probe. A mathematical framework for assessing the statistical significance of detection is also presented.

  6. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  7. Ultrafiltration by gyroid nanoporous polymer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Szewczykowski, Piotr Przemyslaw; Clausen, Lydia D.

    2011-01-01

    Gyroid nanoporous cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene membranes with uniform pores were developed for ultrafiltration applications. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure pre-alignment. The effects of solvent and surface photo-hydrophilization on perm......Gyroid nanoporous cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene membranes with uniform pores were developed for ultrafiltration applications. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure pre-alignment. The effects of solvent and surface photo......-hydrophilization on permeation and molecular weight cut-off were investigated. Gas permeation followed the Knudsen diffusion scheme, while water flux across the originally hydrophobic membrane could be described by a generalized Hagen–Poiseuille equation. A series of PEGs of different molecular weights were used to explore...... the effect of membrane fouling on the flux decline and rejection profiles. Significant fouling occurred in the case of hydrophobic membranes in contact with water solutions, while in the presence of high concentration of ethanol in the filtration solution and in the case of hydrophilized membranes...

  8. Hierarchical quark mass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasin, A.

    1998-02-01

    I define a set of conditions that the most general hierarchical Yukawa mass matrices have to satisfy so that the leading rotations in the diagonalization matrix are a pair of (2,3) and (1,2) rotations. In addition to Fritzsch structures, examples of such hierarchical structures include also matrices with (1,3) elements of the same order or even much larger than the (1,2) elements. Such matrices can be obtained in the framework of a flavor theory. To leading order, the values of the angle in the (2,3) plane (s 23 ) and the angle in the (1,2) plane (s 12 ) do not depend on the order in which they are taken when diagonalizing. We find that any of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix parametrizations that consist of at least one (1,2) and one (2,3) rotation may be suitable. In the particular case when the s 13 diagonalization angles are sufficiently small compared to the product s 12 s 23 , two special CKM parametrizations emerge: the R 12 R 23 R 12 parametrization follows with s 23 taken before the s 12 rotation, and vice versa for the R 23 R 12 R 23 parametrization. (author)

  9. Chronic TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, Lindsay K. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Diamond, Stephen A. [Nanosafe Inc., Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (United States); Ma, Hongbo [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 53211 (United States); Hoff, Dale J. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Li, Shibin, E-mail: lishibinepa@gmail.com [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH){sub 3} coated nano-TiO{sub 2} used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH){sub 3} coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings. - Highlights: • Chronic toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} to a benthic organism (Hyalella azteca) was examined. • Phototoxicity was investigated through exposure of solar simulated radiation (SSR). • The degradation of a surface coating resulted in an increase in photoactivity. • In this testing scenario, UV had a larger impact than chemical exposure in toxicity.

  10. Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials: NO Dimerization Reaction in Carbon Slit Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.; Smith, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 6 (2006), s. 64712.1-64712.14 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanopore * NO dimerization * reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  11. Nested and Hierarchical Archimax copulas

    KAUST Repository

    Hofert, Marius

    2017-07-03

    The class of Archimax copulas is generalized to nested and hierarchical Archimax copulas in several ways. First, nested extreme-value copulas or nested stable tail dependence functions are introduced to construct nested Archimax copulas based on a single frailty variable. Second, a hierarchical construction of d-norm generators is presented to construct hierarchical stable tail dependence functions and thus hierarchical extreme-value copulas. Moreover, one can, by itself or additionally, introduce nested frailties to extend Archimax copulas to nested Archimax copulas in a similar way as nested Archimedean copulas extend Archimedean copulas. Further results include a general formula for the density of Archimax copulas.

  12. Hierarchical materials: Background and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical design draws inspiration from analysis of biological materials and has opened new possibilities for enhancing performance and enabling new functionalities and extraordinary properties. With the development of nanotechnology, the necessary technological requirements for the manufactur...... for the manufacturing of hierarchical materials are advancing at a fast pace, opening new challenges and opportunities. This article presents an overview of possible applications of and perspectives on hierarchical materials.......Hierarchical design draws inspiration from analysis of biological materials and has opened new possibilities for enhancing performance and enabling new functionalities and extraordinary properties. With the development of nanotechnology, the necessary technological requirements...

  13. Nanopore-based fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanxiao; Zhang, Yuechuan; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than $100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanopore fabrication and characterization by helium ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmrich, D.; Beyer, A.; Gölzhäuser, A. [Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Nadzeyka, A.; Bauerdick, S. [Raith GmbH, Konrad-Adenauer-Allee 8, 44263 Dortmund (Germany); Meyer, J. C.; Kotakoski, J. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-04-18

    The Helium Ion Microscope (HIM) has the capability to image small features with a resolution down to 0.35 nm due to its highly focused gas field ionization source and its small beam-sample interaction volume. In this work, the focused helium ion beam of a HIM is utilized to create nanopores with diameters down to 1.3 nm. It will be demonstrated that nanopores can be milled into silicon nitride, carbon nanomembranes, and graphene with well-defined aspect ratio. To image and characterize the produced nanopores, helium ion microscopy and high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy were used. The analysis of the nanopores' growth behavior allows inferring on the profile of the helium ion beam.

  15. Nanopore-based Fourth-generation DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiao Feng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than $100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  16. Formation and photopatterning of nanoporous titania thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Oun-Ho; Cheng, Joy Y.; Kim, Hyun Suk; Rice, Philip M.; Topuria, Teya; Miller, Robert D.; Kim, Ho-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Photopatternable nanoporous titania thin films were generated from mixtures of an organic diblock copolymer, poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO), and an oligomeric titanate (OT) prepared from a chelated titanium isopropoxide. The PS-b-PEO templates well-defined microdomains in thin films of the mixtures, which upon thermal treatment at 450 deg. C, become nanopores in titania. Average pore size and porosity are controlled by the molecular weight and loading level of the PS-b-PEO, respectively. Patterns of nanoporous titania were created by selectively exposing UV light on the mixture films. The UV irradiation destroys the chelating bond and induces the cross-linking reaction of the OT. Subsequent wet development followed by thermal treatment gives patterned nanoporous films of anatase phase titania

  17. The structurally effect of surface coated rhamnogalacturonan I on response of the osteoblast-like cell line SaOS-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svava, Rikke; Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Yihau, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Osseointegration is important when implants are inserted into the bone and can be improved by biochemical surface coating of the implant. In this paper enzymatically modified rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) from apple and lupin was used for biochemical coating of aminated surfaces and the importance...... of the quality of RG-I, the nature of the binding, the fine structure of RG-I, and its effect on SaOS-2 cell line cultured on coated surfaces was investigated. SaOS-2 cells are osteoblast-like cells and a well-established in vitro model of bone-matrix forming osteoblasts. Purification by gel filtration could...

  18. Surface coating of siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers: Enhanced gene silencing and reduced adversed effects in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Xianghui; de Groot, A. M.; Sijts, Alice

    2015-01-01

    giving rise to net anionic liposomes. These complexes and the corresponding liposomes were optimized towards efficient gene silencing and low adverse effects. The optimal anionic liposomes mediated a high silencing effect, which was comparable to that of the control (cationic Lipofectamine 2000), and did...... not display any noticeable cytotoxicity and immunogenicity in vitro. In contrast, the corresponding nanocomplexes mediated a reduced silencing effect with a more narrow safety window. The surface coating with anionic lipid bilayers led to partial decomplexation of the siRNA–peptidomimetic nanocomplex core...

  19. Nanotopography effects on astrocyte attachment to nanoporous gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Ozge; Seker, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous gold, synthesized by a self-assembly process, is a new biomaterial with desirable attributes, including tunable nanotopography, drug delivery potential, electrical conductivity, and compatibility with conventional microfabrication techniques. This study reports on the effect of nanotopography in guiding cellular attachment on nanoporous gold surfaces. While the changes in topography do not affect adherent cell density, average cell area displays a non-monotonic dependence on nanotopography.

  20. Current steering effect of GaN nanoporous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chia-Feng; Wang, Jing-Hao; Cheng, Po-Fu; Tseng, Wang-Po; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Wu, Kaun-Chun; Lee, Wen-Che; Han, Jung

    2014-01-01

    Current steering effect of InGaN light emitting diode (LED) structure was demonstrated by forming a high resistivity GaN nanoporous structure. Disk-array patterns with current-injection bridge structures were fabricated on InGaN LED devices through a focused ion beam (FIB) system. GaN nanoporous structure was formed around the FIB-drilled holes through a electrochemical (EC) wet-etching process on a n-type GaN:Si layer under the InGaN active layer. High emission intensity and small peak wavelength blueshift phenomenon of the electroluminescence spectra were observed in the EC-treated region compared with the non-treated region. The branch-like nanoporous structure was formed along the lateral etched direction to steer the injection current in 5 μm-width bridge structures. In the FIB-drilled hole structure, high light emission intensity of the central-disk region was observed by enlarging the bridge width to 10 μm, with a 5 μm EC-treated width, that reduced the current steering effect and increased the light scattering effect on the nanoporous structure. The EC-treated GaN:Si nanoporous structure acted as a high light scattering structure and a current steering structure that has potential on the current confinement for vertical cavity surface emitting laser applications. - Highlights: • High resistivity nanoporous-GaN formed in InGaN LED through electrochemical process. • Branch-like nanoporous in 5 μm-width bridge structure can steer the injection current. • Nanoporous GaN acted as s light scattering and current steering structures in InGaN LED

  1. Nanoporous ionic organic networks: from synthesis to materials applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian-Ke; Antonietti, Markus; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed rapid progress in the synthesis of nanoporous organic networks or polymer frameworks for various potential applications. Generally speaking, functionalization of porous networks to add extra properties and enhance materials performance could be achieved either during the pore formation (thus a concurrent approach) or by post-synthetic modification (a sequential approach). Nanoporous organic networks which include ion pairs bound in a covalent manner are of specia...

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical study of Pt-based nanoporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingpeng; Holt-Hindle, Peter; MacDonald, Duncan; Thomas, Dan F.; Chen Aicheng

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a variety of Pt-based bimetallic nanostructured materials including nanoporous Pt, Pt-Ru, Pt-Ir, Pt-Pd and Pt-Pb networks have been directly grown on titanium substrates via a facile hydrothermal method. The as-fabricated electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical methods. The active surface areas of these nanoporous Pt-based alloy catalysts are increased by over 68 (Pt-Pd), 69 (Pt-Ru) and 113 (Pt-Ir) fold compared to a polycrystalline Pt electrode. All these synthesized nanoporous electrodes exhibit superb electrocatalytic performance towards electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid. Among the five nanoporous Pt-based electrodes, the Pt-Ir shows the highest peak current density at +0.50 V, with 68 times of enhancement compared to the polycrystalline Pt for methanol oxidation, and with 86 times of enhancement in formic acid oxidation; whereas the catalytic activity of the nanoporous Pt-Pb electrode outperforms the other materials in formic acid oxidation at the low potential regions, delivering an enhanced current density by 280-fold compared to the polycrystalline Pt at +0.15 V. The new approach described in this study is suitable for synthesizing a wide range of bi-metallic and tri-metallic nanoporous materials, desirable for electrochemical sensor design and potential application in fuel cells

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical study of Pt-based nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jingpeng [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Holt-Hindle, Peter; MacDonald, Duncan [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Thomas, Dan F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chen Aicheng [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada)], E-mail: aicheng.chen@lakeheadu.ca

    2008-10-01

    In the present work, a variety of Pt-based bimetallic nanostructured materials including nanoporous Pt, Pt-Ru, Pt-Ir, Pt-Pd and Pt-Pb networks have been directly grown on titanium substrates via a facile hydrothermal method. The as-fabricated electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical methods. The active surface areas of these nanoporous Pt-based alloy catalysts are increased by over 68 (Pt-Pd), 69 (Pt-Ru) and 113 (Pt-Ir) fold compared to a polycrystalline Pt electrode. All these synthesized nanoporous electrodes exhibit superb electrocatalytic performance towards electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid. Among the five nanoporous Pt-based electrodes, the Pt-Ir shows the highest peak current density at +0.50 V, with 68 times of enhancement compared to the polycrystalline Pt for methanol oxidation, and with 86 times of enhancement in formic acid oxidation; whereas the catalytic activity of the nanoporous Pt-Pb electrode outperforms the other materials in formic acid oxidation at the low potential regions, delivering an enhanced current density by 280-fold compared to the polycrystalline Pt at +0.15 V. The new approach described in this study is suitable for synthesizing a wide range of bi-metallic and tri-metallic nanoporous materials, desirable for electrochemical sensor design and potential application in fuel cells.0.

  4. Synthesis and electrochemical study of Pt-based nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingpeng [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Holt-Hindle, Peter; MacDonald, Duncan; Chen, Aicheng [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Thomas, Dan F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2008-10-01

    In the present work, a variety of Pt-based bimetallic nanostructured materials including nanoporous Pt, Pt-Ru, Pt-Ir, Pt-Pd and Pt-Pb networks have been directly grown on titanium substrates via a facile hydrothermal method. The as-fabricated electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical methods. The active surface areas of these nanoporous Pt-based alloy catalysts are increased by over 68 (Pt-Pd), 69 (Pt-Ru) and 113 (Pt-Ir) fold compared to a polycrystalline Pt electrode. All these synthesized nanoporous electrodes exhibit superb electrocatalytic performance towards electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid. Among the five nanoporous Pt-based electrodes, the Pt-Ir shows the highest peak current density at +0.50 V, with 68 times of enhancement compared to the polycrystalline Pt for methanol oxidation, and with 86 times of enhancement in formic acid oxidation; whereas the catalytic activity of the nanoporous Pt-Pb electrode outperforms the other materials in formic acid oxidation at the low potential regions, delivering an enhanced current density by 280-fold compared to the polycrystalline Pt at +0.15 V. The new approach described in this study is suitable for synthesizing a wide range of bi-metallic and tri-metallic nanoporous materials, desirable for electrochemical sensor design and potential application in fuel cells. (author)

  5. Direct observation of DNA translocation influenced by electrically gated nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Genki; Moriya, Hiroki; Tsukahira, Kenta; Yano, Satoshi; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    One of remarkable recent developments in the solid state nanopore based DNA analysis is adding the ability to control electric potential near nanopore as a gate electrode by patterning metal in or on nanopore. In this approach, better control of DNA translocations for example, slowing down the translocation speed might be expected. We have fabricated insulator-metal-insulator nanopores of rather large 100 nm pore in diameter. The 100 nm diameter pores allow us to observe the translocation of lambda-DNA molecules directly by means of fluorescence microscopy without heavy clogging of the DNA molecules into the pores. By controlling ?gate voltage? on metal relative to the cis and trans voltages, the translocation rates of DNA are able to change. Interestingly, applying pulse voltage to the gate metal near 100 ms to reverse the direction of the electric field near the cis side of nanopore reverses the direction of the DNA translocation instantaneously. This in fact provides us a new way to repeat translocation of the same DNA molecule. Furthermore, repeating the pulse tends to clear off the clogged DNA molecules in nanopore. We will present more details of these phenomena caused by the gate voltages.

  6. Streaming current magnetic fields in a charged nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Abraham; Taheri, Peyman; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields induced by currents created in pressure driven flows inside a solid-state charged nanopore were modeled by numerically solving a system of steady state continuum partial differential equations, i.e., Poisson, Nernst-Planck, Ampere and Navier-Stokes equations (PNPANS). This analysis was based on non-dimensional transport governing equations that were scaled using Debye length as the characteristic length scale, and applied to a finite length cylindrical nano-channel. The comparison of numerical and analytical studies shows an excellent agreement and verified the magnetic fields density both inside and outside the nanopore. The radially non-uniform currents resulted in highly non-uniform magnetic fields within the nanopore that decay as 1/r outside the nanopore. It is worth noting that for either streaming currents or streaming potential cases, the maximum magnetic field occurred inside the pore in the vicinity of nanopore wall, as opposed to a cylindrical conductor that carries a steady electric current where the maximum magnetic fields occur at the perimeter of conductor. Based on these results, it is suggested and envisaged that non-invasive external magnetic fields readouts generated by streaming/ionic currents may be viewed as secondary electronic signatures of biomolecules to complement and enhance current DNA nanopore sequencing techniques. PMID:27833119

  7. Effects of pore design on mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Nicholas; Becton, Matthew; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous silicon has been emerging as a powerful building block for next-generation sensors, catalysts, transistors, and tissue scaffolds. The capability to design novel devices with desired mechanical properties is paramount to their reliability and serviceability. In order to bring further resolution to the highly variable mechanical characteristics of nanoporous silicon, here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling laws versus the features of interior ligaments. Results show that pore shape and pattern dictate stress accumulation inside the designed structure, leading to the corresponding failure signature, such as stretching-dominated, bending-dominated, or stochastic failure signatures, in nanoporous silicon. The nanostructure of the material is also seen to drive or mute size effects such as “smaller is stronger” and “smaller is ductile”. This investigation provides useful insight into the behavior of nanoporous silicon and how one might leverage its promising applications. - Graphical abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling trends versus the features of interior ligaments.

  8. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  9. Membrane Curvature Affects the Formation of α-Hemolysin Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-17

    Membrane proteins perform their functions within or on the lipid membrane, and lipid compositions are known to affect membrane protein integration and activity. Recently, the geometric aspect of membrane curvature was shown to play an important role in membrane protein behavior. Certain membrane proteins are known to sense the curvature of the membrane and to preferentially bind to highly curved membranes. However, although numerous membrane proteins assemble to form homo- or heterocomplexes and perform their biological functions, the dependence of membrane protein assembly on membrane curvature remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the membrane curvature on the nanopore formation of α-hemolysin (AH), which is a toxic membrane protein derived from Staphylococcus aureus. The AH protein binds to the membrane as a monomer, assembles to form a heptamer, and forms a nanopore. By simultaneously measuring the molecules bound to the membrane and the activities of the nanopore on the membrane, we determined the nanopore formation ratio of AH. We used various sizes of liposomes and analyzed the dependence on the membrane curvature by using flow cytometry. Combining the results for positive and negative curvature, we found that the nanopore formation ratio of AH was curvature sensitive and was higher in a flat membrane than in a curved membrane. Furthermore, the nanopore formation ratio was almost identical or relatively higher in membranes with negative curvature than those with positive curvature.

  10. Surface charge modulated aptasensor in a single glass conical nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sheng-Lin; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Zheng, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Jin-Lei; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we have proposed a label-free nanopore-based biosensing strategy for protein detection by performing the DNA-protein interaction inside a single glass conical nanopore. A lysozyme binding aptamer (LBA) was used to functionalize the walls of glass nanopore via siloxane chemistry and negatively charged recognition sites were thus generated. The covalent modification procedures and their recognition towards lysozyme of the single conical nanopore were characterized via ionic current passing through the nanopore membrane, which was measured by recording the current-voltage (I-V) curves in 1mM KCl electrolyte at pH=7.4. With the occurring of recognition event, the negatively charged wall was partially neutralized by the positively charged lysozyme molecules, leading to a sensitive change of the surface charge-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Our results not only demonstrate excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards the target protein, but also suggest a route to extend this nanopore-based sensing strategy to the biosensing platform designs of a wide range of proteins based on a charge modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Poretools: a toolkit for analyzing nanopore sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Nicholas J; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2014-12-01

    Nanopore sequencing may be the next disruptive technology in genomics, owing to its ability to detect single DNA molecules without prior amplification, lack of reliance on expensive optical components, and the ability to sequence long fragments. The MinION™ from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) is the first nanopore sequencer to be commercialized and is now available to early-access users. The MinION™ is a USB-connected, portable nanopore sequencer that permits real-time analysis of streaming event data. Currently, the research community lacks a standardized toolkit for the analysis of nanopore datasets. We introduce poretools, a flexible toolkit for exploring datasets generated by nanopore sequencing devices from MinION™ for the purposes of quality control and downstream analysis. Poretools operates directly on the native FAST5 (an application of the HDF5 standard) file format produced by ONT and provides a wealth of format conversion utilities and data exploration and visualization tools. Poretools is an open-source software and is written in Python as both a suite of command line utilities and a Python application programming interface. Source code is freely available in Github at https://www.github.com/arq5x/poretools. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  13. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, S.A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Bayati, M.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Petrochenko, P.E. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Stafslien, S.; Daniels, J.; Cilz, N. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Comstock, D.J.; Elam, J.W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Narayan, R.J., E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.com [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  14. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  15. Trees and Hierarchical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Arndt

    1990-01-01

    The "raison d'etre" of hierarchical dustering theory stems from one basic phe­ nomenon: This is the notorious non-transitivity of similarity relations. In spite of the fact that very often two objects may be quite similar to a third without being that similar to each other, one still wants to dassify objects according to their similarity. This should be achieved by grouping them into a hierarchy of non-overlapping dusters such that any two objects in ~ne duster appear to be more related to each other than they are to objects outside this duster. In everyday life, as well as in essentially every field of scientific investigation, there is an urge to reduce complexity by recognizing and establishing reasonable das­ sification schemes. Unfortunately, this is counterbalanced by the experience of seemingly unavoidable deadlocks caused by the existence of sequences of objects, each comparatively similar to the next, but the last rather different from the first.

  16. Transmutations across hierarchical levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    The development of large-scale ecological models depends implicitly on a concept known as hierarchy theory which views biological systems in a series of hierarchical levels (i.e., organism, population, trophic level, ecosystem). The theory states that an explanation of a biological phenomenon is provided when it is shown to be the consequence of the activities of the system's components, which are themselves systems in the next lower level of the hierarchy. Thus, the behavior of a population is explained by the behavior of the organisms in the population. The initial step in any modeling project is, therefore, to identify the system components and the interactions between them. A series of examples of transmutations in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are presented to show how and why changes occur. The types of changes are summarized and possible implications of transmutation for hierarchy theory, for the modeler, and for the ecological theoretician are discussed

  17. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  18. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors: towards a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Bala Murali; Polans, James; Comer, Jeffrey; Sridhar, Supriya; Wendell, David; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Bashir, Rashid

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are highly versatile platforms for the rapid, label-free electrical detection and analysis of single molecules, applicable to next generation DNA sequencing. The versatility of this technology allows for both large scale device integration and interfacing with biological systems. Here we report on the development of a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore platform that incorporates a highly mobile lipid bilayer on a single solid-state Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensor, for the potential reconstitution of ion channels and biological nanopores. Such a system seeks to combine the superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical stability of Al(2)O(3) solid-state nanopores with the chemical specificity of biological nanopores. Bilayers on Al(2)O(3) exhibit higher diffusivity than those formed on TiO(2) and SiO(2) substrates, attributed to the presence of a thick hydration layer on Al(2)O(3), a key requirement to preserving the biological functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the electrostatic repulsion between the dipole of the DOPC headgroup and the positively charged Al(2)O(3) surface may be responsible for the enhanced thickness of this hydration layer. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors exhibit excellent electrical properties and enhanced mechanical stability (GΩ seals for over 50 h), making this technology ideal for use in ion channel electrophysiology, the screening of ion channel active drugs and future integration with biological nanopores such as α-hemolysin and MspA for rapid single molecule DNA sequencing. This technology can find broad application in bio-nanotechnology.

  19. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous polypyrrole thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mei [Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Yuan Jinying [Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)], E-mail: yuanjy@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi Gaoquan [Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)], E-mail: gshi@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-04-30

    Polypyrrole thin films with pores in nanometer scale were synthesized by direct electrochemical oxidation of pyrrole in a mixed electrolyte of isopropyl alcohol, boron trifluoride diethyl etherate, sodium dodecylsulfonate and poly(ethylene glycol) using well-aligned ZnO nanowires arrays as templates. The thin films exhibit high conductivity of ca. {sigma}{sub rt} {approx} 20.5 s/cm and can be driven to bend during redox processes in 1.0 M lithium perchlorate aqueous solution. The movement rate of an actuator based on this nanoporous film was measured to be over 90{sup o}/s at a driving potential of 0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl)

  20. Nanoporous-carbon films for microsensor preconcentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Kottenstette, R. J.; Tallant, D. R.; Yelton, W. G.

    2002-05-01

    Nanoporous-carbon (NPC) films are grown using physical processes such as low-power pulsed-laser deposition with attenuation of the ablated carbon species kinetic energy attained by using an inert background gas. With room-temperature growth and negligible residual stress, NPC can coat nearly any substrate to any desired thickness. Control of the deposition energetics yields precise morphology, density, and hence, porosity, with no discernable variation in chemical bonding. We produce NPC films 8 μm thick with density <0.2 g/cm3. The well-controlled porosity, i.e., available surface area, is demonstrated by using films with different thicknesses as a preconcentrator for a nerve-gas simulant.

  1. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  2. Multilayer Nanoporous Graphene Membranes for Water Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Lin, Li-Chiang; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-10

    While single-layer nanoporous graphene (NPG) has shown promise as a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination membrane, multilayer graphene membranes can be synthesized more economically than the single-layer material. In this work, we build upon the knowledge gained to date toward single-layer graphene to explore how multilayer NPG might serve as a RO membrane in water desalination using classical molecular dynamic simulations. We show that, while multilayer NPG exhibits similarly promising desalination properties to single-layer membranes, their separation performance can be designed by manipulating various configurational variables in the multilayer case. This work establishes an atomic-level understanding of the effects of additional NPG layers, layer separation, and pore alignment on desalination performance, providing useful guidelines for the design of multilayer NPG membranes.

  3. High Capacity Hydrogen Storage on Nanoporous Biocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Wood, Mikael; Gordon, Michael; Parilla, Phillip; Benham, Michael; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, Fred; Pfeifer, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (http://all-craft.missouri.edu) has been optimizing nanoporous biocarbon for high capacity hydrogen storage. The hydrogen storage was measured gravimetrically and volumetrically (Sievert's apparatus). These measurements have been validated by NREL and Hiden Isochema. Sample S-33/k, our current best performer, stores 73-91 g H2/kg carbon at 77 K and 47 bar, and 1.0-1.6 g H2/kg carbon at 293 K and 47 bar. Hydrogen isotherms run by Hiden Isochema have given experimental binding energies of 8.8 kJ/mol compared to the binding energy of graphite of 5 kJ/mol. Results from a novel boron doping technique will also be presented. The benefits and validity of using boron-doping on carbon will also be discussed.

  4. Detecting Hierarchical Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    . On synthetic and real data we demonstrate that our model can detect hierarchical structure leading to better link-prediction than competing models. Our model can be used to detect if a network exhibits hierarchical structure, thereby leading to a better comprehension and statistical account the network....

  5. Static Correctness of Hierarchical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1990-01-01

    A system of hierarchical, fully recursive types in a truly imperative language allows program fragments written for small types to be reused for all larger types. To exploit this property to enable type-safe hierarchical procedures, it is necessary to impose a static requirement on procedure calls...

  6. Lung injury induced by TiO2 nanoparticles depends on their structural features: size, shape, crystal phases, and surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangxue; Fan, Yubo

    2014-12-03

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, a variety of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are being produced. Nanotoxicology has become a hot topic in many fields, as researchers attempt to elucidate the potential adverse health effects of NPs. The biological activity of NPs strongly depends on physicochemical parameters but these are not routinely considered in toxicity screening, such as dose metrics. In this work, nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2), one of the most commonly produced and widely used NPs, is put forth as a representative. The correlation between the lung toxicity and pulmonary cell impairment related to TiO2 NPs and its unusual structural features, including size, shape, crystal phases, and surface coating, is reviewed in detail. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in pulmonary inflammation in response to the properties of TiO2 NPs is also briefly described. To fully understand the potential biological effects of NPs in toxicity screening, we highly recommend that the size, crystal phase, dispersion and agglomeration status, surface coating, and chemical composition should be most appropriately characterized.

  7. Acute toxicity of two CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots with different surface coating in Daphnia magna under various light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoun; Ji, Kyunghee; Kim, Jungkon; Park, Chansik; Lim, Kook Hee; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Choi, Kyungho

    2010-12-01

    With an increasing use of quantum dots (QDs) in many applications, their potential hazard is of growing concern. However, little is known about their ecotoxicity, especially in vivo. In the present study, we employed freshwater macroinvertebrate, Daphnia magna, to evaluate toxicity characteristics of cadmium selenide/zinc selenide (CdSe/ZnSe) in relation to surface coatings, e.g., mercaptopropionic acid QD ((MPA)QD), and gum arabic/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide QD ((GA/TOPO)QD), and light conditions, i.e., dark, fluorescent light, environmental level of ultraviolet (UV) light, and sunlight. The results of the present study showed that D. magna was more susceptible to (GA/TOPO)QD exposure compared to (MPA)QD. The surface coating of QD appeared to determine the stability of QDs and hence the toxicity, potentially by size change of or the release of toxic components from QDs. However, (GA/TOPO)QD was still less toxic than the equivalent level of CdCl₂. The toxicity of all the tested compounds increased by changing the light condition from dark to white fluorescence to UV-B light, and to natural sunlight. The effect of light condition on QDs toxicity could also be explained by photostability of the QDs, which would affect size of the particle, release of toxic component ions, and generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering increasing use of QDs in various applications, their environmental fates and corresponding toxic potentials deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Biomimetic glass nanopores employing aptamer gates responsive to a small molecule†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelow, Alexis E.; Schepelina, Olga; White, Ryan J.; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation of 20 and 65 nm radii glass nanopores whose surface is modified with DNA aptamers controlling the molecular transport through the nanopores in response to small molecule binding. PMID:20865192

  9. High-Coverage Long Read DNA Sequencing with the Oxford Nanopore MinION

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Miten

    2017-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing was conceived in 1989 by Dave Deamer (UCSC). Over two decades of development from research laboratories and, later on, Oxford Nanopore Technologies resulted in the MinION nanopore sequencer. This work describes the developments in MinION nanopore sequencing and software, and technical milestones achieved since the MinION’s release in 2014. These developments include establishing DNA reads that exceed 200 kb+ lengths and direct, simultaneous detection of nucleotide modifica...

  10. Hierarchical multifunctional nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2014-03-01

    properties of the fibers can also be improved by the growth of nanotubes on the fibers. The combination of the two will produce super-performing materials, not currently available. Since the improvement of fiber starts with carbon nanotube grown on micron-size fibers (and matrix with a nanomaterial) to give the macro-composite, this process is a bottom-up "hierarchical" advanced manufacturing process, and since the resulting nanocomposites will have "multifunctionality" with improve properties in various functional areas such as chemical and fire resistance, damping, stiffness, strength, fracture toughness, EMI shielding, and electrical and thermal conductivity, the resulting nanocomposites are in fact "multifunctional hierarchical nanocomposites." In this paper, the current state of knowledge in processing, performance, and characterization of these materials are addressed.

  11. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  12. A Scalable Synthesis Pathway to Nanoporous Metal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coaty, Christopher; Zhou, Hongyao; Liu, Haodong; Liu, Ping

    2018-01-23

    A variety of nanoporous transition metals, Fe, Co, Au, Cu, and others, have been readily formed by a scalable, room-temperature synthesis process. Metal halide compounds are reacted with organolithium reductants in a nonpolar solvent to form metal/lithium halide nanocomposites. The lithium halide is then dissolved out of the nanocomposite with a common organic solvent, leaving behind a continuous, three-dimensional network of metal filaments that form a nanoporous structure. This approach is applicable to both noble metals (Cu, Au, Ag) and less-noble transition metals (Co, Fe, Ni). The microstructures of these nanoporous transition metals are tunable, as controlling the formation of the metal structure in the nanocomposite dictates the final metal structure. Microscopy studies and nitrogen adsorption analysis show these materials form pores ranging from 2 to 50 nm with specific surface areas from 1.0 m 2 /g to 160 m 2 /g. Our analysis also shows that pore size, pore volume, and filament size of the nanoporous metal networks depend on the mobility of target metal and the amount of lithium halide produced by the conversion reaction. Further, it has been demonstrated that hybrid nanoporous structures of two or more metals could be synthesized by performing the same process on mixtures of precursor compounds. Metals (e.g., Co and Cu) have been found to stabilize each other in nanoporous forms, resulting in smaller pore sizes and higher surface areas than each element in their pure forms. This scalable and versatile synthesis pathway greatly expands our access to additional compositions and microstructures of nanoporous metals.

  13. Ion current rectification, limiting and overlimiting conductances in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Van Roy, Willem; Idrissi, Hosni; Charlier, Daniel; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports on Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) simulations of solid-state nanopores have focused on steady state behaviour under simplified boundary conditions. These are Neumann boundary conditions for the voltage at the pore walls, and in some cases also Donnan equilibrium boundary conditions for concentrations and voltages at both entrances of the nanopore. In this paper, we report time-dependent and steady state PNP simulations under less restrictive boundary conditions, including Neumann boundary conditions applied throughout the membrane relatively far away from the nanopore. We simulated ion currents through cylindrical and conical nanopores with several surface charge configurations, studying the spatial and temporal dependence of the currents contributed by each ion species. This revealed that, due to slow co-diffusion of oppositely charged ions, steady state is generally not reached in simulations or in practice. Furthermore, it is shown that ion concentration polarization is responsible for the observed limiting conductances and ion current rectification in nanopores with asymmetric surface charges or shapes. Hence, after more than a decade of collective research attempting to understand the nature of ion current rectification in solid-state nanopores, a relatively intuitive model is retrieved. Moreover, we measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics of rectifying silicon nitride nanopores presenting overlimiting conductances. The similarity between measurement and simulation shows that overlimiting conductances can result from the increased conductance of the electric double-layer at the membrane surface at the depletion side due to voltage-induced polarization charges. The MATLAB source code of the simulation software is available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  14. Ion current rectification, limiting and overlimiting conductances in nanopores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth van Oeffelen

    Full Text Available Previous reports on Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP simulations of solid-state nanopores have focused on steady state behaviour under simplified boundary conditions. These are Neumann boundary conditions for the voltage at the pore walls, and in some cases also Donnan equilibrium boundary conditions for concentrations and voltages at both entrances of the nanopore. In this paper, we report time-dependent and steady state PNP simulations under less restrictive boundary conditions, including Neumann boundary conditions applied throughout the membrane relatively far away from the nanopore. We simulated ion currents through cylindrical and conical nanopores with several surface charge configurations, studying the spatial and temporal dependence of the currents contributed by each ion species. This revealed that, due to slow co-diffusion of oppositely charged ions, steady state is generally not reached in simulations or in practice. Furthermore, it is shown that ion concentration polarization is responsible for the observed limiting conductances and ion current rectification in nanopores with asymmetric surface charges or shapes. Hence, after more than a decade of collective research attempting to understand the nature of ion current rectification in solid-state nanopores, a relatively intuitive model is retrieved. Moreover, we measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics of rectifying silicon nitride nanopores presenting overlimiting conductances. The similarity between measurement and simulation shows that overlimiting conductances can result from the increased conductance of the electric double-layer at the membrane surface at the depletion side due to voltage-induced polarization charges. The MATLAB source code of the simulation software is available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  15. Voltage Gating of a Biomimetic Nanopore: Electrowetting of a Hydrophobic Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Jemma L; Song, Chen; Wallace, E Jayne; Sansom, Mark S P

    2017-02-28

    It is desirable that nanopores that are components of biosensors are gated, i.e., capable of controllable switching between closed (impermeable) and open (permeable) states. A central hydrophobic barrier within a nanopore may act as a voltage-dependent gate via electrowetting, i.e., changes in nanopore surface wettability by application of an electric field. We use "computational electrophysiology" simulations to demonstrate and characterize electrowetting of a biomimetic nanopore containing a hydrophobic gate. We show that a hydrophobic gate in a model β-barrel nanopore can be functionally opened by electrowetting at voltages that do not electroporate lipid bilayers. During the process of electrowetting, voltage-induced alignment of water dipoles occurs within the hydrophobic gate region of the nanopore, with water entry preceding permeation of ions through the opened nanopore. When the ionic imbalance that generates a transbilayer potential is dissipated, water is expelled from the hydrophobic gate and the nanopore recloses. The open nanopore formed by electrowetting of a "featureless" β-barrel is anionic selective due to the transmembrane dipole potential resulting from binding of Na + ions to the headgroup regions of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Thus, hydrophobic barriers can provide voltage-dependent gates in designed biomimetic nanopores. This extends our understanding of hydrophobic gating in synthetic and biological nanopores, providing a framework for the design of functional nanopores with tailored gating functionality.

  16. Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Ding, Chuntao; Xu, Jinliang; Wang, Shangguang

    2018-01-18

    The Internet of Things (IoT) generates lots of high-dimensional sensor intelligent data. The processing of high-dimensional data (e.g., data visualization and data classification) is very difficult, so it requires excellent subspace learning algorithms to learn a latent subspace to preserve the intrinsic structure of the high-dimensional data, and abandon the least useful information in the subsequent processing. In this context, many subspace learning algorithms have been presented. However, in the process of transforming the high-dimensional data into the low-dimensional space, the huge difference between the sum of inter-class distance and the sum of intra-class distance for distinct data may cause a bias problem. That means that the impact of intra-class distance is overwhelmed. To address this problem, we propose a novel algorithm called Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis (HDA). It minimizes the sum of intra-class distance first, and then maximizes the sum of inter-class distance. This proposed method balances the bias from the inter-class and that from the intra-class to achieve better performance. Extensive experiments are conducted on several benchmark face datasets. The results reveal that HDA obtains better performance than other dimensionality reduction algorithms.

  17. Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT generates lots of high-dimensional sensor intelligent data. The processing of high-dimensional data (e.g., data visualization and data classification is very difficult, so it requires excellent subspace learning algorithms to learn a latent subspace to preserve the intrinsic structure of the high-dimensional data, and abandon the least useful information in the subsequent processing. In this context, many subspace learning algorithms have been presented. However, in the process of transforming the high-dimensional data into the low-dimensional space, the huge difference between the sum of inter-class distance and the sum of intra-class distance for distinct data may cause a bias problem. That means that the impact of intra-class distance is overwhelmed. To address this problem, we propose a novel algorithm called Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis (HDA. It minimizes the sum of intra-class distance first, and then maximizes the sum of inter-class distance. This proposed method balances the bias from the inter-class and that from the intra-class to achieve better performance. Extensive experiments are conducted on several benchmark face datasets. The results reveal that HDA obtains better performance than other dimensionality reduction algorithms.

  18. Directed Hierarchical Patterning of Polycarbonate Bisphenol A Glass Surface along Predictable Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a new approach in designing textured and hierarchical surfaces on polycarbonate bisphenol A type glass to improve hydrophobicity and dust repellent application for solar panels. Solvent- and vapor-induced crystallization of thermoplastic glass polycarbonate bisphenol A (PC is carried out to create hierarchically structured surfaces. In this approach dichloromethane (DCM and acetone are used in sequence. Samples are initially immersed in DCM liquid to generate nanopores, followed by exposing to acetone vapor resulting in the generation of hierarchical structure along the interporous sites. The effects of exposure time on the size, density, and distance of the generated spherules and gaps are studied and correlated with the optical transmittance and contact angle measurements at the surface. At optimized exposure time a contact angle of 98° was achieved with 80% optical transmittance. To further increase the hydrophobicity while maintaining optical properties, the hierarchical surfaces were coated with a transparent composite of tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursor and hexamethyldisilazane as silylation agent resulting in an average contact angle of 135.8° and transmittance of around 70%. FTIR and AFM characterization techniques are employed to study the composition and morphology of the generated surfaces.

  19. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  20. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  1. Nanowire-nanopore transistor sensor for DNA detection during translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping; Xiong, Qihua; Fang, Ying; Qing, Quan; Lieber, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Nanopore sequencing, as a promising low cost, high throughput sequencing technique, has been proposed more than a decade ago. Due to the incompatibility between small ionic current signal and fast translocation speed and the technical difficulties on large scale integration of nanopore for direct ionic current sequencing, alternative methods rely on integrated DNA sensors have been proposed, such as using capacitive coupling or tunnelling current etc. But none of them have been experimentally demonstrated yet. Here we show that for the first time an amplified sensor signal has been experimentally recorded from a nanowire-nanopore field effect transistor sensor during DNA translocation. Independent multi-channel recording was also demonstrated for the first time. Our results suggest that the signal is from highly localized potential change caused by DNA translocation in none-balanced buffer condition. Given this method may produce larger signal for smaller nanopores, we hope our experiment can be a starting point for a new generation of nanopore sequencing devices with larger signal, higher bandwidth and large-scale multiplexing capability and finally realize the ultimate goal of low cost high throughput sequencing.

  2. Fabricating Nanodots using Lift-Off of a Nanopore Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Ramsey, Christopher R.; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    A process for fabricating a planar array of dots having characteristic dimensions of the order of several nanometers to several hundred nanometers involves the formation and use of a thin alumina nanopore template on a semiconductor substrate. The dot material is deposited in the nanopores, then the template is lifted off the substrate after the dots have been formed. This process is expected to be a basis for development of other, similar nanofabrication processes for relatively inexpensive mass production of nanometerscale optical, optoelectronic, electronic, and magnetic devices. Alumina nanopore templates are self-organized structures that result from anodization of aluminum under appropriate conditions. Alumina nanopore templates have been regarded as attractive for use in fabricating the devices mentioned above, but prior efforts to use alumina nanopore templates for this purpose have not been successful. One reason for the lack of success is that the aspect ratios (ratios between depth and diameter) of the pores have been too large: large aspect ratios can result in blockage of deposition and/or can prevent successful lift-off. The development of the present process was motivated partly by a requirement to reduce aspect ratios to values (of the order of 10) for which there is little or no blockage of deposition and attempts at lift-off are more likely to be successful. The fabrication process is outlined.

  3. Antibacterial hemostatic dressings with nanoporous bioglass containing silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Gangfeng Hu,1 Luwei Xiao,2 Peijian Tong,2 Dawei Bi,1 Hui Wang,1 Haitao Ma,1 Gang Zhu,1 Hui Liu21The First People’s Hospital of Xiaoshan, Hangzhou, China; 2Zhejiang Traditional Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, ChinaAbstract: Nanoporous bioglass containing silver (n-BGS was fabricated using the sol-gel method, with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template. The results showed that n-BGS with nanoporous structure had a surface area of 467 m2/g and a pore size of around 6 nm, and exhibited a significantly higher water absorption rate compared with BGS without nanopores. The n-BGS containing small amounts of silver (Ag had a slight effect on its surface area. The n-BGS containing 0.02 wt% Ag, without cytotoxicity, had a good antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, and its antibacterial rate reached 99% in 12 hours. The n-BGS’s clotting ability significantly decreased prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, indicating n-BGS with a higher surface area could significantly promote blood clotting (by decreasing clotting time compared with BGS without nanopores. Effective hemostasis was achieved in skin injury models, and bleeding time was reduced. It is suggested that n-BGS could be a good dressing, with antibacterial and hemostatic properties, which might shorten wound bleeding time and control hemorrhage.Keywords: antibacterial, bioglass, cytotoxicity, dressing, hemostasis, nanopore, silver

  4. Biomimetic novel nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauline, S. Anne; Rajendran, N., E-mail: nrajendran@annauniv.edu

    2014-01-30

    Niobium oxide was synthesized by sol–gel methodology and a crystalline, nanoporous and adherent coating of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was deposited on 316L SS using the spin coating technique and heat treatment. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The coating was characterized using attenuated total reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Mechanical studies confirmed that the coating has excellent adherence to the substrate and the hardness value of the coating was excellent. Contact angle analysis showed increased hydrophilicity for the coated substrate. In vitro bioactivity test confirmed that the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating with nanoporous morphology facilitated the growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp). This was further confirmed by the solution analysis test where increased uptake of calcium and phosphorous ions from simulated body fluid (SBF) was observed. Electrochemical evaluation of the coating confirmed that the crystalline coating is insulative and protective in nature and offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS. Thus, this study confirmed that the nanoporous crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating conferred bioactivity and enhanced corrosion resistance on 316L SS.

  5. MspA nanopores from subunit dimers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Pavlenok

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore

  6. Vapor nucleation paths in lyophobic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Antonio; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2018-04-19

    In recent years, technologies revolving around the use of lyophobic nanopores gained considerable attention in both fundamental and applied research. Owing to the enormous internal surface area, heterogeneous lyophobic systems (HLS), constituted by a nanoporous lyophobic material and a non-wetting liquid, are promising candidates for the efficient storage or dissipation of mechanical energy. These diverse applications both rely on the forced intrusion and extrusion of the non-wetting liquid inside the pores; the behavior of HLS for storage or dissipation depends on the hysteresis between these two processes, which, in turn, are determined by the microscopic details of the system. It is easy to understand that molecular simulations provide an unmatched tool for understanding phenomena at these scales. In this contribution we use advanced atomistic simulation techniques in order to study the nucleation of vapor bubbles inside lyophobic mesopores. The use of the string method in collective variables allows us to overcome the computational challenges associated with the activated nature of the phenomenon, rendering a detailed picture of nucleation in confinement. In particular, this rare event method efficiently searches for the most probable nucleation path(s) in otherwise intractable, high-dimensional free-energy landscapes. Results reveal the existence of several independent nucleation paths associated with different free-energy barriers. In particular, there is a family of asymmetric transition paths, in which a bubble forms at one of the walls; the other family involves the formation of axisymmetric bubbles with an annulus shape. The computed free-energy profiles reveal that the asymmetric path is significantly more probable than the symmetric one, while the exact position where the asymmetric bubble forms is less relevant for the free energetics of the process. A comparison of the atomistic results with continuum models is also presented, showing how, for simple

  7. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  8. Synthesis of ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, G.Q.; Shen, W.Z.; Zheng, M.J.; Fan, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    An effective approach is demonstrated for growing ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering deposition on porous alumina membranes (PAMs). The realization of highly ordered hexagonal ZnO nanopore arrays benefits from the unique properties of ZnO (hexagonal structure, polar surfaces, and preferable growth directions) and PAMs (controllable hexagonal nanopores and localized negative charges). Further evidence has been shown through the effects of nanorod size and thermal treatment of PAMs on the yielded morphology of ZnO nanopore arrays. This approach opens the possibility of creating regular semiconducting nanopore arrays for the application of filters, sensors, and templates

  9. Hierarchical architecture of active knits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, Julianna; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann

    2013-01-01

    Nature eloquently utilizes hierarchical structures to form the world around us. Applying the hierarchical architecture paradigm to smart materials can provide a basis for a new genre of actuators which produce complex actuation motions. One promising example of cellular architecture—active knits—provides complex three-dimensional distributed actuation motions with expanded operational performance through a hierarchically organized structure. The hierarchical structure arranges a single fiber of active material, such as shape memory alloys (SMAs), into a cellular network of interlacing adjacent loops according to a knitting grid. This paper defines a four-level hierarchical classification of knit structures: the basic knit loop, knit patterns, grid patterns, and restructured grids. Each level of the hierarchy provides increased architectural complexity, resulting in expanded kinematic actuation motions of active knits. The range of kinematic actuation motions are displayed through experimental examples of different SMA active knits. The results from this paper illustrate and classify the ways in which each level of the hierarchical knit architecture leverages the performance of the base smart material to generate unique actuation motions, providing necessary insight to best exploit this new actuation paradigm. (paper)

  10. How Much Surface Coating of Hydrophobic Azithromycin Is Sufficient to Prevent Moisture-Induced Decrease in Aerosolisation of Hygroscopic Amorphous Colistin Powder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Loh, Zhi Hui; Yu, Jiaqi; Sun, Si-Ping; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-01

    Aerosolisation performance of hygroscopic particles of colistin could be compromised at elevated humidity due to increased capillary forces. Co-spray drying colistin with a hydrophobic drug is known to provide a protective coating on the composite particle surfaces against moisture-induced reduction in aerosolisation performance; however, the effects of component ratio on surface coating quality and powder aerosolisation at elevated relative humidities are unknown. In this study, we have systematically examined the effects of mass ratio of hydrophobic azithromycin on surface coating quality and aerosolisation performance of the co-spray dried composite particles. Four combination formulations with varying drug ratios were prepared by co-spray drying drug solutions. Both of the drugs in each combination formulation had similar in vitro deposition profiles, suggesting that each composite particle comprises two drugs in the designed mass ratio, which is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data. XPS and ToF-SIMS measurements also revealed that 50% by weight (or 35% by molecular fraction) of azithromycin in the formulation provided a near complete coating of 96.5% (molar fraction) on the composite particle surface, which is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced reduction in fine particle fraction (FPF)recovered and FPFemitted. Higher azithromycin content did not increase coating coverage, while contents of azithromycin lower than 20% w/w did not totally prevent the negative effects of humidity on aerosolisation performance. This study has highlighted that a critical amount of azithromycin is required to sufficiently coat the colistin particles for short-term protection against moisture.

  11. How much surface coating of hydrophobic azithromycin is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced decrease in aerosolisation of hygroscopic colistin powder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi (Tony); Loh, Zhi Hui; Yu, Jiaqi; Sun, Si-ping; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A.; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-01

    Aerosolisation performance of hygroscopic particles of colistin could be compromised at elevated humidity due to increased capillary forces. Co-spray drying colistin with a hydrophobic drug is known to provide a protective coating on the composite particle surfaces against moisture-induced reduction in aerosolisation performance; however, the effects of component ratio on surface coating quality and powder aerosolisation at elevated relative humidities are unknown. In this study, we have systematically examined the effects of mass ratio of hydrophobic azithromycin on surface coating quality and aerosolisation performance of the co-spray dried composite particles. Four combination formulations with varying drug ratios were prepared by co-spray drying drug solutions. Both of the drugs in each combination formulation had similar in vitro deposition profiles, suggesting that each composite particle comprise two drugs in the designed mass ratio, which is supported by XPS and ToF-SIMS data. XPS and ToF-SIMS measurements also revealed that 50 % by weight (or 35 % by molecular fraction) of azithromycin in the formulation provided a near-complete coating of 96.5 % (molar fraction) on the composite particle surface, which is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced reduction in FPFrecovered and FPFemitted. Higher azithromycin content did not increase coating coverage, while contents of azithromycin lower than 20 %w/w did not totally prevent the negative effects of humidity on aerosolisation performance. This study has highlighted that a critical amount of azithromycin is required to sufficiently coat the colistin particles for short-term protection against moisture. PMID:27255350

  12. Sequencing and Analysis of the Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A Genome: A Pathogen Living in the Surface Coat of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Feng

    Full Text Available It is known that several bacteria are adherent to the surface coat of pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, but their function and role in the pathogenesis of pine wilt disease remains debatable. The Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A is a bacterium isolated from the surface coat of pine wood nematodes. In previous studies, GcM5-1A was evident in connection with the pathogenicity of pine wilt disease. In this study, we report the de novo sequencing of the GcM5-1A genome. A 600-Mb collection of high-quality reads was obtained and assembled into sequence contigs spanning a 6.01-Mb length. Sequence annotation predicted 5,413 open reading frames, of which 2,988 were homologous to genes in the other four sequenced P. fluorescens isolates (SBW25, WH6, Pf0-1 and Pf-5 and 1,137 were unique to GcM5-1A. Phylogenetic studies and genome comparison revealed that GcM5-1A is more closely related to SBW25 and WH6 isolates than to Pf0-1 and Pf-5 isolates. Towards study of pathogenesis, we identified 79 candidate virulence factors in the genome of GcM5-1A, including the Alg, Fl, Waa gene families, and genes coding the major pathogenic protein fliC. In addition, genes for a complete T3SS system were identified in the genome of GcM5-1A. Such systems have proved to play a critical role in subverting and colonizing the host organisms of many gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Although the functions of the candidate virulence factors need yet to be deciphered experimentally, the availability of this genome provides a basic platform to obtain informative clues to be addressed in future studies by the pine wilt disease research community.

  13. Nanopore detection of DNA molecules in magnesium chloride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Lei; Sha, Jingjie; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-05-01

    High translocation speed of a DNA strand through a nanopore is a major bottleneck for nanopore detection of DNA molecules. Here, we choose MgCl2 electrolyte as salt solution to control DNA mobility. Experimental results demonstrate that the duration time for straight state translocation events in 1 M MgCl2 solution is about 1.3 ms which is about three times longer than that for the same DNA in 1 M KCl solution. This is because Mg2+ ions can effectively reduce the surface charge density of the negative DNA strands and then lead to the decrease of the DNA electrophoretic speed. It is also found that the Mg2+ ions can induce the DNA molecules binding together and reduce the probability of straight DNA translocation events. The nanopore with small diameter can break off the bound DNA strands and increase the occurrence probability of straight DNA translocation events.

  14. Surface hydration drives rapid water imbibition into strongly hydrophilic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Qiao, Rui

    2017-08-09

    The imbibition of liquids into nanopores plays a critical role in numerous applications, and most prior studies focused on imbibition due to capillary flows. Here we report molecular simulations of the imbibition of water into single mica nanopores filled with pressurized gas. We show that, while capillary flow is suppressed by the high gas pressure, water is imbibed into the nanopore through surface hydration in the form of monolayer liquid films. As the imbibition front moves, the water film behind it gradually densifies. Interestingly, the propagation of the imbibition front follows a simple diffusive scaling law. The effective diffusion coefficient of the imbibition front, however, is more than ten times larger than the diffusion coefficient of the water molecules in the water film adsorbed on the pore walls. We clarify the mechanism for the rapid water imbibition observed here.

  15. Production of organic nanoparticles by using nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuz, A. A.; Şimşek, A. K.; Kazanci, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this research, organic nanoparticles are produced by using different nanoporous membranes with different diameters in different solutions. In production; two liquids, a feed solution and a receiver solution, are seperated by a nanoporous polycarbonate tracketched (PCTE) membrane. The feed solution is pumped through the membrane into the receiver solution. The feed solution contained biopolymers dissolved in HCl and the receiver solution contained NaOH. pH change is used as precipitation method. Chitosan, collagen and alginic acid sodium salt from brown algae are used as biomaterials in order to obtain nanoparticles. Different sized nanoporous membranes are used to find the ideal pore and particle sizes. Nanoparticles are illustrated by SEM and sphere-shaped nanoparticles with different diameters and needle shaped structures are observed.

  16. Multistep Current Signal in Protein Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    KAUST Repository

    Bonome, Emma Letizia

    2015-05-07

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments.

  17. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  18. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yasuga

    Full Text Available Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs "1" and "0" as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA that is or is not translocated through a nanopore; unlabeled DNA was detected electrically. A negative-AND (NAND operation was successfully conducted within approximately 10 min, which is rapid compared with previous studies using unlabeled DNA. In addition, this operation was executed in a four-droplet network. DNA molecules and associated information were transferred among droplets via biological nanopores. This system would facilitate linking of molecules and electronic interfaces. Thus, it could be applied to molecular robotics, genetic engineering, and even medical diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Advances in nanopore sensing promises to transform healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farzin; Wang, Shaoying; Wu, Taoxiang; Guo, Peixuan

    2017-08-01

    International Conference on Nanopore Technology (Shenzhen), 30 March-1 April 2017, Shenzhen, China The International Conference on Nanopore Technology (Shenzhen) was held from 30 March to 1 April 2017 in Shenzhen, China. The goal of the meeting was threefold: leverage the unique properties of nanopore technology to promote transformative advances in medicine, encourage cross-disciplinary collaborations in the research community within China and abroad; and discuss critical challenges that need to be addressed to rapidly advance the field. The meeting was chaired by Peixuan Guo, Endowed chair professor and Director of The Center for RNA Nanobiotechnology & Nanomedicine at The Ohio State University, USA and co-chaired by Xian-En Zhang, distinguished professor of the Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. The conference was attended by more than 300 academic researchers, hospital administrators, government leaders and scientists from many disciplines across the country from both academic institutions and industry.

  20. Detecting and identifying small molecules in a nanopore flux capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Samuel; McClure, Ethan; Zhang, Guigen

    2016-02-19

    A new method of molecular detection in a metallic-semiconductor nanopore was developed and evaluated with experimental and computational methods. Measurements were made of the charging potential of the electrical double layer (EDL) capacitance as charge-carrying small molecules translocated the nanopore. Signals in the charging potential were found to be correlated to the physical properties of analyte molecules. From the measured signals, we were able to distinguish molecules with different valence charge or similar valence charge but different size. The relative magnitude of the signals from different analytes was consistent over a wide range of experimental conditions, suggesting that the detected signals are likely due to single molecules. Computational modeling of the nanopore system indicated that the double layer potential signal may be described in terms of disruption of the EDL structure due to the size and charge of the analyte molecule, in agreement with Huckel and Debye's analysis of the electrical atmosphere of electrolyte solutions.

  1. Hydrophilic nanoporous polystyrenes and 1,2-polybutadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2008-01-01

    Nanoporous polymers from ordered block copolymers having hydrophilic cavity surfaces were successfully prepared by two methodologies: ' 1. Nanoporous polystyrenes fromPtBA-b-PS diblock or PDMS-b-PtBA-b-PS triblock copolymer precursors by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), or combination...... of living anionic polymerization~ and ATRP r~spectively. The one, PtBA block, can be modified to the hydrophilic PAA, where the dther, polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) block, can be fully degraded. Deprotection of the tert-butyl groups in PtBA and the selective etching of PDMS· chains were accomplished...... via surface-initiated ATRP. The nanoporous 1,2-PB precursor with gyroid morphology was prepared from the diblock copolymer 1,2-PB-b-PDMS after cross-linking the major 1,2-PB .. block, and etching the minor PDMS block. Then a bromoester i~itiator for ATRP was immobilized onto the pore walls using...

  2. Catalytic Rapid Pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis over Nanoporous Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Koo Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic rapid pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis, a Korean native tree species, was carried out using Py-GC/MS. Mesoporous MFI, which has both nanopores and micropores, and three nanoporous materials, Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and γ-Al2O3, were used as the catalyst. The acid sites of mesoporous MFI were strong Brønsted acid sites, whereas those of nanoporous materials were mostly weak acid sites. The composition of the product bio-oil varied greatly depending on the acid characteristics of the catalyst used. Phenolics were the most abundant species in the bio-oil, followed by acids and furanics, obtained over Al-MCM-41 or Al-SBA-15 with weak acid sites, whereas aromatics were the most abundant species produced over mesoporous MFI with strong acid sites, followed by phenolics. Aromatics, phenolics, and furanics are all important chemicals contributing to the improvement of bio-oil quality.

  3. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kim

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD. However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up.

  4. On site DNA barcoding by nanopore sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Menegon

    Full Text Available Biodiversity research is becoming increasingly dependent on genomics, which allows the unprecedented digitization and understanding of the planet's biological heritage. The use of genetic markers i.e. DNA barcoding, has proved to be a powerful tool in species identification. However, full exploitation of this approach is hampered by the high sequencing costs and the absence of equipped facilities in biodiversity-rich countries. In the present work, we developed a portable sequencing laboratory based on the portable DNA sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies, the MinION. Complementary laboratory equipment and reagents were selected to be used in remote and tough environmental conditions. The performance of the MinION sequencer and the portable laboratory was tested for DNA barcoding in a mimicking tropical environment, as well as in a remote rainforest of Tanzania lacking electricity. Despite the relatively high sequencing error-rate of the MinION, the development of a suitable pipeline for data analysis allowed the accurate identification of different species of vertebrates including amphibians, reptiles and mammals. In situ sequencing of a wild frog allowed us to rapidly identify the species captured, thus confirming that effective DNA barcoding in the field is possible. These results open new perspectives for real-time-on-site DNA sequencing thus potentially increasing opportunities for the understanding of biodiversity in areas lacking conventional laboratory facilities.

  5. Biodegradable nanoporous nanoparticles for human serum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujia, A.; De Angelis, F.; Scumaci, D.; Gaspari, M.; Liberale, C.; Candeloro, P.; Cuda, G.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Modern medicine and biology search for new powerful tool for biomarkers discovery, appears one of the most promising approaches for early cancer diagnosis. Nowadays, the low molecular weight fraction of human serum is the most informative source of biomarkers, but their study and identification are very difficult due to the incredible complexity of the raw human serum. In this work we describe a novel tool for the filtration of crude human serum or other bio-fluid based on water soluble nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a pore size of about 2-3 nm, and diameters of 200 nm were obtained by ultrasonication of nanoporous silicon. The porous nanoparticles act as a nanosieve able to exclusively harvest the low molecular weight fraction of the fluid thanks to a controllable pore size. After a short incubation, the infiltrated nanosieves can be extracted from the starting fluid by means of centrifugation, and dissolved in water in a few minutes to give the captured molecules back in their native state, without degradation and contamination. The raw fluid is so split in two components of high and low molecular weight, that are both available for further analyses with any other investigation technique. Here, fluorescence spectroscopy, 2D-gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry are exploited to show the split of different bio-fluids under physiological condition. A cut-off (or split level) of 13 kDa is demonstrated also for human serum.

  6. Phonon bottleneck identification in disordered nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous materials are a promising platform for thermoelectrics in that they offer high thermal conductivity tunability while preserving good electrical properties, a crucial requirement for high-efficiency thermal energy conversion. Understanding the impact of the pore arrangement on thermal transport is pivotal to engineering realistic materials, where pore disorder is unavoidable. Although there has been considerable progress in modeling thermal size effects in nanostructures, it has remained a challenge to screen such materials over a large phase space due to the slow simulation time required for accurate results. We use density functional theory in connection with the Boltzmann transport equation to perform calculations of thermal conductivity in disordered porous materials. By leveraging graph theory and regressive analysis, we identify the set of pores representing the phonon bottleneck and obtain a descriptor for thermal transport, based on the sum of the pore-pore distances between such pores. This approach provide a simple tool to estimate phonon suppression in realistic porous materials for thermoelectric applications and enhance our understanding of heat transport in disordered materials.

  7. Environmental Green Chemistry Applications of Nanoporous Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, J.; Garcia, A; Poon, P

    2010-01-01

    Influence of surface properties of nanoporous carbons on activity and selectivity during the photooxidation of 4-chlorophenol on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} was performed. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy confirm the presence of a contact interface between both solids and suggest the coordination of some functional organic groups of the carbon surface, mainly ethers and carboxylic acids, to metallic centre Ti{sup +4} in TiO{sub 2}. Changes in surface pH of carbons from basic to neutral or acid remarkably increase the production of 4-chlorocathecol by a factor of 22 on TiO{sub 2}-Carbon in comparison of TiO{sub 2} alone. A scheme of interaction between TiO{sub 2} and carbon is proposed to the increased photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} and a reaction mechanism for the different intermediate products detected is also proposed. Results showed that TiO{sub 2}-Carbon can be used as an alternative photocatalyst for environmental green chemistry and selective organic synthesis applications.

  8. Nano-porous calcium phosphate balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ildyko; Kosmella, Sabine; Prietzel, Claudia; Bagdahn, Christian; Koetz, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    By dropping a NaH2PO4·H2O precursor solution to a CaCl2 solution at 90°C under continuous stirring in presence of two biopolymers, i.e. gelatin (G) and chitosan (C), supramolecular calcium phosphate (CP) card house structures are formed. Light microscopic investigations in combination with scanning electron microscopy show that the GC-based flower-like structure is constructed from very thin CP platelets. Titration experiments indicate that H-bonding between both biopolymers is responsible for the synergistic effect in presence of both polymers. Gelatin-chitosan-water complexes play an important role with regard to supramolecular ordering. FTIR spectra in combination with powder X-ray diffraction show that after burning off all organic components (heating up >600°C) dicalcium and tricalcium phosphate crystallites are formed. From high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) it is obvious to conclude, that individual crystal platelets are dicalcium phosphates, which build up ball-like supramolecular structures. The results reveal that the GC guided crystal growth leads to nano-porous supramolecular structures, potentially attractive candidates for bone repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A tip-attached tuning fork sensor for the control of DNA translocation through a nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; Huang, Tao; Li, Jiali

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that a tuning fork can be used as a force detecting sensor for manipulating DNA molecules and for controlling the DNA translocation rate through a nanopore. One prong of a tuning fork is glued with a probe tip which DNA molecules can be attached to. To control the motion and position of the tip, the tuning fork is fixed to a nanopositioning system which has sub-nanometer position control. A fluidic chamber is designed to fulfill many requirements for the experiment: for the access of a DNA-attached tip approaching to a nanopore, for housing a nanopore chip, and for measuring ionic current through a solid-state nanopore with a pair of electrodes. The location of a nanopore is first observed by transmission electron microscopy, and then is determined inside the liquid chambers with an optical microscope combined with local scanning the probe tip on the nanopore surface. When a DNA-immobilized tip approaches a membrane surface near a nanopore, free ends of the immobilized DNA strings can be pulled and trapped into the pore by an applied voltage across the nanopore chip, resulting in an ionic current reduction through the nanopore. The trapped DNA molecules can be lifted up from the nanopore at a user controlled speed. This integrated apparatus allows manipulation of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) attached to a probe tip with sub-nanometer precision, and simultaneously allows measurement of the biomolecules by a nanopore device.

  10. 3D architecture constructed via the confined growth of MoS2 nanosheets in nanoporous carbon derived from metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoli; Ding, Tao; Wang, Chunde; Yang, Qing

    2015-11-21

    The design and synthesis of robust, high-performance and low-cost three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structured materials for the electrochemical reduction of water to generate hydrogen is of great significance for practical water splitting applications. In this study, we develop an in situ space-confined method to synthesize an MoS2-based 3D hierarchical structure, in which the MoS2 nanosheets grow in the confined nanopores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-derived 3D carbons as electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production. Benefiting from its unique structure, which has more exposed active sites and enhanced conductivity, the as-prepared MoS2/3D nanoporous carbon (3D-NPC) composite exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a small onset overpotential of ∼0.16 V, large cathodic currents, small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade and good durability. We anticipate that this in situ confined growth provides new insights into the construction of high performance catalysts for energy storage and conversion.

  11. Nanopore Electrochemistry: A Nexus for Molecular Control of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Pore-based structures occur widely in living organisms. Ion channels embedded in cell membranes, for example, provide pathways, where electron and proton transfer are coupled to the exchange of vital molecules. Learning from mother nature, a recent surge in activity has focused on artificial nanopore architectures to effect electrochemical transformations not accessible in larger structures. Here, we highlight these exciting advances. Starting with a brief overview of nanopore electrodes, including the early history and development of nanopore sensing based on nanopore-confined electrochemistry, we address the core concepts and special characteristics of nanopores in electron transfer. We describe nanopore-based electrochemical sensing and processing, discuss performance limits and challenges, and conclude with an outlook for next-generation nanopore electrode sensing platforms and the opportunities they present. PMID:29392173

  12. Fine-tuning the Size and Minimizing the Noise of Solid-state Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Eric; Kwok, Harold; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Godin, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores have emerged as a versatile tool for the characterization of single biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins1. However, the creation of a nanopore in a thin insulating membrane remains challenging. Fabrication methods involving specialized focused electron beam systems can produce well-defined nanopores, but yield of reliable and low-noise nanopores in commercially available membranes remains low2,3 and size control is nontrivial4,5. Here, the application of high electric fields to fine-tune the size of the nanopore while ensuring optimal low-noise performance is demonstrated. These short pulses of high electric field are used to produce a pristine electrical signal and allow for enlarging of nanopores with subnanometer precision upon prolonged exposure. This method is performed in situ in an aqueous environment using standard laboratory equipment, improving the yield and reproducibility of solid-state nanopore fabrication. PMID:24300128

  13. Wet-chemical enzymatic preparation and characterization of ultrathin gold-decorated single glass nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2014-05-20

    The conical glass nanopore was modified through layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition of a monolayer of glucose oxidase, and then an ultrathin gold film was formed in situ through enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The morphology and components of single glass nanopore before and after ultrathin Au deposition were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, respectively. In particular, the quenching of the quantum dots fluorescence in the nanopore tip zone further illustrated that the gold nanofilm was successfully deposited on the inner wall of the single glass nanopore. The Au thin films make the glass nanopores more biologically friendly and allow the nanopores facile functionalization of the surface through the Au-S bonds. For instance, the ionic current rectification (ICR) properties of the gold-decorated glass nanopores could be switched readily at different pHs by introducing different thiol molecules.

  14. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications. PMID:24352224

  15. Influence of nanopore surface charge and magnesium ion on polyadenosine translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Coulon, Pierre Eugène; Bechelany, Mikhael; Cambedouzou, Julien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Balme, Sebastien

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the influence of a nanopore surface state and the addition of Mg(2+) on poly-adenosine translocation. To do so, two kinds of nanopores with a low aspect ratio (diameter ∼3-5 nm, length 30 nm) were tailored: the first one with a negative charge surface and the second one uncharged. It was shown that the velocity and the energy barrier strongly depend on the nanopore surface. Typically if the nanopore and polyA exhibit a similar charge, the macromolecule velocity increases and its global energy barrier of entrance in the nanopore decreases, as opposed to the non-charged nanopore. Moreover, the addition of a divalent chelating cation induces an increase of energy barrier of entrance, as expected. However, for a negative nanopore, this effect is counterbalanced by the inversion of the surface charge induced by the adsorption of divalent cations.

  16. Nanopore Electrochemistry: A Nexus for Molecular Control of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyu Fu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore-based structures occur widely in living organisms. Ion channels embedded in cell membranes, for example, provide pathways, where electron and proton transfer are coupled to the exchange of vital molecules. Learning from mother nature, a recent surge in activity has focused on artificial nanopore architectures to effect electrochemical transformations not accessible in larger structures. Here, we highlight these exciting advances. Starting with a brief overview of nanopore electrodes, including the early history and development of nanopore sensing based on nanopore-confined electrochemistry, we address the core concepts and special characteristics of nanopores in electron transfer. We describe nanopore-based electrochemical sensing and processing, discuss performance limits and challenges, and conclude with an outlook for next-generation nanopore electrode sensing platforms and the opportunities they present.

  17. Nanopore wall-liquid interaction under scope of molecular dynamics study: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The present review is devoted to the analysis of recent molecular dynamics based on the numerical studies of molecular aspects of solid-fluid interaction in nanoscale channels. Nanopore wall-liquid interaction plays the crucial role in such processes as gas separation, water desalination, liquids decontamination, hydrocarbons and water transport in nano-fractured geological formations. Molecular dynamics simulation is one of the most suitable tools to study molecular level effects occurred in such multicomponent systems. The nanopores are classified by their geometry to four groups: nanopore in nanosheet, nanotube-like pore, slit-shaped nanopore and soft-matter nanopore. The review is focused on the functionalized nanopores in boron nitride nanosheets as novel selective membranes and on the slit-shaped nanopores formed by minerals.

  18. Investigation of thermal conduction in symmetric and asymmetric nanoporous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ziqi; Ferrer-Argemi, Laia; Lee, Jaeho

    2017-12-01

    Nanoporous structures with a critical dimension comparable to or smaller than the phonon mean free path have demonstrated significant thermal conductivity reductions that are attractive for thermoelectric applications, but the presence of various geometric parameters complicates the understanding of governing mechanisms. Here, we use a ray tracing technique to investigate phonon boundary scattering phenomena in Si nanoporous structures of varying pore shapes, pore alignments, and pore size distributions, and identify mechanisms that are primarily responsible for thermal conductivity reductions. Our simulation results show that the neck size, or the smallest distance between nearest pores, is the key parameter in understanding nanoporous structures of varying pore shapes and the same porosities. When the neck size and the porosity are both identical, asymmetric pore shapes provide a lower thermal conductivity compared with symmetric pore shapes, due to localized heat fluxes. Asymmetric nanoporous structures show possibilities of realizing thermal rectification even with fully diffuse surface boundaries, in which optimal arrangements of triangular pores show a rectification ratio up to 13 when the injection angles are optimally controlled. For symmetric nanoporous structures, hexagonal-lattice pores achieve larger thermal conductivity reductions than square-lattice pores due to the limited line of sight for phonons. We also show that nanoporous structures of alternating pore size distributions from large to small pores yield a lower thermal conductivity compared with those of uniform pore size distributions in the given porosity. These findings advance the understanding of phonon boundary scattering phenomena in complex geometries and enable optimal designs of artificial nanostructures for thermoelectric energy harvesting and solid-state cooling systems.

  19. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  20. Highly magnetic nanoporous carbon/iron-oxide hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sher; Anand, Chokkalingam; Lakhi, Kripal Singh; Choy, Jin-Ho; Cha, Wang Soo; Elzhatry, Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ohya, Yutaka; Vinu, Ajayan

    2014-11-10

    The preparation of size-controllable Fe2O3 nanoparticles grown in nanoporous carbon with tuneable pore diameters is reported. These hybrid materials exhibit strong non-linear magnetic properties and a magnetic moment of approximately 229 emu g(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for nanoporous hybrids, and can be attributed to the nanosieve effect and the strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the carbon walls. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Active sieving across driven nanopores for tunable selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2017-10-21

    Molecular separation traditionally relies on sieving processes across passive nanoporous membranes. Here we explore theoretically the concept of non-equilibrium active sieving. We investigate a simple model for an active noisy nanopore, where gating-in terms of size or charge-is externally driven at a tunable frequency. Our analytical and numerical results unveil a rich sieving diagram in terms of the forced gating frequency. Unexpectedly, the separation ability is strongly increased as compared to its passive (zero frequency) counterpart. It also points to the possibility of tuning dynamically the osmotic pressure. Active separation outperforms passive sieving and represents a promising avenue for advanced filtration.

  2. Raman fingerprinting of single dielectric nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Sarp; Chen, Chang; Li, Yi; van Roy, Wim; Lagae, Liesbet; van Dorpe, Pol

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies.Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: The

  3. Physisorption of SDS in a Hydrocarbon Nanoporous Polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Wang, Yanwei; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene of pore diameter similar to 15 nm was accomplished by physisorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in water. Loading of the aqueous solution and the accompanying physisorption of SDS into the hydrophobic nanoporous films were investigated...... in a wide range of concentrations. The loading showed varying dependence on the SDS concentration. No loading was observed for SDS concentrations below 4.0 mM. At concentrations above 5.0 mM, the initial part of loading showed a linear dependence on the square root of time, which can be interpreted...

  4. Active sieving across driven nanopores for tunable selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2017-10-01

    Molecular separation traditionally relies on sieving processes across passive nanoporous membranes. Here we explore theoretically the concept of non-equilibrium active sieving. We investigate a simple model for an active noisy nanopore, where gating—in terms of size or charge—is externally driven at a tunable frequency. Our analytical and numerical results unveil a rich sieving diagram in terms of the forced gating frequency. Unexpectedly, the separation ability is strongly increased as compared to its passive (zero frequency) counterpart. It also points to the possibility of tuning dynamically the osmotic pressure. Active separation outperforms passive sieving and represents a promising avenue for advanced filtration.

  5. Nanoporous zinc oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghimpu, L.; Lupan, O.; Popescu, L.; Tiginyanu, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate an inexpensive approach for the fabrication of nanoporous zinc oxide films by using magnetron sputtering. Study of the structural properties proves the crystallographic perfection of porous nanostructures and the possibility of its controlling by adjusting the technological parameters in the growth process. The XRD pattern of nanoporous ZnO films exhibits high intensity of the peaks relative to the background signal which is indicative of the ZnO hexagonal phase and a good crystallinity of the samples grown by magnetron sputtering.

  6. Discriminating Bacteria with Optical Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Xerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Crunaire

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An innovative and low-cost method is proposed for the detection and discrimination of indole-positive pathogen bacteria. The method allows the non-invasive detection of gaseous indole, released by bacteria, with nanoporous colorimetric sensors. The innovation comes from the use of nanoporous matrices doped with 4-(dimethylamino-cinnamaldehyde, which act as sponges to trap and concentrate the targeted analyte and turn from transparent to dark green, long before the colonies get visible with naked eyes. With such sensors, it was possible to discriminate E. coli from H. alvei, two indole-positive and negative bacteria after seven hours of incubation.

  7. Nanoporous membranes with electrochemically switchable, chemically stabilized ionic selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-10-01

    Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play important roles in regulating ionic transport through nanoporous membranes. The ability to control these parameters in situ provides a means to create ion transport systems tunable in real time. Here, we present a new strategy to address this challenge, utilizing three unique electrochemically switchable chemistries to manipulate the terminal functional group and control the resulting surface charge throughout ensembles of gold plated nanopores in ion-tracked polycarbonate membranes 3 cm2 in area. We demonstrate the diazonium mediated surface functionalization with (1) nitrophenyl chemistry, (2) quinone chemistry, and (3) previously unreported trimethyl lock chemistry. Unlike other works, these chemistries are chemically stabilized, eliminating the need for a continuously applied gate voltage to maintain a given state and retain ionic selectivity. The effect of surface functionalization and nanopore geometry on selective ion transport through these functionalized membranes is characterized in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at pH = 5.7. The nitrophenyl surface allows for ionic selectivity to be irreversibly switched in situ from cation-selective to anion-selective upon reduction to an aminophenyl surface. The quinone-terminated surface enables reversible changes between no ionic selectivity and a slight cationic selectivity. Alternatively, the trimethyl lock allows ionic selectivity to be reversibly switched by up to a factor of 8, approaching ideal selectivity, as a carboxylic acid group is electrochemically revealed or hidden. By varying the pore shape from cylindrical to conical, it is demonstrated that a controllable directionality can be imparted to the ionic selectivity. Combining control of nanopore geometry with stable, switchable chemistries facilitates superior control of molecular transport across the membrane, enabling tunable ion transport systems.Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play

  8. Whip spiders (Amblypygi) become water-repellent by a colloidal secretion that self-assembles into hierarchical microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jonas O; Schwaha, Thomas; Seiter, Michael; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Among both plants and arthropods, super-hydrophobic surfaces have evolved that enable self-cleaning, locomotion on water surfaces, or plastron respiration. Super-hydrophobicity is achieved by a combination of non-polar substances and complex micro- and nano-structures, usually acquired by growing processes or the deposition of powder-like materials. Here we report on a multi-phasic secretion in whip spiders (Arachnida, Amblypygi), which externally forms durable, hierarchical microstructures on the basically smooth cuticle. The solidified secretion crust makes the previously highly wettable cuticle super-hydrophobic. We describe the ultrastructure of secretory cells, and the maturation and secretion of the different products involved. Whip spiders represent intriguing objects of study for revealing the mechanisms of the formation of complex microstructures in non-living systems. Understanding the physical and chemical processes involved may, further, be of interest for bio-inspired design of functional surface coatings.

  9. Deliberate change without hierarchical influence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Sladjana; Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to structure processes, overcome resistance and get things done. But is deliberate change also possible without formal...... reveals that deliberate change is indeed achievable in a non-hierarchical collaborative OSS community context. However, it presupposes the presence and active involvement of informal change agents. The paper identifies and specifies four key drivers for change agents’ influence. Originality....../value The findings contribute to organisational analysis by providing a deeper understanding of the importance of leadership in making deliberate change possible in non-hierarchical settings. It points to the importance of “change-by-conviction”, essentially based on voluntary behaviour. This can open the door...

  10. Hierarchical Systems in Open Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Fuente Marcos, R.; Aarseth, S. J.; Kiseleva, L. G.; Eggleton, P. P.

    In this paper we study the formation, evolution, and disruption of hierarchical systems in open clusters. With this purpose, N-body simulations of star clusters containing an initial population of binaries have been carried out using Aarseth's NBODY4 and NBODY5 codes. Stable triples may form from strong interactions of two binaries in which the widest pair is disrupted. The most frequent type of hierarchical systems found in the cluster models are triples in which the outer star is single, but in some cases the outer body is also a binary, giving a hierarchical quadruple. The formation of hierarchical systems of even higher multiplicity is also possible. Many triple systems are non-coplanar and the presence of even a very distant and small outer companion may affect the orbital parameters of the inner binary, including a possible mechanism of significant shrinkage if the binary experiences a weak tidal dissipation. The main features of these systems are analyzed in order to derive general properties which can be checked by observations. The inner binaries have periods in the range 1-1000 days, although rich clusters may have even smaller periods following common envelope evolution. For triple systems, the outer body usually has a mass less than 1/3 of the binary, but is sometimes a collapsed object with even smaller mass. The formation of exotic objects, such as blue stragglers and white dwarfs binaries, inside hierarchical triple systems is particularly interesting. An efficient mechanism for generating such objects is the previous formation of a hierarchical system in which the inner binary may develop a very short period during a common envelope phase, which finally results in a stellar collision.

  11. Integrating Sub-3 nm Plasmonic Gaps into Solid-State Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Verschueren, Daniel; Pud, Sergii; Dekker, Cees

    2017-12-18

    Plasmonic nanopores combine the advantages of nanopore sensing and surface plasmon resonances by introducing confined electromagnetic fields to a solid-state nanopore. Ultrasmall nanogaps between metallic nanoantennas can generate the extremely enhanced localized electromagnetic fields necessary for single-molecule optical sensing and manipulation. Challenges in fabrication, however, hamper the integration of such nanogaps into nanopores. Here, a top-down approach for integrating a plasmonic antenna with an ultrasmall nanogap into a solid-state nanopore is reported. Employing a two-step e-beam lithography process, the reproducible fabrication of nanogaps down to a sub-1 nm scale is demonstrated. Subsequently, nanopores are drilled through the 20 nm SiN membrane at the center of the nanogap using focused-electron-beam sculpting with a transmission electron microscope, at the expense of a slight gap expansion for the smallest gaps. Using this approach, sub-3 nm nanogaps can be readily fabricated on solid-state nanopores. The functionality of these plasmonic nanopores for single-molecule detection is shown by performing DNA translocations. These integrated devices can generate intense electromagnetic fields at the entrance of the nanopore and can be expected to find applications in nanopore-based single-molecule trapping and optical sensing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Stretching and controlled motion of single-stranded DNA in locally heated solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Maxim; Maffeo, Christopher; Wells, David B; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-08-27

    Practical applications of solid-state nanopores for DNA detection and sequencing require the electrophoretic motion of DNA through the nanopores to be precisely controlled. Controlling the motion of single-stranded DNA presents a particular challenge, in part because of the multitude of conformations that a DNA strand can adopt in a nanopore. Through continuum, coarse-grained and atomistic modeling, we demonstrate that local heating of the nanopore volume can be used to alter the electrophoretic mobility and conformation of single-stranded DNA. In the nanopore systems considered, the temperature near the nanopore is modulated via a nanometer-size heater element that can be radiatively switched on and off. The local enhancement of temperature produces considerable stretching of the DNA fragment confined within the nanopore. Such stretching is reversible, so that the conformation of DNA can be toggled between compact (local heating is off) and extended (local heating is on) states. The effective thermophoretic force acting on single-stranded DNA in the vicinity of the nanopore is found to be sufficiently large (4-8 pN) to affect such changes in the DNA conformation. The local heating of the nanopore volume is observed to promote single-file translocation of DNA strands at transmembrane biases as low as 10 mV, which opens new avenues for using solid-state nanopores for detection and sequencing of DNA.

  13. Nanopore fabricated in pyramidal HfO2 film by dielectric breakdown method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Chen, Qi; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-10-01

    The dielectric breakdown method provides an innovative solution to fabricate solid-state nanopores on insulating films. A nanopore generation event via this method is considered to be caused by random charged traps (i.e., structural defects) and high electric fields in the membrane. Thus, the position and number of nanopores on planar films prepared by the dielectric breakdown method is hard to control. In this paper, we propose to fabricate nanopores on pyramidal HfO2 films (10-nm and 15-nm-thick) to improve the ability to control the location and number during the fabrication process. Since the electric field intensity gets enhanced at the corners of the pyramid-shaped film, the probability of nanopore occurrence at vertex and edge areas increases. This priority of appearance provides us chance to control the location and number of nanopores by monitoring a sudden irreversible discrete increase in current. The experimental results showed that the probability of nanopore occurrence decreases in an order from the vertex area, the edge area to the side face area. The sizes of nanopores ranging from 30 nm to 10 nm were obtained. Nanopores fabricated on the pyramid-shaped HfO2 film also showed an obvious ion current rectification characteristic, which might improve the nanopore performance as a biomolecule sequencing platform.

  14. Directly observing the motion of DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Genki; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-27

    We investigate the diffusion and the drift motion of λ DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores prior to their translocation through the nanopores using fluorescence microscopy. The radial dependence of the electric field near a nanopore generated by an applied voltage in ionic solution can be estimated quantitatively in 3D by analyzing the motion of negatively charged DNA molecules. We find that the electric field is approximately spherically symmetric around the nanopore under the conditions investigated. In addition, DNA clogging at the nanopore was directly observed. Surprisingly, the probability of the clogging event increases with increasing external bias voltage. We also find that DNA molecules clogging the nanopore reduce the electric field amplitude at the nanopore membrane surface. To better understand these experimental results, analytical method with Ohm's law and computer simulation with Poisson and Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations are used to calculate the electric field near the nanopore. These results are of great interest in both experimental and theoretical considerations of the motion of DNA molecules near voltage-biased nanopores. These findings will also contribute to the development of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sensing devices.

  15. Antibacterial hemostatic dressings with nanoporous bioglass containing silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangfeng; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian; Bi, Dawei; Wang, Hui; Ma, Haitao; Zhu, Gang; Liu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous bioglass containing silver (n-BGS) was fabricated using the sol-gel method, with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template. The results showed that n-BGS with nanoporous structure had a surface area of 467 m(2)/g and a pore size of around 6 nm, and exhibited a significantly higher water absorption rate compared with BGS without nanopores. The n-BGS containing small amounts of silver (Ag) had a slight effect on its surface area. The n-BGS containing 0.02 wt% Ag, without cytotoxicity, had a good antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, and its antibacterial rate reached 99% in 12 hours. The n-BGS's clotting ability significantly decreased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), indicating n-BGS with a higher surface area could significantly promote blood clotting (by decreasing clotting time) compared with BGS without nanopores. Effective hemostasis was achieved in skin injury models, and bleeding time was reduced. It is suggested that n-BGS could be a good dressing, with antibacterial and hemostatic properties, which might shorten wound bleeding time and control hemorrhage.

  16. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.

    2012-01-01

    -ergodic component of the phase space for energy levels typical of experiments, is surprisingly small, i.e. we conclude that the ergodic hypothesis is a reasonable approximation even for a single particle trapped in a nanopore. Due to the numerical scope of this work, our focus will be the onset of ergodic behavior...

  17. Hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbon materials: myth and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Terrones, Mauricio; Terrones, Humberto

    2007-04-21

    We used Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation to model the hydrogen storage in the primitive, gyroid, diamond, and quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon materials and in carbon nanotubes. We found that none of the investigated nanoporous carbon materials satisfy the US Department of Energy goal of volumetric density and mass storage for automotive application (6 wt% and 45 kg H(2) m(-3)) at considered storage condition. Our calculations indicate that quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon material can reach the 6 wt% at 3.8 MPa and 77 K, but the volumetric density does not exceed 24 kg H(2) m(-3). The bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes can store only up to 4.5 wt%, but with high volumetric density of 42 kg H(2) m(-3). All investigated nanoporous carbon materials are not effective against compression above 20 MPa at 77 K because the adsorbed density approaches the density of the bulk fluid. It follows from this work that geometry of carbon surfaces can enhance the storage capacity only to a limited extent. Only a combination of the most effective structure with appropriate additives (metals) can provide an efficient storage medium for hydrogen in the quest for a source of "clean" energy.

  18. Nanopore Sequencing as a Rapidly Deployable Ebola Outbreak Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Rosenke, Kyle; Fischer, Robert J; Hoenen, Andreas; Judson, Seth D; Martellaro, Cynthia; Falzarano, Darryl; Marzi, Andrea; Squires, R Burke; Wollenberg, Kurt R; de Wit, Emmie; Prescott, Joseph; Safronetz, David; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Bushmaker, Trenton; Feldmann, Friederike; McNally, Kristin; Bolay, Fatorma K; Fields, Barry; Sealy, Tara; Rayfield, Mark; Nichol, Stuart T; Zoon, Kathryn C; Massaquoi, Moses; Munster, Vincent J; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-02-01

    Rapid sequencing of RNA/DNA from pathogen samples obtained during disease outbreaks provides critical scientific and public health information. However, challenges exist for exporting samples to laboratories or establishing conventional sequencers in remote outbreak regions. We successfully used a novel, pocket-sized nanopore sequencer at a field diagnostic laboratory in Liberia during the current Ebola virus outbreak.

  19. High-density nanopore array for selective biomolecule transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2011-11-01

    Development of sophisticated tools capable of manipulating molecules at their own length scale enables new methods for chemical synthesis and detection. Although nanoscale devices have been developed to perform individual tasks, little work has been done on developing a truly scalable platform: a system that combines multiple components for sequential processing, as well as simultaneously processing and identifying the millions of potential species that may be present in a biological sample. The development of a scalable micro-nanofluidic device is limited in part by the ability to combine different materials (polymers, metals, semiconductors) onto a single chip, and the challenges with locally controlling the chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties within a micro or nanochannel. We have developed a unique construct known as a molecular gate: a multilayered polymer based device that combines microscale fluid channels with nanofluidic interconnects. Molecular gates have been demonstrated to selectively transport molecules between channels based on size or charge. In order to fully utilize these structures, we need to develop methods to actively control transport and identify species inside a nanopore. While previous work has been limited to creating electrical connections off-channel or metallizing the entire nanopore wall, we now have the ability to create multiple, separate conductive connections at the interior surface of a nanopore. These interior electrodes will be used for direct sensing of biological molecules, probing the electrical potential and charge distribution at the surface, and to actively turn on and off electrically driven transport of molecules through nanopores.

  20. Nanoporous Crosslinked Polyisoprene from Polyisoprene-Polydimethylsiloxane Block Copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Steffen; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2004-01-01

    or tetrabutylammonium- fluoride, in this way obtaining a nanoporous material. The fraction of the surviving double bonds was estimated by solid state NMR, while thermal analysis was used to characterize the glass transition temperature of PI as a function of crosslinking degree. Small angle x-ray scattering confirmed...

  1. Computer Simulation of Water-Ice Transition in Hydrophobic Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slovák, Jan; Tanaka, H.; Koga, K.; Zeng, X. C.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 292, - (2001), s. 87-101 ISSN 0378-4371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : computer * water-ice transition * hydrophobic nanopore s Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2001

  2. Engineering a nanopore with co-chaperonin function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Ching-Wen; Meervelt, Veerle; Tsai, Keng-Chang; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Mast, Jan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an enzymatic function can reveal functional insights and allows the engineering of biological systems with enhanced properties. We engineered an alpha hemolysin nanopore to function as GroES, a protein that, in complex with GroEL, forms a two-stroke protein-folding nanomachine. The

  3. Fabrication of Porous Anodic Alumina with Ultrasmall Nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding GuQiao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anodization of Al foil under low voltages of 1–10 V was conducted to obtain porous anodic aluminas (PAAs with ultrasmall nanopores. Regular nanopore arrays with pore diameter 6–10 nm were realized in four different electrolytes under 0–30°C according to the AFM, FESEM, TEM images and current evolution curves. It is found that the pore diameter and interpore distance, as well as the barrier layer thickness, are not sensitive to the applied potentials and electrolytes, which is totally different from the rules of general PAA fabrication. The brand-new formation mechanism has been revealed by the AFM study on the samples anodized for very short durations of 2–60 s. It is discovered for the first time that the regular nanoparticles come into being under 1–10 V at the beginning of the anodization and then serve as a template layer dominating the formation of ultrasmall nanopores. Under higher potentials from 10 to 40 V, the surface nanoparticles will be less and less and nanopores transform into general PAAs.

  4. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  5. Warming up human body by nanoporous metallized polyethylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lili; Song, Alex Y; Wu, Peilin; Hsu, Po-Chun; Peng, Yucan; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong; Catrysse, Peter B; Liu, Yayuan; Yang, Ankun; Zhou, Chenxing; Zhou, Chenyu; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2017-09-19

    Space heating accounts for the largest energy end-use of buildings that imposes significant burden on the society. The energy wasted for heating the empty space of the entire building can be saved by passively heating the immediate environment around the human body. Here, we demonstrate a nanophotonic structure textile with tailored infrared (IR) property for passive personal heating using nanoporous metallized polyethylene. By constructing an IR-reflective layer on an IR-transparent layer with embedded nanopores, the nanoporous metallized polyethylene textile achieves a minimal IR emissivity (10.1%) on the outer surface that effectively suppresses heat radiation loss without sacrificing wearing comfort. This enables 7.1 °C decrease of the set-point compared to normal textile, greatly outperforming other radiative heating textiles by more than 3 °C. This large set-point expansion can save more than 35% of building heating energy in a cost-effective way, and ultimately contribute to the relief of global energy and climate issues.Energy wasted for heating the empty space of the entire building can be saved by passively heating the immediate environment around the human body. Here, the authors show a nanophotonic structure textile with tailored infrared property for passive personal heating using nanoporous metallized polyethylene.

  6. Concentration Polarization in Translocation of DNA through Nanopores and Nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S.; Dubsky, P.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we provide a theory to show that high-field electrokinetic translocation of DNA through nanopores or nanochannels causes large transient variations of the ionic concentrations in front and at the back of the DNA due to concentration polarization (CP). The CP causes strong local

  7. Antibacterial hemostatic dressings with nanoporous bioglass containing silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangfeng; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian; Bi, Dawei; Wang, Hui; Ma, Haitao; Zhu, Gang; Liu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous bioglass containing silver (n-BGS) was fabricated using the sol-gel method, with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template. The results showed that n-BGS with nanoporous structure had a surface area of 467 m2/g and a pore size of around 6 nm, and exhibited a significantly higher water absorption rate compared with BGS without nanopores. The n-BGS containing small amounts of silver (Ag) had a slight effect on its surface area. The n-BGS containing 0.02 wt% Ag, without cytotoxicity, had a good antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, and its antibacterial rate reached 99% in 12 hours. The n-BGS’s clotting ability significantly decreased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), indicating n-BGS with a higher surface area could significantly promote blood clotting (by decreasing clotting time) compared with BGS without nanopores. Effective hemostasis was achieved in skin injury models, and bleeding time was reduced. It is suggested that n-BGS could be a good dressing, with antibacterial and hemostatic properties, which might shorten wound bleeding time and control hemorrhage. PMID:22745538

  8. Anisotropic diffusion of water molecules in hydroxyapatite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Muthuramalingam; Lemaire, Thibault; Caruel, Matthieu; Lewerenz, Marius; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Di Tommaso, Devis; Naili, Salah

    2017-07-01

    New insights into the dynamical properties of water in hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanopores, a model system for the fluid flow within nanosize spaces inside the collagen-apatite structure of bone, were obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water confined between two parallel HAP surfaces of different sizes (20 Å ≤ H ≤ 240 Å). Calculations were conducted using a core-shell interatomic potential for HAP together with the extended simple point charge model for water. This force field gives an activation energy for water diffusion within HAP nanopores that is in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The dynamical properties of water within the HAP nanopores were quantified in terms of the second-order water diffusion tensor. Results indicate that water diffuses anisotropically within the HAP nanopores, with the solvent molecules moving parallel to the surface twice as fast as the perpendicular direction. This unusual dynamic behaviour is linked to the strong polarizing effect of calcium ions, and the synergic interactions between the water molecules in the first hydration layer of HAP with the calcium, hydroxyl, and phosphate ions, which facilitates the flow of water molecules in the directions parallel to the HAP surface.

  9. Thermal effects of water intrusion in hydrophobic nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Paulin, Christian; Ballandras, Anthony; Weber, Guy; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-29

    Liquid water intrusion in hydrophobic nanoporous silicalite-1, a pure siliceous zeolite, in isothermal conditions under high pressure produces an endothermic effect. After intrusion, confined water in zeolite pores is in a different state from that of the liquid bulk water. Such forced intrusion also chemically modifies the material and tends to render it slightly more hydrophilic.

  10. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors

  11. Solid-state nanopores for probing DNA and protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores are small nanometer-scale holes in thin membranes. When used to separate two chambers containing salt solution, any biomolecule passing from one chamber to the other is forced to pass through the pore constriction. An electric field applied across the membrane is used to create

  12. Multi-layered hierarchical nanostructures for transparent monolithic dye-sensitized solar cell architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Luca; Fumagalli, Francesco; Perego, Andrea; Bellani, Sebastiano; Mazzolini, Piero; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    Monolithic dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) architectures hold great potential for building-integrated photovoltaics applications. They indeed benefit from lower weight and manufacturing costs as they avoid the use of a transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-coated glass counter electrode. In this work, a transparent monolithic DSC comprising a hierarchical 1D nanostructure stack is fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. The proof of concept device comprises hyperbranched TiO2 nanostructures, sensitized by the prototypical N719, as photoanode, a hierarchical nanoporous Al2O3 spacer, and a microporous indium tin oxide (ITO) top electrode. An overall 3.12% power conversion efficiency with 60% transmittance outside the dye absorption spectral window is demonstrated. The introduction of a porous TCO layer allows an efficient trade-off between transparency and power conversion. The porous ITO exhibits submicrometer voids and supports annealing temperatures above 400 °C without compromising its optoelectronical properties. After thermal annealing at 500 °C, the resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the 800 nm-thick porous ITO layer are found to be respectively 2.3 × 10-3 Ω cm-1, 11 cm2 V-1 s-1, and 1.62 × 1020 cm-3, resulting in a series resistance in the complete device architecture of 45 Ω. Electrochemical impedance and intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy give insight into the electronic charge dynamic within the hierarchical monolithic DSCs, paving the way for potential device architecture improvements.

  13. A unique patterned diamond stamp for a periodically hierarchical nanoarray structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Shen, Yanting; Xu, Weiqing; Xu, Shuping; Li, Hongdong

    2016-10-01

    A diamond stamp with a hierarchical pattern was designed for the direct preparation of a periodic nanoarray structure, which was prepared by the reactive ion etching technique with a hierarchical ultrathin alumina membrane (HUTAM) as a mask. The optimal etching conditions for fabricating the diamond stamp were discussed in order to realize a vertical nanopore structure, avoiding structural damage from lateral etching. By using this diamond stamp, a polymer film with the desired hierarchical nanorod array structure can be obtained easily via the simple stamping process, which greatly simplifies the processing procedure. More importantly, the stamp is reusable because of its super-hardness, which ensures the reproducibility of the nanorod array pattern. Another merit is that the smooth surface of the etched diamond can avoid the use of a release agent. Our results prove that this hard stamp can be used for quick preparation of an elaborate periodic nanoarray structure. This study is significant in that it solves the problems of high cost and easy damage of stamps in nanoimprint lithography, and it might inspire more sophisticated applications of such an ordered structure in nanoplasmonics, biochemical sensing and nanophotonic devices.

  14. Subangstrom Measurements of Enzyme Function Using a Biological Nanopore, SPRNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, A H; Derrrington, I M; Gundlach, J H

    2017-01-01

    Nanopores are emerging as new single-molecule tools in the study of enzymes. Based on the progress in nanopore sequencing of DNA, a tool called Single-molecule Picometer Resolution Nanopore Tweezers (SPRNT) was developed to measure the movement of enzymes along DNA in real time. In this new method, an enzyme is loaded onto a DNA (or RNA) molecule. A single-stranded DNA end of this complex is drawn into a nanopore by an electrostatic potential that is applied across the pore. The single-stranded DNA passes through the pore's constriction until the enzyme comes into contact with the pore. Further progression of the DNA through the pore is then controlled by the enzyme. An ion current that flows through the pore's constriction is modulated by the DNA in the constriction. Analysis of ion current changes reveals the advance of the DNA with high spatiotemporal precision, thereby providing a real-time record of the enzyme's activity. Using an engineered version of the protein nanopore MspA, SPRNT has spatial resolution as small as 40pm at millisecond timescales, while simultaneously providing the DNA's sequence within the enzyme. In this chapter, SPRNT is introduced and its extraordinary potential is exemplified using the helicase Hel308. Two distinct substates are observed for each one-nucleotide advance; one of these about half-nucleotide long steps is ATP dependent and the other is ATP independent. The spatiotemporal resolution of this low-cost single-molecule technique lifts the study of enzymes to a new level of precision, enabling exploration of hitherto unobservable enzyme dynamics in real time. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium surface coatings on surface roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Moshabab A.; AlShahrani, Ibrahim; Almoammar, Salem; Durgesh, Bangalore H.; Kheraif, Abdulaziz A. Al; Hashem, Mohamed I.

    2018-02-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium surface coatings on surface roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) archwires Methods. Three different coated (Epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium) and one uncoated Ni-Ti archwires were evaluated in the present study. Surface roughness (Ra) was assessed using a non-contact surface profilometer. The mechanical properties (nano-hardness and elastic modulus) were measured using a nanoindenter. Bacterial adhesion assays were performed using Streptococcus mutans (MS) and streptococcus sobrinus (SS) in an in-vitro set up. The data obtained were analyzed using analyses of variance, Tukey’s post hoc test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Result. The highest Ra values (1.29 ± 0.49) were obtained for epoxy coated wires and lowest Ra values (0.29 ± 0.16) were obtained for the uncoated wires. No significant differences in the Ra values were observed between the rhodium coated and uncoated archwires (P > 0.05). The highest nano-hardness (3.72 ± 0.24) and elastic modulus values (61.15 ± 2.59) were obtained for uncoated archwires and the lowest nano-hardness (0.18 ± 0.10) and elastic modulus values (4.84 ± 0.65) were observed for epoxy coated archwires. No significant differences in nano-hardness and elastic modulus values were observed between the coated archwires (P > 0.05). The adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (MS) to the wires was significantly greater than that of streptococcus sobrinus (SS). The epoxy coated wires demonstrated an increased adhesion of MS and SS and the uncoated wires demonstrated decreased biofilm adhesion. The Spearman correlation test showed that MS and SS adhesion was positively correlated with the surface roughness of the wires. Conclusion. The different surface coatings significantly influence the roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion parameters of the archwires. The

  16. Ultrathin Hierarchical Porous Carbon Nanosheets for High-Performance Supercapacitors and Redox Electrolyte Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Dubal, Deepak P; Nagar, Bhawna; Ranc, Vaclav; Tomanec, Ondrej; Petr, Martin; Datta, Kasibhatta Kumara Ramanatha; Zboril, Radek; Gómez-Romero, Pedro; Fischer, Roland A

    2018-03-08

    The design of advanced high-energy-density supercapacitors requires the design of unique materials that combine hierarchical nanoporous structures with high surface area to facilitate ion transport and excellent electrolyte permeability. Here, shape-controlled 2D nanoporous carbon sheets (NPSs) with graphitic wall structure through the pyrolysis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are developed. As a proof-of-concept application, the obtained NPSs are used as the electrode material for a supercapacitor. The carbon-sheet-based symmetric cell shows an ultrahigh Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-area-normalized capacitance of 21.4 µF cm -2 (233 F g -1 ), exceeding other carbon-based supercapacitors. The addition of potassium iodide as redox-active species in a sulfuric acid (supporting electrolyte) leads to the ground-breaking enhancement in the energy density up to 90 Wh kg -1 , which is higher than commercial aqueous rechargeable batteries, maintaining its superior power density. Thus, the new material provides a double profits strategy such as battery-level energy and capacitor-level power density. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Modular networks with hierarchical organization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several networks occurring in real life have modular structures that are arranged in a hierarchical fashion. In this paper, we have proposed a model for such networks, using a stochastic generation method. Using this model we show that, the scaling relation between the clustering and degree of the nodes is not a necessary ...

  18. Nanoporous-carbon adsorbers for chemical microsensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Staton, Alan W.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Chemical microsensors rely on partitioning of airborne chemicals into films to collect and measure trace quantities of hazardous vapors. Polymer sensor coatings used today are typically slow to respond and difficult to apply reproducibly. The objective of this project was to produce a durable sensor coating material based on graphitic nanoporous-carbon (NPC), a new material first studied at Sandia, for collection and detection of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic industrial chemicals (TIC), chemical warfare agents (CWA) and nuclear processing precursors (NPP). Preliminary studies using NPC films on exploratory surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices and as a {micro}ChemLab membrane preconcentrator suggested that NPC may outperform existing, irreproducible coatings for SAW sensor and {micro}ChemLab preconcentrator applications. Success of this project will provide a strategic advantage to the development of a robust, manufacturable, highly-sensitive chemical microsensor for public health, industrial, and national security needs. We use pulsed-laser deposition to grow NPC films at room-temperature with negligible residual stress, and hence, can be deposited onto nearly any substrate material to any thickness. Controlled deposition yields reproducible NPC density, morphology, and porosity, without any discernable variation in surface chemistry. NPC coatings > 20 {micro}m thick with density < 5% that of graphite have been demonstrated. NPC can be 'doped' with nearly any metal during growth to provide further enhancements in analyte detection and selectivity. Optimized NPC-coated SAW devices were compared directly to commonly-used polymer coated SAWs for sensitivity to a variety of VOC, TIC, CWA and NPP. In every analyte, NPC outperforms each polymer coating by multiple orders-of-magnitude in detection sensitivity, with improvements ranging from 103 to 108 times greater detection sensitivity! NPC-coated SAW sensors appear capable of detecting most analytes

  19. Hierarchical self-assembly of two-length-scale multiblock copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Loos, Katja; Vukovic, Ivana; Du Sart, Gerrit Gobius

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly in diblock copolymer-based supramolecules, obtained by hydrogen bonding short side chains to one of the blocks, as well as in two-length-scale linear terpolymers results in hierarchical structure formation. The orientation of the different domains, e.g. layers in the case of a lamellar-in-lamellar structure, is determined by the molecular architecture, graft-like versus linear, and the relative magnitude of the interactions involved. In both cases parallel and perpendicular arrangements have been observed. The comb-shaped supramolecules approach is ideally suited for the preparation of nanoporous structures. A bicontinuous morphology with the supramolecular comb block forming the channels was finally achieved by extending the original approach to suitable triblock copolymer-based supramolecules.

  20. Up and down translocation events and electric double-layer formation inside solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Mehdi B; Engelke, Rebecca E; Lukes, Jennifer R; Meunier, Vincent; Drndić, Marija

    2015-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of nanorod translocation events through solid-state nanopores of different sizes which result in positive or negative ion conductance changes. Using theoretical models, we show that positive conductance changes or up events happen for nanopore diameters smaller than a transition diameter dt, and negative conductance changes or down events occur for nanopore diameters larger than dt. We investigate the underlying physics of such translocation phenomena and describe the significance of the electric double-layer effects for nanopores with small diameters. Furthermore, for nanopores with large diameters, it is shown that a geometric model, formulated based on the nanoparticle blockade inside the nanopore, provides a straightforward and reasonably accurate prediction of ion conductance change. Based on this concept, we also implement a method to distinguish and detect nanorods of different sizes by focusing solely on the sign and not the exact value of the conductance change.

  1. Electronic conductance model in constricted MoS{sub 2} with nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, Aditya [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Leburton, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jleburto@illinois.edu [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We describe a self-consistent model for electronic transport in a molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) layer containing a nanopore in a constricted geometry. Our approach is based on a semi-classical thermionic Poisson-Boltzmann technique using a two-valley model within the effective mass approximation to investigate perturbations caused by the nanopore on the electronic current. In particular, we show that the effect of the nanopore on the conductance is reduced as the nanopore is moved from the center to the layer edges. Our model is applied to the detection of DNA translocating through the nanopore, which reveals current features similar to those as predicted in nanopore graphene layers.

  2. Nanopore detection of double stranded DNA using a track-etched polycarbonate membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececi, Kaan; San, Nevim; Kaya, Dila

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the resistive-pulse sensing of 50-bp DNA using track-etched polycarbonate (PC) nanopores and show the translocation dynamics originating from the electrophoretic transport of DNAs. Conically shaped PC nanopore membranes have been prepared with asymmetric chemical etching technique. We show the potential and concentration dependence of DNA translocation through a PC nanopore. We find that the translocation of DNA scales linearly with both potential and concentration. Additionally, the threshold potential is determined to complete the translocation. Finally, by investigating the current-pulse amplitudes of nanopores with different tip sizes, we show that the nanopore size can be successfully used to distinguish the DNA molecules. These results suggest great promise for the sensing of short DNAs and understanding the dynamics of the translocation process using chemically-etched PC nanopores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies on ionic currents in nanopore-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Chu; Ma, Jian; Wu, Yingdong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2014-12-01

    Novel generation of analytical technology based on nanopores has provided possibilities to fabricate nanofluidic devices for low-cost DNA sequencing or rapid biosensing. In this paper, a simplified model was suggested to describe DNA molecule's translocation through a nanopore, and the internal potential, ion concentration, ionic flowing speed and ionic current in nanopores with different sizes were theoretically calculated and discussed on the basis of Poisson-Boltzmann equation, Navier-Stokes equation and Nernst-Planck equation by considering several important parameters, such as the applied voltage, the thickness and the electric potential distributions in nanopores. In this way, the basic ionic currents, the modulated ionic currents and the current drops induced by translocation were obtained, and the size effects of the nanopores were carefully compared and discussed based on the calculated results and experimental data, which indicated that nanopores with a size of 10 nm or so are more advantageous to achieve high quality ionic current signals in DNA sensing.

  4. Effect of surface coating with magnesium stearate via mechanical dry powder coating approach on the aerosol performance of micronized drug powders from dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of particle surface coating with magnesium stearate on the aerosolization of dry powder inhaler formulations. Micronized salbutamol sulphate as a model drug was dry coated with magnesium stearate using a mechanofusion technique. The coating quality was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Powder bulk and flow properties were assessed by bulk densities and shear cell measurements. The aerosol performance was studied by laser diffraction and supported by a twin-stage impinger. High degrees of coating coverage were achieved after mechanofusion, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concomitant significant increases occurred in powder bulk densities and in aerosol performance after coating. The apparent optimum performance corresponded with using 2% w/w magnesium stearate. In contrast, traditional blending resulted in no significant changes in either bulk or aerosolization behaviour compared to the untreated sample. It is believed that conventional low-shear blending provides insufficient energy levels to expose host micronized particle surfaces from agglomerates and to distribute guest coating material effectively for coating. A simple ultra-high-shear mechanical dry powder coating step was shown as highly effective in producing ultra-thin coatings on micronized powders and to substantially improve the powder aerosolization efficiency.

  5. Investigation of the extent of surface coating via mechanofusion with varying additive levels and the influences on bulk powder flow properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate if the coating extent created by a mechanofusion process corresponded with observed changes in bulk powder properties. A fine lactose powder (approximate median diameter 20 μm) was dry coated with magnesium stearate using from 0.1 to 5% (w/w) content. An ultra-thin coating layer of magnesium stearate was anticipated, but previous attempts to determine such thin layers on these fine particles have had limited success, with poor resolution. In this study, the surface coating was examined using the state-of-the-art XPS and ToF-SIMS systems. The powder flow was characterized by Carr index and shear cell testing. XPS was successfully applied to demonstrate variations in surface coverage, as a function of additive levels, and indicated near complete coating coverage at additive levels of 1% (w/w) and above. ToF-SIMS results supported such coating coverage assessment, and indicated coating uniformly across the fine particle surfaces. The flow metrics employed could then be related to the coating coverage metrics. The mechanofusion process also modified the apparent surface roughness observed by SEM and BET. It was suggested that the changes in the surface chemical composition exerted a more evident and direct impact on the powder cohesion and flow characteristics than the changes in the surface morphological properties after the mechanofusion in this study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Na+ and K+ ion selectivity by size-controlled biomimetic graphene nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Zhang, Zhisen; Shi, Hui; Zhang, Junqiao; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2014-08-01

    Because biological ionic channels play a key role in cellular transport phenomena, they have attracted extensive research interest for the design of biomimetic nanopores with high permeability and selectivity in a variety of technical applications. Inspired by the structure of K+ channel proteins, we designed a series of oxygen doped graphene nanopores of different sizes by molecular dynamics simulations to discriminate between K+ and Na+ channel transport. The results from free energy calculations indicate that the ion selectivity of such biomimetic graphene nanopores can be simply controlled by the size of the nanopore; compared to K+, the smaller radius of Na+ leads to a significantly higher free energy barrier in the nanopore of a certain size. Our results suggest that graphene nanopores with a distance of about 3.9 Å between two neighboring oxygen atoms could constitute a promising candidate to obtain excellent ion selectivity for Na+ and K+ ions.Because biological ionic channels play a key role in cellular transport phenomena, they have attracted extensive research interest for the design of biomimetic nanopores with high permeability and selectivity in a variety of technical applications. Inspired by the structure of K+ channel proteins, we designed a series of oxygen doped graphene nanopores of different sizes by molecular dynamics simulations to discriminate between K+ and Na+ channel transport. The results from free energy calculations indicate that the ion selectivity of such biomimetic graphene nanopores can be simply controlled by the size of the nanopore; compared to K+, the smaller radius of Na+ leads to a significantly higher free energy barrier in the nanopore of a certain size. Our results suggest that graphene nanopores with a distance of about 3.9 Å between two neighboring oxygen atoms could constitute a promising candidate to obtain excellent ion selectivity for Na+ and K+ ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  8. Direct measurements reveal non-Markovian fluctuations of DNA threading through a solid-state nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-01-01

    The threading of a polymer chain through a small pore is a classic problem in polymer dynamics and underlies nanopore sensing technology. However important experimental aspects of the polymer motion in a solid-state nanopore, such as an accurate measurement of the velocity variation during translocation, have remained elusive. In this work we analysed the translocation through conical quartz nanopores of a 7 kbp DNA double-strand labelled with six markers equally spaced along its contour. The...

  9. Surface Modification of Nanoporous 1,2-Polybutadiene by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization or Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Schulte, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry were used to obtain functional nanoporous polymers based oil nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) with gyroid morphology. The ATRP monolith initiator was prepared by immobilizing bromoester initiators onto the pore walls...... ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while...

  10. a Simple Method to Prepare Nanoporous Sn:Pb Composite Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Majid; Amirhoseiny, Maryam; Mosayyebi, Abolghasem

    2015-03-01

    A novel and simple approach for preparing nanoporous binder free Sn:Pb composite metal foam has been demonstrated. The anodized metallic composite block was functionalized and also found a nanoporous structure. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the nanoflake-like arrangement has synthesized. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the nanoporous structure of the Sn/Pb foam after etching with 6 M NaOH. The prepared Sn:Pb metal foam is able to be used as a super capacitors electrode to offer large areal capacitance with regards to the synergic integration of Sn and Pb metals and the unique nanoporous structure.

  11. Stochastic nanopore sensors for the detection of terrorist agents: Current status and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aihua; Zhao Qitao; Guan Xiyun

    2010-01-01

    Nanopore stochastic sensor works by monitoring the ionic current modulations induced by the passage of analytes of interest through a single pore, which can be obtained from a biological ion channel by self-assembly or artificially fabricated in a solid-state membrane. In this minireview, we overview the use of biological nanopores and artificial nanopores for the detection of terrorist agents including explosives, organophosphorus nerve agents, nitrogen mustards, organoarsenic compounds, toxins, and viruses. We also discuss the current challenge in the development of deployable nanopore sensors for real-world applications.

  12. Precise attoliter temperature control of nanopore sensors using a nanoplasmonic bullseye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Colin R; Albella, Pablo; Ng, Binghao; Ivanov, Aleksandar P; Roschuk, Tyler; Cecchini, Michael P; Bresme, Fernando; Maier, Stefan A; Edel, Joshua B

    2015-01-14

    Targeted temperature control in nanopores is greatly important in further understanding biological molecules. Such control would extend the range of examinable molecules and facilitate advanced analysis, including the characterization of temperature-dependent molecule conformations. The work presented within details well-defined plasmonic gold bullseye and silicon nitride nanopore membranes. The bullseye nanoantennae are designed and optimized using simulations and theoretical calculations for interaction with 632.8 nm laser light. Laser heating was monitored experimentally through nanopore conductance measurements. The precise heating of nanopores is demonstrated while minimizing the accumulation of heat in the surrounding membrane material.

  13. Detection of short single-strand DNA homopolymers with ultrathin Si3N4 nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Qiu, Yinghua; Yuan, Zhishan; Zhang, Yin; Sha, Jingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Litao; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanopores with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 63 nm are fabricated on a reduced Si3N4 membrane by focused ion beam and high energy electron beam. Through measuring the blocked ionic currents for DNA strands threading linearly through those solid-state nanopores, it is found that the blockade ionic current is proportional to the square of the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA strand. With the nanopore diameter reduced to be comparable with that of DNA strands, the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA becomes smaller, which is attributed to the size confinement effects. The duration time for the linear DNA translocation events increases monotonically with the nanopore length. By comparing the spatial configurations of DNA strands through nanopores with different diameters, it is found that the nanopore with large diameter has enough space to allow the DNA strand to translocate through with complex conformation. With the decrease of the nanopore diameter, the folded part of the DNA is prone to be straightened by the nanopore, which leads to the increase in the occurrence frequency of the linear DNA translocation events. Reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 2.5 nm allows the detection and discrimination of three nucleotide "G" and three nucleotide "T" homopolymer DNA strands based on differences in their physical dimensions.

  14. Toward sensitive graphene nanoribbon-nanopore devices by preventing electron beam-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Balan, Adrian; Drndić, Marija

    2013-12-23

    Graphene-based nanopore devices are promising candidates for next-generation DNA sequencing. Here we fabricated graphene nanoribbon-nanopore (GNR-NP) sensors for DNA detection. Nanopores with diameters in the range 2-10 nm were formed at the edge or in the center of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), with widths between 20 and 250 nm and lengths of 600 nm, on 40 nm thick silicon nitride (SiN(x)) membranes. GNR conductance was monitored in situ during electron irradiation-induced nanopore formation inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating at 200 kV. We show that GNR resistance increases linearly with electron dose and that GNR conductance and mobility decrease by a factor of 10 or more when GNRs are imaged at relatively high magnification with a broad beam prior to making a nanopore. By operating the TEM in scanning TEM (STEM) mode, in which the position of the converged electron beam can be controlled with high spatial precision via automated feedback, we were able to prevent electron beam-induced damage and make nanopores in highly conducting GNR sensors. This method minimizes the exposure of the GNRs to the beam before and during nanopore formation. The resulting GNRs with unchanged resistances after nanopore formation can sustain microampere currents at low voltages (∼50 mV) in buffered electrolyte solution and exhibit high sensitivity, with a large relative change of resistance upon changes of gate voltage, similar to pristine GNRs without nanopores.

  15. Single cigar-shaped nanopores functionalized with amphoteric amino acid chains: experimental and theoretical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Nguyen, Hung Quoc; Nasir, Saima; Cervera, Javier; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2012-04-24

    We present an experimental and theoretical characterization of single cigar-shaped nanopores with pH-responsive carboxylic acid and lysine chains functionalized on the pore surface. The nanopore characterization includes (i) optical images of the nanostructure obtained by FESEM; (ii) different chemical procedures for the nanopore preparation (etching time and functionalizations; pH and electrolyte concentration of the external solution) allowing externally tunable nanopore responses monitored by the current-voltage (I-V) curves; and (iii) transport simulations obtained with a multilayer nanopore model. We show that a single, approximately symmetric nanopore can be operated as a reconfigurable diode showing different rectifying behaviors by applying chemical and electrical signals. The remarkable characteristics of the new nanopore are the sharp response observed in the I-V curves, the improved tunability (with respect to previous designs of symmetric nanopores) which is achieved because of the direct external access to the nanostructure mouths, and the broad range of rectifying properties. The results concern both fundamental concepts useful for the understanding of transport processes in biological systems (ion channels) and applications relevant for tunable nanopore technology (information processing and drug controlled release).

  16. Image Information Mining Utilizing Hierarchical Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.; Marchisio, Giovanni; Koperski, Krzysztof; Datcu, Mihai

    2002-01-01

    The Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) algorithm is an approach for producing high quality, hierarchically related image segmentations. The VisiMine image information mining system utilizes clustering and segmentation algorithms for reducing visual information in multispectral images to a manageable size. The project discussed herein seeks to enhance the VisiMine system through incorporating hierarchical segmentations from HSEG into the VisiMine system.

  17. Molecular release from patterned nanoporous gold thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Ozge; Daggumati, Pallavi; Seker, Erkin

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured materials have shown significant potential for biomedical applications that require high loading capacity and controlled release of drugs. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising novel material that benefits from compatibility with microfabrication, tunable pore morphology, electrical conductivity, well-established gold-thiol conjugate chemistry, and biocompatibility. While np-Au's non-biological applications are abundant, its performance in the biomedical field is nascent. In this work, we employ a combination of techniques including nanoporous thin film synthesis, quantitative electron microscopy, fluorospectrometry, and electrochemical surface characterization to study loading capacity and molecular release kinetics as a function of film properties and discuss underlying mechanisms. The sub-micron-thick sputter-coated nanoporous gold films provide small-molecule loading capacities up to 1.12 μg cm-2 and molecular release half-lives between 3.6 hours to 12.8 hours. A systematic set of studies reveals that effective surface area of the np-Au thin films on glass substrates plays the largest role in determining loading capacity. The release kinetics on the other hand depends on a complex interplay of micro- and nano-scale morphological features.Nanostructured materials have shown significant potential for biomedical applications that require high loading capacity and controlled release of drugs. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising novel material that benefits from compatibility with microfabrication, tunable pore morphology, electrical conductivity, well-established gold-thiol conjugate chemistry, and biocompatibility. While np-Au's non-biological applications are abundant, its performance in the biomedical field is nascent. In this work, we employ a combination of techniques including nanoporous thin film synthesis, quantitative electron microscopy

  18. Automatic Hierarchical Color Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizing images into semantic categories can be extremely useful for content-based image retrieval and image annotation. Grouping images into semantic classes is a difficult problem, however. Image classification attempts to solve this hard problem by using low-level image features. In this paper, we propose a method for hierarchical classification of images via supervised learning. This scheme relies on using a good low-level feature and subsequently performing feature-space reconfiguration using singular value decomposition to reduce noise and dimensionality. We use the training data to obtain a hierarchical classification tree that can be used to categorize new images. Our experimental results suggest that this scheme not only performs better than standard nearest-neighbor techniques, but also has both storage and computational advantages.

  19. Hierarchical matrices algorithms and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This self-contained monograph presents matrix algorithms and their analysis. The new technique enables not only the solution of linear systems but also the approximation of matrix functions, e.g., the matrix exponential. Other applications include the solution of matrix equations, e.g., the Lyapunov or Riccati equation. The required mathematical background can be found in the appendix. The numerical treatment of fully populated large-scale matrices is usually rather costly. However, the technique of hierarchical matrices makes it possible to store matrices and to perform matrix operations approximately with almost linear cost and a controllable degree of approximation error. For important classes of matrices, the computational cost increases only logarithmically with the approximation error. The operations provided include the matrix inversion and LU decomposition. Since large-scale linear algebra problems are standard in scientific computing, the subject of hierarchical matrices is of interest to scientists ...

  20. Effective implementation of hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mudita; Vijayarajan, V.; Sivashanmugam, G.; Bessie Amali, D. Geraldine

    2017-11-01

    Hierarchical clustering is generally used for cluster analysis in which we build up a hierarchy of clusters. In order to find that which cluster should be split a large amount of observations are being carried out. Here the data set of US based personalities has been considered for clustering. After implementation of hierarchical clustering on the data set we group it in three different clusters one is of politician, sports person and musicians. Training set is the main parameter which decides the category which has to be assigned to the observations that are being collected. The category of these observations must be known. Recognition comes from the formulation of classification. Supervised learning has the main instance in the form of classification. While on the other hand Clustering is an instance of unsupervised procedure. Clustering consists of grouping of data that have similar properties which are either their own or are inherited from some other sources.

  1. Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Sano, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a broad spectrum of areas in both hybrid materials and hierarchical composites, including recent development of processing technologies, structural designs, modern computer simulation techniques, and the relationships between the processing-structure-property-performance. Each topic is introduced at length with numerous  and detailed examples and over 150 illustrations.   In addition, the authors present a method of categorizing these materials, so that representative examples of all material classes are discussed.

  2. Statistical Significance for Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, Patrick K.; Liu, Yufeng; Hayes, D. Neil; Marron, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cluster analysis has proved to be an invaluable tool for the exploratory and unsupervised analysis of high dimensional datasets. Among methods for clustering, hierarchical approaches have enjoyed substantial popularity in genomics and other fields for their ability to simultaneously uncover multiple layers of clustering structure. A critical and challenging question in cluster analysis is whether the identified clusters represent important underlying structure or are artifacts of natural sampling variation. Few approaches have been proposed for addressing this problem in the context of hierarchical clustering, for which the problem is further complicated by the natural tree structure of the partition, and the multiplicity of tests required to parse the layers of nested clusters. In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo based approach for testing statistical significance in hierarchical clustering which addresses these issues. The approach is implemented as a sequential testing procedure guaranteeing control of the family-wise error rate. Theoretical justification is provided for our approach, and its power to detect true clustering structure is illustrated through several simulation studies and applications to two cancer gene expression datasets. PMID:28099990

  3. Hierarchical ordering of reticular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Mileyko

    Full Text Available The structure of hierarchical networks in biological and physical systems has long been characterized using the Horton-Strahler ordering scheme. The scheme assigns an integer order to each edge in the network based on the topology of branching such that the order increases from distal parts of the network (e.g., mountain streams or capillaries to the "root" of the network (e.g., the river outlet or the aorta. However, Horton-Strahler ordering cannot be applied to networks with loops because they they create a contradiction in the edge ordering in terms of which edge precedes another in the hierarchy. Here, we present a generalization of the Horton-Strahler order to weighted planar reticular networks, where weights are assumed to correlate with the importance of network edges, e.g., weights estimated from edge widths may correlate to flow capacity. Our method assigns hierarchical levels not only to edges of the network, but also to its loops, and classifies the edges into reticular edges, which are responsible for loop formation, and tree edges. In addition, we perform a detailed and rigorous theoretical analysis of the sensitivity of the hierarchical levels to weight perturbations. In doing so, we show that the ordering of the reticular edges is more robust to noise in weight estimation than is the ordering of the tree edges. We discuss applications of this generalized Horton-Strahler ordering to the study of leaf venation and other biological networks.

  4. Resizing metal-coated nanopores using a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansin, Guillaume A T; Hong, Jongin; Dusting, Jonathan; deMello, Andrew J; Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B

    2011-10-04

    Electron beam-induced shrinkage provides a convenient way of resizing solid-state nanopores in Si(3) N(4) membranes. Here, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to resize a range of different focussed ion beam-milled nanopores in Al-coated Si(3) N(4) membranes. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra and SEM images acquired during resizing highlight that a time-variant carbon deposition process is the dominant mechanism of pore shrinkage, although granular structures on the membrane surface in the vicinity of the pores suggest that competing processes may occur. Shrinkage is observed on the Al side of the pore as well as on the Si(3) N(4) side, while the shrinkage rate is observed to be dependent on a variety of factors. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. On magnetism of nickel clusters in nanoporous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danishevskii, A. M.; Shanina, B. D.; Rogachev, A. Yu.; Sokolov, V. V.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Kyutt, R. N.; Gordeev, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    The structural and magnetometric characteristics of a nanoporous carbon with nickel clusters in nanopores have been studied. The main attention is focused on the fact of substantial decrease in the nickel magnetization as nickel has a close contact to carbon as compared to similar parameter of free nickel microparticles with almost the same sizes. A theoretical model of a periodic cluster consisting of 16 carbon atoms and one nickel atom in a micropore surrounded by carbon atoms has been built. The electron density in such a cluster and its magnetism were found by computer calculations. It is shown that the magnetic moment of a nickel atom in the cluster is substantially smaller than that of a free nickel atom. Based on the results, it is concluded that the decrease in the magnetization of nickel clusters in the carbon environment observed experimentally is due to the adsorption interaction of the nickel and carbon electron subsystems.

  6. Nanoporous poly(lactide) by olefin metathesis degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Arthur; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2013-07-31

    We describe an approach to ordered nanoporous poly(lactide) that relies on self-assembly of poly(butadiene)-poly(lactide) (PB-PLA) diblock copolymers followed by selective degradation of PB using olefin metathesis. The block copolymers were obtained by a combination of anionic and ring-opening transesterification polymerizations. The molar mass of each block was tailored to target materials with either a lamellar or cylindrical microphase-separated morphology. Orientation of these nanoscale domains was induced in thin films and monolithic samples through solvent annealing and mechanical deformation, respectively. Selective degradation of PB was achieved by immersing the samples in a solution of Grubbs first-generation catalyst in cyclohexane, a nonsolvent for PLA. Successful elimination of PB was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Direct imaging of the resulting nanoporous PLA was obtained by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Titanium nitride stamps replicating nanoporous anodic alumina films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, D; Sanchez, O; Asenjo, A; Jaafar, M; Baldonedo, J L; Vazquez, M; Hernandez-Velez, M

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication of nanostructured TiN films by magnetron sputtering using nanoporous anodic alumina films (NAAF) as substrates is reported. These hard nanostructured films could be used for pre-patterning aluminium foils and to obtain nanoporous films replicating the starting NAAF over a wide range of pore diameters and spacings. Pre-patterned Al foils are obtained by compression with pressures lower than those previously reported, then a new NAAF can be fabricated by means of only one anodization process. As an example, one of the TiN stamps was used for pre-patterning an Al foil at a pressure of 200 kg cm -2 and then it was anodized in oxalic acid solution obtaining the corresponding replica of the starting NAAF

  8. Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation

    KAUST Repository

    Wolfram, M-T

    2010-10-29

    High surface charges of polymer pore walls and applied electric fields can lead to the formation and subsequent dissolution of precipitates in nanopores. These precipitates block the pore, leading to current fluctuations. We present an extended Poisson-Nernst-Planck system which includes chemical reactions of precipitation and dissolution. We discuss the mathematical modeling and present 2D numerical simulations. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. Effects of Confinement on Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3984, - (2006), s. 743-751 ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:NRCC(CA) OGP 1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous materials * chemical reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  10. Elastic constants of nanoporous III-V semiconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovská, Michaela; Sedlák, Petr; Kruisová, Alena; Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal; Grym, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 24 (2015) ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : nanoporous semiconductors * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * finite elements modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (URE-Y) Impact factor: 2.772, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/48/24/245102/article

  11. Nanopore Technology: A Simple, Inexpensive, Futuristic Technology for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P D

    2016-10-01

    In health care, importance of DNA sequencing has been fully established. Sanger's Capillary Electrophoresis DNA sequencing methodology is time consuming, cumbersome, hence become more expensive. Lately, because of its versatility DNA sequencing became house hold name, and therefore, there is an urgent need of simple, fast, inexpensive, DNA sequencing technology. In the beginning of this century efforts were made, and Nanopore DNA sequencing technology was developed; still it is infancy, nevertheless, it is the futuristic technology.

  12. Permeation of nanopores by water the effects of channel polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, R; Hansen, J P

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to characterize the permeation by water of cylindrical nanopores, modelling ion channels, as a function of channel radius R and dielectric permittivity epsilon. Intermittent permeation is found in a narrow range around the threshold values of R and epsilon. While channel permeation is highly sensitive to channel polarization effects, no effect on structural properties of the confined water is found on varying epsilon.

  13. Nanoporous Polymer-Ceramic Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Metal Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Zhengyuan

    2013-09-16

    A nanoporous composite material that offers the unique combination of high room-temperature ionic conductivity and high mechanical modulus is reported. When used as the separator/electrolyte in lithium batteries employing metallic lithium as anode, the material displays unprecedented cycling stability and excellent ability to prevent premature cell failure by dendrite-induced short circuits © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. DeepSimulator: a deep simulator for Nanopore sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yu

    2017-12-23

    Motivation: Oxford Nanopore sequencing is a rapidly developed sequencing technology in recent years. To keep pace with the explosion of the downstream data analytical tools, a versatile Nanopore sequencing simulator is needed to complement the experimental data as well as to benchmark those newly developed tools. However, all the currently available simulators are based on simple statistics of the produced reads, which have difficulty in capturing the complex nature of the Nanopore sequencing procedure, the main task of which is the generation of raw electrical current signals. Results: Here we propose a deep learning based simulator, DeepSimulator, to mimic the entire pipeline of Nanopore sequencing. Starting from a given reference genome or assembled contigs, we simulate the electrical current signals by a context-dependent deep learning model, followed by a base-calling procedure to yield simulated reads. This workflow mimics the sequencing procedure more naturally. The thorough experiments performed across four species show that the signals generated by our context-dependent model are more similar to the experimentally obtained signals than the ones generated by the official context-independent pore model. In terms of the simulated reads, we provide a parameter interface to users so that they can obtain the reads with different accuracies ranging from 83% to 97%. The reads generated by the default parameter have almost the same properties as the real data. Two case studies demonstrate the application of DeepSimulator to benefit the development of tools in de novo assembly and in low coverage SNP detection. Availability: The software can be accessed freely at: https://github.com/lykaust15/DeepSimulator.

  15. Annihilation of the triplet excitons in the nanoporous glass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasyev, D.A.; Ibrayev, N.Kh.; Saletsky, A.M.; Starokurov, Y.V.; Gun'ko, V.M.; Mikhalovsky, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The spectra and kinetics of fluorescence decay of 1,2-benzanthracene (1,2-BA) molecular clusters adsorbed in nanoporous borosilicate glasses were investigated. It has been shown that the type of the decay kinetics of delayed fluorescence is determined by the annihilation of triplet excitons in crystalline and percolation clusters. The influence of an external magnetic field on the annihilation rate constant of triplet excitons in the adsorbed 1,2-BA molecules has been studied. The response of the molecular clusters to the magnetic field strongly depends on temperature, pore size and time scale of the observation. Clusters with the crystal structure dominate in the decay kinetics of triplet–triplet annihilation (TTA) and delayed fluorescence in the initial microsecond period of time after excitation. Amorphous clusters determine the form of decay kinetics of delayed fluorescence in the millisecond range. The increase in the pore size and concentration of the adsorbate lead to the dominance of crystalline components. The results presented here can be used to develop techniques for probing the structure of the adsorbed layer in nanoporous systems examining the effect of an external magnetic field on the annihilation delayed fluorescence (ADF) kinetics. Highlights: ► Molecular clusters of 1,2-benzanthracene adsorbed in nanoporous borosilicate glasses. ► Form of decay kinetics of delayed fluorescence. ► Magnetic field effects depend on temperature, pore size and observation time range. ► Clusters with crystal structure and amorphous clusters form in porous glasses

  16. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Maxim; Chao, Shu-Han; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-11-24

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization.

  17. Diffusive dynamics of DNA unzipping in a nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachiewicz, Anna; Molski, Andrzej

    2016-02-15

    When an electric field is applied to an insulating membrane, movement of charged particles through a nanopore is induced. The measured ionic current reports on biomolecules passing through the nanopore. In this work, we explored the kinetics of DNA unzipping in a nanopore using our coarse-grained model (Stachiewicz and Molski, J. Comput. Chem. 2015, 36, 947). Coarse graining allowed a more detailed analysis for a wider range of parameters than all-atom simulations. Dependence of the translocation mode (unzipping or distortion) on the pore diameter was examined, and the threshold voltages were estimated. We determined the potential of mean force, position-dependent diffusion coefficient, and position-dependent effective charge for the DNA unzipping. The three molecular profiles were correlated with the ionic current and molecular events. On the unzipping/translocation force profile, two energy maxima were found, one of them corresponding to the unzipping, and the other to the translocation barriers. The unzipping kinetics were further explored using Brownian dynamics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyun Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio, is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that promises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT. MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the genomics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assembly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in genome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  19. Genomic Pathogen Typing Using Solid-State Nanopores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison H Squires

    Full Text Available In clinical settings, rapid and accurate characterization of pathogens is essential for effective treatment of patients; however, subtle genetic changes in pathogens which elude traditional phenotypic typing may confer dangerous pathogenic properties such as toxicity, antibiotic resistance, or virulence. Existing options for molecular typing techniques characterize the critical genomic changes that distinguish harmful and benign strains, yet the well-established approaches, in particular those that rely on electrophoretic separation of nucleic acid fragments on a gel, have room for only incremental future improvements in speed, cost, and complexity. Solid-state nanopores are an emerging class of single-molecule sensors that can electrophoretically characterize charged biopolymers, and which offer significant advantages in terms of sample and reagent requirements, readout speed, parallelization, and automation. We present here the first application of nanopores for single-molecule molecular typing using length based "fingerprints" of critical sites in bacterial genomes. This technique is highly adaptable for detection of different types of genetic variation; as we illustrate using prototypical examples including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and methicillin-resistant Streptococcus aureus, the solid-state nanopore diagnostic platform may be used to detect large insertions or deletions, small insertions or deletions, and even single-nucleotide variations in bacterial DNA. We further show that Bayesian classification of test samples can provide highly confident pathogen typing results based on only a few tens of independent single-molecule events, making this method extremely sensitive and statistically robust.

  20. Modeling of 1D Anomalous Diffusion in Fractured Nanoporous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albinali Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractured nanoporous reservoirs include multi-scale and discontinuous fractures coupled with a complex nanoporous matrix. Such systems cannot be described by the conventional dual-porosity (or multi-porosity idealizations due to the presence of different flow mechanisms at multiple scales. More detailed modeling approaches, such as Discrete Fracture Network (DFN models, similarly suffer from the extensive data requirements dictated by the intricacy of the flow scales, which eventually deter the utility of these models. This paper discusses the utility and construction of 1D analytical and numerical anomalous diffusion models for heterogeneous, nanoporous media, which is commonly encountered in oil and gas production from tight, unconventional reservoirs with fractured horizontal wells. A fractional form of Darcy’s law, which incorporates the non-local and hereditary nature of flow, is coupled with the classical mass conservation equation to derive a fractional diffusion equation in space and time. Results show excellent agreement with established solutions under asymptotic conditions and are consistent with the physical intuitions.

  1. Nanoporous ionic organic networks: from synthesis to materials applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Ke; Antonietti, Markus; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-11-21

    The past decade has witnessed rapid progress in the synthesis of nanoporous organic networks or polymer frameworks for various potential applications. Generally speaking, functionalization of porous networks to add extra properties and enhance materials performance could be achieved either during the pore formation (thus a concurrent approach) or by post-synthetic modification (a sequential approach). Nanoporous organic networks which include ion pairs bound in a covalent manner are of special importance and possess extreme application profiles. Within these nanoporous ionic organic networks (NIONs), here with a pore size in the range from sub-1 nm to 100 nm, we observe a synergistic coupling of the electrostatic interaction of charges, the nanoconfinement within pores and the addressable functional units in soft matter resulting in a wide variety of functions and applications, above all catalysis, energy storage and conversion, as well as environment-related operations. This review aims to highlight the recent progress in this area, and seeks to raise original perspectives that will stimulate future advancements at both the fundamental and applied level.

  2. Solid-state nanopore studies of hybridized DNA oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagurusamy, Venkat; Weinger, Paul; Kim, Sungcheol; Ling, Xinsheng Sean

    2010-03-01

    Hybridization-assisted nanopore sequencing (HANS) uses short oligomers of DNA bound to a long single-stranded DNA in order to obtain the positional information of the bases that make up the long DNA molecule. To test the feasibility of the HANS approach, we carried out experiments to detect 12-base hybridizations in a tri-mer complex consisting of three single-stranded oligos hybridized at their ends sequenctially. These DNA complexes are connected to polystyrene beads through biotin-streptavidin bonds to enable their detection by nanopores. The experiment is to measure the time dependence of the nanopore ionic current at fixed voltage when the cis side is filled with the oligo-attached beads. Computer simulations are used as guides in the identification of translocation dynamics. Distinct features are found that can be attributed to tri-mers, dimmers, and monomers attached to the beads. The measured mean-first-passage time between two hybridization segments is extracted and is found to be consistent with theoretical estimates.

  3. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses can induce nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Short infrared (IR) laser pulses on the order of hundreds of microseconds to single milliseconds with typical wavelengths of 1800-2100 nm, have shown the capability to reversibly stimulate action potentials (AP) in neuronal cells. While the IR stimulation technique has proven successful for several applications, the exact mechanism(s) underlying the AP generation has remained elusive. To better understand how IR pulses cause AP stimulation, we determined the threshold for the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Using a surrogate calcium ion, thallium, which is roughly the same shape and charge, but lacks the biological functionality of calcium, we recorded the flow of thallium ions into an exposed cell in the presence of a battery of channel antagonists. The entry of thallium into the cell indicated that the ions entered via nanopores. The data presented here demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental effects of IR stimulation and speculates that nanopores, formed in response to the IR exposure, play an upstream role in the generation of AP.

  4. Evolution of Surface Nanopores in Pressurised Gyrospun Polymeric Microfibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Eranka Illangakoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of a solvent or solvent system and the ensuing polymer–solvent interactions are crucial factors affecting the preparation of fibers with multiple morphologies. A range of poly(methylmethacrylate fibers were prepared by pressurised gyration using acetone, chloroform, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane as solvents. It was found that microscale fibers with surface nanopores were formed when using chloroform, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane and poreless fibers were formed when using acetone and DMF as the solvent. These observations are explained on the basis of the physical properties of the solvents and mechanisms of pore formation. The formation of porous fibers is caused by many solvent properties such as volatility, solubility parameters, vapour pressure and surface tension. Cross-sectional images show that the nanopores are only on the surface of the fibers and they were not inter-connected. Further, the results show that fibers with desired nanopores (40–400 nm can be prepared by carefully selecting the solvent and applied pressure in the gyration process.

  5. Controlled nanoporous Pt morphologies by varying deposition parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baldwin, J Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Antoniou, Antonia [GEROGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH

    2009-01-01

    Typically, dealloying of an alloy can result in an open cell nanoporous structure of the least electrochemically active element. Here, we show that a wider range of nanoporous structures is possible by controlling the composition and deposition parameters of the as-synthesized alloy as a way to provide sites for preferential etching. We demonstrate this by synthesizing nanoporous platinum (np-Pt) through electrochemical dealloying in aqueous HF from co-sputtered Pt{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} amorphous films. For increased Pt fraction of the amorphous alloy, silicon dissolution is favored along pre-existing features of the amorphous film (e.g. column boundaries or surface asperities). The resulting np-Pt depends on the manner in which silicon is preferentially removed. In addition to the expected isotropic open cell structure, columnar and Voronoi (radial) np-Pt are observed. A processing-structure map is developed to correlate np-Pt morphology to the initial composition and thickness of the amorphous Pt{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} film and the negative substrate bias used in magnetron sputtering.

  6. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia to dentin and titanium with sandblasted and acid etched surface coated with serum and serum proteins - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Sigrun; Kindblom, Christian; Mizgalska, Danuta; Magdoń, Anna; Jurczyk, Karolina; Sculean, Anton; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the adhesion of selected bacterial strains incl. expression of important virulence factors at dentin and titanium SLA surfaces coated with layers of serum proteins. Dentin- and moderately rough SLA titanium-discs were coated overnight with human serum, or IgG, or human serum albumin (HSA). Thereafter, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, or a six-species mixture were added for 4h and 24h. The number of adhered bacteria (colony forming units; CFU) was determined. Arg-gingipain activity of P. gingivalis and mRNA expressions of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia proteases and T. forsythia protease inhibitor were measured. Coating specimens never resulted in differences exceeding 1.1 log10 CFU, comparing to controls, irrespective the substrate. Counts of T. forsythia were statistically significantly higher at titanium than dentin, the difference was up to 3.7 log10 CFU after 24h (p=0.002). No statistically significant variation regarding adhesion of the mixed culture was detected between surfaces or among coatings. Arg-gingipain activity of P. gingivalis was associated with log10 CFU but not with the surface or the coating. Titanium negatively influenced mRNA expression of T. forsythia protease inhibitor at 24h (p=0.026 uncoated, p=0.009 with serum). The present findings indicate that: a) single bacterial species (T. forsythia) can adhere more readily to titanium SLA than to dentin, b) low expression of T. forsythia protease inhibitor may influence the virulence of the species on titanium SLA surfaces in comparison with teeth, and c) surface properties (e.g. material and/or protein layers) do not appear to significantly influence multi-species adhesion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Air formaldehyde and solvent concentrations during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the woodworking and furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorud, Syvert; Gjolstad, Merete; Ellingsen, Dag G; Molander, Paal

    2005-06-01

    An investigation of contemporary exposure to formaldehyde and organic solvents has been carried out during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the Norwegian woodworking and furniture industry over a period of 3 years. The investigation covered 27 factories of different sizes and with different types of production, and totally 557 parallel formaldehyde and solvent samples were collected. The formaldehyde concentration (geometric mean) was 0.15 ppm (range 0.01-1.48 ppm) with about 10% of the samples exceeding the Norwegian occupational exposure limit of 0.5 ppm. The solvent concentration as additive effect (geometric mean) was 0.13 (range 0.0004-5.08) and about 5% of the samples exceeded the Norwegian occupational exposure limit. The most frequently occurring solvents from acid-curing lacquers were n-butyl acetate, ethanol, ethyl acetate and 1-butanol, which were found in 88-98% of the samples. Toluene, n-butyl acetate and 1-butanol were the only solvents with maximum concentrations exceeding their respective occupational exposure limits. Curtain painting machine operators were exposed to the highest concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric mean 0.51 ppm, range 0.08-1.48 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 1.18, range 0.02-5.08). Other painting application work tasks such as automatic and manual spray-painting, manual painting and dip painting, showed on average considerably lower concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric means 0.07-0.16 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.02-0.18). Non-painting work tasks also displayed moderate concentrations of formaldehyde (geometric means 0.11-0.17 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.04-0.07).

  8. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  9. An engineered ClyA nanopore detects folded target proteins by selective external association and pore entry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soskine, Mikhael; Biesemans, Annemie; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni

    Nanopores have been used in label-free single-molecule studies, including investigations of chemical reactions, nucleic acid analysis, and applications in sensing. Biological nanopores generally perform better than artificial nanopores as sensors, but they have disadvantages including a fixed

  10. Nanoporous materials for reducing the over potential of creating hydrogen by water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Leonard, Kevin C.

    2016-06-14

    Disclosed is an electrolyzer including an electrode including a nanoporous oxide-coated conducting material. Also disclosed is a method of producing a gas through electrolysis by contacting an aqueous solution with an electrode connected to an electrical power source, wherein the electrode includes a nanoporous oxide-coated conducting material.

  11. BIOLOGICAL NANOPORES FOR BIOPOLYMER SENSING AND SEQUENCING BASED ON FRAC ACTINOPORIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Wloka, Carsten; Mutter, Natalie Lisa; Soskine, Misha; Huang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    The invention relates generally to the field of nanopores and the use thereof in various applications, such as analysis of biopolymer s and macromolecules, typically by making electrical measurements during translocation through a nanopores. Provided is a system comprising a funnel- shaped

  12. Physical Model for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Nanopore Size via Conductance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2017-10-27

    Nanopores have been explored for various biochemical and nanoparticle analyses, primarily via characterizing the ionic current through the pores. At present, however, size determination for solid-state nanopores is experimentally tedious and theoretically unaccountable. Here, we establish a physical model by introducing an effective transport length, L eff , that measures, for a symmetric nanopore, twice the distance from the center of the nanopore where the electric field is the highest to the point along the nanopore axis where the electric field falls to e -1 of this maximum. By [Formula: see text], a simple expression S 0 = f (G, σ, h, β) is derived to algebraically correlate minimum nanopore cross-section area S 0 to nanopore conductance G, electrolyte conductivity σ, and membrane thickness h with β to denote pore shape that is determined by the pore fabrication technique. The model agrees excellently with experimental results for nanopores in graphene, single-layer MoS 2 , and ultrathin SiN x films. The generality of the model is verified by applying it to micrometer-size pores.

  13. Electrochemistry at the edge of a single graphene layer in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Sutanuka; Shim, Jeong; Rivera, J.

    2013-01-01

    We study the electrochemistry of single layer graphene edges using a nanopore-based structure consisting of stacked graphene and AlO dielectric layers. Nanopores, with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm, are formed by an electron beam sculpting process on the stacked layers. This leads to a unique...

  14. Patterned Hydrophilization of Nanoporous 1,2‐PB by Thiol‐ene Photochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Anton; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Ndoni, Sokol

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for functionalizing the large polymer–air interface of a gyroid nanoporous polymer. The hydrophilicity of nanoporous cross‐linked 1,2‐polybutadiene is tuned by thiol‐ene photo‐grafting of mercaptosuccinic acid or sodium 2‐mercaptoethanesulfonate. The reaction...

  15. Di-block co-polymer derived nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous liquid core waveguides are fabricated by selectively UV modifying a nanoporous polymer. The starting point is a diblock polymer where 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) molecules are bound to PDMS. When the PB is cross linked it self-assembles into PB with a network of 14 nm diameter PDMS filled...

  16. DNA stretching and optimization of nucleobase recognition in enzymatic nanopore sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoddart, David; Franceschini, Lorenzo; Heron, Andrew; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In nanopore sequencing, where single DNA strands are electrophoretically translocated through a nanopore and the resulting ionic signal is used to identify the four DNA bases, an enzyme has been used to ratchet the nucleic acid stepwise through the pore at a controlled speed. In this work, we

  17. Anion-exchange synthesis of nanoporous FeP nanosheets as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, You; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Jingfang; Shi, Yanmei; Zhang, Bin

    2013-07-28

    Nanoporous FeP nanosheets are successfully synthesized via the anion-exchange reaction of inorganic-organic hybrid Fe18S25-TETAH (TETAH = protonated triethylenetetramine) nanosheets with P ions. The as-prepared nanoporous FeP nanosheets exhibit high electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction activity in acidic medium.

  18. Influence of a nanoporous zirconia implant surface of on cell viability of human osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Osman, E.; Jansen, I.; Everts, V.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The dense nonretentive surface of zirconia implants was modified into a nanoporous surface using selective infiltration etching surface treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of such a nanoporous modified zirconia surface on the attachment of human osteoblasts.

  19. SEM-induced shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores with feature sizes around 5 nm play a critical role in bio-sensing fields, especially in single molecule detection and sequencing of DNA, RNA and proteins. In this paper we present a systematic study on shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores with a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Square nanopores with measurable sizes as small as 8 nm × 8 nm and rectangle nanopores with feature sizes (the smaller one between length and width) down to 5 nm have been obtained, using the SEM-induced shrinkage technique. The analysis of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the recovery of the pore size and morphology reveal that the grown material along with the edge of the nanopore is the result of deposition of hydrocarbon compounds, without structural damage during the shrinking process. A simplified model for pore shrinkage has been developed based on observation of the cross-sectional morphology of the shrunk nanopore. The main factors impacting on the task of controllably shrinking the nanopores, such as the accelerating voltage, spot size, scanned area of e-beam, and the initial pore size have been discussed. It is found that single-crystal silicon nanopores shrink linearly with time under localized irradiation by SEM e-beam in all cases, and the pore shrinkage rate is inversely proportional to the initial equivalent diameter of the pore under the same e-beam conditions.

  20. Spatial blockage of ionic current for electrophoretic translocation of DNA through a graphene nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenping; Liu, Shengju; Li, Xin; Wu, Ren'an

    2014-04-01

    Graphene nanopore has been promising the ultra-high resolution for DNA sequencing due to the atomic thickness and excellent electronic properties of the graphene monolayer. The dynamical translocation phenomena and/or behaviors underneath the blocked ionic current, however, have not been well unveiled to date for the translocation of DNA electrophoretically through a graphene nanopore. In this report, the assessment on the sensitivity of ionic current to instantaneous statuses of DNA in a 2.4 nm graphene nanopore was carried out based on the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. By filtering out the thermal noise of ionic current, the instantaneous conformational variations of DNA in a graphene nanopore have been unveiled from the fluctuations of ionic current, because of the spatial blockage effect of DNA against ionic current. Interestingly, the neighborhood effect of DNA against ionic current was also observed within a distance of 1.5 nm nearby the graphene nanopore, suggesting the further precise control for DNA translocation through a graphene nanopore in gene sequencing. Moreover, the sensitivity of the blocked ionic current toward the instantaneous conformations of DNA in a graphene nanopore demonstrates the great potential of graphene nanopores in the dynamics analysis of single molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Differentiation of Short Single-Stranded DNA Homopolymers in Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venta, Kimberly; Shemer, Gabriel; Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Balan, Adrian; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Ken; Drndić, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, new techniques that monitor ionic current modulations as single molecules pass through a nanoscale pore have enabled numerous single-molecule studies. While biological nanopores have recently shown the ability to resolve single nucleotides within individual DNA molecules, similar developments with solid-state nanopores have lagged, due to challenges both in fabricating stable nanopores of similar dimensions as biological nanopores and in achieving sufficiently low-noise and high-bandwidth recordings. Here we show that small silicon nitride nanopores (0.8 to 2-nm-diameter in 5 to 8-nm-thick membranes) can resolve differences between ionic current signals produced by short (30 base) ssDNA homopolymers (poly(dA), poly(dC), poly(dT)), when combined with measurement electronics that allow a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 10 to be achieved at 1 MHz bandwidth. While identifying intramolecular DNA sequences with silicon nitride nanopores will require further improvements in nanopore sensitivity and noise levels, homopolymer differentiation represents an important milestone in the development of solid-state nanopores. PMID:23621759

  2. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.

    2017-09-12

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  3. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria [Los Alamos, NM; Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos, NM; Olazabal, Virginia [Los Alamos, NM; Hoffbauer, Mark A [Los Alamos, NM; Akhadov, Elshan A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  4. Large apparent electric size of solid-state nanopores due to spatially extended surface conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Joly, Laurent; Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-08-08

    Ion transport through nanopores drilled in thin membranes is central to numerous applications, including biosensing and ion selective membranes. This paper reports experiments, numerical calculations, and theoretical predictions demonstrating an unexpectedly large ionic conduction in solid-state nanopores, taking its origin in anomalous entrance effects. In contrast to naive expectations based on analogies with electric circuits, the surface conductance inside the nanopore is shown to perturb the three-dimensional electric current streamlines far outside the nanopore in order to meet charge conservation at the pore entrance. This unexpected contribution to the ionic conductance can be interpreted in terms of an apparent electric size of the solid-state nanopore, which is much larger than its geometric counterpart whenever the number of charges carried by the nanopore surface exceeds its bulk counterpart. This apparent electric size, which can reach hundreds of nanometers, can have a major impact on the electrical detection of translocation events through nanopores, as well as for ionic transport in biological nanopores.

  5. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Akhadov, Elshan A.

    2017-10-31

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  6. Fabrication of Low Noise Borosilicate Glass Nanopores for Single Molecule Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh A Bafna

    Full Text Available We show low-cost fabrication and characterization of borosilicate glass nanopores for single molecule sensing. Nanopores with diameters of ~100 nm were fabricated in borosilicate glass capillaries using laser assisted glass puller. We further achieve controlled reduction and nanometer-size control in pore diameter by sculpting them under constant electron beam exposure. We successfully fabricate pore diameters down to 6 nm. We next show electrical characterization and low-noise behavior of these borosilicate nanopores and compare their taper geometries. We show, for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of glass nanopore conductance across six-orders of magnitude (1M-1μM of salt conditions, highlighting the role of buffer conditions. Finally, we demonstrate single molecule sensing capabilities of these devices with real-time translocation experiments of individual λ-DNA molecules. We observe distinct current blockage signatures of linear as well as folded DNA molecules as they undergo voltage-driven translocation through the glass nanopores. We find increased signal to noise for single molecule detection for higher trans-nanopore driving voltages. We propose these nanopores will expand the realm of applications for nanopore platform.

  7. Microtome Sliced Block Copolymers and Nanoporous Polymers as Masks for Nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvets, Violetta; Schulte, Lars; Ndoni, Sokol

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Block copolymers self-assembling properties are commonly used for creation of very fine nanostructures [1]. Goal of our project is to test new methods of the block-copolymer lithography mask preparation: macroscopic pieces of block-copolymers or nanoporous polymers with cross...... PDMS can be chemically etched from the PB matrix by tetrabutylammonium fluoride in tetrahydrofuran and macroscopic nanoporous PB piece is obtained. Both block-copolymer piece and nanoporous polymer piece were sliced with cryomicrotome perpendicular to the axis of cylinder alignment and flakes...... of etching patterns appear only under the certain parts of thick flakes and are not continuous. Although flakes from block copolymer are thinner and more uniform in thickness than flakes from nanoporous polymer, quality of patterns under nanoporous flakes appeared to be better than under block copolymer...

  8. Fabrication of high reflectivity nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors by controlled electrochemical etching of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Jin-Ho; Lee, June Key; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-09-01

    The nanoporous medium is a valuable feature of optical devices because of its variable optical refractive index with porosity. One important application is in a GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser having a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composed of alternating nanoporous and bulk GaNs. However, optimization of the fabrication process for high reflectivity DBRs having wellcontrolled high reflection bands has not been studied yet. We used electrochemical etching to study the fabrication process of a nanoporous GaN DBR and analyzed the relationship between the morphology and optical reflectivity. Several electrolytes were examined for the formation of the optimized nanoporous structure. A highly reflective DBRs having reflectivity of ~100% were obtained over a wide wavelength range of 450-750 nm. Porosification of semiconductors into nanoporous layers could provide a high reflectivity DBR due to controlled index-contrast, which would be advantages for the construction of a high-Q optical cavity.

  9. Label-free optical detection of biomolecular translocation through nanopore arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, Andrey; Henley, Robert Y; Larkin, Joseph; Carson, Spencer; Toscano, Michael L; Wanunu, Meni

    2014-10-28

    In recent years, nanopores have emerged as exceptionally promising single-molecule sensors due to their ability to detect biomolecules at subfemtomole levels in a label-free manner. Development of a high-throughput nanopore-based biosensor requires multiplexing of nanopore measurements. Electrical detection, however, poses a challenge, as each nanopore circuit must be electrically independent, which requires complex nanofluidics and embedded electrodes. Here, we present an optical method for simultaneous measurements of the ionic current across an array of solid-state nanopores, requiring no additional fabrication steps. Proof-of-principle experiments are conducted that show simultaneous optical detection and characterization of ssDNA and dsDNA using an array of pores. Through a comparison with electrical measurements, we show that optical measurements are capable of accessing equivalent transmembrane current information.

  10. Detection of a single enzyme molecule based on a solid-state nanopore sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, ShengWei; Gu, DeJian; Liu, Hang; Liu, QuanJun

    2016-04-15

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect a single molecule in a solution. In the present study, relatively large silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopores with diameters of ∼28 and ∼88 nm were fabricated successfully using a focused Ga ion beam. We have used solid-state nanopores with various sizes to detect the single horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecule and for the first time analyzed single HRP molecular translocation events. In addition, a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction and a translocation of the product of enzyme catalysis substrates were investigated by using a Si3N4 nanopore. Our nanopore system showed a high sensitivity in detecting single enzyme molecules and a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction. This method could also be significant for studying gene expression or enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.

  11. Solid-state nanopores of controlled geometry fabricated in a transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Egerton, Ray F.

    2017-11-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography were applied to in situ studies of the formation, shape, and diameter of nanopores formed in a silicon nitride membrane in a transmission electron microscope. The nanopore geometry was observed in three dimensions by electron tomography. Drilling conditions, such as probe current, beam convergence angle, and probe position, affect the formation rate and the geometry of the pores. With a beam convergence semi-angle of α = 22 mrad, a conical shaped nanopore is formed but at α = 45 mrad, double-cone (hourglass-shaped) nanopores were produced. Nanopores with an effective diameter between 10 nm and 1.8 nm were fabricated by controlling the drilling time.

  12. Investigation of field effects in a solid-state nanopore transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Yong; Han, Seungwu

    2015-11-07

    In order to calculate ion currents through solid-state nanopore transistors realistically, we propose a computational model based on the Poisson-Nernst-Plank equation. In the present model, we determine the surface charge density locally on the nanopore by imposing consistency between the ion distribution and the chemical reaction at the surface. The model can consider a non-uniform influence by the gate voltage on the inner surface of the nanopore membrane, which enables us to investigate ion currents depending on the gate geometry such as the thickness and vertical position within the nanopore. We verify the validity of the model by comparing the pH dependence of simulation results with the extant experimental results. We also investigate the transistor behaviour depending on the surface material, pore geometry and gate position. In particular, we propose an optimized system to enhance the on/off ratio of the nanopore transistor.

  13. Lithography-based fabrication of nanopore arrays in freestanding SiN and graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, Daniel V.; Yang, Wayne; Dekker, Cees

    2018-04-01

    We report a simple and scalable technique for the fabrication of nanopore arrays on freestanding SiN and graphene membranes based on electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. By controlling the dose of the single-shot electron-beam exposure, circular nanopores of any size down to 16 nm in diameter can be fabricated in both materials at high accuracy and precision. We demonstrate the sensing capabilities of these nanopores by translocating dsDNA through pores fabricated using this method, and find signal-to-noise characteristics on par with transmission-electron-microscope-drilled nanopores. This versatile lithography-based approach allows for the high-throughput manufacturing of nanopores and can in principle be used on any substrate, in particular membranes made out of transferable two-dimensional materials.

  14. Single-Molecule Sensing with Nanopore Confinement: from Chemical Reactions to Biological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao; Ying, Yi-Lun; Gao, Rui; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-03-25

    The nanopore can generate an electrochemical confinement for single-molecule sensing which help understand the fundamental chemical principle in nanoscale dimensions. By observing the generated ionic current, individual bond-making and bond-breaking steps, single biomolecule dynamic conformational changes and electron transfer processes that occur within pore can be monitored with high temporal and current resolution. These single-molecule studies in nanopore confinement are revealing information about the fundamental chemical and biological processes that cannot be extracted from ensemble measurements. In this concept, we introduce and discuss the electrochemical confinement effects on single-molecule covalent reactions, conformational dynamics of individual molecules and host-guest interactions in protein nanopores. Then, we extend the concept of nanopore confinement effects to confine electrochemical redox reactions in solid-state nanopores for developing new sensing mechanisms. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electro-osmotic flow through nanopores in thin and ultrathin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Hulings, Zachery K.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study how the electro-osmotic fluid velocity in a charged cylindrical nanopore in a thin solid state membrane depends on the pore's geometry, membrane charge, and electrolyte concentration. We find that when the pore's length is comparable to its diameter, the velocity profile develops a concave shape with a minimum along the pore axis unlike the situation in very long nanopores with a maximum velocity along the central pore axis. This effect is attributed to the induced pressure along the nanopore axis due to the fluid flow expansion and contraction near the exit or entrance to the pore and to the reduction of electric field inside the nanopore. The induced pressure is maximal when the pore's length is about equal to its diameter while decreasing for both longer and shorter nanopores. A model for the fluid velocity incorporating these effects is developed and shown to be in a good agreement with numerically computed results.

  16. Counting and dynamic studies of the small unilamellar phospholipid vesicle translocation with single conical glass nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-01-06

    Phospholipid vesicles are ubiquitous cellular organelles that perform vital functions including materials transport and information transmission and have found promising biomedical applications. Although the transmembrane translocation (via nanopores) of phospholipid vesicles, especially small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (SUVs), is recognized to be very important for these processes and applications, the details and dynamics remain not very clear. Herein, we use single conical glass nanopores as a model platform to systematically investigate the translocation dynamics of SUVs (∼50-60 nm in diameter) through small nanopores with orifice diameters ranging from ∼14 to 72 nm. Dynamic translocation of individual SUVs one by one through the nanopores was clearly observed and was analyzed by the occurrence of periodic oscillation in ionic current blockage signal under a negatively applied voltage. Translocation behaviors of the SUVs, in terms of magnitude and duration of ionic current blockage signal, varied and can be modulated by changing nanopore size, solution pH, vesicle concentration, applied voltage, and inner surface charge properties of the nanopores. The translocation rate of the SUVs through an ∼72 nm nanopore is typically on a time scale of a few seconds (per SUV translocation event) and found nonlinearly proportional to the concentration of the SUVs. Moreover, the electrophoretic force has been verified as a main force to drive the SUVs through the nanopore since there is a nearly linear relationship between the current blockage frequency of SUVs translocation and the applied bias potentials ranging from -0.6 to -1 V. The findings provide fundamental insights into the translocation and interactions of SUVs with nanopores, and the reported nanopore platform may find potential useful bioapplications in single-cell and single-vesicle studies.

  17. Constructing hierarchical porous nanospheres for versatile microwave response approaches: the effect of architectural design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Bin; Liang, Xiaohui; Yi, Heng; Gong, He; Ji, Guangbin; Chen, Jiabin; Xu, Guoyue; Du, Youwei

    2017-10-24

    Owing to their immense potential in functionalized applications, tremendous interest has been devoted to the design and synthesis of nanostructures. The introduction of sufficient amount of microwaves into the absorbers on the premise that the dissipation capacity is strong enough remains a key challenge. Pursuing a general methodology to overcome the incompatibility is of great importance. There is widespread interest in designing the materials with specific architectures. Herein, the common absorber candidates were chosen to feature the hierarchical porous Fe 3 O 4 @C@Fe 3 O 4 nanospheres. Due to the reduced skin effect (induced by low-conductivity Fe 3 O 4 outer layer), multiple interfacial polarizations and scattering (due to the ternary hierarchical structures and nanoporous inner core) as well as the improved magnetic dissipation ability (because of multiple magnetic components), the material design enabled a promising microwave absorption performance. This study not only illustrates the primary mechanisms for the improved microwave absorption performance but also underscores the potential in designing the particular architectures as a strategy for achieving the compatibility characteristics.

  18. Loops in hierarchical channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2012-02-01

    Nature provides us with many examples of planar distribution and structural networks having dense sets of closed loops. An archetype of this form of network organization is the vasculature of dicotyledonous leaves, which showcases a hierarchically-nested architecture. Although a number of methods have been proposed to measure aspects of the structure of such networks, a robust metric to quantify their hierarchical organization is still lacking. We present an algorithmic framework that allows mapping loopy networks to binary trees, preserving in the connectivity of the trees the architecture of the original graph. We apply this framework to investigate computer generated and natural graphs extracted from digitized images of dicotyledonous leaves and animal vasculature. We calculate various metrics on the corresponding trees and discuss the relationship of these quantities to the architectural organization of the original graphs. This algorithmic framework decouples the geometric information from the metric topology (connectivity and edge weight) and it ultimately allows us to perform a quantitative statistical comparison between predictions of theoretical models and naturally occurring loopy graphs.

  19. Hierarchical organisation of causal graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziopa, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a supervision system using a hierarchy of models formed by graphs, in which the variables are the nodes and the causal relations between the variables of the arcs. To obtain a representation of the variables evolutions which contains only the relevant features of their real evolutions, the causal relations are completed with qualitative transfer functions (QTFs) which produce roughly the behaviour of the classical transfer functions. Major improvements have been made in the building of the hierarchical organization. First, the basic variables of the uppermost level and the causal relations between them are chosen. The next graph is built by adding intermediary variables to the upper graph. When the undermost graph has been built, the transfer functions parameters corresponding to its causal relations are identified. The second task consists in the upwelling of the information from the undermost graph to the uppermost one. A fusion procedure of the causal relations has been designed to compute the QFTs relevant for each level. This procedure aims to reduce the number of parameters needed to represent an evolution at a high level of abstraction. These techniques have been applied to the hierarchical modelling of nuclear process. (authors). 8 refs., 12 figs

  20. Stability of glassy hierarchical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, M.; Camargo-Forero, L.; Vicsek, T.

    2018-02-01

    The structure of interactions in most animal and human societies can be best represented by complex hierarchical networks. In order to maintain close-to-optimal function both stability and adaptability are necessary. Here we investigate the stability of hierarchical networks that emerge from the simulations of an organization type with an efficiency function reminiscent of the Hamiltonian of spin glasses. Using this quantitative approach we find a number of expected (from everyday observations) and highly non-trivial results for the obtained locally optimal networks, including, for example: (i) stability increases with growing efficiency and level of hierarchy; (ii) the same perturbation results in a larger change for more efficient states; (iii) networks with a lower level of hierarchy become more efficient after perturbation; (iv) due to the huge number of possible optimal states only a small fraction of them exhibit resilience and, finally, (v) ‘attacks’ targeting the nodes selectively (regarding their position in the hierarchy) can result in paradoxical outcomes.

  1. Hierarchically nested river landform sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, G. B.; Weber, M. D.; Brown, R. A.; Baig, D.

    2017-12-01

    River corridors exhibit landforms nested within landforms repeatedly down spatial scales. In this study we developed, tested, and implemented a new way to create river classifications by mapping domains of fluvial processes with respect to the hierarchical organization of topographic complexity that drives fluvial dynamism. We tested this approach on flow convergence routing, a morphodynamic mechanism with different states depending on the structure of nondimensional topographic variability. Five nondimensional landform types with unique functionality (nozzle, wide bar, normal channel, constricted pool, and oversized) represent this process at any flow. When this typology is nested at base flow, bankfull, and floodprone scales it creates a system with up to 125 functional types. This shows how a single mechanism produces complex dynamism via nesting. Given the classification, we answered nine specific scientific questions to investigate the abundance, sequencing, and hierarchical nesting of these new landform types using a 35-km gravel/cobble river segment of the Yuba River in California. The nested structure of flow convergence routing landforms found in this study revealed that bankfull landforms are nested within specific floodprone valley landform types, and these types control bankfull morphodynamics during moderate to large floods. As a result, this study calls into question the prevailing theory that the bankfull channel of a gravel/cobble river is controlled by in-channel, bankfull, and/or small flood flows. Such flows are too small to initiate widespread sediment transport in a gravel/cobble river with topographic complexity.

  2. Multilevel hierarchically ordered artificial biomineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguo; Lin, Kaili; Wu, Chengtie; Wang, Yueyue; Zou, Zhaoyong; Chang, Jiang

    2014-01-15

    Living organisms are known for creating complex organic-inorganic hybrid materials such as bone, teeth, and shells, which possess outstanding functions as compared to their simple mineral forms. This has inspired many attempts to mimic such structures, but has yielded few practical advances. In this study, a multilevel hierarchically ordered artificial biomineral (a composite of hydroxyapatite and gelatine) with favorable nanomechanical properties is reported. A typical optimized HAp/gelatin hybrid material in the perpendicular direction of the HAp c-axis has a modulus of 25.91 + 1.78 GPa and hardness of 0.90 + 0.10 GPa, which well matches that of human cortical bone (modulus 24.3 + 1.4 GPa, hardness 0.69 + 0.05 GPa). The bottom-up crystal constructions (from nano- to micro- to macroscale) of this material are achieved through a hard template approach by the phase transformation from DCP to HAp. The structural biomimetic material shows another way to mimic the complex hierarchical designs of sclerous tissues which have potential value for application in hard tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles for topical applications: effect of surface coating and loading into hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkawy, Aml I; El-Mokhtar, Mohamed A; Nafady, Nivien A; Yousef, Naeima; Hamad, Mostafa A; El-Shanawany, Sohair M; Ibrahim, Ehsan H; Elsabahy, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized via biological reduction of silver nitrate using extract of the fungus Fusarium verticillioides (green chemistry principle). The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and homogenous in size. AgNPs were coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The averaged diameters of AgNPs were 19.2±3.6, 13±4, 14±4.4, and 15.7±4.8 nm, for PEG-, SDS-, and β-CD-coated and uncoated AgNPs, respectively. PEG-coated AgNPs showed greater stability as indicated by a decreased sedimentation rate of particles in their water dispersions. The antibacterial activities of different AgNPs dispersions were investigated against Gram-positive bacteria (methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ) and Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli ) by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). MIC and MBC values were in the range of 0.93-7.5 and 3.75-15 µg/mL, respectively, which were superior to the reported values in literature. AgNPs-loaded hydrogels were prepared from the coated-AgNPs dispersions using several gelling agents (sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [Na CMC], sodium alginate, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, Pluronic F-127, and chitosan). The prepared formulations were evaluated for their viscosity, spreadability, in vitro drug release, and antibacterial activity, and the combined effect of the type of surface coating and the polymers utilized to form the gel was studied. The in vivo wound-healing activity and antibacterial efficacy of Na CMC hydrogel loaded with PEG-coated AgNPs in comparison to the commercially available silver sulfadiazine cream (Dermazin ® ) were evaluated. Superior antibacterial activity and wound-healing capability, with normal skin appearance and hair growth, were demonstrated for the hydrogel formulations, as compared to the silver

  4. A plan to reduce volatile organic compound emissions from consumer products in Canada (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report highlights the recommendations made by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment for the development of a guideline to provide a means by which to reduce (VOC) emissions from consumer products (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) in Canada. VOCs and nitrogen oxides react photochemically in the presence of sunlight to create ground-level ozone, a primary component of urban smog which has a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops and building materials. In recent years, most urban areas of Canada have shown an annual increase in the maximum acceptable air quality levels for ground level ozone. Reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from consumer products was first suggested in 1990 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in phase one of their program entitled the 'Management plan for nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds'. Phase 2 of the program was implemented in 1997 to harmonize the emissions reduction program with the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations. The Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) recommended the following control options: (1) a CEPA guideline should be developed which states the maximum VOC and high-volatility organic compound (HVOC) content in Canadian consumer products including hair care products, herbicides, insecticides, air fresheners, deodorants, fungicides, surface cleaners, fragrance products, anti-microbial agents, laundry products and automotive detailing products. These limits should be identical to those found in the 1998 U.S. Final Rule for Consumer Products, (2) the CEPA guideline should require that records specifying VOC content in weight-per cent be maintained for a period of three years, (3) the CEPA guideline should include a declaration procedure for Canadian importers and manufacturers of consumer products to report to Environment Canada regarding the VOC content of their products, and

  5. Discovering hierarchical structure in normal relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering is a widely used tool for structuring and visualizing complex data using similarity. Traditionally, hierarchical clustering is based on local heuristics that do not explicitly provide assessment of the statistical saliency of the extracted hierarchy. We propose a non......-parametric generative model for hierarchical clustering of similarity based on multifurcating Gibbs fragmentation trees. This allows us to infer and display the posterior distribution of hierarchical structures that comply with the data. We demonstrate the utility of our method on synthetic data and data of functional...

  6. Nanocall: an open source basecaller for Oxford Nanopore sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Matei; Dursi, L J; Yao, Delia; Boutros, Paul C; Simpson, Jared T

    2017-01-01

    The highly portable Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencer has enabled new applications of genome sequencing directly in the field. However, the MinION currently relies on a cloud computing platform, Metrichor (metrichor.com), for translating locally generated sequencing data into basecalls. To allow offline and private analysis of MinION data, we created Nanocall. Nanocall is the first freely available, open-source basecaller for Oxford Nanopore sequencing data and does not require an internet connection. Using R7.3 chemistry, on two E.coli and two human samples, with natural as well as PCR-amplified DNA, Nanocall reads have ∼68% identity, directly comparable to Metrichor '1D' data. Further, Nanocall is efficient, processing ∼2500 Kbp of sequence per core hour using the fastest settings, and fully parallelized. Using a 4 core desktop computer, Nanocall could basecall a MinION sequencing run in real time. Metrichor provides the ability to integrate the '1D' sequencing of template and complement strands of a single DNA molecule, and create a '2D' read. Nanocall does not currently integrate this technology, and addition of this capability will be an important future development. In summary, Nanocall is the first open-source, freely available, off-line basecaller for Oxford Nanopore sequencing data. Nanocall is available at github.com/mateidavid/nanocall, released under the MIT license. matei.david@oicr.on.caSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Plasmonic devices and sensors built from ordered nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Kobayashi, Yoji (University of California, Berkeley); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Long, Jeffrey R. (University of California, Berkeley); Robertson, Ian M. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); House, Stephen D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Graham, Dennis D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Chang, Noel N. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); El Gabaly Marquez, Farid

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this project is to lay the foundation for using ordered nanoporous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to create devices and sensors whose properties are determined by the dimensions of the MOF lattice. Our hypothesis is that because of the very short (tens of angstroms) distances between pores within the unit cell of these materials, enhanced electro-optical properties will be obtained when the nanopores are infiltrated to create nanoclusters of metals and other materials. Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles in disordered templates or in solution typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report results of synthetic efforts. First, we describe a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions {le} 1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag{sub 3} clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible. Second, a preliminary study of methods to incorporate fulleride (K{sub 3}C{sub 60}) guest molecules within MOF pores that will impart electrical conductivity is described.

  8. On the stability of surface-confined nanoporous molecular networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghijsens, Elke; Adisoejoso, Jinne, E-mail: Jinne.adisoejoso@chem.kuleuven.be, E-mail: tobe@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: Steven.DeFeyter@chem.kuleuven.be; Van Gorp, Hans; Destoop, Iris; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Van der Auweraer, Mark; De Feyter, Steven, E-mail: Jinne.adisoejoso@chem.kuleuven.be, E-mail: tobe@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: Steven.DeFeyter@chem.kuleuven.be [Department of Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging and Photonics, KU Leuven—University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Noguchi, Aya; Tahara, Kazukuni; Tobe, Yoshito, E-mail: Jinne.adisoejoso@chem.kuleuven.be, E-mail: tobe@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: Steven.DeFeyter@chem.kuleuven.be [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Division of Frontier Materials Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembly of molecular building blocks into two-dimensional nanoporous networks has been a topic of broad interest for many years. However, various factors govern the specific outcome of the self-assembly process, and understanding and controlling these are key to successful creation. In this work, the self-assembly of two alkylated dehydrobenzo[12]annulene building blocks was compared at the liquid-solid interface. It turned out that only a small chemical modification within the building blocks resulted in enhanced domain sizes and stability of the porous packing relative to the dense linear packing. Applying a thermodynamic model for phase transition revealed some key aspects for network formation.

  9. From Block Copolymers to Nano-porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigild, Martin Etchells; Ndoni, Sokol; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative etching of the polydimethylsiloxane block in a series of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-PDMS) block copolymers is reported. Reacting the block copolymer with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) renders a nanoporous material with the remaining PS maintaining the original morphology...... in the bulk. The method is very accurate for analytical determination of the PDMS content in the samples. Several morphologies (BCC, HEX and Gyroid) are conserved in the resulting glassy PS-matrix, as ascertained by small angle X-ray scattering. Especially, films of mm thickness containing secluded spherical...... nm wide holes of BCC symmetry are produced by this procedure....

  10. Adsorption of light alkanes on coconut nanoporous activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results for adsorption equilibrium of methane, ethane, and butane on nanoporous activated carbon obtained from coconut shells. The adsorption data were obtained gravimetrically at temperatures between 260 and 300K and pressures up to 1 bar. The Toth isotherm was used to correlate the data, showing good agreement with measured values. Low-coverage equilibrium constants were estimated using virial plots. Heats of adsorption at different loadings were also estimated from the equilibrium data. Adsorption properties for this material are compared to the same properties for BPL activated carbon and BAX activated carbon.

  11. Nanoporous network channels from self-assembled triblock copolymer supramolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Sart, Gerrit Gobius; Vukovic, Ivana; Vukovic, Zorica; Polushkin, Evgeny; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Ruokolainen, Janne; Loos, Katja; ten Brinke, Gerrit

    2011-02-16

    Supramolecular complexes of a poly(tert-butoxystyrene)-block-polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) triblock copolymers and less than stoichiometric amounts of pentadecylphenol (PDP) are shown to self-assemble into a core-shell gyroid morphology with the core channels formed by the hydrogen-bonded P4VP(PDP)complexes. After structure formation, PDP was removed using a simple washing procedure, resulting in well-ordered nanoporous films that were used as templates for nickel plating. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Liquid Core Waveguides by UV Modification of Nanoporous Polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant

    2011-01-01

    to not initially penetrate into the pores. We show that the inner surface of the pores can be rendered selectively hydrophilic by exposing them to ultraviolet light thorough a photo mask1. As liquids infiltrate the exposed regions and replace air, the refractive index is raised to 1.42, and thus these areas can......Liquid core waveguides are fabricated from a self-assembled nanoporous polymer, with a porosity of 40%. The high porosity results in an effective refractive index of 1.26 for visible light, i.e. below the refractive index of aqueous solutions. However, since the polymer is hydrophobic, fluids...

  13. Nanoporous Silicified Phospholipids and Application to Controlled Glycolic Acid Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang SangHwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work demonstrates the synthesis and characterization of novel nanoporous silicified phospholipid bilayers assembled inorganic powders. The materials are obtained by silicification process with silica precursor at the hydrophilic region of phospholipid bilayers. This process involves the co-assembly of a chemically active phospholipids bilayer within the ordered porosity of a silica matrix and holds promise as a novel application for controlled drug release or drug containers with a high level of specificity and throughput. The controlled release application of the synthesized materials was achieved to glycolic acid, and obtained a zero-order release pattern due to the nanoporosity.

  14. Fabrication of Highly Ordered Gold Nanorods Film Using Alumina Nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Soltani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for fabrication of highly ordered gold nanorod film is introduced in this article. The procedure is based on thermal evaporation of gold into a porous anodic alumina film (PAA. The PPA film was fabricated by combining the hard and mild anodization. This combination effectively decreases the processing time of fabrication of highly ordered porous anodic alumina film with controlled pore diameter and length.  It was found that gold nanorods configuration affected by the porous anodic alumina film structure such as pore diameter and length. Furthermore the evaporation process change the rods diameter along the nanopores via the decreasing the pore mouth during the gold deposition.

  15. An ordered array of hierarchical spheres for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of traces of pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoye; Zheng, Peng; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhu, Chuhong; Han, Fangming; Huang, Zhulin; Li, Zhongbo; Wang, Zhaoming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2016-09-01

    An ordered array of hierarchically-structured core-nanosphere@space-layer@shell-nanoparticles has been fabricated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. To fabricate this hierarchically-structured chip, a long-range ordered array of Au/Ag-nanospheres is first patterned in the nano-bowls on the planar surface of ordered nanoporous anodic titanium oxide template. A ultra-thin alumina middle space-layer is then conformally coated on the Au/Ag-nanospheres, and Ag-nanoparticles are finally deposited on the surface of the alumina space-layer to form an ordered array of Au/Ag-nanosphere@Al2O3-layer@Ag-nanoparticles. Finite-difference time-domain simulation shows that SERS hot spots are created between the neighboring Ag-nanoparticles. The ordered array of hierarchical nanostructures is used as the SERS-substrate for a trial detection of methyl parathion (a pesticide) in water and a limit of detection of 1 nM is reached, indicating its promising potential in rapid monitoring of organic pollutants in aquatic environment.

  16. Skin-Inspired Hierarchical Polymer Architectures with Gradient Stiffness for Spacer-Free, Ultrathin, and Highly Sensitive Triboelectric Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Minjeong; Lim, Seongdong; Cho, Soowon; Lee, Youngoh; Na, Sangyun; Baig, Chunggi; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2018-04-24

    The gradient stiffness between stiff epidermis and soft dermis with interlocked microridge structures in human skin induces effective stress transmission to underlying mechanoreceptors for enhanced tactile sensing. Inspired by skin structure and function, we fabricate hierarchical nanoporous and interlocked microridge structured polymers with gradient stiffness for spacer-free, ultrathin, and highly sensitive triboelectric sensors (TESs). The skin-inspired hierarchical polymers with gradient elastic modulus enhance the compressibility and contact areal differences due to effective transmission of the external stress from stiff to soft layers, resulting in highly sensitive TESs capable of detecting human vital signs and voice. In addition, the microridges in the interlocked polymers provide an effective variation of gap distance between interlocked layers without using the bulk spacer and thus facilitate the ultrathin and flexible design of TESs that could be worn on the body and detect a variety of pressing, bending, and twisting motions even in humid and underwater environments. Our TESs exhibit the highest power density (46.7 μW/cm 2 ), pressure (0.55 V/kPa), and bending (∼0.1 V/°) sensitivities ever reported on flexible TESs. The proposed design of hierarchical polymer architectures for the flexible and wearable TESs can find numerous applications in next-generation wearable electronics.

  17. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  18. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  19. Hierarchical magnetic assembly of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hangarter, Carlos M; Rheem, Youngwoo; Yoo, Bongyoung; Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Myung, Nosang V

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic alignment is reported as a facile technique for assembling nanowires into hierarchical structures. Cross junction and T junction nanowire networks are demonstrated using a sequential alignment technique on unpatterned substrates and predefined lithographically patterned ferromagnetic electrodes. The formation of T junctions prevails as nanowires from the first alignment behave as ferromagnetic electrodes under the external magnetic field of the second alignment. The presence of prefabricated ferromagnetic electrodes dominates dipole interactions of localized nanowires for preferential alignment. Application of a magnetic field from a cylindrical coaxial magnet has also been utilized to form radially aligned nanowires. The magnetic field of the coaxial cylindrical magnet produced a dense, concentric nanowire configuration at the centre of the magnetic field as a consequence of the radial field gradient, and sparse nanowire arrangements in the peripheral field, which were utilized as interconnects with a concentric electrode design

  20. Electrochemically etched nanoporous silicon membrane for separation of biological molecules in mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burham, Norhafizah; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumril; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for separating biological molecules in mixture using nanoporous silicon membrane. Nanopores were formed using electrochemical etching process (ECE) by etching a prefabricated silicon membrane in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol, and then directly bonding it with PDMS to form a complete filtration system for separating biological molecules. Tygon S3"™ tubings were used as fluid interconnection between PDMS molds and silicon membrane during testing. Electrochemical etching parameters were manipulated to control pore structure and size. In this work, nanopores with sizes of less than 50 nm, embedded on top of columnar structures have been fabricated using high current densities and variable HF concentrations. Zinc oxide was diluted with deionized (DI) water and mixed with biological molecules and non-biological particles, namely protein standard, serum albumin and sodium chloride. Zinc oxide particles were trapped on the nanoporous silicon surface, while biological molecules of sizes up to 12 nm penetrated the nanoporous silicon membrane. The filtered particles were inspected using a Zetasizer Nano SP for particle size measurement and count. The Zetasizer Nano SP results revealed that more than 95% of the biological molecules in the mixture were filtered out by the nanoporous silicon membrane. The nanoporous silicon membrane fabricated in this work is integratable into bio-MEMS and Lab-on-Chip components to separate two or more types of biomolecules at once. The membrane is especially useful for the development of artificial kidney. (paper)

  1. Nanoporous PtFe alloys as highly active and durable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huimei; Hao, Qin; Xu, Caixia

    2014-12-01

    Nanoporous PtFe alloys with two different bimetallic ratios are fabricated by selectively dealloying PtFeAl ternary alloys, characterized by nanoscaled bicontinuous network skeleton with interconnected hollow channels extending in all three dimensions. The reactive components in PtFeAl ternary alloy were sequentially leached out in a highly controllable manner, generating nanoporous architecture with different bimetallic ratios and the typical ligament size as small as 5 nm. These nanoporous PtFe alloys exhibit much enhanced electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction compared with the PtFe/C and Pt/C catalysts. The specific and mass activities for oxygen reduction follow the order of nanoporous Pt75Fe25 > nanoporous Pt55Fe45 > PtFe/C > Pt/C. In the absence of any catalyst support, the structure stability of nanoporous PtFe alloys is greatly enhanced with less loss of the electrochemical surface area and the oxygen reduction activity upon long-term potential scan tests compared with PtFe/C and Pt/C catalysts. The as-made nanoporous PtFe alloys thus hold great application potential as promising cathode electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells with the advantages of easy preparation along with superior oxygen reduction activity and durability.

  2. Extreme Liquid Superheating and Homogeneous Bubble Nucleation in a Solid State Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn Victoria

    This thesis explains how extreme superheating and single bubble nucleation can be achieved in an electrolytic solution within a solid state nanopore. A highly focused ionic current, induced to flow through the pore by modest voltage biases, leads to rapid Joule heating of the electrolyte in the nanopore. At sufficiently high current densities, temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are achieved, ultimately leading to nucleation of a vapor bubble within the nanopore. A mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution within a nanopore is presented. This model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution is used to evaluate related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics. In particular, bubble nucleation is shown to be homogeneous and highly reproducible. These results are consistent with experimental data available from electronic and optical measurements of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a nanopore.

  3. High-throughput optical sensing of nucleic acids in a nanopore array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Castell, Oliver K; Bayley, Hagan; Wallace, Mark I

    2015-11-01

    Protein nanopores such as α-haemolysin and Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) can be used to sequence long strands of DNA at low cost. To provide high-speed sequencing, large arrays of nanopores are required, but current nanopore sequencing methods rely on ionic current measurements from individually addressed pores and such methods are likely to prove difficult to scale up. Here we show that, by optically encoding the ionic flux through protein nanopores, the discrimination of nucleic acid sequences and the detection of sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization events can be parallelized. We make optical recordings at a density of ∼10(4) nanopores per mm(2) in a single droplet interface bilayer. Nanopore blockades can discriminate between DNAs with sub-picoampere equivalent resolution, and specific miRNA sequences can be identified by differences in unzipping kinetics. By creating an array of 2,500 bilayers with a micropatterned hydrogel chip, we are also able to load different samples into specific bilayers suitable for high-throughput nanopore recording.

  4. Study on the Characteristics of Gas Molecular Mean Free Pathin Nanopores by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixin Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean freepath in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that themean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanoporeand the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in thenanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions ofthe nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. Themolecular mean free path varies with the molecule’s distance from the center of thenanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore.The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas isconfined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than themean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our studyresults also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number densitydoes not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas inunbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gasflow’s characteristic at nanoscale.

  5. DNA motion induced by electrokinetic flow near an Au coated nanopore surface as voltage controlled gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-13

    We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on an Au-coated membrane surface near nanopores, prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules, which are presumably generated by electrokinetic flow, vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations. We carefully investigate these DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of the counterions, which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or repelled-DNA's anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could qualitatively explain these unusual DNA motions near metal-collated gated nanopores. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of controlling the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, as in the case of recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with alternating current voltages on the Vgate.

  6. Two color DNA barcode detection in photoluminescence suppressed silicon nitride nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, Ossama N; Di Fiori, Nicolas; Squires, Allison H; Meller, Amit

    2015-01-14

    Optical sensing of solid-state nanopores is a relatively new approach that can enable high-throughput, multicolor readout from a collection of nanopores. It is therefore highly attractive for applications such as nanopore-based DNA sequencing and genotyping using DNA barcodes. However, to date optical readout has been plagued by the need to achieve sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for single fluorophore sensing, while still maintaining millisecond resolution. One of the main factors degrading the optical SNR in solid-state nanopores is the high photoluminescence (PL) background emanating from the silicon nitride (SiNx) membrane in which pores are commonly fabricated. Focusing on the optical properties of SiNx nanopores we show that the local membrane PL intensity is substantially reduced, and its spectrum is shifted toward shorter wavelengths with increasing e-beam dose. This phenomenon, which is correlated with a marked photocurrent enhancement in these nanopores, is utilized to perform for the first time single molecule fluorescence detection using both green and red laser excitations. Specifically, the reduction in PL and the concurrent measurement of the nanopore photocurrent enhancement allow us to maximize the background suppression and to detect a dual color, five-unit DNA barcode with high SNR levels.

  7. Femtosecond laser-patterned nanopore arrays for surface-mediated peptide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachman, Angela L; Hofmeister, Lucas H; Costa, Lino; Boire, Timothy C; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Hofmeister, William H; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to create easy-to-use, reusable substrates capable of storing any peptides or bioactive molecules for a desired period of time until cells uptake them without the need for bioactive molecule or peptide-specific techniques. Nanopore arrays of uniform size and distribution were machined into fused silica substrates using femtosecond laser ablation and loaded with peptides by simple adsorption. The nanopore substrates were validated by examining the effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) loaded nanopores on macrophage phagocytosis and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with and without the pro-inflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrated that nanopores were generated in a uniform array fashion. Ac-SDKP peptides were stably stored in nanopores and internalized by macrophages. Significant reductions in ROS production and phagocytosis in macrophages were observed over control substrates, even in combination with LPS stimulation, indicating that loading Ac-SDKP peptides in pores significantly improved the anti-inflammatory effects. This team of scientists intended to create easy-to-use, reusable substrates for storing peptides or bioactive molecules for a desired period of time before cellular uptake occurs, and without the need for bioactive molecule or peptide-specific techniques. They demonstrate the successful generation of nanopores in a uniform array that stably stores Ac-SDKP peptides in the nanopores. When peptides were internalized by macrophages, significant reductions in ROS production and phagocytosis were observed, indicating improved anti-inflammatory effects. © 2013.

  8. MspA nanopore as a single-molecule tool: From sequencing to SPRNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Gundlach, Jens H

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule picometer resolution nanopore tweezers (SPRNT) is a new tool for analyzing the motion of nucleic acids through molecular motors. With SPRNT, individual enzymatic motions along DNA as small as 40pm can be resolved on sub-millisecond time scales. Additionally, SPRNT reveals an enzyme's exact location with respect to a DNA strand's nucleotide sequence, enabling identification of sequence-specific behaviors. SPRNT is enabled by a mutant version of the biological nanopore formed by Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA). SPRNT is strongly rooted in nanopore sequencing and therefore requires a solid understanding of basic principles of nanopore sequencing. Furthermore, SPRNT shares tools developed for nanopore sequencing and extends them to analysis of single-molecule kinetics. As such, this review begins with a brief history of our work developing the nanopore MspA for nanopore sequencing. We then describe the underlying principles of SPRNT, how it works in detail, and propose some potential future uses. We close with a comparison of SPRNT to other techniques and we present the methods that will enable others to use SPRNT. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Viscosity of Water Interfaces with Hydrophobic Nanopores: Application to Water Flow in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaat, M

    2017-11-07

    The nanoconfinement of water results in changes in water properties and nontraditional water flow behaviors. The determination of the interfacial interactions between water and hydrophobic surfaces helps in understanding many of the nontraditional behaviors of nanoconfined water. In this study, an approach for the identification of the viscosity of water interfaces with hydrophobic nanopores as a function of the nanopore diameter and water-solid (nanopore) interactions is proposed. In this approach, water in a hydrophobic nanopore is represented as a double-phase water with two distinct viscosities: water interface and water core. First, the slip velocity to pressure gradient ratio of water flow in hydrophobic nanopores is obtained via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Then the water interface viscosity is determined via a pressure gradient-based bilayer water flow model. Moreover, the core viscosity and the effective viscosity of water flow in hydrophobic nanopores are derived as functions of the nanopore diameter and water-solid interactions. This approach is utilized to report the interface viscosity, core viscosity, and effective viscosity of water flow in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as functions of the CNT diameter. Moreover, using the proposed approach, the transition from MD to continuum mechanics is revealed where the bulk water properties are recovered for large CNTs.

  10. Formation of self-organized nanoporous anodic oxide from metallic gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bipin; Thapa, Prem S; Higgins, Daniel A; Ito, Takashi

    2012-09-25

    This paper reports the formation of self-organized nanoporous gallium oxide by anodization of solid gallium metal. Because of its low melting point (ca. 30 °C), metallic gallium can be shaped into flexible structures, permitting the fabrication of nanoporous anodic oxide monoliths within confined spaces like the inside of a microchannel. Here, solid gallium films prepared on planar substrates were employed to investigate the effects of anodization voltage (1, 5, 10, 15 V) and H(2)SO(4) concentration (1, 2, 4, 6 M) on anodic oxide morphology. Self-organized nanopores aligned perpendicular to the film surface were obtained upon anodization of gallium films in ice-cooled 4 and 6 M aqueous H(2)SO(4) at 10 and 15 V. Nanopore formation could be recognized by an increase in anodic current after a current decrease reflecting barrier oxide formation. The average pore diameter was in the range of 18-40 nm with a narrow diameter distribution (relative standard deviation ca. 10-20%), and was larger at lower H(2)SO(4) concentration and higher applied voltage. The maximum thickness of nanoporous anodic oxide was ca. 2 μm. In addition, anodic formation of self-organized nanopores was demonstrated for a solid gallium monolith incorporated at the end of a glass capillary. Nanoporous anodic oxide monoliths formed from a fusible metal will lead to future development of unique devices for chemical sensing and catalysis.

  11. Basic evaluation of typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier: Structure, wettability and hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Guo, Yingyu

    2017-04-01

    Herein, the present work devoted to study the basic capacity of nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier that covered structure, wettability and hemolysis so as to provide crucial evaluation. Typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles that consist of nanoporous silica nanoparticles (NSN), amino modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (amino-NSN), carboxyl modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (carboxyl-NSN) and hierachical nanoporous silica nanoparticles (hierachical-NSN) were studied. The results showed that their wettability and hemolysis were closely related to structure and surface modification. Basically, wettability became stronger as the amount of OH on the surface of NSN was higher. Both large nanopores and surface modification can reduce the wettability of NSN. Furthermore, NSN series were safe to be used when they circulated into the blood in low concentration, while if high concentration can not be avoided during administration, high porosity or amino modification of NSN were safer to be considered. It is believed that the basic evaluation of NSN can make contribution in providing scientific instruction for designing drug loaded NSN systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrochemically etched nanoporous silicon membrane for separation of biological molecules in mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burham, Norhafizah; Azlan Hamzah, Azrul; Yunas, Jumril; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a technique for separating biological molecules in mixture using nanoporous silicon membrane. Nanopores were formed using electrochemical etching process (ECE) by etching a prefabricated silicon membrane in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol, and then directly bonding it with PDMS to form a complete filtration system for separating biological molecules. Tygon S3™ tubings were used as fluid interconnection between PDMS molds and silicon membrane during testing. Electrochemical etching parameters were manipulated to control pore structure and size. In this work, nanopores with sizes of less than 50 nm, embedded on top of columnar structures have been fabricated using high current densities and variable HF concentrations. Zinc oxide was diluted with deionized (DI) water and mixed with biological molecules and non-biological particles, namely protein standard, serum albumin and sodium chloride. Zinc oxide particles were trapped on the nanoporous silicon surface, while biological molecules of sizes up to 12 nm penetrated the nanoporous silicon membrane. The filtered particles were inspected using a Zetasizer Nano SP for particle size measurement and count. The Zetasizer Nano SP results revealed that more than 95% of the biological molecules in the mixture were filtered out by the nanoporous silicon membrane. The nanoporous silicon membrane fabricated in this work is integratable into bio-MEMS and Lab-on-Chip components to separate two or more types of biomolecules at once. The membrane is especially useful for the development of artificial kidney.

  13. Surprising transformation of a block copolymer into a high performance polystyrene ultrafiltration membrane with a hierarchically organized pore structure

    KAUST Repository

    Shevate, Rahul

    2018-02-08

    We describe the preparation of hierarchical polystyrene nanoporous membranes with a very narrow pore size distribution and an extremely high porosity. The nanoporous structure is formed as a result of unusual degradation of the poly(4-vinyl pyridine) block from self-assembled poly(styrene)-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) membranes through the formation of an unstable pyridinium intermediate in an alkaline medium. During this process, the confined swelling and controlled degradation produced a tunable pore size. We unequivocally confirmed the successful elimination of the P4VP block from a PS-b-P4VPVP membrane using 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy and other characterization techniques. Surprisingly, the long range ordered surface porosity was preserved even after degradation of the P4VP block from the main chain of the diblock copolymer, as revealed by SEM. Aside from a drastically improved water flux (∼67% increase) compared to the PS-b-P4VP membrane, the hydraulic permeability measurements validated pH independent behaviour of the isoporous PS membrane over a wide pH range from 3 to 10. The effect of the pore size on protein transport rate and selectivity (a) was investigated for lysozyme (Lys), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and globulin-γ (IgG). A high selectivity of 42 (Lys/IgG) and 30 (BSA/IgG) was attained, making the membranes attractive for size selective separation of biomolecules from their synthetic model mixture solutions.

  14. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we present trapping issues of weight-dependent walks on weighted hierarchical networks which are based on the classic scale-free hierarchical networks. Assuming that edge's weight is used as local information by a random walker, we introduce a biased walk. The biased walk is that a walker, at each step, ...

  15. Adaptive hierarchical multi-agent organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghijsen, M.; Jansweijer, W.N.H.; Wielinga, B.J.; Babuška, R.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the design of adaptive hierarchical organizations for multi-agent systems (MAS). Hierarchical organizations have a number of advantages such as their ability to handle complex problems and their scalability to large organizations. By introducing adaptivity in the

  16. In vitro extracellular recording and stimulation performance of nanoporous gold-modified multi-electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Gook Hwa; Kim, Ah Young; Han, Young Hwan; Chung, Myung-Ae; Jung, Sang-Don

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Nanoporous gold (Au) structures can reduce the impedance and enhance the charge injection capability of multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) used for interfacing neuronal networks. Even though there are various nanoporous Au preparation techniques, fabrication of MEA based on low-cost electro-codeposition of Ag:Au has not been performed. In this work, we have modified a Au MEA via the electro-codeposition of Ag:Au alloy, followed by the chemical etching of Ag, and report on the in vitro extracellular recording and stimulation performance of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA. Approach. Ag:Au alloy was electro-codeposited on a bilayer lift-off resist sputter-deposition passivated Au MEA followed by chemical etching of Ag to form a porous Au structure. Main results. The porous Au structure was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and tunneling electron microscopy and found to have an interconnected nanoporous Au structure. The impedance value of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA is 15.4 ± 0.55 kΩ at 1 kHz, accompanied by the base noise V rms of 2.4 ± 0.3 μV. The charge injection limit of the nanoporous Au-modified electrode estimated from voltage transient measurement is approximately 1 mC cm-2, which is comparable to roughened platinum and carbon nanotube electrodes. The charge injection capability of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA was confirmed by observing stimulus-induced spikes at above 0.2 V. The nanoporous Au-modified MEA showed mechanical durability upon ultrasonic treatment for up to an hour. Significance. Electro-codeposition of Ag:Au alloy combined with chemical etching Ag is a low-cost process for fabricating nanoporous Au-modified MEA suitable for establishing the stimulus-response relationship of cultured neuronal networks.

  17. Multi-layered hierarchical nanostructures for transparent monolithic dye-sensitized solar cell architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Luca; Fumagalli, Francesco; Perego, Andrea; Bellani, Sebastiano; Mazzolini, Piero; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2017-06-16

    Monolithic dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) architectures hold great potential for building-integrated photovoltaics applications. They indeed benefit from lower weight and manufacturing costs as they avoid the use of a transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-coated glass counter electrode. In this work, a transparent monolithic DSC comprising a hierarchical 1D nanostructure stack is fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. The proof of concept device comprises hyperbranched TiO 2 nanostructures, sensitized by the prototypical N719, as photoanode, a hierarchical nanoporous Al 2 O 3 spacer, and a microporous indium tin oxide (ITO) top electrode. An overall 3.12% power conversion efficiency with 60% transmittance outside the dye absorption spectral window is demonstrated. The introduction of a porous TCO layer allows an efficient trade-off between transparency and power conversion. The porous ITO exhibits submicrometer voids and supports annealing temperatures above 400 °C without compromising its optoelectronical properties. After thermal annealing at 500 °C, the resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the 800 nm-thick porous ITO layer are found to be respectively 2.3 × 10 -3 Ω cm -1 , 11 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , and 1.62 × 10 20 cm -3 , resulting in a series resistance in the complete device architecture of 45 Ω. Electrochemical impedance and intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy give insight into the electronic charge dynamic within the hierarchical monolithic DSCs, paving the way for potential device architecture improvements.

  18. Hierarchical Rhetorical Sentence Categorization for Scientific Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, G. H.; Khodra, M. L.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2018-03-01

    Important information in scientific papers can be composed of rhetorical sentences that is structured from certain categories. To get this information, text categorization should be conducted. Actually, some works in this task have been completed by employing word frequency, semantic similarity words, hierarchical classification, and the others. Therefore, this paper aims to present the rhetorical sentence categorization from scientific paper by employing TF-IDF and Word2Vec to capture word frequency and semantic similarity words and employing hierarchical classification. Every experiment is tested in two classifiers, namely Naïve Bayes and SVM Linear. This paper shows that hierarchical classifier is better than flat classifier employing either TF-IDF or Word2Vec, although it increases only almost 2% from 27.82% when using flat classifier until 29.61% when using hierarchical classifier. It shows also different learning model for child-category can be built by hierarchical classifier.

  19. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  20. Application of Multi-Species Microbial Bioassay to Assess the Effects of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Aquatic Environment: Potential of a Luminous Microbial Array for Toxicity Risk Assessment (LumiMARA on Testing for Surface-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YounJung Jung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Four different manufactured surface-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with coating of citrate, tannic acid, polyethylene glycol, and branched polyethylenimine were used in this study. The toxicity of surface-coated AgNPs was evaluated by a luminous microbial array for toxicity risk assessment (LumiMARA using multi-species of luminescent bacteria. The salt stability of four different AgNPs was measured by UV absorbance at 400 nm wavelength, and different surface-charged AgNPs in combination with bacteria were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Both branched polyethylenimine (BPEI-AgNPs and polyethylene glycol (PEG-AgNPs were shown to be stable with 2% NaCl (non-aggregation, whereas both citrate (Cit-AgNPs and tannic acid (Tan-AgNPs rapidly aggregated in 2% NaCl solution. The values of the 50% effective concentration (EC50 for BPEI-AgNPs in marine bacteria strains (1.57 to 5.19 mg/L were lower than those for the other surface-coated AgNPs (i.e., Cit-AgNPs, Tan-AgNPs, and PEG-AgNPs. It appears that the toxicity of AgNPs could be activated by the interaction of positively charged AgNPs with the negatively charged bacterial cell wall from the results of LumiMARA. LumiMARA for toxicity screening has advantageous compared to a single-species bioassay and is applicable for environmental samples as displaying ranges of assessment results.