WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface wind observations

  1. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    and the Baltic Sea. The aim is to evaluate their potential use and demonstrate their applicability within the context of offshore wind energy; for the quantication of the wind resources and for the identication of diurnal warming of the sea surface temperature. Space-borne observations of wind are obtained from...

  2. Ocean Surface Wind Speed of Hurricane Helene Observed by SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Cheng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high-resolution hur......The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high......-resolution hurricane was conducted. A case study was carried out to retrieve ocean surface wind field from C-band RADARSAT-1 SAR image which captured the structure of hurricane Helene over the Atlantic Ocean on 20 September, 2006. With wind direction from the outputs of U.S. Navy Operational Global Atmospheric...... CIWRAP models have been tested to extract wind speed from SAR data. The SAR retrieved ocean surface winds were compared to the aircraft wind speed observations from stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR). The results show the capability of hurricane wind monitoring by SAR....

  3. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    as the entire atmosphere above. Under conditions of light winds and strong solar insolation, warming of the upper oceanic layer may occur. In this PhD study, remote sensing from satellites is used to obtain information for the near-surface ocean wind and the sea surface temperature over the North Sea...

  4. Sea Surface Wakes Observed by Spaceborne SAR in the Offshore Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Lehner, Susanne; Jacobsen, Sven

    2014-11-01

    In the paper, we present some X-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) TerraSAR-X (TS-X) images acquired at the offshore wind farms in the North Sea and the East China Sea. The high spatial resolution SAR images show different sea surface wake patterns downstream of the offshore wind turbines. The analysis suggests that there are major two types of wakes among the observed cases. The wind turbine wakes generated by movement of wind around wind turbines are the most often observed cases. In contrast, due to the strong local tidal currents in the near shore wind farm sites, the tidal current wakes induced by tidal current impinging on the wind turbine piles are also observed in the high spatial resolution TS-X images. The discrimination of the two types of wakes observed in the offshore wind farms is also described in the paper.

  5. On the onset of surface wind drift at short fetches as observed in a wind wave flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model wind waves and specially the early stages of surface waves development and ocean-atmosphere fluxes during incipient wind events and storms. In particular, wave models are not so accurate predicting wave behaviour at short fetches, where wind drift onset might be very important. The onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide reference information to the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at rather short non-dimensional fetches. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Surface drift values were up to 0.5 cm/s for the highest wind while very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm. Rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from ANUIES-ECOS M09-U01 project, CONACYT-187112 Estancia Sabática, and Institute Carnot, is greatly acknowledged.

  6. Wave glider observations of surface winds and currents in the core of Typhoon Danas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, S.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of surface winds and currents is essential to understand oceanic responses to tropical cyclones. We used a new platform, a Wave Glider (Liquid Robotics) to observe air-sea processes during a typhoon, equivalent to a category 4-hurricane, at peak strength, near Okinawa, Japan. Surface winds showed strong asymmetry in both speed and direction, faster fore than aft. Rotations of surface winds and currents were not coupled; currents rotated clockwise in the wake of the typhoon eye after passage of rapid wind rotations. Wind work was mostly done ahead of the eye, amplifying prior inertial motions with a phase shift. Wind-induced energy was nearly balanced with an increase in estimated kinetic energy of the upper ocean current, relative to prior inertial oscillations. This study provides a newer, more complete view of actual atmosphere-ocean interactions in a typhoon.

  7. CYGNSS Observations of Surface Wind Speeds in Oceanic Tropical and Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, D. J.; Crespo, J.; Naud, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission is the first of the new generation of NASA Earth Venture missions, and consists of a constellation of eight small satellites scheduled for launch in November 2016. The mission utilizes GPS signals reflected from the Earth's surface to infer near-surface wind speeds over the global tropical oceans. The eight-satellite constellation will observe ocean-surface wind speeds in all weather conditions (including in heavy precipitation) with a median revisit time of approximately 3 hours. While CYGNSS is designed to measure wind speeds in the inner core of tropical cyclones, it will observe near-surface winds over all oceanic regions within the span of its orbit. The orbit inclination is 35 degrees, which means that the satellite will observe primarily the tropics and sub-tropics; however, because the antennae are angled 28 degrees off-nadir, the effective range of latitudes spans -40 to 40 degrees. As such, CYGNSS will observe regions known to be characterized by rapid extratropical cyclone development (e.g., the southern portion of the Gulf Stream off the U.S. East Coast). In this presentation, we discuss CYGNSS sampling characteristics, with an eye toward its potential to observe winds not only in tropical cyclones, but in extratropical cyclones as well. We simulate orbits over a historical extratropical storm, and also utilize a multi-year database of cyclone centers to determine CYGNSS sampling characteristics integrated over many storms.

  8. Surface Wind Vector and Rain Rate Observation Capability of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; El-Nimri, Salem; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is the next-generation Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), and it will offer the capability of simultaneous wide-swath observations of both extreme ocean surface wind vector and strong precipitation from either aircraft (including UAS) or satellite platforms. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce valid wind observations under hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered by precipitation. The SFMR i s a proven aircraft remote sensing system for simultaneously observing extreme ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. The first version of the instrument will be a single polarization system for wind speed and rain rate, with a dual-polarization system to follow for wind vector capability. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by NASA s Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard (laboratory) version of the instrument has been completed and successfully tested in a test chamber. Development of the aircraft instrument is underway, with flight testing planned for the fall of 2009. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on surface wind analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor. New off-nadir data collected in 2008 by SFMR that affirms the ability of this measurement technique to obtain wind speed data at non-zero incidence angle will

  9. Retrieval of sea surface winds under hurricane conditions from GNSS-R observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Cheng; YANG Xiaofeng; MA Wentao; YU Yang; DONG Di; LI Ziwei; XU Cong

    2016-01-01

    Reflected signals from global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) have been widely acknowledged as an important remote sensing tool for retrieving sea surface wind speeds. The power of GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) signals can be mapped in delay chips and Doppler frequency space to generate delay Doppler power maps (DDMs), whose characteristics are related to sea surface roughness and can be used to retrieve wind speeds. However, the bistatic radar cross section (BRCS), which is strongly related to the sea surface roughness, is extensively used in radar. Therefore, a bistatic radar cross section (BRCS) map with a modified BRCS equation in a GNSS-R application is introduced. On the BRCS map, three observables are proposed to represent the sea surface roughness to establish a relationship with the sea surface wind speed. Airborne Hurricane Dennis (2005) GNSS-R data are then used. More than 16 000 BRCS maps are generated to establish GMFs of the three observables. Finally, the proposed model and classic one-dimensional delay waveform (DW) matching methods are compared, and the proposed model demonstrates a better performance for the high wind speed retrievals.

  10. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  11. Quality Control Methodology Of A Surface Wind Observational Database In North Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; Conte, Jorge; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    This work summarizes the design and application of a Quality Control (QC) procedure for an observational surface wind database located in North Eastern North America. The database consists of 526 sites (486 land stations and 40 buoys) with varying resolutions of hourly, 3 hourly and 6 hourly data, compiled from three different source institutions with uneven measurement units and changing measuring procedures, instrumentation and heights. The records span from 1953 to 2010. The QC process is composed of different phases focused either on problems related with the providing source institutions or measurement errors. The first phases deal with problems often related with data recording and management: (1) compilation stage dealing with the detection of typographical errors, decoding problems, site displacements and unification of institutional practices; (2) detection of erroneous data sequence duplications within a station or among different ones; (3) detection of errors related with physically unrealistic data measurements. The last phases are focused on instrumental errors: (4) problems related with low variability, placing particular emphasis on the detection of unrealistic low wind speed records with the help of regional references; (5) high variability related erroneous records; (6) standardization of wind speed record biases due to changing measurement heights, detection of wind speed biases on week to monthly timescales, and homogenization of wind direction records. As a result, around 1.7% of wind speed records and 0.4% of wind direction records have been deleted, making a combined total of 1.9% of removed records. Additionally, around 15.9% wind speed records and 2.4% of wind direction data have been also corrected.

  12. Observing seasonal variations of sea surface wind speed and significant wave height using TOPEX altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    One year of ocean topography experiment (TOPEX) altimeter data are used to study the seasonal variations of global sea surface wind speed and significant wave height. The major wind and wave zones of the world oceans are precisely identified, their seasonal variability and characteristics are quantitatively analyzed, and the diversity of global wind speed seasonality and the variability of significant wave height in response to sea surface wind speed are also revealed.

  13. Two decades [1992-2012] of surface wind analyses based on satellite scatterometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiolles, Fabien; Bentamy, Abderrahim; Blanke, Bruno; Roy, Claude; Mestas-Nuñez, Alberto M.; Grodsky, Semyon A.; Herbette, Steven; Cambon, Gildas; Maes, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Surface winds (equivalent neutral wind velocities at 10 m) from scatterometer missions since 1992 have been used to build up a 20-year climate series. Optimal interpolation and kriging methods have been applied to continuously provide surface wind speed and direction estimates over the global ocean on a regular grid in space and time. The use of other data sources such as radiometer data (SSM/I) and atmospheric wind reanalyses (ERA-Interim) has allowed building a blended product available at 1/4° spatial resolution and every 6 h from 1992 to 2012. Sampling issues throughout the different missions (ERS-1, ERS-2, QuikSCAT, and ASCAT) and their possible impact on the homogeneity of the gridded product are discussed. In addition, we assess carefully the quality of the blended product in the absence of scatterometer data (1992 to 1999). Data selection experiments show that the description of the surface wind is significantly improved by including the scatterometer winds. The blended winds compare well with buoy winds (1992-2012) and they resolve finer spatial scales than atmospheric reanalyses, which make them suitable for studying air-sea interactions at mesoscale. The seasonal cycle and interannual variability of the product compare well with other long-term wind analyses. The product is used to calculate 20-year trends in wind speed, as well as in zonal and meridional wind components. These trends show an important asymmetry between the southern and northern hemispheres, which may be an important issue for climate studies.

  14. Satellite Observations of Wind Farm Impacts on Nocturnal Land Surface Temperature in Iowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Harris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind farms (WFs are believed to have an impact on lower boundary layer meteorology. A recent study examined satellite-measured land surface temperature data (LST and found a local nighttime warming effect attributable to a group of four large WFs in Texas. This study furthers their work by investigating the impacts of five individual WFs in Iowa, where the land surface properties and climate conditions are different from those in Texas. Two methods are used to assess WF impacts: first, compare the spatial coupling between the LST changes (after turbine construction versus before and the geographic layouts of the WFs; second, quantify the LST difference between the WFs and their immediate surroundings (non-WF areas. Each WF shows an irrefutable nighttime warming signal relative to the surrounding areas after their turbines were installed, and these warming signals are generally coupled with the geographic layouts of the wind turbines, especially in summer. This study provides further observational evidence that WFs can cause surface warming at nighttime, and that such a signal can be detected by satellite-based sensors.

  15. L band radar backscatter dependence upon surface wind stress - A summary of new Seasat-1 and aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T. W.; Weissman, D. E.; Gonzalez, F. I.

    1983-01-01

    The wind-scale relationships for L band radar wavelengths near 25 cm and 20 deg angle of incidence and HH polarization are reviewed using a number of aircraft and Seasat-1 SAR observations. The dependence of the L band backscatter coefficient from the ocean upon surface wind speed and direction is stated. The wind speed coefficient is 0.5 + or - 0.1 for a wide range of wind speeds. The wind direction coefficient is near zero for lower winds and stable marine boundary layers, but may be 0.20 + or - 0.05 for moderate wind speeds and an unstable marine boundary layer. These results are interpreted in terms of existing theoretical models for radar scattering from the ocean.

  16. Surface river plume in a large lake under wind forcing: Observations and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Natalia; He, Cheng; Rao, Yerubandi R.; Valipour, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Observations of a small riverine plume (Grand River, ON) in the nearshore zones of Lake Erie were analyzed to describe its spatial variability and its thickness under different wind forcing conditions during late spring of 2012. Observational results reveal a well-marked frontal region in the vicinity of the river mouth, causing the plume to discharge into the lake in the surface layers (positive buoyant). Wind driven alongshore currents at the mid-depth had speeds of 2-9 cm/s, in comparison to those in the cross-shore 3-6 cm/s, which transported the plume along the shore during the measurement period. Series of laboratory experiments were conducted to obtain the propagation speed (U) of the buoyant plume in terms of buoyancy anomaly (Ba), Richardson number (Ri), dimensionless time (t‧), and aspect ratio (A). Based on our experiments, we developed two non-dimensional relationships describing the speed of propagation (U) as U/Ba1/2 = 8 Ri-1/2t‧1/3A and the plume thickness (h) as h/H = 0.8 Ri-1/4t‧1/2A in the water depth (H), which are in agreement with field observations.

  17. Satellite SAR observation of the sea surface wind field caused by rain cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xiaomin; LIN Mingsen; YUAN Xinzhe; DING Jing; XIE Xuetong; ZHANG Yi; XU Ying

    2016-01-01

    Rain cells or convective rain, the dominant form of rain in the tropics and subtropics, can be easy detected by satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images with high horizontal resolution. The footprints of rain cells on SAR images are caused by the scattering and attenuation of the rain drops, as well as the downward airflow. In this study, we extract sea surface wind field and its structure caused by rain cells by using a RADARSAT-2 SAR image with a spatial resolution of 100 m for case study. We extract the sea surface wind speeds from SAR image by using CMOD4 geophysical model function with outside wind directions of NCEP final operational global analysis data, Advance Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard European MetOp-A satellite and microwave scatterometer onboard Chinese HY-2 satellite, respectively. The root-mean-square errors (RMSE) of these SAR wind speeds, validated against NCEP, ASCAT and HY-2, are 1.48 m/s, 1.64 m/s and 2.14 m/s, respectively. Circular signature patterns with brighter on one side and darker on the opposite side on SAR image are interpreted as the sea surface wind speed (or sea surface roughness) variety caused by downdraft associated with rain cells. The wind speeds taken from the transect profile which superposes to the wind ambient vectors and goes through the center of the circular footprint of rain cell can be fitted as a cosine or sine curve in high linear correlation with the values of no less than 0.80. The background wind speed, the wind speed caused by rain cell and the diameter of footprint of the rain cell with kilometers or tens of kilometers can be acquired by fitting curve. Eight cases interpreted and analyzed in this study all show the same conclusion.

  18. Observation and simulation of near-surface wind and its variation with topography in Urumqi, West China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lili; Li, Zhenjie; He, Qing; Miao, Qilong; Zhang, Huqiang; Yang, Xinghua

    2016-12-01

    Near-surface wind measurements obtained with five 100-m meteorology towers, 39 regional automatic stations, and simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to investigate the spatial structure of topography-driven flows in the complex urban terrain of Urumqi, China. The results showed that the wind directions were mainly northerly and southerly within the reach of 100 m above ground in the southern suburbs, urban area, and northern suburbs, which were consistent with the form of the Urumqi gorge. Strong winds were observed in southern suburbs, whereas the winds in the urban, northern suburbs, and northern rural areas were weak. Static wind occurred more frequently in the urban and northern rural areas than in the southern suburbs. In the southern suburbs, wind speed was relatively high throughout the year and did not show significant seasonal variations. The average annual wind speed in this region varied among 1.9-5.5, 1.1-3.6, 1.2-4.3, 1.2-4.3, and 1.1-3.5 m s -1 within the reach of 100 m above ground at Yannanlijiao, Shuitashan, Liyushan, Hongguangshan, and Midong, respectively. The flow characteristics comprised more airflows around the mountain, where the convergence and divergence were dominated by the terrain in eastern and southwestern Urumqi. Further analysis showed that there was a significant mountain-valley wind in spring, summer, and autumn, which occurred more frequently in spring and summer for 10-11 h in urban and northern suburbs. During daytime, there was a northerly valley wind, whereas at night there was a southerly mountain wind. The conversion time from the mountain wind to the valley wind was during 0800-1000 LST (Local Standard Time), while the conversion from the valley wind to the mountain wind was during 1900-2100 LST. The influence of the mountain-valley wind in Urumqi City was most obvious at 850 hPa, according to the WRF model.

  19. Ocean surface wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for improved surface wind and wind stress data is discussed. The collection of wind data using ship reports, research buoys, and cloud motion vectors is examined. The need for data on surface-wind stress fields is emphasized. Accurate stress data are required for studying: (1) the normal seasonal cycle and the intraannual events; (2) wind stress curls and the forcing of ocean circulation; (3) El Nino events; and (4) the low response of the midlatitude ocean circulation.

  20. High resolution modelling and observation of wind-driven surface currents in a semi-enclosed estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, S.; Hartnett, M.; McKinstry, A.; Ragnoli, E.; Nagle, D.

    2012-04-01

    offline coupling with the wind forecast models. Modelled surface currents show good correlation with CODAR observed currents and the resolution of the surface wind data is shown to be important for model accuracy.

  1. Two-dimensional curvature of large angle interplanetary MHD discontinuity surfaces: IMP-8 and WIND observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; McClernan, K.

    2003-07-01

    This study examines the degree of two-dimensional curvature of solar wind directional discontinuity (DD) surfaces at 1 AU using magnetic field, density, and velocity data from the WIND and IMP-8 spacecraft for a large number (N = 134) of carefully selected events having large "discontinuity angles" of 90° or greater. The discontinuity angle (ω) is measured in the DD's current sheet, the normal (n) to which is estimated by field variance analysis. The fundamental analysis depends on estimates of these DD surface normals at the two spacecraft and the DD's center-times and positions. On average, the transit time from one DD sighting to the other was 36 minutes, and the associated distance along the normal direction was 137 RE. The transition-interval lengths across the DDs are translated into thicknesses and examined for the amount of change between the two spacecraft observing points. The average thickness is relatively large, 14 RE.; the most probable thickness is ≈6 RE. All relevant quantities are examined statistically to establish their distributions, average, and degree of change. A weighted average of the radius of curvature is estimated to be 380 RE, but its most probable value is 290 RE. The average ω is 140° with a relatively large spread (σ = 28°). The average direction of propagation is: longitude (ϕn) = 194° and latitude (θn) = 7° (but = 27°), where ϕn = 0° is sunward and θn = 0° is the ecliptic plane. Various parameters are studied with respect to DD type, i.e., rotational or tangential discontinuity (RD or TD), defined in terms of the "ratio" (in percent) of speed of propagation to net speed of the DD surface, where the net speed is the sum of the convection velocity (along n) plus the propagation speed. The RD %-ratio is moderately small, but the TD ratio is very small or zero. The results by this definition of type are favorably compared to those from the more conventional method, which depends on the absolute strength of the normal

  2. The 2-D Curvature of Large Angle Interplanetary MHD Discontinuity Surfaces: IMP-8 and WIND Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.; McClernan, K.

    2002-12-01

    This study examines the degree of 2-D curvature of solar wind directional discontinuity (DD) surfaces at 1 AU using magnetic field, density, and velocity data from the WIND and IMP-8 spacecraft for a large number (N = 134) of carefully selected events having large ``discontinuity angles" of 90° or greater. The discontinuity angle (ω ) is measured in the DDs current sheet, the normal to which is estimated by field variance analysis. The fundamental analysis depends on estimates of these DD surface normals at the two spacecraft, and the DDs center-times and positions. On average, the transit time from one DD sighting to the other was 36 minutes, and the associated distance along the normal direction was 137 RE. The transition-interval lengths across the DDs are translated into thicknesses and examined for the amount of change between the two spacecraft observing points; average thickness is relatively large, 14 RE. All relevant quantities are examined statistically to establish their distributions, average, and degree of change. A weighted average of the radius of curvature is estimated to be 380 RE, but its most probably value is 290 RE. The average ω is 140° with a relatively large spread (σ =28°). The average direction of propagation is: longitude = 194° and latitude = 7° (but = 27°). Various parameters are studied with respect to DD type, defined in terms the ratio of speed of propagation to net speed (``ratio") of the DD surface, (the RD ratio is high and the TD ratio is very low or zero). The results by this definition of type are favorably compared to those from the more conventional method, which depends on the absolute strength of the normal component of the magnetic field. There is little difference in any average parameter value according to type. However, the average ω appears to depend slightly on type with the for the RDs being smaller. A DDs type was shown to change in either direction between the two observation positions about 40% of the

  3. High resolution observations of the near-surface wind field over an isolated mountain and in a steep river canyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Butler

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of numerical wind flow models have been developed for simulating wind flow at relatively fine spatial resolutions (e.g., ∼100 m; however, there are very limited observational data available for evaluating these high resolution models. This study presents high-resolution surface wind datasets collected from an isolated mountain and a steep river canyon. The wind data are presented in terms of four flow regimes: upslope, afternoon, downslope, and a synoptically-driven regime. There were notable differences in the data collected from the two terrain types. For example, wind speeds collected on the isolated mountain increased with distance upslope during upslope flow, but generally decreased with distance upslope at the river canyon site during upslope flow. Wind speed did not have a simple, consistent trend with position on the slope during the downslope regime on the isolated mountain, but generally increased with distance upslope at the river canyon site. The highest measured speeds occurred during the passage of frontal systems on the isolated mountain. Mountaintop winds were often twice as high as wind speeds measured on the surrounding plain. The highest speeds measured in the river canyon occurred during late morning hours and were from easterly downcanyon flows, presumably associated with surface pressure gradients induced by formation of a regional thermal trough to the west and high pressure to the east. Under periods of weak synoptic forcing, surface winds tended to be decoupled from large-scale flows, and under periods of strong synoptic forcing, variability in surface winds was sufficiently large due to terrain-induced mechanical effects (speed-up over ridges and decreased speeds on leeward sides of terrain obstacles that a large-scale mean flow would not be representative of surface winds at most locations on or within the terrain feature. These findings suggest that traditional operational weather model (i.e., with

  4. Wind-driven changes of surface current, temperature, and chlorophyll observed by satellites north of New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Léger, Fabien; Messié, Monique; Dutrieux, Pierre; Menkes, Christophe; Eldin, Gérard

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations of wind, sea level and derived currents, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll are used to expand our understanding of the physical and biological variability of the ocean surface north of New Guinea. Based on scarce cruise and mooring data, previous studies differentiated a trade wind situation (austral winter) when the New Guinea Coastal Current (NGCC) flows northwestward and a northwest monsoon situation (austral summer) when a coastal upwelling develops and the NGCC reverses. This circulation pattern is confirmed by satellite observations, except in Vitiaz Strait where the surface northwestward flow persists. We find that intraseasonal and seasonal time scale variations explain most of the variance north of New Guinea. SST and chlorophyll variabilities are mainly driven by two processes: penetration of Solomon Sea waters and coastal upwelling. In the trade wind situation, the NGCC transports cold Solomon Sea waters through Vitiaz Strait in a narrow vein hugging the coast. Coastal upwelling is generated in westerly wind situations (westerly wind event, northwest monsoon). Highly productive coastal waters are advected toward the equator and, during some westerly wind events, toward the eastern part of the warm pool. During El Niño, coastal upwelling events and northward penetration of Solomon Sea waters combine to influence SST and chlorophyll anomalies.

  5. An Anisotropic Ocean Surface Emissivity Model Based on WindSat Polarimetric Brightness Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. F.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sandeep, S.; Weber, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research has been to develop a standardized fast full-Stokes ocean surface emissivity model with Jacobian for a wind-driven ocean surface applicable at arbitrary microwave frequencies, polarizations, and incidence angles. The model is based on the Ohio State University (OSU) two-scale code for surface emission developed by Johnson (2006, IEEE TGRS, 44, 560) but modified as follows: (1) the Meissner-Wentz dielectric permittivity (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) replaces the original permittivity, (2) the Elfouhaily sea surface spectrum (1997, JGR, 102, C7,15781) replaces the Durden-Vesecky spectrum (1985, IEEE TGRS, OE-10, 445), but the Durden-Vesecky angular spreading function is retained, (3) the high-frequency portion of the Elfouhaily spectrum is multiplied by the Pierson-Moskowitz shape spectrum to correct an error in the original paper, (4) the generalized Phillips-Kitaigorodskii equilibrium range parameter for short waves is modeled as a continuous function of the friction velocity at the water surface to eliminate a discontinuous jump in the original paper. A total of five physical tuning parameters were identified, including the spectral strength and the hydrodynamic modulation factor. The short wave part of the spectrum is also allowed to have an arbitrary ratio relative to the long wave part. The foam fraction is multiplied by a variable correction factor, and also modulated to allow an anisotropic foam fraction with more foam on the leeward side of a wave. The model is being tuned against multi-year sequences of WindSat and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) data as analyzed by Meissner and Wentz (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) for up to four Stokes brightnesses and in all angular harmonics up to two in twenty five wind bins from 0.5-25.5 m/s and of 1 m/s width. As a result there are 40 brightnesses per wind bin, for a total of 1000 brightnesses used to constrain the modified model. A chi-squared tuning criterion based on error standard

  6. Onshore and offshore wind resource evaluation in the northeastern area of the Iberian Peninsula: quality assurance of the surface wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Jiménez, P. A.; Navarro, J.; García-Bustamante, E.; Lucio-Eceiza, E. E.; Montávez, J. P.; García, A. Y.; Prieto, L.

    2012-04-01

    Offshore wind energy is becoming increasingly important as a reliable source of electricity generation. The areas located in the vicinity of the Cantabrian and Mediterranean coasts are areas of interest in this regard. This study targets an assessment of the wind resource focused on the two coastal regions and the strip of land between them, thereby including most of the northeastern part of the Iberian Peninsula (IP) and containing the Ebro basin. The analysis of the wind resource in inland areas is crucial as the wind channeling through the existing mountains has a direct impact on the sea circulations near the coast. The thermal circulations generated by the topography near the coast also influence the offshore wind resource. This work summarizes the results of the first steps of a Quality Assurance (QA) procedure applied to the surface wind database available over the area of interest. The dataset consists of 752 stations compiled from different sources: 14 buoys distributed over the IP coast provided by Puertos del Estado (1990-2010); and 738 land sites over the area of interest provided by 8 different Spanish institutions (1933-2010) and the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR; 1978-2010). It is worth noting that the variety of institutional observational protocols lead to different temporal resolutions and peculiarities that somewhat complicate the QA. The QA applied to the dataset is structured in three steps that involve the detection and suppression of: 1) manipulation errors (i.e. repetitions); 2) unrealistic values and ranges in wind module and direction; 3) abnormally low (e.g. long constant periods) and high variations (e.g. extreme values and inhomogeneities) to ensure the temporal consistency of the time series. A quality controlled observational network of wind variables with such spatial density and temporal length is not frequent and specifically for the IP is not documented in the literature. The final observed dataset will allow for a

  7. Quality Control and First Insights on the Variability of Surface Wind Observations for North Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Eceiza, E.; González-Rouco, F. J.; Navarro Montesinos, J.; Hidalgo; Jiménez, P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Conte, J.; Casabella, N.; Beltrami, H.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, a policy change in energy sources has been fostered in Atlantic Canada. The purpose of this has been to reduce the dependency on energy produced abroad and to propose feasible alternatives with the aim of reducing greenhouse emissions. The region offers a high potential for the development of wind energy facilities and studies within the framework of wind resource assessment are encouraged. Studies of this nature rely on the quality of observational data. Henceforth, it is essential to develop procedures that ensure the reliability of observations before they are subjected to any subsequent analysis. This work summarizes the Quality Control process applied to an observational database of surface wind module and direction in North Eastern North America. The data set consists of 525 stations compiled from three different sources: 344 land sites from Environment Canada (EC; 1940-2009) located in the provinces of Atlantic Canada and Quebec; 40 buoys distributed over the East Coast and the Canadian Great Lakes provided by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (FOC; 1988-2008); and 141 land sites over both Eastern Canada and North Eastern USA provided by the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR; 1975-2010). The process comprises different phases that: 1) unify measurement units and recording times; 2) find accidentally duplicated periods of data within a time series or between different stations; 3) check for physical consistency in the ranges of values; 4) detect time intervals of anomalous low and high variability; and 5) look for long term biases in mean and variance. The temporal extension and resolution of the quality controlled database allows to explore the wind variability at different temporal scales, from daily to multidecadal. This contribution will present a first assessment of the wind field climatology in the region, including a description of long term trends, analogous of wind circulation regimes and their relationship to large scale

  8. Features of Ocean Surface Winds Observed by the QuikSCAT Satellite Before Tropical Cyclogenesis over the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; LAU Kai-Hon; FUNG Chi-Hung; ZHANG Qinghong

    2008-01-01

    Ocean surface winds observed by the Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) satellite prior to the geneses of 36 tropical cy- clones (TCs) in the South China Sea (SCS) are investigated in this paper. The results show that there are areas with negative mean horizontal divergence around the TC genesis locations three days prior to TC formation. The divergence term [-(f+ζ)( u/ x+ v/ y)] in the vorticity equation is calculated based upon the QuikSCAT ocean surface wind data. The calculated mean divergence term is about 10.3 times the mean relative vorticity increase rate around the TC genesis position one day prior to TC genesis, which shows the important contributions of the divergence term to the vorticity increase prior to TC formation. It is suggested that criteria related with the divergence and divergence term be applied in early detections of tropical cyclogenesis using the QuikSCAT satellite data.

  9. Numerical and Observational Investigations of Long-Lived Mcs-Induced Severe Surface Wind Events: the Derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jerome Michael

    This study addresses the production of sustained, straight-line, severe surface winds associated with mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) of extratropical origin otherwise known as derechos. The physical processes which govern the observed derecho characteristics are identified and their possible forcing mechanisms are determined. Detailed observations of two derechos are presented along with simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CSU-RAMS). The observations revealed a derecho environment characterized by strong vertical wind shear through the depth of the troposphere and large values of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The thermodynamic environment of the troposphere in each case had a distinct three-layer structure consisting of: (i) a surface-based stable layer of 1-to-2 km in depth, (ii) an elevated well -mixed layer of 2-4 km in depth, and (iii) an upper tropospheric layer of intermediate stability that extended to the tropopause. Two primary sets of simulations were performed to assess the impact of the observed environmental profiles on the derecho structure, propagation, and longevity. The first set consisted of nested-grid regional-scale simulations initialized from the standard NMC analyses on a domain having relatively coarse horizontal resolution (75 km). The second set of simulations consisted of two and three-dimensional experiments initialized in a horizontally homogeneous environment having a relatively fine horizontal resolution (2 km) and explicit microphysics. The results from these experiments indicate the importance of convectively -induced gravity waves on the MCS structure, propagation, longevity, and severe surface wind development. The sensitivity of the simulated convection and gravity waves to variations in the vertical wind shear and moisture profiles are described. Detailed Doppler radar analyses and 3-D simulations of a severe, bow echo squall line are presented which reveal

  10. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  11. ENSO Ocean Energetics and Observational Wind Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K.; Burls, N.

    2016-12-01

    The viability of wind power as a potential predictor for ENSO state has previously only been investigated in models. Here we use satellite data to obtain observational equatorial wind power which is then decomposed into climatological (ucτc), mixed-mean-perturbation (ucτ' and u'τc), and perturbation (u'τ') components to compare with the wind power/SST relationship seen in the models. The observational wind power components are also used to compare predictive skill with that of their dynamical counterparts-heat content and wind stress-which are more widely accepted and studied as ENSO predictors. The wind power decomposition reveals the u'τ' perturbation component primarily acts as a damping term. We find that the most robust relationship between wind power and SST arises from the u'τc component computed from the perturbation surface currents and climatological wind stress. u'τc is significantly correlated with the Nino 3.4 index and leads by as many as six months, capturing the role of ocean memory. The wind power decomposition highlights exactly how surface currents can weight the contribution of the winds to have more or less of an effect on the ocean state depending on the whether currents and wind stress act together or oppose each other, illustrating that not all wind anomalies are created equal.

  12. Application of the nonlinear time series prediction method of genetic algorithm for forecasting surface wind of point station in the South China Sea with scatterometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Dong, Gang; Sun, Yimei; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wu, Yuqin

    2016-11-01

    The present work reports the development of nonlinear time series prediction method of genetic algorithm (GA) with singular spectrum analysis (SSA) for forecasting the surface wind of a point station in the South China Sea (SCS) with scatterometer observations. Before the nonlinear technique GA is used for forecasting the time series of surface wind, the SSA is applied to reduce the noise. The surface wind speed and surface wind components from scatterometer observations at three locations in the SCS have been used to develop and test the technique. The predictions have been compared with persistence forecasts in terms of root mean square error. The predicted surface wind with GA and SSA made up to four days (longer for some point station) in advance have been found to be significantly superior to those made by persistence model. This method can serve as a cost-effective alternate prediction technique for forecasting surface wind of a point station in the SCS basin. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41230421 and 41605075) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB430101).

  13. Observations and Modelling of Winds and Waves During the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    l’Environnement Terrestre et Planitalre (CRPE), France; Dr. Will M. Drennan, National Water Research Institute, CCIW; Dr. Lynn "Nick" K. Shay, RSMAS; Dr...250 m), and the orbital velocities of the low-frequency surface wave components. A summary of the results from SWADE are described in Shay (1993). 18

  14. Using CYGNSS to Observe Convectively Driven Near-Surface Winds in Tropical Precipitation Systems During Madden-Julian Oscillation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Hoover, Kacie; Castillo, Tyler; Chronis, Themis

    2017-01-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation OKLMA 1411 UTC Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a multi-satellite constellation that launched 15 December 2016. The primary objective of CYGNSS is to use bistatic Global Positioning System (GPS) reflectometry to accurately measure near-surface wind speeds within the heavily raining inner core of tropical cyclones. CYGNSS also features rapid revisit times over a given region in the tropics - ranging from several minutes to a few hours, depending on the constellation geometry at that time. Despite the focus on tropical cyclones, the ability of CYGNSS to provide rapid updates of winds, unbiased by the presence of precipitation, has many other potential applications related to general tropical convection.

  15. COOP Wind and Radiation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind and radiation data from stations in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observers Network. Some precipitation and pressure forms are mistakenly placed in...

  16. WIND STRESS AND SURFACE ROUGHNESS AT AIR-SEA INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the compiled data of thirty independent observations, the report presents the wind - stress coefficient, the surface roughness and the...boundary layer flow regime at the air-sea interface under various wind conditions. Both the wind - stress coefficient and the surface roughness are found to...data and Charnock’s proportionality constant is determined. Finally, two approximate formulae for the wind - stress coefficient, one for light wind and the other for strong wind are suggested.

  17. OW CCMP ocean surface wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) Ocean Surface Wind Vector Analyses (Atlas et al., 2011) provide a consistent, gap-free long-term time-series of ocean...

  18. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  19. QuikSCAT and SSM/I ocean surface winds for wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Astrup, Poul; Nielsen, Per

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface winds observed by satellite scatterometer (QuikSCAT) and passive microwave (SMM/I) provide valuable information for wind energy applications. In wind energy two long-term aspects on the offshore wind climate is of concern. One is the 20-year average necessary for the estimation...

  20. Gap Filling of the CALYPSO HF Radar Sea Surface Current Data through Past Measurements and Satellite Wind Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gauci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency (HF radar installations are becoming essential components of operational real-time marine monitoring systems. The underlying technology is being further enhanced to fully exploit the potential of mapping sea surface currents and wave fields over wide areas with high spatial and temporal resolution, even in adverse meteo-marine conditions. Data applications are opening to many different sectors, reaching out beyond research and monitoring, targeting downstream services in support to key national and regional stakeholders. In the CALYPSO project, the HF radar system composed of CODAR SeaSonde stations installed in the Malta Channel is specifically serving to assist in the response against marine oil spills and to support search and rescue at sea. One key drawback concerns the sporadic inconsistency in the spatial coverage of radar data which is dictated by the sea state as well as by interference from unknown sources that may be competing with transmissions in the same frequency band. This work investigates the use of Machine Learning techniques to fill in missing data in a high resolution grid. Past radar data and wind vectors obtained from satellites are used to predict missing information and provide a more consistent dataset.

  1. Dusty winds II. Observational Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2010-01-01

    We compare observations of AGB stars and predictions of the Elitzur & Ivezic (2001) steady-state radiatively driven dusty wind model. The model results are described by a set of similarity functions of a single independent variable, and imply general scaling relations among the system parameters. We find that the model properly reproduces various correlations among the observed quantities and demonstrate that dust drift through the gas has a major impact on the structure of most winds. From data for nearby oxygen-rich and carbon-rich mass-losing stars we find that (1) the dispersion in grain properties within each group is rather small; (2) both the dust cross-section per gas particle and the dust-to-gas mass ratio are similar for the two samples even though the stellar atmospheres and grain properties are very different; (3) the dust abundance in both outflows is significantly below the Galactic average, indicating that most of the Galactic dust is not stardust - contrary to popular belief, but in suppor...

  2. Observation-Consistent Input and Whitecapping Dissipation in a Model for Wind-Generated Surface Waves: Description and Simple Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria , Australia DAVID W. WANG Oceanography...C12), 9704-9706. way, ASME, 155-163. Young, I. R., 1999: Wind Generated Ocean Waves. Elsevier, 288 pp. Violante-Carvalho, N., F. J. Ocampo -Torres

  3. Circumventing rain-related errors in scatterometer wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Thomas J.; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Satellite scatterometer observations of surface winds over the global oceans are critical for climate research and applications like weather forecasting. However, rain-related errors remain an important limitation, largely precluding satellite study of winds in rainy areas. Here we utilize a novel technique to compute divergence and curl from satellite observations of surface winds and surface wind stress in rainy areas. This technique circumvents rain-related errors by computing line integrals around rainy patches, using valid wind vector observations that border the rainy patches. The area-averaged divergence and wind stress curl inside each rainy patch are recovered via the divergence and curl theorems. We process the 10 year Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) data set and show that the line-integral method brings the QuikSCAT winds into better agreement with an atmospheric reanalysis, largely removing both the "divergence bias" and "anticyclonic curl bias" in rainy areas noted in previous studies. The corrected QuikSCAT wind stress curl reduces the North Pacific midlatitude Sverdrup transport by 20-30%. We test several methods of computing divergence and curl on winds from an atmospheric model simulation and show that the line-integral method has the smallest errors. We anticipate that scatterometer winds processed with the line-integral method will improve ocean model simulations and help illuminate the coupling between atmospheric convection and circulation.

  4. How predictable are equatorial Atlantic surface winds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ingo; Doi, Takeshi; Behera, Swadhin

    2017-04-01

    Sensitivity tests with the SINTEX-F general circulation model (GCM) as well as experiments from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) are used to examine the extent to which sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies contribute to the variability and predictability of monthly mean surface winds in the equatorial Atlantic. In the SINTEX-F experiments, a control experiment with prescribed observed SST for the period 1982-2014 is modified by inserting climatological values in certain regions, thereby eliminating SST anomalies. When SSTs are set to climatology in the tropical Atlantic only (30S to 30N), surface wind variability over the equatorial Atlantic (5S-5N) decreases by about 40% in April-May-June (AMJ). This suggests that about 60% of surface wind variability is due to either internal atmospheric variability or SSTs anomalies outside the tropical Atlantic. A further experiment with climatological SSTs in the equatorial Pacific indicates that another 10% of variability in AMJ may be due to remote influences from that basin. Experiments from the CMIP5 archive, in which climatological SSTs are prescribed globally, tend to confirm the results from SINTEX-F but show a wide spread. In some models, the equatorial Atlantic surface wind variability decreases by more than 90%, while in others it even increases. Overall, the results suggest that about 50-60% of surface wind variance in AMJ is predictable, while the rest is due to internal atmospheric variability. Other months show significantly lower predictability. The relatively strong internal variability as well as the influence of remote SSTs suggest a limited role for coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in equatorial Atlantic variability.

  5. Will surface winds weaken in response to global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Foltz, Gregory R.; Soden, Brian J.; Huang, Gang; He, Jie; Dong, Changming

    2016-12-01

    The surface Walker and tropical tropospheric circulations have been inferred to slow down from historical observations and model projections, yet analysis of large-scale surface wind predictions is lacking. Satellite measurements of surface wind speed indicate strengthening trends averaged over the global and tropical oceans that are supported by precipitation and evaporation changes. Here we use corrected anemometer-based observations to show that the surface wind speed has not decreased in the averaged tropical oceans, despite its reduction in the region of the Walker circulation. Historical simulations and future projections for climate change also suggest a near-zero wind speed trend averaged in space, regardless of the Walker cell change. In the tropics, the sea surface temperature pattern effect acts against the large-scale circulation slow-down. For higher latitudes, the surface winds shift poleward along with the eddy-driven mid-latitude westerlies, resulting in a very small contribution to the global change in surface wind speed. Despite its importance for surface wind speed change, the influence of the SST pattern change on global-mean rainfall is insignificant since it cannot substantially alter the global energy balance. As a result, the precipitation response to global warming remains ‘muted’ relative to atmospheric moisture increase. Our results therefore show consistency between projections and observations of surface winds and precipitation.

  6. Simulation of the surface wind field and wind waves over the Oman Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeloo, Sima; Hadi Moeini, Mohammad; Jandaghi Alaee, Majid

    2016-04-01

    Surface wind field is one of the most important factors in the generation of the marine hydrodynamic phenomena such as wind waves that highly affected by the surface winds. Therefore, accessibility to the correct wind field is of great importance for accurate prediction and simulation of the hydrodynamic variables. Nowadays numerical mesoscale weather prediction models are widely applied as powerful tools to simulate wind and other atmospheric variables with predefined temporal and spatial resolution in desired areas. Despite appropriate results of the numerical models in many regions, there are still some complications in the simulation of the surface wind field in areas with complex orography since the surface wind field is highly affected by the local topography, land-sea discontinuity, temperature gradient etc. Nowadays, with the development of high-speed processors the third generation spectral models are generally used for simulation of wind waves. Wind data are the main input parameters of the numerical spectral wave model. Therefore, the quality of the input wind data can be assessed by comparison of the wave model outputs with measured values. The main goal of the current study is to simulate surface wind field over the Oman Sea using WRF modeling system. To verify the model results, the simulated wind speeds were compared with synoptic and buoy measurements and satellite observations. Wind-wave parameters simulated by the spectral model were also compared with wave measurements to verify simulated surface wind field as the input of the wave model. The Comparison simulated wind speed and directions in coastal synoptic stations and QuikSCAT satellite shows sufficient results for both offshore and coastal areas.

  7. Mapping surface disturbance from wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2013-04-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing segments of the electricity market and this trend will likely continue as countries strive to reduce CO2 production while meeting growing energy demands. One impact of wind facilities is surface disturbance, including roads, that lead to habitat loss and fragmentation. Numerous studies of wind power utilize estimates of surface disturbance for GIS-based modeling or basic calculations of the land area required to generate energy using wind. However published estimates of the land use required for a MW of electricity from wind facilities vary by more than 10 times (0.83 to 250 MW/Km2). We report results from a geospatial analysis of 39 wind facilities in the United States that we fully digitized using high resolution photo-imagery. The selected sites and analyses were designed to elucidate the effects of turbine size, topography, and land use on the area requirements of wind facilities. The results indicate point estimates of average surface disturbance/MW have wide levels of variation, explained primarily by Landcover and Topography. Wind facilities in agricultural landscapes had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities in forests and shrublands, and facilities in relatively flat topography had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities on hills, ridges, or mesas. Land use, topography, and turbine size all influenced turbine spacing. The statistical models suggest we can predict geographic locations where new wind facilities could be placed with minimized surface disturbance.

  8. OW ASCAT Ocean Surface Winds - 2-Day Composites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) sensor onboard the EUMETSAT MetOp polar-orbiting satellite provides ocean surface wind observations by means of radar...

  9. WIND observations of coherent electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangeney

    Full Text Available The time domain sampler (TDS experiment on WIND measures electric and magnetic wave forms with a sampling rate which reaches 120 000 points per second. We analyse here observations made in the solar wind near the Lagrange point L1. In the range of frequencies above the proton plasma frequency fpi and smaller than or of the order of the electron plasma frequency fpe, TDS observed three kinds of electrostatic (e.s. waves: coherent wave packets of Langmuir waves with frequencies f ~ fpe, coherent wave packets with frequencies in the ion acoustic range fpi < f < fpe, and more or less isolated non-sinusoidal spikes lasting less than 1 ms. We confirm that the observed frequency of the low frequency (LF ion acoustic wave packets is dominated by the Doppler effect: the wavelengths are short, 10 to 50 electron Debye lengths λD. The electric field in the isolated electrostatic structures (IES and in the LF wave packets is more or less aligned with the solar wind magnetic field. Across the IES, which have a spatial width of the order of ~ 25λD, there is a small but finite electric potential drop, implying an average electric field generally directed away from the Sun. The IES wave forms, which have not been previously reported in the solar wind, are similar, although with a smaller amplitude, to the weak double layers observed in the auroral regions, and to the electrostatic solitary waves observed in other regions in the magnetosphere. We have also studied the solar wind conditions which favour the occurrence of the three kinds of waves: all these e.s. waves are observed more or less continuously in the whole solar wind (except in the densest regions where a parasite prevents the TDS observations. The type (wave packet or IES of the observed LF waves is mainly determined

  10. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  11. Mean thermospheric winds observed from Halley, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Crickmore

    Full Text Available Thermospheric winds on a total of 237 nights have been studied for the effects due to geomagnetic activity, solar flux, and season. The observations have been made from 1988 to 1992 by a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI operating at Halley (75.5°S, 26.6°W, Antarctica. This is the first statistical study of thermospheric winds near the southern auroral zone. The main factor affecting the wind velocities is the geomagnetic activity. Increases in activity cause an increase in the maximum equatorward wind, and cause the zonal wind in the evening to become more westward. Smaller changes in the mean wind occur with variations in season and solar flux. The small variation with solar flux is more akin to the situation found at mid-latitudes than at high latitudes. Since the geomagnetic latitude of Halley is only 61°, it suggests that the variability of the wind with solar flux may depend more on geomagnetic than geographic latitude. These observations are in good agreement with the empirical Horizontal Wind Model (HWM90. However, comparisons with predictions of the Vector Spherical Harmonic Model (VSH show that for low geomagnetic activity the predicted phases of the two components of the wind closely resemble the observations but the modelled amplitudes are too small by a factor of two. At high geomagnetic activity the major differences are that modelled zonal velocity is too westward in the evening and too eastward after 04 UT. The modelled ion densities at the F-region peak are a factor of up to 9 too large, whilst the predicted mean value and diurnal variation of the altitude of the peak are significantly lower than those observed. It is suggested that these differences result from the ion loss rate being too low, and an inaccurate model of the magnetic field.

  12. The near-surface wind field over the Antarctic continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Turner, J.; Colwell, S. R.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    A 14 year integration with a regional atmospheric model has been used to determine the near-surface climatological wind field over the Antarctic ice sheet at a horizontal grid spacing of 55 km. Previous maps of the near-surface wind field were generally based on models ignoring the large-scale pressure-gradient forcing term in the momentum equation. Presently, state-of-the-art atmospheric models include all pressure-gradient forcing terms. Evaluation of our model output against in situ data shows that the model is able to represent realistically the observed increase in wind speed going from the interior to the coast, as well as the observed wind direction at South Pole and Dumont d'Urville and the bimodal wind distribution at Halley.

  13. Widespread land surface wind decline in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautard, R.; Cattiaux, J.; Yiou, P.; Thépaut, J.-N.; Ciais, P.

    2010-09-01

    The decline of surface wind observed in many regions of the world is a potential source of concern for wind power electricity generation. It is also suggested as the main cause of decreasing pan evaporation. In China, a persistent and significant decrease of monsoon winds was observed in all seasons. Surface wind declines were also evidenced in several regions of the world (U.S., Australia, several European countries). Except over China, no clear explanation was given for the wind decrease in the regions studied. Whether surface winds decrease is due to changes in the global atmospheric circulation or its variability, in surface processes or to observational trends has therefore not been elucidated. The identification of the drivers of such a decline requires a global investigation of available surface and upper-air wind data, which has not been conducted so far. Here we use global datasets of in-situ wind measurements that contain surface weather stations wind data (hourly or three-hourly data acquisition time step) and rawinsonde vertical wind data profiles (monthly time step) prepared by the NCAR. A set of 822 worldwide surface stations with continuous wind records was selected after a careful elimination of stations with obvious breaks and large gaps. This dataset mostly covers the Northern mid latitudes over the period 1979-2008. Using this data set, we found that annual mean wind speeds have declined at 73% of the surface stations over the past 30 years. In the Northern Hemisphere, positive wind trends are found only in a few places. In Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Asia and in North America the annual mean surface wind speed has decreased on average at a rate of -2.9, -5.9, -4.2, and -1.8 %/decade respectively, i.e. a decrease of about 10% in 30 years and up to about 20% in Central Asia. These results are robust to changes in the station selection method and parameters. By contrast, upper-air winds observed from rawinsondes, geostrophic winds deduced from

  14. Surface winds over West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromwich, David

    1993-01-01

    Five winter months (April-August 1988) of thermal infrared satellite images were examined to investigate the occurrence of dark (warm) signatures across the Ross Ice Shelf in the Antarctic continent. These features are inferred to be generated by katabatic winds that descend from southern Marie Byrd Land and then blow horizontally across the ice shelf. Significant mass is added to this airstream by katabatic winds blowing from the major glaciers that flow through the Transantarctic Mountains from East Antarctica. These negatively buoyant katabatic winds can reach the northwestern edge of the shelf - a horizontal propagation distance of up to 1,000 km - 14 percent of the time. Where the airstream crosses from the ice shelf to the ice-covered Ross Sea, a prominent coastal polynya is formed. Because the downslope buoyancy force is near zero over the Ross Ice Shelf, the northwestward propagation of the katabatic air mass requires pressure gradient support. The study shows that the extended horizontal propagation of this atmospheric density current occurred in conjunction with the passage of synoptic cyclones over the southern Amundsen Sea. These cyclones can strengthen the pressure gradient in the interior of West Antarctica and make the pressure field favorable for northwestward movement of the katabatic winds from West Antarctica across the ice shelf in a geostrophic direction. The glacier winds from East Antarctica are further accelerated by the synoptic pressure gradient, usually undergo abrupt adjustment beyond the exit to the glacier valley, and merge into the mountain-parallel katabatic air mass.

  15. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  16. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  17. Modeling wind adjustment factor and midflame wind speed for Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2012-01-01

    Rothermel's surface fire spread model was developed to use a value for the wind speed that affects surface fire, called midflame wind speed. Models have been developed to adjust 20-ft wind speed to midflame wind speed for sheltered and unsheltered surface fuel. In this report, Wind Adjustment Factor (WAF) model equations are given, and the BehavePlus fire modeling...

  18. Characterizing Tropospheric Winds by Combining MISR Cloud-Track and QuikSCAT Surface Wind Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R.; Garay, M. J.; Moroney, C. M.; Liu, W. T.

    2007-12-01

    Numerous studies have found that the inclusion of wind observations results in a significantly greater improvement in operational weather forecasts compared to the addition of temperature or pressure observations alone. However, global tropospheric wind measurements are only available from 12-hourly rawinsonde launches from selected locations, primarily over land. For years the world's oceans were "data voids" in terms of wind measurements. Only recently have satellites begun to fill this gap. The SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite obtains winds referenced to 10 meters above the surface over the global oceans under nearly all weather conditions. The wind speed and direction data from QuikSCAT have been extensively tested against surface observations and are of such quality that these data are routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction models run by both the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). However, scatterometer data only provide wind information near the ocean surface. This information can be complemented with satellite cloud-track winds that provide information about winds in the free troposphere over the ocean, as well as over land, where scatterometer data are not available. In particular, the height resolved cloud motion vectors from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra satellite yield wind speeds for clouds at altitudes less than approximately 2.5 km that are shown to compare favorably with the QuikSCAT winds globally. In addition, the direction of the MISR winds is similar to the QuikSCAT wind vectors when compared on the same basis. The synergistic use of these two sets of wind observations has the potential to make possible a variety of new studies: from improved forecast and climate model validation; to increased understanding of tropospheric water vapor transport; to observations of the coupling

  19. Summertime winds and direct cyclonic circulation: observations from Lake Geneva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lemmin

    Full Text Available Records of wind, air temperature and air pressure from nine stations, situated along the shoreline of Lake Geneva, Switzerland, were analyzed for the summer period May to September. At all stations the consistent appearance of significant spectral peaks and changes in wind direction at the diurnal frequency indicates the importance of lake-land breezes. It is shown that the surrounding topography has a strong modifying effect (temporal and spatial on the lake-land breeze. Superimposed on this cyclic wind pattern, short episodes of strong winds with long fetch over parts of Lake Geneva are regularly observed. Both of these winds exert a spatially variable wind stress over the lake surface on the same time scale. Typical examples of the expected lake's response are presented, among them the seasonally persistent gyre in the central part of the lake. Evidence is provided that this dominant circulation is part of a direct cyclonic circulation, generated by the curl of the diurnal wind field. It is concluded that the mean circulation is caused by these winds and affected by the topography of the surrounding land.

  20. Global analysis of ocean surface wind and wind stress using a general circulation model and Seasat scatterometer winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnay, E.; Atlas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous and 15-day time-averaged fields of surface wind, wind stress, curl of the wind stress, and wind divergence are presented. These fields are derived from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres four-dimensional analysis/forecast cycle, for the period September 6-30, 1978, using conventional data, satellite temperature soundings, cloud-track winds, and subjectively dealiased Seasat scatterometer winds.

  1. Surface Currents and Winds at the Delaware Bay Mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscarella, P A; Barton, N P; Lipphardt, B L; Veron, D E; Wong, K C; Kirwan, A D

    2011-04-06

    Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an eight-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two high-frequency radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.

  2. Hot planetary winds near a star: dynamics, wind-wind interactions, and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Liu, Baowei; Quillen, Alice C.; Blackman, Eric G.; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Signatures of 'evaporative' winds from exoplanets on short (hot) orbits around their host star have been observed in a number of systems. In this paper, we present global adaptive mesh refinement simulations that track the launching of the winds, their expansion through the circumstellar environment, and their interaction with a stellar wind. We focus on purely hydrodynamic flows including the anisotropy of the wind launching and explore the orbital/fluid dynamics of the resulting flows in detail. In particular, we find that a combination of the tidal and Coriolis forces strongly distorts the planetary 'Parker' wind creating 'up-orbit' and 'down-orbit' streams. We characterize the flows in terms of their orbital elements that change depending on their launch position on the planet. We find that the anisotropy in the atmospheric temperature leads to significant backflow on to the planet. The planetary wind interacts strongly with the stellar wind creating instabilities that may cause eventual deposition of planetary gas on to the star. We present synthetic observations of both transit and absorption line-structure for our simulations. For our initial conditions, we find that the orbiting wind material produces absorption signatures at significant distances from the planet and substantial orbit-to-orbit variability. Lyα absorption shows red- and blueshifted features out to 70 km s-1. Finally, using semi-analytic models we constrain the effect of radiation pressure, given the approximation of uniform stellar absorption.

  3. Surface wind energy trends near Taiwan in winter since 1871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The tropical surface wind speed in boreal winter reaches a maximum near Taiwan. This stable wind resource may be used for future clean energy development. How this surface wind energy source has changed in past 141 years is investigated using the 20th century reanalysis dataset and CMIP5 models. Our observational analysis shows that the surface wind speed experienced a weakening trend in the past 141 years (1871 - 2010. The average decreasing rate is around -1.4 m s-1 per century. The decrease is primarily attributed to the relative sea surface temperature (SST cooling in the subtropical North Pacific, which forces a large-scale low-level anti-cyclonic circulation anomaly in situ and is thus responsible for the southerly trend near Taiwan. The relative SST trend pattern is attributed mainly to the greenhouse gas effect associated with anthropogenic activities. The southerly trend near Taiwan is more pronounced in the boreal winter than in summer. Such seasonal difference is attributed to the reversed seasonal mean wind, which promotes more efficient positive feedback in the boreal winter. The CMIP5 historical run analysis reveals that climate models capture less SST warming and large-scale anti-cyclonic circulation in the subtropical North Pacific, but the simulated weakening trend of the surface wind speed near Taiwan is too small.

  4. Impact of Air Pollution on Summer Surface Winds in Xi'an

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新; 董文杰; 刘芳霞

    2011-01-01

    By analysis of observation data,this paper demonstrates that pollution particles could reduce surface wind speed through blocking solar radiation to the ground.The comparation between temperature at the lowland meteorological station Xi'an and that over the nearby highland station Mt.Hun suggests that surface solar radiation at Xi'an is reduced due to the increasing anthropogenic aerosols.The reduced surface energy suppresses the atmospheric instability and convective flows,and thus the downward transfer of faster winds aloft is reduced.Consequently,wind speeds near surface are weakened.This reduction of surface winds is shown by the significant reverse trends of wind speeds over the two stations at different elevations.The aerosols' effects on winds are also manifested in the trends of radionsonde wind speed.The decreased surface winds in Xi'an have also reduced local pan evaporation.

  5. Hot planetary winds near a star: dynamics, wind-wind interactions, and observational signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Liu, Baowei; Quillen, Alice C; Blackman, Eric G; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Signatures of "evaporative" winds from exo-planets on short (hot) orbits around their host star have been observed in a number of systems. In this paper we present global AMR simulations that track the launching of the winds, their expansion through the circumstellar environment, and their interaction with a stellar wind. We focus on purely hydrodynamic flows including the anisotropy of the wind launching and explore the orbital/fluid dynamics of the resulting flows in detail. In particular we find that a combination of the tidal and Coriolis forces strongly distorts the planetary "Parker" wind creating "up-orbit" and "down-orbit" streams. We characterize the flows in terms of their orbital elements which change depending on their launch position on the planet. We find that the anisotropy in the atmospheric temperature leads to significant backflow on to the planet. The planetary wind interacts strongly with the stellar wind creating instabilities that cause eventual deposition of planetary gas onto the star....

  6. Galactic Wind in NGC 4460: New Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oparin, D V

    2015-01-01

    NGC4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the Halpha line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30..80 km/s , and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  7. Widespread land surface wind decline in the Northern Hemisphere partly attributed to land surface changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thepaut, J.; Vautard, R.; Cattiaux, J.; Yiou, P.; Ciais, P.

    2010-12-01

    The decline of surface wind observed in many regions of the world is a potential source of concern for wind power electricity generation. It is also suggested as the main cause of decreasing pan evaporation. In China, a persistent and significant decrease of monsoon winds was observed in all seasons. Surface wind declines were also evidenced in several regions of the world (U.S., Australia, several European countries). Except over China, no clear explanation was given for the wind decrease in the regions studied. Whether surface winds decrease is due to changes in the global atmospheric circulation or its variability, in surface processes or to observational trends has therefore not been elucidated. The identification of the drivers of such a decline requires a global investigation of available surface and upper-air wind data, which has not been conducted so far. Here we use global datasets of in-situ wind measurements that contain surface weather stations wind data (hourly or three-hourly data acquisition time step) and rawinsonde vertical wind data profiles (monthly time step) prepared by the NCAR. A set of 822 worldwide surface stations with continuous wind records was selected after a careful elimination of stations with obvious breaks and large gaps. This dataset mostly covers the Northern mid latitudes over the period 1979-2008. Using this data set, we found that annual mean wind speeds have declined at 73% of the surface stations over the past 30 years. In the Northern Hemisphere, positive wind trends are found only in a few places. In Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Asia and in North America the annual mean surface wind speed has decreased on average at a rate of -2.9, -5.9, -4.2, and -1.8 %/decade respectively, i.e. a decrease of about 10% in 30 years and up to about 20% in Central Asia. These results are robust to changes in the station selection method and parameters. By contrast, upper-air winds observed from rawinsondes, geostrophic winds deduced from

  8. Low-Frequency Rotation of Surface Winds over Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Richardson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hourly surface observations from the Canadian Weather Energy and Engineering Dataset were analyzed with respect to long-term wind direction drift or rotation. Most of the Canadian landmass, including the High Arctic, exhibits a spatially consistent and remarkably steady anticyclonic rotation of wind direction. The period of anticyclonic rotation recorded at 144 out of 149 Canadian meteostations directly correlated with latitude and ranged from 7 days at Medicine Hat (50°N, 110°W to 25 days at Resolute (75°N, 95°W. Only five locations in the vicinity of the Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast were found to obey a “negative” (i.e., cyclonic rotation. The observed anticyclonic rotation appears to be a deterministic, virtually ubiquitous, and highly persistent feature of continental surface wind. These findings are directly applicable to probabilistic assessments of airborne pollutants.

  9. CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds(C3Winds) A New Wind Observing System to Study Mesoscale Cloud Dynamics and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Kelly, M.A.; Yee, J.-H.; Boldt, J.; Demajistre, R.; Reynolds, E. L.; Tripoli, G. J.; Oman, L. D.; Prive, N.; Heidinger, A. K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds (C3Winds) is a NASA Earth Venture Instrument (EV-I) concept with the primary objective to better understand mesoscale dynamics and their structures in severe weather systems. With potential catastrophic damage and loss of life, strong extratropical and tropical cyclones (ETCs and TCs) have profound three-dimensional impacts on the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic structures, producing complex cloud precipitation patterns, strong low-level winds, extensive tropopause folds, and intense stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Employing a compact, stereo IR-visible imaging technique from two formation-flying CubeSats, C3Winds seeks to measure and map high-resolution (2 km) cloud motion vectors (CMVs) and cloud geometric height (CGH) accurately by tracking cloud features within 5-15 min. Complementary to lidar wind observations from space, the high-resolution wind fields from C3Winds will allow detailed investigations on strong low-level wind formation in an occluded ETC development, structural variations of TC inner-core rotation, and impacts of tropopause folding events on tropospheric ozone and air quality. Together with scatterometer ocean surface winds, C3Winds will provide a more comprehensive depiction of atmosphere-boundary-layer dynamics and interactive processes. Built upon mature imaging technologies and long history of stereoscopic remote sensing, C3Winds provides an innovative, cost-effective solution to global wind observations with potential of increased diurnal sampling via CubeSat constellation.

  10. SAR Observation and Modeling of Gap Winds in the Prince William Sound of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Volz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alaska’s Prince William Sound (PWS is a unique locale tending to have strong gap winds, especially in the winter season. To characterize and understand these strong surface winds, which have great impacts on the local marine and aviation activities, the surface wind retrieval from the Synthetic Aperture Radar data (SAR-wind is combined with a numerical mesoscale model. Helped with the SAR-wind observations, the mesoscale model is used to study cases of strong winds and relatively weak winds to depict the nature of these winds, including the area of extent and possible causes of the wind regimes. The gap winds from the Wells Passage and the Valdez Arm are the most dominant gap winds in PWS. Though the Valdez Arm is north-south trending and Wells Passage is east-west oriented, gap winds often develop simultaneously in these two places when a low pressure system is present in the Northern Gulf of Alaska. These two gap winds often converge at the center of PWS and extend further out of the Sound through the Hinchinbrook Entrance. The pressure gradients imposed over these areas are the main driving forces for these gap winds. Additionally, the drainage from the upper stream glaciers and the blocking effect of the banks of the Valdez Arm probably play an important role in enhancing the gap wind.

  11. An Examination of the Quality of Wind Observations with Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Kasper; Vedel, Henrik; Muñoz-Gomez, Juan; Woetmann, Niels

    2017-04-01

    Over the last years, the number of devices connected to the internet has increased significantly making it possible for internal and external sensors to communicate via the internet, opening up many possibilities for additional data for use in the atmospheric sciences. Vaavud has manufactured small anemometer devices which can measure wind speed and wind direction when connected to a smartphone. This work examines the quality of such crowdsourced Handheld Wind Observations (HWO). In order to examine the quality of the HWO, multiple idealised measurement sessions were performed at different sites in different atmospheric conditions. In these sessions, a high-precision ultrasonic anemometer was installed to work as a reference measurement. The HWO are extrapolated to 10 m in order to compare these to the reference observations. This allows us to examine the effect of stability correction in the surface layer and the quality of height extrapolated HWO. The height extrapolation is done using the logarithmic wind profile law with and without stability correction. Furthermore, this study examines the optimal ways of using traditional observations and numerical models to validate HWO. In order to do so, a series of numerical reanalysis have been run for a period of 5 months to quantise the effect of including crowdsourced HWO in a traditional observation dataset.

  12. An overview on SAR measurements of sea surface wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studies show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has the capability of providing high-resolution (sub-kilometer) sea surface wind fields. This is very useful for applications where knowledge of the sea surface wind at fine scales is crucial. This paper aims to review the latest work on sea surface wind field retrieval using SAR images. As shown, many different approaches have been developed for retrieving wind speed and wind direction. However, much more work will be required to fully exploit the SAR data for improving the retrieval accuracy of high-resolution winds and for producing wind products in an operational sense.

  13. Simultaneous observation of wind shears and misalignments from rotor loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciola, S.; Bertelè, M.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    A wind turbine is used in this paper as a sensor to measure the wind conditions at the rotor disk. In fact, as any anisotropy in the wind will lead to a specific signature in the machine response, by inverting a response model one may infer its generating cause, i.e. the wind. Control laws that exploit this knowledge can be used to enhance the performance of a wind turbine or a wind power plant. This idea is used in the present paper to formulate a linear implicit model that relates wind states and rotor loads. Simulations are run in both uniform and turbulent winds, using a high-fidelity aeroservoleastic wind turbine model. Results demonstrate the ability of the proposed observer in detecting the horizontal and vertical wind misalignments, as well as the vertical and horizontal shears.

  14. Effects of surface wind speed decline on hydrology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Surface wind speed decline in China has been widely reported, but its effects on hydrology have not been fully evaluated to date. In this study, we evaluate the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology in China during 1966-2011 by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model. Two model experiments, i.e. VIC simulations with the observed (EXP1) and detrended wind speed (EXP2), are performed in the major river basins in China. The differences between the two experiments are analyzed to assess the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology. Results show that wind speed has decreased by 29% of its mean in China, even by 80% for some areas in the northern China. The wind speed decline have resulted in a decrease of evapotranspiration by 1-3% of mean annual evapotranspiration and an increase of runoff by 1-6% of mean annual runoff at most basins in China. The effect of wind speed on runoff and soil moisture is large in the northern basins where small change in hydrological conditions would have significant implications for water management. In addition, Wind speed decline has offset the expansion of the drought area in China. It has contributed to a reduction of drought areas by 21%, 17%, 15% and 12% for the mean drought area in the Songhuajiang River, Hai River, Liao River and Yellow River basins, respectively, and by 8.8% of the mean drought area over China. The effect of wind speed decline on soil moisture drought is large in most basins in China expect for the Southwest and Pearl River basins.

  15. Wind Resource Estimation using QuikSCAT Ocean Surface Winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Zhang, Guosheng; Cheng, Yongcun

    2011-01-01

    and the complexity of air-sea interaction processes, an empirical relationship that adjusts QuikSCAT winds in coastal waters was first proposed based on vessel measurements. Then the shape and scale parameters of Weibull function are determined for wind resource estimation. The wind roses are also plotted. Results...

  16. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    OpenAIRE

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K; K. Satheesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that determin...

  17. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  18. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  19. Remote sensing observation used in offshore wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Christiansen, Merete Bruun

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing observations used in offshore wind energy are described in three parts: ground-based techniques and applications, airborne techniques and applications, and satellite-based techniques and applications. Ground-based remote sensing of winds is relevant, in particular, for new large wind...

  20. Fault tolerant control of wind turbines using unknown input observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for accommodating faults in the rotor and generator speed sensors in a wind turbine. These measured values are important both for the wind turbine controller as well as the supervisory control of the wind turbine. The scheme is based on unknown input observers, which...

  1. A preliminary assessment of the sea surface wind speed production of HY-2 scanning microwave radiometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaoqi; ZHU Jianhua; LIN Mingsen; ZHAO Yili; WANG He; CHEN Chuntao; PENG Hailong; ZHANG Youguang

    2014-01-01

    A scanning microwave radiometer (RM) was launched on August 16, 2011, on board HY-2 satellite. The six-month long global sea surface wind speeds observed by the HY-2 scanning microwave radiometer are preliminarily validated using in-situ measurements and WindSat observations, respectively, from January to June 2012. The wind speed root-mean-square (RMS) difference of the comparisons with in-situ data is 1.89 m/s for the measurements of NDBC and 1.72 m/s for the recent four-month data measured by PY30-1 oil platform, respectively. On a global scale, the wind speeds of HY-2 RM are compared with the sea surface wind speeds derived from WindSat, the RMS difference of 1.85 m/s for HY-2 RM collocated observations data set is calculated in the same period as above. With analyzing the global map of a mean difference between HY-2 RM and WindSat, it appears that the bias of the sea surface wind speed is obviously higher in the inshore regions. In the open sea, there is a relatively higher positive bias in the mid-latitude regions due to the overestimation of wind speed observations, while the wind speeds are underestimated in the Southern Ocean by HY-2 RM relative to WindSat observations.

  2. Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global satellite observations of lidar backscatter measurements acquired by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO mission and collocated sea surface wind speed data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E, are used to investigate the relation between wind driven wave slope variance and sea surface wind speed. The new slope variance – wind speed relation established from this study is similar to the linear relation from Cox-Munk (1954 and the log-linear relation from Wu (1972, 1990 for wind speed larger than 7 m/s and 13.3 m/s, respectively. For wind speed less than 7 m/s, the slope variance is proportional to the square root of the wind speed, assuming a two dimensional isotropic Gaussian wave slope distribution. This slope variance – wind speed relation becomes linear if a one dimensional Gaussian wave slope distribution is assumed. Contributions from whitecaps and subsurface backscattering are effectively removed by using 532 nm lidar depolarization measurements. This new slope variance – wind speed relation is used to derive sea surface wind speed from CALIPSO single shot lidar measurements (70 m spot size, after correcting for atmospheric attenuation. The CALIPSO wind speed result agrees with the collocated AMSR-E wind speed, with 1.2 m/s rms error.

  3. Study of Practicability of Improved Irwin's Surface Wind Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Junji KATAGIRI; Toshio TSURUMI; Takeshi OHKUMA; Hisao MARUKAWA

    2009-01-01

      The practicability of a surface wind sensor (SWS) is examined by comparing the mean and fluctuating wind velocities obtained from this instrument with those measured by an omni-directional multi-channel anemometer (OMA...

  4. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  5. Influence of surface stressing on stellar coronae and winds

    CERN Document Server

    Jardine, M; van Ballegooijen, A; Donati, J -F; Morin, J; Fares, R; Gombosi, T I

    2013-01-01

    The large-scale field of the Sun is well represented by its lowest energy (or potential) state. Recent observations, by comparison, reveal that many solar-type stars show large-scale surface magnetic fields that are highly non-potential - that is, they have been stressed above their lowest-energy state. This non-potential component of the surface field is neglected by current stellar wind models. The aim of this paper is to determine its effect on the coronal structure and wind. We use Zeeman-Doppler surface magnetograms of two stars - one with an almost potential, one with a non-potential surface field - to extrapolate a static model of the coronal structure for each star. We find that the stresses are carried almost exclusively in a band of uni-directional azimuthal field that is confined to mid-latitudes. Using this static solution as an initial state for an MHD wind model, we then find that the final state is determined primarily by the potential component of the surface magnetic field. The band of azimut...

  6. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  7. Scattering by Artificial Wind and Rain Roughened Water Surfaces at Oblique Incidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craeye, C.; Sobieski, P. W.; Bliven, L. F.

    1997-01-01

    Rain affects wind retrievals from scatterometric measurements of the sea surface. To depict the additional roughness caused by rain on a wind driven surface, we use a ring-wave spectral model. This enables us to analyse the rain effect on K(u) band scatterometric observations from two laboratory experiments. Calculations based on the small perturbation method provide good simulation of scattering measurements for the rain-only case, whereas for combined wind and rain cases, the boundary perturbation method is appropriate.

  8. Fine-measuring technique and application for sea surface wind by mobile Doppler wind lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhishen; Wang, Zhangjun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang; Zhang, Xin; Bi, Decang; Chen, Yubao; Li, Rongzhong; Yang, Yuqiang

    2009-06-01

    The Key Laboratory of Ocean Remote Sensing of the Ministry of Education of China, Ocean University of China, has developed the first mobile Doppler wind lidar in China. As an important component of meteorological services for the Good Luck Beijing 2007 Qingdao International Regatta, the mobile Doppler wind lidar was used to measure the sea surface wind (SSW) with 100 m*100 m spatial and 10-min temporal resolution in Qingdao from 15 to 23 August 2007. We present the results from two aspects of this campaign. First, the lidar was operated in the fixed-direction mode and compared to SSW simultaneously measured by a collocated buoy. Second, we present lidar wind measurements throughout the regatta and show good agreement with the match situation of the International Regatta. In addition, we present a case study, accounting for the observation of sailboats stopped by the headwind. With considerable data accumulated, we have shown that the mobile Doppler wind lidar can indeed provide near real-time SSW in support of the sailing games. The lidar has also provided meteorological services for the 2008 Olympic sailing games from 8 to 22 August and Paralympics Sailing Games from 8 to 13 September 2008 in Qingdao.

  9. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  10. Effectiveness of WRF wind direction for retrieving coastal sea surface wind from synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeyama, Yuko; Ohsawa, Teruo; Kozai, Katsutoshi;

    2013-01-01

    Wind direction is required as input to the geophysical model function (GMF) for the retrieval of sea surface wind speed from a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The present study verifies the effectiveness of using the wind direction obtained from the weather research and forecasting model...

  11. On the dependence of sea surface roughness on wind waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, H.K.; Højstrup, J.; Vested, H.J.;

    1998-01-01

    The influence of wind waves on the momentum transfer (wind stress) between the atmosphere and sea surface was studied using new measured data from the RASEX experiment and other datasets compiled by Donelan et al. Results of the data analysis indicate that errors in wind friction velocity u...

  12. Assimilation of wind speed and direction observations: results from real observation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The assimilation of wind observations in the form of speed and direction (asm_sd by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Data Assimilation System (WRFDA was performed using real data and employing a series of cycling assimilation experiments for a 2-week period, as a follow-up for an idealised post hoc assimilation experiment. The satellite-derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV and surface dataset in Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS were assimilated. This new method takes into account the observation errors of both wind speed (spd and direction (dir, and WRFDA background quality control (BKG-QC influences the choice of wind observations, due to data conversions between (u,v and (spd, dir. The impacts of BKG-QC, as well as the new method, on the wind analysis were analysed separately. Because the dir observational errors produced by different platforms are not known or tuned well in WRFDA, a practical method, which uses similar assimilation weights in comparative trials, was employed to estimate the spd and dir observation errors. The asm_sd produces positive impacts on analyses and short-range forecasts of spd and dir with smaller root-mean-square errors than the u,v-based system. The bias of spd analysis decreases by 54.8%. These improvements result partly from BKG-QC screening of spd and dir observations in a direct way, but mainly from the independent impact of spd (dir data assimilation on spd (dir analysis, which is the primary distinction from the standard WRFDA method. The potential impacts of asm_sd on precipitation forecasts were evaluated. Results demonstrate that the asm_sd is able to indirectly improve the precipitation forecasts by improving the prediction accuracies of key wind-related factors leading to precipitation (e.g. warm moist advection and frontogenesis.

  13. Automatic Classification of Offshore Wind Regimes With Weather Radar Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trombe, Pierre-Julien; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Weather radar observations are called to play an important role in offshore wind energy. In particular, they can enable the monitoring of weather conditions in the vicinity of large-scale offshore wind farms and thereby notify the arrival of precipitation systems associated with severe wind...... and amplitude) using reflectivity observations from a single weather radar system. A categorical sequence of most likely wind regimes is estimated from a wind speed time series by combining a Markov-Switching model and a global decoding technique, the Viterbi algorithm. In parallel, attributes of precipitation...... systems are extracted from weather radar images. These attributes describe the global intensity, spatial continuity and motion of precipitation echoes on the images. Finally, a CART classification tree is used to find the broad relationships between precipitation attributes and wind regimes...

  14. Calculating the sensitivity of wind turbine loads to wind inputs using response surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinker, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to calculate wind turbine load sensitivities to turbulence parameters through the use of response surfaces. A response surface is a high-dimensional polynomial surface that can be calibrated to any set of input/output data and then used to generate synthetic data...... parameters examined in this paper, the variance caused by the Kaimal length scale and nonstationarity parameter are negligible. Thus, the findings in this paper represent the first systematic evidence that stochastic wind turbine load response statistics can be modeled purely by mean wind wind speed...

  15. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that deterministic forecasting methods can make accurate short-term predictions of wind speed using past data, at locations where the wind dynamics exhibit chaotic behaviour. The predictions are remarkably accurate up to 1 h with a normalised RMSE (root mean square error) of less than 0.02 and reasonably accurate up to 3 h with an error of less than 0.06. Repeated application of these methods at 234 different geographical locations for predicting wind speeds at 30-day intervals for 3 years reveals that the accuracy of prediction is more or less the same across all locations and time periods. Comparison of the results with f-ARIMA model predictions shows that the deterministic models with suitable parameters are capable of returning improved prediction accuracy and capturing the dynamical variations of the actual time series more faithfully. These methods are simple and computationally efficient and require only records of past data for making short-term wind speed forecasts within practically tolerable margin of errors.

  16. A Statistical Model for the Prediction of Wind-Speed Probabilities in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, G. C.; Hertwig, D.; Andronopoulos, S.; Bartzis, J. G.; Coceal, O.

    2016-11-01

    Wind fields in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) are highly three-dimensional and characterized by strong spatial and temporal variability. For various applications such as wind-comfort assessments and structural design, an understanding of potentially hazardous wind extremes is important. Statistical models are designed to facilitate conclusions about the occurrence probability of wind speeds based on the knowledge of low-order flow statistics. Being particularly interested in the upper tail regions we show that the statistical behaviour of near-surface wind speeds is adequately represented by the Beta distribution. By using the properties of the Beta probability density function in combination with a model for estimating extreme values based on readily available turbulence statistics, it is demonstrated that this novel modelling approach reliably predicts the upper margins of encountered wind speeds. The model's basic parameter is derived from three substantially different calibrating datasets of flow in the ASL originating from boundary-layer wind-tunnel measurements and direct numerical simulation. Evaluating the model based on independent field observations of near-surface wind speeds shows a high level of agreement between the statistically modelled horizontal wind speeds and measurements. The results show that, based on knowledge of only a few simple flow statistics (mean wind speed, wind-speed fluctuations and integral time scales), the occurrence probability of velocity magnitudes at arbitrary flow locations in the ASL can be estimated with a high degree of confidence.

  17. Effect of phase coupling on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Nonlinear features of wind generated surface waves are considered here to be caused by nonrandomness (non-Uniform) in the phase spectrum. Nonrandomness in recorded waves, if present, would be generally obscured within the error level of observations...

  18. Altimeter Estimation of Sea Surface Wind Stress for Light to Moderate Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Douglas; Edson, James B.; Chapron, Bertrand

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft altimeter and in situ measurements are used to examine relationships between altimeter backscatter and the magnitude of near-surface wind and friction velocities. Comparison of altimeter radar cross section with wind speed is made through the modified Chelton-Wentz algorithm. Improved agreement is found after correcting 10-m winds for both surface current and atmospheric stability. An altimeter friction velocity algorithm is derived based on the wind speed model and an open-ocean drag coefficient. Close agreement between altimeter- and in situ-derived friction velocities is found. For this dataset, quality of the altimeter inversion to surface friction velocity is comparable to that for adjusted winds and clearly better than the inversion to true 10-m wind speed.

  19. Comparisons of some parametrizations of wind direction variability with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Belinda M.; Thomson, David J.

    An understanding of wind direction variability is important in predicting the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere. Parametrizations of wind direction variability over different time scales are compared with turbulence observations made at the Meteorological Research Unit (MRU) at Cardington. Observations of the variability averaged over one hour in stable conditions are compared with the parametrizations proposed by Hanna and by Joffre and Laurila for light winds and show broad agreement with these parametrizations. The formula proposed by Hanna, suitably matched to a similarity approach at strong winds, can be recommended for general use. The direction variability over longer time periods (up to 12 h) has also been investigated. Results show only a weak dependence on averaging time with the wind direction variability roughly proportional to averaging time to the power 1/4.

  20. Wind flow and wind loads on the surface of a tower- shaped building: Numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow structure and wind pressure distribution caused by obtuse obstacles are usually the focuses in Computational Wind Engineer researches (CWE). By solving the non- hydrostatical dynamic equations, PUMA model (Peking University Model of Atmospheric Environment) was developed and applied to simulating the flow structure and wind pressure distribution around a tower-shaped building. Evaluation about the wind environment and wind loads around the building was obtained through the analysis of the numerical simulation results and wind tunnel data. Comparisons between the simulation and wind tunnel study indicate that numerical simulation results agree well in the flow field and wind pressure distribution around the tower-shaped building. On the other hand, the horizontal grid interval of 2 m and the vertical grid of 3 m were still too crude to simulate the flow structure and wind pressure distribution on the building surface more exactly in detail; and the absence of suitable pressure perturbation parameterization scheme between the solid and the adjacent space also limits the accuracy of the numerical simulation. The numerical simulation model can be used to evaluate the wind environment and wind load around high buildings.

  1. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  2. Extremely long hard bursts observed by Konus-Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Golenetskii, S; Il'Inskii, V; Mazets, E; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Hurley, K; Sakamoto, T; Oleynik, P; Ulanov, M; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Shinohara, C; Starr, R; 10.1063/1.2943422

    2013-01-01

    We report the observations of the prompt emission of the extremely long hard burst, GRB 060814B, discovered by Konus-Wind and localized by the IPN. The observations reveal a smooth, hard, ~40-min long pulse followed by weaker emission seen several hours after the burst onset. We also present the Konus-Wind data on similar burst, GRB 971208, localized by BATSE/IPN. And finally we discuss the different possible origins of these unusual events.

  3. HESS Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C

    2006-01-01

    The high resolution capabilities of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) introduced a new era in Gamma-Ray Astronomy, and opens a new window on pulsar wind nebula (PWN) research. A rotationally induced jet (associated with PSR B1509-58) is resolved for the first time in gamma-rays, allowing us to trace the particle transport directly, without having the complicating effect of spatially varying field distributions on the synchrotron emissivity. For PWN older or more extended than Crab (i.e. those with lower field strengths), HESS also reveals the properties of electrons contributing to the EUV/soft X-ray synchrotron bands, whereas EUV/soft X-rays suffer from severe interstellar absorption effects. Finally, HESS morphological studies of evovled PWN also allow us to directly measure the effects of assymetric reverse shock interactions due to SNR forward shock expansion into the inhomogeneous interstellar medium.

  4. Upper wind observing systems used for meteorological operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nash

    Full Text Available Methods of upper wind measurements used in operational meteorology have been reviewed to provide guidance to those developing wind profiler radar systems. The main limitations of the various methods of tracking weather balloons are identified using results from the WMO radiosonde comparisons and additional tests in the United Kingdom. Costs associated with operational balloon measurements are reviewed. The sampling and quality of operational aircraft wind observations are illustrated with examples from the ASDAR system. Measurement errors in horizontal winds are quantified wherever possible. When tracking equipment is functioning correctly, random errors in southerly and westerly wind component measurements from aircraft and weather balloons are usually in the range 0.5-2 m s-1.

  5. Observer Based Detection of Sensor Faults in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Nielsen, R.

    2009-01-01

    An observer based scheme is proposed to detect sensor faults in wind  turbines. In the example used for the proposed scheme the wind turbine  drive train is considered. A model of the drive train is used to  design the observer, and in this model the wind speed is an important  input, however......, if an unknown input observer the fault detection  scheme can be non dependent on the actual wind speed. The scheme  is validated on data from a more advanced and detailed simulation  model. The proposed scheme detects the sensor faults a few samples  after the beginning of the faults....

  6. Near Real Time MISR Wind Observations for Numerical Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, K. J.; Protack, S.; Rheingans, B. E.; Hansen, E. G.; Jovanovic, V. M.; Baker, N.; Liu, J.; Val, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) project, in association with the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC), has this year adapted its original production software to generate near-real time (NRT) cloud-motion winds as well as radiance imagery from all nine MISR cameras. These products are made publicly available at the ASDC with a latency of less than 3 hours. Launched aboard the sun-synchronous Terra platform in 1999, the MISR instrument continues to acquire near-global, 275 m resolution, multi-angle imagery. During a single 7 minute overpass of any given area, MISR retrieves the stereoscopic height and horizontal motion of clouds from the multi-angle data, yielding meso-scale near-instantaneous wind vectors. The ongoing 15-year record of MISR height-resolved winds at 17.6 km resolution has been validated against independent data sources. Low-level winds dominate the sampling, and agree to within ±3 ms-1 of collocated GOES and other observations. Low-level wind observations are of particular interest to weather forecasting, where there is a dearth of observations suitable for assimilation, in part due to reliability concerns associated with winds whose heights are assigned by the infrared brightness temperature technique. MISR cloud heights, on the other hand, are generated from stereophotogrammetric pattern matching of visible radiances. MISR winds also address data gaps in the latitude bands between geostationary satellite coverage and polar orbiting instruments that obtain winds from multiple overpasses (e.g. MODIS). Observational impact studies conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and by the German Weather Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst) have both demonstrated forecast improvements when assimilating MISR winds. An impact assessment using the GEOS-5 system is currently in progress. To benefit air quality forecasts, the MISR project is currently investigating the feasibility of generating near-real time aerosol products.

  7. Rayleigh Doppler Lidar for Higher Tropospheric and Stratospheric Wind Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Lei; WANG Cong-Rong; WU Hai-Bin; DONG Ji-Hui

    2012-01-01

    A mobile molecular Doppler wind lidar (DWL) based on the double-edge technique is described for wind measurement from 10 km to 40 km altitude.Two edge filters located in the wings of the thermally broadened molecular backscattered signal spectrum at 355 nm are employed as a frequency discriminator to determine the Doppler shift proportional to the wind velocity.The lidar operates at 355 nm with a 45 cm aperture telescope and a matching azimuth-over-elevation scanner that can provide full hemispherical pointing.Intercomparison experiments of the lidar wind profile measurement are performed with collocated pilot balloon.The results show that the standard deviation of wind speed and direction are less than l0m/s and 30° in the 5-40 km altitude range,respectively.The small mean difference and normal distribution between DWL and pilot balloon data and the transient eddy of the west-wind jet observed demonstrate that the DWL consistently measures the wind with acceptable random errors.%A mobile molecular Doppler wind lidar (DWL) based on the double-edge technique is described for wind measurement from 10 km to 40 km altitude. Two edge filters located in the wings of the thermally broadened molecular backscattered signal spectrum at 355 nm are employed as a frequency discriminator to determine the Doppler shift proportional to the wind velocity. The lidar operates at 355 nm with a 45 cm aperture telescope and a matching azimuth-over-elevation scanner that can provide full hemispherical pointing. Intercomparison experiments of the lidar wind profile measurement are performed with collocated pilot balloon. The results show that the standard deviation of wind speed and direction are less than 10m/s and 30° in the 5-40 km altitude range, respectively. The small mean difference and normal distribution between DWL and pilot balloon data and the transient eddy of the west-wind jet observed demonstrate that the DWL consistently measures the wind with acceptable random errors.

  8. Interpretation of nonlinearity in wind generated ocean surface waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    This study attempts to resolve a mix-up between a physical process and its mathematical interpretation in the context of wind waves on ocean surface. Wind generated wave systems, are conventionally interpreted as a result of interaction of a number...

  9. Cauchy-Matern Model of Sea Surface Wind Speed at the Lake Worth, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the Cauchy-Matern (CM process with long-range dependence (LRD. The closed form of its power spectrum density (PSD function is given. We apply it to model the autocovariance function (ACF and the PSD of the sea surface wind speed (wind speed for short observed in the Lake Worth, Florida, over the 1984–2006 period. The present results exhibit that the wind speed at the Lake Worth over 1984–2006 is of LRD. The present results exhibit that the CM process may yet be a novel model to fit the wind speed there.

  10. Influence of Persistent Wind Scour on the Surface Mass Balance of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indrani; Bell, Robin E.; Scambos, Ted A.; Wolovick, Michael; Creyts, Timothy T.; Studinger, Michael; Fearson, Nicholas; Nicolas, Julien P.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; vandenBroeke, Michiel R.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow accumulation over Antarctica is a key constraint for estimates of the Antarctic mass balance, as well as climatic interpretations of ice-core records. Over Antarctica, near-surface winds accelerate down relatively steep surface slopes, eroding and sublimating the snow. This wind scour results in numerous localized regions (Antarctica. The scour zones are persistent because they are controlled by bedrock topography. On the basis of our Dome A observations, we develop an empirical model to predict wind-scour zones across the Antarctic continent and find that these zones are predominantly located in East Antarctica. We estimate that approx. 2.7-6.6% of the surface area of Antarctica has persistent negative net accumulation due to wind scour, which suggests that, across the continent, the snow mass input is overestimated by 11-36.5 Gt /yr in present surface-mass-balance calculations.

  11. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure...

  12. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  13. Estimation of Near Surface Wind Speeds in Strongly Rotating Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean; Wicker, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Modeling studies consistently demonstrate that the most violent winds in tornadic vortices occur in the lowest tens of meters above the surface. These velocities are unobservable by radar platforms due to line of sight consider- ations. In this work, a methodology is developed which utilizes parametric tangential velocity models derived from Doppler radar measurements, to- gether with a tangential momentum and mass continuity constraint, to esti- mate the radial and vertical velocities in a steady axisymmetric frame. The main result is that information from observations aloft can be extrapolated into the surface layer of the vortex. The impact of the amount of information available to the retrieval is demonstrated through some numerical tests with pseudo-data.

  14. Complex Wind-Induced Variations of Surface Snow Accumulation Rates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; van den Broeke, M.; Lenaerts, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. Using airborne radar, lidar and thresholds of surface slope, modeled surface mass balance (SMB) and wind fields, we have predicted continent-wide distribution of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones are located over relatively steep ice surfaces formed by ice flow over bedrock topography. Near-surface winds accelerate over these steeper slopes and erode and sublimate the snow. This results in numerous localized regions (typically ≤ 200 km2) with reduced or negative surface accumulation. Although small zones of re-deposition occur at the base of the steeper slope areas, the redeposited mass is small relative to the ablation loss. Total losses from wind-scour and wind-glaze areas amounts to tens of gigatons annually. Near the coast, winds often blow significant amounts of surface snow from these zones into the ocean. Large uncertainties remain in SMB estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we also use Operation IceBridge's snow radar data to provide evidence for a gradual ablation of ~16-18 m of firn (~200 years of accumulation) from wind-scour zones over the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. The maximum ablation rates observed in this region are ~ -54 kg m-2 a-1 (-54 mm water equivalent a-1). Our airborne radio echo-sounding analysis show snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones is <10% of the cumulative mass loss. Our study shows that the local mass loss is dominated by sublimation to water vapor rather than wind-transport of snow.

  15. Effect of film slicks on near-surface wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail; Ermakov, Stanislav; Ostrovsky, Lev; Shomina, Olga

    2016-09-01

    The transient effects of horizontal variation of sea-surface wave roughness due to surfactant films on near-surface turbulent wind are studied theoretically and experimentally. Here we suggest two practical schemes for calculating variations of wind velocity profiles near the water surface, the average short-wave roughness of which is varying in space and time when a film slick is present. The schemes are based on a generalized two-layer model of turbulent air flow over a rough surface and on the solution of the continuous model involving the equation for turbulent kinetic energy of the air flow. Wave tank studies of wind flow over wind waves in the presence of film slicks are described and compared with theory.

  16. Variation in wind speed and surface shear stress from open floor to porous parallel windbreaks: A wind tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, De-Xin; Zhong, Ye; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Shi, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Ting-Yao

    2009-08-01

    As vegetative windbreaks become established on a large scale in agricultural ecosystems, understanding the influence of windbreak networks on the momentum budget of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes important. The authors conducted a wind tunnel experiment to study the variation of wind speed profile and surface shear stress of wind flow passing from an open surface to another with parallel windbreaks. Five spacing (L = 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 h, wherein h is the windbreak height) windbreak arrays with moderate porosity (aerodynamic porosity α = 0.501) were used in the experiments. Both near-floor and over-array wind speed measurements showed that airflow will approach equilibrium state behind a special windbreak of the array, varying from 4th to 9th windbreak when the spacing change from 30 to 5 h. Within the range of L/h values investigated, arrays with narrower spacing cause higher friction velocity and roughness length, which were up to 2.26 and nearly 100 times those observed over open floor, respectively. A semiempirical momentum budget model is developed on the arrayed surface to estimate windbreak drag and shear stress on the protected floor. Windbreak drag accounts for more than 80% of shear stress on the arrayed surface, and the shear stress on protected floor is less than 20% when L/h < 40 based on the model estimation. The sum of the two estimated components agrees well with the estimates obtained from over-array wind profiles.

  17. Surface deformations and wave generation by wind blowing over a viscous liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquier, A.; Moisy, F.; Rabaud, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate experimentally the early stage of the generation of waves by a turbulent wind at the surface of a viscous liquid. The spatio-temporal structure of the surface deformation is analyzed by the optical method Free Surface Synthetic Schlieren, which allows for time-resolved measurements with a micrometric accuracy. Because of the high viscosity of the liquid, the flow induced by the turbulent wind in the liquid remains laminar, with weak surface drift velocity. Two regimes of deformation of the liquid-air interface are identified. In the first regime, at low wind speed, the surface is dominated by rapidly propagating disorganized wrinkles, elongated in the streamwise direction, which correspond to the surface response to the pressure fluctuations advected by the turbulent airflow. The amplitude of these deformations increases approximately linearly with wind velocity and are essentially independent of the fetch (distance along the channel). Above a threshold in wind speed, we observe the growth of well defined gravity-capillary waves with crests nearly perpendicular to the wind direction. In this second regime, the wave amplitude increases with wind speed but far more quickly than in the first regime.

  18. Wind Characteristics of Coastal and Inland Surface Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Lazarus, Steven; Jin, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Lidar measurements of the winds in the surface layer (up to 80 m) inland and near the beach are studied to better characterize the velocity profile and the effect of roughness. Mean and root-mean-squared profiles of horizontal and vertical wind components are analyzed. The effects of variable time (18, 60 and 600 seconds) averaging on the above profiles are discussed. The validity of common surface layer wind profile models to estimate skin friction drag is assessed in light of these measurements. Other turbulence statistics such as auto- and cross- correlations in spatial and temporal domains are also presented. The help of FIT DMES field measurement crew is acknowledged.

  19. Probability distribution of surface wind speed induced by convective adjustment on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    The influence of convective adjustment on the spatial structure of Venusian surface wind and probability distribution of its wind speed is investigated using an idealized weather research and forecasting model. When the initially uniform wind is much weaker than the convective wind, patches of both prograde and retrograde winds with scales of a few kilometers are formed during active convective adjustment. After the active convective adjustment, because the small-scale convective cells and their related vertical momentum fluxes dissipate quickly, the large-scale (>4 km) prograde and retrograde wind patches remain on the surface and in the longitude-height cross-section. This suggests the coexistence of local prograde and retrograde flows, which may correspond to those observed by Pioneer Venus below 10 km altitude. The probability distributions of surface wind speed V during the convective adjustment have a similar form in different simulations, with a sharp peak around ∼0.1 m s-1 and a bulge developing on the flank of the probability distribution. This flank bulge is associated with the most active convection, which has a probability distribution with a peak at the wind speed 1.5-times greater than the Weibull fitting parameter c during the convective adjustment. The Weibull distribution P(> V) (= exp[-(V/c)k]) with best-estimate coefficients of Lorenz (2016) is reproduced during convective adjustments induced by a potential energy of ∼7 × 107 J m-2, which is calculated from the difference in total potential energy between initially unstable and neutral states. The maximum vertical convective heat flux magnitude is proportional to the potential energy of the convective adjustment in the experiments with the initial unstable-layer thickness altered. The present work suggests that convective adjustment is a promising process for producing the wind structure with occasionally generating surface winds of ∼1 m s-1 and retrograde wind patches.

  20. Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind: Wind Observation and Wave Dispersion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and alpha-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  1. Variability of the wind field in the tropical oceans as observed by satellite sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grima, N.; Bentamy, A.; Quilfen, Y. [IFREMER/Brest, Plouzane (France)

    1995-12-31

    It is generally agreed today that the knowledge of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean is essential for understanding climate and ocean circulation, especially in tropical regions where the oceans are mainly and quickly influenced by wind action. The wind stress is the primary force driving the topical oceans from daily to interannual time scales. Conventional measurements from ships of the wind vectors are not available with a sufficient quality regarding the data accuracy as well as their coverage. Satellite observations of the surface wind over the sea are now available on a routine basis at the Institut Francais de Recherche pour l`Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), derived from the European Remote Sensing-1 (ERS-1) scatterometer and altimeter and from the radiometer Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). More than 3 years of weekly stress fields (1991--1994) with a resolution of one degree in latitude and longitude are produced using an objective analysis method. The accuracy of these gridded winds was evaluated by comparison with TAO buoys in the tropical Pacific area (Riou, 1995). The root mean square differences are of the order of 1.2 m/s and 15 degrees. The greatest differences are observed in the TOGA/COARE region where the wind variability is largest on the weekly scale. The low frequencies (monthly to interannual) of the wind variability are discussed and compared to those obtained from the TAO buoys. In this paper the time and space scales of the sea surface wind are described using a complex EOF analysis. One of the most interesting results is that the weekly averaged wind fields derived from ERS-1 scatterometer are useful to depict a 30--50-day oscillation over the tropical Pacific ocean.

  2. Observations of surface radon in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Piero Di; Pitari, Giovanni; de Luca, Natalia; Battisti, Domenico

    2009-07-01

    Two years of in situ radon concentration measurements in the atmospheric surface layer have been collected in a central Italy town (L’Aquila), located in the Aterno river valley. These data have been analyzed in order to study the controlling mechanisms of surface radon abundance; observations of coincident meteorological parameters confirmed the role of dynamics on the local removal rate of this tracer. The relatively high negative correlation of hourly data of surface wind speed and radon activity concentration ( R = -0.54, on annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon is one of the most important controlling processes of the tracer accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. An attempt is made to quantify the precipitation impact on radon soil fluxes. No anticorrelation of radon and precipitation comes out from the data ( R = -0.15), as in previous studies. However, since the main physical parameter affecting the ground radon release is expected to be the soil accumulation of water, snow or ice, the emission flux has also been correlated with soil moisture; in this way a much clearer anticorrelation is found ( R = -0.54).

  3. Estimates of Mode-S EHS aircraft-derived wind observation errors using triple collocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Siebren

    2016-08-01

    Information on the accuracy of meteorological observation is essential to assess the applicability of the measurements. In general, accuracy information is difficult to obtain in operational situations, since the truth is unknown. One method to determine this accuracy is by comparison with the model equivalent of the observation. The advantage of this method is that all measured parameters can be evaluated, from 2 m temperature observation to satellite radiances. The drawback is that these comparisons also contain the (unknown) model error. By applying the so-called triple-collocation method , on two independent observations at the same location in space and time, combined with model output, and assuming uncorrelated observations, the three error variances can be estimated. This method is applied in this study to estimate wind observation errors from aircraft, obtained utilizing information from air traffic control surveillance radar with Selective Mode Enhanced Surveillance capabilities Mode-S EHS, see. Radial wind measurements from Doppler weather radar and wind vector measurements from sodar, together with equivalents from a non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model, are used to assess the accuracy of the Mode-S EHS wind observations. The Mode-S EHS wind (zonal and meridional) observation error is estimated to be less than 1.4 ± 0.1 m s-1 near the surface and around 1.1 ± 0.3 m s-1 at 500 hPa.

  4. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  5. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.

  6. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  7. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-09

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps.

  8. Verification of the ECMWF ensemble forecasts of wind speed against analyses and observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Hagedorn, Renate

    2012-01-01

    A framework for the verification of ensemble forecasts of near-surface wind speed is described. It is based on existing scores and diagnostic tools, though considering observations from synoptic stations as reference instead of the analysis. This approach is motivated by the idea of having a user...

  9. Assessment of Wind Turbine Structural Integrity using Response Surface Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Svenningsen, Lasse; Moser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A new approach to assessment of site specific wind turbine loads is proposed. •The approach can be applied in both fatigue and ultimate limit state. •Two different response surface methodologies have been investigated. •The model uncertainty introduced by the response surfaces is dete...

  10. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  11. Dominant patterns of winter Arctic surface wind variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bingyi; John Walsh; LIU Jiping; ZHANG Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Dominant statistical patterns of winter Arctic surface wind (WASW) variability and their impacts on Arctic sea ice motion are investigated using the complex vector empirical orthogonal function (CVEOF) method. The results indicate that the leading CVEOF of Arctic surface wind variability, which accounts for 33% of the covariance, is characterized by two different and alternating spatial patterns (WASWP1 and WASWP2). Both WASWP1 and WASWP2 show strong interannual and decadal variations, superposed on their declining trends over past decades. Atmospheric circulation anomalies associated with WASWP1 and WASWP2 exhibit, respectively, equivalent barotropic and some baroclinic characteristics, differing from the Arctic dipole anomaly and the seesaw structure anomaly between the Barents Sea and the Beaufort Sea. On decadal time scales, the decline trend of WASWP2 can be attributed to persistent warming of sea surface temperature in the Greenland—Barents—Kara seas from autumn to winter, relfecting the effect of the Arctic warming. The second CVEOF, which accounts for 18% of the covariance, also contains two different spatial patterns (WASWP3 and WASWP4). Their time evolutions are signiifcantly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the central Arctic Pattern, respectively, measured by the leading EOF of winter sea level pressure (SLP) north of 70°N. Thus, winter anomalous surface wind pattern associated with the NAO is not the most important surface wind pattern. WASWP3 and WASWP4 primarily relfect natural variability of winter surface wind and neither exhibits an apparent trend that differs from WASWP1 or WASWP2. These dominant surface wind patterns strongly inlfuence Arctic sea ice motion and sea ice exchange between the western and eastern Arctic. Furthermore, the Fram Strait sea ice volume lfux is only signiifcantly correlated with WASWP3. The results demonstrate that surface and geostrophic winds are not interchangeable in terms of

  12. Ion kinetic scale in the solar wind observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Přech, Lubomír; Zastenker, Georgy N

    2013-01-11

    This Letter shows the first results from the solar wind monitor onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft which measures plasma moments with a time resolution of 31 ms. This high-time resolution allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. We present examples of the frequency spectra of the density, velocity, and thermal velocity. Our study reveals that although these parameters exhibit the same behavior at the magnetohydrodynamic scale, their spectra are remarkably different at the kinetic scale.

  13. Ion‐driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; Stevens, Michael L.; Podesta, John J.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. But it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft‐frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field B o. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. Observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x B o = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén‐cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to B o), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right‐hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.

  14. In situ observational research of the gap wind "Hijikawa-Arashi" in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yukitaka; Terao, Toru; Shigeta, Yoshinori; Ohsawa, Teruo

    2015-02-01

    The Hijikawa-arashi, a gap wind occurring in Ozu City, Ehime Prefecture, Japan, was investigated through in situ observations of horizontal and vertical directions. Analysis of surface air temperature data revealed that the inland Ozu Basin was radiatively cooled on the days on which the Hijikawa-arashi events occurred. This induced a greater difference in air temperature between the basin and the estuary of the Hijikawa River in comparison to days that no basin cooling occurred. In addition, the wind speeds of the Hijikawa-arashi observed at the estuary of the Hijikawa River were strongly proportional to the sea-level pressure difference between the inland Ozu Basin and the estuary. Theoretical calculations indicated that this pressure gradient force was sufficient for driving the strong wind of the Hijikawa-arashi. Moreover, calculation of the Froude number using vertical meteorological data revealed that the Hijikawa-arashi developed as a supercritical flow. That is, the flow was intensified at the exit of the gap, in accordance with the hydraulic theory. The vertical observations detected the inversion layer over the Hijikawa-arashi and suggested an application of the shallow water theory to this gap wind. The Hijikawa-arashi is an interesting gap flow with a strong wind, despite its small-scale geography relative to other gap winds worldwide. There is an important trigger getting higher basin pressure upstream due to the radiative cooling of the atmosphere and formation of a cold pool at the basin.

  15. Wind influence on surface current variability in the Ibiza Channel from HF Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Arancha; Marmain, Julien; Fernández, Vicente; Tintoré, Joaquin; Orfila, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Surface current variability is investigated using 2.5 years of continuous velocity measurements from an high frequency radar (HFR) located in the Ibiza Channel (Western Mediterranean Sea). The Ibiza Channel is identified as a key geographical feature for the exchange of water masses but still poorly documented. Operational, quality controlled, HFR derived velocities are provided by the Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System (SOCIB). They are assessed by performing statistical comparisons with current-meter, ADCP, and surface lagrangian drifters. HFR system does not show significant bias, and its accuracy is in accordance with previous studies performed in other areas. The main surface circulation patterns are deduced from an EOF analysis. The first three modes represent almost 70 % of the total variability. A cross-correlation analysis between zonal and meridional wind components and the temporal amplitudes of the first three modes reveal that the first two modes are mainly driven by local winds, with immediate effects of wind forcing and veering following Ekman effect. The first mode (37 % of total variability) is the response of meridional wind while the second mode (24 % of total variability) is linked primarily with zonal winds. The third and higher order modes are related to mesoscale circulation features. HFR derived surface transport presents a markedly seasonal variability being mostly southwards. Its comparison with Ekman-induced transport shows that wind contribution to the total surface transport is on average around 65 %.

  16. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    , the AIRS infrared data reveals the temperature of the atmosphere around the storm, but doesn't tell us about the wind direction or relative intensity. The directional vectors of the SeaWinds data set show how the air is circulating around the storm. Scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction by bouncing microwave pulses off the ocean's surface. The SeaWinds instruments measure the backscattered radar energy from wind-generated ocean waves. By making multiple measurements from different looks at the same location, we can infer the vector wind averaged over each 25 km resolution cell. The primary mission objective of the SeaWinds and QuikSCAT scatterometers is to obtain long-term, global coverage of the ocean vector winds for oceanographic and climate research. While not specifically designed for detailed mapping and tracking of hurricanes, both instruments have been found to be useful resources for operational forecasters. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. In situ observations of nightime warm katabatic winds on Gale by REMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzano, María-Paz; Martín-Torres, Francisco Javier; Newman, Claire; Hamilton, Victoria; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; de la Torre, Manuel; Haberle, Bob; Mischna, Michael; Kahanpää, Henrik; Harri, Ari-Matti; Navarro, Sara; Lepinette, Alain; Sebastian, Eduardo; Javier Gómez-Elvira, REMS Team; the MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    We report the first in-situ observations of warm nighttime winds at Gale landing site. Gale is an impact crater basin with 5 km depth and an internal mound of the same height. This sharp topographic contrast induces huge environmental differences after sunset that leads to the appearance of downslope winds. Katabatic winds are produced as the descending mass of air is compressed adiabatically because of the pressure difference. This leads to the injection at the base of the crater of a jet of air with increased temperature. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission has sensors recording air and ground temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and ultraviolet radiation in different bands. REMS collects data from all sensors simultaneously daily during the course of the mission. REMS has detected the signatures of katabatic winds simultaneously in 4 of its sensors: pressure wiggles associated with the incoming mass of air (pressure sensor), sudden air temperature increments up to 10 K (air temperature sensor); an associated modulation in the ground temperature (ground temperature sensor); and variations of strength and orientation indicating a donwnslope wind (wind sensor). The hot air winds observed by REMS show a pattern with a certain characteristic frequency along the nighttime hours. The magnitude and signature of the air temperature increase after sunset changes when the local column of dust increases suggesting a strong dependence on the local circulation of air and local column of dust. Katabatic winds must be ubiquous on Mars given the huge topographic differences of its poorly eroded landscape. These warm nighttime winds prevent cooling of the ground surface and may lead to erroneous thermal inertia estimates when the ground temperature is remotely measured from orbiters, that usually do not take them into account them in the retrieval process. Furthermore the signature of katabatic winds

  18. The Dynamic Stiffness of Surface Footings for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the dynamic stiffness of foundations for large offshore wind turbines. Especially, the purpose of the analysis is to quantify the uncertainties related to the first natural frequency of a turbine supported by a surface footing on layered soil. The dynamic properties...... due to sediment transportation. Further, the stiffness and density of the materials within a single layer is subject to uncertainties. This leads to uncertainties of the dynamic stiffness of the foundation and therefore the natural frequencies. The aim of the study is to quantify the level...... of uncertainties and discuss the utilization of reliability-based design of surface footings for wind turbines....

  19. Wind observations of low energy particles within a solar wind reconnection region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report characteristics of thermal particle observations during the encounter of the Wind satellite with the separatrix and the outflow domains of a reconnection event on 22 July 1999 in the solar wind. During the studied event the electrostatic analyzers on Wind were transmitting three-dimensional electron and proton distributions in a burst mode every 3 s, the spin period of the spacecraft. The event was associated with a magnetic shear angle of 114° and a large guide magnetic field. The observations suggest that Wind crossed the separatrix and outflow regions about a thousand of ion skin depths from the X-line. At the leading separator boundary, a strong proton beam was identified that originated from the direction of the X-line. In the separatrix and the outflow regions, the phase space distributions of thermal electrons displayed field aligned bidirectional anisotropy. During the crossings of the current sheets bounding the outflow region, we identified two adjacent layers in which the dominant thermal electron flows were towards the X-line at the inner edges of the current sheets and away from the X-line at the outer edges. Interestingly, simulation studies and observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have revealed that the electron flows are reversed, consistent with the Hall current system.

  20. Wind work on the geostrophic ocean circulation: An observational study of the effect of small scales in the wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris W.; Wilson, Chris

    2008-02-01

    We use QuikSCAT scatterometer data, together with geostrophic surface currents calculated from a combination of satellite altimetry, gravity and drifter data, to investigate the rate of work done on the geostrophic circulation by wind stress. In particular, we test the suggestion that accounting for ocean currents in the calculation of stress from 10 m winds can result in a reduction of 20-35% in the wind work, compared with an approximate calculation in which currents are not accounted for. We calculate the predicted effect of accounting for ocean currents to be a reduction in power of about 0.19 TW, and find a total power input from observations which include this effect to be 0.76 TW, smaller than earlier estimates by about the right amount. By recalculating the power input using smoothed wind stresses or currents, we demonstrate that the effect of ocean currents is visible in the midlatitude data, and close to the predicted value. Proof that the data are adequate to resolve the effect in the tropics, however, is lacking, suggesting that additional processes may also be important in this region.

  1. Fire Whirl Evolution Observed during a Valley Wind-Sea Breeze Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Seto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This observational study documented the atmospheric environment of a prescribed fire conducted in a narrow valley when a small fire whirl developed during a mesoscale wind reversal. Based on analysis of in situ meteorological measurements, it is hypothesized that the fire whirl formed due to the presence of strong vertical wind shear caused by the interaction of a sea breeze front with a weaker up-valley wind. Vorticity generated by the interaction of the wind shear and the fire front was estimated to be ~0.2 s−1. Peak turbulence kinetic energy was caused by the wind shear rather than the buoyancy generated by the fire front. It was also found that the convective Froude number itself may not be sufficient for fire whirl prediction since it is less relevant to the near-surface boundary-layer turbulence generated by environmental wind shear. Observations from this case study indicate that even low-intensity prescribed fires can result in the formation of fire whirls due to mesoscale changes in the ambient atmospheric environment.

  2. Observations of Wind-Induced Motion in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. C.; Palo, S. E.; Zappa, C. J.; LoDolce, G.; Weibel, D.; Lawrence, D.

    2014-12-01

    The increasingly recognized importance of the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) in the global and Arctic climate systems necessitates study of the complex processes at work in the interactions between ice floes, the ocean, and the atmosphere. This study uses observations of surface currents and floe drift speeds to explore the hydrodynamic processes driven by interactions with surface winds surrounding isolated small floes in the Arctic summertime MIZ. The 2013 MIZOPEX campaign flew several unmanned aircraft over the MIZ north of Oliktok Point, AK. These flights had two primary missions: dropping microbuoys into areas of open water between ice floes, and imaging in both thermal and visible using airborne systems. The Air-Deployed Micro Buoys (ADMB) drifted with surface currents, providing a measure of current speeds from the GPS track. ADMB were equipped with a string of thermistors extending two meters below the surface, which measured near-surface temperature gradients. Analysis of visible aerial imagery of ice floes is used to retrieve floe drift speeds from sequential photos by using aircraft telemetry to geolocate the images. Wind speeds from NCEP reanalysis and nearby met data are compared to surface currents and floe drift speeds; surface currents are approximately 4% of wind speeds, which agree well with lab measurements. Thermal imagery from the campaign show cold wakes at the surface near ice floes in certain wind conditions. The spatial view provided by airborne measurements, when combined with subsurface temperature gradients and the relation between drift and current speeds to local wind forcing, paints a picture of the physical interaction between an isolated ice floe in the MIZ and the open water surrounding it.

  3. Understanding the Role of Wind in Reducing the Surface Mass Balance Estimates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; Creyts, T. T.; Bell, R. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Lenaerts, J.; Paden, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. An improved estimate of surface mass balance must include the significant role near-surface wind plays in the sublimation and redistribution of snow across Antarctica. We have developed an empirical model based on airborne radar and lidar observations, and modeled surface mass balance and wind fields to produce a continent-wide prediction of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones have zero to negative surface mass balance, are located over locally steep ice sheet areas (>0.002) and controlled by bedrock topography. The near-surface winds accelerate over these zones, eroding and sublimating the surface snow. This scouring results in numerous localized regions (≤ 200 km2) with reduced surface accumulation. Each year, tens of gigatons of snow on the Antarctic ice sheet are ablated by persistent near-surface katabatic winds over these wind-scour zones. Large uncertainties remain in the surface mass balance estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss through sublimation or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we integrate Operation IceBridge's snow radar over the Recovery Ice Stream with a series of ice core dielectric and depth-density profiles for improved surface mass balance estimates that reflect the mass loss over the wind-scour zones. Accurate surface mass balance estimates from snow radars require spatially variable depth-density profiles. Using an ensemble of firn cores, MODIS-derived surface snow grain size, modeled accumulation rates and surface temperatures from RACMO2, we assemble spatially variable depth-density profiles and use our mapping of snow density variations to estimate layer mass and net accumulation rates from snow radar layer data. Our study improves the quantification of

  4. Wind-driven marine phytoplank blooms: Satellite observation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom is defined as a rapid increase or accumulation in biomass in an aquatic system. It not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g.,Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actuallythe traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms.Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing , this study introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; (2)Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. (3)Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. The proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combined "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. These

  5. High-Energy Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi-Harb, S.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), the inflated bubbles of relativistic particles and magnetic fields injected by neutron stars, provide unique laboratories for probing Nature's most powerful accelerators and the interaction of their winds with the surrounding SN ejecta or ISM. PWNe have become an important legacy of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and currently represent the largest population of identified Galactic very high-energy gamma-ray sources. I will review the growing X-ray and gamma-ray observations of these fascinating objects which, together with radio observations, allow us to infer the physical properties of these systems. I will focus on the PWN diversity among the SNR population, in connection with their debated SN progenitors and environment.

  6. Recent observations of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available A short review of recent observations of solar wind fluctuations in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD range of scales is presented. In recent years, the use of high time-resolution data on an extended interval of heliocentric distance has allowed significant advances in our knowledge of MHD fluctuations. We first focus on the origin and evolution of the Alfvénic-type fluctuations. The role of interplanetary sources and the influence of interactions with structures convected by the solar wind are examined. Then compressive fluctuations are investigated, with special attention being given to their nature and origin. Observations are discussed in the light of recent theories and models. Finally, predictions for MHD turbulence in polar regions of the heliosphere are highlighted.

  7. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, M.D.; Skinner, W.R.; Marshall, A.R.; Hays, P.B.; Lieberman, R.S.; Gell, D.A.; Ortland, D.A.; Morton, Y.T.; Wu, D.L.; Franke, S.J.; Schmidlin, F.J.; Vincent, R.A.

    1993-06-18

    This paper reports wind measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere made by the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). These measurements are correlated with ground based radar and rocket measurements. The HRDI makes measurements by observing doppler shifts in molecular oxygen lines. The intercomparison helps to validate the remote sensing results, helps to verify the on board calibration system, and also gives a common measurement which other measurements systems can be compared against.

  8. Determining Land-Surface Parameters from the ERS Wind Scatterometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodhouse, I.H.; Hoekman, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    The ERS-1 wind scatterometer (WSC) has a resolution cell of about 50 km but provides a high repetition rate (less than four days) and makes measurements at multiple incidence angles. In order to retrieve quantitative geophysical parameters over land surfaces using this instrument, a method is presen

  9. The Influence of Wind on HF Radar Surface Current Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    9 1. Ekman , 1905 .........................................................................................9 2. McNally, Luther and...x THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xi LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Ekman Spiral. – The angle between the wind and the surface current is 45º... Paul Jessen Terry Rago Superv. Gen. Eng. Robert Wyland I also appreciate the Oceanography and Meteorology/Oceanography students

  10. Observations of turbulence and fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Observational and theoretical studies of turbulent fluctuations in space plasma have been ongoing for many years. There are still many unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of the fluctuations in the heliosphere. This work pursues the subject and uses Voyage 1 and 2, and ISEE-3 measurements to study the evolution of solar-wind plasma and the magnetic field between heliocentric distances of 1 and 20 AU and to more than 25/sup 0/ in latitude above the ecliptic plane. Parker's 1958 solar-wind model is found to be accurate to within 5% in predicting the behavior of long-term (solar rotation) averages in the interplanetary magnetic field when time dependencies in the bulk plasma speed are included. No evidence was found of flux loss in the outer heliosphere as recently reported in the literature. Methods of turbulence analysis and are used to organize the observations and several predictions and expectations of ideal MHD turbulence theory are tested. Spectral indices expected for inertial-range turbulence are present in much of the data analyzed, and this inertial range is found in increasingly larger spatial scales with increasing radial distance from the sun. Evidence for inverse cascade of magnetic helicity is observed in selected intervals, although this was not found to be true in general in the solar wind.

  11. CFOSAT: A new Chinese-French satellite for joint observations of ocean wind vector and directional spectra of ocean waves

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Danièle; Tison, Céline; Amiot, Thierry; Delaye, Lauriane; Mouche, Alexis; Guitton, Gilles; Aouf, Lotfi; Castillan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; CFOSAT (the China France Oceanography Satellite) is a joint mission from the Chinese and French Space Agencies, devoted to the observation ocean surface wind and waves so as to improve wind and wave forecast for marine meteorology, ocean dynamics modeling and prediction, climate variability knowledge, fundamental knowledge of surface processes. Currently under Phase D (manufacturing phase), the launch is now planned for mid-2018 the later. The CFOSAT will carry two pay...

  12. Wind-Speed—Surface-Heat-Flux Feedback in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junshi; Niino, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Strong winds associated with dust devils can induce locally large heat fluxes from the surface, and resulting enhanced buoyancy may further intensify the dust devils. This positive wind—surface-heat-flux feedback is studied using a large-eddy simulation of a convective boundary layer. A comparison of the results with and without the feedback process for the same environment demonstrates the significance of the feedback process for simulated dust devils.

  13. Effects of winds, tides and storm surges on ocean surface waves in the Sea of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; TIAN Jiwei; LI Peiliang; HOU Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are strongly forced by high wind conditions associated with winter storms in the Sea of Japan. They are also modulated by tides and storm surges. The effects of the variability in surface wind forcing, tides and storm surges on the waves are investigated using a wave model, a high-resolution atmospheric mesoscale model and a hydrodynamic ocean circulation model. Five month-long wave model simulations are inducted to examine the sensitivity of ocean waves to various wind forcing fields, tides and storm surges during January 1997. Compared with observed mean wave parameters, results indicate that the high frequency variability in the surface wind filed has very great effect on wave simulation. Tides and storm surges have a significant impact on the waves in nearshores of the Tsushima-kaihyō, but not for other regions in the Sea of Japan. High spatial and temporal resolution and good quality surface wind products will be crucial for the prediction of surface waves in the JES and other marginal seas, especially near the coastal regions.

  14. Locust displacing winds in eastern Australia reassessed with observations from an insect monitoring radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhenhua; Drake, V. Alistair; Sidhu, Leesa; Taylor, John R.

    2017-07-01

    Based on previous investigations, adult Australian plague locusts are believed to migrate on warm nights (with evening temperatures >25 °C), provided daytime flight is suppressed by surface winds greater than the locusts' flight speed, which has been shown to be 3.1 m s-1. Moreover, adult locusts are believed to undertake briefer `dispersal' flights on nights with evening temperature >20 °C. To reassess the utility of these conditions for forecasting locust flight, contingency tests were conducted comparing the nights selected on these bases (predicted nights) for the months of November, January, and March and the nights when locust migration were detected with an insect monitoring radar (actual nights) over a 7-year period. In addition, the wind direction distributions and mean wind directions on all predicted nights and actual nights were compared. Observations at around 395 m above ground level (AGL), the height at which radar observations have shown that the greatest number of locusts fly, were used to determine the actual nights. Tests and comparisons were also made for a second height, 990 m AGL, as this was used in the previous investigation. Our analysis shows that the proposed criteria are successful from predicting migratory flight only in March, when the surface temperature is effective as a predicting factor. Surface wind speed has no predicting power. It is suggested that a strong daytime surface wind speed requirement should not be considered and other meteorological variables need to be added to the requirement of a warm surface temperature around dusk for the predictions to have much utility.

  15. Error estimates for ocean surface winds: Applying Desroziers diagnostics to the Cross-Calibrated, Multi-Platform analysis of wind speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ross N.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Leidner, S. Mark; Smith, Deborah K.; Atlas, Robert M.

    2013-04-01

    The cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind project [Atlas et al., 2011] generates high-quality, high-resolution, vector winds over the world's oceans beginning with the 1987 launch of the SSM/I F08, using Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) microwave satellite wind retrievals, as well as in situ observations from ships and buoys. The variational analysis method [VAM, Hoffman et al., 2003] is at the center of the CCMP project's analysis procedures for combining observations of the wind. The VAM was developed as a smoothing spline and so implicitly defines the background error covariance by means of several constraints with adjustable weights, and does not provide an explicit estimate of the analysis error. Here we report on our research to develop uncertainty estimates for wind speed for the VAM inputs and outputs, i.e., for the background (B), the observations (O) and the analysis (A) wind speed, based on the Desroziers et al. [2005] diagnostics (DD hereafter). The DD are applied to the CCMP ocean surface wind data sets to estimate wind speed errors of the ECMWF background, the microwave satellite observations and the resulting CCMP analysis. The DD confirm that the ECMWF operational surface wind speed error standard deviations vary with latitude in the range 0.7-1.5 m/s and that the cross-calibrated Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) wind speed retrievals standard deviations are in the range 0.5-0.8 m/s. Further the estimated CCMP analysis wind speed standard deviations are in the range 0.2-0.4 m/s. The results suggests the need to revise the parameterization of the errors due to the FGAT (first guess at the appropriate time) procedure. Errors for wind speeds S. M. Leidner, J. C. Jusem, D. K. Smith, and D. Gombos, A cross-calibrated, multi-platform ocean surface wind velocity product for meteorological and oceanographic applications, Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 92, 157-174, 2011, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2946.1. Desroziers, G., L. Berre, B. Chapnik, and P. Poli

  16. Blended 6-Hourly Sea Surface Wind Vectors and Wind Stress on a Global 0.25 Degree Grid (1987-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Blended Global Sea Surface Winds products contain ocean surface wind vectors and wind stress on a global 0.25 degree grid, in multiple time resolutions of...

  17. Near-nadir microwave specular returns from the sea surface - Altimeter algorithms for wind and wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been adopted to construct altimeter wind algorithms: one is based on the mean-square sea surface slope, and the other is based on the Seasat scatterometer wind. Both types of algorithms are critically reviewed with respect to the mechanism governing near-nadir sea returns and the comparison between altimeter and buoy winds. A new algorithm is proposed; it is deduced on the basis of microwave specular reflection and is finely tuned with buoy-measured winds. On the basis of this algorithm and the formula of the wind-stress coefficient, a simple wind-stress algorithm is also proposed.

  18. Modeling and Observing the Role of Wind-Waves in Titan's Hydrocarbon Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Soderblom, J. M.; Donelan, M. A.; Barnes, J. W.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Oceanography is no longer just an Earth Science. Standing bodies of liquid that interact with both atmospheric and surface reservoirs are known to exist on Titan and are thought to have existed on early Mars. The exchange of heat, moisture, and momentum between lakes/seas and the atmosphere are of fundamental importance to the hydrologic systems of all three bodies. On Earth, surface liquids are almost always disturbed by some form of wave activity. On Titan, however, Cassini observations through the end of the Equinox Mission (12/2010) showed no indication of surface waves. This was intriguing given the predominance of aeolian features at equatorial latitudes and has been attributed to the light winds predicted during the Titan winter. More recently, the previous series of upper limits and non-detections have given way to indications that the expected freshening of winds in northern summer is causing sporadic ruffling of sea surfaces. Specifically, apparent sunglints offset from the geometric specular point have become a common observation by VIMS and transient radar signatures have been observed over the surfaces of both Ligeia Mare and Kraken Mare. SAR images also reveal morphologies consistent with secondary coastlines, most notably Ontario Lacus and Ligeia Mare. This presentation will review Cassini observations of transient surface activity on Titan's Mare and quantitatively describe the implied constraints on sea surface roughness. Assuming that the transient activity is due to wind waves, we can turn the Cassini spacecraft into an anemometer by coupling roughness constraints to a physics-based model of wave generation and propagation in the Titan environment. By determining the fraction of the lake surface that is oriented in a specific geometry, which can be obtained from either nadir RADAR backscatter or VIMS specular reflection measurements, we can determine the driving wind speeds that best match the observations by matching the fraction of the

  19. Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Popecki, M. A.; Lugaz, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Dept. of Physics, Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, University of Helsinki (Finland); Moestl, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria and Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (CNRS-UPS), Universite de Toulouse, F-31038, Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-13

    Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s{sup -1}) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By 'small' we mean a duration from {approx}1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfven Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of {approx}4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton {beta}= 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s{sup -1}; and (iv) Alfven Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

  20. Deterministic nature of the underlying dynamics of surface wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sreelekshmi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modelling the fluctuations of the Earth's surface wind has a significant role in understanding the dynamics of atmosphere besides its impact on various fields ranging from agriculture to structural engineering. Most of the studies on the modelling and prediction of wind speed and power reported in the literature are based on statistical methods or the probabilistic distribution of the wind speed data. In this paper we investigate the suitability of a deterministic model to represent the wind speed fluctuations by employing tools of nonlinear dynamics. We have carried out a detailed nonlinear time series analysis of the daily mean wind speed data measured at Thiruvananthapuram (8.483° N,76.950° E from 2000 to 2010. The results of the analysis strongly suggest that the underlying dynamics is deterministic, low-dimensional and chaotic suggesting the possibility of accurate short-term prediction. As most of the chaotic systems are confined to laboratories, this is another example of a naturally occurring time series showing chaotic behaviour.

  1. Deterministic nature of the underlying dynamics of surface wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelekshmi, R. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2012-10-01

    Modelling the fluctuations of the Earth's surface wind has a significant role in understanding the dynamics of atmosphere besides its impact on various fields ranging from agriculture to structural engineering. Most of the studies on the modelling and prediction of wind speed and power reported in the literature are based on statistical methods or the probabilistic distribution of the wind speed data. In this paper we investigate the suitability of a deterministic model to represent the wind speed fluctuations by employing tools of nonlinear dynamics. We have carried out a detailed nonlinear time series analysis of the daily mean wind speed data measured at Thiruvananthapuram (8.483° N,76.950° E) from 2000 to 2010. The results of the analysis strongly suggest that the underlying dynamics is deterministic, low-dimensional and chaotic suggesting the possibility of accurate short-term prediction. As most of the chaotic systems are confined to laboratories, this is another example of a naturally occurring time series showing chaotic behaviour.

  2. Retrieval algorithm of sea surface wind vectors for WindSat based on a simple forward model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yili

    2013-01-01

    WindSat/Coriolis is the first satellite-borne polarimetric microwave radiometer,which aims to improve the potential of polarimetric microwave radiometry for measuring sea surface wind vectors from space.In this paper,a wind vector retrieval algorithm based on a novel and simple forward model was developed for WindSat.The retrieval algorithm of sea surface wind speed was developed using multiple linear regression based on the simulation dataset of the novel forward model.Sea surface wind directions that minimize the difference between simulated and measured values of the third and fourth Stokes parameters were found using maximum likelihood estimation,by which a group of ambiguous wind directions was obtained.A median filter was then used to remove ambiguity of wind direction.Evaluated with sea surface wind speed and direction data from the U.S.National Data Buoy Center (NDBC),root mean square errors are 1.2 m/s and 30° for retrieved wind speed and wind direction,respectively.The evaluation results suggest that the simple forward model and the retrieval algorithm are practicable for near-real time applications,without reducing accuracy.

  3. The climate influence of anthropogenic land-use changes on near-surface wind energy potential in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; WANG Yuan; CHU HuiYun; TANG JianPing

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the potential impact of climate change on wind energy in China. The climate change of near-surface wind energy potential in China under the background of global warming and its association with anthropogenic land-use changes are investigated by calculating the difference in surface wind speeds between the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and the observations since the re-analysis dataset contains the influence of large-scale climate changes due to greenhouse gases, it is less sensitive to regional surface processes associated with land types. The surface wind data in this study consist of long-tarm observations from 604 Chinese Roution Meteorological Stations and theNCEP/NCAR reanalysis data from 1960-1999. The results suggest that the observed mean wind speeds significantly weakened and the near-surface wind power trended downward due to urbanization and other land-use changes in the last 40 years. The mean wind energy weakened by -3.84 W·m-2 per decade due to the influence of anthropogenic land-use change, which is close to the observed climate change (-4.51 W·m-2/10 a).

  4. Observational Signatures of Galactic Winds Powered by Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nims, Jesse; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2014-01-01

    We predict the observational signatures of galaxy scale outflows powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Most of the emission is produced by the forward shock driven into the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) rather than by the reverse shock. AGN powered galactic winds with energetics suggested by phenomenological feedback arguments should produce spatially extended 1-10 keV X-ray emission of 10^(41-44) erg/s, significantly in excess of the spatially extended X-ray emission associated with normal star forming galaxies. The presence of such emission is a direct test of whether AGN outflows significantly interact with the ISM of their host galaxy. We further show that even radio quiet quasars should have a radio luminosity comparable to or in excess of the far infrared-radio correlation of normal star forming galaxies. This radio emission directly constrains the total kinetic energy flux in AGN-powered galactic winds. Radio emission from AGN wind shocks can also explain the recently highlighted correlations be...

  5. Energy transfer of surface wind-induced currents to the deep ocean via resonance with the Coriolis force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2017-03-01

    There are two main comparable sources of energy to the deep ocean-winds and tides. However, the identity of the most efficient mechanism that transfers wind energy to the deep ocean is still debated. Here we study, using oceanic general circulation model simulations and analytic derivations, the way that the wind directly supplies energy down to the bottom of the ocean when it is stochastic and temporally correlated or when it is periodic with a frequency that matches the Coriolis frequency. Basically, under these, commonly observed, conditions, one of the wind components resonates with the Coriolis frequency. Using reanalysis surface wind data and our simple model, we show that about one-third of the kinetic energy that is associated with wind-induced currents resides in the abyssal ocean, highlighting the importance of the resonance of the wind with the Coriolis force.

  6. The Ability of Radio Heliospheric Remote Sensing Observations to Provide Global Solar Wind Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Yu, H.; Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R.

    2012-12-01

    Heliospheric remote sensing, in particular those using Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) observations, allow the 3-D reconstruction of solar wind parameters globally. These parameters include velocity, density, and by extrapolation from solar surface magnetogram observations, vector magnetic field components. Since the year 2000, the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Nagoya University, Japan, has provided a source of IPS data with short-enough latency to enable forecasts of these solar wind parameters throughout the inner heliosphere. Over time these techniques have been improved upon with data from other radio sites (Ootacamund - Ooty - India; and the European Incoherent SCATter - EISCAT - radio telescopes based across Northern Scandinavia). Here we review the improvements, limitations, and the potential future of these techniques. In particular in one new development, the ability to measure polarization from radio sources allows the possibility to use Faraday rotation inputs to reconstruct heliospheric vector magnetic fields without a reliance on solar surface magnetic field extrapolation.

  7. Retrieval of vertical wind profiles during monsoon from satellite observed winds over the Indian Ocean using complex EOF analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C M Kishtawal; Sujit Basu; S Karthikeyan

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the feasibility of deriving vertical wind profiles from current satellite observations. With this aim, we carried out complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis of a large number of radiosonde observations of wind profiles over the Indian Ocean during the monsoon months. It has been found that the first two CEOFs explain 67% of the total variance in wind fields. While the first principal component is well correlated with the winds at 850 mb ( = 0.80), the second one is highly correlated with winds at 200 mb ( = 0.89). This analysis formed the basis of a retrieval algorithm which ensures the retrieval of vertical profiles of winds using satellite tracked cloud motion vector winds. Under the assumption that accurate measurements of wind are available at the above mentioned levels, the r.m.s. error of retrieval of each component of wind is estimated to range between 2ms-1 and 6ms-1 at different levels, which is much less than the natural variance of winds at these levels. For a better visualization of retrieval, we have provided retrieved and true wind profiles side by side for four typical synoptic conditions during the monsoon season.

  8. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Sarkar; Sujit Basu; A K Varma; Jignesh Kshatriya

    2002-09-01

    The nature of the inherent temporal variability of surface winds is analyzed by comparison of winds obtained through different measurement methods. In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time series data available for 240 hours in the month of May, 1999 were subjected to an auto-correlation analysis. The analysis indicates an exponential fall of the auto- correlation in the first few hours with a decorrelation time scale of about 6 hours. For a meaningful comparison between satellite derived products and in situ data, satellite data acquired at different time intervals should be used with appropriate `weights', rather than treating the data as concurrent in time. This paper presents a scheme for temporal weighting using the auto-correlation analysis. These temporal `weights' can potentially improve the root mean square (rms) deviation between satellite and in situ measurements. A case study using the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Indian Ocean buoy wind speed data resulted in an improvement of about 10%.

  9. Effect of wind turbine wakes on cropland surface fluxes in the US Great Plains during a Nocturnal Low Level Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. E.; Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Takle, E. S.; Prueger, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Installation of large scale wind farms is becoming a common operation in the Midwest, and wind farms frequently are situated among fields of agricultural crops. Each wind turbine is known to alter the behavior of the air mass downwind of the rotor; consequently, the rotor wakes alter the local microclimate. Quantification of the effects of wind turbine wakes on local microclimate is required to understand how large-scale wind deployment affects large-scale agriculture. This study examines the potential effect of wind turbine wakes on a corn crop in central Iowa during summer 2010. The field site consisted of one surface flux tower upwind of a row of five modern wind turbine generators, an identical surface flux station downwind of the turbine row, and a ground based LIDAR system downwind of the wind turbines. Each flux tower was instrumented with an array consisting of radiometers, a three-dimensional sonic anemometer, an open cell CO2 analyzer, a cup anemometer and wind vane, temperature and relative humidity sensors, and a tipping bucket. The LIDAR system reliably obtained readings up to 200 m above ground level (AGL), spanning the entire rotor disk (~40 m to 120 m AGL). This presentation examines wake-surface interaction on one particular night, during which the prevailing winds situated the LIDAR directly behind a wind turbine approximately 2 rotor diameters downwind of the turbine tower. As expected preliminary LIDAR results indicate that in the turbine rotor shadow there is a strong deficit of horizontal momentum. Additionally, a strong nocturnal low-level jet occurred above the turbine rotor disk. Wavelet spectral analysis indicates that oscillatory behavior, with frequencies characteristic of wind turbine wakes, is observed in the LIDAR horizontal and vertical winds and in the downwind flux station datastreams. The characterization of wake effects provided by this unique dataset will allow for better parameterization and modeling of wind turbine wake

  10. Winds on the West Florida Shelf: Regional comparisons between observations and model estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2017-02-01

    Wind fields on the West Florida Continental Shelf are investigated using observations from five University of South Florida Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System buoys and seven of NOAA's National Ocean Service and National Weather Service, National Data Buoy Center stations or buoys spanning the 10 year period, 2004-2013. These observations are compared with NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis wind fields (NCEP winds). The analyses consist of vector correlations in both the time and frequency domains. The primary findings are that winds observed on and near the coastline underestimate those observed offshore and that NCEP winds derived from assimilating mostly land-based observations also underestimate winds observed offshore. With regard to wind stress, and depending upon location, wind stress derived from NCEP winds are 6%-49% lower than what is computed from observations over open water. A corollary is that wind forcing fields that are underestimated may result in coastal ocean model circulation fields that are also underestimated. These analyses stress the importance of having offshore wind observations, and suggest that adding more offshore wind observations will lead to improved coastal ocean wind fields and hence to improved model renditions of coastal ocean model circulation and related water property fields.

  11. Mesoscale Near-Surface Wind Speed Variability Mapping with Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George; Sikora, Todd; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2008-11-05

    Operationally-significant wind speed variability is often observed within synthetic aperture radar-derived wind speed (SDWS) images of the sea surface. This paper is meant as a first step towards automated distinguishing of meteorological phenomena responsible for such variability. In doing so, the research presented in this paper tests feature extraction and pixel aggregation techniques focused on mesoscale variability of SDWS. A sample of twenty eight SDWS images possessing varying degrees of near-surface wind speed variability were selected to serve as case studies. Gaussian high- and low-pass, local entropy, and local standard deviation filters performed well for the feature extraction portion of the research while principle component analysis of the filtered data performed well for the pixel aggregation. The findings suggest recommendations for future research.

  12. Surface Weather Observations (Pre-1893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly weather records from U.S. Army Forts stations (~1820-1871), U.S. Army Signal Service Stations (1871-1892), Smithsonian Institution voluntary observer network...

  13. Observations and Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations are a ubiquitous component of the solar wind. Evidence from many spacecraft indicates that the fluctuations are convected out of the solar corona with relatively flat power spectra and constitute a source of free energy for a turbulent cascade of magnetic and kinetic energy to high wave numbers. Observations and simulations support the conclusion that the cascade evolves most rapidly in the vicinity of velocity shears and current sheets. Numerical solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations have elucidated the role of expansion on the evolution of the turbulence. Such studies are clarifying not only how a turbulent cascade develops, but also the nature of the symmetries of the turbulence. Of particular interest is the origin of the two-component correlation function of magnetic fluctuations that was deduced from ISEE-3 data. A central issue to be resolved is whether the correlation function indicates the existence of a quasi-two- dimensional component of the turbulence, or reflects another origin, such as pressure-balanced structures or small velocity shears. In our efforts to simulate solar wind turbulence we have included a tilted rotating current heliospheric sheet as well as variety of waves (e.g., Alfvénic, quasi-two-dimensional, pressure balance structures) and microstreams. These simulations have replicated many of the observations, but challenges remain.

  14. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to QuikSCAT and moored buoy winds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B N Goswami; E N Rajagopal

    2003-03-01

    The quality of the surface wind analysis at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCMRWF), New Delhi over the tropical Indian Ocean and its improvement in 2001 are examined by comparing it with in situ buoy measurements and satellite derived surface winds from NASA QuikSCAT satellite (QSCT) during 1999, 2000 and 2001. The NCMRWF surface winds su ered from easterly bias of 1.0-1.5 ms-1 in the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) and northerly bias of 2.0-3.0 ms-1 in the south equatorial IO during 1999 and 2000 compared to QSCT winds. The amplitude of daily variability was also underestimated compared to that in QSCT. In particular, the amplitude of daily variability of NCMRWF winds in the eastern equatorial IO was only about 60% of that of QSCT during 1999 and 2000. The NCMRWF surface winds during 2001 have significantly improved with the bias of the mean analyzed winds considerably reduced everywhere bringing it to within 0.5 ms-1 of QSCT winds in the equatorial IO. The amplitude and phase of daily and intraseasonal variability are very close to that in QSCT almost everywhere during 2001. It is shown that the weakness in the surface wind analysis during 1999 and 2000 and its improvement in 2001 are related to the weakness in simulation of precipitation by the forecast model in the equatorial IO and its improvement in 2001.

  15. Impact of non-uniform surface magnetic fields on stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2005-01-01

    Observations of active stars reveal highly non-uniform surface distributions of magnetic flux. Theoretical models considering magnetised stellar winds however often presume uniform surface magnetic fields, characterised by a single magnetic field strength. The present work investigates the impact of non-uniform surface magnetic field distributions on the stellar mass and angular momentum loss rates. The approach of Weber & Davis (1967) is extended to non-equatorial latitudes to quantify the impact of latitude-dependent magnetic field distributions over a large range of stellar rotation rates and thermal wind properties. The analytically prescribed field patterns are dominated by magnetic flux concentrations at intermediate and high latitudes. The global stellar mass loss rates are found to be rather insensitive to non-uniformities of the surface magnetic field. Depending on the non-uniformity of the field distribution, the angular momentum loss rates deviate in contrast at all rotation rates between -60% ...

  16. Observations of the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Coplan, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements made by the Isee 3 ion composition experiment have been used to determine the kinetic temperatures of 3He(++), 4He(++), 16O(6+), and 16O(7+) in the solar wind. It is found that these temperatures generally obey the relation that T(i)/m(i) equals const, but fluctuations, some of which are caused by dynamical effects in the flow, are observed. The temperature of oxygen sometimes rises above 10 K, which is very strong evidence for heating outside the collisional region of the corona. The tendency toward equal temperatures per nucleon occurs everywhere where collisions are unimportant, suggesting that the temperatures are set up close to the sun rather than elsewhere in the interplanetary medium. The velocity distribution function of helium is observed to be non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high velocity tail.

  17. CYGNSS Spaceborne Constellation for Ocean Surface Winds: Mission Design and Sampling Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Chris; Ridley, Aaron; Clarizia, Maria Paola; Gleason, Scott; Rose, Randall; Scherrer, John

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Earth Venture Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a spaceborne mission scheduled to launch in October 2016 that is focused on tropical cyclone (TC) inner core process studies. CYGNSS is specifically designed to address the inadequacy in observations of the inner core that result from two causes: 1) much of the inner core ocean surface is obscured from conventional remote sensing instruments by intense precipitation in the eye wall and inner rain bands; and 2) the rapidly evolving (genesis and intensification) stages of the TC life cycle are poorly sampled in time by conventional polar-orbiting, wide-swath surface wind imagers. CYGNSS measurements of bistatic radar cross section of the ocean can be directly related to the near surface wind speed, in a manner roughly analogous to that of conventional ocean wind scatterometers. The technique has been demonstrated previously from space by the UK-DMC mission in 2005-6. CYGNSS will advance the wind measuring capability demonstrated by the experimental payload on UK-DMC to a more mature ocean science mission. The CYGNSS constellation is comprised of 8 observatories in 500 km circular orbits at a common inclination angle of 35°. Each observatory contains a Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) which consists of a multi-channel GPS receiver, a low gain zenith antenna and two high gain nadir antennas. Each DDMI measures simultaneous specular scattered signals from the 4 GPS transmitters with the highest probable signal-to-noise ratio. The receivers coherently integrate the received signals for 1 ms, then incoherently integrate on board for an additional one second. This results in 32 wind measurements per second. CYGNSS has spatial and temporal sampling properties that are distinctly different from conventional wide-swath polar imagers. Spatial sampling is marked by 32 simultaneous single pixel "swaths" that are 25 km wide and, typically, 100s of km long. They can be considered roughly

  18. The Impact of Sea-Surface Winds on Meteorological Conditions in Israel: An Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Saaroni, H.; Atlas, R.; Ardizzone, J.; Ben-Dor, E.; Druyan, L.; Jusem, C. J.; Karnieli, A.; Terry, J.

    2000-01-01

    The SSM/I (Spectral Sensor Microwave Imager) dataset is used to monitor surface wind speed and direction at four locations over the Eastern Mediterranean during December 1998 - January 1999. Time series of these data are compared to concurrent series of precipitation, surface temperature, humidity and winds at selected Israeli stations: Sde Dov (coastal), Bet Dagan (5 km. inland), Jerusalem (Judean Hills), Hafetz Haim (3 km. inland) and Sde Boker (central Negev). December 1998 and the beginning of January 1999 were dry in Israel, but significant precipitation was recorded at many stations during the second half of January (1999). SSM/I data show a surge in westerly surface winds west of Israel (32 N, 32.5 E) on 15 January, coinciding with the renewal of precipitation. We discuss the relevant circulation and pressure patterns during this transition in the context of the evolving meteorological conditions at the selected Israeli locations. The SSM/I dataset of near ocean surface winds, available for the last 12 years, is described. We analyze lagged correlation between these data and the Israeli station data and investigate possibility of predictive skill. Application of such relationships to short-term weather prediction would require real-time access to the SSM/I observations.

  19. Projected changes to surface wind characteristics and extremes over North America in CRCM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dae Il; Sushama, Laxmi

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the tendency of wind speed and direction have significant implications for long-term water cycle, air pollution, arid and semiarid environments, fire activity, and wind energy production. Furthermore, changes in wind extremes have direct impacts on buildings, infrastructures, agriculture, power lines, and trees. This study evaluates projected changes to wind speed characteristics (i.e., seasonal and annual mean, seasonal and diurnal cycles, directional distribution, and extreme events) for the future 2071-2100 period, with respect to the current 1981-2010 period over North America, using four different simulations from the fifth-generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) with two driving GCMs under RCP (Representative Concentration Pathways) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The CRCM5 simulates the climatology of mean sea level pressure gradient and associated wind direction over North America well when compared to ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The CRCM5 also reproduces properly the spatial distributions of observed seasonal and annual mean wind speeds obtained from 611 meteorological stations across North America. The CRCM5 simulations generally suggest an increase in future mean wind speed for northern and eastern parts of Canada, due to a decrease of future mean sea level pressure and more intense low pressure air circulation systems already situated in those regions such as Aleutian and Icelandic Lows. Projected changes to annual maximum wind speed show more spatial variability compared to seasonal and annual mean wind speed as extreme wind speed is influenced more by regional-scale features associated with instantaneous surface temperature and air pressure gradients. The CRCM5 simulations suggest some increases in the future 50-year return levels of wind speed, mainly due to changes in the inter-annual variability of annual maximum wind speed. However, the projected changes vary in spatial pattern with the driving GCM fields and emission scenarios

  20. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes over southern Indian peninsula station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M N Patil; R T Waghmare; T Dharmaraj; G R Chinthalu; Devendraa Siingh; G S Meena

    2016-10-01

    Surface to atmosphere exchange has received much attention in numerical weather prediction models. This exchange is defined by turbulent parameters such as frictional velocity, drag coefficient and heat fluxes, which have to be derived experimentally from high-frequency observations. High-frequency measurementsof wind speed, air temperature and water vapour mixing ratio (eddy covariance measurements), were made during the Integrated Ground Observation Campaign (IGOC) of Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) at Mahabubnagar, India (16◦44'N, 77◦59'E) in the south-west monsoon season. Using these observations, an attempt was made to investigatethe behaviour of the turbulent parameters, mentioned above, with respect to wind speed. We found that the surface layer stability derived from the Monin–Obukhov length scale, is well depicted by the magnitude of wind speed, i.e., the atmospheric boundary layer was under unstable regime for wind speeds greater than 4 m s−1; under stable regime for wind speeds less than 2 m s−1 and under neutral regime for wind speeds in the range of 2–3 m s$^{−1}$. All the three stability regimes were mixed for wind speeds 3–4 m s$^{−1}$. The drag coefficient shows scatter variation with wind speed in stable as well as unstable conditions.

  1. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes over southern Indian peninsula station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, M. N.; Waghmare, R. T.; Dharmaraj, T.; Chinthalu, G. R.; Siingh, Devendraa; Meena, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Surface to atmosphere exchange has received much attention in numerical weather prediction models. This exchange is defined by turbulent parameters such as frictional velocity, drag coefficient and heat fluxes, which have to be derived experimentally from high-frequency observations. High-frequency measurements of wind speed, air temperature and water vapour mixing ratio (eddy covariance measurements), were made during the Integrated Ground Observation Campaign (IGOC) of Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) at Mahabubnagar, India (16∘44'N, 77∘59'E) in the south-west monsoon season. Using these observations, an attempt was made to investigate the behaviour of the turbulent parameters, mentioned above, with respect to wind speed. We found that the surface layer stability derived from the Monin-Obukhov length scale, is well depicted by the magnitude of wind speed, i.e., the atmospheric boundary layer was under unstable regime for wind speeds >4 m s-1; under stable regime for wind speeds <2 m s-1 and under neutral regime for wind speeds in the range of 2-3 m s-1. All the three stability regimes were mixed for wind speeds 3-4 m s-1. The drag coefficient shows scatter variation with wind speed in stable as well as unstable conditions.

  2. Recent progress in astrophysical plasma turbulence from solar wind observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the recent progress that has been made in understanding astrophysical plasma turbulence in the solar wind, from in situ spacecraft observations. At large scales, where the turbulence is predominantly Alfvenic, measurements of critical balance, residual energy, and 3D structure are discussed, along with comparison to recent models of strong Alfvenic turbulence. At these scales, a few percent of the energy is also in compressive fluctuations, and their nature, anisotropy, and relation to the Alfvenic component is described. In the small scale kinetic range, below the ion gyroscale, the turbulence becomes predominantly kinetic Alfven in nature, and measurements of the spectra, anisotropy, and intermittency of this turbulence are discussed with respect to recent cascade models. One of the major remaining questions is how the turbulent energy is dissipated, and some recent work on this question, in addition to future space missions which will help to answer it, are briefly discussed.

  3. Responses of the Tropical Pacific to Wind Forcing as Observed by Spaceborne Sensors and Simulated by an Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Qenqing; Atlas, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this study, satellite observations, in situ measurements, and model simulations are combined to assess the oceanic response to surface wind forcing in the equatorial Pacific. The surface wind fields derived from observations by the spaceborne special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and from the operational products of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are compared. When SSM/I winds are used to force a primitive-equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM), they produce 3 C more surface cooling than ECMWF winds for the eastern equatorial Pacific during the cool phase of an El Nino-Southern Oscillation event. The stronger cooling by SSM/I winds is in good agreement with measurements at the moored buoys and observations by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, indicating that SSM/I winds are superior to ECMWF winds in forcing the tropical ocean. In comparison with measurements from buoys, tide gauges, and the Geosat altimeter, the OGCM simulates the temporal variations of temperature, steric, and sea level changes with reasonable realism when forced with the satellite winds. There are discrepancies between model simulations and observations that are common to both wind forcing fields, one of which is the simulation of zonal currents; they could be attributed to model deficiencies. By examining model simulations under two winds, vertical heat advection and uplifting of the thermocline are found to be the dominant factors in the anomalous cooling of the ocean mixed layer.

  4. Effective wind speed estimation: Comparison between Kalman Filter and Takagi-Sugeno observer techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauterin, Eckhard; Kammerer, Philipp; Kühn, Martin; Schulte, Horst

    2016-05-01

    Advanced model-based control of wind turbines requires knowledge of the states and the wind speed. This paper benchmarks a nonlinear Takagi-Sugeno observer for wind speed estimation with enhanced Kalman Filter techniques: The performance and robustness towards model-structure uncertainties of the Takagi-Sugeno observer, a Linear, Extended and Unscented Kalman Filter are assessed. Hence the Takagi-Sugeno observer and enhanced Kalman Filter techniques are compared based on reduced-order models of a reference wind turbine with different modelling details. The objective is the systematic comparison with different design assumptions and requirements and the numerical evaluation of the reconstruction quality of the wind speed. Exemplified by a feedforward loop employing the reconstructed wind speed, the benefit of wind speed estimation within wind turbine control is illustrated.

  5. Field and numerical study of wind and surface waves at short fetches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grants No. 15-35-20953, 14-05-00367, 15-45-02580) and project ASIST of FP7. The field experiment is supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 15-17-20009), numerical simulations are partially supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 14-17-00667). References 1. A.V. Babanin, V.K. Makin Effects of wind trend and gustiness on the sea drag: Lake George study // Journal of Geophysical Research, 2008, 113, C02015, doi:10.1029/2007JC004233 2. S.S. Atakturk, K.B. Katsaros Wind Stress and Surface Waves Observed on Lake Washington // Journal of Physical Oceanography, 1999, 29, pp. 633-650 3. Kuznetsova A.M., Baydakov G.A., Papko V.V., Kandaurov A.A., Vdovin M.I., Sergeev D.A., Troitskaya Yu.I. Adjusting of wind input source term in WAVEWATCH III model for the middle-sized water body on the basis of the field experiment // Hindawi Publishing Corporation, Advances in Meteorology, 2016, Vol. 1, article ID 574602 4. G.A. Baydakov, A.M. Kuznetsova, D.A. Sergeev, V.V. Papko, A.A. Kandaurov, M.I. Vdovin, and Yu.I. Troitskaya Field study and numerical modeling of wind and surface waves at the middle-sized water body // Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol.17, EGU2015-9427, Vienne, Austria, 2015.

  6. Features of wind field over the sea surface in the coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzikova, A. K.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Myasoedov, A. G.; Chapron, B.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze SAR wind field features, in particular the effects of wind shadowing. These effects represent the dynamics of the internal atmospheric boundary layer, which is formed due to the transition of the air flow arriving from the rough land surface to the "smooth" water surface. In the wind-shadowed area, the flow accelerates, and a surface wind stress increases with fetch. The width of the shadow depends not only on the wind speed and atmospheric boundary layer stratification, but also on geographic features such as windflow multiple transformations over the complex surface land-Lake Chudskoe-land-Gulf of Finland. Measurements showed that, in the area of wind acceleration, the surface stress normalized by an equilibrium value (far from the coast) is a universal function of dimensionless fetch Xf/G. Surface wind stress reaches an equilibrium value at Xf/G ≈ 0.4, which is the scale of the planetary-boundary-layer relaxation.

  7. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  8. Gela, Italy, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-03

    manual table is also presented for surface wind meeting INSTHUINTE CLASS conditions as follows: Ceiling 200 through lh0 feet inclusive with visibility...OBSERVATIONS Ui AFETAC 0 8 5 tCI . A] yo s 0 Oi T’. UMAEo.-St! -I AL L MT AtL’ ~Ck WID T A SURFACE WINDS - F .EArH: ST VI "t L PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND...temperature Lombined; tuid again for dry-bulb, wet-bulb, and dew-point tempera - tures separately. Total observations for thc.;e four Items is also

  9. Space Weathering of the Lunar Surface by Solar Wind Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsoo S.; Sim, Chaekyung

    2017-08-01

    The lunar regolith is space-weathered to a different degree in response to the different fluxes of incident solar wind particles and micrometeoroids. Crater walls, among other slating surfaces, are good tracers of the space-weathering process because they mature differently depending on the varying incident angles of weathering agents. We divide a crater wall into four quadrants (north, south, east, and west) and analyze the distribution of 950-nm/750-nm reflectance-ratio and 750-nm reflectance values in each wall quadrant, using the topography-corrected images by Multispectral Imager (MI) onboard SELENE (Kaguya). For thousands of impact craters across the Moon, we interpret the spectral distributions in the four wall quadrants in terms of the space weathering by solar wind particles and micrometeoroids and of gardening by meteroids. We take into account the solar-wind shielding by the Earth’s magnetotail to correctly assess the different spectral behaviors between east- and west-facing walls of the craters in the near-side of the Moon.

  10. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface....... Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed...

  11. Wind profiler observations of a monsoon low-level jet over a tropical Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. R. Kalapureddy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-year high-resolution wind observations of the wind profiler have been utilized to characterize the diurnal and seasonal features of the monsoon Low-Level Jet (LLJ over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, with a focus on the diurnal variability of low-level winds. The Boreal summer monsoon winds show a conspicuously strong westerly LLJ with average wind speed exceeding 20 m s−1. The L-band wind profiler measurements have shown an advantage of better height and time resolutions over the conventional radiosonde method for diurnal wind measurements. An interesting diurnal oscillation of LLJ core has been observed. It is varying in the height range of 1.8±0.6 km with the maximum and minimum intensity noticed during the early morning and afternoon hours, respectively. The jet core (wind maxima height is observed to coincide with the inversion height. Strong wind shears are normally located beneath the LLJ core. The sole wind profiler observations are capable of identifying the monsoon phases, such as onset, break and active spells, etc. The mutual influence between the LLJ and the boundary layer has been discussed. One notices that the observed LLJ diurnal structures depend on the local convective activity, wind shears and turbulence activity associated with boundary layer winds. The day-to-day change in the LLJ structure depends on the latitudinal position of the LLJ core.

  12. Measurements of wind friction speeds over lava surfaces and assessment of sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Wind velocity profiles were obtained over alluvial plains, lava flows, and a cinder cone in the Mojave Desert to determine the wind shear and the potential for particle transport. It was found that aerodynamic roughness for winds increases nearly a factor of 5 as flow crosses from the alluvium to the lava surface, resulting in wind shear that is 21 percent greater. Thus, wind erosion and sand flux may be substantially enhanced over the lava field. Moreover, wind flow turbulence is enhanced in the wake of the cinder cone, which also increases erosion and sediment transportation by the wind.

  13. Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) Observational wind atlas for 10 met. stations in Northern, Western and Eastern Cape provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten; Kelly, Mark C.;

    Program (WAsP 10). The wind-climatological inputs are the observed wind climates derived from the WAsP Climate Analyst. Topographical inputs are elevation maps constructed from SRTM 3 data and roughness length maps constructed from SWBD data and Google Earth satellite imagery. Summaries are given...... of the data measured at the 10 masts for the reference period October 2010 to September 2011. The main result of the microscale modelling is observational wind atlas data sets, which can be used for verification of the mesoscale modelling. In addition, the microscale modelling itself has been verified...

  14. Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) Observational wind atlas for 10 met. stations in Northern, Western and Eastern Cape provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten; Kelly, Mark C.;

    Program (WAsP 11). The wind-climatological inputs are the observed wind climates derived from the WAsP Climate Analyst. Topographical inputs are elevation maps constructed from SRTM 3 data and roughness length maps constructed from SWBD data and Google Earth satellite imagery. Summaries are given...... of the data measured at the 10 masts, mainly for a 3-year reference period from October 2010 to September 2013. The main result of the microscale modelling is observational wind atlas data sets, which can be used for verification of the mesoscale modelling. In addition, the microscale modelling itself has...

  15. DISTRIBUTED EXTERNAL SURFACE HARDENING OF CAR DESIGN BY WINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fomin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves coverage of features and results of the research conducted by the authors to determine the feasibility and establishment of pre-stressed-strained state of freight cars by winding in order to improve their strength characteristics. It is also necessary to present the theoretical justification for the effectiveness of the application of this method for car designs and an appropriate example for the tank-car. Methodology. The conducted study is based on an analysis of known works on the subject, mathematical justification and computer modeling. At the calculations of rolling stock components contemporary conventional techniques were used. Findings. Authors found that the winding method for pre-stressed-strained state is effective and appropriate for use in the construction of railway rolling stock and, in particular freight cars. Freight car designs with the pre-stressed-strained state are characterized by a number of strength advantages, among which there is an improvement of the work on the perception of operational loads and resource conservation. Originality. For the first time it is proposed the improvement of bearing capacity of freight car constructions through the creation of its component in the directed stress-strained state. It is also for the first time proposed the use of distributed external surface hardening by the method of winding to create a pre-stress-strained state of structural components of freight cars. The methods for winding designs of freight cars and their implementation were considered. Practical value. The studies developed a number of technical solutions for improving the design of freight cars and tank-container, which has been patented. Corresponding solutions for the tank-car are partially presented. Practical implementation of such solutions will significantly improve the technical, economic and operational performances of car designs.

  16. Intensification of aerosol pollution associated with its feedback with surface solar radiation and winds in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Guo, Jianping; Wang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Beijing has been experiencing serious air pollution in recent years, resulting in serious impacts on the local environment and climate and on human health. In addition to individual pollution sources and weather systems, feedback between aerosols and downwelling solar radiation (DSR) and between aerosols and winds also contribute to heavy aerosol pollution. By using atmospheric visibility (VIS) to represent the relative amount of aerosol pollution during a 5 week observation around the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) period (22 October to 25 November 2014) over a site in south Beijing, China, we show clear positive relationships between DSR and VIS and between winds and VIS. The sensitivities of daily DSR and surface winds to VIS are approximately 15.42 W/m2/km and 0.068 m/s/km, respectively. The strengthening contributions to atmospheric visibility by surface DSR-VIS interactions and between surface wind-aerosol interactions are estimated at approximately 15% and 12%, respectively, in south Beijing around the APEC period.

  17. Retrieval of ocean surface wind stress and drag coefficient from spaceborne SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨劲松; 黄韦艮; 周长宝

    2001-01-01

    A model for retrieval of wind stress and drag coefficient on the sea surface with the data measured by spacebome synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been developed based on the SAR imaging mechanisms of ocean surface capillary waves and short gravity waves. This model consists of radiometric calibration, wind speed retrieval and wind stress and drag coefficient calculation. A Radarsat SAR image has been used to calculate wind stress and drag coeffi cient. Good results have been achieved.

  18. Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) surface observation data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GMOS global surface elemental mercury (Hg0) observations from 2013 & 2014. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Sprovieri, F., N. Pirrone,...

  19. Wind flow and wind loads on the surface of a tower-shaped building:Numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow structure and wind pressure distribution caused by obtuse obstacles are usually the focuses in Computational Wind Engineer researches (CWE). By solving the non-hydrostatical dynamic equations, PUMA model (Peking University Model of Atmospheric Environment) was developed and applied to simulating the flow structure and wind pressure distribution around a tower-shaped building. Evaluation about the wind environment and wind loads around the building was obtained through the analysis of the numerical simulation results and wind tunnel data. Comparisons between the simulation and wind tunnel study indicate that numerical simulation results agree well in the flow field and wind pressure distribution around the tower-shaped building. On the other hand, the horizontal grid interval of 2 m and the vertical grid of 3 m were still too crude to simulate the flow structure and wind pressure distribution on the building surface more exactly in detail; and the absence of suitable pressure perturbation parameterization scheme between the solid and the adjacent space also limits the accuracy of the numerical simulation. The numerical simulation model can be used to evaluate the wind environment and wind load around high buildings.

  20. Discussion on wind factor influencing the distribution of biological soil crusts on surface of sand dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongSheng Wu; Hasi Erdun; RuiPing Yin; Xin Zhang; Jie Ren; Jian Wang; XiuMin Tian; ZeKun Li; HengLu Miao

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions, whose formation and development have an important impact on the restoration process of the desert ecosystem. In order to explore the relationship between surface airflow and development characteristics of biological soil crusts, we studied surface airflow pattern and development characteristics of biological soil crusts on the fixed dune profile through field observation. Results indicate that the speed of near-surface airflow is the lowest at the foot of windward slope and the highest at the crest, showing an increasing trend from the foot to the crest. At the leeward side, although near-surface airflow increases slightly at the lower part of the slope after an initial sudden decrease at upper part of the slope, its overall trend decreases from the crest. Wind velocity variation coefficient varied at different heights over each observation site. The thickness, shear strength of biological soil crusts and percentage of fine particles at crusts layer decreased from the slope foot to the upper part, showing that biological soil crusts are less developed in high wind speed areas and well developed in low wind speed areas. It can be seen that there is a close relationship between the distribution of biological soil crusts in different parts of the dunes and changes in airflow due to geomorphologic variation.

  1. ISEE observations of radiation at twice the solar wind plasma frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C.C.; Hoang, S. and others

    1988-02-01

    Radiation produced in the vicinity of the Earth's bow shock at twice the solar wind electron plasma frequency f/sub p/ is seen by both ISEE-1 and ISEE-3, respectively at about 20 and about 200 R/sub E/ from the Earth. This electromagnetic radiation is due to the presence, in the electron foreshock, of electrons reflected and accelerated at the Earth's bow shock. We show that the source is near the upstream boundary of the foreshock, the surface where the magnetic field lines are tangent to the bow shock. A typical diameter of the source is 120-150 R/sub E/. Emissivity is given. The angular size of the source, seen by ISEE-3, is increased by scattering of the 2f/sub p/ radio waves on the solar wind density fluctuations. We examine whether the bandwidth and directivity predicted by current source models are consistent with our observations.

  2. Errors of five-day mean surface wind and temperature conditions due to inadequate sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface meteorological reports of wind components, wind speed, air temperature, and sea-surface temperature from buoys located in equatorial and midlatitude regions are used in a simulation of random sampling to determine errors of the calculated means due to inadequate sampling. Subsampling the data with several different sample sizes leads to estimates of the accuracy of the subsampled means. The number N of random observations needed to compute mean winds with chosen accuracies of 0.5 (N sub 0.5) and 1.0 (N sub 1,0) m/s and mean air and sea surface temperatures with chosen accuracies of 0.1 (N sub 0.1) and 0.2 (N sub 0.2) C were calculated for each 5-day and 30-day period in the buoy datasets. Mean values of N for the various accuracies and datasets are given. A second-order polynomial relation is established between N and the variability of the data record. This relationship demonstrates that for the same accuracy, N increases as the variability of the data record increases. The relationship is also independent of the data source. Volunteer-observing ship data do not satisfy the recommended minimum number of observations for obtaining 0.5 m/s and 0.2 C accuracy for most locations. The effect of having remotely sensed data is discussed.

  3. FPI observations of nighttime mesospheric and thermospheric winds in China and their comparisons with HWM07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, W.; Xu, J.; Jiang, G.; Ma, R. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science; Zhou, Q. [Zhengzhou Univ. (China). School of Electrical Engineering; Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed the nighttime horizontal neutral winds in the middle atmosphere ({proportional_to} 87 and {proportional_to} 98 km) and thermosphere ({proportional_to} 250 km) derived from a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), which was installed at Xinglong station (40.2 N, 117.4 E) in central China. The wind data covered the period from April 2010 to July 2012. We studied the annual, semiannual and terannual variations of the midnight winds at {proportional_to} 87 km, {proportional_to} 98 km and {proportional_to} 250 km for the first time and compared them with Horizontal Wind Model 2007 (HWM07). Our results show the following: (1) at {proportional_to} 87 km, both the observed and model zonal winds have similar phases in the annual and semiannual variations. However, the HWM07 amplitudes are much larger. (2) At {proportional_to} 98 km, the model shows strong eastward wind in the summer solstice, resulting in a large annual variation, while the observed strongest component is semiannual. The observation and model midnight meridional winds agree well. Both are equatorward throughout the year and have small amplitudes in the annual and semiannual variations. (3) There are large discrepancies between the observed and HWM07 winds at {proportional_to} 250 km. This discrepancy is largely due to the strong semiannual zonal wind in the model and the phase difference in the annual variation of the meridional wind. The FPI annual variation coincides with the results from Arecibo, which has similar geomagnetic latitude as Xinglong station. In General, the consistency of FPI winds with model winds is better at {proportional_to} 87 and {proportional_to} 98 km than that at {proportional_to} 250 km. We also studied the seasonally and monthly averaged nighttime winds. The most salient features include the following: (1) the seasonally averaged zonal winds at {proportional_to} 87 and {proportional_to} 98 km typically have small variations throughout the night. (2) The model zonal and

  4. FPI observations of nighttime mesospheric and thermospheric winds in China and their comparisons with HWM07

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the nighttime horizontal neutral winds in the middle atmosphere (~ 87 and ~ 98 km and thermosphere (~ 250 km derived from a Fabry–Perot interferometer (FPI, which was installed at Xinglong station (40.2° N, 117.4° E in central China. The wind data covered the period from April 2010 to July 2012. We studied the annual, semiannual and terannual variations of the midnight winds at ~ 87 km, ~ 98 km and ~ 250 km for the first time and compared them with Horizontal Wind Model 2007 (HWM07. Our results show the following: (1 at ~ 87 km, both the observed and model zonal winds have similar phases in the annual and semiannual variations. However, the HWM07 amplitudes are much larger. (2 At ~ 98 km, the model shows strong eastward wind in the summer solstice, resulting in a large annual variation, while the observed strongest component is semiannual. The observation and model midnight meridional winds agree well. Both are equatorward throughout the year and have small amplitudes in the annual and semiannual variations. (3 There are large discrepancies between the observed and HWM07 winds at ~ 250 km. This discrepancy is largely due to the strong semiannual zonal wind in the model and the phase difference in the annual variation of the meridional wind. The FPI annual variation coincides with the results from Arecibo, which has similar geomagnetic latitude as Xinglong station. In General, the consistency of FPI winds with model winds is better at ~ 87 and ~ 98 km than that at ~ 250 km. We also studied the seasonally and monthly averaged nighttime winds. The most salient features include the following: (1 the seasonally averaged zonal winds at ~ 87 and ~ 98 km typically have small variations throughout the night. (2 The model zonal and meridional nighttime wind variations are typically much larger than those of observations at ~ 87 km and ~ 98 km. (3 At ~ 250 km, model zonal wind compares well with the observation in the winter. For spring and

  5. Changes in Surface Wind Speed over North America from CMIP5 Model Projections and Implications for Wind Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centennial trends in the surface wind speed over North America are deduced from global climate model simulations in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project—Phase 5 (CMIP5 archive. Using the 21st century simulations under the RCP 8.5 scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, 5–10 percent increases per century in the 10 m wind speed are found over Central and East-Central United States, the Californian Coast, and the South and East Coasts of the USA in winter. In summer, climate models projected decreases in the wind speed ranging from 5 to 10 percent per century over the same coastal regions. These projected changes in the surface wind speed are moderate and imply that the current estimate of wind power potential for North America based on present-day climatology will not be significantly changed by the greenhouse gas forcing in the coming decades.

  6. Intercomparison of Several Ocean Surface Wind Products over the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Bourassa, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Surface winds are one of the key parameters that control the exchange of energy between the atmosphere and oceans. Being the major source of momentum for the upper ocean, winds mainly control ocean processes and air-sea interaction especially in synoptically active regions such as the Nordic Seas (Greenland, Norwegian, Iceland, and Barents Seas). Intense formation of water masses takes place in the Nordic Seas through cooling, brine rejection, and mixing of Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic waters. Deep water produced in this region by deep convection participates in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Water masses formed in the Nordic Seas are also important for the maintenance of thermohaline structure of the Arctic Ocean. The Nordic Seas has always been a challenging region for Arctic Ocean modeling due to complex ocean circulation, water mass transformation, intense air-sea interaction, deep vertical convection, etc. The lack of reliable high-resolution wind products over the Polar region is another factor that has been impacting modeling of the Arctic Ocean in general and the Nordic Seas in particular. Coarse resolution atmospheric fields are often used to force the Arctic Ocean models. The major drawback of the coarse resolution wind products is their inability to resolve small- and meso-scale cyclones frequently impacting the Nordic Seas. Several gridded surface wind products derived from scatterometer wind observations have reasonably high spatial resolution to represent most of the small scale cyclones in the region. In the present model study, Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform surface wind data (CCMP) are compared against the wind fields from traditional the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 2 (NCEPR), from NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and from the interium version (30km) of the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR). The NCEPR is a coarse resolution product (1.9°) and still is the primary source of forcing fields for the Arctic Ocean models. The

  7. Wind wave spectral observations in Currituck Sound, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Charles E.; Resio, Donald T.

    2007-05-01

    We examine a set of 1626 high-resolution frequency-direction wind wave spectra and collocated winds collected during a 7-month period at a site in Currituck Sound, North Carolina, in terms of one-dimensional spectral structure and directional distribution functions. The data set includes cases of shore-normal winds in broad-fetch conditions as well as winds oblique to the basin geometry, with all fetches of order 10 km or less. Using equilibrium-range scaling, all one-dimensional spectra have a spectral peak region, an equilibrium range of finite bandwidth following an f-4 slope at slightly higher frequencies, and a high-frequency tail that falls off more rapidly than f-4. For shore-normal winds, spectral peakedness appears to be high and approximately constant for young waves, low and approximately constant for old waves, and steeply graded for intermediate inverse wave ages in the range 1.0 variable equilibrium-range bandwidths in oblique-wind conditions, clearly indicating a more complex balance of source terms in these cases than in the more elementary situation of shore-normal winds. These complications are not without consequence in wave modeling, as any bounded or semibounded lake or estuary will be subject to oblique winds, and current operational models do not deal well with conditions like those we find here.

  8. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  9. The New Horizons Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) Observations of the Solar Wind from 11-33 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Nicolaou, G.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T-V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T-V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  10. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Nicolaou, G., E-mail: helliott@swri.edu [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE-98128, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  11. Latitudinal distribution of the solar wind properties in the low- and high-pressure regimes: Wind observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    Full Text Available The solar wind properties depend on λ, the heliomagnetic latitude with respect to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS, more than on the heliographic latitude. We analyse the wind properties observed by Wind at 1 AU during about 2.5 solar rotations in 1995, a period close to the last minimum of solar activity. To determine λ, we use a model of the HCS which we fit to the magnetic sector boundary crossings observed by Wind. We find that the solar wind properties mainly depend on the modulus |λ|. But they also depend on a local parameter, the total pressure (magnetic pressure plus electron and proton thermal pressure. Furthermore, whatever the total pressure, we observe that the plasma properties also depend on the time: the latitudinal gradients of the wind speed and of the proton temperature are not the same before and after the closest HCS crossing. This is a consequence of the dynamical stream interactions. In the low pressure wind, at low |λ|, we find a clear maximum of the density, a clear minimum of the wind speed and of the proton temperature, a weak minimum of the average magnetic field strength, a weak maximum of the average thermal pressure, and a weak maximum of the average β factor. This overdense sheet is embedded in a density halo. The latitudinal thickness is about 5° for the overdense sheet, and 20° for the density halo. The HCS is thus wrapped in an overdense sheet surrounded by a halo, even in the non-compressed solar wind. In the high-pressure wind, the plasma properties are less well ordered as functions of the latitude than in the low-pressure wind; the minimum of the average speed is seen before the HCS crossing. The latitudinal thickness of the high-pressure region is about 20°. Our observations are qualitatively consistent with the numerical model of Pizzo for the deformation of the heliospheric current sheet and plasma sheet.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (solar wind

  12. Lidar observations of wind over Xin Jiang, China: general characteristics and variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Sun, Dong-song; Weng, Ning-quan; Wang, Jian-guo; Dou, Xian-kang; Zhang, Yan-hong; Guan, Jun; Miao, Qingjian; Chen, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on a Fabry-Perot etalon is developed for wind measurement. The structure and technical parameters of this lidar system are described in brief. The 1740 wind profiles from 8 to 40 km altitudes by the lidar in Xinjiang, China, were obtained in 2010 and 2011, and were used to analyze the characteristics and variations of wind. The results shown that the wind velocity is within a three-layer structure: westerly jet layer (9-14 km), quasi-zero velocity layer (18-22 km) and gale layer (22-40 km). In August and September, the wind direction is within a three-layer structure: zonal westerly wind layer (5-18 km) where wind direction is west, zonal wind reverse layer (18-22 km) where wind direction is unstable and easterly wind layer (22-40 km) where wind direction is east. In October, wind direction is west (8-40 km). Wind observations by lidar are a realistic offset to the rawins.

  13. Wind relaxation and a coastal buoyant plume north of Pt. Conception, CA: Observations, simulations, and scalings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanda, Sutara H.; Kumar, Nirnimesh; Miller, Arthur J.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Haas, Kevin; Cai, Donghua; Edwards, Christopher A.; Washburn, Libe; Fewings, Melanie R.; Torres, Rachel; Feddersen, Falk

    2016-10-01

    In upwelling regions, wind relaxations lead to poleward propagating warm water plumes that are important to coastal ecosystems. The coastal ocean response to wind relaxation around Pt. Conception, CA is simulated with a Regional Ocean Model (ROMS) forced by realistic surface and lateral boundary conditions including tidal processes. The model reproduces well the statistics of observed subtidal water column temperature and velocity at both outer and inner-shelf mooring locations throughout the study. A poleward-propagating plume of Southern California Bight water that increases shelf water temperatures by ≈ 5°C is also reproduced. Modeled plume propagation speed, spatial scales, and flow structure are consistent with a theoretical scaling for coastal buoyant plumes with both surface-trapped and slope-controlled dynamics. Plume momentum balances are distinct between the offshore (>30 m depth) region where the plume is surface-trapped, and onshore of the 30 m isobath (within 5 km from shore) where the plume water mass extends to the bottom and is slope controlled. In the onshore region, bottom stress is important in the alongshore momentum equation and generates vertical vorticity that is an order of magnitude larger than the vorticity in the plume core. Numerical experiments without tidal forcing show that modeled surface temperatures are biased 0.5°C high, potentially affecting plume propagation distance and persistence.

  14. Winds observed in the Northern European seas with wind lidars, meteorological masts and satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stein, D.; Peña, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    that for specific conditions, e.g. very stable atmosphere, the wind profiles can be heavily influenced by the boundary layer height at the 100 m level in the northern European seas. A very interesting part of the analysis includes the shear exponent (alpha) calculated during seasons, during 24-hours and for 12 wind...

  15. Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, Chile

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, in extreme southern Chile. WMO station ID 85934. Period of record 1896-1954. The original forms were scanned at the Museo...

  16. Multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence: theory and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, A. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyj, L. M.

    1996-10-01

    A fractal model of the solar wind is presented. This model treats fluctuations of the solar wind velocity from the viewpoint of nonlinear processes originating in the convective region and photosphere of the Sun. The multifractal structure of proton velocity fluctuations in a region of heliocentric distances from 0.2 to 0.8 AU is a result of these processes. Continuous measurements of solar wind velocity aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft during one month were used to compare the theoretical and experimental results. It is shown that fluctuations of proton velocity have a multifractal structure in a frequency range of 10-5 - 10-3Hz.

  17. Impact of surface wind biases on the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, O.; Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.; Holland, P. R.; Uotila, P.; Zunz, V.; Kimura, N.

    2016-09-01

    We derive the terms in the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget from the output of three models, and compare them to observations of the same terms. Those models include two climate models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and one ocean-sea ice coupled model with prescribed atmospheric forcing. Sea ice drift and wind fields from those models, in average over April-October 1992-2005, all exhibit large differences with the available observational or reanalysis datasets. However, the discrepancies between the two distinct ice drift products or the two wind reanalyses used here are sometimes even greater than those differences. Two major findings stand out from the analysis. Firstly, large biases in sea ice drift speed and direction in exterior sectors of the sea ice covered region tend to be systematic and consistent with those in winds. This suggests that sea ice errors in these areas are most likely wind-driven, so as errors in the simulated ice motion vectors. The systematic nature of these biases is less prominent in interior sectors, nearer the coast, where sea ice is mechanically constrained and its motion in response to the wind forcing more depending on the model rheology. Second, the intimate relationship between winds, sea ice drift and the sea ice concentration budget gives insight on ways to categorize models with regard to errors in their ice dynamics. In exterior regions, models with seemingly too weak winds and slow ice drift consistently yield a lack of ice velocity divergence and hence a wrong wintertime sea ice growth rate. In interior sectors, too slow ice drift, presumably originating from issues in the physical representation of sea ice dynamics as much as from errors in surface winds, leads to wrong timing of the late winter ice retreat. Those results illustrate that the applied methodology provides a valuable tool for prioritizing model improvements based on the ice concentration budget-ice drift biases-wind biases

  18. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  19. Role of observed Pacific trade wind trends in the recent hiatus and future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Nicola; England, Matthew; Gupta, Alex Sen; Spence, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Over the period 2001-2013 a slowdown (or 'hiatus') in global surface temperature has been observed. Recent studies have identified Pacific decadal variability as a major driver of hiatus and accelerated warming periods. Here we use an eddy-permitting global ocean model to investigate the role of the observed 1992-2011 trade wind intensification and associated atmospheric surface changes related with a strong negative phase of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) in driving ocean circulation and heat content changes. We find a strengthening of the Pacific shallow overturning cells and Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) in response to strengthened winds, which brings cooler water to the surface of the eastern Pacific and transports additional heat into the subsurface western Pacific. The intensified winds also increase the volume and heat transport of the Indonesian Throughflow, moving some of the additional heat from the western Pacific into the Indian Ocean. The net result is a warmer subsurface western Pacific, a cooler upper eastern Pacific and a warmer subsurface Indian Ocean, with an overall increase in Indo-Pacific heat content. Extended experiments with a symmetric reversal of the atmospheric state examine how the ocean would respond if the winds (and other associated atmospheric variables) were to revert to their initial state. We find a slowdown of the EUC and Pacific shallow overturning cells, resulting in a return to climatological SST conditions in the western and eastern Pacific. The ITF also slows toward its original strength. However, the temperature, heat content and ITF responses are not entirely symmetric due to an overall increase in the surface heat flux into the ocean associated with the cooler surface of the Pacific and irreversible heat transfer from the Pacific into the Indian Ocean via the ITF. There is also irreversible heat transport across the thermocline via diapycnal mixing, further contributing to this asymmetry. Consequently, after

  20. Observations of high and low Fe charge states in individual solar wind streams with coronal-hole origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Context. The solar wind originating from coronal holes is comparatively well-understood and is characterized by lower densities and average charge states compared to the so-called slow solar wind. Except for wave perturbations, the average properties of the coronal-hole solar wind are passably constant. Aims: In this case study, we focus on observations of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) of individual streams of coronal-hole solar wind that illustrate that although the O and C charge states are low in coronal-hole wind, the Fe charge distribution is more variable. In particular, we illustrate that the Fe charge states in coronal-hole solar wind are frequently as high as in slow solar wind. Methods: We selected individual coronal-hole solar wind streams based on their collisional age as well as their respective O and C charge states and analyzed their Fe charge-state distributions. Additionally, with a combination of simple ballistic back-mapping and the potential field source surface model, transitions between streams with high and low Fe charge states were mapped back to the photosphere. The relative frequency of high and low Fe charge-state streams is compared for the years 2004 and 2006. Results: We found several otherwise typical coronal-hole streams that include Fe charge states either as high as or lower than in slow solar wind. Eight such transitions in 2006 were mapped back to equatorial coronal holes that were either isolated or connected to the northern coronal-hole. Attempts to identify coronal structures associated with the transitions were so far inconclusive.

  1. Variability in the coupling between sea surface temperature and wind stress in the global coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuntao; Castelao, Renato M.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interaction between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress throughout the global coastal ocean was investigated using 7 years of satellite observations. Coupling coefficients between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl and between downwind SST gradients and wind stress divergence were used to quantify spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the interaction. The use of a consistent data set and standardized methods allow for direct comparisons between coupling coefficients in the different coastal regions. The analysis reveals that strong coupling is observed in many mid-latitude regions throughout the world, especially in regions with strong fronts like Eastern and Western Boundary Currents. Most upwelling regions in Eastern Boundary Currents are characterized by strong seasonal variability in the strength of the coupling, which generally peaks during summer in mid latitudes and during winter at low latitudes. Seasonal variability in coastal regions along Western Boundary Currents is comparatively smaller. Intraseasonal variability is especially important in regions of strong eddy activity (e.g., Western Boundary Currents), being particularly relevant for the coupling between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl. Results from the analysis can be used to guide modeling studies, since it allows for the a priori identification of regions in which regional models need to properly represent the ocean-atmosphere interaction to accurately represent local variability.

  2. Comparison of surface wind stress measurements - Airborne radar scatterometer versus sonic anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucks, J. T.; Leming, T. D.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Sea surface wind stress measurements recorded by a sonic anemometer are correlated with airborne scatterometer measurements of ocean roughness (cross section of radar backscatter) to establish the accuracy of remotely sensed data and assist in the definition of geophysical algorithms for the scatterometer sensor aboard Seasat A. Results of this investigation are as follows: Comparison of scatterometer and sonic anemometer wind stress measurements are good for the majority of cases; however, a tendency exists for scatterometer wind stress to be somewhat high for higher wind conditions experienced in this experiment (6-9 m/s). The scatterometer wind speed algorithm tends to overcompute the higher wind speeds by approximately 0.5 m/s. This is a direct result of the scatterometer overestimate of wind stress from which wind speeds are derived. Algorithmic derivations of wind speed and direction are, in most comparisons, within accuracies defined by Seasat A scatterometer sensor specifications.

  3. Lidar observations of marine boundary-layer winds and heights: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    marine atmospheric boundary layer. The campaign was the last phase of a research project, in which the vertical wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer was firstly investigated on a coastal and a semi-urban site. At FINO3 the wind lidar, which measures the wind speed up to 2000 m, shows...... the investigation of the behavior with height of the two horizontal wind speed components. From the preliminary analysis of these vertical profiles, a variety of atmospheric and forcing conditions is distinguished; from a number of 10-min mean profiles the wind is observed to turn both antiand clockwise more than...

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SEA SURFACE DIRECTIONAL WAVE SPECTRA UNDER TYPHOON WIND FORCING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numercial simulation of sea surface directional wave spectra under typhoon wind forcing in the South China Sea (SCS) was carreid out using the WAVEWATCH-III wave model. The simulation was run for 210 h until the Typhoon Damrey (2005) approached Vietnam. The simulated data were compared with buoy observations, which were obtained in the northwest sea area of Hainan Island. The results show that the significant wave height, wave direction, wave length and frequency spetra agree well with buoy observations. The spatial characteristics of the signifciant wave height, mean wave period, mean wave length, wave age and directional spectra depend on the relative position from the typhoon center. Also, the misalignment between local wind and wave directions were investigated.

  5. Inter-annual variability of sea surface temperature, wind speed and sea surface height anomaly over the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Sathe, P.V.

    have made an attempt to study the annual and inter-annual variability of certain prominent processes occurring over the tropical Indian Ocean. The monthly mean values of Wind Speed (FSU), Sea Surface Temperature (REYNOLDS) and Sea Surface Height Anomaly...

  6. NUMERICAL STUDY OF WAVE EFFECTS ON SURFACE WIND STRESS AND SURFACE MIXING LENGTH BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL CIRCULATION MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bing-chen; LI Hua-jun; LEE Dong-yong

    2006-01-01

    The effects of waves on Surface Drag Coefficient (SDC) and surface mixing length were analyzed and discussed by carrying out three-dimensional current modeling for the Bohai Sea in the present work. A three- dimensional coupled hydrodynamical-ecological model for regional and shelf seas (COHERENS) incorporating the influences of wave-current interactions was coupled with the third-generation wave model swan taking into account time-varying currents. The effects of waves on currents were included in the SDC, surface mixing length and bottom drag coefficient. Firstly, the formulations in Donelan were incorporated into the COHERENS to account for wave-dependent SDC. In order to compare simulation results for the wave-dependent SDC, the simulation for wind-dependent SDC was also carried out. Second, Wave-Induced Surface Mixing Length (described as WISML sometimes in this paper) was incorporated into the COHERENS. Four numerical experiments were conducted to discuss the effects of two kinds of wave processes. Generally, the values of time series of current velocity and water surface elevation given by the simulation with all of the three wave processes have a good agreement with observed data. The existence of WISML changes obviously current vertical profiles and the existence of the wave dependent SDC modifies the current field of both top and bottom layers with the wind-dependent SDC.

  7. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  8. Addressing Spatial Variability of Surface-Layer Wind with Long-Range WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Kelly, Mark C.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of mean wind measurements from a coordinated system of long-range WindScanners. From individual scan patterns the mean wind field was reconstructed over a large area, and hence it highlights the spatial variability. From comparison with sonic anemometers, the quality...

  9. Solar identification of solar-wind disturbances observed at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, J. R.; Acton, L. W.; Alexander, D.; Galvin, A. B.; Harvey, K. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Hudson, H. S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses polar passages are producing a unique set of observations of solar-wind disturbances at high heliographic latitudes. In this paper we use the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) to locate some of these events, as defined by the Ulysses/SWICS data, in the solar corona. Of 8 events, we identify two with flares, three with front-side large arcade events, two with far-side events, and one was not seen in the Ulysses data. The arcade events generally resemble long-duration flares seen in active regions, but are larger, slower, and cooler. We present Yohkoh images of each of these events. In the large arcade events (see Alexander et al., 1996, for a detailed look at one of them) the magnetic morphology at the location of the Yohkoh arcade is generally consistent with the development of a large system of loops. Some of the identifications are ambiguous, and we summarize the reasons for this. From the SWICS data we have obtained ionization temperatures for several events, and find that they have no obvious pattern in relation to the X-ray temperatures; this may be expected on the basis that the interplanetary plasma cloud is physically distinct from the plasma trapped in the corona. Soft X-ray observations of the solar corona show occasional occurrences of large-scale brightenings in the form of arcades of loops. Such structures have been known since Skylab (e.g., Sturrock, 1980), and have a clear relationship with coronal mass ejections (e.g., Kahler, 1977). We now may study this phenomenon statistically with the much more comprehensive Yohkoh observations; with Yohkoh movies we can also begin to extend our knowledge to the three-dimensional development of the structures. At the same time Ulysses has sampled the latitude dependence of the interplanetary effects. With this paper we introduce this subject and provide a preliminary listing of events from the passage of Ulysses through high heliographic latitudes. The starting point of the present survey is a list

  10. Assimilation of SeaWinds Observations and NWP Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffelen, A.; de Vries, J.; Tveter, F.; Mogensen, K.

    2003-04-01

    KNMI works within the EUMETSAT NWP SAF on the processing of SeaWinds scatterometer data and distributes software and winds. The aim is to prepare the wind user community for the ASCAT scatterometer on METOP in 2006. Aspects of concern are spatial resolution and data quality and a trade-off is made. At www.knmi.nl/scatterometer a 100-km product is displayed, which is being tested and used routinely at several European and non-European NWP centres. We show that the spatial averaging of backscatter data is advantageous for both retrieval quality and uniqueness of the winds. Traditionally, 4 local probability maxima are used in the ambiguity removal. At KNMI we devised a new ambiguity removal scheme, called MSS, that not only allows more solutions, but also takes into account their relative probabilities. This is shown to work favourably in keeping well-determined wind structures and reducing noise. We anticipate that MSS will work well for 50-km data which is what we are now testing. The use of the current KNMI 100-km product is neutral or positive in NWP data assimilation, and in particular positive in experiments where the NoSCAT control run contains forecast failures. The KNMI/EUMETSAT project team is looking for people that would like to test both software and data products.

  11. Strong winter monsoon wind causes surface cooling over India and China in the Late Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Asian winter monsoon characterised by the strong northwesterly wind in East Asia and northeasterly wind in South Asia, has a great impact on the surface temperature of the Asian continent. Its outbreak can result in significant cooling of the monsoon region. However, it is still unclear whether such an impact existed and is detectable in the deep past. In this study, we use temperature reconstructions from plant and mammal fossil data together with climate model results to examine the co-evolution of surface temperature and winter monsoon in the Late Miocene (11–5 Ma, when a significant change of the Asian monsoon system occurred. We find that a stronger-than-present winter monsoon wind might have existed in the Late Miocene due to the lower Asian orography, particularly the northern Tibetan Plateau and the mountains north of it. This can lead to a pronounced cooling in southern China and northern India, which counteracts the generally warmer conditions in the Late Miocene compared to present. The Late Miocene strong winter monsoon was characterised by a marked westerly component and primarily caused by a pressure anomaly between the Tibetan Plateau and Northern Eurasia, rather than by the gradient between the Siberian High and the Aleutian Low. As a result, the close association of surface temperature with winter monsoon strength on inter-annual scale as observed at present may not have established in the Late Miocene.

  12. Three-dimensional MHD simulation for the solar wind structure observed by Ulysses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ulysses has been the first spacecraft to explore the high latitudinal regions of the heliosphere till now. During its first rapid pole-to-pole transit from September 1994to June 1995, Ulysses observed a fast speed flow with magnitude reaching 700-800 km/s at high latitudinal region except + 20° area near the ecliptic plane where the velocity is 300-400 km/s. The observations also showed a sudden jump of the velocity across the two regions. In this note,based on the characteristic and representative observations of the solar magnetic field and K-coronal polarized brightness, the large-scale solar wind structure mentioned above is reproduced by using a three-dimensional MHD model. The numerical results are basically consistent with those of Ulysses observations. Our results also show that the distributions of magnetic field and plasma number density on the solar source surface play an important role in governing this structure. Furthermore, the three-dimensional MHD model used here has a robust ability to simulate this kind of large-scale wind structure.

  13. Fault Diagnosis of an Advanced Wind Turbine Benchmark using Interval-based ARRs and Observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa; Puig, Vicenc;

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based fault diagnosis (FD) approach for wind turbines and its application to a realistic wind turbine FD benchmark. The proposed FD approach combines the use of analytical redundancy relations (ARRs) and interval observers. Interval observers consider an unknown...

  14. The RUNE Experiment—A Database of Remote-Sensing Observations of Near-Shore Winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier Ralph; Peña, Alfredo; Lea, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive database of near-shore wind observations that were carried out during the experimental campaign of the RUNE project. RUNE aims at reducing the uncertainty of the near-shore wind resource estimates from model outputs by using lidar, ocean, and satellite observations. Here...

  15. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch when the wind duration was sufficient for the conditions to be considered stationary. The scaling of wave energy and frequency with open water distance demonstrated the indirect effects of ice cover on regional wave evolution. Waves in partial ice cover could be similarly categorized as distance-limited by applying the same open water scaling to determine an ‘effective fetch’. The process of local wave generation in ice appeared to be a strong function of the ice concentration, wherein the ice cover severely reduces the effective fetch. The wave field in the Beaufort Sea is thus a function of the sea ice both locally, where wave growth primarily occurs in the open water between floes, and regionally, where the ice edge may provide a more classic fetch limitation. Observations of waves in recent years may be indicative of an emerging trend in the Arctic Ocean, where we will observe increasing wave energy with decreasing sea ice extent.

  16. Surface deformations and wave generation by wind blowing over a viscous liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Paquier, Anna; Rabaud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the early stage of the generation of waves by a turbulent wind at the surface of a viscous liquid. The spatio-temporal structure of the surface deformation is analyzed by the optical method Free Surface Synthetic Schlieren, which allows for time-resolved measurements with a micrometric accuracy. Because of the high viscosity of the liquid, the flow induced by the turbulent wind in the liquid remains laminar, with weak surface drift velocity. Two regimes of deformation of the liquid-air interface are identified. In the first regime, at low wind speed, the surface is dominated by rapidly propagating disorganized wrinkles, elongated in the streamwise direction, which can be interpreted as the surface response to the pressure fluctuations advected by the turbulent airflow. The amplitude of these deformations increases approximately linearly with wind velocity and are essentially independent of the fetch (distance along the channel). Above a threshold in wind speed, the perturbations ...

  17. A diagnostic model to estimate winds and small-scale drag from Mars Observer PMIRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and modeling studies indicate that small-scale drag due to breaking gravity waves is likely to be of considerable importance for the circulation in the middle atmospheric region (approximately 40-100 km altitude) on Mars. Recent earth-based spectroscopic observations have provided evidence for the existence of circulation features, in particular, a warm winter polar region, associated with gravity wave drag. Since the Mars Observer PMIRR experiment will obtain temperature profiles extending from the surface up to about 80 km altitude, it will be extensively sampling middle atmospheric regions in which gravity wave drag may play a dominant role. Estimating the drag then becomes crucial to the estimation of the atmospheric winds from the PMIRR-observed temperatures. An interative diagnostic model based upon one previously developed and tested with earth satellite temperature data will be applied to the PMIRR measurements to produce estimates of the small-scale zonal drag and three-dimensional wind fields in the Mars middle atmosphere. This model is based on the primitive equations, and can allow for time dependence (the time tendencies used may be based upon those computed in a Fast Fourier Mapping procedure). The small-scale zonal drag is estimated as the residual in the zonal momentum equation; the horizontal winds having first been estimated from the meridional momentum equation and the continuity equation. The scheme estimates the vertical motions from the thermodynamic equation, and thus needs estimates of the diabatic heating based upon the observed temperatures. The latter will be generated using a radiative model. It is hoped that the diagnostic scheme will be able to produce good estimates of the zonal gravity wave drag in the Mars middle atmosphere, estimates that can then be used in other diagnostic or assimilation efforts, as well as more theoretical studies.

  18. Surface chlorophyll, westerly winds, and El Nino in the western Pacific warm pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Messié, Monique; Bosc, Christelle

    The western equatorial Pacific warm pool is characterized by sea surface temperature (SST) higher than 29° C and sea surface salinity (SSS) lower than 35. It is usually considered as a broad oligotrophic region with a nitrate exhausted and low chlorophyll (lower than 0.1 mg m-3 ) surface layer. Nevertheless, ocean colour imagery shows that surface chlorophyll concentrations vary at the interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal time-scales. In this study, we use the 2000-2007 SeaWiFS data together with QuikScat wind, TMI SST, altimetric sea level, and OSCAR satellite-derived surface currents to describe and understand the variability of the surface chlorophyll in the region. In particular, nutrient and phytoplankton-rich waters upwelled near the country-regionplaceNew Guinea coast influence the distribution of surface chlorophyll in the equatorial warm pool from intra-seasonal to interannual time-scales. We show that the eastern part of the region is occupied by a quasi-persistent strip of very oligotrophic waters with chlorophyll concentrations close to those observed in the subtropical gyres (0.07 mg m-3 ). It extends over about 20 degrees of longitude and its width varies seasonally and with the El Niño/La Niña phases. Overall, this very oligotrophic zone matches n n the well-documented region with the warmest SST (over 30° C), thickest barrier layer (more than 20 m), and highest sea level (more than 220 cm) of the equatorial Pacific. Its eastern limit matches the eastern edge of the warm pool and moves zonally at seasonal and interannual time-scales. While the eastern edge has been described in previous studies, the western edge is poorly known. It is marked by the 0.1 mg m-3 chlorophyll isoline and its zonal motions occur at seasonal, interannual, and intraseasonal time-scales, as well. We investigate the late-2001 to late-2002 time period to assess the intra-seasonal variability of the surface chlorophyll in relation with the wind intra-seasonal variability

  19. Solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron density profiles in the Martian ionosphere observed by the radio occultation experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine if the densities are influenced by the solar wind. Evidence is presented that the altitude of the maximum ionospheric electron density shows a positive correlation to the energetic proton flux in the solar wind. The solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere can be attributed to heating of the neutral atmosphere by the solar wind energetic proton precipitation. The modulation is observed to be most prominent at high solar zenith angles. It is argued that this is consistent with the proposed modulation mechanism.

  20. Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) Observational wind atlas for 10 met. stations in Northern, Western and Eastern Cape provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten; Kelly, Mark C.;

    Program (WAsP 11). The windclimatological inputs are the observed wind climates derived from the WAsP Climate Analyst. Topographical inputs are elevation maps constructed from SRTM 3 data and rough-ness length maps constructed from SWBD data and Google Earth satellite imagery. Summaries are given...... of the data measured at the 10 masts, mainly for a 3-year reference period from October 2010 to September 2013. The main result of the microscale modelling is observational wind atlas data sets, which can be used for verification of the mesoscale modelling. In addition, the microscale modelling itself has...

  1. Observation and numerical experiments for drag coefficient under typhoon wind forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiqiu; Zhou, Liangming; Li, Shuiqing; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a study on drag coefficients under typhoon wind forcing based on observations and numerical experiments. The friction velocity and wind speed are measured at a marine observation platform in the South China Sea. Three typhoons: SOULIK (2013), TRAMI (2013) and FITOW (2013) are observed at a buoy station in the northeast sea area of Pingtan Island. A new parameterization is formulated for the wind drag coefficient as a function of wind speed. It is found that the drag coefficient ( C d ) increases linearly with the slope of 0.083×10-3 for wind speed less than 24 m s-1. To investigate the drag coefficient under higher wind conditions, three numerical experiments are implemented for these three typhoons using SWAN wave model. The wind input data are objective reanalysis datasets, which are assimilated with many sources and provided every six hours with the resolution of 0.125°×0.125°. The numerical simulation results show a good agreement with wave observation data under typhoon wind forcing. The results indicate that the drag coefficient levels off with the linear slope of 0.012×10-3 for higher wind speeds (less than 34 m s-1) and the new parameterization improvese the simulation accuracy compared with the Wu (1982) default used in SWAN.

  2. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P

    2015-01-06

    Fast (>700 km s(-1)) and slow (~400 km s(-1)) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full-disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  3. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, David H; Warren, Harry P

    2016-01-01

    Fast (>700 km/s) and slow (~400 km/s) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full- disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  4. GHRSST Level 2P Gridded Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from WindSat polarimetric radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains sea surface temperature derived from observations made by the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)...

  5. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  7. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries for Fort Ord/Fritzche AAF, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    IVTZ 1: REPORTING PRACTICES HAVE CHANGED WITH TIME. METAR AND SYNOPTIC REPORTING STATIONS RECORD (ON AWS FORMS 10/10A) AND TRANSMIT LONGLINE ONLY THE...OE61nic WCAEII *A* PERCENAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE SURFACE WIND DIRECTION VERSUS WIND SPEED usran. mumuvu mc FrA1 HOURLY OBSERVATIONS gaDam ENUMER...OPERATED STATIONIS. REFER TO THE "STATION HISTORY" PAGE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION ON REPORTING PRACTICES . NMONITH.Y TEMPERATURES. ALSO FROM SUMMARY OF

  8. Anisotropic Solar Wind Sputtering of the Lunar Surface Induced by Crustal Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Sarantos, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar exosphere is generated by several processes each of which generates neutral distributions with different spatial and temporal variability. Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface is a major process for many regolith-derived species and typically generates neutral distributions with a cosine dependence on solar zenith angle. Complicating this picture are remanent crustal magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, which decelerate and partially reflect the solar wind before it strikes the surface. We use Kaguya maps of solar wind reflection efficiencies, Lunar Prospector maps of crustal field strengths, and published neutral sputtering yields to calculate anisotropic solar wind sputtering maps. We feed these maps to a Monte Carlo neutral exospheric model to explore three-dimensional exospheric anisotropies and find that significant anisotropies should be present in the neutral exosphere depending on selenographic location and solar wind conditions. Better understanding of solar wind/crustal anomaly interactions could potentially improve our results.

  9. Solar Wind Electron Interaction with the Dayside Lunar Surface and Crustal Magnetic Fields: Evidence for Precursor Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, Jasper S.; Poppe, A.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; Horanyi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Electron distributions measured by Lunar Prospector above the dayside lunar surface in the solar wind often have an energy dependent loss cone, inconsistent with adiabatic magnetic reflection. Energy dependent reflection suggests the presence of downward parallel electric fields below the spacecraft, possibly indicating the presence of a standing electrostatic structure. Many electron distributions contain apparent low energy (solar wind electrons, possibly indicating streaming and/or whistler instabilities. The Moon may therefore influence solar wind plasma well upstream from its surface. Magnetic anomaly interactions and/or non-monotonic near surface potentials provide the most likely candidates to produce the observed precursor effects, which may help ensure quasi-neutrality upstream from the Moon.

  10. Turbulence feature modifications from high to low wind conditions: results from the CCT observations at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Mario; Mazzola, Mauro; Tampieri, Francesco; Pietro Viola, Angelo; Choi, Taejin

    2017-04-01

    The turbulence features in the quasi neutral surface layer are investigated as the intensity of the wind decreases, i.e. as the forcing due to the shear decreases. In this aim, a 5-year (2012-2016) set of observations of meteorological and micro-meteorological parameters acquired on the Climate Change Tower (CCT) in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard Islands, is used. The 34-m high tower, operated by the Italian National Council of Research (CNR) is equipped with four slow response wind and temperature probes and three fast response sonic anemometers and is located on heterogeneous terrain. One of the fast sensors was installed by KOPRI since 2012. The observations are averaged over 10 and 30 minutes intervals. The analysis addresses the share of the mean turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) among the along-wind, cross-wind and vertical velocity variances (respectively u2 >, , ), with attention to the parameterizations of the boundary layer commonly used in NWP models: the classical Mellor-Yamada (1982) scheme with the return-to-isotropy term by Rotta(1951) and its modifications, and the recent approach by Zilitinkevich and coworkers (2013). The results show that the share of TKE among the vertical and the total horizontal variance u2 > + is weakly dependent on the wind velocity while the share of the total horizontal variance between the along-wind and cross-wind components depends on wind speed. At high velocity (and large wind shear) a clear anisotropy , with u2 >≈ 2 , is observed, quite consistent with literature (Tampieri, 2017, pag. 69). As the velocity decreases, the ratio u2 > /(u2 > + ) displays a wide flat distribution between 0.2 and 0.8 with median values corresponding approximately to horizontal isotropy: u2 >≈. These features can be parameterized using suitable coefficients, function of the wind intensity in the equations for the TKE share, capturing the average behaviour of the flow. A further investigation based on estimates of the relative importance of the high

  11. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  12. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  13. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  14. Fault Detection and Isolation and Fault Tolerant Control of Wind Turbines Using Set-Valued Observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casau, Pedro; Rosa, Paulo Andre Nobre; Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    and Isolation (FDI) and Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) of wind turbines, by taking advantage of the recent advances in SVO theory for model invalidation. A simple wind turbine model is presented along with possible faulty scenarios. The FDI algorithm is built on top of the described model, taking into account......Research on wind turbine Operations & Maintenance (O&M) procedures is critical to the expansion of Wind Energy Conversion systems (WEC). In order to reduce O&M costs and increase the lifespan of the turbine, we study the application of Set-Valued Observers (SVO) to the problem of Fault Detection...

  15. Unusual Solar Radio Events Observed by the Wind and STEREO Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present several unusual solar radio events observed by the Wind spacecraft. These events - type II and type III bursts - show significant unexpected time-frequency structure that is likely due to interaction of the electron beam sources with atypical density variations of the solar wind. These events permit us to test our understanding of the emission processes, as well as demonstrating the remote detection of solar wind structure. We will also report on updates to the Wind Waves website at NASA GSFC of interest to radio data users.

  16. CFOSAT: a new Chinese-French satellite for joint observations of ocean wind vector and directional spectra of ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, D.; Tison, C.; Amiot, T.; Delaye, L.; Mouche, A.; Guitton, G.; Aouf, L.; Castillan, P.

    2016-05-01

    CFOSAT (the China France Oceanography Satellite) is a joint mission from the Chinese and French Space Agencies, devoted to the observation ocean surface wind and waves so as to improve wind and wave forecast for marine meteorology, ocean dynamics modeling and prediction, climate variability knowledge, fundamental knowledge of surface processes. Currently under Phase D (manufacturing phase), the launch is now planned for mid-2018 the later. The CFOSAT will carry two payloads, both Ku-Band radar: the wave scatterometer (SWIM) and the wind scatterometer (SCAT). Both instruments are based on new concepts with respect to existing satellite-borne wind and wave sensors. Indeed, one of the originalities of CFOSAT is that it will provide simultaneously and in the same zone, the directional spectra of ocean waves and the wind vector. The concept used to measure the directional spectra of ocean waves has never been used from space until now: it is based on a near-nadir incidence pointing, rotating fan-beam radar, used in a real-aperture mode. In this paper we present the CFOSAT mission, its objectives and main characteristics. We then focus on the SWIM instrument, the expected geophysical products and performances. Finally, we present ongoing studies based on existing satellite data of directional spectra of ocean waves (Sentinel-1, ..) and carried out in preparation to CAL/VAL activities and to future data exploitation.

  17. Constraining Numerical Geodynamo Modeling with Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Numerical dynamo solutions have traditionally been generated entirely by a set of self-consistent differential equations that govern the spatial-temporal variation of the magnetic field, velocity field and other fields related to dynamo processes. In particular, those solutions are obtained with parameters very different from those appropriate for the Earth s core. Geophysical application of the numerical results therefore depends on correct understanding of the differences (errors) between the model outputs and the true states (truth) in the outer core. Part of the truth can be observed at the surface in the form of poloidal magnetic field. To understand these differences, or errors, we generate new initial model state (analysis) by assimilating sequentially the model outputs with the surface geomagnetic observations using an optimal interpolation scheme. The time evolution of the core state is then controlled by our MoSST core dynamics model. The final outputs (forecasts) are then compared with the surface observations as a means to test the success of the assimilation. We use the surface geomagnetic data back to year 1900 for our studies, with 5-year forecast and 20-year analysis periods. We intend to use the result; to understand time variation of the errors with the assimilation sequences, and the impact of the assimilation on other unobservable quantities, such as the toroidal field and the fluid velocity in the core.

  18. Detecting, categorizing and forecasting large romps in wind farm power output using meteorological observations and WPPT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutler, N.; Kay, M.; Jacka, K.

    2007-01-01

    (swings) in power output. In addition to this, detected large ramps are studied in detail and categorized. WPPT combines wind speed and direction forecasts from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology regional numerical weather prediction model, MesoLAPS, with real-time wind power observations to make hourly...

  19. Interannual variations of surface winds over China marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Che; YAN Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    In a study of surface monsoon winds over the China marginal seas,Sun et al.(2012) use singular value decomposition method to identify regional dominant modes and analyze their interdecadal variability.This paper continues to evaluate the interannual variability of each dominant mode and its relation to various atmospheric,oceanic and land factors.The findings include:1) The intensity of the winter monsoon over the East China Sea is highly correlated with the Siberian High intensity and anti-correlated with the latitudinal position of the Aleutian Low as well as the rainfall in eastem China,Korean Peninsula and Japan; 2) The western Pacific subtropical high is significantly correlated with the summer monsoon intensity over the East China Sea and anti-correlated with the summer monsoon over the South China Sea; 3) The winter monsoon in a broad zonal belt through the Luzon Strait is dominated by the ENSO signal,strengthening in the La Ni(n)a phase and weakening in the El Ni(n)o phase.This inverse relation exhibits interdecadal shift with a period of weak correlation in the 1980s; 4) Analysis of tidal records validates the interdecadal weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon and reveals an atmospheric bridge that conveys the ENSO signal into the South China Sea via the winter monsoon.

  20. Tropical Atlantic biases and their relation to surface wind stress and terrestrial precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Ingo [Research Institute for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama (Japan); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Xie, Shang-Ping [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); Wittenberg, Andrew T. [NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Masumoto, Yukio [Research Institute for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Most coupled general circulation models (GCMs) perform poorly in the tropical Atlantic in terms of climatological seasonal cycle and interannual variability. The reasons for this poor performance are investigated in a suite of sensitivity experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) coupled GCM. The experiments show that a significant portion of the equatorial SST biases in the model is due to weaker than observed equatorial easterlies during boreal spring. Due to these weak easterlies, the tilt of the equatorial thermocline is reduced, with shoaling in the west and deepening in the east. The erroneously deep thermocline in the east prevents cold tongue formation in the following season despite vigorous upwelling, thus inhibiting the Bjerknes feedback. It is further shown that the surface wind errors are due, in part, to deficient precipitation over equatorial South America and excessive precipitation over equatorial Africa, which already exist in the uncoupled atmospheric GCM. Additional tests indicate that the precipitation biases are highly sensitive to land surface conditions such as albedo and soil moisture. This suggests that improving the representation of land surface processes in GCMs offers a way of improving their performance in the tropical Atlantic. The weaker than observed equatorial easterlies also contribute remotely, via equatorial and coastal Kelvin waves, to the severe warm SST biases along the southwest African coast. However, the strength of the subtropical anticyclone and along-shore winds also play an important role. (orig.)

  1. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The emission and scattering of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces and wind speed measurements from the Aquarius sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    2014-09-01

    In order to achieve the required accuracy in sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements from L-band radiometers such as the Aquarius/SAC-D or SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, it is crucial to accurately correct the radiation that is emitted from the ocean surface for roughness effects. We derive a geophysical model function (GMF) for the emission and backscatter of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces. The analysis is based on radiometer brightness temperature and scatterometer backscatter observations both taken on board Aquarius. The data are temporally and spatially collocated with wind speeds from WindSat and F17 SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder) and wind directions from NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System). This GMF is the basis for retrieval of ocean surface wind speed combining L-band H-pol radiometer and HH-pol scatterometer observations. The accuracy of theses combined passive/active L-band wind speeds matches those of many other satellite microwave sensors. The L-band GMF together with the combined passive/active L-band wind speeds is utilized in the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm for the surface roughness correction. We demonstrate that using these L-band wind speeds instead of NCEP wind speeds leads to a significant improvement in the SSS accuracy. Further improvements in the roughness correction algorithm can be obtained by adding VV-pol scatterometer measurements and wave height (WH) data into the GMF.

  3. Validation of AROME wind speed forecasts against mast observations in the Finnish wind power resource mapping project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, J.

    2009-09-01

    The upgrade of the Finnish wind power resource mapping is going on. The previous mapping was published 1991 and it was mainly based on observations. The climatology for the present mapping is made with meso-scale NWP mode and down scaling to detailed topography using WAsP-model. One of the tasks in the mapping is to validate/verify the model wind speed against mast observation. There is a group of masts with measurement heights around 100 meters available for this purpose. Most of the masts are in the Helsinki Testbed area while some of the masts are at existing wind farms. From a larger data set (ERA INTERIM) a representative sample of months has been chosen and also two extra 12 month sets representing extreme wind conditions. The total sample consists of 72 separate months. The lateral boundaries and first guess is from ERA INTERIM data. HIRLAM model (with 7.5 km resolution) is used to make initial analyses for 2.5 km AROME model with 6 hourly data assimilation cycle. Finally AROME model is used to simulate the wind climate. The output is with 3 hour interval. The WAsP-model is used to downscale the wind in coastal areas and hills in Northern Finland with 250 meter resolution and corresponding roughness. For validation the operative AROME is used. Only 00 UTC initial analyses are used to make forecasts up to +24 hours with 3 hourly outputs to cover the diurnal cycle. The validation period began from June 2008 and it will last to the end of the project in October 2009. The number of masts is around 20 and the height of measurements is typically between 60 and 100 meters. The validation is made with traditional verification methods. A special attention is also made to the quality control of observations. A part of the wind speed measurement instruments are not typical cup anemometers but acoustic instruments (Vaisala VXT520). The detailed results of validation will be presented. The preliminary results for the year 2008 indicate that there is a slight positive

  4. Survey on effect of surface winds on aircraft design and operation and recommendations for needed wind research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houbolt, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the effect of environmental surface winds and gusts on aircraft design and operation is presented. A listing of the very large number of problems that are encountered is given. Attention is called to the many studies that have been made on surface winds and gusts, but development in the engineering application of these results to aeronautical problems is pointed out to be still in the embryonic stage. Control of the aircraft is of paramount concern. Mathematical models and their application in simulation studies of airplane operation and control are discussed, and an attempt is made to identify their main gaps or deficiencies. Key reference material is cited. The need for better exchange between the meteorologist and the aeronautical engineer is discussed. Suggestions for improvements in the wind and gust models are made.

  5. Impact of assimilating met-tower, turbine nacelle anemometer and other intensified wind farm observation systems on 0 - 12h wind energy prediction using the NCAR WRF-RTFDDA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Cheng, W.; Liu, Y. W.; Wiener, G.; Frehlich, R.; Mahoney, W.; Warner, T.; Himelic, J.; Parks, K.; Early, S.

    2010-09-01

    In collaboration with Xcel Energy and Vasaila Inc., the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) conducts modeling study to evaluate the existing and the enhanced intensive observation systems for wind power nowcasting and short-range forecasting at a northern Colorado wind farm. The NCAR WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model) based Real-Time Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (RTFDDA) and forecasting system, which has been employed to support Xcel Energy operational wind forecast, was used in this study. The observational data include ten met-towers, a 915Hz wind profiler, a sodar and a Windcube Doppler lidar, besides the in-farm met-towers and wind speed and power reports from more than 300 of wind turbines. The WRF-RTFDDA 4-dimensioanl data assimilation algorithm allows to spread and propagate observation information in the WRF model space (x, y, z and time) with weighting functions built according to the observation location and time. The WRF-RTFDDA was set up to run with four nested domains with grid increments of 30, 10, 3.333 and 1.111km respectively. The standard and diverse non-conventional observations are assimilated on coarse grid domains along with the special wind farm observations. In this study, we investigate a) spread of surface observations in PBL according to PBL depth and regimes, b) optimization of horizontal influence radii and steep-terrain adjustment, and c) impact of different observation platforms and data types on 0 - 12 h wind prediction . It is found that PBL mixing and thermodynamic structures are greatly influenced by the PBL parameterization formulation. The range of the data assimilation effect on forecasts relies on weather and PBL regimes. In most cases, assimilation of in-farm and near-farm observations improves up to 12-hour wind power prediction and assimilation of in-farm data can significantly improves 0 - 6 hour forecasts.

  6. Mean winds observed with Indian MST radar over tropical mesosphere and comparison with various techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Narayana Rao, D.; Narayana Rao, T. [Sri Venkateswara Univ., Tirupati (India). Dept. of Physics; Thulasiraman, S.; Nee, J.B. [National Central Univ., Chung Li (Taiwan); Gurubaran, S.; Rajaram, R. [Equatorial Geophysical Research Lab., Indian Inst. of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli (India)

    2001-08-01

    Temporal variation of mean winds between the 65 to 85 km height region from the data collected over the course of approximately four years (1995-99), using the Indian MST radar located at Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), India is presented in this paper. Mesospheric mean winds and their seasonal variation in the horizontal and vertical components are presented in detail. Westward flows during each of the equinoxes and eastward flows during the solstices are observed in the zonal component. The features of the semi-annual oscillation (SAO) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the zonal component are noted. In the meridional component, contours reveal a northward motion during the winter and a southward motion during the summer. Large inter-annual variability is found in the vertical component with magnitudes of the order of {+-}2 ms{sup -1}. The MST observed winds are also compared with the winds observed by the MF radar located at Tirunelveli (8.7 N, 77.8 E), India, the high resolution Doppler imager (HRDI) onboard the upper atmospheric research satellite (UARS), and with the CIRA-86 model. A very good agreement is found between both the ground-based instruments (MST radar and MF radar) in the zonal component and there are few discrepancies in the meridional component. UARS/HRDI observed winds usually have larger magnitudes than the ground-based mean winds. Comparison of the MST derived winds with the CIRA-86 model in the zonal component shows that during the spring equinox and the summer, the winds agree fairly well, but there are a lot of discrepancies in the other seasons and the observed winds with the MST radar are less in magnitude, though the direction is same. The strengths and limitations in estimating reliable mesospheric mean winds using the MST radar are also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over typical underlying surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over Gobi and mobile sand surface have been investigated experimentally in the wind tunnel. The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the relation- ship between pulsatory characteristics of instantaneous wind speed in sand flow and the motion state of sand grains. For a given underlying surface, pulsation of wind velocities in sand flow on different heights has a good correlation. As the space distance among different heights increases, fluctuation of instantaneous wind speed presents a decreasing trend and its amplitude is closely related to the mo- tion state of sand grains and their transport. Pulsatory intensity increases with the indicated wind speed, but its relative value does not depend on it, only agrees with height.

  8. Field-based observations confirm linear scaling of sand flux with wind stress

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-driven sand transport generates atmospheric dust, forms dunes, and sculpts landscapes. However, it remains unclear how the sand flux scales with wind speed, largely because models do not agree on how particle speed changes with wind shear velocity. Here, we present comprehensive measurements from three new field sites and three published studies, showing that characteristic saltation layer heights, and thus particle speeds, remain approximately constant with shear velocity. This result implies a linear dependence of saltation flux on wind shear stress, which contrasts with the nonlinear 3/2 scaling used in most aeolian process predictions. We confirm the linear flux law with direct measurements of the stress-flux relationship occurring at each site. Models for dust generation, dune migration, and other processes driven by wind-blown sand on Earth, Mars, and several other planetary surfaces should be modified to account for linear stress-flux scaling.

  9. Global cloud climatology from surface observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Surface weather observations from stations on land and ships in the ocean are used to obtain the global distribution, at 5{sup o}x5{sup o} latitude-longitude resolution, of total cloud cover and the average amounts of the different cloud types: cumulus, cumulonimbus, stratus, stratocumulus, nimbostratus, altostratus, altocumulus, cirrus, cirrostratus, cirrocumulus, and fog. Diurnal and seasonal variations are derived, as well as interannual variations and multi-year trends. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Asymmetric penetration of solar wind perturbations down to 400-km altitudes at Mars observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, K.; Seki, K.; Hara, T.; Brain, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Since Mars has no intrinsic global magnetic field, the exchange of energy, momentum, and material with the planet takes place through interaction between the solar wind and the Martin upper atmosphere. It is thought that solar wind encountering Mars can penetrate into the point where the solar wind dynamic pressure and the plasma thermal pressure in the Martin ionosphere are almost balanced and the solar wind flow is deflected around the boundary. However, the actual interaction can be complicated, since both plasma processes and the existence of crustal magnetic fields can modify the structure of the boundary. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at the Martian ionopause is one of important candidate process to cause the modification. The dDistribution of ionopause surface waves generated by the K-H instability can should exhibit a clear asymmetry between hemispheres of upward and downward solar wind motional electric fields [e.g., Terada et al., 2002]. It is also suggested that the crustal magnetic fields can locally push the MPB (magnetic pileup boundary) upward [e.g., Brain et al., 2003]. It is also reported that the boundary between the solar wind and Martian ionosphere is located at an altitude of 380 km on average in the dayside [e.g., Mitchell et al., 2001]. However, this boundary location can change significantly depending on solar wind conditions. While it is considered that the solar wind can penetrate to lower altitudes than usual when the solar wind pressure is high, the frequency of the solar wind penetration and its quantitative dependence on the solar wind conditions are not yet well understood. In this study, we focused on penetration of solar wind electromagnetic disturbances, which are a characteristic feature of the shocked solar wind (magnetosheath), down to 400-km altitude at Mars. Using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data, we investigated the observational frequency and characteristics of the penetration events. We used data from the MGS

  11. Observations of Anisotropic Scaling of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Wu, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Using high-speed solar wind data recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, we investigate and estimate the anisotropic inertial range scaling of the interplanetary magnetic field. We apply the method of the magnetic structure function (MSF), Sn (τ) = lang|b(t + τ) - b(t)| n rang vprop τζ(n), to analyze the scaling of solar wind turbulence over the range from 1 s to 104 s. By sorting the fluctuations according to the direction of the local mean magnetic field, we obtain a second-order structure function in (r, Θ) coordinates that reveals the scale-dependent anisotropy of the power spectrum. The scale-dependent anisotropy of the MSF indicates that the fluctuation energy tends to cascade toward the direction perpendicular to the local field. The dependence of the MSF scaling index ζ on the direction of the local field is found to be similar to that reported in Horbury et al. and Podesta, with ζbottom = 0.53 ± 0.18 and ζpar = 1.00 ± 0.14. Furthermore, we estimate and find the scaling law between the perpendicular and parallel scales r par vprop r 0.614 bottom, which implies the elongation along the parallel direction as the turbulence eddy evolves toward the small lengthscales. These results are in agreement with the predictions of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  12. Slow Solar Wind: Observable Characteristics for Constraining Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Abbo, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y. K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Slow Solar Wind (SSW) origin is an open issue in the post SOHO era and forms a major objective for planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.Results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in-situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW.Advances models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations.Nevertheless, there are still debated questions such as:What are the source regions of SSW? What are their contributions to the SSW?Which is the role of the magnetic topology in corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of SSW?Which are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW?The aim of this study is to present the insights on the SSW origin and formationarisen during the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled ''Slowsolar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona'' held in Bern (Switzerland) in March2014--2015. The attached figure will be presented to summarize the different hypotheses of the SSW formation.

  13. A statistical method to get surface level air-temperature from satellite observations of precipitable water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Shikauchi, A.; Sugimori, Y.; Kubota, M.

    Vol. 49, pp. 551 to 558. 1993 A Statistical Method to Get Surface Level Air-Temperature from Satellite Observations of Precipitable Water PANKAJAKSHAN THADATHIL*, AKIRA SHIKAUCHI, YASUHIRO SUGIMORI and MASAHISA KUBOTA School of Marine Science... observations for getting the estimates of heat flux across the air-sea boundary (Miller, 1981; Liu, 1988). Bulk method has widely been used for this purpose and the parameters required are: sea surface temperature, and wind speed, air-temperature and specific...

  14. Changes in Wind Speed and Extremes in Beijing during 1960-2008 Based on Homogenized Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen; YAN Zhongwei; TU Kai; LIU Weidong; WANG Yingchun

    2011-01-01

    Daily observations of wind speed at 12 stations in the Greater Beijing Area during 1960-2008 were homogenized using the Multiple Analysis of Series for Homogenization method. The linear trends in the regional mean annual and seasonal (winter, spring, summer and autumn) wind speed series were -0.26,-0.39, -0.30, -0.12 and -0.22 m s-1 (10 yr)-1, respectively. Winter showed the greatest magnitude in declining wind speed, followed by spring, autumn and summer. The annual and seasonal frequencies of wind speed extremes (days) also decreased, more prominently for winter than for the other seasons. The declining trends in wind speed and extremes were formed mainly by some rapid declines during the 1970s and 1980s. The maximum declining trend in wind speed occurred at Chaoyang (CY), a station within the central business district (CBD) of Beijing with the highest level of urbanization. The declining trends were in general smaller in magnitude away from the city center, except for the winter case in which the maximum declining trend shifted northeastward to rural Miyun (MY). The influence of urbanization on the annual wind speed was estimated to be about -0.05 m s-1 (10 yr)-1 during 1960-2008, accounting for around one fifth of the regional mean declining trend. The annual and seasonal geostrophic wind speeds around Beijing, based on daily mean sea level pressure (MSLP) from the ERA-40 reanalysis dataset, also exhibited decreasing trends, coincident with the results from site observations. A comparative analysis of the MSLP fields between 1966-1975 and 1992-2001 suggested that the influences of both the winter and summer monsoons on Beijing were weaker in the more recent of the two decades. It is suggested that the bulk of wind in Beijing is influenced considerably by urbanization, while changes in strong winds or wind speed extremes are prone to large-scale climate change in the region.

  15. A Method for Sea Surface Wind Field Retrieval from SAR Image Mode Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Weizeng; SUN Jian; GUAN Changlong; SUN Zhanfeng

    2014-01-01

    To retrieve wind field from SAR images, the development for surface wind field retrieval from SAR images based on the improvement of new inversion model is present. Geophysical Model Functions (GMFs) have been widely applied for wind field retrieval from SAR images. Among them CMOD4 has a good performance under low and moderate wind conditions. Although CMOD5 is developed recently with a more fundamental basis, it has ambiguity of wind speed and a shape gradient of normalized radar cross section under low wind speed condition. This study proposes a method of wind field retrieval from SAR image by com-bining CMOD5 and CMOD4 Five VV-polarisation RADARSAT2 SAR images are implemented for validation and the retrieval re-sults by a combination method (CMOD5 and CMOD4) together with CMOD4 GMF are compared with QuikSCAT wind data. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) of wind speed is 0.75 m s-1 with correlation coefficient 0.84 using the combination method and the RMSE of wind speed is 1.01 m s-1 with correlation coefficient 0.72 using CMOD4 GMF alone for those cases. The proposed method can be applied to SAR image for avoiding the internal defect in CMOD5 under low wind speed condition.

  16. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  17. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  18. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  19. Removing the impact of wind direction on remote sensing of sea surface salinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Xiaobin; LIU Yuguang; ZHANG Hande

    2006-01-01

    Using the small-slope approximation model of microwave emission of rough sea surface, the impacts of sea surface wind on brightness temperature variations generated by the surface roughness, i.e. △Th,v, are investigated. Here △T denotes the brightness temperature variation, and "h" and "v" denote the horizontal and vertical polarizations respectively. △Th,v has a linear relation with wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) respectively. Further more, the impact of wind direction on SSS retrieval, under small incidence angles, can be removed by calculating (△Th+△Tv). These characteristics provide simple new ways to develop an SSS retrieval algorithm without wind direction factor.

  20. Wind fields of storms from surface isobars for wave hindcasting

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Santanam, K.

    Marine operations of various types are critically linked to mean and extreme wave statistics. In the Indian seas extreme wave conditions are caused by cyclones and steady strong monsoon winds. Wave data from cyclone areas are not directly available...

  1. Surface Fluxes and Wind-Wave Interactions in Weak Wind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    science /abl/cblast LONG-TERM GOALS We will investigate air-sea transfer of momentum, heat, and moisture under weak wind conditions. We will...over the ASIT tower and the wind direction was good for the tower sonic performance (6 days in total). As we found last year that although the momentum...flux derived from the aircraft is flight- direction dependent, which was recently found to be a common problem for all aircraft flux measurements

  2. Changes in Surface Wind Speed over North America from CMIP5 Model Projections and Implications for Wind Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Sujay Kulkarni; Huei-Ping Huang

    2014-01-01

    The centennial trends in the surface wind speed over North America are deduced from global climate model simulations in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project—Phase 5 (CMIP5) archive. Using the 21st century simulations under the RCP 8.5 scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, 5–10 percent increases per century in the 10 m wind speed are found over Central and East-Central United States, the Californian Coast, and the South and East Coasts of the USA in winter. In summer, climate models proje...

  3. Annual and interannual variability of scatterometer ocean surface wind over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, GS; Xu, Q.; Gong, Z.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the annual and interannual variability of ocean surface wind over the South China Sea (SCS), the vector empirical orthogonal function (VEOF) method and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method were employed to analyze a set of combined satellite scatterometer wind data during...

  4. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations.

  5. Surface-to-mountaintop transport characterised by radon observations at the Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric composition measurements at Jungfraujoch are affected intermittently by thermally-driven (anabatic mountain winds as well as by other vertical transport mechanisms. Using radon-222 observations, and a new analysis method, we quantify the land surface influence hour-by-hour and detect the presence of anabatic winds on a daily basis. During 2010–2011, anabatic winds occurred on roughly 40% of days, but only from April–September. Anabatic wind days were associated with warmer air temperatures over a large fraction of Europe and with a shift in airmass properties. Shifts were evident even when comparing the same radon concentrations, a proxy for land-surface influence. Aerosol washout, when quantified as a function of rain-rate using a radon normalisation technique, was also influenced by anabatic winds being more pronounced on non-anabatic days. Excluding the influence of anabatic winds, however, did not lead to a better definition of the unperturbed aerosol background than a definition based on radon alone, supporting the use of a radon threshold to identify periods with weak land-surface influence.

  6. Surface Wind Stresses and Triggering of Global Dust Storms on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischna, Michael A.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-10-01

    Global dust storms on Mars occur during summer in the southern hemisphere, but their occurrence in some years and not in others has stubbornly eluded explanation. Shirley (2016, in review, and at arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) and Mischna and Shirley (2016, in revision, and at arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137) have demonstrated the role of a so-called "coupling term acceleration" (CTA) in modifying the Mars global circulation through potential exchange of Mars' orbital and rotational momenta. The CTA has been incorporated into the MarsWRF general circulation model (GCM), which reveals distinct changes to the circulation due to the CTA, leading to conditions favorable to GDS formation in all years in which perihelion season GDS were observed, and conditions unfavorable in nearly all other years. These circulation changes reveal themselves, in part, through changes in surface wind stress, which is a strong function of near-surface wind speed. We present additional analysis of these results for the past years with perihelion season GDS (7 in total) showing commonalities in the evolution of surface stresses in the season leading up to GDS initiation. Specifically, the enhancement of surface stress during this pre-storm season, arising from the orbit-spin coupling in years with perihelion season storms, presents some common patterns. Among these are the rate and duration of increase of wind stress, and the minimum level of enhancement from the CTA that is apparently required in these years prior to initiation of a GDS. Previously we assessed changes in surface stress using a simple, dust-free model atmosphere. Here, further, we perform parallel simulations for MY 24-27 using realistic dust profiles from TES limb observations. The inclusion of dust in the GCM modifies atmospheric opacity and will alter global atmospheric temperatures leading to a markedly different atmospheric state. We find that the inclusion of dust in the atmosphere reduces the magnitude of surface stresses as

  7. Theoretical and Observational Consequences of Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignace, Richard

    1996-05-01

    My dissertation concerns the study of stellar winds from theoretical modeling of the wind structure and the development of observational diagnostics. First, I have investigated the effects of stellar rotation for the wind structure of stars across the H-R Diagram. The effect of rotation is to increase the wind density at the equator while decreasing the density near the poles. The model, known as the Wind-Compressed Zone (WCZ) model, predicts that equatorial wind compressions are most likely to occur for stars with rapid rotation, low terminal speeds, and/or radial velocity distributions that increase gradually from the base of the wind. It is found that in favorable cases, stellar rotation can play a significant role in shaping the winds of Wolf Rayet stars, B supergiants, Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, and even some novae. The second major part of my thesis relates to the fact that the WCZ model will predict the magnetic field structure in the wind, if the field strength is relatively weak. However, there are generally no good diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields in the weak field limit, where Zeeman splitting is smaller than Doppler broadening. Thus, I have explored applications of the Hanle effect for probing magnetic fields in stellar winds. This effect (which has been used in studies of the solar atmosphere) deals with the modification of resonance line scattering polarization by a magnetic field. Solutions for the Hanle effect in optically thin axisymmetric extended stellar envelopes have been derived. Relative to the zero field case, the Hanle effect can result in significant changes of the line polarization, in some cases causing a position angle flip of 90(deg) . With multiline observations the Hanle effect is a viable diagnostic of stellar magnetic fields in the range 1-1000 Gauss. This thesis work was completed under the supervision of Joseph Cassinelli and in collaboration with Kenneth Nordsieck and Jon Bjorkman.

  8. A comparative study on 3-D solar wind structure observed by Ulysses and MHD simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; XIANG Changqing; ZHONG Dingkun; FAN Quanlin

    2005-01-01

    During Ulysses' first rapid pole-to-pole transit from September 1994 to June 1995, its observations showed that middle- or high-speed solar winds covered all latitudes except those between -20° and +20° near the ecliptic plane,where the velocity was 300-450 km/s. At poleward 40°,however, only fast solar winds at the speed of 700-870 km/s were observed. In addition, the transitions from low-speed wind to high-speed wind or vice versa were abrupt. In this paper, the large-scale structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses near solar minimum is simulated by using the three-dimensional numerical MHD model. The model combines TVD Lax-Friedrich scheme and MacCormack Ⅱ scheme and decomposes the calculation region into two regions: one from 1 to 22 Rs and the other from 18 Rs to 1 AU.Based on the observations of the solar photospheric magnetic field and an addition of the volumetric heating to MHD equations, the large-scale solar wind structure mentioned above is reproduced by using the three-dimensional MHD model and the numerical results are roughly consistent with Ulysses' observations. Our simulation shows that the initial magnetic field topology and the addition of volume heating may govern the bimodal structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses and also demonstrates that the three-dimensional MHD numerical model used here is efficient in modeling the large-scale solar wind structure.

  9. Spectral Properties of ENVISAT ASAR and QuikSCAT Surface Winds in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Badger, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Spectra derived from ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) and QuikSCAT near-surface ocean winds are investigated over the North Sea. The two sensors offer a wide range of spatial resolutions, from 600 m to 25 km, with different spatial coverage over the area of interest. This provides...... a unique opportunity to study the impact of the spatial resolution on the spectral properties of the wind over a wide range of length scales. Initially, a sub-domain in the North Sea is chosen, due to the overlap of 87 wind scenes from both sensors. The impact of the spatial resolution is manifested...... or lower. The lower power levels of coarser resolution wind products, particularly when comparing QuikSCAT to ENVISAT ASAR, strongly suggest that the effective resolution of the wind products should be high enough to resolve the spectral properties. Spectra computed from 87 wind maps are consistent...

  10. Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity and Wind from The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Tang, W.; Hayashi, A.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, the first Earth Science Decadal Survey mission, was launched January 31, 2015 to provide high-resolution, frequent-revisit global mapping of soil moisture. SMAP has two instruments, a polarimetric radiometer and a multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar. Both instruments operate at L-band frequencies (~ 1GHz) and share a single 6-m rotating mesh antenna, producing a fixed incidence angle conical scan at 40⁰ across a 1000-km swath and a 2-3 day global revisit. The SMAP SSS and ocean surface wind retrieval algorithm developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory leverages the QuikSCAT and Aquarius algorithms to account for the two-look geometry (fore and aft looks from the conical scan) and dual-polarization observations for simultaneous retrieval of SSS and wind speed. The retrieval algorithm has been applied to more than three months of SMAP radiometer data. Comparison with the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) wind speed suggests that the SMAP wind speed reaches an accuracy of about 0.7 ms-1. The preliminary assessment of the SMAP SSS products gridded at 50 km spatial resolution and weekly intervals is promising. The spatial patterns of the SSS agree well with climatological distributions, but exhibit several unique spatial and temporal features. The temporal evolutions of freshwater plumes from several major rivers, such as the Amazon, Niger, Congo, Ganges, and Mississippi, are all consistent with the timing of rainy and dry seasons, indicated in the SMAP's soil moisture products. Rigorous accuracy assessment will be performed by comparison with in situ SSS data from buoys and ARGO floats. The SMAP evaluation products will be released to the public prior to November 2015.

  11. Applications of SMAP data to retrieval of ocean surface wind and salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon; Fore, Alexander; Tang, Wenqing; Hayashi, Akiko; Stiles, Bryan; Zhang, Fuqing; Weng, Yonghui; Real, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    We have examined the L-band radiometer and radar data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission for ocean research and applications. We find that the SMAP data are in excellent agreement with the geophysical model function (GMF) derived from the Aquarius data up to a wind speed of 20 ms-1. For severe wind conditions, the higher resolution data from SMAP allowed us to assess the sensitivity of L-band radiometer signals to hurricane force winds. We applied the L-band GMF to the retrieval of ocean surface wind and SSS from the SMAP data. Comparison with the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting, WindSat and RapidSCAT wind speeds suggests that SMAP's radiometer wind speed reaches an excellent accuracy of about 1.1-1.7 ms-1 below a wind speed of 20 ms-1. We have also found that the maximum wind speed derived from the SMAP radiometer data can reach 140 knots for severe storms and are generally in good agreement with the hurricane track analysis and operational aircraft Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer wind speeds. The spatial patterns of the SMAP SSS agree well with climatological distributions, but exhibit several unique spatial and temporal features.

  12. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Gust (knots)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind gust forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  13. Requirements for large-eddy simulation of surface wind gusts in a mountain valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Michael J.; Purnell, Don; Lauren, Michael K.

    1996-09-01

    During the passage of a front, data from a light-weight cup anemometer and wind vane, sited in a steep-walled glacial valley of the Mt Cook region of the Southern Alps of New Zealand, were analysed to derive a power spectrum of the wind velocity for periods between 0.5 and 16 min. The energy spectrum roughly followed a -5/3 power law over the range of periods from 0.5 4 min — as might be expected in the case of an inertial subrange of eddies. However, any inertial subrange clearly does not extend to periods longer than this. We suggest that the observed eddies were generated in a turbulent wake associated with flow separation at the ridge crests, and large eddies are shed at periods of 4 8 min or more. A compressible fluid-dynamic model, with a Smagorinsky turbulence closure scheme and a “law of the wall” at the surface, was used to calculate flow over a cross section through this area in neutrally stratified conditions. A range of parameters was explored to assess some of the requirements for simulating surface wind gusts in mountainous terrain in New Zealand. In order to approximate the observed wind spectrum at Tasman aerodrome, Mount Cook, we found the model must be three-dimensional, with a horizontal resolution better than 250 m and with a Reynolds-stress eddy viscosity of less than 5 m2 s-1. In two-dimensional simulations, the eddies were too big in size and in amplitude and at the surface this was associated with reversed flow extending too far downstream. In contrast the three-dimensional simulations gave a realistic gusting effect associated with large scale “cat's paws” (a bigger variety of those commonly seen over water downstream of moderate hills), with reversed flow only at the steep part of the lee slope. The simulations were uniformly improved by better resolution, at all tested resolutions down to 250 m mesh size. The spectra of large eddies simulated in steep terrain were not very sensitive to the details of the eddy stress formulation

  14. Future GLAST observations of Supernova remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Funk, S

    2007-01-01

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of ~100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range betwee...

  15. Doppler lidar investigation of wind turbine wake characteristics and atmospheric turbulence under different surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaochun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi

    2017-06-12

    Four field experiments based on Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar with different surface roughness have been carried out in 2013-2015 to study the turbulent wind field in the vicinity of operating wind turbine in the onshore and offshore wind parks. The turbulence characteristics in ambient atmosphere and wake area was analyzed using transverse structure function based on Plane Position Indicator scanning mode. An automatic wake processing procedure was developed to determine the wake velocity deficit by considering the effect of ambient velocity disturbance and wake meandering with the mean wind direction. It is found that the turbine wake obviously enhances the atmospheric turbulence mixing, and the difference in the correlation of turbulence parameters under different surface roughness is significant. The dependence of wake parameters including the wake velocity deficit and wake length on wind velocity and turbulence intensity are analyzed and compared with other studies, which validates the empirical model and simulation of a turbine wake for various atmosphere conditions.

  16. Estimating wind velocity standard deviation values in the inertial sublayer from observations in the roughness sublayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabino, Simona; Trini Castelli, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    In air quality practice, observed data are often input to air pollution models to simulate the pollutants dispersion and to estimate their concentration. When the area of interest includes urban sites, observed data collected at urban or suburban stations can be available, and it can happen to use them for estimating surface layer parameters given in input to the models. In such case, roughness sublayer quantities may enter the parameterizations of the turbulence variables as if they were representative of the inertial sublayer, possibly leading to a not appropriate application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. We investigate whether it is possible to derive suitable values of the wind velocity standard deviations for the inertial sublayer using the friction velocity and stability parameter observed in the roughness sublayer, inside a similarity-like analytical function. For this purpose, an analysis of sonic anemometer data sets collected in suburban and urban sites is proposed. The values derived through this approach are compared to actual observations in the inertial sublayer. The transferability of the empirical coefficients estimated for the similarity functions between different sites, characterized by similar or different morphologies, is also addressed. The derived functions proved to be a reasonable approximation of the actual data. This method was found to be feasible and generally reliable, and can be a reference to keep using, in air pollution models, the similarity theory parameterizations when measurements are available only in the roughness sublayer.

  17. Comparison among four kinds of data of sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢强; 王卫强; 毛庆文

    2002-01-01

    By using remote sensing (ERS) data, FSU data, GOADS data and Hellerman & Rcsenstein objective analysis data to analyze the sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea, it is found that the remote sensing data have higher resolution and more reasonable values. Therefore we suggest that remote sensing data be chosen in the study of climatological features of sea surface wind stress and its seasonal variability in the South China Sea, especially in the study of small and middle scale eddies.

  18. SOHO observations of the north polar solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Betta, R.; Orlando, S.; Reale, F.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.; Fineschi, S.; Romoli, M.; Brekke, P.; Fludra, A.; Gurman, J. B.; Lemaire, P.; Schuhle, U.

    1997-01-01

    The observations performed with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) are reported on. These observations concerned the Lyman alpha and O VI 1032 A and 1037 A lines and covered the heliocentric distance from 1.5 to 3.5 solar radii. The corresponding inner corona was observed with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS) and the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) in several chromospheric and coronal lines, including those observed with UVCS. The images provided an overall scenario of the polar coronal hole.

  19. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J L; Fainberg, J; Stone, R G

    1983-11-04

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  20. The impact of Surface Wind Velocity Data Assimilation on the Predictability of Plume Advection in the Lower Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Thomas; Kajino, Mizuo; Kunii, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    The authors investigated the impact of surface wind velocity data assimilation on the predictability of plume advection in the lower troposphere exploiting the radioactive cesium emitted by the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 as an atmospheric tracer. It was because the radioactive cesium plume was dispersed from the sole point source exactly placed at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and its surface concentration was measured at many locations with a high frequency and high accuracy. We used a non-hydrostatic regional weather prediction model with a horizontal resolution of 3 km, which was coupled with an ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system in this study, to simulate the wind velocity and plume advection. The main module of this weather prediction model has been developed and used operationally by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) since before March 2011. The weather observation data assimilated into the model simulation were provided from two data resources; [#1] the JMA observation archives collected for numerical weather predictions (NWPs) and [#2] the land-surface wind velocity data archived by the JMA surface weather observation network. The former dataset [#1] does not contain land-surface wind velocity observations because their spatial representativeness is relatively small and therefore the land-surface wind velocity data assimilation normally deteriorates the more than one day NWP performance. The latter dataset [#2] is usually used for real-time weather monitoring and never used for the data assimilation of more than one day NWPs. We conducted two experiments (STD and TEST) to reproduce the radioactive cesium plume behavior for 48 hours from 12UTC 14 March to 12UTC 16 March 2011 over the land area of western Japan. The STD experiment was performed to replicate the operational NWP using only the #1 dataset, not assimilating land-surface wind observations. In contrast, the TEST experiment was performed assimilating both

  1. Influence of persistent wind scour on the surface mass balance of Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, I.; Bell, R.E.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Broeke, M.R. van den

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow accumulation over Antarctica is a key constraint for estimates of the Antarctic mass balance, as well as climatic interpretations of ice-core records1,2. Over Antarctica, near-surface winds accelerate down relatively steep surface slopes, eroding and sublimati

  2. Examining Periodic Solar Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Viall, Nicholeen M; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell; 10.1007/s11207-010-9633-1

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length-scales as small as \\approx 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence (2008) examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also non-turbulent periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper (2009) analyzed the {\\alpha} to proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed ...

  3. Disturbance observer based pitch control of wind turbines for disturbance rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Xu; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    In this research, a disturbance observer based (DOB) control scheme is illustrated to reject the unknown low frequency disturbances to wind turbines. Specifically, we aim at maintaining the constant output power but achieving better generator speed regulation when the wind turbine is operated at time-varying and turbulent wind field. The disturbance observer combined with a filter is designed to asymptotically reject the persistent unknown time-varying disturbances. The proposed algorithm is tested in both linearized and nonlinear NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine. The application of this DOB pitch controller achieves improved power and speed regulation in Region 3 compared with a baseline gain scheduling PID collective controller both in linearized and nonlinear plant.

  4. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this "quasar mode" feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been dir...

  5. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Barabash, Stas; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Fraenz, Markus; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho,George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Solomon, Sean C.; Zhang, Tielong; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    At 23:08 UTC on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude of 338 kin during its final flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements provides a rare opportunity to examine the influence of upstream conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of new features of the Venus - solar wind interaction including hot flow anomalies upstream of the bow shock, a flux rope in the near-tail and a two-point determination of the timescale for magnetic flux transport through this induced magnetosphere. Citation: Stavin, J. A., et al. (2009), MESSENGER and Venus Express observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus,

  6. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  7. Field study and numerical modeling of wind and surface waves at the middle-sized water body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2015-04-01

    different parameterizations of flux both provided in WAVEWATCH III and in the inserted suggested experimental parameterization. For the cases with default WAVEWATCH III flux parameterizations, wave amplitude characteristics were overestimated, and spectral maxima showed the downshifting comparing with the measured data. Insertion of the suggested parameterization of flux input improved the coincidence. The difference in the use of WAM3 and Tolman & Chalikov source packages is discussed. To conclude, we discuss the applicability of suggested flux parameterization: it increases the accuracy of the simulations and makes possible the application of this technique for getting the surface wind waves forecasts on the water bodies. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research under Grant No. 15-45-02580,RFBR grant 14-05-31343, President Grant for young scientists MK-3550.2014.5, RSF 14-17-00667. References 1. Babanin and Makin Effects of wind trend and gustiness on the sea drag: Lake George study // Journal of Geophysical Research, 2008, 113, C02015, doi:10.1029/2007JC004233 2. Atakturk and Katsaros Wind Stress and Surface Waves Observed on Lake Washington // Journal of Physical Oceanography, 1999, 29, pp. 633-650

  8. An Observational Evaluation of Magnetic Confinement in the Winds of BA Supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Shultz, M; Petit, V; Grunhut, J; Neiner, C; Hanes, D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic wind confinement has been proposed as one explanation for the complex wind structures of supergiant stars of spectral types B and A. Observational investigation of this hypothesis was undertaken using high-resolution ({\\lambda}/{\\Delta}{\\lambda} {\\sim} 65,000) circular polarization (Stokes V ) spectra of six late B and early A type supergiants ({\\beta} Ori, B8Iae; 4 Lac, B9Iab; {\\eta} Leo, A0Ib; HR1040, A0Ib; {\\alpha} Cyg, A2Iae; {\

  9. CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rauscher, Emily, E-mail: ekempton@ucolick.org [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

  10. Generating wind fields that honour point observations and physical conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlabing, Dirk; Bárdossy, András

    2015-04-01

    Wind exhibits a strong spatial and temporal variability. In the application of lake modelling, these features are important for simulating water flows and stratification correctly, as mean and variance of wind speed determine the input of momentum into the lake. This makes a mere interpolation of point measurements an unsuitable method for producing model input. Additionally to concrete point measurements, more subtle aspects of wind fields are to be reproduced. It follows from the fact that wind vectors represent moving air that a wind field has to be divergency-free in order to be mass-conservative. Further, a temporal sequence of wind fields has to comply with the Navier-Stokes equation in order to conserve momentum. All these constraints can be met by representing the conditioned wind field as a linear combination of unconditioned, normally distributed random fields that individually possess the same spatial covariance structuref as observed wind fields. The aim of having the same covariance structure in the conditioned wind field is formulated as an optimization problem with respect to the weights used in the linear combination. With the help of Quadratic Programming (QP) and exploiting the convexity of the problem, feasible solutions can easily be found. In this QP problem, observations become linear constraints. Conservation laws can be incorporated by introducing control volumes in a similar fashion as they are used in fluid mechanics. Budgets of flows through these control volumes become integral conditions in the QP problem. The applicability of the approach will be shown using an artificial example and real-world data measured on shore and on a moving boat on Lake Constance.

  11. Mammal Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon OCS Data Release presents marine mammal observations from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field activity 2014-607-FA in the Oregon Outer...

  12. Mammal Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon OCS Data Release presents marine mammal observations from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field activity 2014-607-FA in the Oregon Outer...

  13. Geologic Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Floating Windfarm Suite Data Release presents geological observations from video collected on U.S. Geological...

  14. Geologic Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Floating Windfarm Suite Data Release presents geological observations from video collected on U.S. Geological...

  15. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  16. XMM-Newton observations reveal the disappearance of the wind in 4U 1630-47

    CERN Document Server

    Trigo, M Díaz; Miller-Jones, J C A; Guainazzi, M

    2014-01-01

    We report on XMM-Newton observations of the black hole X-ray binary 4U 1630-47 during its 2012-2013 outburst. The first five observations monitor the source as its luminosity increases across the high-soft state of accretion. In the sixth observation the source has made a transition to an "anomalous" state, characterised by a significant contribution of electron scattering. A thermally/radiatively driven disc wind is present in the first four observations, which becomes more photoionised as the luminosity increases with time. In the fifth observation, the wind is not observed any more as a consequence of strong photoionisation and the low sensitivity of this observation. This overall trend is then consistent with a fully ionised wind causing the electron scattering characteristic of the anomalous state in the sixth observation. A broad iron emission line co-exists with the absorption features from the wind in the first four observations but is not visible in the last two observations. We find that the changes...

  17. Summertime wind climate in Yerevan: valley wind systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, Artur

    2017-03-01

    1992-2014 wind climatology analysis in Yerevan is presented with particular focus given to the summertime thermally induced valley wind systems. Persistence high winds are observed in Yerevan during July-August months when the study region is strongly affected by a heat-driven plain-plateau circulation. The local valley winds arrive in Yerevan in the evening hours, generally, from 1500 to 1800 UTC, leading to rapid enhancement of wind speeds and dramatic changes in wind direction. Valley-winds significantly impact the local climate of Yerevan, which is a densely populated city. These winds moderate evening temperatures after hot and dry weather conditions observed during summertime afternoons. On the other hand, valley winds result in significantly higher nocturnal temperatures and more frequent occurrence of warm nights (tn90p) in Yerevan due to stronger turbulent mixing of boundary layer preventing strong surface cooling and temperature drop in nighttime and morning hours. The applied WRF-ARW limited area model is able to simulate the key features of the observed spatial pattern of surface winds in Armenia associated with significant terrain channeling, wind curls, etc. By contrast, ECMWF EPS global model fails to capture mesoscale and local wind systems over Armenia. However, the results of statistical verification of surface winds in Yerevan showed that substantial biases are present in WRF 18-h wind forecasts, as well as, the temporal variability of observed surface winds is not reproduced adequately in WRF-ARW model.

  18. Deep Chandra Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Created by PSR B0355+54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Noel; Rangelov, Blagoy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.; Romani, Roger W.; Posselt, Bettina; Slane, Patrick; Temim, Tea; Ng, C.-Y.; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A.; Buehler, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with PSR B0355+54 (eight observations with a 395 ks total exposure, performed over an eight month period). We investigated the spatial and spectral properties of the emission coincident with the pulsar, compact nebula (CN), and extended tail. We find that the CN morphology can be interpreted in a way that suggests a small angle between the pulsar spin axis and our line of sight, as inferred from the radio data. On larger scales, emission from the 7\\prime (≈ 2 pc) tail is clearly seen. We also found hints of two faint extensions nearly orthogonal to the direction of the pulsar’s proper motion. The spectrum extracted at the pulsar position can be described with an absorbed power-law + blackbody model. The nonthermal component can be attributed to magnetospheric emission, while the thermal component can be attributed to emission from either a hot spot (e.g., a polar cap) or the entire neutron star surface. Surprisingly, the spectrum of the tail shows only a slight hint of cooling with increasing distance from the pulsar. This implies either a low magnetic field with fast flow speed, or particle reacceleration within the tail. We estimate physical properties of the PWN and compare the morphologies of the CN and the extended tail with those of other bow shock PWNe observed with long CXO exposures.

  19. Characteristics of surface wind structure of tropical cyclones over the north Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mohapatra; Monica Sharma

    2015-10-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) wind field monitoring and forecast are important for mariners, ships on sea and modelling group for creation of synthetic vortex, and storm surge and coastal inundation forecasting. Among others, a multi-platform satellite surface wind analysis developed by Co-operative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), USA for the TCs are referred by India Meteorological Department for surface wind field monitoring of TC. Hence, a study has been undertaken to analyze the characteristics of surface wind distribution and hence the structure of TC based on the real time data available from CIRA during 2007–2013. The study includes 19 TCs over the Bay of Bengal (BOB) and six over Arabian Sea (AS). The maximum radial extent of winds reaching threshold values of 34(17), 50(26) and 64(33) knot (ms−1) in each of the four geographical quadrants has been segregated with respect to season of formation, basin of formation and intensity of TC for analysis. The objective is to develop a reference surface wind structure of TC and examine its validity with respect to physical processes. The size of outer core (34(17) knot (ms−1) wind radial extension) as well as inner core (50(26) and 64(33) knot (ms−1) wind radial extension) increases significantly with increase in intensification of TC over BOB during both pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons and over AS during pre-monsoon season. The outer core of winds in TCs over the BOB is asymmetric in both pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons and for all categories of intensity of TCs. On the other hand, the asymmetry in inner core winds is significantly less. There is also no asymmetry in radial wind extension over the AS during both the seasons, except in case of outer core wind radial extension of VSCS during pre-monsoon season. The low level environment like enhanced cross equatorial flow, lower/middle level relative humidity, vertical wind shear and proximity of TC to the land surface are the determining

  20. Fort Campbell, Campbell AAF, Kentucky. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    R SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) ,4671 FT CAMPRELL KY 73-81 "A-’ ALL WEATHtR. SPEED MAN...34., AFETAC SURFACE WINDS A2 EATHR SEV1CL/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 74f-71 FT CAMPRELL KY 73-81...SERVI11/mAC ’ 467 . FT CAMPRELL KY 73-31 Ju’. e PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) VfSf bitT STAT JTE -ILES !Ci Nu, i I -o i > I

  1. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2003-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the trajectory of the spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred on January 2, 1997 in the Japan Sea by fusing two microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. In this study 'fusion' is defined as the method of more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil than before. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced drift vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. The distribution of component of spill vector is mostly accounted for by the distribution of geostrophic velocity component during the study period with some discrepancies during March, 1997.

  2. Observer Backstepping Control for Variable Speed Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Gryning, Mikkel Peter Sidoroff; Blanke, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    . The nonlinear controller aims at regulating the generator torque such that an optimal tip-speed ratio can be obtained. Simply relying on the measured rotor angular velocity the proposed observer backstepping controller guarantees global asymptotic tracking of the desired trajectory while maintaining a globally...

  3. Wind flow modulation due to variations of the water surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomina, Olga; Ermakov, Stanislav; Kapustin, Ivan; Lazareva, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Air-ocean interaction is a classical problem in atmosphere and ocean physics, which has important geophysical applications related to calculation of vertical and horizontal humidity, aerosol and gas fluxes, development of global climate models and weather forecasts. The structure of wind flow over fixed underlying surfaces, such as forestry, buildings, mountains, is well described, while the interaction between a rough water surface and turbulent wind is far more complicated because of the presence of wind waves with different wavelength and amplitudes and propagating with different velocities and directions. The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally the variability of the wind profile structure due to variations of wave characteristics. The surface roughness variations were produced using a) surfactant films (oleic acid) spread on the water surface and b) mechanically generated waves superimposed on wind waves. The first case is related to oil slicks on sea surface, the second one - to the sea swell, which propagates into zones with lower wind velocities and interacts with wind flow. Laboratory experiments were conducted in the Oval Wind Wave Tank (OWWT) at the Institute of Applied Physics, cross-section of the wind channel is 30 cm x30 cm. Wave amplitude and the spectrum of surface waves were measured by a wire wave gauge, the wind speed was measured using a hot-wire anemometer DISA and a Pitot tube. In the experiments with surfactants, two frequencies of dripping of the oleic acid were studied, so that low concentration films with the elasticity parameters of about 19 mN/m and the high concentration ("thick") films with the elasticity of 34 mN/m were formed. In the experiments with mechanically generated waves (MGW) different regimes were studied with MGW amplitude of 3.4 mm and of 4.4 mm, and with MGW frequencies of 3.3 Hz and 3.7 Hz. It was shown, that: a) the mean velocity of the wind flow in the presence of surfactant and MGW can be described

  4. The solar wind at solar maximum: comparisons of EISCAT IPS and in situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Breen

    Full Text Available The solar maximum solar wind is highly structured in latitude, longitude and in time. Coronal measurements show a very high degree of variability, with large variations that are less apparent within in situ spacecraft measurements. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS observations from EISCAT, covering distances from 20 to 100 solar radii (RS, are an ideal source of information on the inner solar wind and can be used, therefore, to cast light on its evolution with distance from the Sun. Earlier comparisons of in situ and IPS measurements under solar minimum conditions showed good large-scale agreement, particularly in the fast wind. In this study we attempt a quantitative comparison of measurements made over solar maximum by EISCAT (20–100 RS and the Wind and Ulysses spacecraft (at 215 RS and 300–1000 RS, respectively. The intervals studied were August–September 1999, May 2000, September 2000 and May 2001, the last-named being the period of the second Ulysses fast latitude scan. Both ballistic and – when possible – MHD/ballistic hybrid models were used to relate the data sets, and we compare the results obtained from these two mapping methods. The results of this study suggest that solar wind velocities measured in situ were less variable than those estimated from IPS measurements closer to the Sun, with the greatest divergence between IPS velocities and in situ measurements occurring in regions where steep longitudinal velocity gradients were seen in situ. We suggest that the interaction between streams of solar wind with different velocities leads to "smoothing" of solar wind velocities between 30–60 RS and 1 AU, and that this process continues at greater distances from the Sun.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (solar wind plasma; sources of the solar wind; instruments and techniques

  5. Nonlinear Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion System Using Dfig with Aerodynamic Torque Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ouari; Mohand, Ouhrouche; Toufik, Rekioua; Taib, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    In order to improvement of the performances for wind energy conversions systems (WECS), an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, as an alternative to conventional PI-type control methods, a nonlinear predictive control (NPC) approach is developed for DFIG-based wind turbine. To enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. An explicitly analytical form of the optimal predictive controller is given consequently on-line optimization is not necessary The DFIG is fed through the rotor windings by a back-to-back converter controlled by Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), where the stator winding is directly connected to the grid. The presented simulation results show a good performance in trajectory tracking of the proposed strategy and rejection of disturbances is successfully achieved.

  6. The Climatology of Neutral Winds in the MLT Region as Observed From Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Gell, D.; Cooper, M.; Marsh, A.; Killeen, T.; Wu, Q.; Solomon, S.; Ortland, D.; Drob, D.; Emmert, J.

    2005-12-01

    Unique observations of the horizontal neutral winds in the altitude range 70 to 115 km have been performed from satellite platforms by HRDI and WINDII (UARS) and by TIDI (TIMED), the former since September 1991 and the latter since January 2002. All three experiments observed airglow on the terrestrial limb and derived vertical wind profiles of geophysical quantities by inverting altitude scans of Doppler shifted emission spectra. As a result, the global mesosphere / lower thermosphere region has been sampled for 14 years by a common technique resulting in an unparalleled neutral wind database. This database will be one of the key contributions to an improved Horizontal Wind Model (HWM). This paper will describe results from the first long term climatological study of the MLT region based on satellite wind measurements. The basic dynamic structure in the MLT is a tide, which also has long-term variation that has similar periods to the 27-month QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) and the SAO (semi-annual oscillation). Signatures of ultra-long variability require analysis of the full wind database.

  7. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  8. Wind‐gust parametrizations at heights relevant for wind energy: a study based on mast observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Vihma, T.; Gryning, Sven-Erik;

    2013-01-01

    gustiness conditions were studied using observations from two coastal/archipelago weather masts in the Gulf of Finland (northern Europe) with observation heights between 30 and 143 m. Only moderate and strong wind cases were addressed. Both masts were located over relatively flat terrain but the local...

  9. Using Surface Pressure to Improve Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Retrievals from Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Jochen Horstmann of NATO Undersea Research Centre ( NURC ). GD and NURC have developed separate methods for estimating wind directions. In addition, NURC ...has been developing “cross-pol” GMFs, which have a lot of promise in the high wind regime. The GD and NURC wind directions are merged into a single

  10. A new method for quality control of Chinese rawinsonde wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jie; Wang, Bin; Li, Qingxiang

    2014-11-01

    In 2006, the National Meteorological Information Center (NMIC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) developed its real-time quality control (QC) system of rawinsonde observations coming from the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) and established the Global Upper-air Report Dataset, which, with the NMIC B01 format, is generally referred to as the B01 dataset and updated on a daily basis. However, when the B01 dataset is applied in climate analysis, some wind errors as well as some accurate values with incorrect error marks are found. To improve the quality and usefulness of Chinese rawinsonde wind observations, a new QC method (NewQC) is proposed in this paper. Different from the QC approach used for B01 datasets, the NewQC includes two vertical-wind-shear checks to analyze the vertical consistency of winds, in which the constant height level winds are used as reference data for the QC of mandatory pressure level winds. Different threshold values are adopted in the wind shear checks for different stations and different vertical levels. Several typical examples of QC of different error types by the new algorithm are shown and its performance with respect to 1980-2008 observational data is statistically evaluated. Compared with the radiosonde QC algorithms used in both the Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS, http://madis.noaa.gov/madis_raob_qc.html) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the B01 dataset, the NewQC shows higher accuracy and better reliability, particularly when used to judge successive observation errors.

  11. Gravity wave observations by Doppler wind and temperature lidar measurements in the strato- and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Hildebrand, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    The observation of wind and temperature perturbations by gravity waves propagating throughout the strato- and mesosphere is a challenging task. Both the kinetic and potential energy density can be derived and yield information about ensemble mean properties of gravity waves. We measure temperatures and winds with the Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research station in Northern Norway (69N, 16E). Using two independently steerable telescopes and lasers we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components and temperatures simultaneously. The observations can be performed even under sunlit conditions, which is essential for measuring atmospheric perturbations over several days and during summer at this location. We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during night and to about 70 km during daytime. For one case with observations lasting more than 50 hours, we find amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wave field is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves, however quasi-monochromatic waves can be identified at limited times and allow a more detailed analysis of wave properties like propagation direction, amplitudes and the momentum flux.

  12. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  13. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  14. An integrated approach for wind fields assessment in coastal areas, based on bioindicators, CFD modeling, and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Bruno M.; Lopes, António

    2017-04-01

    Wind-deformed trees can be good bioindicators of the mean wind speed and prevailing wind directions. The current research used bioindicators, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and linear models to assess the wind fields in the windy coastal area of Cascais/Portugal. The main objectives of this research are to assess mean speed and directions of winds by using bioindicators and modeling techniques and to correlate both results in order to assess the best methods. The results obtained with the bioindicators showed that carpeting, the most severe deformation, was observed near the shoreline showing that the highest wind speeds are felt in this sector. Inland, where the winds have lower mean speeds, flagging forms are more frequent. When correlated with the bioindicators, the linear model gave better results than CFD models. We can conclude that in areas with good wind potential, the use of bioindicators can be a good alternative in the absence of wind data.

  15. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  16. Deep Chandra Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Created by PSR B0355+54

    CERN Document Server

    Klingler, Noel; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G; Romani, Roger W; Posselt, Bettina; Slane, Patrick; Temim, Tea; Ng, C -Y; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A; Buehler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with PSR B0355+54 (eight observations with a 395 ks total exposure, performed over an 8 month period). We investigated the spatial and spectral properties of the emission coincident with the pulsar, compact nebula (CN), and extended tail. We find that the CN morphology can be interpreted in a way that suggests a small angle between the pulsar spin axis and our line-of-sight, as inferred from the radio data. On larger scales, emission from the 7' (2 pc) tail is clearly seen. We also found hints of two faint extensions nearly orthogonal to the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum extracted at the pulsar position can be described with an absorbed power-law + blackbody model. The nonthermal component can be attributed to magnetospheric emission, while the thermal component can be attributed to emission from either a hot spot (e.g., a polar cap) or the entire neutron star surface. Surprisingly, the...

  17. The Alignment of the Mean Wind and Stress Vectors in the Unstable Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, M.; Dias, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    A significant non-alignment between the mean horizontal wind vector and the stress vector was observed for turbulence measurements both above the water surface of a large lake, and over a land surface (soybean crop). Possible causes for this discrepancy such as flow distortion, averaging times and the procedure used for extracting the turbulent fluctuations (low-pass filtering and filter widths etc.), were dismissed after a detailed analysis. Minimum averaging times always less than 30 min were established by calculating ogives, and error bounds for the turbulent stresses were derived with three different approaches, based on integral time scales (first-crossing and lag-window estimates) and on a bootstrap technique. It was found that the mean absolute value of the angle between the mean wind and stress vectors is highly related to atmospheric stability, with the non-alignment increasing distinctively with increasing instability. Given a coordinate rotation that aligns the mean wind with the x direction, this behaviour can be explained by the growth of the relative error of the u- w component with instability. As a result, under more unstable conditions the u- w and the v- w components become of the same order of magnitude, and the local stress vector gives the impression of being non-aligned with the mean wind vector. The relative error of the v- w component is large enough to make it undistinguishable from zero throughout the range of stabilities. Therefore, the standard assumptions of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory hold: it is fair to assume that the v- w stress component is actually zero, and that the non-alignment is a purely statistical effect. An analysis of the dimensionless budgets of the u- w and the v- w components confirms this interpretation, with both shear and buoyant production of u- w decreasing with increasing instability. In the v- w budget, shear production is zero by definition, while buoyancy displays very low-intensity fluctuations around

  18. High wind speeds prevent formation of a distinct bacterioneuston community in the sea-surface microlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlff, Janina; Stolle, Christian; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Hodapp, Dorothee; Wurl, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) at the boundary between atmosphere and hydrosphere represents a demanding habitat for bacteria. Wind speed is a crucial but poorly studied factor for its physical integrity. Increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, as suggested for future climate scenarios, may particularly act on this habitat at the air-sea interface. We investigated the effect of increasing wind speeds and different pCO2 levels on SML microbial communities in a wind-wave tunnel, which offered the advantage of low spatial and temporal variability. We found that enrichment of bacteria in the SML occurred solely at a U10 wind speed of ≤5.6 m s-1 in the tunnel and ≤4.1 m s-1 in the Baltic Sea. High pCO2 levels further intensified the bacterial enrichment in the SML during low wind speed. In addition, low wind speed and pCO2 induced the formation of a distinctive bacterial community as revealed by 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and influenced the presence or absence of individual taxonomic units within the SML. We conclude that physical stability of the SML below a system-specific wind speed threshold induces specific bacterial communities in the SML entailing strong implications for ecosystem functioning by wind-driven impacts on habitat properties, gas exchange and matter cycling processes. © FEMS 2017.

  19. Modeling Solar-Wind Heavy-Ions' Potential Sputtering of Lunar KREEP Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Meyer, F. W.; Harris, R. P.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Recent laboratory data suggest that potential sputtering may be an important weathering mechanism that can affect the composition of both the lunar surface and its tenuous exosphere; its role and implications, however, remain unclear. Using a relatively simple kinetic model, we will demonstrate that solar-wind heavy ions induced sputtering of KREEP surfaces is critical in establishing the timescale of the overall solar-wind sputtering process of the lunar surface. We will also also show that potential sputtering leads to a more pronounced and significant differentiation between depleted and enriched surface elements. We briefly discuss the impacts of enhanced sputtering on the composition of the regolith and the exosphere, as well as of solar-wind sputtering as a source of hydrogen and water on the moon.

  20. Wind and sunlight shape microbial diversity in surface waters of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica A; Aylward, Frank O; Eppley, John M; Karl, David M; Church, Matthew J; DeLong, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    Few microbial time-series studies have been conducted in open ocean habitats having low seasonal variability such as the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), where surface waters experience comparatively mild seasonal variation. To better describe microbial seasonal variability in this habitat, we analyzed rRNA amplicon and shotgun metagenomic data over two years at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA. We postulated that this relatively stable habitat might reveal different environmental factors that influence planktonic microbial community diversity than those previously observed in more seasonally dynamic habitats. Unexpectedly, the data showed that microbial diversity at 25 m was positively correlated with average wind speed 3 to 10 days prior to sampling. In addition, microbial community composition at 25 m exhibited significant correlations with solar irradiance. Many bacterial groups whose relative abundances varied with solar radiation corresponded to taxa known to exhibit strong seasonality in other oceanic regions. Network co-correlation analysis of 25 m communities showed seasonal transitions in composition, and distinct successional cohorts of co-occurring phylogenetic groups. Similar network analyses of metagenomic data also indicated distinct seasonality in genes originating from cyanophage, and several bacterial clades including SAR116 and SAR324. At 500 m, microbial community diversity and composition did not vary significantly with any measured environmental parameters. The minimal seasonal variability in the NPSG facilitated detection of more subtle environmental influences, such as episodic wind variation, on surface water microbial diversity. Community composition in NPSG surface waters varied in response to solar irradiance, but less dramatically than reported in other ocean provinces. PMID:26645474

  1. Doppler Navigation System with a Non-Stabilized Antenna as a Sea-Surface Wind Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasov, Alexey; Khachaturian, Alena; Veremyev, Vladimir; Bogachev, Mikhail

    2017-06-09

    We propose a concept of the utilization of an aircraft Doppler Navigation System (DNS) as a sea-surface wind sensor complementary to its normal functionality. The DNS with an antenna, which is non-stabilized physically to the local horizontal with x-configured beams, is considered. We consider the wind measurements by the DNS configured in the multi-beam scatterometer mode for a rectilinear flight scenario. The system feasibility and the efficiency of the proposed wind algorithm retrieval are supported by computer simulations. Finally, the associated limitations of the proposed approach are considered.

  2. Short term forecasting of surface layer wind speed using a continuous cascade model

    CERN Document Server

    Baile, Rachel; Poggi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a statistical method for short-term forecasting of surface layer wind velocity amplitude relying on the notion of continuous cascades. Inspired by recent empirical findings that suggest the existence of some cascading process in the mesoscale range, we consider that wind speed can be described by a seasonal component and a fluctuating part represented by a "multifractal noise" associated with a random cascade. Performances of our model are tested on hourly wind speed series gathered at various locations in Corsica (France) and Netherlands. The obtained results show a systematic improvement of the prediction as compared to reference models like persistence or Artificial Neural Networks.

  3. Observations of Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae: A VERITAS Key Science Project

    CERN Document Server

    Humensky, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The study of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae was one of the Key Science Projects for the first two years of VERITAS observations. VERITAS is an array of four imaging Cherenkov telescopes located at the Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona. Supernova remnants are widely considered to be the strongest candidate for the source of cosmic rays below the knee at around 10^15 eV. Pulsar wind nebulae are synchrotron nebulae powered by the spin-down of energetic young pulsars, and comprise one of the most populous very-high-energy gamma-ray source classes. This poster will summarize the results of this observation program.

  4. Comparison of remote sensing data with in-situ wind observation during the development of the South China Sea monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian; WANG Dongxiao; CHEN Ju; YANG Lei

    2012-01-01

    Wind measurements derived from QuikSCAT data were compared with those measured by anemometer on Yongxing Island in the South China Sea (SCS) for the period from April 2008 to November 2009.The comparison confirms that QuikSCAT estimates of wind speed and direction are generally accurate,except for the extremes of high wind speeds (>13.8 m/s) and very low wind speeds (<1.5 m/s)where direction is poorly predicted.In-situ observations show that the summer monsoon in the northern S CS starts between May 6 and June 1.From March 13,2010 to August 31,2010,comparisons of sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall from AMSR-E with data from a buoy located at Xisha Islands,as well as wind measurements derived from ASCAT and observations from an automatic weather station show that QuikSCAT,ASCAT and AMSR-E data are good enough for research.It is feasible to optimize the usage of remote-sensing data if validated with in-situ measurements.Remarkable changes were observed in wind,barometric pressure,humidity,outgoing longwave radiation (OLR),air temperature,rainfall and SST during the monsoon onset.The eastward shift of western Pacific subtropical high and the southward movement of continental cold front preceded the monsoon onset in SCS.The starting dates of SCS summer monsoon indicated that the southwest monsoon starts in the Indochinese Peninsula and forms an eastward zonal belt,and then the belt bifurcates in the SCS,with one part moving northeastward into the tropical western North Pacific,and another southward into western Kalimantan.This largely determined the pattern of the SCS summer monsoon.Wavelet analysis of zonal wind and OLR at Xisha showed that intra-seasonal variability played an important role in the summer.This work improves the accuracy of the amplitude of intra-seasonal and synoptic variation obtained from remote-sensed data.

  5. Observations of an aeolian landscape: From surface to orbit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary

    2016-12-01

    Landscapes derived solely from aeolian processes are rare on Earth because of the dominance of subaqueous processes. In contrast, aeolian-derived landscapes should typify Mars because of the absence of liquid water, the long exposure times of surfaces, and the presence of wind as the default geomorphic agent. Using the full range of available orbital and Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity images, wind-formed features in Gale Crater were cataloged and analyzed in order to characterize the aeolian landscape and to derive the evolution of the crater wind regime over time. Inferred wind directions show a dominance of regional northerly winds over geologic time-scales, but a dominance of topography-driven katabatic winds in modern times. Landscapes in Gale Crater show a preponderance of aeolian features at all spatial scales. Interpreted processes forming these features include first-cycle aeolian abrasion of bedrock, pervasive deflation, organization of available sand into bedforms, abundant cratering, and gravity-driven wasting, all of which occur over a background of slow physical weathering. The observed landscapes are proposed to represent a spectrum of progressive surface denudation from fractured bedrock, to retreating bedrock-capped mesas, to remnant hills capped by bedrock rubble, to desert pavement plains. This model of landscape evolution provides the mechanism by which northerly winds acting over ∼3 Ga excavated tens of thousands of cubic kilometers of material from the once sediment-filled crater, thus carving the intra-crater moat and exhuming Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons). The current crater surface is relatively sand-starved, indicating that potential sediment deflation from the crater is greater than sediment production, and that most exhumation of Mount Sharp occurred in the ancient geologic past.

  6. Observing system simulation experiments for the laser atmospheric wind sounder using global spectral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohaly, Gregg; Krishnamurti, T. N.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental to improving the understanding of the total Earth system are increased and improved observations. In the coming decade several spaceborne instrumented platforms will be constructed and implemented. These platforms will, in large, be housing the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument suite. One of the proposed instruments is a wind profiling system which is currently referred to as the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). This instrument will use a CO2 Doppler lidar wind profiler to give wind measurements with a vertical and horizontal resolution which has yet to be seen globally. The LAWS instrument is now a candidate for launch on a NASA EOS-B platform and is fundamental to increasing our understanding of Earth system science. The LAWS data sets will form an integral component of the temporally continuous data base needed for research of the coupled climate systems. This instrument's observations will aid in giving an improved description of the atmospheric circulation, including the transports of energy, momentum, moisture, trace gases, and aerosols. Also, the wind data will be assimilated and used as the initial state for many global forecast models at various operational centers. Results of system simulation experiments are discussed, and future experiments are described.

  7. Small is different: RPC observations of a small scale comet interacting with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James L.; Carr, Christopher M.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Henri, Pierre; Rosetta Plasma Consortium Team

    2016-10-01

    Rosetta followed comet 67P from low activity at more than 3 AU heliocentric distance to peak activity at perihelion and then out again. We study the evolution of the dynamic plasma environment using data from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC). Observations of cometary plasma began in August 2014, at a distance of 100 km from the comet nucleus and at 3.6 AU from the Sun. As the comet approached the Sun, outgassing from the comet increased, as did the density of the cometary plasma. Measurements showed a highly heterogeneous cold ion environment, permeated by the solar wind. The solar wind was deflected due to the mass loading from newly added cometary plasma, with no discernible slowing down. The magnetic field magnitude increased significantly above the background level, and strong low frequency waves were observed in the magnetic field, a.k.a. the "singing comet". Electron temperatures were high, leading to a frequently strongly negative spacecraft potential. In mid to late April 2015 the solar wind started to disappear from the observation region. This was associated with a solar wind deflection reaching nearly 180°, indicating that mass loading became efficient enough to form a solar wind-free region. Accelerated water ions, moving mainly in the anti-sunward direction, kept being observed also after the solar wind disappearance. Plasma boundaries began to form and a collisionopause was tentatively identified in the ion and electron data. At the time around perihelion, a diamagnetic cavity was also observed, at a surprisingly large distance from the comet. In late 2016 the solar wind re-appeared at the location of Rosetta, allowing for studies of asymmetry of the comet ion environment with respect to perihelion. A nightside excursion allowed us to get a glimpse of the electrodynamics of the innermost part of the plasma tail. Most of these phenomena are dependent on the small-scale physics of comet 67P, since for most of the Rosetta mission the solar wind

  8. Validation of sea surface temperature, wind speed and integrated water vapour from MSMR measurements. Project report

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    and autonomous weather station) were utilized for measuring sea truth parameters such as sea surface temperature (SST), Sea Surface Wind Speed (WS) and Columnar Water Vapor (WV). Total match-ups for SST and WS measured from various platforms exceeded 1400 (2 hrs...

  9. A fast model for mean and turbulent wind characteristics over terrain with mixed surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, P.; Mikkelsen, T.; Jensen, N.O.

    1997-01-01

    The real-time near-range atmospheric model chain in RODOS already includes the fast spectral LINCOM code, which was originally developed by Rise for modelling the mean wind fields over hilly, but otherwise homogeneous, terrain. Its output is used as a wind field driver for the dispersion model...... of arrival of radioactive clouds traversing, for instance, a land/water/land surface, and (2) for calculation of the turbulent shear stress, and thereby the scaling parameters, over mixed terrain....

  10. Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Wind of Hurricane Michael by GPS Reflected Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the propagating geometry and the waveform of the GPS reflected signals are expatiated in detail. Furthermore, the principle and the method of retrieving sea surface wind are presented. In order to test the feasibility of retrieval, the experiment data obtained by NASA in Hurricane Michael are used. The result shows that the retrieval accuracy of wind speed is about 2 m/s.

  11. Observational Limits on the Spin-down Torque of Accretion Powered Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Claudio; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The rotation period of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) represents a longstanding puzzle. While young low-mass stars show a wide range of rotation periods, many CTTS are slow rotators, spinning at a small fraction of breakup, and their rotation period does not seem to shorten, despite the fact that they are actively accreting and contracting. Matt & Pudritz proposed that the spin-down torque of a stellar wind powered by a fraction of the accretion energy would be strong enough to balance the spin-up torque due to accretion. Since this model establishes a direct relation between accretion and ejection, the observable stellar parameters (mass, radius, rotation period, magnetic field) and the accretion diagnostics (accretion shock luminosity) can be used to constrain the wind characteristics. In particular, since the accretion energy powers both the stellar wind and the shock emission, we show in this Letter how the accretion shock luminosity L UV can provide upper limits to the spin-down efficiency of the stellar wind. It is found that luminous sources with L UV >= 0.1 L sun and typical dipolar field components UV Lt 0.1 L sun) are compatible with a zero-torque condition, but the corresponding stellar winds are still very demanding in terms of mass and energy flux. We therefore conclude that accretion powered stellar winds are unlikely to be the sole mechanism to provide an efficient spin-down torque for accreting CTTS.

  12. Constraining storm-scale forecasts of deep convective initiation with surface weather observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Luke

    Successfully forecasting when and where individual convective storms will form remains an elusive goal for short-term numerical weather prediction. In this dissertation, the convective initiation (CI) challenge is considered as a problem of insufficiently resolved initial conditions and dense surface weather observations are explored as a possible solution. To better quantify convective-scale surface variability in numerical simulations of discrete convective initiation, idealized ensemble simulations of a variety of environments where CI occurs in response to boundary-layer processes are examined. Coherent features 1-2 hours prior to CI are found in all surface fields examined. While some features were broadly expected, such as positive temperature anomalies and convergent winds, negative temperature anomalies due to cloud shadowing are the largest surface anomaly seen prior to CI. Based on these simulations, several hypotheses about the required characteristics of a surface observing network to constrain CI forecasts are developed. Principally, these suggest that observation spacings of less than 4---5 km would be required, based on correlation length scales. Furthermore, it is anticipated that 2-m temperature and 10-m wind observations would likely be more relevant for effectively constraining variability than surface pressure or 2-m moisture observations based on the magnitudes of observed anomalies relative to observation error. These hypotheses are tested with a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using a single CI-capable environment. The OSSE results largely confirm the hypotheses, and with 4-km and particularly 1-km surface observation spacing, skillful forecasts of CI are possible, but only within two hours of CI time. Several facets of convective-scale assimilation, including the need for properly-calibrated localization and problems from non-Gaussian ensemble estimates of the cloud field are discussed. Finally, the characteristics

  13. North Atlantic atmospheric circulation and surface wind in the Northeast of the Iberian Peninsula: uncertainty and long term downscaled variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Bustamante, E.; Jimenez, P.A. [CIEMAT, Departamento de Energias Renovables, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Rouco, J.F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Madrid (Spain); Navarro, J. [CIEMAT, Departamento de Energias Renovables, Madrid (Spain); Xoplaki, E. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Bern (Switzerland); Montavez, J.P. [Universidad de Murcia, Departamento de Fisica, Murcia (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The variability and predictability of the surface wind field at the regional scale is explored over a complex terrain region in the northeastern Iberian Peninsula by means of a downscaling technique based on Canonical Correlation Analysis. More than a decade of observations (1992-2005) allows for calibrating and validating a statistical method that elicits the main associations between the large scale atmospheric circulation over the North Atlantic and Mediterranean areas and the regional wind field. In an initial step the downscaling model is designed by selecting parameter values from practise. To a large extent, the variability of the wind at monthly timescales is found to be governed by the large scale circulation modulated by the particular orographic features of the area. The sensitivity of the downscaling methodology to the selection of the model parameter values is explored, in a second step, by performing a systematic sampling of the parameters space, avoiding a heuristic selection. This provides a metric for the uncertainty associated with the various possible model configurations. The uncertainties associated with the model configuration are considerably dependent on the spatial variability of the wind. While the sampling of the parameters space in the model set up moderately impact estimations during the calibration period, the regional wind variability is very sensitive to the parameters selection at longer timescales. This fact illustrates that downscaling exercises based on a single configuration of parameters should be interpreted with extreme caution. The downscaling model is used to extend the estimations several centuries to the past using long datasets of sea level pressure, thereby illustrating the large temporal variability of the regional wind field from interannual to multicentennial timescales. The analysis does not evidence long term trends throughout the twentieth century, however anomalous episodes of high/low wind speeds are identified

  14. Wind Tunnel Study on Flows over Various Two-dimensional Idealized Urban-liked Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yat-Kiu; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2013-04-01

    Extensive human activities (e.g. increased traffic emissions) emit a wide range of pollutants resulting in poor urban area air quality. Unlike open, flat and homogenous rural terrain, urban surface is complicated by the presence of buildings, obstacles and narrow streets. The irregular urban surfaces thus form a random roughness that further modifies the near-surface flows and pollutant dispersion. In this study, a physical modelling approach is employed to commence a series of wind tunnel experiments to study the urban-area air pollution problems. The flow characteristics over different hypothetical urban roughness surfaces were studied in a wind tunnel in isothermal conditions. Preliminary experiments were conducted based on six types of idealized two-dimensional (2D) street canyon models with various building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios (ARs) 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/10 and 1/12. The main instrumentation is an in-house 90o X-hotwire anemometry. In each set of configuration, a sampling street canyon was selected near the end of the streamwise domain. Its roof level, i.e. the transverse between the mid points of the upstream and downstream buildings, was divided into eight segments. The measurements were then recorded on the mid-plane of the spannwise domain along the vertical profile (from building roof level to the ceiling of wind tunnel) of the eight segments. All the data acquisition processes were handled by the NI data acquisition modules, NI 9239 and CompactDAQ-9188 hardware. Velocity calculation was carried out in the post-processing stage on a digital computer. The two-component flow velocities and velocity fluctuations were calculated at each sampling points, therefore, for each model, a streamwise average of eight vertical profiles of mean velocity and velocity fluctuations was presented. A plot of air-exchange rate (ACH) against ARs was also presented in order to examine the ventilation performance of different tested models. Preliminary results

  15. Multispacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and magnetopause during extreme solar wind disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Erdos, G.; Nemeth, Z.

    2012-01-01

    by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component transverse to the solar wind flow. The observed magnetopause crossings could be predicted with a reasonable accuracy (0.1-0.2 RE) by one of the presented models at least. For geosynchronous magnetopause crossings observed by the GOES satellites, (1) the new model...... provided the best predictions when the IMF was extremely large having a large negative Bz component, and (2) the predictions of the model of Shue et al. (1998) agreed best with the observations when the solar wind dynamic pressure was extremely large. The magnetopause crossings close to the cusp observed......Three events are discussed from the declining phase of the last solar cycle when the magnetopause and/or the bow shock were observed unusually close to the Earth due to major interplanetary disturbances. The observed extreme locations of the discontinuities are compared with the predictions...

  16. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust front

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haldun Karan

    2014-02-01

    High temporal and vertical resolutions of kinematic and thermodynamic characteristics of a late-mature gust front are presented using the Mobile Integrated Profiling System andWeather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler data. As the gust front passed over the Mobile Integrated Profiling System vertical velocities and the horizontal wind field with 1 and 1.5 min temporal resolutions, respectively, were sampled within the gust front updrafts, gust frontal head and body structures. A 12-channel microwave profiling radiometer was used to delineate the thermodynamic properties with 5–6 min temporal and 100 m vertical resolution. Lidar backscatter from the 0.906 m ceilometer was also used to demonstrate the cloud field and the gust front depth. The gust front structurally and dynamically resembled laboratory simulated density current, and was composed of an elevated forward protrusion of a nose, and a turbulent mixing region at the top behind the head. The updrafts associated with the gust front that was moving into a stable layer were not surface rooted. Rather, the updrafts less than 3.5 ms−1 were observed 500 m above ground level during the gust front passage. These updrafts were present from above the nose level to top of the head. The observations indicated that kinematic and thermodynamic characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer significantly influenced the propagation speed, updraft characteristics, and overall structural organization of the gust front. The observations validated that observed propagation speed of the gust front was in close agreement with the calculated propagation speed by integrating the buoyancy term within the gust front depth.

  17. Suzaku Observations of PSR B1259-63: A New Manifestation of Relativistic Pulsar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mori, Koji; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-27

    We observed PSR B1259-63, a young non-accreting pulsar orbiting around a Be star SS 2883, eight times with the Suzaku satellite from July to September 2007, to characterize the X-ray emission arising from the interaction between a pulsar relativistic wind and Be star outflows. The X-ray spectra showed a featureless continuum in 0.6-10 keV, modeled by a power law with a wide range of photon index 1.3-1.8. When combined with the Suzaku PIN detector which allowed spectral analysis in the hard 15-50 keV band, X-ray spectra do show a break at {approx} 5 keV in a certain epoch. Regarding the PSR B1259-63 system as a compactified pulsar wind nebula, in which e{sup {+-}} pairs are assumed to be accelerated at the inner shock front of the pulsar wind, we attribute the X-ray spectral break to the low-energy cutoff of the synchrotron radiation associated with the Lorentz factor of the relativistic pulsar wind {gamma}{sub 1} {approx} 4 x 10{sup 5}. Our result indicates that Comptonization of stellar photons by the unshocked pulsar wind will be accessible (or tightly constrained) by observations with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the next periastron passage. The PSR B1259-63 system allows us to probe the fundamental properties of the pulsar wind by a direct means, being complementary to the study of large-scale pulsar wind nebulae.

  18. Impact of high-resolution sea surface temperature, emission spikes and wind on simulated surface ozone in Houston, Texas during a high ozone episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuai; Choi, Yunsoo; Jeon, Wonbae; Roy, Anirban; Westenbarger, David A.; Kim, Hyun Cheol

    2017-03-01

    Model-measurement comparisons for surface ozone often show significant error, which could be attributed to problems in meteorology and emissions fields. A WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ air quality modeling system was used to investigate the contributions of these inputs. In this space, a base WRF run (BASE) and a WRF run initializing with NOAA GOES satellite sea surface temperature (SST) (SENS) were performed to clarify the impact of high-resolution SST on simulated surface ozone (O3) over the Greater Houston area during 25 September 2013, corresponding to the high O3 episode during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ Texas campaign. The SENS case showed reduced land-sea thermal contrast during early morning hours due to 1-2 °C lower SST over water bodies. The lowered SST reduced the model wind speed and slowed the dilution rate. These changes led to a simulated downwind O3 change of ∼5 ppb near the area over land with peak simulated afternoon O3. However, the SENS case still under-predicted surface O3 in urban and industrial areas. Episodic flare emissions, dry sunny postfrontal stagnated conditions, and land-bay/sea breeze transitions could be the potential causes of the high O3. In order to investigate the additional sources of error, three sensitivity simulations were performed for the high ozone time period. These involved adjusted emissions, adjusted wind fields, and both adjusted emissions and winds. These scenarios were superimposed on the updated SST (SENS) case. Adjusting NOx and VOC emissions using simulated/observed ratios improved correlation and index of agreement (IOA) for NOx from 0.48 and 0.55 to 0.81 and 0.88 respectively, but still reported spatial misalignment of afternoon O3 hotspots. Adjusting wind fields to represent morning weak westerly winds and afternoon converging zone significantly mitigated under-estimation of the observed O3 peak. For example, simulations with adjusted wind fields and adjusted (emissions + wind fields) reduced under-estimation of the peak

  19. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  20. Statistical downscaling of IPCC sea surface wind and wind energy predictions for U.S. east coastal ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhigang; Xue, Zuo; He, Ruoying; Bao, Xianwen; Song, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A multivariate statistical downscaling method is developed to produce regional, high-resolution, coastal surface wind fields based on the IPCC global model predictions for the U.S. east coastal ocean, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), and the Caribbean Sea. The statistical relationship is built upon linear regressions between the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) spaces of a cross- calibrated, multi-platform, multi-instrument ocean surface wind velocity dataset (predictand) and the global NCEP wind reanalysis (predictor) over a 10 year period from 2000 to 2009. The statistical relationship is validated before applications and its effectiveness is confirmed by the good agreement between downscaled wind fields based on the NCEP reanalysis and in-situ surface wind measured at 16 National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoys in the U.S. east coastal ocean and the GOM during 1992-1999. The predictand-predictor relationship is applied to IPCC GFDL model output (2.0°×2.5°) of downscaled coastal wind at 0.25°×0.25° resolution. The temporal and spatial variability of future predicted wind speeds and wind energy potential over the study region are further quantified. It is shown that wind speed and power would significantly be reduced in the high CO2 climate scenario offshore of the mid-Atlantic and northeast U.S., with the speed falling to one quarter of its original value.

  1. Mountain Waves in High Resolution Forecast Models: Automated Diagnostics of Wave Severity and Impact on Surface Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An automated method producing a diagnostic of the severity of lee waves and their impacts on surface winds as represented in output from a high resolution linear numerical model (3D velocities over mountains (3DVOM covering several areas of the U.K. is discussed. Lee waves involving turbulent rotor activity or downslope windstorms represent a hazard to aviation and ground transport, and summary information of this kind is highly valuable as an efficient ‘heads-up’ for forecasters, for automated products or to feed into impact models. Automated diagnosis of lee wave surface effects presents a particular challenge due to the complexity of turbulent zones in the lee of irregular terrain. The method proposed quantifies modelled wind perturbations relative to those that would occur in the absence of lee waves for a given background wind, and diagnoses using it are found to be quite consistent between cases and for different ranges of U.K. hills. A recent upgrade of the operational U.K. limited area model, the U.K. Variable Resolution Model (UKV used for general forecasting at the Met Office means that it now resolves lee waves, and its performance is here demonstrated using comparisons with aircraft- and surface-based observations and the linear model. In the future, automated diagnostics may be adapted to use its output to routinely produce contiguous mesoscale maps of lee wave activity and surface impacts over the whole U.K.

  2. Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Turbine Inflow: A Case Study in the Southern Great Plains, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Wharton; Matthew Simpson; Jessica L. Osuna; Jennifer F. Newman; Biraud, Sebastien C.

    2014-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate choice of land surface model (LSM) on the near surface wind profile, including heights reached by multi-megawatt (MW) wind turbines. Simulations of wind profiles and surface energy fluxes were made using five LSMs of varying degrees of sophistication in dealing with soil–plant–atmosphere feedbacks for the Department of Energy (DOE) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Central Facili...

  3. A Study of DC Surface Plasma Discharge in Absence of Free Airflow: Ionic Wind Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study we are interested with the DC (Direct Current electric corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. We present experimental results related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the DC corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. We used different geometrical forms of dielectric surface such as a plate, a cylinder and a wing of aircraft of type NACA 0015. We present the current density-electric filed characteristics for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces non-thermal plasma so that it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. We have measured the ionic wind induced by the corona discharge in absence of free external airflow, we give the ionic wind velocity profiles for different surface forms and we compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity values. We notice that the maximum ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  4. Micro-swimmer dynamics in free-surface turbulence subject to wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioli, Cristian; Lovecchio, Salvatore; Soldati, Alfredo

    2016-11-01

    We examine the effect of wind-induced shear on the orientation and distribution of motile micro-swimmers in free-surface turbulence. Winds blowing above the air-water interface can influence the distribution and productivity of motile organisms via the shear generated just below the surface. Swimmer dynamics depend not only by the advection of the fluid but also by external stimuli like nutrient concentration, light, gravity. Here we focus on gyrotaxis, resulting from the gravitational torque generated by an asymmetric mass distribution within the organism. The combination of such torque with the viscous torque due to shear can re-orient swimmers, reducing their vertical migration and causing entrapment in horizontal fluid layers. Through DNS-based Euler-Lagrangian simulations we investigate the effect of wind-induced shear on the motion of gyrotactic swimmers in turbulent open channel flow. We consider different wind directions and swimmers with different reo-rientation time (reflecting the ability to react to turbulent fluctuations). We show that only stable (high-gyrotaxis) swimmers may reach the surface and form densely concentrated filaments, the topology of which depends on the wind direction. Otherwise swimmers exhibit weaker vertical fluxes and segregation at the surface.

  5. Unknown input observer based detection of sensor faults in a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an unknown input observer is designed to detect three different sensor fault scenarios in a specified bench mark model for fault detection and accommodation of wind turbines. In this paper a subset of faults is dealt with, it are faults in the rotor and generator speed sensors as we...

  6. Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

  7. Solar wind reflection from the lunar surface: The view from far and near

    CERN Document Server

    Saul, L; Vorburger, A; M., D F Rodríguez; Fuselier, S A; McComas, D J; Möbius, E; Barabash, S; Funsten, Herb; Janzen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Moon appears bright in the sky as a source of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). These ENAs have recently been imaged over a broad energy range both from near the lunar surface, by India's Chandrayaan-1 mission (CH-1), and from a much more distant Earth orbit by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) satellite. Both sets of observations have indicated that a relatively large fraction of the solar wind is reflected from the Moon as energetic neutral hydrogen. CH-1's angular resolution over different viewing angles of the lunar surface has enabled measurement of the emission as a function of angle. IBEX in contrast views not just a swath but a whole quadrant of the Moon as effectively a single pixel, as it subtends even at the closest approach no more than a few degrees on the sky. Here we use the scattering function measured by CH-1 to model global lunar ENA emission and combine these with IBEX observations. The deduced global reflection is modestly larger (by a factor of 1.25) when the angular scatteri...

  8. High-resolution satellite-derived ocean surface winds in the Nordic-Barents seas region: Implications for ocean modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Bourassa, M. A.; Hughes, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution (0.25°) ocean surface wind velocity data derived from satellite observations are used to analyze winds in the Nordic-Barents seas during 2007-2008. For the analysis, a Cross-Calibrated, Multi-Platform (CCMP), multi-instrument ocean surface wind velocity data set is utilized. The product has been developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) within Making Earth Science data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. A variational method was used to combine wind measurements derived from satellite-born active and passive remote sensing instruments. In the objective procedure, winds from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Operational Analysis (DS111.1) were used as the background fields. The ocean surface wind fields are compared with those derived from the National Centers for Environmental Protection/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The NCEP/NCAR fields are commonly used to provide atmospheric forcing for Arctic Ocean models. The utility of using high-resolution winds in the ocean modeling is discussed. In particular, air-sea heat fluxes estimated from the two wind data sets are compared. It is anticipated that wind fields with higher spatial and temporal resolution will better resolve small-scale, short-lived atmospheric systems. As an example, the ice free region in the Nordic and Barents seas is frequently impacted by very intense cyclones known as “polar lows” with wind speeds near to or above gale force. A polar low forms over the sea and predominantly during the winter months. The size of these cyclones varies greatly from 100 to 1000 km. Presumably small-scale cyclones are misrepresented or not resolved in the NCAR fields leading to biases in the air-sea flux calculations in the ocean models. Inaccurate estimates of the air-sea fluxes eventually lead to biases in the Arctic Ocean model solutions.

  9. Coastal Boundary Layer Characteristics of Wind, Turbulence, and Surface Roughness Parameter over the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Namboodiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the features of wind, turbulence, and surface roughness parameter over the coastal boundary layer of the Peninsular Indian Station, Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station (TERLS. Every 5 min measurements from an ultrasonic anemometer at 3.3 m agl from May 2007 to December 2012 are used for this work. Symmetries in mesoscale turbulence, stress off-wind angle computations, structure of scalar wind, resultant wind direction, momentum flux (M, Obukhov length (L, frictional velocity (u*, w-component, turbulent heat flux (H, drag coefficient (CD, turbulent intensities, standard deviation of wind directions (σθ, wind steadiness factor-σθ relationship, bivariate normal distribution (BND wind model, surface roughness parameter (z0, z0 and wind direction (θ relationship, and variation of z0 with the Indian South West monsoon activity are discussed.

  10. Exodus: redirecting Genesis for solar wind observations 4-8 million km from Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, J.; Barraclough, B.; Gosling, J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Wiens, R.; Liewer, P.; Murphy, N.

    2003-04-01

    Genesis is an ongoing NASA Discovery mission designed to collect samples of the solar wind at L1 and return them to Earth for analysis. After the return capsule is dropped off in September, 2004, the spacecraft, with its in situ solar wind ion and electron spectrometers, is available to perform a new solar wind mission. Spacecraft capabilities, including ample remaining Dv, allow it to achieve and maintain a distant retrograde orbit, a heliocentric orbit in which the spacecraft spends a significant amount of time ˜0.025 AU upstream and downstream of Earth (˜2.5x the Earth-L1 distance). From this orbit Genesis observations may be used, together with those from available L1 spacecraft, to compare solar wind parameters across important spatial scales. The multi-point collaborative studies will uniquely allow us to understand the propagation and evolution of solar wind plasma, as well as the internal spatial structure of large solar wind transients, for spacecraft separation distances of 0.025 to 0.05 AU. Such separation distances are significantly greater than can be attained between any pair of current and proposed satellites in Earth or in L1 halo orbits. At the same time the separations will be small enough to allow confident tracking of particular solar wind structures between spacecraft. In addition to groundbreaking science, the Genesis spacecraft would be a pathfinder for potential future space weather sentinels. We present a proposal to redirect the Genesis spacecraft after its prime mission is complete, and create a new, inexpensive mission: EXODUS.

  11. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bühl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: A comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that the measurements of the Doppler lidar can extent the view of the cloud radar and the wind profiler, especially when observing clouds.

  12. Entrainment of radio frequency chaff by wind as a function of surface aerodynamic roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, John A; Nickling, William G

    2003-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) chaff (approximately 2-cm x 25-microm diameter aluminum-coated glass silicate cylinders) released by military aircraft during testing and training activities has the potential to become entrained by wind upon settling to the Earth's surface. Once entrained from the surface there is the potential for RF chaff to be abraded and produce PM10 and PM2.5, which are regulated pollutants and pose health concerns. A series of portable wind tunnel tests were carried out to examine the propensity of RF chaff to become entrained by wind by defining the relationship between the threshold friction velocity of RF chaff (u(*t RF chaff)) and aerodynamic roughness (z(o)) of surfaces onto which it may deposit. The test surfaces were of varying roughness including types near the Naval Air Station (NAS), Fallon, NV, where RF chaff is released. The u(*t) of this fibrous material ranged from 0.14 m/sec for a smooth playa to 0.82 m/sec for a rough crusted playa surface with larger cobble-sized (approximately 6-26-cm diameter) rocks rising above the surface. The u(*t RF chaff) is dependent on the z(o) of the surface onto which it falls as well as the physical characteristics of the roughness. The wind regime of Fallon would allow for chaff suspension events to occur should it settle on typical surfaces in the area. However, the wind climatology of this area makes the probability of such events relatively low.

  13. A multi-model assessment of the impact of currents, waves and wind in modelling surface drifters and oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, M.; Bruciaferri, D.; Gerin, R.; Pinardi, N.; Poulain, P. M.; Garreau, P.; Zodiatis, G.; Perivoliotis, L.; Fazioli, L.; Sorgente, R.; Manganiello, C.

    2016-11-01

    Validation of oil spill forecasting systems suffers from a lack of data due to the scarcity of oil slick in situ and satellite observations. Drifters (surface drifting buoys) are often considered as proxy for oil spill to overcome this problem. However, they can have different designs and consequently behave in a different way at sea, making it not straightforward to use them for oil spill model validation purposes and to account for surface currents, waves and wind when modelling them. Stemming from the need to validate the MEDESS4MS (Mediterranean Decision Support System for Marine Safety) multi-model oil spill prediction system, which allows access to several ocean, wave and meteorological operational model forecasts, an exercise at sea was carried out to collect a consistent dataset of oil slick satellite observations, in situ data and trajectories of different type of drifters. The exercise, called MEDESS4MS Serious Game 1 (SG1), took place in the Elba Island region (Western Mediterranean Sea) during May 2014. Satellite images covering the MEDESS4MS SG1 exercise area were acquired every day and, in the case an oil spill was observed from satellite, vessels of the Italian Coast Guard (ITCG) were sent in situ to confirm the presence of the pollution. During the exercise one oil slick was found in situ and drifters, with different water-following characteristics, were effectively deployed into the oil slick and then monitored in the following days. Although it was not possible to compare the oil slick and drifter trajectories due to a lack of satellite observations of the same oil slick in the following days, the oil slick observations in situ and drifters trajectories were used to evaluate the quality of MEDESS4MS multi-model currents, waves and winds by using the MEDSLIK-II oil spill model. The response of the drifters to surface ocean currents, different Stokes drift parameterizations and wind drag has been examined. We found that the surface ocean currents

  14. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  15. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Travnicek, P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  16. High-frequency field observations of aeolian saltation interactions with turbulent boundary layer winds

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The wind-blown transport of sand is driven by turbulent winds that fluctuate over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Increasingly sophisticated models and wind tunnel experiments have attempted to capture these dynamics of aeolian saltation, yet model predictions often diverge substantially from field observations. To help fill this knowledge gap, we collected comprehensive high-frequency field measurements to characterize the dynamics of aeolian saltation under natural conditions. Here, we provide detailed description of our field deployments, including information about sites, instruments, and data processing methods. We then demonstrate how our field measurements can help to improve understanding of the mechanics of aeolian processes. We also describe the limitations of our measurement techniques and the needs for future work.

  17. Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Winds from space: A decade and a half of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, W. R.; Niciejewski, R.; Gell, D. A.; Cooper, M.; Marshall, A. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Wu, Q.; Killeen, T. L.; Ortland, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    Continuous space borne observations of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere wind field have now been made for more than 14 years. Wind measurements commenced in late 1991 with two wind sensing instrument on the UARS spacecraft (HRDI and WINDII) and continue to the present with the TIDI instrument on TIMED. The HRDI and WINDII instruments operated simultaneously during much of the operational life of UARS and have been extensively validated. Both TIDI and HRDI obtained measurements from 2002 to 2005 providing a very desirable three year overlap to cross calibrate the instruments. The length of this combined data set permits study of the inter-annual variability of this part of the atmosphere. This paper discusses some of longer term phenomena that have been studied.

  18. Longitudinal structure in atomic oxygen concentrations observed with WINDII on UARS. [Wind Imaging Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Thuillier, G.; Solheim, B. H.; Chandra, S.; Cogger, L. L.; Duboin, M. L.; Evans, W. F. J.; Gattinger, R. L.; Gault, W. A.; Herse, M.

    1993-01-01

    WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, began atmospheric observations on September 28, 1991 and since then has been collecting data on winds, temperatures and emissions rates from atomic, molecular and ionized oxygen species, as well as hydroxyl. The validation of winds and temperatures is not yet complete, and scientific interpretation has barely begun, but the dominant characteristic of these data so far is the remarkable structure in the emission rate from the excited species produced by the recombination of atomic oxygen. The latitudinal and temporal variability has been noted before by many others. In this preliminary report on WINDII results we draw attention to the dramatic longitudinal variations of planetary wave character in atomic oxygen concentration, as reflected in the OI 557.7 nm emission, and to similar variations seen in the Meine1 hydroxyl band emission.

  19. Statistical downscaling of sea-surface wind over the Peru-Chile upwelling region: diagnosing the impact of climate change from the IPSL-CM4 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goubanova, K. [CNES/CNRS/IRD/UPS, Laboratoire d' Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Toulouse (France); Instituto del Mar del Peru, Callao (Peru); Echevin, V.; Terray, P. [IPSL/UPMC/IRD, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie et de Climatologie, Experimentation et Approches Numeriques, Paris (France); Dewitte, B. [CNES/CNRS/IRD/UPS, Laboratoire d' Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Toulouse (France); Instituto del Mar del Peru, Callao (Peru); Instituto Geofisico del Peru, Lima (Peru); Codron, F. [UPMC/CNRS, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France); Takahashi, K. [Instituto Geofisico del Peru, Lima (Peru); Vrac, M. [IPSL/CNRS/CEA/UVSQ, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-04-15

    The key aspect of the ocean circulation off Peru-Chile is the wind-driven upwelling of deep, cold, nutrient-rich waters that promote a rich marine ecosystem. It has been suggested that global warming may be associated with an intensification of upwelling-favorable winds. However, the lack of high-resolution long-term observations has been a limitation for a quantitative analysis of this process. In this study, we use a statistical downscaling method to assess the regional impact of climate change on the sea-surface wind over the Peru-Chile upwelling region as simulated by the global coupled general circulation model IPSL-CM4. Taking advantage of the high-resolution QuikSCAT wind product and of the NCEP reanalysis data, a statistical model based on multiple linear regressions is built for the daily mean meridional and zonal wind at 10 m for the period 2000-2008. The large-scale 10 m wind components and sea level pressure are used as regional circulation predictors. The skill of the downscaling method is assessed by comparing with the surface wind derived from the ERS satellite measurements, with in situ wind observations collected by ICOADS and through cross-validation. It is then applied to the outputs of the IPSL-CM4 model over stabilized periods of the pre-industrial, 2 x CO{sub 2} and 4 x CO{sub 2} IPCC climate scenarios. The results indicate that surface along-shore winds off central Chile (off central Peru) experience a significant intensification (weakening) during Austral winter (summer) in warmer climates. This is associated with a general decrease in intra-seasonal variability. (orig.)

  20. ACE/SWICS OBSERVATIONS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS WITHIN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weberg, Micah J. [PhD Candidate in Space and Planetary Physics, 2435 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Professor, Space Science and Aerospace Engineering, Associate Dean for Entrepreneurship, 2429 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Lepri, Susan T., E-mail: mjweberg@umich.edu, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu, E-mail: slepri@umich.edu [Associate Research Scientist, 2417 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We present the first in situ observations of heavy ion dropouts within the slow solar wind, observed for select elements ranging from helium to iron. For iron, these dropouts manifest themselves as depletions of the Fe/H ratio by factors up to {approx}25. The events often exhibit mass-dependent fractionation and are contained in slow, unsteady wind found within a few days from known stream interfaces. We propose that such dropouts are evidence of gravitational settling within large coronal loops, which later undergo interchange reconnection and become source regions of slow, unsteady wind. Previously, spectroscopic studies by Raymond et al. in 1997 (and later Feldman et al. in 1999) have yielded strong evidence for gravitational settling within these loops. However, their expected in situ signature plasma with heavy elements fractionated by mass was not observed prior to this study. Using data from the SWICS instrument on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we investigate the composition of the solar wind within these dropouts and explore long term trends over most of a solar cycle.

  1. Super-Eddington stellar winds driven by near-surface energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g. unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in the giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem v_crit˜ (dot{E} G)^{1/5} (where dot{E} is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(rh). For vcrit ≳ vesc(rh), the wind kinetic power at large radii dot{E}_w ˜ dot{E}. For vcrit ≲ vesc(rh), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus dot{E}_w ≲ dot{E}. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass-loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass-loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.

  2. Origin of the solar wind: A novel approach to link in situ and remote observations. A study for SPICE and SWA on the upcoming Solar Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Context. During the last decades great progress has been achieved in understanding the properties and the origin of the solar wind. While the sources for the fast solar wind are well understood, the sources for the slow solar wind remain elusive. Aims: The upcoming Solar Orbiter mission aims to improve our understanding of the sources of the solar wind by establishing the link between in situ and remote sensing observations. In this paper we aim to address the problem of linking in situ and remote observations in general and in particular with respect to ESA's Solar Orbiter mission. Methods: We have used a combination of ballistic back mapping and a potential field source surface model to identify the solar wind source regions at the Sun. As an input we use in situ measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer and magnetograms obtained from the Michelson Doppler Interferometer on board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory. For the first time we have accounted for the travel time of the solar wind above and also below the source surface. Results: We find that a prediction scheme for the pointing of any remote sensing instrumentation is required to capture a source region not only in space but also in time. An ideal remote-sensing instrument would cover up to ≈50% of all source regions at the right time. In the case of the Spectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment instrument on Solar Orbiter we find that ≈25% of all source regions would be covered. Conclusions: To successfully establish a link between in situ and remote observations the effects of the travel time of the solar wind as well as the magnetic displacement inside the corona cannot be neglected. The predictions needed cannot be based solely on a model, nor on observations alone, only the combination of both is sufficient.

  3. Large Amplitude Whistlers in the Magnetosphere Observed with Wind-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2011-01-01

    We describe the results of a statistical survey of Wind-Waves data motivated by the recent STEREO/Waves discovery of large-amplitude whistlers in the inner magnetosphere. Although Wind was primarily intended to monitor the solar wind, the spacecraft spent 47 h inside 5 R(sub E) and 431 h inside 10 R(sub E) during the 8 years (1994-2002) that it orbited the Earth. Five episodes were found when whistlers had amplitudes comparable to those of Cattell et al. (2008), i.e., electric fields of 100 m V/m or greater. The whistlers usually occurred near the plasmapause. The observations are generally consistent with the whistlers observed by STEREO. In contrast with STEREO, Wind-Waves had a search coil, so magnetic measurements are available, enabling determination of the wave vector without a model. Eleven whistler events with useable magnetic measurements were found. The wave vectors of these are distributed around the magnetic field direction with angles from 4 to 48deg. Approximations to observed electron distribution functions show a Kennel-Petschek instability which, however, does not seem to produce the observed whistlers. One Wind episode was sampled at 120,000 samples/s, and these events showed a signature that is interpreted as trapping of electrons in the electrostatic potential of an oblique whistler. Similar waveforms are found in the STEREO data. In addition to the whistler waves, large amplitude, short duration solitary waves (up to 100 mV/m), presumed to be electron holes, occur in these passes, primarily on plasma sheet field lines mapping to the auroral zone.

  4. Hurlburt Field, Valparaiso, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-25

    TOTA,--- NUBE OF OBSERVATIONS 1--- -7 ’I.. C)AIA PRUCf.SSIN" r.VI ,NI3r 1 TAC(/USA, SURFACE WINDS 2 A WEATtER ShkVLE/ AC PERCENTAGE...T~ NNW ~ 3 110 9 1. 2,6 61__ __ __ __7__ __ Ile- 17 3.9 1-36--1011 10 ___ t ___ o z__ ____ -__ TOTA NUBE OF9 OB.41TON 14407 _____TA __’_ 0 * 8.5 .2

  5. Persistent aeolian activity at Endeavour crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars; new observations from orbit and the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Bell, James F., III

    2015-05-01

    Aeolian-driven bedform activity is now known to occur in many regions of Mars, based on surface and orbital observation of contemporary martian ripple and dune mobility events. Many of these sites have only been monitored with sufficient resolution data for the last few Mars years, when the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) began acquiring images of Mars. One exception is the well-monitored Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, which was one of the first known sites of unambiguous dune activity (migration and deflation). However, those early detections used lower resolution images over longer temporal baselines (versus the HIRISE data now available), leaving some measurements poorly constrained. New orbital and surface observations of Endeavour show multiple spatial (cm, m, km) and temporal (seasons, Mars year) scales of aeolian-driven surface change, which confirms earlier reports. Dome dunes in the eastern portion of the crater persistently deflate, disseminating dark sand across lighter-toned regolith and/or eroded bright dust, and likely contribute to the crater interior's episodic decreases in orbital albedo measurements. Other dome dunes are detected with the highest migration rates (4-12 m per Mars year) and volumetric sand fluxes reported yet for Mars. Estimated dune construction times or "turnover times" here and elsewhere on Mars are significantly shorter than martian obliquity cycles, implying that it is not necessary to invoke paleoclimate wind regimes to explain current dune morphologies. Located on the crater rim, the Opportunity rover detected evidence for near- and far-field aeolian-driven activity, with observations of spherules/sand movement in the rover workspace, bedform albedo alteration, and dust-lifting events. Observations of intracrater dunes show periodic shifting dark streaks that significantly constrain local wind regimes (directionality and seasonality). Constraints on wind directions from surface and orbital images

  6. Impacts of subgrid-scale orography parameterization on simulated surface layer wind and monsoonal precipitation in the high-resolution WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junhong; Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You; Jiménez, Pedro A.; Dudhia, Jimy; Hong, Jinkyu

    2015-01-01

    paper reports on the first attempt to investigate whether excessive precipitation over mountainous areas, which is a common problem in model simulations, could be remedied by the implementation of a more realistic surface wind field in the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. A series of 48 h short-range forecasts was conducted for the month of July 2006 within the triple-nested WRF configuration, for which the highest resolution of 3 km was focused on areas with complex orography over East Asian monsoonal regions. For accurate surface wind simulations, the subgrid-scale (SGS) orography parameterization scheme was employed. It was found that the simulated surface wind showed negative (positive) bias over mountainous (flat) regions when the SGS orography parameterization was excluded. After inclusion of the SGS orography parameterization, wind speed over mountainous (flat) regions increased (decreased), implying that the bias was mitigated. Moisture divergence (convergence) over the mountains (on the leeward side of the mountains) was induced, and surface latent heat flux increased along the mountain ranges following the improvement in the representation of the surface wind by the inclusion of the SGS orography parameterization. Eventually, excessive precipitation simulated over mountainous areas of East Asia, which is a feature commonly observed in numerical model studies, was alleviated because of the moisture divergence and increased surface latent heat flux.

  7. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  8. Dyeing of Snow Surfaces to Observe Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    of freezeup problems important to obtain a clear visual perspective and with water. We found that both coloring agents to obtain good photographic...a dye of methanol coloring in with floodlights, whereas Figure 7b is a view of the water. Freezeup at the sprayer nozzle was one same area lighted...from behind, problem and the snow surface had a blemished appearance because of the addition of the water, which then froze. Freezeup may not be a

  9. Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms (Keyed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to fill in the observation gap prior to the time when commercial aviation began in the U.S., The NCDC Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) retrieved...

  10. Super-Eddington Stellar Winds Driven by Near-Surface Energy Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Quataert, Eliot; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2015-01-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g., unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem vc ~ (Edot G)^{1/5} (where Edot is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(r_h). For vc > vesc(r_h) the wind kinetic power at large radii Edot_w ~ Edot. For vc < vesc(r_h), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus Edot_w < Edot. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation di...

  11. Correlation between dust events in Mongolia and surface wind and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganbat Amgalan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents dust event spatiotemporal distribution and regional trends, and the impact of surface wind and precipitation on dust occurrences in Mongolia. We used data collected between 2000 and 2013 from 113 meteorological stations in natural forest steppe, steppe, Gobi Desert, and mountain zones. We analyzed the relationship between dusty days, derived using the sum of days with dust storms and/or drifting dust, and days with strong winds (at a threshold wind speed of a constant 6.5 m s-1, hereafter, strong wind days and precipitation by comparing the dusty days in dust-frequent years, dust-less years, and dust-mean years. Dusty days in dust-frequent years were associated with strong wind days when the precipitation is about 10 mm and dust occurrences were suppressed by large amounts of precipitation (approximately 22 mm in dust-less years over the southeastern part of the Gobi Desert in May. We propose a potential dust index (PDI based on the correlations among dusty days, strong winds and precipitation. The PDI performed as predicted in most areas of the country in the spring season.

  12. Quantifying the impact of sub-grid surface wind variability on sea salt and dust emissions in CAM5

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Wan, Hui; Qian, Yun; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J; Sakaguchi, Koichi; LIU, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of sub-grid variability of surface wind on sea salt and dust emissions in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The basic strategy is to calculate emission fluxes multiple times, using different wind speed samples of a Weibull probability distribution derived from model-predicted grid-box mean quantities. In order to derive the Weibull distribution, the sub-grid standard deviation of surface wind speed is estimated by taking into ac...

  13. Conceptions of Tornado Wind Speed and Land Surface Interactions among Undergraduate Students in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broeke, Matthew S.; Arthurs, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain novice conceptions of tornado wind speed and the influence of surface characteristics on tornado occurrence, 613 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory science courses at a large state university in Nebraska were surveyed. Our findings show that students lack understanding of the fundamental concepts that (1) tornadoes are…

  14. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Ainslie, M.A.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform-related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modelling

  15. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Sea-surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate m

  16. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main non-platform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modeling

  17. Optimizing Surface Winds using QuikSCAT Measurements in the Mediterranean Sea During 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-28

    r.com/ locate / jmarsysOptimizing surface winds using QuikSCAT measurements in the Mediterranean Sea during 2000–2006 A. Birol Kara a,⁎, Alan J...flux algorithms. J. Geophys. Res. 113, C04009. doi:10.1029/2007JC004324. Large, W.G., Danabasoglu, G., Doney, S.C., McWilliams , J.C., 1997

  18. Lightning attachment to wind turbine surfaces affected by internal blade conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garolera, Anna Candela; Holboell, Joachim; Madsen, Soren Find

    2012-01-01

    on the blade surface instead of the receptor is also possible, with the risk of damages in the composite structure as a consequence. The present paper focuses on electrical fields and streamer activity in connection to conductive components inside a wind turbine blade when a downward leader is approaching...

  19. Evaporation of HD Droplets From Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalance Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaporation of HD Droplets from Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalancc Wind Tunnels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAD13...hr (lightly swirled on a rotating plateau). Then, the glass was rinsed with dematerialized water and dried (using appropriate fat-free non-felting

  20. Experiment about Drag Reduction of Bionic Non-smooth Surface in Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Li-mei; Ren Lu-quan; Han Zhi-wu; Zhang Shi-cun

    2005-01-01

    The body surface of some organisms has non-smooth structure, which is related to drag reduction in moving fluid. To imitate these structures, models with a non-smooth surface were made. In order to find a relationship be tween drag reduction and the non-smooth surface, an orthogonal design test was employed in a low speed wind tunnel. Six factors likely to influence drag reduction were considered, and each factor tested at three levels. The six factors were the configuration, diameter/bottom width, height/depth, distribution, the arrangement of the rough structures on the experimental model and the wind speed. It was shown that the non-smooth surface causes drag reduction and the distribution of non-smooth structures on the model, and wind speed, are the predominant factors affecting drag reduction. Using analysis of variance, the optimal combination and levels were obtained, which were a wind speed of 44 m/s, distribution of the non-smooth structure on the tail of the experimental model, the configuration of riblets, diameter/bottom width of 1 mm, height/depth of 0.5 mm, arranged in a rhombic formation. At the optimal combination mentioned above, the 99% confidence interval for drag reduction was 11.13 % to 22.30%.

  1. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Ainslie, M.A.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform-related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modelling

  2. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Sea-surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate m

  3. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main non-platform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modeling

  4. Near-surface wind speed statistical distribution: comparison between ECMWF System 4 and ERA-Interim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Raül; Gonzalez-Reviriego, Nube; Torralba, Verónica; Cortesi, Nicola; Young, Doo; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of seasonal forecast verification, knowing whether the characteristics of the climatological wind speed distribution, simulated by the forecasting systems, are similar to the observed ones is essential to guide the subsequent process of bias adjustment. To bring some light about this topic, this work assesses the properties of the statistical distributions of 10m wind speed from both ERA-Interim reanalysis and seasonal forecasts of ECMWF system 4. The 10m wind speed distribution has been characterized in terms of the four main moments of the probability distribution (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) together with the coefficient of variation and goodness of fit Shapiro-Wilks test, allowing the identification of regions with higher wind variability and non-Gaussian behaviour at monthly time-scales. Also, the comparison of the predicted and observed 10m wind speed distributions has been measured considering both inter-annual and intra-seasonal variability. Such a comparison is important in both climate research and climate services communities because it provides useful climate information for decision-making processes and wind industry applications.

  5. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  6. Using Surface Pressure To Improve Tropical Cyclone /Surface Wind Retrievals From SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Jochen Horstmann of NATO Undersea Research Centre ( NURC ). GD and NURC have developed separate methods for estimating wind directions. The GD and NURC ...Working version of SLP retrieval code, including necessary PBL model developments, that is compatible with GD, NURC and WiSAR file formats (as well as for...installed at NURC and we have been experimenting with Horstmann to determine if it can (or should) be included as an integrated part of the NURC SAR wind

  7. Evaluation of ENVISAT ASAR data for sea surface wind retrieval in Hong Kong coastal waters of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing; LIN Hui; ZHENG Quanan; XIU Peng; CHENG Yongcun; LIU Yuguang

    2008-01-01

    The C-band wind speed retrieval models,CMOD4,CMOD-IFR2,and CMODS were applied to retrieval of sea surface wind speeds from ENVISAT(European environmental satellite)ASAR(advanced synthetic aperture radar)data in the coastal waters near Hang Kong during a period from October 2005 to July 2007.The retrieved wind speeds are evaluated by comparing with buoy measurements and the QuikSCAT(quick scatterometer)wind products.The results show that the CMOD4 model gives the best performance at wind speeds lower than 15 m/s.The correlation coefficients with buoy and QuikSCAT winds are 0.781 and 0.896,respectively.The root mean square errors are the same 1.74m/s.Namely,the CMOD4 model is the best one for sea surface wind speed retrieval from ASAR data in the COastal waters near Hong Kong.

  8. Observations on Ventifacts and Wind-Polished Boulders in Pleistocene Coversands, Ice-Marginal New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitroff, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of New Jersey Pine Barrens' paleoenvironment biome has been problematic. The region's Pleistocene environment has been interpreted as cool and moist, with boreal forest. A competing interpretation envisioned cold, dry, semidesert conditions. Pebble- to boulder-sized ventifacts with a wide suite of erosional forms provide evidence for strong Pleistocene wind action, which occurred when the land was sparsely vegetated allowing an abundance of abradants to be easily entrained and transported. Although commonplace, ventifact presence and utility in paleoenvironmental reconstruction is ignored. Most ventifacts occur on upland surfaces and attest to stability in this part of the region's otherwise low-relief landscape, and their subsequent disarrangement provides clues to geomorphic processes and landscape evolution. Ventifacts progressed downslope along upper valley-side slopes largely by gravitational mass movement, particularly under periglacial conditions. Development of eolian features such as pavement einkante, scallops, and weathering pit modification can evolve only where sustained wind velocities are very high and sand sources are abundant. Pine Barrens ventifacts provide evidence that desert-like conditions prevailed. Some ventifact surfaces are covered with a silica glaze or an iron-enriched metal film, or both, indicating multiple episodes of wind abrasion. Coating study holds much promise for future dating and climate reconstruction investigations.

  9. WIND observations of plasma waves inside the magnetic cloud boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fengsi; ZHONG Dingkun; FENG Xueshang; YANG Fang; LIU Rui

    2005-01-01

    Based on the WIND observational data for the plasma waves from thermal noise receptor (TNR) working on the frequency 4―256 kHz and the solar wind and the magnetic fields, we analyze the plasma wave activities in the 60 magnetic cloud's boundary layers (BLs) and find that there are often various plasma wave activities in the BLs, which are different from those in the adjacent solar wind (SW) and the magnetic clouds (MC). The basic characteristics are that: (1) the enhancement of the Langmuir wave near the electronic plasma frequency (fpe) is a dominant wave activity, which occupies 75% investigated samples; (2) the events enhanced both in the langmuir and ion acustic (f < fpe) waves are about 60% of investigated samples; (3) broadband, continuous enhancement events in the plasma wave activities were observed in the whole frequency band of TNR, and about 30% of the 60 samples, however, were not observed in the SW and the MC investigated events; (4) although the ratio of the temperatures between the electon and proton, Te/Tp≤1, the ion caustic wave enhancement activities are still often observed in the BLs, which makes it difficult to ex-plain them by the traditional plasma theory. New results reported in this paper further show that the magnetic cloud's BL is an important dynamic structure, which could provide useful diagnosis for understanding the cloud's BL physics and could expand a space developing space plasma wave theory.

  10. Solar wind observations with the ion composition instrument aboard the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1989-01-01

    The principal observations obtained by the Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) flown on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft, which was in the solar wind from September 1978 to the end of 1982, before being directed to the far magnetotail of the Earth are discussed. Almost continuous observations were made of the abundances of 3He++, 4He++, 06+, 07+, Ne, Si and Fe in various charge states, and of their bulk speeds and temperatures. The results show that there is a strong tendency in the collisionless solar wind for the ionic temperatures to be proportional to the masses. For heavier ions these temperatures exceed typical coronal electron temperatures. 4He++, especially in high speed streams, moves faster than H+, and travels at the same speed as heavier ions. The mechanism leading to this heating and rapid streaming is still not entirely clear.

  11. Solar wind observations with the ion composition instrument aboard the ISEE-3 ICE spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1989-01-01

    The principal observations obtained by the Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) flown on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft, which was in the solar wind from September 1978 to the end of 1982, before being directed to the far magnetotail of the Earth are discussed. Almost continuous observations were made of the abundances of 3He++, 4He++, O6+, O7+, Ne, Si and Fe in various charge states, and of their bulk speeds and temperatures. The results show that there is a strong tendency in the collisionless solar wind for the ionic temperatures to be proportional to the masses. For heavier ions these temperatures exceed typical coronal electron temperatures. 4He++, especially in high speed streams, moves faster than H+, and travels at the same speed as heavier ions. The mechanism leading to this heating and rapid streaming is still not entirely clear.

  12. Wind-profiler observations of gravity waves produced by convection at mid-latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Choi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a case study which includes regions of large rapidly varying vertical velocities observed by a VHF wind-profiler at Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W. Analysis indicates that this region is associated with gravity waves above the tropopause level and simultaneous regions of convective activity below the tropopause level. This case study also suggests that convective activity can be identified effectively by finding periods of large uncertainties on the derived velocities. These regions are hypothesized to be related to regions of small-scale inhomogeneity in the wind field. Examination suggests that the large vertical velocity fluctuations above these convective regions are short period gravity wave packets as expected from theory. In addition the vertical flux of the horizontal momentum associated with the gravity waves also displays the pattern of reversal observed in previous studies.

  13. Coherent motions and time scales that control heat and mass transfer at wind-swept water surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Forecast of the heat and chemical budgets of lakes, rivers, and oceans requires improved predictive understanding of air-water interfacial transfer coefficients. Here we present laboratory observations of the coherent motions that occupy the air-water interface at wind speeds (U10) 1.1-8.9 m/s. Spatiotemporal near-surface velocity data and interfacial renewal data are made available by a novel flow tracer method. The relative activity, velocity scales, and time scales of the various coherent interfacial motions are measured, namely for Langmuir circulations, streamwise streaks, nonbreaking wind waves, parasitic capillary waves, nonturbulent breaking wind waves, and turbulence-generating breaking wind waves. Breaking waves exhibit a sudden jump in streamwise interfacial velocity wherein the velocity jumps up to exceed the wave celerity and destroys nearby parasitic capillary waves. Four distinct hydrodynamic regimes are found to exist between U10 = 0 and 8.9 m/s, each with a unique population balance of the various coherent motions. The velocity scales, time scales, and population balance of the different coherent motions are input to a first-principles gas transfer model to explain the waterside transfer coefficient (kw) as well as experimental patterns of temperature and gas concentration. The model mixes concepts from surface renewal and divergence theories and requires surface divergence strength (β), the Lagrangian residence time inside the upwelling zone (tLu), and the total lifetime of new interface before it is downwelled (tLT). The model's output agrees with time-averaged measurements kw, patterns of temperature in infrared photographs, and spatial patterns of gas concentration and kw from direct numerical simulations. Several nondimensional parameters, e.g. βtLu and τstLT where τs is the interfacial shear rate, determine the effectiveness of a particular type of coherent motion for affecting kw.

  14. WFIP2 - The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project: Observing Systems And Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, J. M.; Cline, J.; Banta, R. M.; Benjamin, L.; Benjamin, S.; Berg, L. K.; Bianco, L.; Bickford, J.; Brewer, A.; Choukulkar, A.; Clawson, K.; Clifton, A.; Cook, D. R.; Djalalova, I.; Fernando, H.; Friedrich, K.; Kenyon, J.; Kosovic, B.; King, C. W.; Marquis, M.; McCaa, J. R.; McCaffrey, K.; Olson, J. B.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Sharp, J.; Shaw, W. J.; Wade, K.; Wharton, S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Lantz, K. O.; Long, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    The second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a DOE and NOAA funded public-private partnership whose goal is to improve NWP model forecast skill for turbine-height winds in regions with complex terrain. WFIP2 partners include DOE National Laboratories (PNNL, ANL, NREL, LLNL), NOAA Laboratories (ESRL, ARL), Vaisala Inc., NCAR, the University of Notre Dame and University of Colorado, and the Bonneville Power Administration. A core element of WFIP2 is an 18 month field program located in the Pacific Northwest, focusing on the Columbia River Gorge and Basin in eastern Oregon and Washington states, with instrument deployment occurring in the summer and autumn of 2015. The approach taken is to collect an extensive set of new meteorological observations, especially within the atmospheric boundary layer, use these to observe and understand relevant atmospheric processes, develop and test new model physical parameterization schemes, and ultimately transfer these improved models to NOAA/NWS operations and to the wider meteorological community. Observing systems that will be deployed for WFIP2 include: 11 wind profiling radars 17 sodars 5 wind profiling lidars 4 scanning lidars 4 radiometers 10 microbarographs ceilometer 28 sonic anemometers Numerical models that are being used for WFIP2 are WRF-based models including the NOAA RAP (Rapid Refresh) and High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), as well as the NAM and GFS. Science issues that are being addressed include gap flow, mountain waves, mountain wakes, convective storm outflows, the mix-out of stable cold pools, and boundary layer turbulence profiling. An overview of WFIP2 will be given with an emphasis on the suite of instrumentation deployed and their observational capabilities. Several case studies of interesting meteorological events from the first several months of the field program will be presented, including comparisons with model forecasts.

  15. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials: Role and Some Possible Implications of Potential Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Meyer, F.; Reinhold, c.

    2010-01-01

    Solar-wind induced sputtering of the lunar surface includes, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering. The role of the latter mechanism, however, in many focused studies has not been properly ascertained due partly to lack of data but can also be attributed to the assertion that the contribution of solar-wind heavy ions to the total sputtering is quite low due to their low number density compared to solar-wind protons. Limited laboratory measurements show marked enhancements in the sputter yields of slow-moving, highly-charged ions impacting oxides. Lunar surface sputtering yields are important as they affect, e.g., estimates of the compositional changes in the lunar surface, its erosion rate, as well as its contribution to the exosphere as well as estimates of hydrogen and water contents. Since the typical range of solar-wind ions at 1 keV/amu is comparable to the thickness of the amorphous rim found on lunar soil grains, i.e. few 10s nm, lunar simulant samples JSC-1A AGGL are specifically enhanced to have such rims in addition to the other known characteristics of the actual lunar soil particles. However, most, if not all laboratory studies of potential sputtering were carried out in single crystal targets, quite different from the rim s amorphous structure. The effect of this structural difference on the extent of potential sputtering has not, to our knowledge, been investigated to date.

  16. Potential of collocated radiometer and wind profiler observations for monsoon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, B.; Prabha, Thara V.; Jaya Rao, Y.; Kiran, T.; Dinesh, G.; Chakravarty, Kaustav; Sonbawne, S. M.; Rajeevan, M.

    2017-09-01

    Collocated observations from microwave radiometer and wind profiler are used in a pilot study during the monsoon period to derive information on the thermodynamics and winds and association with rainfall characteristics. These instruments were operated throughout the monsoon season of 2015. Continuous vertical profiles of winds, temperature and humidity show significant promise for understanding the low-level jet, its periodicity and its association with moisture transport, clouds and precipitation embedded within the monsoon large-scale convection. Observations showed mutually beneficial in explaining variability that are part of the low frequency oscillations and the diurnal variability during monsoon. These observations highlight the importance of locally driven convective systems, in the presence of weak moisture transport over the area. The episodic moisture convergence showed a periodicity of 9 days which matches with the subsequent convection and precipitation and thermodynamic regimes. Inferences from the diurnal cycle of moisture transport and the convective activity, relationship with the low-level jet characteristics and thermodynamics are also illustrated.

  17. A New Quality Control Method base on IRMCD for Wind Profiler Observation towards Future Assimilation Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Yu

    2017-04-01

    A wind profiler network with a total of 65 profiling radars was operated by the MOC/CMA in China until July 2015. In this study, a quality control procedure is constructed to incorporate the profiler data from the wind-profiling network into the local data assimilation and forecasting system (BJRUC). The procedure applies a blacklisting check that removes stations with gross errors and an outlier check that rejects data with large deviations from the background. Instead of the bi-weighting method, which has been commonly implemented in outlier elimination for one-dimensional scalar observations, an outlier elimination method is developed based on the iterated reweighted minimum covariance determinant (IRMCD) for multi-variate observations such as wind profiler data. A quality control experiment is separately performed for subsets containing profiler data tagged in parallel with/without rain flags at every 00UTC/12UTC from 20 June to 30 Sep 2015. From the results, we find that with the quality control, the frequency distributions of the differences between the observations and model background become more Gaussian-like and meet the requirements of a Gaussian distribution for data assimilation. Further intensive assessment for each quality control step reveals that the stations rejected by blacklisting contain poor data quality, and the IRMCD rejects outliers in a robust and physically reasonable manner.

  18. Observations of meso-scale neutral wind interaction with auroral precipitation in the thermosphere at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, Michael; Nozawa, Satonori; Yiu, Ho-Ching Iris; Anderson, Callum; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Howells, Vikki; Baddeley, Lisa; Aruliah, Anasuya; McWhirter, Ian; McCrea, I. W.; Fujii, Ryoichi

    We report on observations of E-region neutral wind fields and their interaction with auroral precipitation at meso-scale spatial resolution. The EISCAT Svalbard radar was used to observe the ionospheric line-of-sight ion flows and temperatures in the E-and F-regions whilst scan-ning its beam. An all-sky optical Scanning Doppler Imager was used at 557.7 nm to observe thermospheric neutral line-of-sight winds and temperatures. High-latitude data from February 2010 are presented. In the case of an auroral arc, strong acceleration of the E-region neutral wind occurs within 10s of km to the arc on a time scale of 10s of minutes. We demonstrate through modelling that this effect cannot be explained by height changes in the 557.7 nm emis-sion layer. The most likely explanation seems to be greatly enhanced ion drag associated with the increased plasma density caused by the particle precipitation, and the localised ionospheric electric field associated with the Pedersen closure current of auroral arcs. Since Joule heat-ing occurs predominantly in the E-region, meso-scale variability in the thermosphere probably accounts for a significant under-estimation in the total energy dissipation.

  19. Global mesospheric tidal winds observed by the high resolution Doppler imager on board the upper atmosphere research satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Y.T.; Lieberman, R.S.; Hays, P.B.; Ortland, D.A.; Marshall, A.R.; Wu, D.; Skinner, W.R.; Burrage, M.D.; Gell, D.A.; Yee, J.H.

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents results of mesospheric and lower thermospheric wind tides. The observations come from the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite. From these observations, the authors report the observation of tidal effects on top of the meridonal winds observed in this region. Previous measurements have been mainly limited to radar measurements from fixed ground stations, which do not give consistent results, and do not provide a global picture of the wave structure.

  20. Observed winds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma City and Manhattan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven; White, John; Zhou, Ying

    2007-12-01

    Wind and tracer data from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) and the Manhattan Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05) urban field experiments are being analyzed to aid in understanding air flow and dispersion near street-level in built-up downtown areas. The mean winds are separately calculated for groups of anemometers having similar exposures such as “near street level” and “on building top”. Several general results are found, such as the scalar wind speed at street level is about 1/3 of that at building top. Turbulent standard deviations of wind speed components and temperature, and vertical fluxes of momentum and sensible heat, are calculated from sonic anemometers near street level at 20 locations in JU2003 and five locations in MSG05, and from two rooftop locations in MSG05. The turbulence observations are consistent with observations in the literature at other cities, although the JU2003 and MSG05 data are unique in that many data are available near street level. For example, it is found that the local (i.e., at the measuring height) σw/u_{ast} averages about 1.5 and the local u_{ast}/u averages about 0.25 in the two cities, where σw is the standard deviation of vertical velocity fluctuations, u_{ast} is the friction velocity, and u is the wind speed. The ratio of temperature fluctuations to temperature scale, σT/T_{ast} , averages about -3 in both cities, consistent with similarity theory for slightly unstable conditions, where σT is the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations, and T_{ast} is the temperature scale. The calculated Obukhov length, L, is also consistent with slightly unstable conditions near street level, even at night during JU2003. The SF6 tracer concentration observations from JU2003 are analyzed. Values of uC_{max}/Q for the continuous releases are calculated for each release and arc distance, where C_{max} is the 30-min average arc maximum concentration, Q is the continuous source emission rate, and u is the

  1. Simulation of rotor aerodynamics : use of the actuator surface method to model the MEXICO wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, S.P.; Watters, C.S.; Masson, C. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the model rotor experiments under controlled conditions (MEXICO) project. The experiments are being conducted in the largest wind tunnel in Europe in order to determine optimal yaw and pitch angles for wind turbines as well as to test the performance of blade aerodynamic profiles and rotor instrumentation. Data obtained during the experiments are used to determine velocity component points in order to develop a greater understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics and improve calculation methods. Blade element momentum (BEM) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and vortex wake codes are used in the program, which includes an actuator surface method embedded in a customized CFD finite element method. To date, the project has validated various models with experimental data, and mapped the induced velocities upwind and downwind from rotors. Further research is being conducted to compare experimental results with other results in the literature related to blade loading, root bending moments, and detailed flow characteristics. Charts of experimental results were included. tabs., figs.

  2. Wind enhances differential air advection in surface snow at sub-meter scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Selker, John S.; Higgins, Chad W.

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure gradients and pressure fluctuations drive within-snow air movement that enhances gas mobility through interstitial pore space. The magnitude of this enhancement in relation to snow microstructure properties cannot be well predicted with current methods. In a set of field experiments, we injected a dilute mixture of 1 % carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen gas (N2) of known volume into the topmost layer of a snowpack and, using a distributed array of thin film sensors, measured plume evolution as a function of wind forcing. We found enhanced dispersion in the streamwise direction and also along low-resistance pathways in the presence of wind. These results suggest that atmospheric constituents contained in snow can be anisotropically mixed depending on the wind environment and snow structure, having implications for surface snow reaction rates and interpretation of firn and ice cores.

  3. An atmosphere-wave regional coupled model: improving predictions of wave heights and surface winds in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Koch, Wolfgang; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Ho-Hagemann, Ha T. M.; Stanev, Emil V.

    2017-04-01

    The coupling of models is a commonly used approach when addressing the complex interactions between different components of earth systems. We demonstrate that this approach can result in a reduction of errors in wave forecasting, especially in dynamically complicated coastal ocean areas, such as the southern part of the North Sea - the German Bight. Here, we study the effects of coupling of an atmospheric model (COSMO) and a wind wave model (WAM), which is enabled by implementing wave-induced drag in the atmospheric model. The numerical simulations use a regional North Sea coupled wave-atmosphere model as well as a nested-grid high-resolution German Bight wave model. Using one atmospheric and two wind wave models simultaneously allows for study of the individual and combined effects of two-way coupling and grid resolution. This approach proved to be particularly important under severe storm conditions as the German Bight is a very shallow and dynamically complex coastal area exposed to storm floods. The two-way coupling leads to a reduction of both surface wind speeds and simulated wave heights. In this study, the sensitivity of atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and atmospheric pressure, to the wave-induced drag, in particular under storm conditions, and the impact of two-way coupling on the wave model performance, is quantified. Comparisons between data from in situ and satellite altimeter observations indicate that two-way coupling improves the simulation of wind and wave parameters of the model and justify its implementation for both operational and climate simulations.

  4. Modeling and Observing the Role of Wind-Waves in Lake-Climate Interactions on Titan using the T104 Flyby of Kraken Mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Lorenz, R. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Donelan, M. A.; Karatekin, O.; Mastrogiuseppe, M., Sr.; Le Gall, A. A.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Poggiali, V.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanography is no longer just an Earth Science. Standing bodies of liquid that interact with both atmospheric and surface reservoirs are known to exist on Titan, and are thought to have existed on early Mars. The exchange of heat, moisture, and momentum between lakes/seas and the atmosphere are of fundamental importance to the hydrologic systems of all three bodies. The generation and propagation of wind-waves, and their consequent shoreline erosion, are key factors in air-sea-surface exchange. Titan, in particular, offers a laboratory in which to understand these processes at a more fundamental level. Much of the parameterization for wave models on Earth are empirical, despite laboratory studies that have demonstrated wave growth depends on both gravity and fluid properties. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of wave generation will provide valuable data to anchor physical models. Furthermore, in the presence of wind waves, Cassini can be used as an anemometer to measure wind speeds over hydrocarbon liquids. Herein, we will report on the results of the Aug 21st altimetry observation over Titan's largest sea, Kraken Mare, and interpret them in the context of wave activity and composition (from passive radiometry). On Earth, it is rare to observe a body of water whose surface is not disturbed by some form of wave activity. On Titan, Cassini observations through the end of its Equinox Mission in Dec 2010 showed no indication of waves. These observations are intriguing given the predominance of aeolian features at equatorial latitudes and have been attributed to the light winds predicted during the Titan winter. More recently, however, the previous series of upper limits and non-detections are giving way to indications that the expected freshening of winds in northern summer may be causing sporadic ruffling of the sea surfaces. Specifically, apparent sunglints offset from the geometric specular point has been observed by VIMS in

  5. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lacombe, Catherine; Matteini, Lorenzo; Santolik, Ondrej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Mangeney, Andre; de Conchy, Yvonne; Maksimovic, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies $f\\in[1,400]$ Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In $\\sim 10\\%$ of the selected data, we observe narrow-band, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The life time of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e. lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of the background turbulence, a slow wind, a relative...

  6. Estimating wind-turbine-caused bird and bat fatality when zero carcasses are observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Dalthorp, Daniel; Dail, David; Madsen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Many wind-power facilities in the United States have established effective monitoring programs to determine turbine-caused fatality rates of birds and bats, but estimating the number of fatalities of rare species poses special difficulties. The loss of even small numbers of individuals may adversely affect fragile populations, but typically, few (if any) carcasses are observed during monitoring. If monitoring design results in only a small proportion of carcasses detected, then finding zero carcasses may give little assurance that the number of actual fatalities is small. Fatality monitoring at wind-power facilities commonly involves conducting experiments to estimate the probability (g) an individual will be observed, accounting for the possibilities that it falls in an unsearched area, is scavenged prior to detection, or remains undetected even when present. When g asking what value of g is required to attain a desired M* for a given α. We found that when g  ~0.45. Further, we develop extensions for temporal replication that can inform prior distributions of M and methods for combining information across several areas or time periods. We apply the method to data collected at a wind-power facility where scheduled searches yielded X = 0 raptor carcasses

  7. Observations of Thin Current Sheets in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Magnetic Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dorelli, J.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Karimabadi, H.; Mozer, F.; Wendel, D. E.; TenBarge, J.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2013-12-01

    A recent analysis of 450 vec/s resolution data from the STAFF search-coil magnetometer on board Cluster has revealed, for the first time, the presence of thin current sheets and discontinuities from the proton Larmor scale down to the electron Larmor scale in the solar wind. This is in the range of scales where a cascade of energy consistent with highly oblique kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations (KAW), eventually dissipated by electron Landau damping, has been detected. The current sheets have been found to have a size between 20-200 km, indicating that they are very localized. We will compare the observations with results coming from 2D Hall MHD, Gyrokinetic, and full Particle-in-Cell turbulence simulations. Preliminary work has highlighted promising qualitative agreement between the properties of the structures observed in the Cluster data and the current sheets generated in the simulations. With the aim of investigating the role played by those structures in dissipating the magnetic energy in the solar wind, E●J has been computed within each magnetic discontinuity. This has been made possible via a combined analysis of both STAFF-SC magnetic field data and the electric field data from the Electric Fields and Wave instrument (EFW). We describe procedures used to reduce the noise in the EFW data. The results obtained represent an effort to clarify the processes involved in the dissipation of magnetic energy in the solar wind.

  8. Solar wind structure at large heliocentric distances - An interpretation of Pioneer 10 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Examination of hourly values of the solar wind speed observed by the Pioneer 10 spacecraft beyond a heliocentric distance of 4 AU reveals (1) a prevalent 'sawtoothlike' speed-time profile, most speed fluctuations displaying a rapid rise and a much slower decline, and (2) the nearly universal appearance of abrupt (on the 1-hour time resolution of these data) changes in the speed on the rising portions of the speed fluctuations. These previously unreported characteristics, as well as the rate of decay of stream amplitudes derived earlier by Collard and Wolfe, are in general agreement with the predictions of stream propagation models that neglect any conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy outside of shock fronts. Thus the Pioneer 10 observations give the first confirmation of the general concept of solar wind stream evolution employed in these models, i.e., that solar wind speed inhomogeneities appear to steepen to form shock waves and that the 'wave amplitudes' decay slowly as the shock waves propagate outward from the sun.

  9. Uncertainty Quantification for Robust Control of Wind Turbines using Sliding Mode Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Horst

    2016-09-01

    A new quantification method of uncertain models for robust wind turbine control using sliding-mode techniques is presented with the objective to improve active load mitigation. This approach is based on the so-called equivalent output injection signal, which corresponds to the average behavior of the discontinuous switching term, establishing and maintaining a motion on a so-called sliding surface. The injection signal is directly evaluated to obtain estimates of the uncertainty bounds of external disturbances and parameter uncertainties. The applicability of the proposed method is illustrated by the quantification of a four degree-of-freedom model of the NREL 5MW reference turbine containing uncertainties.

  10. Evidence for the interplanetary electric potential? WIND observations of electrostatic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    Full Text Available In the solar wind at 1 AU, coherent electrostatic waveforms in the ion acoustic frequency range (~ 1 kHz have been observed by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS instrument on the Wind spacecraft. Small drops of electrostatic potential (Df > 10-3 V have been found across some of these waveforms, which can thus be considered as weak double layers (Mangeney et al., 1999. The rate of occurrence of these potential drops, at 1 AU, is estimated by a comparison of the TDS data with simultaneous data of another Wind instrument, the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR, which measures continuously the thermal and non-thermal electric spectra above 4 kHz. We assume that the potential drops have a constant amplitude and a constant rate of occurrence between the Sun and the Earth. The total potential drop between the Sun and the Earth, which results from a succession of small potential drops during the Sun-Earth travel time, is then found to be about 300 V to 1000 V, of the same order of magnitude as the interplanetary potential implied by a two-fluid or an exospheric model of the solar wind: the interplanetary potential may manifest itself as a succession of weak double layers. We also find that the hourly average of the energy of the non-thermal ion acoustic waves, observed on TNR between 4 and 6 kHz, is correlated to the interplanetary electrostatic field, parallel to the spiral magnetic field, calculated with a two-fluid model: this is another evidence of a relation between the interplanetary electrostatic field and the electrostatic fluctuations in the ion acoustic range. We have yet to discuss the role of the Doppler effect, which is strong for ion acoustic waves in the solar wind, and which can bias the measure of the ion acoustic wave energy in the narrow band 4–6 kHz.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence; solar wind plasma Space plasma physics (electro-static structures

  11. Northeast storms ranked by wind stress and wave-generated bottom stress observed in Massachusetts Bay, 1990-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, B.; Sherwood, C.R.; Dalyander, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Along the coast of the northeastern United States, strong winds blowing from the northeast are often associated with storms called northeasters, coastal storms that strongly influence weather. In addition to effects caused by wind stress, the sea floor is affected by bottom stress associated with these storms. Bottom stress caused by orbital velocities associated with surface waves integrated over the duration of a storm is a metric of storm strength at the sea floor. Near-bottom wave-orbital velocities calculated by using measurements of significant wave height and dominant wave period and the parametric spectral method described in Wiberg and Sherwood [Wiberg, P.L., Sherwood, C.R. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface wave parameters. Computers in Geosciences, in press] compared well with observations in Massachusetts Bay. Integrated bottom-wave stress (called IWAVES), calculated at 30 m water depth, and a companion storm-strength metric, integrated surface wind stress at 10 m (called IWINDS), are used to provide an overview of the strength, frequency, and timing of large storms in Massachusetts Bay over a 17-year period from January 1990 through December 2006. These new metrics reflect both storm duration and intensity. Northeast storms were the major cause of large waves in Massachusetts Bay because of the long fetch to the east: of the strongest 10% of storms (n=38) ranked by IWAVES, 22 had vector-averaged wind stress from the northeast quadrant. The Blizzard of December 1992, the Perfect Storm of October 1991, and a December 2003 storm were the strongest three storms ranked by IWAVES and IWINDS, and all were northeasters. IWAVES integrated over the winter season (defined as October-May) ranged by about a factor of 11; the winters with the highest integrated IWAVES were 1992-1993 and 2004-2005 and the winter with the lowest integrated IWAVES was 2001-2002. May 2005 was the only month in the 17-year record that two of the nine

  12. Real time simulation of nonlinear generalized predictive control for wind energy conversion system with nonlinear observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouari, Kamel; Rekioua, Toufik; Ouhrouche, Mohand

    2014-01-01

    In order to make a wind power generation truly cost-effective and reliable, an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, we develop a new control strategy, using nonlinear generalized predictive control (NGPC) approach, for DFIG-based wind turbine. The proposed control law is based on two points: NGPC-based torque-current control loop generating the rotor reference voltage and NGPC-based speed control loop that provides the torque reference. In order to enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. Finally, a real-time simulation is carried out to illustrate the performance of the proposed controller.

  13. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data 1928-1948 (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of hourly U.S. surface airways observations (SAO). These observations extend as far back as 1928, from the time when commercial aviation began...

  14. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    in the Danish Baltic Sea. Monin-Obukhov theory is often used for the description of the wind speed profile. From a given wind speed at one height, the profile is predicted using two parameters, Obukhov length and sea surface roughness. Different methods to estimate these parameters are discussed and compared......-Obukhov theory, a simple correction method to account for this effect has been developed and is tested in the same way. The models for the estimation of the sea surface roughness were found to lead only to small differences. For the purpose of wind resource assessment, even the assumption of a constant roughness......). The power output estimation has also been compared with the method of the resource estimation program WAsP. For the Rodsand data set the prediction error of WAsP is about 4%. For the extrapolation with Monin-Obukhov theory with different L and z(0) estimations, it is 5-9%. The simple wind profile correction...

  15. Sea surface wind perturbations over the Kashevarov Bank of the Okhotsk Sea: a satellite study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Tarkhova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface wind perturbations over sea surface temperature (SST cold anomalies over the Kashevarov Bank (KB of the Okhotsk Sea are analyzed using satellite (AMSR-E and QuikSCAT data during the summer-autumn period of 2006–2009. It is shown, that frequency of cases of wind speed decreasing over a cold spot in August–September reaches up to 67%. In the cold spot center SST cold anomalies reached 10.5 °C and wind speed lowered down to ~7 m s−1 relative its value on the periphery. The wind difference between a periphery and a centre of the cold spot is proportional to SST difference with the correlations 0.5 for daily satellite passes data, 0.66 for 3-day mean data and 0.9 for monthly ones. For all types of data the coefficient of proportionality consists of ~0.3 m s−1 on 1 °C.

  16. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  17. Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

    2010-02-21

    measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of

  18. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Misawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    OS ADJ A151678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE ISMOS ) ’/4 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND DETACHMENT ASHEVILLE NC MAR...34 ... , , ,, . - Ali A151 678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE iSMOs ) 414 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND . DETACHMENT

  19. A 15-year climatology of wind pattern impacts on surface ozone in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souri, Amir Hossein; Choi, Yunsoo; Li, Xiangshang; Kotsakis, Alexander; Jiang, Xun

    2016-06-01

    Houston is recognized for its large petrochemical industrial facilities providing abundant radicals for tropospheric ozone formation. Fortunately, maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) surface ozone concentrations have declined in Houston (- 0.6 ± 0.3 ppbv yr- 1) during the summers (i.e., May to September) of 2000 to 2014, possibly due to the reductions in precursor emissions by effective control policies. However, it is also possible that changes in meteorological variables have affected ozone concentrations. This study focused on the impact of long-term wind patterns which have the highest impact on ozone in Houston. The analysis of long-term wind patterns can benefit surface ozone studies by 1) providing wind patterns that distinctly changed ozone levels, 2) investigating the frequency of patterns and the respective changes and 3) estimating ozone trends in specific wind patterns that local emissions are mostly involved, thus separating emissions impacts from meteorology to some extent. To this end, the 900-hPa flow patterns in summers of 2000 to 2014 were clustered in seven classes (C1-C7) by deploying an unsupervised partitioning method. We confirm the characteristics of the clusters from a backward trajectory analysis, monitoring networks, and a regional chemical transport model simulation. The results indicate that Houston has experienced a statistically significant downward trend (- 0.6 ± 0.4 day yr- 1) of the cluster of weak easterly and northeasterly days (C4), when the highest fraction of ozone exceedances (MDA8 > 70 ppbv) occurred. This suggests that the reduction in ozone precursors was not the sole reason for the decrease in ozone exceedance days (- 1.5 ± 0.6 day yr- 1). Further, to examine the efficiency of control policies intended to reduce the amount of ozone, we estimated the trend of MDA8 ozone in C4 and C5 (weak winds) days when local emissions are primarily responsible for high ambient ozone levels. Both C4 and C5 show a large reduction in the

  20. Solar Wind Strahl Observations and Their Implication to the Core-Halo Formation due to Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF?s) in the solar wind is presented. This study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the electron VDF?s and the stability of the strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the strahl-electron density, temperature anisotropy, and electron heat-flux. These parameters are used to investigate the stability of the strahl population. The analysis check for whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler or KAW instabilities), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by modeling of the 3D-VDF?s from which the moments properties of the various populations are obtained. The results of this study have profound implication on the current hypothesis about the probable formation of the solar wind halo electrons produced from the scattering of the strahl population. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the core-halo in an isolated event. The observation implies that the scattering of the strahl is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicate that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx. 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  1. An analytical two-flow model to simulate the distribution of irradiance in coastal waters with a wind-roughed surface and bottom reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Ming

    1997-06-01

    more important the water depth and value of the bottom reflectance. The results of this work indicates little change of subsurface or in-water reflectances, due to variations of wind speed and observation angle. Simulations of the wind effect on the total downwelling irradiance from the two- flow model indicates that the total downwelling irradiance just below a wind-roughened water surface increases to about 1% of the total downwelling irradiance on a calm water surface when the sun is near zenith and increases to about 3% when the sun is near the horizon. This analytically based model, solved or developed utilizing the unique boundary conditions, can be applied to remote sensing of oceanic upper mixed layer dynamics, plant canopies, primary production, and shallow water environments with different bottom type reflectances. Future applications may include determining effects of sediment resuspension of bottom sediments in the bottom boundary layer on remotely sensed data.

  2. Multispacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and magnetopause during extreme solar wind disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tátrallyay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Three events are discussed from the declining phase of the last solar cycle when the magnetopause and/or the bow shock were observed unusually close to the Earth due to major interplanetary disturbances. The observed extreme locations of the discontinuities are compared with the predictions of three magnetopause and four bow shock models which describe them in considerably different ways using statistical methods based on observations. A new 2-D magnetopause model is introduced (based on Verigin et al., 2009 which takes into account the pressure of the compressed magnetosheath field raised by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF component transverse to the solar wind flow. The observed magnetopause crossings could be predicted with a reasonable accuracy (0.1–0.2 RE by one of the presented models at least. For geosynchronous magnetopause crossings observed by the GOES satellites, (1 the new model provided the best predictions when the IMF was extremely large having a large negative Bz component, and (2 the predictions of the model of Shue et al. (1998 agreed best with the observations when the solar wind dynamic pressure was extremely large. The magnetopause crossings close to the cusp observed by the Cluster spacecraft were best predicted by the 3-D model of Lin et al. (2010. The applied empirical bow shock models and the 3-D semi-empiric bow shock model combined with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD solution proved to be insufficient for predicting the observed unusual bow shock locations during large interplanetary disturbances. The results of a global 3-D MHD model were in good agreement with the Cluster observations on 17 January 2005, but they did not predict the bow shock crossings on 31 October 2003.

  3. Substorm-related thermospheric density and wind disturbances derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ritter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The input of energy and momentum from the magnetosphere is most efficiently coupled into the high latitude ionosphere-thermosphere. The phenomenon we are focusing on here is the magnetospheric substorm. This paper presents substorm related observations of the thermosphere derived from the CHAMP satellite. With its sensitive accelerometer the satellite can measure the air density and zonal winds. Based on a large number of substorm events the average high and low latitude thermospheric response to substorm onsets was deduced. During magnetic substorms the thermospheric density is enhanced first at high latitudes. Then the disturbance travels at an average speed of 650 m/s to lower latitudes, and 3–4 h later the bulge reaches the equator on the night side. Under the influence of the Coriolis force the travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD is deflected westward. In accordance with present-day atmospheric models the disturbance zonal wind velocities during substorms are close to zero near the equator before midnight and attain moderate westward velocities after midnight. In general, the wind system is only weakly perturbed (Δvy<20 m/s by substorms.

  4. Observational limits on the spin-down torque of Accretion Powered Stellar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Zanni, C

    2010-01-01

    The rotation period of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) represents a longstanding puzzle. While young low-mass stars show a wide range of rotation periods, many CTTS are slow rotators, spinning at a small fraction of break-up, and their rotation period does not seem to shorten, despite the fact that they are actively accreting and contracting. Matt & Pudritz (2005) proposed that the spin-down torque of a stellar wind powered by a fraction of the accretion energy would be strong enough to balance the spin-up torque due to accretion. Since this model establishes a direct relation between accretion and ejection, the observable stellar parameters (mass, radius, rotation period, magnetic field) and the accretion diagnostics (accretion shock luminosity), can be used to constraint the wind characteristics. In particular, since the accretion energy powers both the stellar wind and the shock emission, we show in this letter how the accretion shock luminosity L_UV can provide upper limits to the spin-down efficiency ...

  5. First observations of simultaneous interhemispheric conjugate high-latitude thermospheric winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, M. J.; Anderson, C.; Yiu, H.-C. I.; Kellerman, A. C.; Makarevich, R. A.; Aruliah, A.; Conde, M.; Griffin, E.; Davies, T.; McWhirter, I.; Dyson, P. L.

    2010-09-01

    We report the first observations of simultaneous high-latitude interhemispheric F region neutral wind fields by combining the 630 nm optical measurements from two scanning Doppler imagers (SDIs) and three Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) for a period exceeding 5 h. From the Southern Hemisphere, a SDI at Mawson and a FPI at Davis, both in Antarctica, are geomagnetically mapped onto the Northern Hemisphere. These data are combined in the Northern Hemisphere with a SDI at Longyearbyen, Svalbard, and two FPIs near Kiruna in Sweden and Sodankyla in Finland. Geomagnetic conditions were moderate (Kp = 3--3+) and steady although the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component did change polarity several times. There is good agreement between the conjugate 630 nm optical intensities and wind vectors where the two SDIs' fields of view overlap. All wind field vectors are overlaid onto the northern Super Dual Auroral Radar Network ion convection contours. Qualitatively, the agreement between neutral and ion flow is remarkably good throughout the study interval, even down to mesoscale spatial size.

  6. Observations of Detailed Structure in the Solar Wind at 1 AU with STEREO/HI-2

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, Craig; Tappin, James

    2011-01-01

    Heliospheric imagers offer the promise of remote sensing of large-scale structures present in the solar wind. The STEREO/HI-2 imagers, in particular, offer high resolution, very low noise observations of the inner heliosphere but have not yet been exploited to their full potential. This is in part because the signal of interest, Thomson scattered sunlight from free electrons, is $\\sim 10^3$ times fainter than the background visual field in the images, making background subtraction challenging. We have developed a procedure for separating the Thomson-scattered signal from the other background/foreground sources in the HI-2 data. Using only the Level 1 data from STEREO/HI-2, we are able to generate calibrated imaging data of the solar wind with sensitivity of a few $\\times10^{-17}$\\sbright, compared to the background signal of a few $\\times10^{-13}$\\sbright. These images reveal detailed spatialstructure in CMEs and the solar wind at projected solar distances in excess of 1 AU, at the instrumental motion-blur re...

  7. Analysis on observing optimization for the wind-driven circulation by an adjoint approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东晓; 吴国雄; 朱江; 兰健

    2000-01-01

    The adjoint approach is a variational method which is often applied to data assimilation widely in meteorology and oceanography. It is used for analyses on observing optimization for the wind-driven Sverdrup circulation. The adjoint system developed by Thacker and Long (1992), which is based on the GFDL Byran-Cox model, includes three components, i. e. the forward model, the adjoint model and the optimal algorithm. The GFDL Byran-Cox model was integrated for a long time driven by a batch of ideal wind stresses whose meridional component is set to null and zonal component is a sine function of latitudes in a rectangle box with six vertical levels and 2 by 2 degree horizontal resolution. The results are regarded as a "real" representative of the wind-driven Sverdrup circulation, from which the four dimensional fields are allowed to be sampled in several ways, such as sampling at the different levels or along the different vertical sections. To set the different samples, the fields of temperature, salinity

  8. Observations of magnetospheric substorms occurring with no apparent solar wind/IMF trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Murphree, J.S. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    An outstanding topic in magnetospheric physics is whether substorms are always externally triggered by disturbances in either the interplanetary magnetic field or solar wind, or whether they can also occur solely as the result of an internal magnetospheric instability. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. Horwitz and McPherron have shown examples of substorm onsets which they claimed were not externally triggered. However, as pointed out by Lyons, there are several problems associated with these studies that make their results somewhat inconclusive. In particular, in the McPherron et al. study, fluctuations in the B{sub y} component were not considered as possible triggers. Furthermore, Lyons suggests that the sharp decreases in the AL index during intervals of steady IMF/solar wind, are not substorms at all but rather that they are just enhancements of the convection driven DP2 current system that are often observed to occur during steady magnetospheric convection events. In the present study, we utilize a much more comprehensive dataset (consisting of particle data from the Los Alamos energetic particle detectors at geosynchronous orbit, IMP 8 magnetometer and plasma data, Viking UV auroral imager data, mid-latitude Pi2 pulsation data, ground magnetometer data and ISEE1 magnetic field and energetic particle data) to show as unambiguously as possible that typical substorms can indeed occur in the absence of an identifiable trigger in the solar wind/IMF.

  9. Tidal wind oscillations in the tropical lower atmosphere as observed by Indian MST Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Sasi

    Full Text Available Diurnal tidal components in horizontal winds measured by MST radar in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over a tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E are presented for the autumn equinox, winter, vernal equinox and summer seasons. For this purpose radar data obtained over many diurnal cycles from September 1995 to August 1996 are used. The results obtained show that although the seasonal variation of the diurnal tidal amplitudes in zonal and meridional winds is not strong, vertical phase propagation characteristics show significant seasonal variation. An attempt is made to simulate the diurnal tidal amplitudes and phases in the lower atmosphere over Gadanki using classical tidal theory by incorporating diurnal heat sources, namely, solar radiation absorption by water vapour, planetary boundary layer (PBL heat flux, latent heat release in deep convective clouds and short wave solar radiation absorption by clouds. A comparison of the simulated amplitudes and phases with the observed ones shows that agreement between the two is quite good for the equinox seasons, especially the vertical structure of the phases of the meridional wind components.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology; waves and tides

  10. Polar F-layer model-observation comparisons: a neutral wind surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Sojka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a month-long continuous database of incoherent scatter radar observations of the ionosphere from the EISCAT Savlbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen, Norway, provides an unprecedented opportunity for model/data comparisons. Physics-based ionospheric models, such as the Utah State University Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM, are usually only compared with observations over restricted one or two day events or against climatological averages. In this study, using the ESR observations, the daily weather, day-to-day variability, and month-long climatology can be simultaneously addressed to identify modeling shortcomings and successes. Since for this study the TDIM is driven by climatological representations of the magnetospheric convection, auroral oval, neutral atmosphere, and neutral winds, whose inputs are solar and geomagnetic indices, it is not surprising that the daily weather cannot be reproduced. What is unexpected is that the horizontal neutral wind has come to the forefront as a decisive model input parameter in matching the diurnal morphology of density structuring seen in the observations.

  11. Calibrating surface weather observations to atmospheric attenuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanii, Babak

    2001-06-01

    A correlation between near-IR atmospheric attenuation measurements made by the Atmospheric Visibility Monitor (AVM) at the Table Mountain Facility and airport surface weather observations at Edwards Air Force Base has been performed. High correlations (over 0.93) exist between the Edwards observed sky cover and the average AVM measured attenuations over the course of the 10 months analyzed. The statistical relationship between the data-sets allows the determination of coarse attenuation statistics from the surface observations, suggesting that such statistics may be extrapolated from any surface weather observation site. Furthermore, a superior technique for converting AVM images to attenuation values by way of MODTRAN predictions has been demonstrated.

  12. Variable wind ripple migration at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, observed by timelapse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Valdez, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    Granule ripples at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) were observed using inexpensive digital timelapse cameras over a 70-day period in winter 2010-2011. The ripples migrated during a handful of discrete events — visible ripple movement occurred on only 11 days during the observation period. The movement conditions are documented with hourly and 15-minute records from two nearby weather stations, and by a cup anemometer at the site itself. During the most prominent movement episode, when local winds averaged ~ 10 m/s, ripples of several sizes were observed simultaneously and a reciprocal relationship of ripple size and propagation speed was seen, with small (~ 10 cm) ripples moving at ~ 1.4 cm/min, and larger (~ 80 cm) ripples at ~ 0.15 cm/min. Ripple sizes and morphologies evolve throughout the observation period.

  13. Effects of surface current-wind interaction in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation simulation of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Heiner; Löptien, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Deoxygenation in the Baltic Sea endangers fish yields and favours noxious algal blooms. Yet, vertical transport processes ventilating the oxygen-deprived waters at depth and replenishing nutrient-deprived surface waters (thereby fuelling export of organic matter to depth) are not comprehensively understood. Here, we investigate the effects of the interaction between surface currents and winds on upwelling in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation model of the Baltic Sea. Contrary to expectations we find that accounting for current-wind effects inhibits the overall vertical exchange between oxygenated surface waters and oxygen-deprived water at depth. At major upwelling sites, however (e.g. off the southern coast of Sweden and Finland) the reverse holds: the interaction between topographically steered surface currents with winds blowing over the sea results in a climatological sea surface temperature cooling of 0.5 K. This implies that current-wind effects drive substantial local upwelling of cold and nutrient-replete waters.

  14. Extraordinarily Warm Northeast Pacific Surface Waters: 2014 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Freeland, H.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of sea surface temperatures (SST) from January 2014 revealed a massive region in the northeast Pacific with extraordinarily warm conditions, exceeding all anomalies over the last several decades. Profile data from both Argo and Line-P surveys supports the Reynolds SSTa analysis and further indicates that the anomaly was, and continues to be, confined to the upper ocean, above approximately 100 m depth. The anomaly has lasted for many months, exceeding 4 standard deviations above the multi-decadal mean, a feature that would not be expected more than once in several millennia. The "blob", as it is dubbed, drifted first off and then towards shore during the spring and fall of 2014 driven by, among other forces, the seasonal up and down-welling winds, respectively that occur along the west coast of North America. By November 2014, when winter down-welling winds became prevalent, the warm surface waters encroached all the way into Barkley Sound along western Vancouver Island, as measured by the continuous temperature measurements on the NEPTUNE ocean observatory of Ocean Networks Canada. The analysis includes some of the known dynamical variations which contributed to the formation of the blob, with an emphasis on mid to high latitude atmosphere-ocean conditions, avoiding the temptation to link the development processes occurring in the Gulf of Alaska in the winter of 2013 to equatorial phenomena.

  15. Solar Wind Access to Lunar Polar Craters: Feedback Between Surface Charging and Plasma Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Jackson, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the plasma environment within permanently shadowed lunar craters is critical to understanding local processes such as surface charging, electrostatic dust transport, volatile sequestration, and space weathering. In order to investigate the nature of this plasma environment, the first two-dimensional kinetic simulations of solar wind expansion into a lunar crater with a self-consistent plasma-surface interaction have been undertaken. The present results reveal how the plasma expansion into a crater couples with the electrically-charged lunar surface to produce a quasi-steady wake structure. In particular, there is a negative feedback between surface charging and ambipolar wake potential that allows an equilibrium to be achieved, with secondary electron emission strongly moderating the process. A range of secondary electron yields is explored, and two distinct limits are highlighted in which either surface charging or ambipoiar expansion is responsible for determining the overall wake structure.

  16. Superhydrophobic wind turbine blade surfaces obtained by a simple deposition of silica nanoparticles embedded in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouch, Rachid; Ross, Guy G.

    2010-11-01

    Samples of wind turbine blade surface have been covered with a superhydrophobic coating made of silica nanoparticles embedded in commercial epoxy paint. The superhydrophobic surfaces have a water contact angle around 152°, a hysteresis less than 2° and a water drop sliding angle around 0.5°. These surfaces are water repellent so that water drops cannot remain motionless on the surface. Examination of coated and uncoated surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, together with measurements of water contact angles, indicates that the air trapped in the cavity enhances the water repellency similarly to the lotus leaf effect. Moreover, this new coating is stable under UVC irradiation and water pouring. The production of this nanoscale coating film being simple and low cost, it can be considered as a suitable candidate for water protection of different outdoor structures.

  17. Superhydrophobic wind turbine blade surfaces obtained by a simple deposition of silica nanoparticles embedded in epoxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmouch, Rachid, E-mail: karmouch@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-Centre Energie Materiaux Telecommunications, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ross, Guy G. [INRS-Centre Energie Materiaux Telecommunications, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    Samples of wind turbine blade surface have been covered with a superhydrophobic coating made of silica nanoparticles embedded in commercial epoxy paint. The superhydrophobic surfaces have a water contact angle around 152{sup o}, a hysteresis less than 2{sup o} and a water drop sliding angle around 0.5{sup o}. These surfaces are water repellent so that water drops cannot remain motionless on the surface. Examination of coated and uncoated surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, together with measurements of water contact angles, indicates that the air trapped in the cavity enhances the water repellency similarly to the lotus leaf effect. Moreover, this new coating is stable under UVC irradiation and water pouring. The production of this nanoscale coating film being simple and low cost, it can be considered as a suitable candidate for water protection of different outdoor structures.

  18. Hub Height Ocean Winds over the North Sea Observed by the NORSEWInD Lidar Array: Measuring Techniques, Quality Control and Data Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stein, Detlef; Courtney, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the North Sea, an array of wind profiling wind lidars were deployed mainly on offshore platforms. The purpose was to observe free stream winds at hub height. Eight lidars were validated prior to offshore deployment with observations from cup anemometers at 60, 80, 100 and 116 m on an onshore met....... The flow distortion around platforms was examined using wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics and it was found that at 100 m height wind observations by the lidars were not significantly influenced by flow distortion. Observations of the vertical wind profile shear exponent at hub height...

  19. A Ka-Band Backscatter Model Function and an Algorithm for Measurement of the Wind Vector Over the Sea Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nekrasov, A.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band backscatter model and an algorithm for measurement of the wind speed and direction over the sea surface by a frequency-modulated continous-wave radar demonstrator system operated in scatterometer mode have been developed. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a simulation of the wind vector

  20. A wind tunnel study of flows over idealised urban surfaces with roughness sublayer corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yat-Kiu; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Dynamics in the roughness (RSLs) and inertial (ISLs) sublayers in the turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over idealised urban surfaces are investigated analytically and experimentally. In this paper, we derive an analytical solution to the mean velocity profile, which is a continuous function applicable to both RSL and ISL, over rough surfaces in isothermal conditions. Afterwards, a modified mixing-length model for RSL/ISL transport is developed that elucidates how surface roughness affects the turbulence motions. A series of wind tunnel experiments are conducted to measure the vertical profiles of mean and fluctuating velocities, together with momentum flux over various configurations of surface-mounted ribs in cross flows using hot-wire anemometry (HWA). The analytical solution agrees well with the wind tunnel result that improves the estimate to mean velocity profile over urban surfaces and TBL dynamics as well. The thicknesses of RSL and ISL are calculated by monitoring the convergence/divergence between the temporally averaged and spatio-temporally averaged profiles of momentum flux. It is found that the height of RSL/ISL interface is a function of surface roughness. Examining the direct, physical influence of roughness elements on near-surface RSL flows reveals that the TBL flows over rough surfaces exhibit turbulence motions of two different length scales which are functions of the RSL and ISL structure. Conclusively, given a TBL, the rougher the surface, the higher is the RSL intruding upward that would thinner the ISL up to 50 %. Therefore, the conventional ISL log-law approximation to TBL flows over urban surfaces should be applied with caution.

  1. MHD Model Results of Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Mars and Comparison with MAVEN Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. J.; Russell, C. T.; Nagy, A. F.; Toth, G.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    The crustal remnant field on Mars rotates constantly with the planet, varying the magnetic field configuration interacting with the solar wind. It has been found that ion loss rates slowly vary with the subsolar longitude, anticorrelating with the intensity of the dayside crustal field source, with some time delay, using a time-dependent multispecies MHD model. In this study, we investigate in detail how plasma properties are influenced locally by the crustal field and its rotation. Model results will be compared in detail with plasma observations from MAVEN.

  2. Unknown input observer based detection of sensor faults in a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an unknown input observer is designed to detect three different sensor fault scenarios in a specified bench mark model for fault detection and accommodation of wind turbines. In this paper a subset of faults is dealt with, it are faults in the rotor and generator speed sensors as well...... as a converter sensor fault. The proposed scheme detects the speed sensor faults in question within the specified requirements given in the bench mark model, while the converter fault is detected but not within the required time to detect....

  3. Observations and Analysis of Turbulent Wake of Wind Turbine by Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent wake of wind turbine will reduce the power output of wind farm. The access to real turbulent wake of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales is provided by the pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using lidar measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit by the turbine wake.

  4. Connecting the surface of the Sun to the Heliosphere : wind speed and magnetic field geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rui

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale solar wind speed distribution varies in time in response to the cyclic variations of the strength and geometry of the magnetic field of the corona. Based on this idea, semi-empirical predictive laws for the solar wind speed (such as in the widely-used WSA law) use simple parameters describing the geometry of the coronal magnetic field. In practice, such scaling laws require ad-hoc corrections and empirical fits to in-situ spacecraft data, and a predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. I will discuss improvements to this kind of laws based on the analysis of very large samples of wind acceleration profiles in open flux-tubes (both from MHD simulations and potential-field extrapolations), and possible strategies for corona and heliosphere model coupling. I will, furthermore present an ongoing modelling effort to determine the magnetic connectivity, paths and propagation delays of any type of disturbance (slow/fast solar wind, waves, energetic particles, ballistic propagation) between the solar surface and any point in the interplanetary space at any time. This is a key point for the exploitation of data from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, and more generally for establishing connections between remote and in-situ spacecraft data. This is work is supported by the FP7 project #606692 (HELCATS).

  5. Near surface spatially averaged air temperature and wind speed determined by acoustic travel time tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Raabe

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic travel time tomography is presented as a possibility for remote monitoring of near surface airtemperature and wind fields. This technique provides line-averaged effective sound speeds changing with temporally and spatially variable air temperature and wind vector. The effective sound speed is derived from the travel times of sound signals which propagate at defined paths between different acoustic sources and receivers. Starting with the travel time data a tomographic algorithm (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique, SIRT is used to calculate area-averaged air temperature and wind speed. The accuracy of the experimental method and the tomographic inversion algorithm is exemplarily demonstrated for one day without remarkable differences in the horizontal temperature field, determined by independent in situ measurements at different points within the measuring field. The differences between the conventionally determined air temperature (point measurement and the air temperature determined by tomography (area-averaged measurement representative for the area of the measuring field 200m x 260m were below 0.5 K for an average of 10 minutes. The differences obtained between the wind speed measured at a meteorological mast and calculated from acoustic measurements are not higher than 0.5 ms-1 for the same averaging time. The tomographically determined area-averaged distribution of air temperature (resolution 50 m x 50 m can be used to estimate the horizontal gradient of air temperature as a pre-condition to detect horizontal turbulent fluxes of sensible heat.

  6. Statistical parameters of the spatiotemporal variability of the wind direction in the surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishov, E. A.; Koprov, B. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Multipoint measurements of wind direction were carried out during the expedition of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPA RAS), in Tsimlyansk in 2012. Spatial correlation functions for the transverse direction and temporal correlation functions for the longitudinal direction are plotted under stable and unstable stratification of the atmosphere. The longitudinal correlation radius is much higher than the transverse one, and radii in daytime realizations are larger than in nighttime. To determine the stratification conditions, an ultrasonic anemometer-thermometer was used. Autospectra of wind direction fluctuations were plotted. They include long segments of power dependence on the frequency. The spectral correlation coefficients of variations in the wind direction versus intersensor distance in the transverse direction are also calculated. A set of fast-response thermometers was used in the experiment. They allowed temperature mapping, i.e., plotting the time variations in the isothermal surface altitude. That analysis was also applied to visualization of the spatiotemporal variability of wind direction. The resulting data were used for planning the helicity measurements in the Tsimlyansk expedition in 2014.

  7. Global surface pressure measurements of static and dynamic stall on a wind turbine airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Gregory, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Recognizing the need for global surface measurement techniques to characterize the time-varying, three-dimensional loading encountered on rotating wind turbine blades, fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been evaluated for resolving unsteady aerodynamic effects in incompressible flow. Results of a study aimed at demonstrating the laser-based, single-shot PSP technique on a low Reynolds number wind turbine airfoil in static and dynamic stall are reported. PSP was applied to the suction side of a Delft DU97-W-300 airfoil (maximum thickness-to-chord ratio of 30 %) at a chord Reynolds number of 225,000 in the University of Wyoming open-return wind tunnel. Static and dynamic stall behaviors are presented using instantaneous and phase-averaged global pressure maps. In particular, a three-dimensional pressure topology driven by a stall cell pattern is detected near the maximum lift condition on the steady airfoil. Trends in the PSP-measured pressure topology on the steady airfoil were confirmed using surface oil visualization. The dynamic stall case was characterized by a sinusoidal pitching motion with mean angle of 15.7°, amplitude of 11.2°, and reduced frequency of 0.106 based on semichord. PSP images were acquired at selected phase positions, capturing the breakdown of nominally two-dimensional flow near lift stall, development of post-stall suction near the trailing edge, and a highly three-dimensional topology as the flow reattaches. Structural patterns in the surface pressure topologies are considered from the analysis of the individual PSP snapshots, enabled by a laser-based excitation system that achieves sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the single-shot images. The PSP results are found to be in general agreement with observations about the steady and unsteady stall characteristics expected for the airfoil.

  8. On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope

    CERN Document Server

    Joelson, Maminirina

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new formulation of the probability distribution function of wind driven water surface slope with an $\\alpha$-stable distribution probability. The mathematical formulation of the probability distribution function is given under an integral formulation. Application to represent the probability of time slope data from laboratory experiments is carried out with satisfactory results. We compare also the $\\alpha$-stable model of the water surface slopes with the Gram-Charlier development and the non-Gaussian model of Liu et al\\cite{Liu}. Discussions and conclusions are conducted on the basis of the data fit results and the model analysis comparison.

  9. Wind tunnel experiment of drag of isolated tree models in surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For very sparse tree land individual tree was the basic element of interaction between atmosphere and the surface. Drag of isolated tree was preliminary aerodynamic index for analyzing the atmospheric boundary layer of this kind of surface. A simple pendulum method was designed and carried out in wind tunnel to measure drag of isolated tree models according to balance law of moment of force. The method was easy to conduct and with small error. The results showed that the drag and drag coefficient of isolated tree increased with decreasing of its permeability or porosity. Relationship between drag coefficient and permeability of isolated tree empirically was expressed by quadric curve.

  10. Specific features of heat transfer on the external surface of smoke stacks blown by wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneev, A. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    Results of a full-scale experiment on studying heat transfer on the surface of a reinforced-concrete smoke stack blown by wind at the value of Reynolds number Re = 1.05 × 107 are presented. Comparison of the experimental results with the experimental data obtained previously by other researchers under laboratory conditions at Re cylinder in a transcritical streamlining mode. The data obtained in the present study open the possibility to estimate the average values of heat transfer coefficient on the surface of smoke stacks in a flow of atmospheric air at 4 × 106 < Re < 107.

  11. PMSE and wind profiles from observations above EISCAT Tromsø site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Nozawa, Satonori; Haeggstroem, Ingemar; Tjulin, Anders; Dalin, Peter; Hall, Chris; Anyairo, Charles; Rostami, Sina

    2017-04-01

    One of the processes that are linked to the entry of cosmic dust in atmosphere is the formation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE). PMSE are strong radar echoes that are observed in the polar summer mesosphere. They are caused by spatial variations in the plasma refractive index which arise in the presence of electrically charged ice particles. The ice particles that are linked to PMSE are often below the optically observable size range and are assumed to form by water ice condensing onto meteoric smoke particles at around 80 to 90 km altitude. The atmosphere at PMSE altitude is influenced by solar radiative forcing from above and gravity waves from below, and while ionization is small, it is highly variable due to a number of different processes. A straightforward quantitative description of the physics leading to PMSE formation is at present still missing. With one of the first tri-static PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF radar we found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE process. We compare the EISCAT observations to wind observations carried with other radar at the same location and discuss implications for future observations. We acknowledge Chris Meek and Alan Manson who provided MF radar data. EISCAT is an international association supported by research organizations in Norway (NFR), Sweden (VR), Finland (SA), Japan (NIPR and STEL), China (CRIPR), and the United Kingdom (NERC); data are available under http://www. eiscat.se/madrigal/.

  12. Long-term Behaviour Of Venus Winds At Cloud Level From Virtis/vex Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Peralta, J.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Venus Express (VEX) mission has been in orbit to Venus for more than three years now. The VIRTIS instrument onboard VEX observes Venus in two channels (visible and infrared) obtaining spectra and multi-wavelength images of the planet. Images in the ultraviolet range are used to study the upper cloud at 66 km while images in the infrared (1.74 μm) map the opacity of the lower cloud deck at 48 km. Here we present an analysis of the overall dynamics of Venus’ atmosphere at both levels using observations that cover a large fraction of the VIRTIS dataset. We will present our latest results concerning the zonal winds, the overall stability in the lower cloud deck motions and the variability in the upper cloud. Meridional winds are also observed in the upper and lower cloud in the UV and IR images obtained with VIRTIS. While the upper clouds present a net meridional motion consistent with the upper branch of a Hadley cell the lower cloud present more irregular, variable and less intense motions in the meridional direction. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. RH acknowledges a "Ramón y Cajal” contract from MEC.

  13. Inertia gravity wave in the stratosphere and mesosphere observed by Doppler wind and temperature lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Hildebrand, J.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature by Doppler Rayleigh lidar in the middle atmosphere. The observations were performed at the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research station in northern Norway (69°N,16°E) between 21 and 23 January 2012. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during nighttime and to about 70 km during daytime. We observe amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wavefield is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves; however, quasi-monochromatic waves could be identified at limited times around 60 km altitude with a mean momentum flux in direction of propagation of 3.8 m2/s2.

  14. TEXES Observations of M Supergiants: Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Harper, G M; Ryde, N; Brown, A; Brown, J; Greathouse, T K; Strong, S

    2009-01-01

    We have detected [Fe II] 17.94 um and 24.52 um emission from a sample of M supergiants using TEXES on the IRTF. These low opacity emission lines are resolved at R = 50, 000 and provide new diagnostics of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the stellar wind acceleration zone. The [Fe II] lines, from the first excited term, are sensitive to the warm plasma where energy is deposited into the extended atmosphere to form the chromosphere and wind outflow. These diagnostics complement previous KAO and ISO observations which were sensitive to the cooler and more extended circumstellar envelopes. The turbulent velocities, Vturb is about 12 to 13 km/s, observed in the [Fe II] forbidden lines are found to be a common property of our sample, and are less than that derived from the hotter chromospheric C II] 2325 Angstrom lines observed in alpha Ori, where Vturb is about 17 to 19 km/s. For the first time, we have dynamically resolved the motions of the dominant cool atmospheric component discovered in alpha Ori from multi...

  15. Assimilating surface observations in a four-dimensional variational Doppler radar data assimilation system to improve the analysis and forecast of a squall line case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingchao; Zhao, Kun; Sun, Juanzhen; Zhou, Bowen; Lee, Wen-Chau

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines how assimilating surface observations can improve the analysis and forecast ability of a fourdimensional Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS). Observed surface temperature and winds are assimilated together with radar radial velocity and reflectivity into a convection-permitting model using the VDRAS four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system. A squall-line case observed during a field campaign is selected to investigate the performance of the technique. A single observation experiment shows that assimilating surface observations can influence the analyzed fields in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The surface-based cold pool, divergence and gust front of the squall line are all strengthened through the assimilation of the single surface observation. Three experiments—assimilating radar data only, assimilating radar data with surface data blended in a mesoscale background, and assimilating both radar and surface observations with a 4DVAR cost function—are conducted to examine the impact of the surface data assimilation. Independent surface and wind profiler observations are used for verification. The result shows that the analysis and forecast are improved when surface observations are assimilated in addition to radar observations. It is also shown that the additional surface data can help improve the analysis and forecast at low levels. Surface and low-level features of the squall line—including the surface warm inflow, cold pool, gust front, and low-level wind—are much closer to the observations after assimilating the surface data in VDRAS.

  16. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission from Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2008-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth s magnetosheath. The light curve of the O VII (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.36). The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  17. Evaluation of surface layer flux parameterizations using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeremy; Zhu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate calculation of surface turbulent fluxes between the atmosphere and the underlying ocean/land surface is one of the major challenges in geosciences. In practice, the surface turbulent fluxes are estimated from the mean surface meteorological variables based on the bulk transfer model combined with the Monnin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. Few studies have been done to examine the extent to which such a flux parameterization can be applied to different weather and surface conditions. A novel validation method is developed in this study to evaluate the surface flux parameterization using in-situ observations collected at a station off the coast of Gulf of Mexico. The main findings are: (a) the theoretical prediction that uses MOS theory does not match well with those directly computed from the observations. (b) The largest spread in exchange coefficients is shown in strong stable conditions with calm winds. (c) Large turbulent eddies, which depend strongly on the mean flow pattern and surface conditions, tend to break the constant flux assumption in the surface layer.

  18. The Indian Summer Monsoon onset revisited: new approach based on the analysis of historical wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Paulina; Gallego, David; Ribera, Pedro; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; Garcia-Herrera, Ricardo; Vega, Inmaculada; Gómez, Francisco de Paula

    2016-04-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon onset is one of the meteorological events most anticipated in the world. Due to its relevance for the population, the India Meteorological Department has dated the onset over the southern tip of the Indian Peninsula (Kerala) since 1901. The traditional method to date the onset was based in the judgment of skilled meteorologist and because of this, the method was considered subjective and not adequate for the study of long-term changes in the onset. A new method for determining the monsoon onset based solely on objective criteria has been in use since 2006. Unfortunately, the new method relies -among other variables- on OLR measurements. This requirement impedes the construction of an objective onset series before the satellite era. An alternative approach to establish the onset by objective methods is the use of the wind field. During the last decade, some works have demonstrated that the changes in the wind direction in some areas of the Indian Ocean can be used to determine the monsoon onset rather precisely. However, this method requires precise wind observations over a large oceanic area which has limited the periods covered for such kind of indices to those of the reanalysis products. In this work we present a new approach to track the Indian monsoon onset based solely on historical wind direction measurements taken onboard ships. Our new series provides an objective record of the onset since the last decade of the 19th century and perhaps more importantly, it can incorporate any new historical wind record not yet known in order to extend the series length. The new series captures quite precisely the rapid precipitation increase associated to the monsoon onset, correlates well with previous approaches and it is robust against anomalous (bogus) onsets. Although no significant trends in the onset date were detected, a tendency to later than average onsets during the 1900-1925 and 1970-1990 periods and earlier than average onsets between

  19. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries (SOCS) for Moody AFB, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Observation Climatic Summaries for Columbus AFB, Mississippi. USAFETAC/DS--91/264 4. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries for Williams AFB, Arizona...DB DRY BULB TEMPERATURE MEAS MEASURABLE DP DEW POINT TEMPERATURE NO. NUMBER EQ EQUAL OBS OBSERVATION F FAHRENHEIT OBST OBSTRUCTION FRZG FREEZING POF...PRECIP &/OR SNOW &/OR OBST NO. OF HAZE SAND TO VSN OBS ... ...... o.........o. o ............ ..... oo

  20. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  1. Rosetta and Mars Express observations of the influence of high solar wind pressure on the Martian plasma environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. T. Edberg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on new simultaneous in-situ observations at Mars from Rosetta and Mars Express (MEX on how the Martian plasma environment is affected by high pressure solar wind. A significant sharp increase in solar wind density, magnetic field strength and turbulence followed by a gradual increase in solar wind velocity is observed during ~24 h in the combined data set from both spacecraft after Rosetta's closest approach to Mars on 25 February 2007. The bow shock and magnetic pileup boundary are coincidently observed by MEX to become asymmetric in their shapes. The fortunate orbit of MEX at this time allows a study of the inbound boundary crossings on one side of the planet and the outbound crossings on almost the opposite side, both very close to the terminator plane. The solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF downstream of Mars are monitored through simultaneous measurements provided by Rosetta. Possible explanations for the asymmetries are discussed, such as crustal magnetic fields and IMF direction. In the same interval, during the high solar wind pressure pulse, MEX observations show an increased amount of escaping planetary ions from the polar region of Mars. We link the high pressure solar wind with the observed simultaneous ion outflow and discuss how the pressure pulse could also be associated with the observed boundary shape asymmetry.

  2. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Velocity Barb (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind velocity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  3. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Speed (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind speed forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  4. Observations of wind and waves in the central Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99 and their effect on mixed layer depth variability due to forced mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Swain; R K Shukla; A Raghunadha Rao; J K Panigrahi; N R Venkitachalam

    2003-06-01

    Time-series wind and wave measurements were carried out onboard INS Sagardhwani in the central Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99. Various other marine meteorological and oceanographic measurements relevant to monsoon studies were also collected simultaneously. The observed variations of wind and waves and the associated mixed layer depth (MLD) variability based on both temperature and density criteria at 3 hourly intervals are presented in this paper as a case study. At the time-series location (13°N, 87°E) wind varied between 6 and 16 m/s and the predominant direction was southwesterly. The significant wave height and period varied from 1.9 to 3.7m and 8 to 13 s respectively. Some of the available statistical predictive methods for the determination of MLD by forced mixing are utilized to test the extent of mechanical mixing within the top layer of water by the local wind and wave activity. The same is extended to formulate a new empirical relation for gross estimation of effective depth within which the sound energy is generally trapped during its transmission in the surface duct. The present analysis aiming for estimation of observed MLD variability (35 to 75 m) using the suggested simple empirical relation reveals that, the mixed layer variability observed during the experiment depends on both local ocean variability as well as remote forcing as reported earlier.

  5. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  6. Observed Asteroid Surface Area in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Wright, E. L.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  7. Comments on Navy/NRL requirements for sea surface temperature and surface wind measurements on Seasat-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, R. E.; Jeck, R. K., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    SEASAT instrumentation payload requirements to provide satellite data for the Navy fleet operational fog prediction program include: (1) some form of C-band microwave radiometer capability; (2) a scanning antenna with a 40-km Instanteneous Field of View (IFOV) for the C-band channel; (3) a narrow band and high resolution IR scanning radiometer for cloud free areas; and (4) a capability for measuring surface winds of 3 to 50 m/sec at + or - 10% accuracy and 50 to 100 km spatial resolution.

  8. Limits on Alpha Particle Temperature Anisotropy and Differential Flow from Kinetic Instabilities: Solar Wind Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D G; Maruca, Bennett A; Kasper, Justin C

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this letter, we use a long period of in-situ measurements provided by the {\\em Wind} spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha-proton differential flow velocity and the alpha-particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of $T_{\\perp\\alpha}/T_{\\perp p}$ ($T_{\\parallel\\alpha}/T_{\\parallel p}$) when alpha-proton differential flow vel...

  9. Observational Test for a Random Sweeping Model in Solar Wind Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perschke, C; Narita, Y; Motschmann, U; Glassmeier, K H

    2016-03-25

    Evidence of frequency broadening at ion kinetic scales due to large-scale eddies and waves is found in solar wind turbulence by a test for a random sweeping model using the magnetic energy spectrum in the frequency vs wave number domain in the comoving frame of the flow obtained from multispacecraft observations. The statistical analysis of the frequency vs wave number spectra without using Taylor's hypothesis shows Gaussian frequency broadening around nearly zero frequencies that increases for larger wave numbers and non-Gaussian tails at higher frequencies. Comparison of the observed frequency broadening with a random sweeping model derived from hydrodynamic turbulence reveals similarities with respect to the Gaussian shape. The standard deviation of the broadening scales with ∼k^{1.6±0.2} and differs from the hydrodynamic turbulence model that predicts ∼k^{2/3}. We interpret this stronger increasing broadening as a consequence of the more diverse large scale structures (eddies and waves) in plasma turbulence and the accompanied more complex sweeping. Consequently, an identification and association of waves with normal modes based on their dispersion relation only, in particular at ion kinetic scales and below, is not possible in solar wind turbu