WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface weather stations

  1. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  2. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  3. Energy balance of a glacier surface: analysis of Automatic Weather Station data from the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Klok, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe and analyze a complete 1-yr data set from an automatic weather station (AWS) located on the snout of the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland. The AWS stands freely on the glacier surface and measures pressure, windspeed, wind direction, air temperature and humidity, incoming and reflected

  4. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  5. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  6. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  7. Weather Monitoring Station: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Dipak V. Sose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weather monitoring plays a very important role in human life hence study of weather system is necessary. Currently there are two types of the weather monitoring stations available i.e. wired and wireless. Wireless system has some advantages over the wired one hence popular now a days. The parameters are include in weather monitoring usually temperature, humidity atmospheric pressure, light intensity, rainfall etc. There are many techniques existed using different processor such as PIC, AVR, ARM etc. Analog to digital channel are used to fetch the analog output of the sensors. The wireless techniques used in the weather monitoring having GSM, FM channel, Zigbee, RF etc Protocols

  8. Geostatistical improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information using satellite land surface and weather stations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Alves, Marcelo; de Carvalho, Luiz Gonsaga; Vianello, Rubens Leite; Sediyama, Gilberto C.; de Oliveira, Marcelo Silva; de Sá Junior, Arionaldo

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to use the simple cokriging methodology to characterize the spatial variability of Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration and Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration methods based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer (MODIS) global evapotranspiration products and high-resolution surfaces of WordClim temperature and precipitation data. The climatic element data referred to 39 National Institute of Meteorology climatic stations located in Minas Gerais state, Brazil and surrounding states. The use of geostatistics and simple cokriging technique enabled the characterization of the spatial variability of the evapotranspiration providing uncertainty information on the spatial prediction pattern. Evapotranspiration and precipitation surfaces were implemented for the climatic classification in Minas Gerais. Multivariate geostatistical determined improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information. The regions in the south of Minas Gerais derived from the moisture index estimated with the MODIS evapotranspiration (2000-2010), presented divergence of humid conditions when compared to the moisture index derived from the simple kriged and cokriged evapotranspiration (1961-1990), indicating climate change in this region. There was stronger pattern of crossed covariance between evapotranspiration and precipitation rather than temperature, indicating that trends in precipitation could be one of the main external drivers of the evapotranspiration in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

  9. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A.R.; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An autonomous, low-power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This compact, portable lidar will operate continuously in a temperature controlled enclosure, charge its own batteries through a combination of a small rugged wind generator and solar panels, and transmit its data from remote locations to ground stations via satellite. A network of these instruments will be established by co-locating them at remote Automatic Weather Station (AWS) sites in Antarctica under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Office of Polar Programs provides support to place the weather stations in remote areas of Antarctica in support of meteorological research and operations. The AWS meteorological data will directly benefit the analysis of the lidar data while a network of ground based atmospheric lidar will provide knowledge regarding the temporal evolution and spatial extent of Type la polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). These clouds play a crucial role in the annual austral springtime destruction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica, i.e. the ozone hole. In addition, the lidar will monitor and record the general atmospheric conditions (transmission and backscatter) of the overlying atmosphere which will benefit the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Prototype lidar instruments have been deployed to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station (1995-96, 2000) and to an Automated Geophysical Observatory site (AGO 1) in January 1999. We report on data acquired with these instruments, instrument performance, and anticipated performance of the AWS Lidar.

  10. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  11. Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, Donna J [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kyrouac, Jenni A [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) is a surface meteorological station, manufactured by Vaisala, Inc., dedicated to the balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS), providing surface measurements of the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the wind speed and direction for each radiosonde profile. These data are automatically provided to the BBSS during the launch procedure and included in the radiosonde profile as the surface measurements of record for the sounding. The MAWS core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (hPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Temperature and relative humidity: 2 meters • Barometric pressure: 1 meter • Winds: 10 meters.

  12. Weather station with a web server

    OpenAIRE

    Repinc, Matej

    2013-01-01

    In this diploma thesis we present the process of making a cheap weather station using Arduino prototyping platform and its functionality. The weather station monitors current temperature, humidity of air and air pressure. The station has its own simple HTTP server that is used to relay current data in two different formats: JSON encoded data and simple HTML website. The weather station can also send data to a pre-defined server used for data collection. We implemented a web site where data an...

  13. Surface Weather Observations (Pre-1893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly weather records from U.S. Army Forts stations (~1820-1871), U.S. Army Signal Service Stations (1871-1892), Smithsonian Institution voluntary observer network...

  14. On-line data acquisition system for Aanderaa weather station

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    Aanderaa Weather Station can be installed at unattended remote places for collection of various weather parameters at regular preselected intervals. The weather parameters are recorded on the magnetic spool inside a battery operated datalogger which...

  15. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  16. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  17. Weather station on platform Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgan, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to make a weather station on the computer Raspberry Pi. In the first part of the thesis we focused on the history of the computer’s development and a presentation of technologies we used. Hardware technologies enabled us to mea- sure air temperature and pressure (sensor MPL115A2), humidity (sensor DHT11) and coordinates GPS (receiver MAX-6). For the programming technologies we used Python and some other tools and libraries: Crontab, SQLAlchemy, SQLite, CherryPi, M...

  18. Weather station on platform Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgan, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to make a weather station on the computer Raspberry Pi. In the first part of the thesis we focused on the history of the computer’s development and a presentation of technologies we used. Hardware technologies enabled us to mea- sure air temperature and pressure (sensor MPL115A2), humidity (sensor DHT11) and coordinates GPS (receiver MAX-6). For the programming technologies we used Python and some other tools and libraries: Crontab, SQLAlchemy, SQLite, CherryPi, M...

  19. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, MDTA Roadway weather station, weather stations, weather sensors, Roadway weather sensors, RWIS, MDTA weather sensors, Published in 2009, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. It...

  20. Relationship between Surface Urban Heat Island intensity and sensible heat flux retrieved from meteorological parameters observed by road weather stations in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawuć, Lech

    2017-04-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a direct consequence of altered energy balance in urban areas (Oke 1982). There has been a significant effort put into an understanding of air temperature variability in urban areas and underlying mechanisms (Arnfield 2003, Grimmond 2006, Stewart 2011, Barlow 2014). However, studies that are concerned on surface temperature are less frequent. Therefore, Voogt & Oke (2003) proposed term "Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI)", which is analogical to UHI and it is defined as a difference in land surface temperature (LST) between urban and rural areas. SUHI is a phenomenon that is not only concerned with high spatial variability, but also with high temporal variability (Weng and Fu 2014). In spite of the fact that satellite remote sensing techniques give a full spatial pattern over a vast area, such measurements are strictly limited to cloudless conditions during a satellite overpass (Sobrino et al., 2012). This significantly reduces the availability and applicability of satellite LST observations, especially over areas and seasons with high cloudiness occurrence. Also, the surface temperature is influenced by synoptic conditions (e.g., wind and humidity) (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). Hence, utilising single observations is not sufficient to obtain a full image of spatiotemporal variability of urban LST and SUHI intensity (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). One of the possible solutions would be a utilisation of time-series of LST data, which could be useful to monitor the UHI growth of individual cities and thus, to reveal the impact of urbanisation on local climate (Tran et al., 2006). The relationship between UHI and synoptic conditions have been summarised by Arnfield (2003). However, similar analyses conducted for urban LST and SUHI are lacking. We will present analyses of the relationship between time series of remotely-sensed LST and SUHI intensity and in-situ meteorological observations collected by road weather stations network, namely: road surface

  1. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  2. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  3. Monitoring Weather Station Fire Rehabilitation Treatments: Hanford Reach National Monument

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Weather Station Fire (July, 2005) burned across 4,918 acres in the Saddle Mountain Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument, which included parts of the...

  4. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, INDOT Weather Stations, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, INDOT.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006....

  5. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, weather stations, Published in 2002, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is...

  6. Accuracy assessment of land surface temperature retrievals from Landsat 7 ETM + in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica using iButton temperature loggers and weather station data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabyn, Lars; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Stichbury, Glen; Cary, Craig; Storey, Bryan; Laughlin, Daniel C; Katurji, Marwan

    2014-04-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are the largest snow/ice-free regions on this vast continent, comprising 1% of the land mass. Due to harsh environmental conditions, the valleys are bereft of any vegetation. Land surface temperature is a key determinate of microclimate and a driver for sensible and latent heat fluxes of the surface. The Dry Valleys have been the focus of ecological studies as they arguably provide the simplest trophic structure suitable for modelling. In this paper, we employ a validation method for land surface temperatures obtained from Landsat 7 ETM + imagery and compared with in situ land surface temperature data collected from four transects totalling 45 iButtons. A single meteorological station was used to obtain a better understanding of daily and seasonal cycles in land surface temperatures. Results show a good agreement between the iButton and the Landsat 7 ETM + product for clear sky cases. We conclude that Landsat 7 ETM + derived land surface temperatures can be used at broad spatial scales for ecological and meteorological research.

  7. Implementation of weather stations at Ghanaian high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieron, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (www.tahmo.org) is an initiative that aims to develop a dense weather observation network in Sub-Sahara Africa. The ambition is to have 20.000 low-cost innovative weather stations in place in 2015. An increased amount of weather data is locally required to provide stakeholders that are dependent on the weather, such as farmers and fishermen, with accurate forecasts. As a first proof of concept, showing that sensors can be built at costs lower than commercially available, a disdrometer was developed. In parallel with the design of the measurement instruments, a high school curriculum is developed that covers environmental sciences. In order to find out which requirements the TAHMO weather station and accompanying educational materials should meet for optimal use at Junior High Schools research was done at Ghanaian schools. Useful insights regarding the future African context of the weather station and requirements for an implementation strategy were obtained during workshops with teachers and students, visits to WMO observatories and case studies regarding use of educational materials. The poster presents the conclusions of this research, which is part of the bigger TAHMO framework.

  8. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Langen, Peter L.; Pálsson, Finnur; Mottram, Ruth; Gascoin, Simon; Björnsson, Helgi

    2017-07-01

    A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980-2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB). This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs) from the period 2001-2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995-2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995-2014) shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981-2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes currently not accounted for in RCMs

  9. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Schmidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980–2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB. This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs from the period 2001–2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995–2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995–2014 shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981–2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes

  10. Weather Stations as Educational and Hazard-Forecasting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, L. J.; Gierke, J. S.; Gochis, E. E.; Dominguez, R.; Mayer, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Small, relatively inexpensive (educational opportunities at all grade levels, while also facilitating compilation of climate data for longer term research. Weather stations and networks of stations have been installed both locally and abroad in mostly rural and resource-limited settings. The data are being used either in the classroom to engage students in place-based, scientific investigations and/or research to improve hydrometeorological hazard forecasting, including water scarcity. The San Vicente (El Salvador) Network of six stations monitors rainfall to aid warning and evacuations for landslide and flooding hazards. Other parameters are used in modeling the watershed hydrology. A station installed in Hermosillo, Mexico is used in both Geography and Ecology Classes. Trends in temperature and rainfall are graphed and compared to historic data gathered over the last 30 years by CONAGUA. These observations are linked to local water-related problems, including well salinization, diminished agriculture, depleted aquifers, and social conflict regarding access to water. Two weather stations were installed at the Hannahville Indian Community School (Nah Tah Wahsh) in Michigan for educational purposes of data collection, analysis, and presentation. Through inquiry-based explorations of local hydrological processes, students are introduced to how meteorological data are used in understanding watershed hydrology and the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Several Michigan Technological University Peace Corps Masters International students have deployed weather stations in and around the communities where they serve, and the data are used in research to help in understanding water resource availability and irrigation needs.

  11. Weather station for scientific data collection

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Mehra, P.; Desa, E.; Nagvekar, S.; Kumar, V.

    pressure, solar radiation and relative humidity. The system has been designed for meteorological measurements on land and from oceanographic ships. Innovative mechanical packaging and use of surface mount device (SMD) technology has resulted in an extremely...

  12. Sophisticated technology for offshore weather station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-11-15

    A laser wind velocity measurement system has been installed by the NaiKun Wind Energy Group at its offshore wind project site at the Haida Energy Field (HEF) in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. The ZephIR LiDAR was developed by QinetiQ of the United Kingdom. Compared to regular cup anemometers, this new measurement system provides a greater profile of wind resources because it measures wind speed, direction, turbulence and shear at various heights by measuring the Doppler shift of laser radiation scattered by atmospheric aerosols. The technology has been used at various research centres worldwide and wind energy developers such as Fred Olsen Renewables, Talisman Energy and Meridian Energy use the system to facilitate project development and acquire wind resource data. The HEF has some of the strongest and most consistent winds in Canada. NaiKun has access to Environment Canada's wind data which has been collected over the past decade at an onshore meteorological station in the area. The ZephIR LiDAR was actually operating at the onshore site prior to offshore installation in order to correlate the existing wind anemometer data. It is anticipated that LiDAR technology will facilitate resource profiling by quickly providing wind measurements within the entire area of a turbine blade rotation from base to hub height. Collected data will be used to optimize project design and layout of the wind turbine array. Germany-based GL Wind Test was retained by NaiKun to manage the data acquisition and analysis. 2 figs.

  13. Federal Weather Radar Stations in the United States as of September 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  14. Improved Recharge Estimation from Portable, Low-Cost Weather Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Hartmut M; Wang, Zijian; Assefa, Kibreab A; Woodbury, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater recharge estimation is a critical quantity for sustainable groundwater management. The feasibility and robustness of recharge estimation was evaluated using physical-based modeling procedures, and data from a low-cost weather station with remote sensor techniques in Southern Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada. Recharge was determined using the Richards-based vadose zone hydrological model, HYDRUS-1D. The required meteorological data were recorded with a HOBO(TM) weather station for a short observation period (about 1 year) and an existing weather station (Abbotsford A) for long-term study purpose (27 years). Undisturbed soil cores were taken at two locations in the vicinity of the HOBO(TM) weather station. The derived soil hydraulic parameters were used to characterize the soil in the numerical model. Model performance was evaluated using observed soil moisture and soil temperature data obtained from subsurface remote sensors. A rigorous sensitivity analysis was used to test the robustness of the model. Recharge during the short observation period was estimated at 863 and 816 mm. The mean annual recharge was estimated at 848 and 859 mm/year based on a time series of 27 years. The relative ratio of annual recharge-precipitation varied from 43% to 69%. From a monthly recharge perspective, the majority (80%) of recharge due to precipitation occurred during the hydrologic winter period. The comparison of the recharge estimates with other studies indicates a good agreement. Furthermore, this method is able to predict transient recharge estimates, and can provide a reasonable tool for estimates on nutrient leaching that is often controlled by strong precipitation events and rapid infiltration of water and nitrate into the soil.

  15. Surface and snowdrift sublimation at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiery, W.; Gorodetskaya, I.V.; Bintanja, R.; van Lipzig, N.P.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Reijmer, C.H.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the near-coastal regions of Antarctica, a significant fraction of the snow precipitating onto the surface is removed again through sublimation – either directly from the surface or from drifting snow particles. Meteorological observations from an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) near the Belgian r

  16. Weather satellite picture receiving stations, APT digital scan converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, C. H.; Kamowski, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The automatic picture transmission digital scan converter is used at ground stations to convert signals received from scanning radiometers to data compatible with ground equipment designed to receive signals from vidicons aboard operational meteorological satellites. Information necessary to understand the circuit theory, functional operation, general construction and calibration of the converter is provided. Brief and detailed descriptions of each of the individual circuits are included, accompanied by a schematic diagram contained at the end of each circuit description. Listings of integral parts and testing equipment required as well as an overall wiring diagram are included. This unit will enable the user to readily accept and process weather photographs from the operational meteorological satellites.

  17. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, WeatherStations-This dataset contains the names and locations of weathers stations found throughout Utah, Published in 2005, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  18. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, WeatherStations-This dataset contains the names and locations of weathers stations found throughout Utah, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  19. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  20. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, Kansas Weather Stations, Published in 2005, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Kansas Adjutant General's Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at Smaller than 1:100000 scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as...

  1. Verification of Forecast Weather Surface Variables over Vietnam Using the National Numerical Weather Prediction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Du Duc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The national numerical weather prediction system of Vietnam is presented and evaluated. The system is based on three main models, namely, the Japanese Global Spectral Model, the US Global Forecast System, and the US Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The global forecast products have been received at 0.25- and 0.5-degree horizontal resolution, respectively, and the WRF model has been run locally with 16 km horizontal resolution at the National Center for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting using lateral conditions from GSM and GFS. The model performance is evaluated by comparing model output against observations of precipitation, wind speed, and temperature at 168 weather stations, with daily data from 2010 to 2014. In general, the global models provide more accurate forecasts than the regional models, probably due to the low horizontal resolution in the regional model. Also, the model performance is poorer for stations with altitudes greater than 500 meters above sea level (masl. For tropical cyclone performance validations, the maximum wind surface forecast from global and regional models is also verified against the best track of Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Finally, the model forecast skill during a recent extreme rain event in northeast Vietnam is evaluated.

  2. Portland IAP, Portland, Oregon. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-08

    For theComiade I U’"S AMR FORCE u’S TECNICA REVISED UNIFORM SUMMARY APPLI CAIONS CEM0R OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS I, HOURLY OBSERVATIONS Hourly...ALL ’ i STATION STATION NAME ,e O L PERCENTAGE. FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATH’ER i CONDITIONS FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS , "ii ONT HORS HUNER - RAIN

  3. Forecasting New Hampshire Power Outages through the Analysis of Weather Station Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessenden, Ross T.

    data, consistent relationships throughout the data set were fairly weak. CARTs were then created to examine the joint effect of the entire set of weather variables, such as interactions and nonlinear relationships, to improve the overall predictability of power outages. After creating the trees from the four-year training data set, their predictive ability was tested using the final year of data. The CART predictive models showed that among Eversource TRUPER variables, the hardest to predict was customers per TRUPER. The best performing model predicted customers per TRUPER to an average error of 96 customers, or a percent mean average error (PMAER) of 131% of 2010 customers per TRUPER. This result could deal with the high variability seen in customer outages per TRUPER, across a single weather event, driven by widelyvarying population and customer density. The most accurately predicted TRUPER variable, outage duration, saw average PMAER values of 60% of the mean (e.g., if mean duration per TRUPER for the year was 100 minutes, the model would miss on average by 60 minutes). Overall, the model results show surface weather data has a weak correlation to the TRUPER variables analyzed. The model can predict situations when one would expect longer duration outages but is unable to accurately predict the magnitude of these variables. When xii adapting the predictive models to smaller portions of the data set, warm-season data showed the greatest predictability, considerably outperforming the other data sets (cold-season, 2006-2009, and single station). Cold-season showed the greatest volatility and, not surprisingly, proved the most difficult to predict.

  4. Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-12

    USAFETACITN-63-0I. "AN AID FOR USING THE REVISED UNIFORM SUMMARY OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS" 1RUSSAO. TABLE OF CONTENTS STATION HISTORY C PART A: WEATHER...24 634 OSC STATION LOCATION AND INSTRUMENTATION HISTORY Vitt~f tLAU UELtlNE L~TI EMI AIM WK A.1. U 6itffn maI~t . 041 1 Oscoda AA ich A Jul.43 1 Aug43...fla saiTT[I SUSHI ~ 15658 __________________ 1 Jul 43 1/A N/A 1/A N/A 2 JU 53 Permanently mounted on iop of AN/GMQ-1 ML-204-~1 30 ft the weather

  5. Meteorological observations from Dauphin Island Sea Lab Weather Station 1974-1997 (NCEI Accession 0156662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DISL Weather Station collected twice daily meteorological observations at the east end of Dauphin Island, Alabama (30 degrees 14' 57" N, 88 degrees 04' 38" W)...

  6. Impacts of combining reanalyses and weather station data on the accuracy of discharge modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essou, Gilles R. C.; Brissette, François; Lucas-Picher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Reanalyses are important sources of meteorological data. Recent studies have shown that precipitation and temperature data from reanalysis present a strong potential for hydrological modelling, especially in regions with a sparse observational network. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the combination of three global atmospheric reanalyses - ERA-Interim, CFSR and MERRA - and one gridded observation dataset on the accuracy of hydrological model discharge simulations. Two combination approaches were used. The first one combined reanalyses and the observational database using a weighted average of the precipitation and temperature inputs. The second one consisted in using all meteorological inputs separately and combining the simulated hydrographs. The combinations were performed over 460 Canadian watersheds (representing regions with a low density of weather stations) and 370 US watersheds (representing regions with a higher density of weather stations). Results showed significant improvements in the simulated discharges for 68% and 92% of the Canadian watersheds for the input combinations and output combinations, respectively. Moreover, both approaches led to significant improvements in the simulated discharges for 72% of the US watersheds studied. For all watersheds where simulated discharges using observational data had a Nash Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) lower than 0.5, the combination with reanalyses resulted in a median NSE increase of 0.3. This indicates that reanalysis can successfully compensate for deficiencies in the surface observation record and provide significantly better hydrological modelling performance.

  7. Air Weather Service Master Station Catalog: USAFETAC Climatic Database Users Handbook No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    MA MAURITIUS 61 MC MOROCCO 60 MD MADEIRA 08 MF ST.MARTIN, ST.BARTHOLOMEW, GUADELOUPE , AND FR ISLANDS 78 MG MADAGASCAR 67 MH MARSHALL ISLANDS 91 MI...THE SOUTH 78 MN ST. MAARTEN, ST.EUSTATIUS, AND SABA 78 MF ST. MARTIN, ST. BARTHOLOMEW, GUADELOUPE , AND FR ISLANDS 78 SU SUDAN 62 SM SURINAME 81 SV...strait z = zaliv ..... gulf AGMS - Agricultural meteorological station AGRO - Agricultural station AMSG - Air weather station of the civil air fleet

  8. Surface and snowdrift sublimation at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Thiery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the near-coastal regions of Antarctica, a significant fraction of the snow precipitating onto the surface is removed again through sublimation – either directly from the surface or from drifting snow particles. Meteorological observations from an Automatic Weather Station (AWS near the Belgian research station Princess Elisabeth in Dronning Maud Land, East-Antarctica, are used to study surface and snowdrift sublimation and to assess their impacts on both the surface mass balance and the surface energy balance. Comparison to three other AWSs in Dronning Maud Land shows that sublimation has a significant influence on the surface mass balance at katabatic locations by removing 10–23 % of their total precipitation, but at the same time reveals anomalously low surface and snowdrift sublimation rates at Princess Elisabeth (18 mm w.e. yr–1 compared to 42 mm w.e. yr–1 at Svea Cross and 52 mm w.e. yr–1 at Wasa/Aboa. This anomaly is attributed to local topography, which shields the station from strong katabatic influence, and therefore on the one hand allows for a strong surface inversion to persist throughout most of the year and on the other hand causes a lower probability of occurrence of intermediately strong winds. These wind speed classes turn out to contribute most to the total snowdrift sublimation mass flux, given their ability to lift a high number of particles while still allowing for considerable undersaturation.

  9. Cloud information for FIRE from surface weather reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Carole J.; Warren, Stephen G.; London, Julius

    1990-01-01

    Surface weather observations of clouds were analyzed to obtain a global cloud climatology (Warren et al, 1986; 1988). The form of the synoptic weather code limits the types of cloud information which are available from these reports. Comparison of surface weather reports with instrumental observations during the FIRE field experiments can help to clarify the operational definitions which were made in the climatology because of the nature of the synoptic code. The long-term climatology from surface weather observations is also useful background for planning the location and timing of intensive field experiments.

  10. Using Arduinos and 3D-printers to Build Research-grade Weather Stations and Environmental Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many plant, soil, and surface-boundary-layer processes in the geosphere are governed by the microclimate at the land-air interface. Environmental monitoring is needed at smaller scales and higher frequencies than provided by existing weather monitoring networks. The objective of this project was to design, prototype, and test a research-grade weather station that is based on open-source hardware/software and off-the-shelf components. The idea is that anyone could make these systems with only elementary skills in fabrication and electronics. The first prototypes included measurements of air temperature, humidity, pressure, global irradiance, wind speed, and wind direction. The best approach for measuring precipitation is still being investigated. The data acquisition system was deigned around the Arduino microcontroller and included an LCD-based user interface, SD card data storage, and solar power. Sensors were sampled at 5 s intervals and means, standard deviations, and maximum/minimums were stored at user-defined intervals (5, 30, or 60 min). Several of the sensor components were printed in plastic using a hobby-grade 3D printer (e.g., RepRap Project). Both passive and aspirated radiation shields for measuring air temperature were printed in white Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). A housing for measuring solar irradiance using a photodiode-based pyranometer was printed in opaque ABS. The prototype weather station was co-deployed with commercial research-grade instruments at an agriculture research unit near Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Excellent agreement was found between Arduino-based system and commercial weather instruments. The technology was also used to support air quality research and automated air sampling. The next step is to incorporate remote access and station-to-station networking using Wi-Fi, cellular phone, and radio communications (e.g., Xbee).

  11. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  12. The NASA-Lewis terrestrial photovoltaics program. [solar cell power system for weather station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    Research and technology efforts on solar cells and arrays having relevance to terrestrial uses are outline. These include raising cell efficiency, developing the FEP-covered module concept, and exploring low cost cell concepts. Solar cell-battery power systems for remote weather stations have been built to demonstrate the capabilities of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  13. Comments on: Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program: 30 Years of Polar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Recently Lazzara et al. (2012) presented a review of the technical and scientific progress in deployment, data collection and analysis of the Automated Weather Stations (AWS) in the Antarctic. In the subsection entitled Science Applications using AWS Observations, the authors briefly account for several scientific occurrences of meteorological data collected by AWS.

  14. Using automatic weather station data to quantify snowmelt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.; Reijmer, C.H.; Boot, W.

    2011-01-01

    Snowmelt constitutes an important part of the surface energy and mass balance of the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. In Greenland, the entire ice sheet experiences occasional melt, as indicated by thin, isolated ice lenses in firn cores drilled at the highest part of the ice sheet and

  15. Surface and snowdrift sublimation at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Thiery

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the near-coastal regions of Antarctica, a significant fraction of the snow precipitating onto the surface is removed again through sublimation – either directly from the surface or from drifting snow particles. Meteorological observations from an Automatic Weather Station (AWS near the Belgian research station Princess Elisabeth in Dronning Maud Land, East-Antarctica, are used to study surface and snowdrift sublimation and to assess their impacts on both the surface mass balance and the surface energy balance during 2009 and 2010. Comparison to three other AWSs in Dronning Maud Land with 11 to 13 yr of observations shows that sublimation has a significant influence on the surface mass balance at katabatic locations by removing 10–23% of their total precipitation, but at the same time reveals anomalously low surface and snowdrift sublimation rates at Princess Elisabeth (17 mm w.e. yr−1 compared to 42 mm w.e. yr−1 at Svea Cross and 52 mm w.e. yr−1 at Wasa/Aboa. This anomaly is attributed to local topography, which shields the station from strong katabatic influence, and, therefore, on the one hand allows for a strong surface inversion to persist throughout most of the year and on the other hand causes a lower probability of occurrence of intermediately strong winds. This wind speed class turns out to contribute most to the total snowdrift sublimation mass flux, given its ability to lift a high number of particles while still allowing for considerable undersaturation.

  16. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, e911 Towers layer contain weather tower information, Published in 2007, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Edwards County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is...

  17. Inorganic carbon time series at Ocean Weather Station M in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Skjelvan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT has been collected at Ocean Weather Station M (OWSM in the Norwegian Sea since 2001. Seasonal variations in CT are confined to the upper 50 m, where the biology is active, and below this layer no clear seasonal signal is seen. From winter to summer the surface CT concentration typical drops from 2140 to about 2040 μmol kg−1, while a deep water CT concentration of about 2163 μmol kg−1 is measured throughout the year. Observations show an annual increase in salinity normalized carbon concentration (nCT of 1.3±0.7 μmol kg−1 in the surface layer, which is equivalent to a pCO2 increase of 2.6±1.2 μatm yr−1, i.e. larger than the atmospheric increase in this area. Observations also show an annual increase in the deep water nCT of 0.57± 0.24 μmol kg−1, of which about a tenth is due to inflow of old Arctic water with larger amounts of remineralised matter. The remaining part has an anthropogenic origin and sources for this might be Greenland Sea surface water, Iceland Sea surface water, and/or recirculated Atlantic Water. By using an extended multi linear regression method (eMLR it is verified that anthropogenic carbon has entered the whole water column at OWSM.

  18. Study on Rear-end Real-time Data Quality Control Method of Regional Automatic Weather Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the rear-end real-time data quality control method of regional automatic weather station. [Method] The basic content and steps of rear-end real-time data quality control of regional automatic weather station were introduced. Each element was treated with systematic quality control procedure. The existence of rear-end real time data of regional meteorological station in Guangxi was expounded. Combining with relevant elements and linear changes, improvement based on traditiona...

  19. Meteorological effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015: analysis of UK Met Office automatic weather station data and comparison with automatic weather station data from the Faroes and Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penman, John; Jónsson, Trausti; Bigg, Grant R.; Björnsson, Halldór; Sjúrðarson, Sølvi; Hansen, Mads A.; Cappelen, John; Bryant, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we analyse high-frequency (1 min) surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), wind speed and direction and cloud-cover data acquired during the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 from 76 UK Met Office weather stations, and compare the results with those from 30 weather stations in the Faroe Islands and 148 stations in Iceland. There was a statistically significant mean UK temperature drop of 0.83±0.63°C, which occurred over 39 min on average, and the minimum temperature lagged the peak of the eclipse by about 10 min. For a subset of 14 (16) relatively clear (cloudy) stations, the mean temperature drop was 0.91±0.78 (0.31±0.40)°C but the mean temperature drops for relatively calm and windy stations were almost identical. Mean wind speed dropped significantly by 9% on average during the first half of the eclipse. There was no discernible effect of the eclipse on the wind-direction or MSLP time series, and therefore we can discount any localized eclipse cyclone effect over Britain during this event. Similar changes in air temperature and wind speed are observed for Iceland, where conditions were generally clearer, but here too there was no evidence of an eclipse cyclone; in the Faroes, there was a much more muted meteorological signature. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550769

  20. Meteorological effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015: analysis of UK Met Office automatic weather station data and comparison with automatic weather station data from the Faroes and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Edward; Penman, John; Jónsson, Trausti; Bigg, Grant R; Björnsson, Halldór; Sjúrðarson, Sølvi; Hansen, Mads A; Cappelen, John; Bryant, Robert G

    2016-09-28

    Here, we analyse high-frequency (1 min) surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), wind speed and direction and cloud-cover data acquired during the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 from 76 UK Met Office weather stations, and compare the results with those from 30 weather stations in the Faroe Islands and 148 stations in Iceland. There was a statistically significant mean UK temperature drop of 0.83±0.63°C, which occurred over 39 min on average, and the minimum temperature lagged the peak of the eclipse by about 10 min. For a subset of 14 (16) relatively clear (cloudy) stations, the mean temperature drop was 0.91±0.78 (0.31±0.40)°C but the mean temperature drops for relatively calm and windy stations were almost identical. Mean wind speed dropped significantly by 9% on average during the first half of the eclipse. There was no discernible effect of the eclipse on the wind-direction or MSLP time series, and therefore we can discount any localized eclipse cyclone effect over Britain during this event. Similar changes in air temperature and wind speed are observed for Iceland, where conditions were generally clearer, but here too there was no evidence of an eclipse cyclone; in the Faroes, there was a much more muted meteorological signature.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  1. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, Prince George's County Earth Networks Owned Weather Stations located on County Facilities, Published in 2005, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Prince George's County Office of Information Technology and Communications.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  2. Weather Radar Adjustment Using Runoff from Urban Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Rasmussen, Michael Robdrup

    2017-01-01

    Weather radar data used for urban drainage applications are traditionally adjusted to point ground references, e.g., rain gauges. However, the available rain gauge density for the adjustment is often low, which may lead to significant representativeness errors. Yet, in many urban catchments......, rainfall is often measured indirectly through runoff sensors. This paper presents a method for weather radar adjustment on the basis of runoff observations (Z-Q adjustment) as an alternative to the traditional Z-R adjustment on the basis of rain gauges. Data from a new monitoring station in Aalborg......, Denmark, were used to evaluate the flow-based weather radar adjustment method against the traditional rain-gauge adjustment. The evaluation was performed by comparing radar-modeled runoff to observed runoff. The methodology was both tested on an events basis and multiple events combined. The results...

  3. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  4. Calibrating surface weather observations to atmospheric attenuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanii, Babak

    2001-06-01

    A correlation between near-IR atmospheric attenuation measurements made by the Atmospheric Visibility Monitor (AVM) at the Table Mountain Facility and airport surface weather observations at Edwards Air Force Base has been performed. High correlations (over 0.93) exist between the Edwards observed sky cover and the average AVM measured attenuations over the course of the 10 months analyzed. The statistical relationship between the data-sets allows the determination of coarse attenuation statistics from the surface observations, suggesting that such statistics may be extrapolated from any surface weather observation site. Furthermore, a superior technique for converting AVM images to attenuation values by way of MODTRAN predictions has been demonstrated.

  5. High-Speed Monitoring of Multiple Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Array Configurations and Supplementary Weather Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    Three grid-connected monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic arrays have been instrumented with research-grade sensors on the Gaithersburg, MD campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These arrays range from 73 kW to 271 kW and have different tilts, orientations, and configurations. Irradiance, temperature, wind, and electrical measurements at the arrays are recorded, and images are taken of the arrays to monitor shading and capture any anomalies. A weather station has also been constructed that includes research-grade instrumentation to measure all standard meteorological quantities plus additional solar irradiance spectral bands, full spectrum curves, and directional components using multiple irradiance sensor technologies. Reference photovoltaic (PV) modules are also monitored to provide comprehensive baseline measurements for the PV arrays. Images of the whole sky are captured, along with images of the instrumentation and reference modules to document any obstructions or anomalies. Nearly, all measurements at the arrays and weather station are sampled and saved every 1s, with monitoring having started on Aug. 1, 2014. This report describes the instrumentation approach used to monitor the performance of these photovoltaic systems, measure the meteorological quantities, and acquire the images for use in PV performance and weather monitoring and computer model validation.

  6. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 December 1971 to 31 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Insurance against weather risk : use of heating degree-days from non-local stations for weather derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Weather derivatives enable policy-holders to safeguard themselves against extreme weather conditions. The effectiveness and the efficiency of the risk transfer is determined by the spatial risk basis, which is the stochastic dependency of the local weather outcome being insured and the outcome of

  9. Jovian magnetospheric weathering of Europa's nonice surface material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, Charles A.; Paranicas, Christopher; Blaney, Diana L.; Murchie, Scott; Seelos, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Jovian plasma and energetic charged particles bombard the Galilean satellites. These satellites vary from volcanically active (Io) to a nearly primordial surface (Callisto). These satellites are imbedded in a harsh and complex particle radiation environment that weathers their surfaces, and thus are virtual laboratories for understanding how particle bombardment alters the surfaces of airless bodies. Europa orbits deeply in the Jovian radiation belts and may have an active surface, where space weathering and geologic processes can interact in complex ways with a range of timescales. At Europa's surface temperature of 80K to 130K, the hydrated nonice material and to a lesser extent, water ice, will be thermally stable over geologic times and will exhibit the effects of weathering. The ice on the surface of Europa is amorphous and contains trace products such as H2O2 [1] due to weathering. The nonice material, which likely has an endogenic component [2] may also be partially amorphous and chemically altered as a result of being weathered by electrons, Iogenic sulfur, or other agents [3]. This hydrated salt or frozen brine likely compositionally 'matures' over time as the more weakly bound constituents are preferentially removed compared with Ca and Mg [4]. Electron bombardment induces chemical reactions through deposition of energy (e.g., ionizations) possibly explaining some of the nonice material's redness [5,6]. Concurrently, micrometeroid gardening mixes the upper surface burying weathered and altered material while exposing both fresh material and previous altered material, potentially with astrobiological implications. Our investigation of the spectral alteration of nonice analog materials irradiated by 10s keV electrons demonstrates the prevalence of this alteration and we discuss relevance to potential measurements by the Europa MISE instrument.References: [1] Moore, M. and R. Hudson, (2000), Icarus, 145, 282-288; [2] McCord et al., (1998), Science, 280, 1242

  10. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Caccamo Maria Teresa; Calabró Emanuele; Cannuli Antonio; Magazù Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive corr...

  11. Dover AFB, Delaware Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-16

    UNIFORM SUMMARY A.PPLICATIONS CEPWER OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS HOURLY OBSERVATIONS _r_ )Lsr.a*o:Lt,- are ievuI~ td a~i ttnoz~ rtecord or record...STATION MNS YEANS MONTH ALL WEATHER A LL CLASS Noun$ II..S.T.J CONDITION SPEED MEAN IKNTS) 1.3 4.6 7-10 It1-16 17.21 22-27 2533 34.40 41-.47 48.55 td ...704 _24 .U 59 17 ~9 6 99 ] 0Kk 5. _1 1 0_ 42.7 - 4 . ,, 13.4, 3 6 7 - 11 ,,. - 9 -17@539. 5’,_ 7 7 li. 7.a91 22a. 57e~9, -"eB .e 344 9~9 2~ 9*2 59.c 5

  12. Space Weathering of the Lunar Surface by Solar Wind Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsoo S.; Sim, Chaekyung

    2017-08-01

    The lunar regolith is space-weathered to a different degree in response to the different fluxes of incident solar wind particles and micrometeoroids. Crater walls, among other slating surfaces, are good tracers of the space-weathering process because they mature differently depending on the varying incident angles of weathering agents. We divide a crater wall into four quadrants (north, south, east, and west) and analyze the distribution of 950-nm/750-nm reflectance-ratio and 750-nm reflectance values in each wall quadrant, using the topography-corrected images by Multispectral Imager (MI) onboard SELENE (Kaguya). For thousands of impact craters across the Moon, we interpret the spectral distributions in the four wall quadrants in terms of the space weathering by solar wind particles and micrometeoroids and of gardening by meteroids. We take into account the solar-wind shielding by the Earth’s magnetotail to correctly assess the different spectral behaviors between east- and west-facing walls of the craters in the near-side of the Moon.

  13. Weather-related Ground Motions Recorded by Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. F.; Chi, W. C.; Lai, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband seismometers record ground motions, which can be induced by weather-related processes. Analyzing such signals might help to better understand those natural processes. Here, we used continuous seismic data, meteorological data and stream data to analyze the weather-related ground motions during typhoon cases and rainy season case in Taiwan. We detected some long period seismic signals at the station Mahsi (MASB) during three meteorological cases (Typhoon Kalmaegi in 2008, Typhoon Morakot in 2009 and the East Asian rainy season in 2012). The amplitude of the seismic waveform correlated with the amount of the precipitation and the derivative of water level and discharge in the nearby river. According to the relationships of waveforms in main and minor rainfall events, we derived apparent source time functions (ASTFs) and used the ASTFs to estimate and quantify the precipitation of main rainfall events in the cases. The estimated precipitation has high correlation coefficients (> 0.82) with the observation. It shows that the long period seismic data may be applied to rainfall monitoring.

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 October 1969 to 17 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 April 1974 to 01 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7400741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 January 1974 to 05 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 October 1971 to 10 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7201202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 May 1970 to 04 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000917)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 June 1971 to 16 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 November 1970 to 03 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 February 1973 to 09 March 1973 (NODC Accession 7301106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the QUADRA from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 22 October 1977 to 05 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7800676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the QUADRA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected from...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN and MCCULLOCH from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 May 1969 to 10 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN and MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 June 1968 to 21 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 January 1971 to 11 February 1971 (NODC Accession 7100877)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 August 1973 to 17 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 October 1974 to 07 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7500707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN and other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit....

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 May 1968 to 05 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 10 October 1972 to 09 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300801)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 December 1970 to 12 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 June 1968 to 13 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 November 1970 to 19 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 May 1968 to 20 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 January 1971 to 07 February 1971 (NODC Accession 7100927)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 09 October 1969 to 02 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 September 1970 to 03 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7001420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 September 1969 to 05 October 1969 (NODC Accession 6901099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 March 1973 to 18 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 May 1969 to 22 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900713)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 November 1969 to 15 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 February 1970 to 08 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 February 1971 to 13 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 June 1969 to 17 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 June 1971 to 16 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 08 November 1971 to 30 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 January 1973 to 03 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 16 December 1968 to 20 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL, CHAUTAUQUA, and DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 October 1973 to 31 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 23 December 1973 to 12 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 August 1971 to 17 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 July 1973 to 15 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7400097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 October 1973 to 26 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 December 1973 to 28 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400739)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 May 1973 to 05 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301179)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 03 April 1970 to 24 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000771)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1971 to 23 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200577)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 October 1975 to 11 February 1976 (NODC Accession 7600727)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit....

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 June 1974 to 26 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 August 1969 to 18 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 October 1969 to 15 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 August 1976 to 14 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 11 January 1972 to 04 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200611)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 January 1970 to 05 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 September 1972 to 01 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300485)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 November 1973 to 12 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 September 1969 to 22 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 June 1970 to 07 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7100766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 24 October 1971 to 17 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200900)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 17 August 1969 to 07 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 03 January 1971 to 29 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 14 November 1971 to 08 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and J (OWS-J) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 November 1969 to 11 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), J (5230N 02000W), and in transit. Data...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 1970-12-12 to 1971-01-02 (NODC Accession 7100905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 13 April 1968 to 11 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB, GRESHAM, and HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 June 1968 to 30 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 16 June 1969 to 04 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900859)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 May 1972 to 02 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300024)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 28 July 1969 to 13 August 1969 (NODC Accession 6900856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 January 1970 to 30 January 1970 (NODC Accession 7000376)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 March 1971 to 29 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 July 1969 to 25 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were...

  2. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 April 1973 to 04 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 January 1969 to 22 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 September 1973 to 12 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7400209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 June 1971 to 28 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 January 1970 to 13 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000361)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 March 1969 to 26 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN Ewithin a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 July 1971 to 25 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 September 1974 to 27 September 1974 (NODC Accession 7500166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 August 1973 to 13 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7400043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 09 December 1968 to 19 February 1969 (NODC Accession 6900427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA, CASCO, BOUTWELL, and YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 30 August 1970 to 23 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7100472)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 06 April 1970 to 01 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 March 1970 to 12 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 September 1973 to 24 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 May 1973 to 08 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 January 1970 to 26 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000507)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 June 1972 to 24 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 13 September 1968 to 03 October 1968 (NODC Accession 6900127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 November 1972 to 21 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300769)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 January 1971 to 23 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 September 1970 to 03 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7100471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 June 1970 to 31 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001070)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 December 1970 to 25 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 August 1972 to 10 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 08 May 1971 to 27 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 April 1973 to 10 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  8. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 November 1973 to 02 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH and MINNETONKA and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 24 March 1968 to 29 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH and MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  10. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 August 1973 to 08 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 October 1973 to 28 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400821)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 August 1971 to 22 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 March 1970 to 02 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 29 December 1972 to 31 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 July 1970 to 26 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7000969)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 October 1968 to 03 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6800332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 31 January 1973 to 27 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300897)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 April 1974 to 14 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7400762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 03 July 1969 to 31 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 September 1971 to 09 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 February 1970 to 27 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 08 June 1969 to 01 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 March 1971 to 13 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 August 1969 to 11 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  5. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 06 May 1973 to 28 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7400231)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 19 October 1969 to 14 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000143)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the JARVIS from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 April 1973 to 04 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 1969-12-30 to 1970-01-11 (NODC Accession 7000262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 16 May 1969 to 13 June 1969 (NODC Accession 7000012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 November 1971 to 13 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 27 August 1970 to 20 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 08 March 1971 to 07 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101206)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 November 1974 to 25 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7500652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 09 August 1970 to 17 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 September 1976 to 25 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 March 1971 to 17 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 June 1971 to 14 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 June 1973 to 25 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from Ocean Weather Station J (OWS-J) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 May 1957 to 31 May 1957 (NODC Accession 7201312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station J (5230N 02000W) and in transit. Data were collected from 26 May 1957 to 31...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 November 1970 to 30 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100764)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 May 1970 to 14 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7001183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 July 1970 to 12 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7100144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 10 December 1970 to 02 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 December 1971 to 20 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 May 1970 to 10 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000943)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 March 1975 to 02 April 1975 (NODC Accession 7500664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 October 1970 to 19 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 March 1970 to 24 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 March 1975 to 22 March 1975 (NODC Accession 7500668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANTON DOHRN and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 17 February 1960 to 24 February 1967 (NODC Accession 6900261)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANTON DOHRN and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE and other platforms from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 August 1969 to 18 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE, INGHAM, and SOUTHWIND within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 February 1973 to 27 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300750)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 10 May 1971 to 31 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 February 1970 to 18 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 January 1973 to 13 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300755)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 June 1969 to 01 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 June 1973 to 30 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 February 1973 to 16 March 1973 (NODC Accession 7300752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 21 March 1970 to 12 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 April 1969 to 16 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 July 1970 to 07 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7001072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 August 1971 to 01 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 11 March 1970 to 04 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000822)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 July 1971 to 04 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 November 1973 to 13 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 July 1969 to 11 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 December 1975 to 13 January 1976 (NODC Accession 7601044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 August 1968 to 23 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800277)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 September 1970 to 16 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 November 1970 to 11 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100758)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the JARVIS and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 August 1976 to 15 February 1977 (NODC Accession 7700265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 August 1968 to 19 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800282)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 October 1972 to 09 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 August 1968 to 24 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 June 1972 to 28 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 September 1971 to 07 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 07 November 1972 to 29 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300567)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 July 1973 to 16 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7301171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 November 1968 to 05 December 1968 (NODC Accession 6900563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 October 1970 to 10 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7001322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 31 May 1971 to 28 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 November 1973 to 01 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7500003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 26 May 1969 to 17 June 1969 (NODC Accession 6900878)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 29 September 1969 to 23 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 21 February 1971 to 24 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 February 1970 to 20 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 August 1968 to 15 September 1968 (NODC Accession 6800333)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 August 1970 to 07 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 March 1974 to 20 April 1974 (NODC Accession 7500009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 May 1973 to 16 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1974 to 05 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 02 August 1971 to 30 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 January 1971 to 25 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100761)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 November 1974 to 09 December 1974 (NODC Accession 7500649)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 June 1968 to 16 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 October 1968 to 02 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6900098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 06 April 1968 to 09 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 July 1968 to 25 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800342)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 December 1973 to 07 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean for 1970-01-02 (NODC Accession 7000210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 June 1972 to 27 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 21 April 1968 to 15 May 1968 (NODC Accession 6800006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 June 1972 to 17 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201442)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 March 1971 to 16 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 December 1972 to 28 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 October 1968 to 03 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6900107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 20 January 1970 to 30 January 1970 (NODC Accession 7000411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 January 1975 to 18 February 1975 (NODC Accession 7500817)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 15 January 1970 to 03 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000409)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 September 1972 to 25 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 July 1969 to 07 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 April 1977 to 11 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 January 1974 to 25 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400517)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 March 1971 to 18 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100924)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 30 March 1971 to 20 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 August 1970 to 10 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 December 1971 to 17 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 February 1972 to 25 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 September 1969 to 21 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000093)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 February 1974 to 25 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400519)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 13 October 1970 to 03 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 09 May 1971 to 02 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 14 February 1971 to 07 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 May 1972 to 10 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300898)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 April 1970 to 02 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 October 1968 to 25 October 1968 (NODC Accession 6900095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 April 1972 to 16 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 July 1969 to 23 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), and in transit. Data...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 August 1973 to 05 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400134)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MUNRO and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 December 1975 to 03 February 1976 (NODC Accession 7601181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 December 1971 to 08 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 October 1972 to 13 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 14 July 1968 to 03 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800279)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 24 November 1970 to 19 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100862)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the Ocean Weather Station A (OWS-A) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 January 1963 to 13 April 1963 (NODC Accession 7000212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W) and in transit. Data were collected by the University of...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 March 1972 to 24 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 September 1971 to 13 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WEST-HINDER and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 March 1958 to 24 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WEST-HINDER and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 May 1971 to 10 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 August 1976 to 08 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 10 November 1969 to 01 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 March 1969 to 06 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900694)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 May 1973 to 16 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 March 1973 to 06 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 July 1970 to 20 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7001299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 January 1971 to 28 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100876)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 June 1970 to 15 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 11 October 1970 to 31 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7100193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 June 1968 to 12 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 August 1971 to 13 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 December 1971 to 12 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200503)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 30 August 1970 to 17 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7100358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 January 1974 to 22 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 July 1971 to 04 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1971 to 24 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 14 December 1973 to 09 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 October 1971 to 29 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 13 February 1969 to 01 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 19 March 1973 to 07 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 May 1971 to 07 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 November 1972 to 10 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300491)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 July 1968 to 30 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 30 April 1972 to 25 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7201434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 16 September 1973 to 12 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 20 June 1971 to 10 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 September 1975 to 30 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 October 1972 to 25 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 June 1970 to 20 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 October 1972 to 22 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 July 1971 to 23 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200413)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 November 1972 to 08 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 23 April 1972 to 16 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 July 1972 to 06 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 January 1972 to 10 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 November 1972 to 04 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 June 1972 to 17 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 January 1972 to 09 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 September 1972 to 29 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 August 1971 to 15 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 12 September 1971 to 07 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 July 1972 to 30 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 September 1972 to 12 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 December 1971 to 20 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201404)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 11 June 1972 to 06 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 August 1972 to 17 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 July 1971 to 24 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 July 1972 to 07 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 January 1973 to 26 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 13 November 1971 to 03 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 21 May 1972 to 10 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7201443)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 April 1972 to 12 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the JARVIS from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 15 August 1972 to 06 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 February 1972 to 23 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 18 January 1972 to 12 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 July 1971 to 29 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 02 July 1972 to 28 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 August 1971 to 13 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1972 to 07 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7201242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 April 1972 to 11 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7201407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 July 1972 to 18 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 18 March 1972 to 08 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from from 12 January 1972 to 05 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200973)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 November 1972 to 24 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300492)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 September 1971 to 14 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200429)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 August 1972 to 21 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 11 July 1971 to 06 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 11 February 1972 to 26 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7300018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 May 1972 to 01 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 August 1971 to 25 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 November 1971 to 04 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 25 September 1972 to 18 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 24 July 1972 to 09 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7201441)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 August 1972 to 02 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 January 1972 to 05 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 December 1972 to 04 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from WINONA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 24 October 1971 to 01 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 July 1972 to 20 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 August 1971 to 24 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1972 to 17 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 August 1972 to 24 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean on 13 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300481)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 March 1972 to 22 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 09 February 1972 to 24 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 August 1972 to 17 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300203)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 January 1973 to 24 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 September 1972 to 03 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 February 1972 to 04 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 November 1971 to 11 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200974)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 April 1971 to 14 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7200325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 December 1972 to 24 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 November 1970 to 11 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (5230N 02000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 15 May 1970 to 17 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 September 1969 to 17 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 26 November 1968 to 14 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE, DUANE, HAMILTON, HUMBOLDT, and MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 January 1975 to 23 January 1975 (NODC Accession 7500665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 December 1973 to 13 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1973 to 08 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 17 November 1969 to 06 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 January 1974 to 20 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 January 1973 to 29 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 June 1971 to 04 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 May 1973 to 15 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 May 1970 to 11 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000819)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 March 1969 to 22 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 August 1969 to 26 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 June 1970 to 05 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 October 1972 to 30 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300482)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from Ocean Weather Station A (OWS-A) in the North Atlantic Ocean from the from 12 January 1964 to 27 June 1966 (NODC Accession 7300616)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W) and in transit. Data were collected by the Hydrographic...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 March 1970 to 24 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  10. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 March 1972 to 18 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7300020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 27 August 1969 to 18 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 28 April 1970 to 19 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000820)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 July 1968 to 15 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 November 1972 to 06 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 March 1972 to 13 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 August 1975 to 21 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7600089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 December 1971 to 31 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200902)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 February 1976 to 26 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 February 1972 to 22 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1972 to 29 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 July 1968 to 08 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the BERING STRAIT and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 21 January 1969 to 10 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900639)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT, DUANE, CHASE, and GRESHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C...

  3. Snow on the Ross Ice Shelf: comparison of reanalyses and observations from automatic weather stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cohen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of precipitation from the ECMWF ERA-Interim and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis-2 datasets is developed using snow accumulation measurements from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS around the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS, Antarctica. The high temporal resolution of the AWS snow accumulation measurements allow for a new, event-based comparison of reanalyses precipitation to in-situ observations. Snow accumulation records from nine AWS provide multiple years of accumulation data between 2008–2012 over a relatively large, homogeneous region of Antarctica and provide the basis for a statistical evaluation of accumulation events. The analysis shows that ERA-Interim reproduces significantly more precipitation events than NCEP-2 and these events correspond to an average 8.2% more precipitation. Correlations between reanalyses and AWS event sizes are seen at several stations (at > 90% significance levels and show that ERA-Interim consistently produces larger precipitation events than NCEP-2. The significant and complex effects of wind on snow accumulation (which can both limit and enhance accumulation make determining biases in the reanalyses data not possible with the AWS data, however the analysis does illustrate significant and important differences between ERA-Interim and NCEP-2 precipitation.

  4. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  5. A weather type method to study surface ocean variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M.; Camus, P.; Mendez, F. J.; Losada, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    The set of methodologies for obtaining wave climate information at high spatial resolution from relatively coarse resolution is known as downscaling. Dynamic downscaling, based on the use of numerical models, is perhaps the most widely used methodology for surface ocean variables. An alternative approach is the statistical downscaling, that can be conducted by means of regression methods or weather pattern-based approaches. The main advantages of the statistical downscaling based on weather patterns are: the low computational requirements; the ease of implementation; the additional climatology information; and local forecast application. Moreover, this technique allows exploring the synoptic atmospheric climatology and their relationship with surface ocean variables. It is well known nowadays that the seasonal-to-interannual variability of wave climate is linked to the atmosphere circulation patterns. We proposed a statistical approach based on the predictand (eg. local wave characteristics) is associated to a particular synoptic-scale weather type (predictor). The predictor is the n-days-averaged sea level pressure field (SLP) anomalies, which are synthesized using data mining techniques to describe a number of weather types. In particular, we focus in NE Atlantic (NAO region) using as predictor the 3-days-averaged SLP fields calculated by NCEP atmospheric reanalysis (1948-2010). A principal component analysis is applied over SLP fields to reduce the spatial and temporal dimensions. The K-means clustering technique is then applied to the two-dimensional sample of the principal components which explain more than 95% variance of the SLP. The K-means technique divides the data space into a number of clusters, where each of them is characterized by a centroid and formed by the data for which the centroid is the nearest. Finally, we visualize the weather types associated to each centroid in an ordered way similar to self-organizing maps, SOMs. The probability

  6. Evidence of Space Weathering Processes Across the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Blewett, David T.; Gaffey, Michael; Mittlefehldt, David W.; CristinaDeSanctis, Maria; Reddy, Vishnu; Coradini, Angioletta; Nathues, Andreas; Denevi, Brett W.; Li, Jian-Yang; hide

    2011-01-01

    As NASA s Dawn spacecraft explores the surface of Vesta, it has become abundantly clear that Vesta is like no other planetary body visited to date. Dawn is collecting global data at increasingly higher spatial resolution during its one-year orbital mission. The bulk properties of Vesta have previously been linked to the HED meteorites through remote mineral characterization of its surface from Earth-based spectroscopy. A principal puzzle has been why Vesta exhibits relatively unweathered diagnostic optical features compared to other large asteroids. Is this due to the composition of this proto-planet or the space environment at Vesta? Alteration or weathering of materials in space normally develops as the products of several processes accumulate on the surface or in an evolving particulate regolith, transforming the bedrock into fragmental material with properties that may be measurably different from the original. Data from Dawn reveal that the regolith of Vesta is exceptionally diverse. Regional surface units are observed that have not been erased by weathering with time. Several morphologically-fresh craters have excavated bright, mafic-rich materials and exhibit bright ray systems. Some of the larger craters have surrounding subdued regions (often asymmetric) that are lower in albedo and relatively red-sloped in the visible while exhibiting weaker mafic signatures. Several other prominent craters have rim exposures containing very dark material and/or display a system of prominent dark rays. Most, but not all, dark areas associated with craters exhibit significantly lower spectral contrast, suggesting that either a Vesta lithology with an opaque component has been exposed locally or that the surface has been contaminated by a relatively dark impactor. Similarly, most, but not all, bright areas associated with craters exhibit enhanced mafic signatures compared to surroundings. On a regional scale, the large south polar structure and surrounding terrain exhibit

  7. Boreal Atmospheric circulation patterns on the basis of the world network weather station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, V. A.; Moskalenko, L. V.; Golenko, N. N.; Golenko, M. N.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the recent developments of various methods of data representation in meteorology, the image of the globe-scale atmospheric circulation system has appeared. Basically, the circulation assessment is based on the indirect teleconnection method and rotated principal component analysis of the sea level pressure or geopotential height fields. These methods have several constraints because of the integration of intermittent and frontal atmospheric synoptic variability.As follows from the work of prof. B.L. Dzerdzeevskii, due to the existing of Arctic blocking processes, simplified geostrophic wind concept on the basis of the low-frequency baric patterns of the permanent centers of action, should be reconsidered in more details. For this purpose, weather station direct in-situ data with the use of progressive vector diagrams for wind speed and direction time series visualization are appropriate. Wind diagrams incorporate various fluctuations with time scales from synoptic to climatic, which can be considered without any filtration applied. The subject of work is to study the long-term wind regimes in the Northern Hemisphere, with the aim to obtain atmospheric circulation patterns in the regions of interest, in particular induced by the NAO(North Atlantic oscillation), EAWR(East Atlantic-West Russia) and SH(Siberian High) centers of action at different time and space scales. The analysis is based on the standard meteorological data (including wind direction and speed) of WMO network weather stations in the period since 1998 up to the present. For intercalibration and validation, NCEP-NCAR and QuickSCAT sea winds databases were considered, as well. Basic features of the wind variability are governed by the relevant types of the large-scale synoptic atmospheric processes, which depend upon the state of the global atmospheric circulation, their large-scale gyres and separate smaller vorticity cells. All the individual wind diagrams appear as having rather simple low

  8. Surface science station of the infrared beamline at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, M; Kimura, H; Nishida, S; Nanba, T

    2001-01-01

    An experimental station for surface science has been constructed at the infrared beamline (BL43IR) of SPring-8, Japan. The station utilizes synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 100-20000 cm sup - sup 1 to perform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) of surfaces. It consists of an experimental section, a preparation chamber, gas handling equipment and a pair of focusing optics. In situ observation of vibrational spectra is possible using both IRAS and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

  9. A comparison of all-weather land surface temperature products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joao; Trigo, Isabel F.; Ghilain, Nicolas; Goettche, Frank-M.; Ermida, Sofia; Olesen, Folke-S.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Arboleda, Alirio

    2017-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF, http://landsaf.ipma.pt) has been providing land surface temperature (LST) estimates using SEVIRI/MSG on an operational basis since 2006. The LSA-SAF service has since been extended to provide a wide range of satellite-based quantities over land surfaces, such as emissivity, albedo, radiative fluxes, vegetation state, evapotranspiration, and fire-related variables. Being based on infra-red measurements, the SEVIRI/MSG LST product is limited to clear-sky pixels only. Several all-weather LST products have been proposed by the scientific community either based on microwave observations or using Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models to fill the gaps caused by clouds. The goal of this work is to provide a nearly gap-free operational all-weather LST product and compare these approaches. In order to estimate evapotranspiration and turbulent energy fluxes, the LSA-SAF solves the surface energy budget for each SEVIRI pixel, taking into account the physical and physiological processes occurring in vegetation canopies. This task is accomplished with an adapted SVAT model, which adopts some formulations and parameters of the Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land (TESSEL) model operated at the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), and using: 1) radiative inputs also derived by LSA-SAF, which includes surface albedo, down-welling fluxes and fire radiative power; 2) a land-surface characterization obtained by combining the ECOCLIMAP database with both LSA-SAF vegetation products and the H(ydrology)-SAF snow mask; 3) meteorological fields from ECMWF forecasts interpolated to SEVIRI pixels, and 4) soil moisture derived by the H-SAF and LST from LSA-SAF. A byproduct of the SVAT model is surface skin temperature, which is needed to close the surface energy balance. The model skin temperature corresponds to the radiative temperature of the interface between soil and atmosphere

  10. nowCOAST's Map Service for Surface Weather and Ocean Observations (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides maps depicting the latest surface weather and marine weather observations at observing sites using...

  11. Rancang Bangun Maximum Power Point Tracking pada Panel Photovoltaic Berbasis Logika Fuzzy di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Prima Juliansyah Putra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu aplikasi yang sering digunakan dalam bidang energi terbarukan adalah panel photovoltaic. Panel ini memiliki prinsip kerja berdasarkan efek photovoltaic dimana lempengan logam akan menghasilkan energi listrik apabila diberi intensitas cahaya. Untuk menghasilkan daya keluaran panel yang maksimal, maka diperlukan suatu algoritma yang biasa disebut Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT.MPPT yang diterapkan pada sistem photovoltaic berfungsi untuk mengatur nilai tegangan keluaran panel sehingga titik ker-janya beroperasi pada kondisi maksimal. Algoritma MPPT pada panel ini telah dilakukan dengan menggunakan logika fuzzy melalui mikrokontroler Arduino Uno sebagai pem-bangkit sinyal Pulse Width Modulation (PWM yang akan dikirimkan menuju DC-DC Buck Boost Converter. Keluaran dari buck boost converterakan dihubungkan secara langsung dengan buoy weather station untuk menyuplai energi listrik tiap komponen yang berada di dalamnya. Untuk menguji performansi dari algoritma MPPT yang telah dirancang, maka sistem akan diuji menggunakan variasi beban antara metode direct-coupled dengan MPPT menggunakan logika fuzzy. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa MPPT dengan logika fuzzy dapat menghasilkan daya maksimum daripada direct-coupled. Pada sistem panel photovoltaic ini memiliki range efisiensi 33.07589 % hingga 74.25743 %. Daya mak-simal dapat dicapai oleh sistem untuk tiap variasi beban dan efisiensi maksimal dapat dicapai pada beban 20 Ohm dari hasil pengujian sistem MPPT.

  12. Using stochastic activity networks to study the energy feasibility of automatic weather stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassano, Luca [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informatica e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Cesarini, Daniel [Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa (Italy); Avvenuti, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) are systems equipped with a number of environmental sensors and communication interfaces used to monitor harsh environments, such as glaciers and deserts. Designing such systems is challenging, since designers have to maximize the amount of sampled and transmitted data while considering the energy needs of the system that, in most cases, is powered by rechargeable batteries and exploits energy harvesting, e.g., solar cells and wind turbines. To support designers of AWSs in the definition of the software tasks and of the hardware configuration of the AWS we designed and implemented an energy-aware simulator of such systems. The simulator relies on the Stochastic Activity Networks (SANs) formalism and has been developed using the Möbius tool. In this paper we first show how we used the SAN formalism to model the various components of an AWS, we then report results from an experiment carried out to validate the simulator against a real-world AWS and we finally show some examples of usage of the proposed simulator.

  13. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccamo Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive correlation between the minimum temperature and the maximum temperature values whereas a negative correlation emerges between daily rainfall and minimum temperature values as well as for daily rainfall and maximum temperature values. These results suggest the possibility to estimate the global and diffuse solar radiation using more reliable climatologic parameters for optimizing solar energy collected by solar panels.

  14. Milliwatt radioisotope power supply for the PASCAL Mars surface stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel T.; Murbach, Marcus S.

    2001-02-01

    A milliwatt power supply is being developed based on the 1 watt Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU), which has already been used to provide heating alone on numerous spacecraft. In the past year the power supply has been integrated into the design of the proposed PASCAL Mars Network Mission, which is intended to place 24 surface climate monitoring stations on Mars. The PASCAL Mars mission calls for the individual surface stations to be transported together in one spacecraft on a trajectory direct from launch to orbit around Mars. From orbit around Mars each surface station will be deployed on a SCRAMP (slotted compression ramp) probe and, after aerodynamic and parachute deceleration, land at a preselected location on the planet. During descent sounding data and still images will be accumulated, and, once on the surface, the station will take measurements of pressure, temperature and overhead atmospheric optical depth for a period of 10 Mars years (18.8 Earth years). Power for periodic data acquisition and transmission to orbital then to Earth relay will come from a bank of ultracapacitors which will be continuously recharged by the radioisotope power supply. This electronic system has been designed and a breadboard built. In the ultimate design the electronics will be arrayed on the exterior surface of the radioisotope power supply in order to take advantage of the reject heat. This assembly in turn is packaged within the SCRAMP, and that assembly comprises the surface station. An electrically heated but otherwise prototypical power supply was operated in combination with the surface station breadboard system, which included the ultracapacitors. Other issues addressed in this work have been the capability of the generator to withstand the mechanical shock of the landing on Mars and the effectiveness of the generator's multi-foil vacuum thermal insulation. .

  15. Observed linear trend in few surface weather elements over the Northwest Himalayas (NWH) during winter season

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dan Singh; Vikas Sharma; Vikas Juyal

    2015-04-01

    Linear trends in few surface weather variables such as air temperatures (maximum temperature, minimum temperature), snow and rainy days, snowfall and rainfall amounts, rainfall contribution to seasonal total precipitation amount, seasonal snow cover depth and snow cover days (duration) are examined from winter-time observations at 11 stations located over the Northwest Himalayas (NWH). This study indicates that snowfall tends to show a decline in this region, while the rainfall tends to increase during the winter months. Seasonal snow cover depth and seasonal snow cover days also tend to show a decline over the NWH. Decrease in seasonal snow cover depth and duration have reduced the winter period in terms of availability of seasonal snow cover over the NWH during the last 2–3 decades. Other surface weather variables also exhibited significant temporal changes in recent decades. Observed trends in temperature and precipitation over the NWH in recent decades are also supported by long data series of temperature over the western Himalayas (WH), north mountain India (NMI) rainfall data and reanalysis products.

  16. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  17. Separation of dry and wet periods from regular weather station data for the analysis of wind erosion risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeini, Mohammadali Saremi; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    ), climate (e.g. air temperature, solar radiation, evaporation) and soil (e.g. infiltration rate, adhesion). The purpose of this study is to overcome the lack of soil moisture data for wind erosion risk assessment by developing a method to estimate the soil wetness based on easy available weather data......, such as daily precipitation, hourly/sub hourly ambient air temperature and hourly/sub hourly relative humidity. This new method was used to identify periods of wet and dry soil moisture conditions of a time series from 20 weather stations in Denmark. The length of the time series varied between 8 to 37 years...... that using wind data without the influence of soil moisture most likely lead to an overestimation of the wind erosion risk. It is, therefore, strongly recommended for wind erosion risk assessments to associate more importance to winds that occur during dry times of the year, by including soil moisture...

  18. Incirlik AB, Adana, Turkey. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-15

    WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 130 INCIALIK Al TURKEY/ADANA 67-74 AE2 09010 STATION STATION NAME YEARS HOUNS 4L. S. T.1 T-.WET SULS TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F...TURKy/ADANA 6_ _6 JUt_ STAT.ON STATIC. NiAME ER A E OT’*N’[R IR OT -! T..p. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTALTOA , r 2! 1. S /o 7 .. . 6 . .i

  19. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroid Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominque, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Schriver, David; hide

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the composition of Mercury's crust is key to comprehending the formation of the planet. The regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered via a set of space weathering processes. These processes are the same set of mechanisms that work to form Mercury's exosphere, and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The alterations need to be understood in order to determine the initial crustal compositions. The complex interrelationships between Mercury's exospheric processes, the space environment, and surface composition are examined and reviewed. The processes are examined in the context of our understanding of these same processes on the lunar and asteroid regoliths. Keywords: Mercury (planet) Space weathering Surface processes Exosphere Surface composition Space environment 3

  20. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASCO from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 May 1955 to 26 September 1966 (NODC Accession 7500368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5630N 05100W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA and DALLAS from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 24 February 1969 to 21 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA and DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON and WINONA from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 16 April 1969 to 19 June 1969 (NODC Accession 6900696)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON and WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N...

  4. Indication of insensitivity of planetary weathering behavior and habitable zone to surface land fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Abbot, Dorian S; Ciesla, Fred J

    2012-01-01

    It is likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences planetary weathering behavior. This is important because the silicate weathering feedback determines the width of the habitable zone in space and time. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate, useful for gaining qualitative understanding, is developed to examine climate evolution for planets of various land-ocean fractions. It is pointed out that, if seafloor weathering does not depend directly on surface temperature, there can be no weathering-climate feedback on a waterworld. This would dramatically narrow the habitable zone of a waterworld. Results from our model indicate that weathering behavior does not depend strongly on land fraction for partially ocean-covered planets. This is powerful because it suggests that previous habitable zone theory is robust to changes in land fraction, as long as there is some land. F...

  5. Widespread Weathered Glass on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Briony; Bell, James F., III

    2012-01-01

    Low albedo sediments cover >10(exp 7) sq km in the northern lowlands of Mars, but the composition and origin of these widespread deposits have remained ambiguous despite many previous investigations. Here we use near-infrared spectra acquired by the Mars Express OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activite') imaging spectrometer to show that these sediments exhibit spectral characteristics that are consistent with both high abundances of iron-bearing glass and silica-enriched leached rinds on glass. This interpretation is supported by observations of low-albedo soil grains with possible rinds at the Phoenix Mars Lander landing site in the northern lowlands. By comparison with the extensive glass-rich dune fields and sand sheets of Iceland, we propose an explosive volcanic origin for these glass-rich sediments. We also propose that the glassy remnant rinds on the sediments are the result of post-depositional alteration, as these rinds are commonly formed in arid terrestrial volcanic environments during water-limited, moderately acidic leaching. These weathered, glass-rich deposits in the northern lowlands are also colocated with the strongest concentrations of a major global compositional surface type previously identified in mid-infrared spectra, suggesting that they may be representative of global processes. Our results provide potential confirmation of models suggesting that explosive volcanism has been widespread on Mars, and also raise the possibilities that glass-rich volcaniclastics are a major source of eolian sand on Mars and that widespread surficial aqueous alteration has occurred under Amazonian climatic conditions.

  6. Driver behaviour data linked with vehicle, weather, road surface, and daylight data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2017-02-01

    In this data set, vehicle observations have been linked to data containing weather and road surface conditions. A total of 311 908 observations are collected and classified in categories of precipitation type, road status information, and daylight condition. The data is collected for a long period of time, so that several different weather situations are present, ranging from dry summer to adverse winter weather conditions.

  7. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind ion irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are widely known to alter the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies.

  8. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    As of January 1, 1988, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 368 continuous streamflow, 12 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 38 gage height, 15 crest-stage partia 1-record, 4 periodic discharge through range, 32 floodhydrocjraph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record 45 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 83 periodic biological, 19 lake surveys, 160 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 33 periodic pesticide, 20 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor elements, 125 periodic chemical-quality, 74 periodic physica1-organic, 24 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 21 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemicalquality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations.

  9. Comparative Analysis on Observation Data of the Transfer Station in Anqing National Basic Weather Station%安庆国家基本气象观测站迁站对比观测资料差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳小群; 顾卫; 郑皖生; 周宏健; 吴福正

    2016-01-01

    利用2013年安庆国家基本气象观测站新旧站的气温、相对湿度、风、深层地温等资料,对安庆气象站迁站观测资料进行统计对比分析,总结了新、旧站址各气象要素差值的形成原因,认为新旧站址周围环境不同、下垫面性质不同、观测场海拔高度不同是造成观测数据有一定差异的主要原因,为国家基本气象站的资料序列延续和订正提供参考,为有关气象科技服务提供新、旧站址气象资料差异性订正依据。%Based on observation data of temperature, relative humidity, wind, deep soil temperature from the old and new Anqing national basic weather sta-tion in 2013, difference of each meteoro-logical factor was contrasted, and main reason for difference of each meteorologi-cal factor was analyzed. Main reasons for obvious difference of the meteorological factor were that observation environment, underlaying surface property, altitude at new and old stations were different. The research provided basis for continuity and homogeneity correction of the data sequence at Anqing national basic weather station.

  10. Atmospheric Visual and Infrared Transmission Deduced from Surface Weather Observations: Weather and Warplanes. V1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    require stadistically valid predictions of PGM utility as a function of weather conditions in different potential theaters of combat at different times of...resource in making statisti- cally valid predictions of weapon performance (including diurnal, sea- sonal, and geographic variability). The model of...dewpoint range IO°F- 700F. -1 -16- be valid at 296 0K (73*F). They further suggest a strong temperature dependence of yc. (These corrections have been

  11. Surface Temperature Variation Prediction Model Using Real-Time Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Vant-Hull, B.; Nazari, R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Combination of climate change and urbanization are heating up cities and putting the lives of millions of people in danger. More than half of the world's total population resides in cities and urban centers. Cities are experiencing urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. Hotter days are associated with serious health impacts, heart attaches and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Densely populated cities like Manhattan, New York can be affected by UHI impact much more than less populated cities. Even though many studies have been focused on the impact of UHI and temperature changes between urban and rural air temperature, not many look at the temperature variations within a city. These studies mostly use remote sensing data or typical measurements collected by local meteorological station networks. Local meteorological measurements only have local coverage and cannot be used to study the impact of UHI in a city and remote sensing data such as MODIS, LANDSAT and ASTER have with very low resolution which cannot be used for the purpose of this study. Therefore, predicting surface temperature in urban cities using weather data can be useful.Three months of Field campaign in Manhattan were used to measure spatial and temporal temperature variations within an urban setting by placing 10 fixed sensors deployed to measure temperature, relative humidity and sunlight. Fixed instrument shelters containing relative humidity, temperature and illumination sensors were mounted on lampposts in ten different locations in Manhattan (Vant-Hull et al, 2014). The shelters were fixed 3-4 meters above the ground for the period of three months from June 23 to September 20th of 2013 making measurements with the interval of 3 minutes. These high resolution temperature measurements and three months of weather data were used to predict temperature variability from weather forecasts. This study shows that the amplitude of spatial and temporal variation in temperature for each day can be predicted

  12. Automatic Weather Station and Backup Techniques%自动气象站数据备份技巧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景新娟; 赵俊平; 刘雪芹; 杨瑞霞; 郭晓晨

    2014-01-01

    Based on the problems caused by some weather stations’ not backing up the date promptly, the paper makes an analysis on the present situation of data backup of automatic weather station and expounds in detail the methods of automatically date backup by means of sharing the date of the host and backup computers as well as using the target project. With an expectation to help automatic weather stations backup the relative data files promptly, the paper is also expected to contribute to further improve the quality of service by docking the data collector and the backup computer so as to solve such problems as data processing or data missing resulting in missing predictions and reports when the host computer is out of order.%分析了自动气象站数据备份的现状,针对台站数据备份不及时等问题,提出了通过业务主机与备份机数据共享,利用计划任务自动备份数据文件的方法。实现了自动气象站有关数据文件的及时备份,能够在主用计算机故障时实现采集器与备份机及时对接,从而解决了由于数据缺失引起的问题,为进一步提高业务质量奠定了基础。

  13. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    As of January 1, 1987, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 376 continuous streamflow, 76 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 34 gage height, 16 crest-stage partial-record, 8 periodic discharge through range, 33 floodhydrograph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record, 46 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 84 periodic biological, 17 lake surveys, 162 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 42 periodic pesticide, 19 automatic sampler, 141 periodic minor elements, 130 periodic chemical-quality, 78 periodic physical-organic, 22 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 22 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemical-quality or sediment'stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surfacewater stations.

  14. Predictability of PV power grid performance on insular sites without weather stations: use of artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure; Poggi, Philippe; Haurant, P; 10.4229/24thEUPVSEC2009-5BV.2.35

    2010-01-01

    The official meteorological network is poor on the island of Corsica: only three sites being about 50 km apart are equipped with pyranometers which enable measurements by hourly and daily step. These sites are Ajaccio (41\\degree 55'N and 8\\degree 48'E, seaside), Bastia (42\\degree 33'N, 9\\degree 29'E, seaside) and Corte (42\\degree 30'N, 9\\degree 15'E average altitude of 486 meters). This lack of weather station makes difficult the predictability of PV power grid performance. This work intends to study a methodology which can predict global solar irradiation using data available from another location for daily and hourly horizon. In order to achieve this prediction, we have used Artificial Neural Network which is a popular artificial intelligence technique in the forecasting domain. A simulator has been obtained using data available for the station of Ajaccio that is the only station for which we have a lot of data: 16 years from 1972 to 1987. Then we have tested the efficiency of this simulator in two places w...

  15. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xianai [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Duygu, E-mail: dkocaefe@uqac.ca [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Yasar [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Boluk, Yaman [University of Alberta, 3-142 Markin/CNRL Natural Resources Engineering Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2W2 (Canada); Krause, Cornelia [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigate detailed structural changes of heat-treated wood due to weathering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify connection between physical structural changes and chemical degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study effect of heat treatment conditions on weathering degradation process. - Abstract: Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  16. 自动气象站异常记录分析及处理方法%Analysis and Treatment of Abnormal Recording Method of Automatic Weather Stations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梅

    2015-01-01

    According to the “standard meteorological observation”, “surface meteorological observation system software operation manual” and relevant technical regulations, some problems were presented at automatic weather stations, problems such as great wind and wind time missing caused by operational software, the duplication unloading of J file data when the collector was switched off and abnormal records when the sensor was replaced. In this paper, these problems are analyzed and addressed. Their relevant processing methods are introduced for the reference of professionals dealing with detection work so as to improve the quality of meteorological data of automatic weather stations and ensure the accuracy, continuity and data integrity.%根据中国气象局《地面气象观测规范》、《地面气象测报业务系统软件操作手册》及有关技术规定,就自动气象站出现的由业务软件导致极大风和最大风时间缺测、采集器关闭时J文件数据重复卸载、传感器更换时出现异常记录等问题进行重点分析,并提出相关处理方法,供广大探测业务人员参考,以期提高自动气象站气象数据质量,确保观测资料的准确性、连续性、完整性。

  17. Analysis of antenna position measurements and weather station network data during the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign of 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Todd R; Broguiere, Dominique; Fomalont, Ed B; Dent, William R F; Phillips, Neil; Rabanus, David; Vlahakis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In a radio interferometer, the determination of geometrical antenna positions relies on accurate calibration of the dry and wet delay of the atmosphere above each antenna. For the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), which has baseline lengths up to 16 kilometers, the geography of the site forces the height above mean sea level of the more distant antenna pads to be significantly lower than the central array. Thus, both the ground level meteorological values and the total water column can be quite different between antennas in the extended configurations. During 2015, a network of six additional weather stations was installed to monitor pressure, temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity, in order to test whether inclusion of these parameters could improve the repeatability of antenna position determinations in these configurations. We present an analysis of the data obtained during the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign of Oct. through Nov. 2015. The repeatability of antenna position measurem...

  18. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroidal Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark. R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Schriver, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Blewett, David T.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Ho, George C.; Ebel, Denton S.; Nittler, Larry R.; Vilas, Faith; Pieters, Carle M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M..; Helbert, Jorn; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Weider, Shoshana Z.; Mouawad, Nelly; Izenberg, Noam R.; McClintock, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury's regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered by a set of space weathering processes. Before we can interpret crustal composition, it is necessary to understand the nature of these surface alterations. The processes that space weather the surface are the same as those that form Mercury's exosphere (micrometeoroid flux and solar wind interactions) and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of a global magnetic field. To comprehend how space weathering acts on Mercury's regolith, an understanding is needed of how contributing processes act as an interactive system. As no direct information (e.g., from returned samples) is available about how the system of space weathering affects Mercury's regolith, we use as a basis for comparison the current understanding of these same processes on lunar and asteroidal regoliths as well as laboratory simulations. These comparisons suggest that Mercury's regolith is overturned more frequently (though the characteristic surface time for a grain is unknown even relative to the lunar case), more than an order of magnitude more melt and vapor per unit time and unit area is produced by impact processes than on the Moon (creating a higher glass content via grain coatings and agglutinates), the degree of surface irradiation is comparable to or greater than that on the Moon, and photon irradiation is up to an order of magnitude greater (creating amorphous grain rims, chemically reducing the upper layers of grains to produce nanometer scale particles of metallic iron, and depleting surface grains in volatile elements and alkali metals). The processes that chemically reduce the surface and produce nanometer-scale particles on Mercury are suggested to be more effective than similar processes on the Moon. Estimated abundances of nanometer-scale particles can account for Mercury's dark surface relative to that of the Moon without requiring macroscopic grains of opaque minerals. The presence of

  19. A Sounding-based Severe Weather Tool to Support Daily Operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H.; Roeder, William P.

    2014-01-01

    People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

  20. Teachers guide for building and operating weather satellite ground stations for high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R. J.; Gotwald, T.

    1981-01-01

    A number of colleges and universities are operating APT direct readout stations. However, high school science teachers have often failed to realize the potential of meteorological satellites and their products as unique instructional tools. The ability to receive daily pictures from these satellites offers exciting opportunities for secondary school teachers and students to assemble the electronic hardware and to view real time pictures of Earth from outer space. The station and pictures can be used in the classroom to develop an approach to science teaching that could span many scientific disciplines and offer many opportunities for student research and participation in scientific processes. This can be accomplished with relatively small expenditures of funds for equipment. In most schools some of the equipment may already be available. Others can be constructed by teachers and/or students. Yet another source might be the purchase of used equipment from industry or through the government surplus channels. The information necessary for individuals unfamiliar with these systems to construct a direct readout for receiving real time APT photographs on a daily basis in the classroom is presented.

  1. Using crowdsourced data from citizen weather stations to analyse air temperature in 'local climate zones' in Berlin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Daniel; Meier, Fred; Bechtel, Benjamin; Otto, Marco; Scherer, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Provision of observational data with high spatial coverage over extended time periods still remains as one of the biggest challenges in urban climate research. Classical meteorological networks are seldomly designed to monitor atmospheric conditions in a broad variety of urban environments, though the heterogeneity of urban structures leads to distinct thermal characteristics on local scales, i.e., hundreds of metres to several kilometres. One approach to overcome the aforementioned challenges of observation networks is to use data from weather stations that are maintained by citizens. The private company 'netatmo' (www.netatmo.com) produces and distributes such citizen weather stations (CWS) around the world. The stations automatically send their data to the netatmo server, and the user decides if data are publicly shared. Shared data can freely be retrieved via an application programming interface. We collected air temperature (T) data for the year 2015 for the city of Berlin, Germany, and surroundings with more than 1500 'netatmo' CWS in the study area. The entire data set was thoroughly quality checked, and filter techniques, involving data from a reference network, were developed to address different types of errors associated with CWS data. Additionally, the accuracy of 'netatmo' CWS was checked in a climate chamber and in a long-term field experiment. Since the terms 'urban' and 'rural' are ambiguous in urban climate studies, Stewart and Oke (2012) developed the 'local climate zone' (LCZ) concept to enhance understanding and interpretation of air temperature differences in urban regions. LCZ classification for the study region was conducted using the 'WUDAPT' approach by Bechtel et al. (2015). The quality-checked CWS data were used to analyse T characteristics of LCZ classes in Berlin and surroundings. Specifically, we analysed how LCZ classes are represented by CWS in 2015, how T varies within each LCZ class ('intra-LCZ variability'), and if significant

  2. Soesterberg, Netherlands. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-13

    3 6.3 WSW CA1LM02 1. 1.6 A TOA NUBE O3 O1ERATON 213 .65’ I WN(I18 0 3s e. - -N - SFEA DO 08. (O.A PS 1OJ 1DTOSO*TI7OMMEODLT NNW~ a -? 3 � s VARIL...9051 + +j’+, 34 4 40 7 t1 .2 22+*821 82,61+-+ + a!+ of + TOTAL NUBE OF OBEVAIN 683 + 64:P: .. :++: .5:. .(O. A).. . +++.+.,+s f ms o n 1001 USAF...ON 9 981&1S Oi AM oWo - -- - -- -- ’ -ൈ 2 -- TOTAL NUBE OF~d OSRAIN 25 pp f, k- DATA PRUC SSINGBRANCHCCEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE

  3. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  4. Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Q. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Xie, S. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Best Estimate (ARMBE) station-based surface data (ARMBESTNS) value-added product. It is a twin data product of the ARMBE 2-Dimensional gridded (ARMBE2DGRID) data set. Unlike the ARMBE2DGRID data set, ARMBESTNS data are reported at the original site locations and show the original information (except for the interpolation over time). Therefore, the users have the flexibility to process the data with the approach more suitable for their applications. This document provides information about the input data, quality control (QC) method, and output format of this data set. As much of the information is identical to that of the ARMBE2DGRID data, this document will emphasize more on the different aspects of these two data sets.

  5. On the dual nature of lichen-induced rock surface weathering in contrasting micro-environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Gonçalves, João; Oliveira, Cláudia; Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Paz-Bermúdez, Graciela; Almeida, Rubim; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-10-01

    Contradictory evidence from biogeomorphological studies has increased the debate on the extent of lichen contribution to differential rock surface weathering in both natural and cultural settings. This study, undertaken in Côa Valley Archaeological Park, aimed at evaluating the effect of rock surface orientation on the weathering ability of dominant lichens. Hyphal penetration and oxalate formation at the lichen-rock interface were evaluated as proxies of physical and chemical weathering, respectively. A new protocol of pixel-based supervised image classification for the analysis of periodic acid-Schiff stained cross-sections of colonized schist revealed that hyphal spread of individual species was not influenced by surface orientation. However, hyphal spread was significantly higher in species dominant on northwest facing surfaces. An apparently opposite effect was noticed in terms of calcium oxalate accumulation at the lichen-rock interface; it was detected by Raman spectroscopy and complementary X-ray microdiffraction on southeast facing surfaces only. These results suggest that lichen-induced physical weathering may be most severe on northwest facing surfaces by means of an indirect effect of surface orientation on species abundance, and thus dependent on the species, whereas lichen-induced chemical weathering is apparently higher on southeast facing surfaces and dependent on micro-environmental conditions, giving only weak support to the hypothesis that lichens are responsible for the currently observed pattern of rock-art distribution in Côa Valley. Assumptions about the drivers of open-air rock-art distribution patterns elsewhere should also consider the micro-environmental controls of lichen-induced weathering, to avoid biased measures of lichen contribution to rock-art deterioration.

  6. Bad Tolz AAF, Bad Tolz, Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-26

    PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 417.. BADL 01-2 OER MANY AAF ---67 STATION STATION kANS VI.$ No 1. ALL WEATHER 21...and aruual for all years Tcc , ... ase pab !atior.s rovide the caunalative percentae fre..ency to tenths of temperature by 5-degrea ’ahrcnheit

  7. Ground effects of space weather investigated by the surface impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, R.; Boteler, D.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a discussion of the surface impedance applicable in connection with studies of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological systems. This viewpoint means that the surface impedance is regarded as a tool to determine the horizontal (geo)electric field at the Earth's surface, which is the key quantity for GIC. Thus the approach is different from the traditional magnetotelluric viewpoint. The definition of the surface impedance usually involves wavenumber-frequency-domain fields, so inverse Fourier transforming the expression of the electric field in terms of the surface impedance and the geomagnetic field results in convolution integrals in the time and space domains. The frequency-dependent surface impedance has a high-pass filter character whereas the corresponding transfer function between the electric field and the time derivative of the magnetic field is of a low-pass filter type. The relative change of the latter transfer function with frequency is usually smaller than that of the surface impedance, which indicates that the geoelectric field is closer to the time derivative than to the magnetic field itself. An investigation of the surface impedance defined by the space-domain electric and magnetic components indicates that the largest electric fields are not always achieved by the plane wave assumption, which is sometimes regarded as an extreme case for GIC. It is also concluded in this paper that it is often possible to apply the plane wave relation locally between the surface electric and magnetic fields. The absolute value of the surface impedance decreases with an increasing wavenumber although the maximum may also be at a non-zero value of the wavenumber. The imaginary part of the surface impedance usually much exceeds the real part.

  8. Friendship IAP, Maryland. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-04

    USAFETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY’k A1 dEATHER SERVXCE/MAC STATIO STATION 041A vt LS MONT. PAGE I1 - i(Fl WI~III~i~i1IIi ET SUL& TESIPEXATUnE DEPRESION (F...WEATHER SERVICE/MAC L2AD0. FRIENDOSHIP IAP MD 74-S1orf STATION STATION *464 VtAAS M. PAGE 2 -nn-nn Th.~.WIT SUL$ TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) ITOTAL TOTAL () 0...Alte WEAT.4ER SERVICE/IAC 776ff F7hnSHTP Ti A mn-t ER STAION NWA YA PAGE 1 WE? BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL 1 TOTAL (I 0 1.2 j3-43. 7. 9. . 1o 1

  9. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Krause, Cornélia

    2013-01-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  10. A Review on Climate Change in Weather Stations of Guilan Province Using Mann-Kendal Methodand GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Jalal

    2016-07-01

    Climate has always been changing during the life time of the earth, and has appeared in the form of ice age, hurricanes, severe and sudden temperature changes, precipitation and other climatic elements, and has dramatically influenced the environment, and in some cases has caused severe changes and even destructions. Some of the most important aspects of climate changes can be found in precipitation types of different regions in the world and especially Guilan, which is influenced by drastic land conversions and greenhouse gases. Also, agriculture division, industrial activities and unnecessary land conversions are thought to have a huge influence on climate change. Climate change is a result of abnormalcies of metorologyl parameters. Generally, the element of precipitation is somehow included in most theories about climate change. The present study aims to reveal precipitation abnormalcies in Guilan which lead to climate change, and possible deviations of precipitation parameter based on annual, seasonal and monthly series have been evaluated. The Mann-Kendal test has been used to reveal likely deviations leading to climate change. The trend of precipitation changes in long-term has been identifiedusing this method. Also, the beginning and end of these changes have been studied in five stations as representatives of all the thirteen weather stations. Then,the areas which have experienced climate change have been identified using the GIS software along with the severity of the changes with an emphasis on drought. These results can be used in planning and identifying the effects of these changes on the environment. Keywords: Climate Change, Guilan, Mann-Kendal, GIS

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT and COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) and V (OWS-V) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 15 July 1968 to 25 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800290)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT and COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), V (3400N 16400E),...

  12. Impact of additional surface observation network on short range weather forecast during summer monsoon 2008 over Indian subcontinent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Kumar; Randhir Singh; P C Joshi; P K Pal

    2011-02-01

    The three dimensional variational data assimilation scheme (3D-Var) is employed in the recently developed Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Assimilation experiments have been conducted to assess the impact of Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) surface observations (temperature and moisture) on the short range forecast over the Indian region. In this study, two experiments, CNT (without AWS observations) and EXP (with AWS observations) were made for 24-h forecast starting daily at 0000 UTC during July 2008. The impact of assimilation of AWS surface observations were assessed in comparison to the CNT experiment. The spatial distribution of the improvement parameter for temperature, relative humidity and wind speed from one month assimilation experiments demonstrated that for 24-h forecast, AWS observations provide valuable information. Assimilation of AWS observed temperature and relative humidity improved the analysis as well as 24-h forecast. The rainfall prediction has been improved due to the assimilation of AWS data, with the largest improvement seen over the Western Ghat and eastern India.

  13. Kimpo-iap K-14, Seoul, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-30

    31.4 8,0 37;5 2266 03.05 .1 5.4 .504 3 6.8 6.3 43o2 2279 C 06;0S .2 5.6 5o5 50.6 211, . eo 63.0 2265 S09-.1 .2 4 4, 11.5 2696 35.5 2263 12.1* .1 _0 .0 5.0...SURFACE WINDS AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 4 3 2 n l K IM PJ IA P K ORFA / S EO U...OBSERVATIONS) 412n1 KtMPfl TAP KOR9A/SFDUL K-14 46,4050;71 qgp *TATK 4 StATION NAM& VIAS MONTH ALL W ATHER 12n.-14no CLASS HOURS IL.S.T.) ( CONDITION SPEED

  14. Paleomagnetic dating of paleo-weathering surfaces, North America and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, S. A.; Elmore, R. D.; Parnell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Permian-Triassic chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) have been reported in basement rocks below weathering surfaces in continental Europe and North America, and are attributed to weathering fluids which caused precipitation of authigenic hematite. Identification and dating of these paleotopographic surfaces can have implications for climatic conditions during the weathering event. In this study we report paleomagnetic and petrographic results from unconformity surfaces in North America and Scotland to determine the characteristics and extent of this weathering event. Red granites from the Wichita Mountains in southern Oklahoma hold a CRM in hematite that is late Permian in age. The red granites represent a weathering profile that is seen in the upper 200m of the granites, and is present throughout the Wichita Mountains. On the Kintyre peninsula in Scotland, reddened Dalradian schist below an unconformity overlain by Permian-Triassic sandstones contains a late Permian-early Triassic CRM with southwesterly declinations and up inclinations (D = 184.6°, I = -33.3°). The CRM resides in hematite that is intergrown with dolomite. The overlying red sandstone has a similar CRM. Grey Dalradian schist contains magnetite but does not contain a stable magnetization. At another locality, reddened and dolomitized Dalradian schist below an unconformity overlain by the Devonian Old Red Sandstone contains a CRM with northeasterly declinations and down inclinations. The Devonian sandstones contain a CRM with southwesterly declinations and moderate up inclinations that are approximately antipodal to the CRM in the schist. The CRMs in the schist and sandstones reside in hematite. The fluids which caused remagnetization must have penetrated below the Permian unconformity into the Devonian unconformity. Other unconformity surfaces in Scotland (Cambrian-Lewisian; Triassic-Torridonian; Torridonian-Lewisian) are also being investigated as part of this study to determine if similar

  15. Fort Campbell AAF, Clarksville, Kentucky. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-10

    FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 13806 FO~RT CA;*,PSFLL KY/ CAMPRELL AAF 43-45,t5-72 AUG STATION STATIONM ARC ?"Its MONTH (ALL V4,FATKER 1200-1400 CLASS... CAMPRELL AAF 44-45P50-72 APR STATKO, STATIO’ N E Y. "s ONT. PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE 12o-o (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) VISIBLITY (STATUTE MILES...T.,S 0EM Ate OM.CITE ( UDATA PRUCESS, b,"ACCh USAF ETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC + 13806 FORT CAMPBELL KY/ CAMPRELL AAF 4"A

  16. Myrtle Beach AFB South Carolina. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-03

    falling to the ground, not freezing. Freeziag rain and/or freezing drizzle ( glaze ) - Precipitation falling in liquid form, but freezing on contact...13717 0YRTLE DFACh AFB SOUTH CAROLINA 43-47.,49-72 APR TATION STATION Nut TANS MONTH . ALL WE.ATHER ALL CLASS MOlUS (L.S.T.) C CONDITION SPEED...19_ 111 902~. * 131 36/ 251 r 51 5v k V~2 117 Z 32/ 311 .4. 51 5_ 12i 81~ - - I4 . C 26/ 27~ L L . I____l ’ I 6 20 19 t -__ __I El- nut (X) I x

  17. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  18. Surface ozone observation at Syowa Station, Antarctica from February 1982 to January 1983

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeru, Chubachi

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the result of surface ozone measurement at Syowa Station from February 1982 to January 1983 with a Dasibi ozone meter. In order to improve the reliability, the instrument was calibrated in Japan before and after the observation. The surface ozone mixing ratio at Syowa Station shows the annual change with a winter maximum and a summer minimum, being quite similar to that at Amundsen-Scott (South Pole) Station.

  19. EVALUATION OF SURFACE QUALITY OF MEDIUM DENSITY FIBERBOARDS (MDF AND PARTICLEBOARDS AS FUNCTION OF WEATHERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniela GARCIA PEREZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate thesurface quality of commercially producedparticleboard and medium density fiberboard (MDFpanels as function of weathering. Four types ofpanels were exposed to three weathering cycles ofwater soaking, freezing, and heat exposures todetermine the influence of such conditions on theirsurface roughness. The stylus type equipment wasemployed to determine the roughness of controlsamples as well as after each one of the weatheringcycle. Two accepted roughness parameters, namelyaverage roughness (Ra and mean peak-to-valleyheight (Rz were used for the measurement of overallroughness changes of the specimens. Surfaces ofboth types of particleboard samples were adverselyinfluenced as a result of first cycle of weathering andthen they were reconditioned and subjected to twomore exposure cycles. In the case of MDF samplesthe first and the second weathering exposuresincreased roughness of the samples but they wererebalanced at the end of the third cycle. The highestRa value of 17.16μm was determined forparticleboard samples exposed to the first exposurecycle. Overall surface quality of MDF samples wereless influenced than those of particleboardspecimens. Based on the findings in this work itappears that stylus technique can effectively be usedto evaluate surface quality of such composite panelsas they are subjected to different weatheringexposures.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  1. Mars surface weathering products and spectral analogs: Palagonites and synthetic iron minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    There are several hypotheses regarding the formation of Martian surface fines. These surface fines are thought to be products of weathering processes occurring on Mars. Four major weathering environments of igneous rocks on Mars have been proposed; (1) impact induced hydrothermal alterations; (2) subpermafrost igneous intrusion; (3) solid-gas surface reactions; and (4) subaerial igneous intrusion over permafrost. Although one or more of these processes may be important on the Martian surface, one factor in common for all these processes is the reaction of solid or molten basalt with water (solid, liquid, or gas). These proposed processes, with the exception of solid-gas surface reactions, are transient processes. The most likely product of transient hydrothermal processes are layer silicates, zeolites, hydrous iron oxides and palagonites. The long-term instability of hydrous clay minerals under present Martian conditions has been predicted; however, the persistence of such minerals due to slow kinetics of dehydration, or entrapment in permafrost, where the activity of water is high, can not be excluded. Anhydrous oxides of iron (e.g., hematite and maghemite) are thought to be stable under present Martian surface conditions. Oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals associated with Martian basalts has been proposed. Weathering of sulfide minerals leads to a potentially acidic permafrost and the formation of Fe(3) oxides and sulfates. Weathering of basalts under acidic conditions may lead to the formation of kaolinite through metastable halloysite and metahalloysite. Kaolinite, if present, is thought to be a thermodynamically stable phase at the Martian surface. Fine materials on Mars are important in that they influence the surface spectral properties; these fines are globally distributed on Mars by the dust storms and this fraction will have the highest surface area which should act as a sink for most of the absorbed volatiles near the surface of Mars. Therefore

  2. Ubon RTAFB, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-03-02

    593 ADA 09696 1 ’HANI DATA PROCESSING DIVISION USAF ETAC Air Weather Service ( MAC ) .;: DI HFORM SUMMARY OF ’,CE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS UDON ...1jjn.oilc0o. TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVAIIONS 11 r USAIFTA( 𔃾 ’OL1, .. AT 𔃻 K f I I IV/ISI !N A CEILING VERSUSVISIBILITY 𔃾 17 1. n, AC-’A THANI T,,A /I T...41017 Ui8N RATCNATHANI THAI/ UdON RTAFO 66-70 FEFi STATION STATION AME PERIOo ONT CUMULATIVE PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS

  3. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  4. Tropical Ocean Surface Energy Balance Variability: Linking Weather to Climate Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Clayson, Carol Anne

    2013-01-01

    Radiative and turbulent surface exchanges of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variability of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. These fluxes are integral components to tropical ocean-atmosphere variability; they can drive ocean mixed layer variations and modify the atmospheric boundary layer properties including moist static stability, thereby influencing larger-scale tropical dynamics. Non-parametric cluster-based classification of atmospheric and ocean surface properties has shown an ability to identify coherent weather regimes, each typically associated with similar properties and processes. Using satellite-based observational radiative and turbulent energy flux products, this study investigates the relationship between these weather states and surface energy processes within the context of tropical climate variability. Investigations of surface energy variations accompanying intraseasonal and interannual tropical variability often use composite-based analyses of the mean quantities of interest. Here, a similar compositing technique is employed, but the focus is on the distribution of the heat and moisture fluxes within their weather regimes. Are the observed changes in surface energy components dominated by changes in the frequency of the weather regimes or through changes in the associated fluxes within those regimes? It is this question that the presented work intends to address. The distribution of the surface heat and moisture fluxes is evaluated for both normal and non-normal states. By examining both phases of the climatic oscillations, the symmetry of energy and water cycle responses are considered.

  5. Analytical Application of Monitoring Data and Graphic from Regional Automatic Weather Station Based on Web%基于Web的区域气象站监测资料图形分析应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄克磊; 王媛; 杨娜娜; 李秋元; 赵辉; 肖杰

    2009-01-01

    Introduced the characteristics of drawing isoline by Surfer software, described the methods of adding Surfer application, implement of analysis on isoline (iso-surface) of weather data from regional automatic weather station, graphic display and network sharing.With operational system of analytical application on isoline (iso-surface) of rainfall in Qin river valley as the example, the drawing method of isoline on weather data based on B/S structure was introduced.%介绍了Surfer软件绘制等值线的特性,阐述了在Asp.Net环境添加Surfer应用,实现区域自动气象站资料等值线(面)分析、图形显示及网络共享的方法.并以"沁河流域雨量等值线(面)分析应用"业务系统为例,介绍了基于B/S结构的气象资料等值线图的绘制方法.

  6. Performance Assessment of a Solar powered Air Quality and Weather Station Placed on a School Rooftop in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary of compact, roof version of a Village Green Project station installed on a secondary school rooftop in Hong Kong. Preliminary comparison of the station's data against nearby regulatory monitors are summarized.

  7. Effects of UV weathering on surface properties of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour, lignin, and cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yao; Liu, Ru; Cao, Jinzhen; Chen, Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the influence of accelerated weathering on polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour (WF), lignin, and cellulose at different loading levels were evaluated. Six groups of samples were exposed in a QUV accelerated weathering tester for a total of 960 h. The surface color, surface gloss, contact angle and flexural properties of the samples were tested. Besides, the weathered surface was characterized by SEM and ATR-FTIR. The results revealed that (1) the discoloration of composites was accelerated by the presence of lignin, especially at high content; (2) composites containing lignin showed less loss of flexural strength and modulus, less cracks, and better hydrophobicity on weathered surface than other groups, confirming its functions of stabilization and antioxidation; (3) cellulose-based composites exhibited better color stability but more significant deterioration in flexural properties after weathering compared to other composites, suggesting that such kind of composites could not be used as load-bearing structure in outdoor applications.

  8. The impact of synoptic weather on UK surface ozone and implications for premature mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, R. J.; Butt, E. W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Doherty, R. M.; Fenech, S.; Schmidt, A.; Arnold, S. R.; Savage, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollutants, such as ozone, have adverse impacts on human health and cause, for example, respiratory and cardiovascular problems. In the United Kingdom (UK), peak surface ozone concentrations typically occur in the spring and summer and are controlled by emission of precursor gases, tropospheric chemistry and local meteorology which can be influenced by large-scale synoptic weather regimes. In this study we composite surface and satellite observations of summer-time (April to September) ozone under different UK atmospheric circulation patterns, as defined by the Lamb weather types. Anticyclonic conditions and easterly flows are shown to significantly enhance ozone concentrations over the UK relative to summer-time average values. Anticyclonic stability and light winds aid the trapping of ozone and its precursor gases near the surface. Easterly flows (NE, E, SE) transport ozone and precursor gases from polluted regions in continental Europe (e.g. the Benelux region) to the UK. Cyclonic conditions and westerly flows, associated with unstable weather, transport ozone from the UK mainland, replacing it with clean maritime (North Atlantic) air masses. Increased cloud cover also likely decrease ozone production rates. We show that the UK Met Office regional air quality model successfully reproduces UK summer-time ozone concentrations and ozone enhancements under anticyclonic and south-easterly conditions for the summer of 2006. By using established ozone exposure-health burden metrics, anticyclonic and easterly condition enhanced surface ozone concentrations pose the greatest public health risk.

  9. Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Planetary Mission Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We often look "through a glass, darkly" at solar system bodies with tenuous atmospheres and direct surface exposure to the local space environment. Space weathering exposure acts via universal space-surface interaction processes to produce a thin patina of outer material covering, potentially obscuring endogenic surface materials of greatest interest for understanding origins and interior evolution. Examples of obscuring exogenic layers are radiation crusts on cometary nuclei and iogenic components of sulfate hydrate deposits on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. Weathering processes include plasma ion implantation into surfaces, sputtering by charged particles and solar ultraviolet photons, photolytic chemistry driven by UV irradiation, and radiolytic chemistry evolving from products of charged particle irradiation. Regolith structure from impacts, and underlying deeper structures from internal evolution, affects efficacy of certain surface interactions, e.g. sputtering as affected by porosity and surface irradiation dosage as partly attenuated by local topographic shielding. These processes should be regarded for mission science planning as potentially enabling, e.g. since direct surface sputtering, and resultant surface-bound exospheres, can provide in-situ samples of surface composition to ion and neutral mass spectrometers on orbital spacecraft. Sample return for highest sensitivity compOSitional and structural analyses at Earth will usually be precluded by limited range of surface sampling, long times for return, and high cost. Targeted advancements in instrument technology would be more cost efficient for local remote and in-situ sample analysis. More realistic laboratory simulations, e.g. for bulk samples, are needed to interpret mission science observations of weathered surfaces. Space environment effects on mission spacecraft and science operations must also be specified and mitigated from the hourly to monthly changes in space weather and from longer

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Oneida Lake Weather Station (ESF7) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-07 to 2016-06-30 (NODC Accession 0123659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123659 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Sodus Bay Weather Station (ESF4) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-15 to 2016-06-30 (NODC Accession 0123656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123656 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  12. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 July 1962 to 31 August 1962 (NODC Accession 6200209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the COOS BAY from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 July 1966 to 30 July 1966 (NODC Accession 6600090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the COOS BAY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (56305N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 13 November 1963 to 08 December 1963 (NODC Accession 6300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 November 1973 to 27 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7301191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), and in transit. Data were...

  16. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA and other platforms from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 19 November 1963 to 18 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6900791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data...

  17. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 November 1966 to 26 November 1966 (NODC Accession 6600313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 January 1974 to 01 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400133)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 August 1969 to 11 September 1969 (NODC Accession 6900731)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 July 1962 to 02 August 1962 (NODC Accession 6200220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...