WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface weather observation

  1. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  2. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  3. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  4. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  5. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  6. Surface Weather Observations (Pre-1893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly weather records from U.S. Army Forts stations (~1820-1871), U.S. Army Signal Service Stations (1871-1892), Smithsonian Institution voluntary observer network...

  7. Calibrating surface weather observations to atmospheric attenuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanii, Babak

    2001-06-01

    A correlation between near-IR atmospheric attenuation measurements made by the Atmospheric Visibility Monitor (AVM) at the Table Mountain Facility and airport surface weather observations at Edwards Air Force Base has been performed. High correlations (over 0.93) exist between the Edwards observed sky cover and the average AVM measured attenuations over the course of the 10 months analyzed. The statistical relationship between the data-sets allows the determination of coarse attenuation statistics from the surface observations, suggesting that such statistics may be extrapolated from any surface weather observation site. Furthermore, a superior technique for converting AVM images to attenuation values by way of MODTRAN predictions has been demonstrated.

  8. Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms (Keyed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to fill in the observation gap prior to the time when commercial aviation began in the U.S., The NCDC Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) retrieved...

  9. nowCOAST's Map Service for Surface Weather and Ocean Observations (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides maps depicting the latest surface weather and marine weather observations at observing sites using...

  10. Monthly Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  11. Soesterberg, Netherlands. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-13

    3 6.3 WSW CA1LM02 1. 1.6 A TOA NUBE O3 O1ERATON 213 .65’ I WN(I18 0 3s e. - -N - SFEA DO 08. (O.A PS 1OJ 1DTOSO*TI7OMMEODLT NNW~ a -? 3 � s VARIL...9051 + +j’+, 34 4 40 7 t1 .2 22+*821 82,61+-+ + a!+ of + TOTAL NUBE OF OBEVAIN 683 + 64:P: .. :++: .5:. .(O. A).. . +++.+.,+s f ms o n 1001 USAF...ON 9 981&1S Oi AM oWo - -- - -- -- ’ -ൈ 2 -- TOTAL NUBE OF~d OSRAIN 25 pp f, k- DATA PRUC SSINGBRANCHCCEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE

  12. Portland IAP, Portland, Oregon. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-08

    For theComiade I U’"S AMR FORCE u’S TECNICA REVISED UNIFORM SUMMARY APPLI CAIONS CEM0R OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS I, HOURLY OBSERVATIONS Hourly...ALL ’ i STATION STATION NAME ,e O L PERCENTAGE. FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATH’ER i CONDITIONS FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS , "ii ONT HORS HUNER - RAIN

  13. Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-12

    USAFETACITN-63-0I. "AN AID FOR USING THE REVISED UNIFORM SUMMARY OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS" 1RUSSAO. TABLE OF CONTENTS STATION HISTORY C PART A: WEATHER...24 634 OSC STATION LOCATION AND INSTRUMENTATION HISTORY Vitt~f tLAU UELtlNE L~TI EMI AIM WK A.1. U 6itffn maI~t . 041 1 Oscoda AA ich A Jul.43 1 Aug43...fla saiTT[I SUSHI ~ 15658 __________________ 1 Jul 43 1/A N/A 1/A N/A 2 JU 53 Permanently mounted on iop of AN/GMQ-1 ML-204-~1 30 ft the weather

  14. Atmospheric Visual and Infrared Transmission Deduced from Surface Weather Observations: Weather and Warplanes. V1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    require stadistically valid predictions of PGM utility as a function of weather conditions in different potential theaters of combat at different times of...resource in making statisti- cally valid predictions of weapon performance (including diurnal, sea- sonal, and geographic variability). The model of...dewpoint range IO°F- 700F. -1 -16- be valid at 296 0K (73*F). They further suggest a strong temperature dependence of yc. (These corrections have been

  15. Constraining storm-scale forecasts of deep convective initiation with surface weather observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Luke

    Successfully forecasting when and where individual convective storms will form remains an elusive goal for short-term numerical weather prediction. In this dissertation, the convective initiation (CI) challenge is considered as a problem of insufficiently resolved initial conditions and dense surface weather observations are explored as a possible solution. To better quantify convective-scale surface variability in numerical simulations of discrete convective initiation, idealized ensemble simulations of a variety of environments where CI occurs in response to boundary-layer processes are examined. Coherent features 1-2 hours prior to CI are found in all surface fields examined. While some features were broadly expected, such as positive temperature anomalies and convergent winds, negative temperature anomalies due to cloud shadowing are the largest surface anomaly seen prior to CI. Based on these simulations, several hypotheses about the required characteristics of a surface observing network to constrain CI forecasts are developed. Principally, these suggest that observation spacings of less than 4---5 km would be required, based on correlation length scales. Furthermore, it is anticipated that 2-m temperature and 10-m wind observations would likely be more relevant for effectively constraining variability than surface pressure or 2-m moisture observations based on the magnitudes of observed anomalies relative to observation error. These hypotheses are tested with a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using a single CI-capable environment. The OSSE results largely confirm the hypotheses, and with 4-km and particularly 1-km surface observation spacing, skillful forecasts of CI are possible, but only within two hours of CI time. Several facets of convective-scale assimilation, including the need for properly-calibrated localization and problems from non-Gaussian ensemble estimates of the cloud field are discussed. Finally, the characteristics

  16. Dover AFB, Delaware Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-16

    UNIFORM SUMMARY A.PPLICATIONS CEPWER OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS HOURLY OBSERVATIONS _r_ )Lsr.a*o:Lt,- are ievuI~ td a~i ttnoz~ rtecord or record...STATION MNS YEANS MONTH ALL WEATHER A LL CLASS Noun$ II..S.T.J CONDITION SPEED MEAN IKNTS) 1.3 4.6 7-10 It1-16 17.21 22-27 2533 34.40 41-.47 48.55 td ...704 _24 .U 59 17 ~9 6 99 ] 0Kk 5. _1 1 0_ 42.7 - 4 . ,, 13.4, 3 6 7 - 11 ,,. - 9 -17@539. 5’,_ 7 7 li. 7.a91 22a. 57e~9, -"eB .e 344 9~9 2~ 9*2 59.c 5

  17. Observed linear trend in few surface weather elements over the Northwest Himalayas (NWH) during winter season

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dan Singh; Vikas Sharma; Vikas Juyal

    2015-04-01

    Linear trends in few surface weather variables such as air temperatures (maximum temperature, minimum temperature), snow and rainy days, snowfall and rainfall amounts, rainfall contribution to seasonal total precipitation amount, seasonal snow cover depth and snow cover days (duration) are examined from winter-time observations at 11 stations located over the Northwest Himalayas (NWH). This study indicates that snowfall tends to show a decline in this region, while the rainfall tends to increase during the winter months. Seasonal snow cover depth and seasonal snow cover days also tend to show a decline over the NWH. Decrease in seasonal snow cover depth and duration have reduced the winter period in terms of availability of seasonal snow cover over the NWH during the last 2–3 decades. Other surface weather variables also exhibited significant temporal changes in recent decades. Observed trends in temperature and precipitation over the NWH in recent decades are also supported by long data series of temperature over the western Himalayas (WH), north mountain India (NMI) rainfall data and reanalysis products.

  18. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  19. Recovery of Global Surface Weather Observations for Historical Reanalyses and International Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Rob; Compo, Gil; Carton, Jim

    2011-05-01

    Third International Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions Over the Earth Initiative Workshop: Reanalysis and Applications; Baltimore, Maryland, 3-5 November 2010 ; The third Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions over the Earth (ACRE) workshop advanced the goals of the international ACRE initiative (http://www.met-acre.org/) to undertake and facilitate the recovery of instrumental terrestrial and marine global surface weather observations underpinning global weather reconstructions and reanalyses spanning the past 200-250 years (http://reanalyses.org). The workshop improved integration of the 35-40 ACRE-linked international scientific projects, institutions, and organizations working toward these ends. The meeting highlighted the broad array and international usage of ACRE-facilitated data sets and reanalysis: the International Surface Pressure Databank (ISPD; http://dss.ucar.edu/datasets/ds132.0/), the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (http:/icoads.noaa.gov/ICOADS;), and the 20th Century Reanalysis (20CR; http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/20thC_Rean/). The need for more data recovery for all regions of the globe during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was emphasized. Many regional efforts for such recovery are under way. The Arctic and maritime regions were highlighted as particular areas needing attention. As a result of the meeting, connections with existing projects were made and new efforts were started to address these needs.

  20. Lubbock Regional Airport, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 7 267 LUBOCK REGIONAL ARPT TX 73-81 ALUG ALL WEATHER 1 ]0-ZC02 SPEED MEAN IN’S) 5.- 4.-6 7.10...VISIBILITYA!;- EAITHER SF0VlCF/-AC :-’ LUBOCK ;ZE IONAL Af T T - C PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS 672- 6 0. T 6 67 69.1~ 64

  1. Fort Campbell AAF, Clarksville, Kentucky. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-10

    FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 13806 FO~RT CA;*,PSFLL KY/ CAMPRELL AAF 43-45,t5-72 AUG STATION STATIONM ARC ?"Its MONTH (ALL V4,FATKER 1200-1400 CLASS... CAMPRELL AAF 44-45P50-72 APR STATKO, STATIO’ N E Y. "s ONT. PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE 12o-o (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) VISIBLITY (STATUTE MILES...T.,S 0EM Ate OM.CITE ( UDATA PRUCESS, b,"ACCh USAF ETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC + 13806 FORT CAMPBELL KY/ CAMPRELL AAF 4"A

  2. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Bleve, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  3. Columbus AFB, Columbus, Mississippi. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-05

    Weather Service (MAC) 13. NU S .AES- Scott AFB IL 62225 , 468 p. 14 MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(II dillerIl I,nm Controfling Oihce) IS SECURIT /Y.CL...64 DATA lPRk;CFS3 ’ 4G WvlnC4 .- , /- ,rSURFACE WINDS 4 ,! W Ai) h .tI-RPVI> : , ,PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND it DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY...69., 69. 6, 9, 2:k 350 lu.222 27) 26 7o.9 7 . ? .2 1.2~ 74.? P( Z~~ ~~ 300 4). 4g .7 66. 3 6 8 . 6 6 9 . 9 7 0 . 2 7 ( . 70 1,, ’ , 71.I ?1 71., l

  4. Siegenberg Germany Gunnery Range, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-10-28

    PERrORMING OGANZ𔃺.. %k.4E A% tD ADODESS b E t E’ U SAFETAC/OL-A A .6_q 1 S 5 Air Force Environmental Technical Appl. Center Scott AFB IL 62225 1% ’K...INNERY RANGE 64070 JUL S51ONSAT-CV NAE YER S=N PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATHER CONDZTIONS FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS MONTH HOS T .RAIN...10 !1 - .6 17 . 21 22 - 27 28 -33 34 40 Al - 48 55 >$6 % WIND DIR. AS " S EE D N. 7! 00 Is 798_--4,61’T NN ENE td ;1 _____ 1 - 3j~Z~ SSE $61 . -_ 1

  5. Gela, Italy, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-03

    manual table is also presented for surface wind meeting INSTHUINTE CLASS conditions as follows: Ceiling 200 through lh0 feet inclusive with visibility...OBSERVATIONS Ui AFETAC 0 8 5 tCI . A] yo s 0 Oi T’. UMAEo.-St! -I AL L MT AtL’ ~Ck WID T A SURFACE WINDS - F .EArH: ST VI "t L PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND...temperature Lombined; tuid again for dry-bulb, wet-bulb, and dew-point tempera - tures separately. Total observations for thc.;e four Items is also

  6. Impact of additional surface observation network on short range weather forecast during summer monsoon 2008 over Indian subcontinent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Kumar; Randhir Singh; P C Joshi; P K Pal

    2011-02-01

    The three dimensional variational data assimilation scheme (3D-Var) is employed in the recently developed Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Assimilation experiments have been conducted to assess the impact of Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) surface observations (temperature and moisture) on the short range forecast over the Indian region. In this study, two experiments, CNT (without AWS observations) and EXP (with AWS observations) were made for 24-h forecast starting daily at 0000 UTC during July 2008. The impact of assimilation of AWS surface observations were assessed in comparison to the CNT experiment. The spatial distribution of the improvement parameter for temperature, relative humidity and wind speed from one month assimilation experiments demonstrated that for 24-h forecast, AWS observations provide valuable information. Assimilation of AWS observed temperature and relative humidity improved the analysis as well as 24-h forecast. The rainfall prediction has been improved due to the assimilation of AWS data, with the largest improvement seen over the Western Ghat and eastern India.

  7. Hurlburt Field, Valparaiso, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-25

    TOTA,--- NUBE OF OBSERVATIONS 1--- -7 ’I.. C)AIA PRUCf.SSIN" r.VI ,NI3r 1 TAC(/USA, SURFACE WINDS 2 A WEATtER ShkVLE/ AC PERCENTAGE...T~ NNW ~ 3 110 9 1. 2,6 61__ __ __ __7__ __ Ile- 17 3.9 1-36--1011 10 ___ t ___ o z__ ____ -__ TOTA NUBE OF9 OB.41TON 14407 _____TA __’_ 0 * 8.5 .2

  8. Seattle Tacoma IAP, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-21

    ground, not freezing. Freezing rain and/or freezin zle ( glaze ) - Precipitation falling in liquid form, but freezing on contact with an unheated...8217We n -STO.2 nut m 0mI ALL WEATHER 1800-2000 ClAm W.- I(L I. SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 1-3 4.6 7- 10 11 - 16 17-21 22.27 28- 33 34.40 41 .47 48 . 55 󈧼

  9. Incirlik AB, Adana, Turkey. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-15

    WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 130 INCIALIK Al TURKEY/ADANA 67-74 AE2 09010 STATION STATION NAME YEARS HOUNS 4L. S. T.1 T-.WET SULS TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F...TURKy/ADANA 6_ _6 JUt_ STAT.ON STATIC. NiAME ER A E OT’*N’[R IR OT -! T..p. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTALTOA , r 2! 1. S /o 7 .. . 6 . .i

  10. Daggett Municipal, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-02

    T~TATT I Am maL imlr ALL WEATHER �-2300 SP1EED1 MEAN (KNTS) 1 -3 4. 6 7-10 11 16 17. 21 22-27 2 6 33 34-40 41 . 4 - 55 t56 % WIND R. - SPEED e...000,0100.0100.0 - 98.4 996 1 99.2 990, 99.,p 99.9 99.9 99.99,v o.Olo.o 1 .oO,,o~ Ojo .oEo.01 TOTA NUMUI OF0SERVATIONS 748 USAF fTC 0. 4.5 :L A, low- An 0

  11. Myrtle Beach AFB South Carolina. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-03

    falling to the ground, not freezing. Freeziag rain and/or freezing drizzle ( glaze ) - Precipitation falling in liquid form, but freezing on contact...13717 0YRTLE DFACh AFB SOUTH CAROLINA 43-47.,49-72 APR TATION STATION Nut TANS MONTH . ALL WE.ATHER ALL CLASS MOlUS (L.S.T.) C CONDITION SPEED...19_ 111 902~. * 131 36/ 251 r 51 5v k V~2 117 Z 32/ 311 .4. 51 5_ 12i 81~ - - I4 . C 26/ 27~ L L . I____l ’ I 6 20 19 t -__ __I El- nut (X) I x

  12. Kimpo-iap K-14, Seoul, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-30

    31.4 8,0 37;5 2266 03.05 .1 5.4 .504 3 6.8 6.3 43o2 2279 C 06;0S .2 5.6 5o5 50.6 211, . eo 63.0 2265 S09-.1 .2 4 4, 11.5 2696 35.5 2263 12.1* .1 _0 .0 5.0...SURFACE WINDS AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 4 3 2 n l K IM PJ IA P K ORFA / S EO U...OBSERVATIONS) 412n1 KtMPfl TAP KOR9A/SFDUL K-14 46,4050;71 qgp *TATK 4 StATION NAM& VIAS MONTH ALL W ATHER 12n.-14no CLASS HOURS IL.S.T.) ( CONDITION SPEED

  13. Friendship IAP, Maryland. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-04

    USAFETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY’k A1 dEATHER SERVXCE/MAC STATIO STATION 041A vt LS MONT. PAGE I1 - i(Fl WI~III~i~i1IIi ET SUL& TESIPEXATUnE DEPRESION (F...WEATHER SERVICE/MAC L2AD0. FRIENDOSHIP IAP MD 74-S1orf STATION STATION *464 VtAAS M. PAGE 2 -nn-nn Th.~.WIT SUL$ TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) ITOTAL TOTAL () 0...Alte WEAT.4ER SERVICE/IAC 776ff F7hnSHTP Ti A mn-t ER STAION NWA YA PAGE 1 WE? BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL 1 TOTAL (I 0 1.2 j3-43. 7. 9. . 1o 1

  14. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  15. McGuire AFB, New Jersey. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-20

    2000 78 gUSAFETAC MYMv 0 10 SIOL A), moowmm ofv’F.no m, N wN a - ,/ USAFrTAC 010-5 L J, P’t’O SIlQIS~ttl~t IOItt: c’,.,-- * . *1 GLOBAL CLIMATOLOGY... mm Aon oss O$S i = . ft PA " --- 5LrBAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH S AFETAC SURFACE WINDS AIR wEATHER SERVICE/MA" PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND...FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) ALL hLFAT Hr ClASS mm US?.) SPEED IA KITS) I- 4.6 7.0 1.16 17-21 22 - 27 2 - 33 34.40 41 -47 491.55 2t s6 WIND DIR. _ _ SPEED

  16. ClimoBase: Rouse Canadian Surface Observations of Weather, Climate, and Hydrological Variables, 1984-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ClimoBase is a collection of surface climate measurements collected in Northern Canada by Dr. Wayne Rouse between 1984 and 1998 in three locations: Churchill,...

  17. Taipei IAP, Taiwan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-09-07

    TOTA NUBE OP5 OBS3RVATIONS A 22 N6 Fb 6 3 1 USAFETAC FOM 0-8-S (0. A) PREAIOS EDITION$ Of THIS FORM ARE OBSOLETE vV TAe C/usA SURFACE WINDS tIi .EAr E4...4_. s a 4? TOTA NUBE 04OSSAIN -26 ls--- at 4, 1 3,7. L sW 1.5 1,41 ,61 .4.1 4 NW~ lo l 7 .,1 ,1 17 2 ,51 0N 1591 10.9 1.,8 10.9

  18. Lemoore NAS, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    local standard tim. MISSING HOUR GROUPS Summary sheets are omitted when stations mintaining limited observing schedules did not report certain three...8217 .EATIF; SERVIC’ / AC L,- MOODL ’AS CA 73-81 ALL SiAT, - STATION NAME YEARS P..DCLNTAGL FRECUrNCY OF OCCURENCE OF *EATHEiO CONDITIONS FROM HOUPLY...their doubtful and limited ve.tee.) A total count of valid observations is given for months and snual. Stations are included in which a portion or all

  19. Taegu AB, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A, C-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-07

    USAETAC 0.6.5 (OL*A) MviOUS 101TIONS Of THIS OIM S A OSS ITIl ~1------------ -- ---- -- -- -- -- -- -- - GLL.AL CLIMATOLOUY PRANCH LS r7ETAC SURFACE...1 5 > ~16 . 0 NOCEILING 4’.5 6 . 1 ol. 6 . ,7.5 69:4 7 .7 7. 7 .4 71.5 ’ 𔃻 TI 71.5 1 -1. C . - 20000 5% b ’S1. 6 ? ś ".,95 7?.6 73.9 74 74.7 7j S...61.6 51 .9 61 .9 b I o 6 . 6Z 6 2.5 b2t Q2.5 .> 20000 , ,. 2 b 2 4 6 3 o 4 6 r. 6 5 .6 a ’. 8 6 5 . , 65 o 5 ,:o 4 6 0 4 6 6 4 6 6 . 4 S6 0 4 4 6 ? 18000

  20. Selfridge ANGB, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    PRECIPITATION PSYCMROMETRIC.ORY VS WIT SULS SNOWFALL MEAN & STD DIV.- 104Y SULI, WET 9UL6, & DEW POINT)SNOW DEPTH obAasvTim SURFACE WINDS P REATIJV UIDITY...5_000 i 1 "n. ir.| -,11 - l I-7A_n aI.* B17 . -7. 7’P~ Lier I2t f hA ) A 2 4 ft-A.:P, 48l )I~ - 7 9 ai 1. ;:, . 0. 51.3 51.7 51.8 52.0 52.0 52.3 2s.3...SELfRIOBE Atd6I "I 69-712.74-ak CPAGE I1 WIT OLS TOMMATUS ONUSS IV) TOTAL TOTAL (p) 2 1- 4s 6 J7- 4 i011 i. . 1 . 1 Iii 1 I I I I III.II . 1 3 I 60% 6 4 1 V

  1. Tatalina AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    3 i TATALINA AFS AK 73-8p PER .ENTAGE cREQ JENCY OF OCCURRENCE Ng20-112fl FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS 31.1 31.8 31.8 31.8 31.i 31.8 31.3 31.8 31.8 31.8...lower than indicated. Since wet bulb temperatures are calculated from the dew points, they are also biased toward higher values. In fact, some of the mean

  2. Kwajalein, Marshall Island, Bucholz. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-08

    C urM+i ’ + • msmn’mmsUNU1MT,6 + - -* . . 0=11TKINS U-LIMU mill lmmmmummll 4 M) Review and Approval statement This report is approved for public...OBSERVATIONS) C 40604 RWAJALFI?4 MARSHALL [S/pIIJf-InLu 44.72 fjCT STATION STATION nuIt TIA S IDON*m - L t - WFA TIIF P 1 s0 o- V 0 0 WlAS NOMI (L ST

  3. Bitburg AB, Bitburg, Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-20

    n󈧔 11 13I _ _0 16 -j- _ _ _ _ I _ j I _ 8-2L11 Il116 _1 iM . 1 f, I. 9t USAPETAC ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ .4 6.71.O5( ) ~O~~ou~ aAcc ~ 21-21~- -2 1 12- A17 TOAL...reporte’ prior to 1949, nor subsequent to June 1958; and was computed by machine methods for observations recorded during these periods. All values

  4. Fort Belvoir, Alexandria, Virginia. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-09-07

    9------- ------ TA-- It ItA.v , SI’P) I ) I"A-’IT 0 4ii We, ’o -TTA NUBE OF~- OBSERVATIONS~ i, . -1 3 ,,, CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY ’ _________ I i...JU. 0-14-5(OL 4) ~Rv,1T t o us2o 11958so,s o , o rvsov, a " ..... 0 T 9 9 -9 i -7 TOTA NUBE OF OBEVTOS 6" RO UO " , 77,77F- I + "A k PR

  5. Fulda AAF, Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-02-08

    SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 355 Fi,&DA GERMiN ~IY 4AF b-~-Z______ STATON STATION MAN9 ICA.$ O.N ALL EATnE., 3" ,-.5 cuss NOUAS (L s 1 SPEEDN MEAN...30,1 33,1 3346 33,3 33 O 33, 34.7 1600 0 30,4 319,2 33,3 33,3 337. 239, 11000 1 4, 2 7,2 279 213 29,9 30.1 3,4 33.1 33.4 33,3 36 3,6 ’,>_20oo2. Zola

  6. Athinai Apt., Athens, Greece. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-11-06

    FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 9 ’A’ A .~ kFC /.~~~ APT 4 5-406,61-66 _________ A"K- ALNSTA T IO N NA M E ..._ _ . CLASS SOURS IL ST SPEED EI MEAN (KNTS) 1 -3...79.4 99.1 99.1100,1100# 100$(100. 100. 100, 100. 100. 100. 100. 100.0100.C100.C 100 1o 9.4 99,1 99, 10*0 * l oo ¢.IO0*olO 00100 *0om100 0( 00o( loGo

  7. Kingsley Field, Klamath Falls, Oregon. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-16

    FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS - RAIN FR1eZING SNOW x OF FOG SMOKE IDUST % OF ORS TOTAL I MON’ti HOURS THNDR AD/Olt IRAIN &6/OR IAND/ORt HAIL *O"S WIT AN/O...2 0 via 2000 OF DlAYS 1 ICHS -20 0.0 j.2 26,.50 510 101-250 . 2..1.5 _______ wni0001= -00! No. -- WIT SNOW ALI NONE TE~ 10 5412 5434 54614155 S...8217 i -, (.TL 1-.,949.925.7 7.Q 1.8 *4 41- ; |73 743S - ’ II ! _ _ _ ___ __-__ __ I -’ b17 ’ i 1 _____________i________ I i

  8. George AFB, Victorville, Caifornia Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A -F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-14

    Lu..A:-Aized ill elt -ht -Lur periods correspondin,- to the followuing sets 0of hourly observal iols: .~ J.-AoO, ’iolet .. A.-4et, i~o-i~oLcou-.AAA...8217 _. - -h >_i -6 5/16 c No Elt ,, 7. 7 , 7 92.7 2. 7 ’ .7 -Z. 7 Y?.7 󈧚.7 --. 7 .7 72.7> 20004: 20C 9-u1j 9 4. q - 94 a -4 2. , 94 . 94 . , 54•9 94 94 9...SUMMARY A 1 .TH r. SEFV iCt /MAC 2 1 .3 E F CA 7.,73-81 J AIN STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH PAGE 1 1 -y J- IlI:. NOUNS (L. S. T.) T..p. WET BULB

  9. Michales AAF, Dugway, Utah. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A - F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-21

    14 j4 6, NN 5S _ 51 * 3 23 07 2b4 S4. 11. 3.7 12 o6 #1 100. 4- . ssw~~TTA NUBE OF OBSERVATIONS__-~~ - ’ AAA 6....4 t ____ P L _ z SA DATA PROCESSIv, PA...0040 10 010&0100 o TOA NUBE OFOBEVAIOS163 USAFETA 0-1-5 OL ) FVYFOS (DTIO$ O THI FOM A~ Oi.U. r1 rev *DATA PRQCESSli\\IG iAiCm U$AF ETAC CEILING...9909 99,9 99,9 99,9100.o00100o,010 0,loooo 0,lo00 UaF 00200 0.14. (0 A)00vo0100.010000100P PORP A O0t0, TOTA NUBE OF OBSRVAION IM4 04 * t.,,-- .... 14

  10. FT Stewart AAF, Savannah, Georgia. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-18

    6 96 ______1.4 3.4 WSW__ 96 03 ____- 8 2.7 NNW .81 .61 1.1 2.8 113_2 11,6-_- - 1.41 1 .B TOA NUBE OF_ OBSERVATIONS 36 USFEA 0CALM _ __)PEIUS...1-7 4.5 ~ 6 % WN WSW_ .___ .31_ 1.01 3.0 -~ WNE *3 1. 6 ____6_ 4.1 NNE 3*5 100 26______ _ 6.7. E- F 97 115 3 - -.2 1_ 2.5030 ESETTA NUBE OF__...97, 9.9 9. 89 9F3 9* TOTA NUBE OF OBSERVATONS- q2 USA ETC 01- 4 )"vu ot*so mss~ * ao ~ 444 % 441tA~4𔃾 ~t’ .444~- 4’~4 -~j 4 4- 4y! y4~4~ ~ 44 4- 4

  11. Holloman AFB, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-12

    FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) ,’_,132 HOLLONAN AFB NN 68-70,75-81 04AY WarM . iIAMr Uhu m..?. ALL WIEATHER 1500-1T00...ppS -&3 w 3s &3 Jt ~- - ~ - a)k3 .e--------------------.JL4 _ ~ w mt ~ w &ima 4I- - - - - -- - - - h 77 77 GLOBA CLMTG BRANCH UIF9A SUFC WID El SAIR...OSUSIVATION) ciwm 1110110 ( WARM ON a’e 11. 1 s atI. I at 2 1 1s’ 19 1k-. Is i’ i" a t’$ i, a 3. 1* to " C~ *~ at s a o "tT*To T ts Is 1*. as M 10,usm

  12. Elmendorf AFB, Anchorage, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-17

    OBSERVATIONS) 260 EjJMENDORF AF0 ALASK /ANCHORAGE 6 6-79 SE ITATION STATION RAMP VEA~sS 505Thm CALL WIATivg 2800-2000 CLA" 40 isA IS EL..) ( CONDItION SPEED) 1...iiiiiiii - - _ l-l nA T A ,1, 1C. is Z’I e(’ ,It .,. - DAILY TEMPERATURES l if ?,52 4C: I L;I1.,-JuIqkI AF, ALA.aVA/Al C1-I!R1t .; ,| ’,i 5 -/ iSA ,;O...2 0. O 3,861.7 .550 8/5 . 1 1 2 14 101 Element (X) ZX9 Z X I Mean No. of Hours w th Temp rtu re < RJh 4418271 60855 69.9 87 870 . F 󈧤F 67F 73F 80F

  13. Ubon RTAFB, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-03-02

    593 ADA 09696 1 ’HANI DATA PROCESSING DIVISION USAF ETAC Air Weather Service ( MAC ) .;: DI HFORM SUMMARY OF ’,CE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS UDON ...1jjn.oilc0o. TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVAIIONS 11 r USAIFTA( 𔃾 ’OL1, .. AT 𔃻 K f I I IV/ISI !N A CEILING VERSUSVISIBILITY 𔃾 17 1. n, AC-’A THANI T,,A /I T...41017 Ui8N RATCNATHANI THAI/ UdON RTAFO 66-70 FEFi STATION STATION AME PERIOo ONT CUMULATIVE PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS

  14. Rhein-Main Apt, Germany/Franfurt. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    DATA PROCESSING BRANCH usAF E’ C CEILING, VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 0 RHEINMAIN APT GERMANY/FRAtKFURT...SERVICE/MAC RHEINMAIN APT GENMANY/FRANKFURT 67-7o OEZ U. PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE 0000-.)200 , (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) o , - VISIBILITY

  15. Bad Tolz AAF, Bad Tolz, Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-26

    PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 417.. BADL 01-2 OER MANY AAF ---67 STATION STATION kANS VI.$ No 1. ALL WEATHER 21...and aruual for all years Tcc , ... ase pab !atior.s rovide the caunalative percentae fre..ency to tenths of temperature by 5-degrea ’ahrcnheit

  16. Kobler Field, Saipan, Mariana Island. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-19

    HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 41408 KUBLER PLD SAIPAN NAS/MARIANA 45-47,53-62 ALL $TATION STAT...NN[UOT ALL WEATHER ALL CLASS COouS CL *.T.J SPEED MEAN (NTS) 1...FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 414OR KUBLER FLO SAIPAN NAS/I’ARIANA 43#54-62 _ __R ALL WEATHFk ALL cASS -11S 4L 9 T...OBSERVATIONS) 4140 8 KUBLER FLO SAIPAN NAS/4ARIANA 45,47,53-62 mAY ALL wATHFR ALL sPFD 1 F T7 MEAN (KNTS) -3 . 6 7- 10 11 - 16 17 21 22 27 28 .33 34- 40 41

  17. Don Muang IAP, Bangkok, Thailand. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-04-02

    00,10 10. 0.09, M0.±0.1k., 0..D.’ 0 J AQf 100 98,4100, 00.0100. 100.01001 00. 100,0100,0100, 100.0 00,0 00,o000.0100.0 2: 0 so .00100 1 100,1000 20...SUMMARYOP SURFACE WEATHER OSEAYATM BANGKOK THAILAND/DON WUANG IAP W8ANO 41001 N 13 55 E 100 36 ELEV 33 FT VTOD WMOE 46436 PARTS A-F POR FROM HOURLY OBS JAN...LOCATION STION FROM TO STATIONIrr) BAROMETER DAY 0I Don uang Apt, Thailand /TAF Jan 54 Dee 63 N 13 55 E 100 36 33 39 Ft 24 LOCATION CHANACTEI LOCATION

  18. Cloud information for FIRE from surface weather reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Carole J.; Warren, Stephen G.; London, Julius

    1990-01-01

    Surface weather observations of clouds were analyzed to obtain a global cloud climatology (Warren et al, 1986; 1988). The form of the synoptic weather code limits the types of cloud information which are available from these reports. Comparison of surface weather reports with instrumental observations during the FIRE field experiments can help to clarify the operational definitions which were made in the climatology because of the nature of the synoptic code. The long-term climatology from surface weather observations is also useful background for planning the location and timing of intensive field experiments.

  19. Fort Campbell, Campbell AAF, Kentucky. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    R SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) ,4671 FT CAMPRELL KY 73-81 "A-’ ALL WEATHtR. SPEED MAN...34., AFETAC SURFACE WINDS A2 EATHR SEV1CL/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 74f-71 FT CAMPRELL KY 73-81...SERVI11/mAC ’ 467 . FT CAMPRELL KY 73-31 Ju’. e PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) VfSf bitT STAT JTE -ILES !Ci Nu, i I -o i > I

  20. Langley AFB, Newport News, Virginia. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    i1 1 "+ ’I"+ " *+ +" ENVI-77E 74 4, +, + ~ P CATON C UTER +"+,, :+ PARTO SURFACE WINDS , jr..,+ + -, + +"C reenedi tispatar vriu ta.ltins...frequency distribution of wet-bulb ) depression in 17 classes spread ho izontally; by 2-degree intervals of dry-bulb temperature spread vertically ...humidity and total number of observations in two tables. a. Table 1 is prepared by month and annual, all years combined, with montb being the vertical

  1. Nha Trang Apt.,Vietnam. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-29

    38. 38, e *2 120 2.1 6 2 8 82 6 * 6 o5 6 62 62 .62. 62. 62 .62. 62. 62, 62- 62. 2000oo 62, 62.21 . 2:1 .62:; ,2, 2: big : a 6 62, 62 62. ?-16000 3...10 - I _ __ - - - - - -_ V * ADATA PROCESSING OIVISIONV USAF ETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY S AIR WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 41010

  2. KSC Shuttle APT, Titusville, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-06

    o vus " usvenS.u V = Sowp vtt 4ete - 4*h* Iy (,L( AL LIIM LTtILUry tsPA’C 2 J 5 AJ-;t.AL WEATHER CONDITIONS AIR. i-ATHR SERVTCFIAC 128tW K.jC SrITTL r...0 O0 .0 *0 00 75 .0 s0 .0 Ill .0, .0 .0 40 R,00 . 76 .1 .d go~ 0 . .0 .0 so so 00 00 __ so TRAC td *0 00 .0 .q 0 .0 00 .0 TRA0 70 -A~ 0 .~. 0 *0 .0

  3. Hamilton AFB, San Rafael, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-11-03

    QIILLT1y M4,rrTCA7ITA1 -It G-YY1CA"T rrL- U? kiy iL~jD ItISTRIIIUTON STAMP LEGIBLY. 80 ~ 1104 DATE RECEIVED) IN l) TIC 1I11OTOGRMPII TIS SIfEF~r AND...wihTompotatute Dry sulb 79 93W~ 127T974., D0610 SO* A 9 F s2 RPM ~ ~ Z,7-- - - - - - -- - -w’ DATA PRUCESSING DIV;SIQN3 USO FTAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY "AIR WEATHER

  4. Biggs AAF, El Paso, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-14

    BGSAF E AO 38 U -OOTN FRO HORL OLOBLECIMAOLOYIONS Hoti !S WEATHER CONDITLOONS MONTH CRMS I AD/OR jRAIN &,cRj ANDOR MAIL -B A’ D/OR WITH 015? NO. OF (L5 W...0_____ Fs 32_FJa067 F 73F 0 F -93 F Total . -,-.. ;. .." "I ~ q " -," " * ’f 41 v>"K~ ’ ’, ,Jim j - - ’ ArTA C PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY L. < el’ AT.Ft? SUIV

  5. Coupling convectively driven atmospheric circulation to surface rotation: Evidence for active methane weather in the observed spin rate drift of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, Jonathan L

    2008-01-01

    A large drift in the rotation rate of Titan observed by Cassini provided the first evidence of a subsurface ocean isolating the massive core from the icy crust. Seasonal exchange of angular momentum between the surface and atmosphere accounts for the magnitude of the effect, but observations lag the expected signal by a few years. We argue this time lag is due to the presence of an active methane weather cycle in the atmosphere. An analytic model of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric angular momentum is developed and compared to time-dependent simulations of Titan's atmosphere with and without methane thermodynamics. The disappearance of clouds at the summer pole suggests the drift rate has already switched direction, signaling the change in season from solstice to equinox.

  6. Stallion Site, San Marcial, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A, C through F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-21

    N1 2,& 2.6 . . ME _.__,_ 16.- 3 SEE 2.6__ 2...L A SW1 5__ 1 ~ WSW w 2.6 -JL2. WNW _ __ 2r . . (C MW 2a6_ 26_ .8 j, NNW zb 2.6 saA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1l.1...PROCESSINO SRAHCN SCRM TI U M R 3 USAF ITAG SC R MTICSNM A Y -r AIR WIATHER SIVICEI"AC 1)ohl STALLION 3119 wa Augp&p) E’ STATION STATION NAME ERP G NIONT. T...D ATA PROCESSING BRANCH RLTVoA, PO~l~tN SaA *CNRELATIVE HUMIDITY 3 ETAC/USAF ; G AI|R WEATHER SERVICI/MAC a i $TALLIIIN SITE NM _ _7_

  7. Fort Huachuca, Libby AAF, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-22

    AAF AZ 61-70 APP STATION STATIOq NA&W YEARS UNCT PAGE 1 0900-1100 MsI" IL. S. T.) T..p.WET &ULD TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL I TTL "/ 0 1-2 53 -6 I 9...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY P2 AP WEATHER SERVICE/"AC 722730 FT MUACI4UCA/LhSU VLAF AZ 6-0JUL 19 PAGE 1 c90o-11jo WET WULM TUMPERATUItE DEPRESION (P) _____TOTAL...STATIO’ STATION NAME YEARS MO.T. PAGE 1 09S0-11anHO0URS L. S. T.) WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL ( (Fl 0 1-2 3.4 5.6 It7.8 10 11112 13

  8. Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-25

    5s7 4.1 6.3 * .1 17,’ Wp SSE 1.6 1,3 2.3 .3 .0 _,.__6,2 S , a4 o3 4,_ 2 SSW .3 . .1 .4 3.6 SIN ,4 ,2 *2 @1 .7I 5,9 wSW ,i . 2 1, Q .1 6 5,4 w o...7ESE I~ lE 4.3 . 7’,.4 , SE 3el 7 a ’W 1.5 17.7 7 SSE ’, 1.0 .9 c3 -;-7 o s ,6 1.3 1.2 ___ _2T SIN 26 ,4 s,3 1’,4 4,5 WSW #1 .4 .1 .3 _ _.9 w *,1 .1 l...3766 SFP SA,- SITAn SAt& V... N0M1m ALL WEATHER 0000-0200 CLASS NOCUSS L.S.t.I SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 3 4. 6 7- 10 j 11 - 16 17. 21 22.27 28-33 34.40 41 .47

  9. U-Tapao RTNAS, Thailand. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-26

    VISIBILITY AIR NEA T ,+IR 5ERVILF/MAC 4 1(TA12A ; - AB THAILAN,1 66-71 ICT PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE ALL (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 17.5’ 37.5 37.5...8217EAT- Elt ,F VTCF/!A( 4 1(12:4 J-TAPAii AB THAILANO 67-72 oAR PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE 18Ŕ-2000 FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 84 .6 85.4 85.4 86

  10. Hector Apt, Fargo, North Dakota. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-11

    Supervisor for further instructions. - U~rF-ETAC/3)5-& /Of DOCUMENT IDENIFICATION /1J I D UxImON STATEMEN A-Approved for public release; Distribution...precipitation my be reported in the same observation, the sums of the individual categories my exceed the percentages of the observations with precip. Fog ...Included are fog , ice fog , and ground fog . Smoke and/or haze - Occurrences of smoke, haze, or combinations of smoke and haze are included. Blowing snow

  11. Martin Marietta Airfield, Baltimore, Maryland. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-02

    PARTSI PRECIPITATION PSYCHROMITRIC-DRY VS WET IULS SNOWFALL M9EAN & SYD DIV SNOW DEPTH (DRY RLL, WIT SULD, & DEW POINT) PARKC SURFACE WINDSREAIEUM iT... WiT -;2.2 1 s94o76 97.o 9 7 ’n --47 . 9 8- -9.4 F9. 7 _ 45.8 7-,P 77,4 Ld1.( It, d.2 Tj,3 -u22 193 ,1L9 4 ,6 9 7 ,. 97,0 27,9 9Ao8 99.4(p0o TOTAL...Q b17 85,5 67,7 4o 89 89,4 89,9 89o8 69 R 9,8 89. 89,8 89,b-a 8 0 , l a " I .3 3 , 3 7 2 8 9 . 9 , 1. 9 1 . a 9 : 3 9 2 , . 9 2 , a . s 4 9 2 93

  12. Fritzsche AAF, Fort Ord, Salinas, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-02-17

    34 ,NW 363 1~~- - - . - NNW ___5 2.’- VARIL .... L U’ WSTOTA NUBE OF__ OBSERVATIONS _ ’ USAFETAC o 0.8.5 (OL-I) PR(vlous (Domo ns OF TI~lS FORM ARE...OBSERVATIONS 7 ,, *O t M~~~USAEOTAC u 0-14-5 (OL I) t VO$OTOSFH~~ ~(~,C.T 2,. 0 7 2- -. - 1 6 1 ’ tt. 4,954 9 .o6. 6 5 97 2 9 36-13’ TOTA NUBE ...o 6 9167 1 t " . 71 . > 0 4,91.4 :74 71 4 1 C3 ~ 915 909a TOA NUBE OF OBSRVTINS ’i4ii I n i m I .. ’ ’" ,,, , ,. . . . .. A. ~4i , DATA PROCESStI

  13. Volk FLD. Camp Douglas, Wisconsin. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-08-03

    TI~ HOa 9L.L 3, 6r NW Q 󈧞t s 95 1 .ON11 70 TOA NUBE Of OBSERVATIONS NNE 4 ~. - _ __ _ __ __ 4307 NE ~ j ~ -~~ __ ___1.8 ENAF ETA jv .±L 0-- - --1...34:.-++,,,. i Zt I 3M 240 0 07, 004 4. 4+ TOA NUBE OF OBERATON ,FORM USAF < TA -~ ,4 0-. (OW P +~ umc"s ,o +;.THIS ++ J:AAR & . t...34~~~- " , " -" 4 CAVA, -. , , .. 5,64 12 to, , + fi _ k JO NUBE Of OBSERVATIONS" • + . + *..,.+. ?. ,, ; ,.2 0 • ’-m A USAF~:,.’, ,ET.A+ 0--5OL1 "yt" mm o

  14. Norton AFB, San Bernardino, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-08

    j ~ ,) ______X_ TOA NUBE NW OBSERVATION-S__ VARUL _____ _____ I AAA_ -v_ 𔃾K; USAFTAC 044 0 85 (C. A tII,04J IOTL 4 0’ ~ FRM M 0411II RA 44? DATA...11.26 27.21 22.27 28.33 24.40 A?2.47 48.55 S6 %I WIND CDIR. I IIDEED SE 2. N 3 -L _____ - WNW ___ -4 1 ’I 1 TOTA NUBE 4,4SEYTIN ~ I ~ 4I 16 71 34 RIiA...9s o,,o n.t 10 0 I TOTAL- NUBE OF OBERAIOS--_- - 6 L A- - X’ Ř. ~’’ DATA PR.ICIESSING 9RiANCH USAF ETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIAIR WEAT’H.R SLPVICE/MAC

  15. Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-29

    98.6 98.899.9 TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS 930 SUSAF ETAC ’OR’ 0-14-5 (OL A) mmvtous mo. ,.s o fow Aif oSo mil 1’ + .: --. ’ --- U * - --..----.- t o...OCCURRENCE I 5.X-170C (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) t EING VISBIT.TY STATUTE MIL (E a>10 -6 >5 Z3 _2- .2 l _ 5 6 I - - 5 6 0 NOCEIIN’. 02 4c 4f64 4 t,41...8217 2: >- ""𔃻 1 > : 5’ > 16 > a >0 NOCH IN G ; I. -F5 .1 57.2 59.2 61.1 61.3 62.0 62.u 62.C1 >8000 A4.4 6 ;.t 63.1 6E.2 67.4 67.9 68.5 68. 6A.t, 68.7

  16. Bitburg Air Base, West Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-29

    UNIT NUMBERS Air Force Environmental Technical Apple Center Scott AFB IL 62225 It. SWOt ~ t g Ws ~g FICE NAME AND ADORESS IS REPORT DATE AiU ete evc MC...forms or from automated data collections for all Air Force operated stations. For those stations observing less than 24 hours per day, and where maxi ...for any column. Two tables of daily extremes are prepared: a. Exree maxi temperature E b. Extreme minimum temperature NOTE: The following symbols are

  17. Pyongtaek AB, Camp Humphries, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-20

    4! . NE j*4, I 5 )*T. ___ _ j"i "L "__ __ _ ’. . w 2 7 . .-T u, 9; .3. s.SSE’ _ A.4_ W W .I 4 . . .4 ,|, _,_... VABI SWTA NUBE Of OBSERVATIONS, .NC 7...SSE *L 19 1.󈨋 7.3 __ __ __ ~1 __.__ L IF__ t NW ._ IF .9! IF _ _ _ _ _._ _ _ _ _ WSW 1604 __F____9 Z F I r___ 7~. -. t WOTA NUBE OP OBERATON 12 4

  18. Bangor International/Dow AFB, Maine. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-06

    valid observations reported but no occurrences, zeros are given in the tables as follows: EXTREME DAILY PRECIPITATION ".00" equals none for the month...ceiling from zero to equal to or greater than 20,000 feet and as a separate class "no ceiling", versus visibility in 16 classes from zero t- equal to or...JAN STATION STATION NAME VEA.S C T . PAGE 1 120O-14G3 HOrAS , S. T.’ T .p. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESSION (F) TOTAL _ TOTAL (F) 0 1 3- -4 56 7 8 9- 10

  19. Relationship between Surface Urban Heat Island intensity and sensible heat flux retrieved from meteorological parameters observed by road weather stations in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawuć, Lech

    2017-04-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a direct consequence of altered energy balance in urban areas (Oke 1982). There has been a significant effort put into an understanding of air temperature variability in urban areas and underlying mechanisms (Arnfield 2003, Grimmond 2006, Stewart 2011, Barlow 2014). However, studies that are concerned on surface temperature are less frequent. Therefore, Voogt & Oke (2003) proposed term "Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI)", which is analogical to UHI and it is defined as a difference in land surface temperature (LST) between urban and rural areas. SUHI is a phenomenon that is not only concerned with high spatial variability, but also with high temporal variability (Weng and Fu 2014). In spite of the fact that satellite remote sensing techniques give a full spatial pattern over a vast area, such measurements are strictly limited to cloudless conditions during a satellite overpass (Sobrino et al., 2012). This significantly reduces the availability and applicability of satellite LST observations, especially over areas and seasons with high cloudiness occurrence. Also, the surface temperature is influenced by synoptic conditions (e.g., wind and humidity) (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). Hence, utilising single observations is not sufficient to obtain a full image of spatiotemporal variability of urban LST and SUHI intensity (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). One of the possible solutions would be a utilisation of time-series of LST data, which could be useful to monitor the UHI growth of individual cities and thus, to reveal the impact of urbanisation on local climate (Tran et al., 2006). The relationship between UHI and synoptic conditions have been summarised by Arnfield (2003). However, similar analyses conducted for urban LST and SUHI are lacking. We will present analyses of the relationship between time series of remotely-sensed LST and SUHI intensity and in-situ meteorological observations collected by road weather stations network, namely: road surface

  20. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) for Greater Pittsburgh IAP, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-09

    OBSERVATIONS! 6 2: 5 t~ A il 3. 1. t 1 ~cil- C, 3.3. 347 5.4 35. .󈧧.uc .0 - 5. h 3w.5-~*o~ jb ~;cc 11 ,,9 ~ 4 )i ~ ~ ~ A44 . 4 45 4* 4 44.4 4 5* 45.4...t, 4.6 2--.7 4*f *;., ->"f . .. . . . . .24 jb .0 3) _%; "_ :7 .4 $9.0 65.0 5.9 1l4 . e O, 11, 1 70 - .3 27 0 . 5 ’_ 89 9o 1 16.3 7j 9 9~ 4. .1 40.1...6 9 7 2 3 4 3 1 1 C 9 9 I _e_____32_15)L 6*426.1 921ily8 ! a A A 7IW~~tVY~ C, L T L LULLI -- --- I --- PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY G 7 .TT’ Jj PPITf

  1. Gray AAF, Fort Lewis, Lacey, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-23

    99.6Jjj 2 9, 1 99.199.09 10 TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS . . FOr USAFETAC ,Ś. 0-14-5 (OL 1) RtA0U$ tD fl0NSOFTK$ t APE OB$I(X/I .. " • ) ,;Tt...YEAP I I 2 MONTHS td 2𔃾 30 10 31 41~ 33 -02ro’. 4 3) 7 33 4 21 1( 1 -T.41 --Z4 +4 . - .. 17 2 -,-ś 29 3. 45 45 7 Z • 7 19 3Q 31 4 ’ 34 34 ?7 74 -- 1...01 3f ~ 3 1 2 .01 i L 1 -75/77 .2 I . 5e41 .01 76/ 79 o i 4’ 7 .6 7 i 0- .01f T 1 . .0-’- 7 7- 2 _ _ 10 k,72 71 1 1 44, <. ’).9 .to 2 46 2461-- ;s

  2. Robins AFB, Warner Robins, Georgia. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-31

    SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 138bo’) RtU3ItIS AFb GA 67-70P73-78 JUN STATIN STATION SATEq ITills MO4IT# ALL WEATIER 2100-2300 CLAIS TB l...a. 2 7 2 <_ tA 27.1 16 -mo r .N 0’ .993 549! 00 6005 60.0 0. 60. 60. 20000 3.45 60.1 63.) e6d6. 67.J 67. 467. 67*d 67o’ 67.e 67:~6. 7 7 0.6 55~ 1...62.7 2 62 20000 58.! 71. 72.󈧑 73.2 73 73 3, 73*91 73o 73.9 73. 73.9 739 7 , BOW’ 71 720 --- 74. 74t’ .V1 74 74o. 74., I I0058., 71.; 72,’ 73.9 741

  3. Nellis AFB, Las Vegas, Nevada, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Part A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-07

    l-l S __, led _ 5 z.._-- ’,3 , ,0 ’,0 0_0 _.0, SSW 1 1. 9 .1 L.s ,9 * # * 0 .0 6’*0_11,7 sw . IV . 9 Jj*0 .5 .2 *1 -4. 9,0 w_ _ .2; , * .0... COSTO IMEAN (KNIS) 1 .3 4.6 7. 10 11-16 17-21 22.27 28-33 34-40 41-.47 48 -55 :56 % WIND b DIR. -SPEED N ~ m A7 ., .. j 7 5-7 So__ -___ f___ NE 3 .0...OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) CEILINGVISIBILITY (STATUTE MILES) (FEET)I 10 ~ 6 : 4 3 21 ~ 2 aIi IV I Z:sA 2 1 1 /2 /6 2 0NO CELN - I -- 1870e 8705

  4. Sandhofen Germany/Coleman AAF. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-02-16

    TIPo OF TYPE of HT AlOVE ROU EAEU, ADOITIONAL ENiPIEWT, O 1REASON FOR CIANCE OCATION CHANCE LOCATIOR TRANSMITTER RECORDER CROUIO 5 iMar 62 Located on...3 4 6 7 𔃺 1 7 2 22 27 28 33 3 O & 4 4 0 NN 1, t 1 £4 As. OIZ * a" ’ 1 l 1i ki. .3 .I ,O!. ?, 1 NE .7t it 41 A96 E 1NE .9 . i A , pie 9 I so Il&9 ALI...1 NNW 91 jA i:~i _- - 139 _K66 -- -. CALM - ~r--- loe 331 202 .4 1. 2 , TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS -____- USAFETAC 0 8 5 (OL 1 1 PIE US ISU IC- IIE

  5. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Langen, Peter L.; Pálsson, Finnur; Mottram, Ruth; Gascoin, Simon; Björnsson, Helgi

    2017-07-01

    A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980-2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB). This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs) from the period 2001-2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995-2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995-2014) shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981-2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes currently not accounted for in RCMs

  6. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Schmidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980–2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB. This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs from the period 2001–2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995–2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995–2014 shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981–2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes

  7. Space weathering of asteroids: Lessons from Itokawa for future observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; HIroi, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Space weathering of surface silicate minerals is the main process that should control the change of brightness and color of airless silicate bodies such and the Moon, Mercury and asteroids. Spectra of S-type asteroids exhibit more overall depletion and reddening, and more weakening of absorption bands than spectra of ordinary chondrites. These spectral mismatches are explained by the space weathering, where the primary proven mechanism of such spectral change is production of nanophase metallic iron particles (npFe0) 1), which were confirmed in the amorphous rim of lunar soil grains 2,3). Vapor-deposition through at high-velocity dust particle impacts as well as implantation of intensive solar wind ions would be responsible for producing the space weathering rims bearing nano-iron particles (npFe0). Simulation experiments using nanosecond pulse laser successfully produced vapor-deposition type npFe0 to change optical properties 4,5,6). Laser experiments showed that pyroxene would be weathered less than olivine, for pyroxene, pulse laser irradiation produced melt (amorphous) droplets containing npFe0, rather than vapour deposited rim that should provide stronger optical effect trough multiple scattering of incidental light. Itokawa Observed by Remote Sensing In November 2005, Japanese Asteroid Sample Return Mission HAYABUSA spacecraft rendezvoused S-type asteroid (25143) Itokawa. Optically, the surface of Itokawa is divided into brighter (and bluer) areas and darker (and redder) areas 7,8). In rough zones, dark boulder-rich surfaces usually superpose on bright materials. The near-infrared spectrometer (NIRS) confirmed previous disk-integrated results that suggested Itokawa's spectrum closely matched a weakly weathered LL5/6 chondrite 9). Although the surface is covered with rocks and is apparently lack of fine regolith, Itokawa's surface show darkening and reddening by space weathering. Experimental results suggest rocky meteorite fragments can be

  8. Driver behaviour data linked with vehicle, weather, road surface, and daylight data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2017-02-01

    In this data set, vehicle observations have been linked to data containing weather and road surface conditions. A total of 311 908 observations are collected and classified in categories of precipitation type, road status information, and daylight condition. The data is collected for a long period of time, so that several different weather situations are present, ranging from dry summer to adverse winter weather conditions.

  9. Verification of Forecast Weather Surface Variables over Vietnam Using the National Numerical Weather Prediction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Du Duc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The national numerical weather prediction system of Vietnam is presented and evaluated. The system is based on three main models, namely, the Japanese Global Spectral Model, the US Global Forecast System, and the US Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The global forecast products have been received at 0.25- and 0.5-degree horizontal resolution, respectively, and the WRF model has been run locally with 16 km horizontal resolution at the National Center for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting using lateral conditions from GSM and GFS. The model performance is evaluated by comparing model output against observations of precipitation, wind speed, and temperature at 168 weather stations, with daily data from 2010 to 2014. In general, the global models provide more accurate forecasts than the regional models, probably due to the low horizontal resolution in the regional model. Also, the model performance is poorer for stations with altitudes greater than 500 meters above sea level (masl. For tropical cyclone performance validations, the maximum wind surface forecast from global and regional models is also verified against the best track of Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Finally, the model forecast skill during a recent extreme rain event in northeast Vietnam is evaluated.

  10. Evidence of Space Weathering Processes Across the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Blewett, David T.; Gaffey, Michael; Mittlefehldt, David W.; CristinaDeSanctis, Maria; Reddy, Vishnu; Coradini, Angioletta; Nathues, Andreas; Denevi, Brett W.; Li, Jian-Yang; hide

    2011-01-01

    As NASA s Dawn spacecraft explores the surface of Vesta, it has become abundantly clear that Vesta is like no other planetary body visited to date. Dawn is collecting global data at increasingly higher spatial resolution during its one-year orbital mission. The bulk properties of Vesta have previously been linked to the HED meteorites through remote mineral characterization of its surface from Earth-based spectroscopy. A principal puzzle has been why Vesta exhibits relatively unweathered diagnostic optical features compared to other large asteroids. Is this due to the composition of this proto-planet or the space environment at Vesta? Alteration or weathering of materials in space normally develops as the products of several processes accumulate on the surface or in an evolving particulate regolith, transforming the bedrock into fragmental material with properties that may be measurably different from the original. Data from Dawn reveal that the regolith of Vesta is exceptionally diverse. Regional surface units are observed that have not been erased by weathering with time. Several morphologically-fresh craters have excavated bright, mafic-rich materials and exhibit bright ray systems. Some of the larger craters have surrounding subdued regions (often asymmetric) that are lower in albedo and relatively red-sloped in the visible while exhibiting weaker mafic signatures. Several other prominent craters have rim exposures containing very dark material and/or display a system of prominent dark rays. Most, but not all, dark areas associated with craters exhibit significantly lower spectral contrast, suggesting that either a Vesta lithology with an opaque component has been exposed locally or that the surface has been contaminated by a relatively dark impactor. Similarly, most, but not all, bright areas associated with craters exhibit enhanced mafic signatures compared to surroundings. On a regional scale, the large south polar structure and surrounding terrain exhibit

  11. Automatic Classification of Offshore Wind Regimes With Weather Radar Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trombe, Pierre-Julien; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Weather radar observations are called to play an important role in offshore wind energy. In particular, they can enable the monitoring of weather conditions in the vicinity of large-scale offshore wind farms and thereby notify the arrival of precipitation systems associated with severe wind...... and amplitude) using reflectivity observations from a single weather radar system. A categorical sequence of most likely wind regimes is estimated from a wind speed time series by combining a Markov-Switching model and a global decoding technique, the Viterbi algorithm. In parallel, attributes of precipitation...... systems are extracted from weather radar images. These attributes describe the global intensity, spatial continuity and motion of precipitation echoes on the images. Finally, a CART classification tree is used to find the broad relationships between precipitation attributes and wind regimes...

  12. A comparison of all-weather land surface temperature products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joao; Trigo, Isabel F.; Ghilain, Nicolas; Goettche, Frank-M.; Ermida, Sofia; Olesen, Folke-S.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Arboleda, Alirio

    2017-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF, http://landsaf.ipma.pt) has been providing land surface temperature (LST) estimates using SEVIRI/MSG on an operational basis since 2006. The LSA-SAF service has since been extended to provide a wide range of satellite-based quantities over land surfaces, such as emissivity, albedo, radiative fluxes, vegetation state, evapotranspiration, and fire-related variables. Being based on infra-red measurements, the SEVIRI/MSG LST product is limited to clear-sky pixels only. Several all-weather LST products have been proposed by the scientific community either based on microwave observations or using Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models to fill the gaps caused by clouds. The goal of this work is to provide a nearly gap-free operational all-weather LST product and compare these approaches. In order to estimate evapotranspiration and turbulent energy fluxes, the LSA-SAF solves the surface energy budget for each SEVIRI pixel, taking into account the physical and physiological processes occurring in vegetation canopies. This task is accomplished with an adapted SVAT model, which adopts some formulations and parameters of the Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land (TESSEL) model operated at the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), and using: 1) radiative inputs also derived by LSA-SAF, which includes surface albedo, down-welling fluxes and fire radiative power; 2) a land-surface characterization obtained by combining the ECOCLIMAP database with both LSA-SAF vegetation products and the H(ydrology)-SAF snow mask; 3) meteorological fields from ECMWF forecasts interpolated to SEVIRI pixels, and 4) soil moisture derived by the H-SAF and LST from LSA-SAF. A byproduct of the SVAT model is surface skin temperature, which is needed to close the surface energy balance. The model skin temperature corresponds to the radiative temperature of the interface between soil and atmosphere

  13. Relating observations of contrail persistence to numerical weather analysis output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Duda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential for using high-resolution meteorological data from two operational numerical weather analyses (NWA to diagnose and predict persistent contrail formation is evaluated using two independent contrail observation databases. Contrail occurrence statistics derived from surface and satellite observations between April 2004 and June 2005 are matched to the humidity, vertical velocity, wind shear and atmospheric stability derived from analyses from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS models. The relationships between contrail occurrence and the NWA-derived statistics are analyzed to determine under which atmospheric conditions persistent contrail formation is favored within NWAs. Humidity is the most important factor determining whether contrails are short-lived or persistent, and persistent contrails are more likely to appear when vertical velocities are positive, and more likely to spread when the atmosphere is less stable. Although artificial upper limits on upper tropospheric humidity within the NWAs prevent a direct quantitative agreement of model data with contrail formation theory, logistic regression or similar statistical methods may improve the prediction of contrail occurrence.

  14. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xianai [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Duygu, E-mail: dkocaefe@uqac.ca [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Yasar [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Boluk, Yaman [University of Alberta, 3-142 Markin/CNRL Natural Resources Engineering Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2W2 (Canada); Krause, Cornelia [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigate detailed structural changes of heat-treated wood due to weathering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify connection between physical structural changes and chemical degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study effect of heat treatment conditions on weathering degradation process. - Abstract: Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  15. The National Eclipse Weather Experiment: an assessment of citizen scientist weather observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, L; Portas, A M; Gray, S L; Harrison, R G

    2016-09-28

    The National Eclipse Weather Experiment (NEWEx) was a citizen science project designed to assess the effects of the 20 March 2015 partial solar eclipse on the weather over the United Kingdom (UK). NEWEx had two principal objectives: to provide a spatial network of meteorological observations across the UK to aid the investigation of eclipse-induced weather changes, and to develop a nationwide public engagement activity-based participation of citizen scientists. In total, NEWEx collected 15 606 observations of air temperature, cloudiness and wind speed and direction from 309 locations across the UK, over a 3 h window spanning the eclipse period. The headline results were processed in near real time, immediately published online, and featured in UK national press articles on the day of the eclipse. Here, we describe the technical development of NEWEx and how the observations provided by the citizen scientists were analysed. By comparing the results of the NEWEx analyses with results from other investigations of the same eclipse using different observational networks, including measurements from the University of Reading's Atmospheric Observatory, we demonstrate that NEWEx provided a fair representation of the change in the UK meteorological conditions throughout the eclipse. Despite the simplicity of the approach adopted, robust reductions in both temperature and wind speed during the eclipse were observed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  16. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  17. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  18. NCDC Surface Weather Records Inventory - 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alphabetic listing by state of all the aviation, synoptic, supplementary airways, and similar observations on file at NCDC from the beginning of the record through...

  19. Mobile vehicle road and weather observation quality check methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Daniel Raymond

    data quality and accuracy, requiring the development of quality checks for mobile data collection. Using OBDII-equipped automobiles and mobile collection methods, we can begin to address issues of data quality by understanding, characterizing, and demonstrating the quality of mobile system observations from operational and research environments. Several forms of quality checking can be used, including range checks, Barnes spatial checks, comparing vehicle data to road weather models, and applying Clarus quality check methodologies and algorithms to mobile observations. Development of these quality checks can lead to the future integration of mobile data into the Clarus system, data implementation for improved forecasting, maintenance decision support, and traveler safety. This paper will discuss the benefits and challenges in mobile data collection, along with how the development and implementation of a system of quality checks will improve the quality and accuracy of mobile data collection.

  20. Weather Radar Adjustment Using Runoff from Urban Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Rasmussen, Michael Robdrup

    2017-01-01

    Weather radar data used for urban drainage applications are traditionally adjusted to point ground references, e.g., rain gauges. However, the available rain gauge density for the adjustment is often low, which may lead to significant representativeness errors. Yet, in many urban catchments......, rainfall is often measured indirectly through runoff sensors. This paper presents a method for weather radar adjustment on the basis of runoff observations (Z-Q adjustment) as an alternative to the traditional Z-R adjustment on the basis of rain gauges. Data from a new monitoring station in Aalborg......, Denmark, were used to evaluate the flow-based weather radar adjustment method against the traditional rain-gauge adjustment. The evaluation was performed by comparing radar-modeled runoff to observed runoff. The methodology was both tested on an events basis and multiple events combined. The results...

  1. Observational Simulation of Icing in Extreme Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew; Agelin-Chaab, Martin; Komar, John; Elfstrom, Garry; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2017-04-01

    Observations and prediction of icing in extreme weather conditions are important for aviation, transportation, and shipping applications, and icing adversely affects the economy. Icing environments can be studied either in the outdoor atmosphere or in the laboratory. There have been several aircraft based in-situ studies related to weather conditions affecting aviation operations, transportation, and marine shipping that includes icing, wind, and turbulence. However, studying severe weather conditions from aircraft observations are limited due to safety and sampling issues, instrumental uncertainties, and even the possibility of aircraft producing its own physical and dynamical effects. Remote sensing based techniques (e.g. retrieval techniques) for studying severe weather conditions represent usually a volume that cannot characterize the important scales and also represents indirect observations. Therefore, laboratory simulations of atmospheric processes can help us better understand the interactions among microphysical and dynamical processes. The Climatic Wind Tunnel (CWT) in ACE at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) has a large semi-open jet test chamber with flow area 7-13 m2 that can precisely control temperatures down to -40°C, and up to 250 km hr-1 wind speeds, for heavy or dry snow conditions with low visibility, similar to ones observed in the Arctic and cold climate regions, or at high altitude aeronautical conditions. In this study, the ACE CWT employed a spray nozzle array suspended in its settling chamber and fed by pressurized water, creating various particle sizes from a few microns up to mm size range. This array, together with cold temperature and high wind speed, enabled simulation of severe weather conditions, including icing, visibility, strong wind and turbulence, ice fog and frost, freezing fog, heavy snow and blizzard conditions. In this study, the test results will be summarized, and their application to aircraft

  2. Jovian magnetospheric weathering of Europa's nonice surface material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, Charles A.; Paranicas, Christopher; Blaney, Diana L.; Murchie, Scott; Seelos, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Jovian plasma and energetic charged particles bombard the Galilean satellites. These satellites vary from volcanically active (Io) to a nearly primordial surface (Callisto). These satellites are imbedded in a harsh and complex particle radiation environment that weathers their surfaces, and thus are virtual laboratories for understanding how particle bombardment alters the surfaces of airless bodies. Europa orbits deeply in the Jovian radiation belts and may have an active surface, where space weathering and geologic processes can interact in complex ways with a range of timescales. At Europa's surface temperature of 80K to 130K, the hydrated nonice material and to a lesser extent, water ice, will be thermally stable over geologic times and will exhibit the effects of weathering. The ice on the surface of Europa is amorphous and contains trace products such as H2O2 [1] due to weathering. The nonice material, which likely has an endogenic component [2] may also be partially amorphous and chemically altered as a result of being weathered by electrons, Iogenic sulfur, or other agents [3]. This hydrated salt or frozen brine likely compositionally 'matures' over time as the more weakly bound constituents are preferentially removed compared with Ca and Mg [4]. Electron bombardment induces chemical reactions through deposition of energy (e.g., ionizations) possibly explaining some of the nonice material's redness [5,6]. Concurrently, micrometeroid gardening mixes the upper surface burying weathered and altered material while exposing both fresh material and previous altered material, potentially with astrobiological implications. Our investigation of the spectral alteration of nonice analog materials irradiated by 10s keV electrons demonstrates the prevalence of this alteration and we discuss relevance to potential measurements by the Europa MISE instrument.References: [1] Moore, M. and R. Hudson, (2000), Icarus, 145, 282-288; [2] McCord et al., (1998), Science, 280, 1242

  3. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Krause, Cornélia

    2013-01-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  4. Technique for observation derived boundary conditions for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Paolo; Mackay, Duncan; Yeates, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate modelling technique suitable for the next generation of Space Weather predictive tools. Specifically, we put forward an approach that can provide interplanetary Space Weather forecasting models with an accurate time dependent boundary condition of erupting flux ropes in the upper Solar Corona. The unique strength of this technique is that it follows the time evolution of coronal magnetic fields directly driven from observations and captures the full life span of magnetic flux ropes from formation to ejection. To produce accurate and effective boundary conditions we couple two different modelling techniques, MHD simulations with quasi-static non-potential modelling. Our modelling approach uses a time series of observed synoptic magnetograms to drive the non-potential evolution model of the coronal magnetic field to follow the formation and loss of equilibrium of magnetic flux ropes. Following this a MHD simulation captures the dynamic evolution of the ejection phase of the flux rope into interplanetary space. We focus here on the MHD simulation that describes the ejection of two magnetic flux ropes through the solar corona to the outer boundary. At this boundary we then produce time dependent boundary conditions for the magnetic field and plasma that in the future may be applied to interplanetary space weather prediction models. We illustrate that the coupling of observationally derived quasi-static non-potential magnetic field modelling and MHD simulations can significantly reduce the computational time for producing realistic observationally derived boundary conditions at the boundary between the corona and interplanetary space.

  5. On the dual nature of lichen-induced rock surface weathering in contrasting micro-environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Gonçalves, João; Oliveira, Cláudia; Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Paz-Bermúdez, Graciela; Almeida, Rubim; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-10-01

    Contradictory evidence from biogeomorphological studies has increased the debate on the extent of lichen contribution to differential rock surface weathering in both natural and cultural settings. This study, undertaken in Côa Valley Archaeological Park, aimed at evaluating the effect of rock surface orientation on the weathering ability of dominant lichens. Hyphal penetration and oxalate formation at the lichen-rock interface were evaluated as proxies of physical and chemical weathering, respectively. A new protocol of pixel-based supervised image classification for the analysis of periodic acid-Schiff stained cross-sections of colonized schist revealed that hyphal spread of individual species was not influenced by surface orientation. However, hyphal spread was significantly higher in species dominant on northwest facing surfaces. An apparently opposite effect was noticed in terms of calcium oxalate accumulation at the lichen-rock interface; it was detected by Raman spectroscopy and complementary X-ray microdiffraction on southeast facing surfaces only. These results suggest that lichen-induced physical weathering may be most severe on northwest facing surfaces by means of an indirect effect of surface orientation on species abundance, and thus dependent on the species, whereas lichen-induced chemical weathering is apparently higher on southeast facing surfaces and dependent on micro-environmental conditions, giving only weak support to the hypothesis that lichens are responsible for the currently observed pattern of rock-art distribution in Côa Valley. Assumptions about the drivers of open-air rock-art distribution patterns elsewhere should also consider the micro-environmental controls of lichen-induced weathering, to avoid biased measures of lichen contribution to rock-art deterioration.

  6. Global cloud climatology from surface observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Surface weather observations from stations on land and ships in the ocean are used to obtain the global distribution, at 5{sup o}x5{sup o} latitude-longitude resolution, of total cloud cover and the average amounts of the different cloud types: cumulus, cumulonimbus, stratus, stratocumulus, nimbostratus, altostratus, altocumulus, cirrus, cirrostratus, cirrocumulus, and fog. Diurnal and seasonal variations are derived, as well as interannual variations and multi-year trends. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Space Weathering of the Lunar Surface by Solar Wind Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsoo S.; Sim, Chaekyung

    2017-08-01

    The lunar regolith is space-weathered to a different degree in response to the different fluxes of incident solar wind particles and micrometeoroids. Crater walls, among other slating surfaces, are good tracers of the space-weathering process because they mature differently depending on the varying incident angles of weathering agents. We divide a crater wall into four quadrants (north, south, east, and west) and analyze the distribution of 950-nm/750-nm reflectance-ratio and 750-nm reflectance values in each wall quadrant, using the topography-corrected images by Multispectral Imager (MI) onboard SELENE (Kaguya). For thousands of impact craters across the Moon, we interpret the spectral distributions in the four wall quadrants in terms of the space weathering by solar wind particles and micrometeoroids and of gardening by meteroids. We take into account the solar-wind shielding by the Earth’s magnetotail to correctly assess the different spectral behaviors between east- and west-facing walls of the craters in the near-side of the Moon.

  8. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  9. A weather type method to study surface ocean variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M.; Camus, P.; Mendez, F. J.; Losada, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    The set of methodologies for obtaining wave climate information at high spatial resolution from relatively coarse resolution is known as downscaling. Dynamic downscaling, based on the use of numerical models, is perhaps the most widely used methodology for surface ocean variables. An alternative approach is the statistical downscaling, that can be conducted by means of regression methods or weather pattern-based approaches. The main advantages of the statistical downscaling based on weather patterns are: the low computational requirements; the ease of implementation; the additional climatology information; and local forecast application. Moreover, this technique allows exploring the synoptic atmospheric climatology and their relationship with surface ocean variables. It is well known nowadays that the seasonal-to-interannual variability of wave climate is linked to the atmosphere circulation patterns. We proposed a statistical approach based on the predictand (eg. local wave characteristics) is associated to a particular synoptic-scale weather type (predictor). The predictor is the n-days-averaged sea level pressure field (SLP) anomalies, which are synthesized using data mining techniques to describe a number of weather types. In particular, we focus in NE Atlantic (NAO region) using as predictor the 3-days-averaged SLP fields calculated by NCEP atmospheric reanalysis (1948-2010). A principal component analysis is applied over SLP fields to reduce the spatial and temporal dimensions. The K-means clustering technique is then applied to the two-dimensional sample of the principal components which explain more than 95% variance of the SLP. The K-means technique divides the data space into a number of clusters, where each of them is characterized by a centroid and formed by the data for which the centroid is the nearest. Finally, we visualize the weather types associated to each centroid in an ordered way similar to self-organizing maps, SOMs. The probability

  10. Near Real Time MISR Wind Observations for Numerical Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, K. J.; Protack, S.; Rheingans, B. E.; Hansen, E. G.; Jovanovic, V. M.; Baker, N.; Liu, J.; Val, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) project, in association with the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC), has this year adapted its original production software to generate near-real time (NRT) cloud-motion winds as well as radiance imagery from all nine MISR cameras. These products are made publicly available at the ASDC with a latency of less than 3 hours. Launched aboard the sun-synchronous Terra platform in 1999, the MISR instrument continues to acquire near-global, 275 m resolution, multi-angle imagery. During a single 7 minute overpass of any given area, MISR retrieves the stereoscopic height and horizontal motion of clouds from the multi-angle data, yielding meso-scale near-instantaneous wind vectors. The ongoing 15-year record of MISR height-resolved winds at 17.6 km resolution has been validated against independent data sources. Low-level winds dominate the sampling, and agree to within ±3 ms-1 of collocated GOES and other observations. Low-level wind observations are of particular interest to weather forecasting, where there is a dearth of observations suitable for assimilation, in part due to reliability concerns associated with winds whose heights are assigned by the infrared brightness temperature technique. MISR cloud heights, on the other hand, are generated from stereophotogrammetric pattern matching of visible radiances. MISR winds also address data gaps in the latitude bands between geostationary satellite coverage and polar orbiting instruments that obtain winds from multiple overpasses (e.g. MODIS). Observational impact studies conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and by the German Weather Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst) have both demonstrated forecast improvements when assimilating MISR winds. An impact assessment using the GEOS-5 system is currently in progress. To benefit air quality forecasts, the MISR project is currently investigating the feasibility of generating near-real time aerosol products.

  11. Widespread Weathered Glass on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Briony; Bell, James F., III

    2012-01-01

    Low albedo sediments cover >10(exp 7) sq km in the northern lowlands of Mars, but the composition and origin of these widespread deposits have remained ambiguous despite many previous investigations. Here we use near-infrared spectra acquired by the Mars Express OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activite') imaging spectrometer to show that these sediments exhibit spectral characteristics that are consistent with both high abundances of iron-bearing glass and silica-enriched leached rinds on glass. This interpretation is supported by observations of low-albedo soil grains with possible rinds at the Phoenix Mars Lander landing site in the northern lowlands. By comparison with the extensive glass-rich dune fields and sand sheets of Iceland, we propose an explosive volcanic origin for these glass-rich sediments. We also propose that the glassy remnant rinds on the sediments are the result of post-depositional alteration, as these rinds are commonly formed in arid terrestrial volcanic environments during water-limited, moderately acidic leaching. These weathered, glass-rich deposits in the northern lowlands are also colocated with the strongest concentrations of a major global compositional surface type previously identified in mid-infrared spectra, suggesting that they may be representative of global processes. Our results provide potential confirmation of models suggesting that explosive volcanism has been widespread on Mars, and also raise the possibilities that glass-rich volcaniclastics are a major source of eolian sand on Mars and that widespread surficial aqueous alteration has occurred under Amazonian climatic conditions.

  12. The Potential for Observing African Weather with GNSS Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan A. Isioye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared to the wide range of atmospheric sensing techniques, global navigation satellite system (GNSS offers the advantage of operating under all weather conditions, is continuous, with high temporal and spatial resolution and high accuracy, and has long-term stability. The utilisation of GNSS ground networks of continuous stations for operational weather and climate services is already in place in many nations in Europe, Asia, and America under different initiatives and organisations. In Africa, the situation appears to be different. The focus of this paper is to assess the conditions of the existing and anticipated GNSS reference network in the African region for meteorological applications. The technical issues related to the implementation of near-real-time (NRT GNSS meteorology are also discussed, including the data and network requirements for meteorological and climate applications. We conclude from this study that the African GNSS network is sparse in the north and central regions of the continent, with a dense network in the south and fairly dense network in the west and east regions of the continent. Most stations lack collocated meteorological sensors and other geodetic observing systems as called for by the GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN GNSS Precipitable Water Task Team and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. Preliminary results of calculated zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD from the African GNSS indicate spatial variability and diurnal dependence of ZTD. To improve the density and geometry of the existing network, countries are urged to contribute more stations to the African Geodetic Reference Frame (AFREF program and a collaborative scheme between different organisations maintaining different GNSS stations on the continent is recommended. The benefit of using spaced based GNSS radio occultation (RO data for atmospheric sounding is highlighted and filling of geographical gaps from the station-based observation

  13. Lightning Sensors for Observing, Tracking and Nowcasting Severe Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Severe and extreme weather is a major natural hazard all over the world, often resulting in major natural disasters such as hail storms, tornados, wind storms, flash floods, forest fires and lightning damages. While precipitation, wind, hail, tornados, turbulence, etc. can only be observed at close distances, lightning activity in these damaging storms can be monitored at all spatial scales, from local (using very high frequency [VHF] sensors), to regional (using very low frequency [VLF] sensors), and even global scales (using extremely low frequency [ELF] sensors). Using sensors that detect the radio waves emitted by each lightning discharge, it is now possible to observe and track continuously distant thunderstorms using ground networks of sensors. In addition to the number of lightning discharges, these sensors can also provide information on lightning characteristics such as the ratio between intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning, the polarity of the lightning discharge, peak currents, charge removal, etc. It has been shown that changes in some of these lightning characteristics during thunderstorms are often related to changes in the severity of the storms. In this paper different lightning observing systems are described, and a few examples are provided showing how lightning may be used to monitor storm hazards around the globe, while also providing the possibility of supplying short term forecasts, called nowcasting. PMID:27879700

  14. Lightning Sensors for Observing, Tracking and Nowcasting Severe Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin

    2008-01-21

    Severe and extreme weather is a major natural hazard all over the world, oftenresulting in major natural disasters such as hail storms, tornados, wind storms, flash floods,forest fires and lightning damages. While precipitation, wind, hail, tornados, turbulence,etc. can only be observed at close distances, lightning activity in these damaging stormscan be monitored at all spatial scales, from local (using very high frequency [VHF]sensors), to regional (using very low frequency [VLF] sensors), and even global scales(using extremely low frequency [ELF] sensors). Using sensors that detect the radio wavesemitted by each lightning discharge, it is now possible to observe and track continuouslydistant thunderstorms using ground networks of sensors. In addition to the number oflightning discharges, these sensors can also provide information on lightningcharacteristics such as the ratio between intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning, thepolarity of the lightning discharge, peak currents, charge removal, etc. It has been shownthat changes in some of these lightning characteristics during thunderstorms are oftenrelated to changes in the severity of the storms. In this paper different lightning observingsystems are described, and a few examples are provided showing how lightning may beused to monitor storm hazards around the globe, while also providing the possibility ofsupplying short term forecasts, called nowcasting.

  15. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  16. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  17. Tropical Ocean Surface Energy Balance Variability: Linking Weather to Climate Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Clayson, Carol Anne

    2013-01-01

    Radiative and turbulent surface exchanges of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variability of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. These fluxes are integral components to tropical ocean-atmosphere variability; they can drive ocean mixed layer variations and modify the atmospheric boundary layer properties including moist static stability, thereby influencing larger-scale tropical dynamics. Non-parametric cluster-based classification of atmospheric and ocean surface properties has shown an ability to identify coherent weather regimes, each typically associated with similar properties and processes. Using satellite-based observational radiative and turbulent energy flux products, this study investigates the relationship between these weather states and surface energy processes within the context of tropical climate variability. Investigations of surface energy variations accompanying intraseasonal and interannual tropical variability often use composite-based analyses of the mean quantities of interest. Here, a similar compositing technique is employed, but the focus is on the distribution of the heat and moisture fluxes within their weather regimes. Are the observed changes in surface energy components dominated by changes in the frequency of the weather regimes or through changes in the associated fluxes within those regimes? It is this question that the presented work intends to address. The distribution of the surface heat and moisture fluxes is evaluated for both normal and non-normal states. By examining both phases of the climatic oscillations, the symmetry of energy and water cycle responses are considered.

  18. Combining Solar Science and Asteroid Science with the Space Weather Observation Network (SWON)

    OpenAIRE

    Maiwald, Volker; Weiß, André; Jansen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The peculiarity of space weather for Earth orbiting satellites, air traffic and power grids on Earth and especially the financial and operational risks posed by damage due to space weather, underline the necessity of space weather observation. The importance of such observations is even more increasing due to the impending solar maximum. In recognition of this importance we propose a mission architecture for solar observation as an alternative to already published mission plans like Solar Pro...

  19. Observations and Impact Assessments of Extreme Space Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.

    2007-05-01

    "Space weather" refers to conditions on the Sun, in the solar wind, and in Earth`s magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Activity on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections can lead to high levels of radiation in space and can cause major magnetic storms at the Earth. Space radiation can come as energetic particles or as electromagnetic emissions. Adverse conditions in the near-Earth space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids. This can lead to a variety of socioeconomic losses. Astronauts and airline passengers exposed to high levels of radiation are also at risk. Society`s vulnerability to space weather effects is an issue of increasing concern. We are dependent on technological systems that are becoming more susceptible to space weather disturbances. We also have a permanent human presence in space with the International Space Station and the President and NASA have expressed a desire to expand our human space activities with missions to the moon and Mars. This will make space weather of even greater concern in the future. In this talk I will describe many space weather effects and will describe some of the societal and economic impacts that extreme events have had.

  20. Forecasting New Hampshire Power Outages through the Analysis of Weather Station Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessenden, Ross T.

    Eversource Energy, formerly Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH), has worked closely with Plymouth State University (PSU) in the past, and present, to better predict weather-related power outage events and maximize the efficiency with which Eversource responds to them. This research paired weather data from thirteen stations throughout New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts with Eversource Trouble Report and Unsatisfactory Performance of Equipment Report (TRUPER) data in an effort to quantify weather situations that lead to power outages. The ultimate goal involved developing a predictive model that uses weather data to forecast the magnitude of power outages. The study focused on the Eversource Western/Central service territory and utilized data from 2006-2010. The first four years, 2006-2009, were analyzed using Classification and Regression Tree (CART) statistical analysis. The results of this CART analysis trained a predictive model, while the fifth year, 2010, served as the testing set for the predictive model. To conduct the statistical analysis, a database was created pairing TRUPER reports with the closest available hourly weather observations. The database included nine weather variables matched with three variables from the TRUPER data: 1) customers, 2) customer minutes, and 3) outage duration. While the entire Eversource service territory saw 91,286 TRUPERs from 2006-2010, the Western/Central service territory, the focus of this study, accounted for 29,430. Before conducting the CART analysis, correlations between single weather variables and TRUPER data were calculated and, in general, proved xi weak. In addition to analyzing the complete four-year training data set, many portions/variations of the data set were analyzed. The analyses included a yearly analysis, time lag analysis, cold/warm-season analysis, and a single-station analysis. Although individual years and smaller data sets showed moderately higher correlations between weather and outage

  1. The impact of synoptic weather on UK surface ozone and implications for premature mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, R. J.; Butt, E. W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Doherty, R. M.; Fenech, S.; Schmidt, A.; Arnold, S. R.; Savage, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollutants, such as ozone, have adverse impacts on human health and cause, for example, respiratory and cardiovascular problems. In the United Kingdom (UK), peak surface ozone concentrations typically occur in the spring and summer and are controlled by emission of precursor gases, tropospheric chemistry and local meteorology which can be influenced by large-scale synoptic weather regimes. In this study we composite surface and satellite observations of summer-time (April to September) ozone under different UK atmospheric circulation patterns, as defined by the Lamb weather types. Anticyclonic conditions and easterly flows are shown to significantly enhance ozone concentrations over the UK relative to summer-time average values. Anticyclonic stability and light winds aid the trapping of ozone and its precursor gases near the surface. Easterly flows (NE, E, SE) transport ozone and precursor gases from polluted regions in continental Europe (e.g. the Benelux region) to the UK. Cyclonic conditions and westerly flows, associated with unstable weather, transport ozone from the UK mainland, replacing it with clean maritime (North Atlantic) air masses. Increased cloud cover also likely decrease ozone production rates. We show that the UK Met Office regional air quality model successfully reproduces UK summer-time ozone concentrations and ozone enhancements under anticyclonic and south-easterly conditions for the summer of 2006. By using established ozone exposure-health burden metrics, anticyclonic and easterly condition enhanced surface ozone concentrations pose the greatest public health risk.

  2. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  3. Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Planetary Mission Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We often look "through a glass, darkly" at solar system bodies with tenuous atmospheres and direct surface exposure to the local space environment. Space weathering exposure acts via universal space-surface interaction processes to produce a thin patina of outer material covering, potentially obscuring endogenic surface materials of greatest interest for understanding origins and interior evolution. Examples of obscuring exogenic layers are radiation crusts on cometary nuclei and iogenic components of sulfate hydrate deposits on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. Weathering processes include plasma ion implantation into surfaces, sputtering by charged particles and solar ultraviolet photons, photolytic chemistry driven by UV irradiation, and radiolytic chemistry evolving from products of charged particle irradiation. Regolith structure from impacts, and underlying deeper structures from internal evolution, affects efficacy of certain surface interactions, e.g. sputtering as affected by porosity and surface irradiation dosage as partly attenuated by local topographic shielding. These processes should be regarded for mission science planning as potentially enabling, e.g. since direct surface sputtering, and resultant surface-bound exospheres, can provide in-situ samples of surface composition to ion and neutral mass spectrometers on orbital spacecraft. Sample return for highest sensitivity compOSitional and structural analyses at Earth will usually be precluded by limited range of surface sampling, long times for return, and high cost. Targeted advancements in instrument technology would be more cost efficient for local remote and in-situ sample analysis. More realistic laboratory simulations, e.g. for bulk samples, are needed to interpret mission science observations of weathered surfaces. Space environment effects on mission spacecraft and science operations must also be specified and mitigated from the hourly to monthly changes in space weather and from longer

  4. Geomorphic controls on mineral weathering, elemental transport, and production of mineral surface area in a schist bedrock weathering profile, Piedmont Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenell, B.; Yoo, K.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Mahoney, J. B.; Lepak, L.

    2013-12-01

    We assess a deep chemical weathering profile in the context of geomorphic evolution in the Laurels Schist, a late proterozoic greenschist formation in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory located in the Piedmont region in southeastern Pennsylvania. Two 21-meter deep rotosonic drill cores were sampled at the ridge top and footslope positions in a first-order, forested watershed. The top meter was sampled at high-resolution in a soil pit adjacent to each drill core and along a hillslope transect to assess geomorphic controls on the weathering profile. Weathering processes in soil and saprolite were examined by observing changes in mineralogy, including the emergence of secondary phyllosilicate and oxide minerals; measuring specific surface area of bulk soil and saprolite; and by quantifying elemental mass changes of major and minor rock-forming elements. Mineral profiles were assessed using clay and bulk XRD, and reveal that kaolinite, a common secondary phyllosilicate, is present above 1.5 meters in the weathering profile. Specific surface area (SSA) values decrease with increasing depth to a critical depth around 2 meters, where the values of untreated (carbon-loaded) and muffled (carbon removed by heating) mineral grains converge to baseline SSA values below 10 m2g-1, indicating that carbon is sorbed with mineral surface area in the upper 2 meters. Immobile element concentrations decrease with increasing depth up to 3 meters, indicating that the preferential removal of mobile elements extends beyond the depth of C-mineral adsorption. Variability of immobile elements in the deep weathering profile reveal variations that could be the result of weathering in fractures but are more likely inherited by the rock composition and particle size of pre-metamorphosed parent rock.

  5. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

  6. Spectral properties of Titan's impact craters imply chemical weathering of its surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. W.; Sotin, C.; MacKenzie, S.; Soderblom, J. M.; Le Mouélic, S.; Kirk, R. L.; Stiles, B. W.; Malaska, M. J.; Le Gall, A.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We examined the spectral properties of a selection of Titan's impact craters that represent a range of degradation states. The most degraded craters have rims and ejecta blankets with spectral characteristics that suggest that they are more enriched in water ice than the rims and ejecta blankets of the freshest craters on Titan. The progression is consistent with the chemical weathering of Titan's surface. We propose an evolutionary sequence such that Titan's craters expose an intimate mixture of water ice and organic materials, and chemical weathering by methane rainfall removes the soluble organic materials, leaving the insoluble organics and water ice behind. These observations support the idea that fluvial processes are active in Titan's equatorial regions. PMID:27656006

  7. An Integrated Management System of Multipoint Space Weather Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Watanabe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An outline of a planned system for the global space-weather monitoring network of NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology is given. This system can manage data collection much more easily than our current system by installations of autonomous recovery, periodical state monitoring, and dynamic warning procedures. According to a provisional experiment using a network simulator, the new system will work under limited network conditions, e.g., a 160 msec delay, a 10 % packet loss rate, and a 500 Kbps bandwidth.

  8. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroid Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominque, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Schriver, David; hide

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the composition of Mercury's crust is key to comprehending the formation of the planet. The regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered via a set of space weathering processes. These processes are the same set of mechanisms that work to form Mercury's exosphere, and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The alterations need to be understood in order to determine the initial crustal compositions. The complex interrelationships between Mercury's exospheric processes, the space environment, and surface composition are examined and reviewed. The processes are examined in the context of our understanding of these same processes on the lunar and asteroid regoliths. Keywords: Mercury (planet) Space weathering Surface processes Exosphere Surface composition Space environment 3

  9. Indication of insensitivity of planetary weathering behavior and habitable zone to surface land fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Abbot, Dorian S; Ciesla, Fred J

    2012-01-01

    It is likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences planetary weathering behavior. This is important because the silicate weathering feedback determines the width of the habitable zone in space and time. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate, useful for gaining qualitative understanding, is developed to examine climate evolution for planets of various land-ocean fractions. It is pointed out that, if seafloor weathering does not depend directly on surface temperature, there can be no weathering-climate feedback on a waterworld. This would dramatically narrow the habitable zone of a waterworld. Results from our model indicate that weathering behavior does not depend strongly on land fraction for partially ocean-covered planets. This is powerful because it suggests that previous habitable zone theory is robust to changes in land fraction, as long as there is some land. F...

  10. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind ion irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are widely known to alter the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies.

  11. Impact of various observing systems on weather analysis and forecast over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Ojha, Satya P.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the potential impact of various types of data on weather forecast over the Indian region, a set of data-denial experiments spanning the entire month of July 2012 is executed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system. The experiments are designed to allow the assessment of mass versus wind observations and terrestrial versus space-based instruments, to evaluate the relative importance of the classes of conventional instrument such as radiosonde, and finally to investigate the role of individual spaceborne instruments. The moist total energy norm is used for validation and forecast skill assessment. The results show that the contribution of wind observations toward error reduction is larger than mass observations in the short range (48 h) forecast. Terrestrial-based observations generally contribute more than space-based observations except for the moisture fields, where the role of the space-based instruments becomes more prevalent. Only about 50% of individual instruments are found to be beneficial in this experiment configuration, with the most important role played by radiosondes. Thereafter, Meteosat Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) (only for short range forecast) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) are second and third, followed by surface observations, Sounder for Probing Vertical Profiles of Humidity (SAPHIR) radiances and pilot observations. Results of the additional experiments of comparative performance of SSM/I total precipitable water (TPW), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and SAPHIR radiances indicate that SSM/I is the most important instrument followed by SAPHIR and MHS for improving the quality of the forecast over the Indian region. Further, the impact of single SAPHIR instrument (onboard Megha-Tropiques) is significantly larger compared to three MHS instruments (onboard NOAA-18/19 and MetOp-A).

  12. Meteorological observations from Dauphin Island Sea Lab Weather Station 1974-1997 (NCEI Accession 0156662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DISL Weather Station collected twice daily meteorological observations at the east end of Dauphin Island, Alabama (30 degrees 14' 57" N, 88 degrees 04' 38" W)...

  13. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  14. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroidal Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark. R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Schriver, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Blewett, David T.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Ho, George C.; Ebel, Denton S.; Nittler, Larry R.; Vilas, Faith; Pieters, Carle M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M..; Helbert, Jorn; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Weider, Shoshana Z.; Mouawad, Nelly; Izenberg, Noam R.; McClintock, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury's regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered by a set of space weathering processes. Before we can interpret crustal composition, it is necessary to understand the nature of these surface alterations. The processes that space weather the surface are the same as those that form Mercury's exosphere (micrometeoroid flux and solar wind interactions) and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of a global magnetic field. To comprehend how space weathering acts on Mercury's regolith, an understanding is needed of how contributing processes act as an interactive system. As no direct information (e.g., from returned samples) is available about how the system of space weathering affects Mercury's regolith, we use as a basis for comparison the current understanding of these same processes on lunar and asteroidal regoliths as well as laboratory simulations. These comparisons suggest that Mercury's regolith is overturned more frequently (though the characteristic surface time for a grain is unknown even relative to the lunar case), more than an order of magnitude more melt and vapor per unit time and unit area is produced by impact processes than on the Moon (creating a higher glass content via grain coatings and agglutinates), the degree of surface irradiation is comparable to or greater than that on the Moon, and photon irradiation is up to an order of magnitude greater (creating amorphous grain rims, chemically reducing the upper layers of grains to produce nanometer scale particles of metallic iron, and depleting surface grains in volatile elements and alkali metals). The processes that chemically reduce the surface and produce nanometer-scale particles on Mercury are suggested to be more effective than similar processes on the Moon. Estimated abundances of nanometer-scale particles can account for Mercury's dark surface relative to that of the Moon without requiring macroscopic grains of opaque minerals. The presence of

  15. The role of SANSA's geomagnetic observation network in space weather monitoring: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, P. B.; Cilliers, P. J.; Sutcliffe, P. R.

    2015-10-01

    Geomagnetic observations play a crucial role in the monitoring of space weather events. In a modern society relying on the efficient functioning of its technology network such observations are important in order to determine the potential hazard for activities and infrastructure. Until recently, it was the perception that geomagnetic storms had no or very little adverse effect on radio communication and electric power infrastructure at middle- and low-latitude regions like southern Africa. The 2003 Halloween storm changed this perception. In this paper we discuss the role of the geomagnetic observation network operated by the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) in space weather monitoring. The primary objective is to describe the geomagnetic data sets available to characterize and monitor the various types of solar-driven disturbances, with the aim to better understand the physics of these processes in the near-Earth space environment and to provide relevant space weather monitoring and prediction.

  16. Sustainable Arctic observing network for predicting weather extremes in mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, J.; Sato, K.; Yamazaki, A.

    2016-12-01

    Routine atmospheric observations within and over the Arctic Ocean are very expensive and difficult to conduct because of factors such as logistics and the harsh environment. Nevertheless, the great benefit of such observations is their contribution to an improvement of skills of weather predictions over the Arctic and mid-latitudes. The Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) from mid-2017 to mid-2019 proposed by the World Weather Research Programme - Polar Prediction Project (WWRP-PPP) would be the best opportunity to address the issues. The combination of observations and data assimilation is an effective way to understand the predictability of weather extremes in mid-latitudes. This talk presents the current activities related to PPP based on international special radiosonde observing network in the Arctic, and challenges toward YOPP. Comparing with summer and winter cases, the additional observations over the Arctic during winter were more effective for improving the predicting skills of weather extremes because the impact of the observations would be carried toward the mid-latitudes by the stronger jet stream and its frequent meanderings. During summer, on the other hand, the impact of extra observations was localized over the Arctic region but still important for precise weather forecasts over the Arctic Ocean, contributing to safe navigation along the Northern Sea Route. To consolidate the sustainable Arctic radiosonde observing network, increasing the frequency of observations at Arctic coastal stations, instead of commissioning special observations from ships and ice camps, would be a feasible way. In fact, several existing stations facing the Arctic Ocean have already increased the frequency of observations during winter and/or summer.

  17. A study on the integrity and authentication of weather observation data using Identity Based Encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Woo; Lee, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Weather information provides a safe working environment by contributing to the economic activity of the nation, and plays role of the prevention of natural disasters, which can cause large scaled casualties and damage of property. Especially during times of war, weather information plays a more important role than strategy, tactics and information about trends of the enemy. Also, it plays an essential role for the taking off and landing of fighter jet and the sailing of warships. If weather information, which plays a major role in national security and economy, gets misused for cyber terrorism resulting false weather information, it could be a huge threat for national security and the economy. We propose a plan to safely transmit the measured value from meteorological sensors through a meteorological telecommunication network in order to guarantee the confidentiality and integrity of the data despite cyber-attacks. Also, such a plan allows one to produce reliable weather forecasts by performing mutual authentication through authentication devices. To make sure of this, one can apply an Identity Based Signature to ensure the integrity of measured data, and transmit the encrypted weather information with mutual authentication about the authentication devices. There are merits of this research: It is not necessary to manage authentication certificates unlike the Public Key Infrastructure methodology, and it provides a powerful security measure with the capability to be realized in a small scale computing environment, such as the meteorological observation system due to the low burden on managing keys.

  18. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  19. An integrated user-oriented weather forecast system for air traffic using real-time observations and model data

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Caroline; Tafferner, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the Weather Forecast User-oriented System Including Object Nowcasting (WxFUSION), an integrated weather forecast system for air traffic. The system is currently under development within a new project named “Weather and Flying” under the leadership of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IPA) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). WxFUSION aims at combining data from various sources, as there are weather observations, remote sensing, nowcasting and numerical model forecast ...

  20. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  1. Ground effects of space weather investigated by the surface impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, R.; Boteler, D.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a discussion of the surface impedance applicable in connection with studies of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological systems. This viewpoint means that the surface impedance is regarded as a tool to determine the horizontal (geo)electric field at the Earth's surface, which is the key quantity for GIC. Thus the approach is different from the traditional magnetotelluric viewpoint. The definition of the surface impedance usually involves wavenumber-frequency-domain fields, so inverse Fourier transforming the expression of the electric field in terms of the surface impedance and the geomagnetic field results in convolution integrals in the time and space domains. The frequency-dependent surface impedance has a high-pass filter character whereas the corresponding transfer function between the electric field and the time derivative of the magnetic field is of a low-pass filter type. The relative change of the latter transfer function with frequency is usually smaller than that of the surface impedance, which indicates that the geoelectric field is closer to the time derivative than to the magnetic field itself. An investigation of the surface impedance defined by the space-domain electric and magnetic components indicates that the largest electric fields are not always achieved by the plane wave assumption, which is sometimes regarded as an extreme case for GIC. It is also concluded in this paper that it is often possible to apply the plane wave relation locally between the surface electric and magnetic fields. The absolute value of the surface impedance decreases with an increasing wavenumber although the maximum may also be at a non-zero value of the wavenumber. The imaginary part of the surface impedance usually much exceeds the real part.

  2. The influence of aspect on the biological weathering of granites: observations from the Kunlun Mountains, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin; Arocena, Joselito M.; Boelhouwers, Jan; Liping, Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Bedrock and boulder weathering in the higher elevation, permafrost areas of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau have usually been ascribed to frost action. For short periods during two summers, an attempt was made to better elucidate weathering processes in this region. A combination of visual observation coupled with rudimentary data regarding removable weathered material from the four cardinal aspects of granite boulders at elevations of 4600-5000 m in the Kunlun Mountains (Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau) showed that there was a distinct aspect influence (south>west>north>east) on weathering. It was also observed that there were aspect-constrained variations in chasmoendolithic communities and for lichen distribution. To further aid understanding, temperature data for the four aspects were collected for several weeks during the summers of 2 years, with data recording at 1-min intervals using ultraresponsive (0.05 s), high precision (0.1 °C), ultrasmall (0.15 mm diameter) thermocouples; humidity data were also collected at the rock face. Based on these data, an attempt is made to evaluate the nature of granite weathering in this region. To better understand what the impact of the lichens/endolithic communities was and how this varies, use is made of XRD and SEM analyses on samples from each aspect. In addition, iron-rich patinas were found on a number of the boulders, and these too were analyzed in an attempt to see their relationship (if any) to the biological action.

  3. Space weathering of asteroidal surfaces. Influence on the UV-Vis spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Baratta, G. A.; Garozzo, M.; Strazzulla, G.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The surfaces of airless bodies in the Solar System are continuously altered by the bombardment of micrometeoroids and irradiation by solar wind, flares, and cosmic particles. Major effects of this process - space weathering - are darkening and “reddening” of the spectra of surface materials, as well as a “degrading” of absorption features. Aims: We studied the changes induced by energetic ion irradiation in the ultraviolet-visual-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) (0.2-0.98 μm) reflectance spectra of targets selected to mimic the surfaces of airless bodies in the inner Solar System. Our chosen targets are olivine pellets, pure or covered by an organic polymer (polystyrene), which is transparent before irradiation. Polystyrene is used as a template for organic matter of low volatility that can be present on asteroidal surfaces. Moreover we measured the changes induced by ion irradiation in the absorption coefficient of the polymer. The purpose was to have a tool to better compare laboratory with observed spectra and distinguish between planetary objects with pure silicate surfaces and those whose surface is covered by organic matter exposed to cosmic ion bombardment. Methods: The samples were irradiated in vacuum, at room temperature, with 200 keV protons or 200-400 keV argon ions. Before, during, and after irradiation diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired. Polystyrene films were also deposited on quartz substrates and irradiated while transmittance spectra were recorded. Results: We measured the variations of the absorption coefficient of polystyrene as a function of ion fluence. We showed that after ion irradiation the diffuse reflectance spectra of the samples covered by organics exhibit a much more significant variation than those of pure silicates. The spectra of targets made of olivine plus polystyrene can be fitted by using the measured absorption coefficient of polystyrene. Conclusions: The results obtained for pure olivine extend to the UV the

  4. Comments on: Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program: 30 Years of Polar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Recently Lazzara et al. (2012) presented a review of the technical and scientific progress in deployment, data collection and analysis of the Automated Weather Stations (AWS) in the Antarctic. In the subsection entitled Science Applications using AWS Observations, the authors briefly account for several scientific occurrences of meteorological data collected by AWS.

  5. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  6. Keesler AFB, Mississippi. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    WINODO PEED IN -NOTS DIRECTION 1 1-3 4-6 7-10 11-lb 17-21 22-27 28-33 34-40 41-47 48-55 6E 56 ICTAL MEAN IOEGREE5) I % WIND N _ _ _ _ I 5 7...47 48-55 GE 5b ICTAL MEAN IDEbREEST I x WINO N I 4.6 3.7 4.5 1.3 14.1 5.8 NNE I 3.0 3.5 3.1 .8 10.4 5.7 NE 1.9 3.4 1.8 7.2 5.1 ENE 2.2 2.2 1.0 5.3...DIRECTION I 1-3 4-6 7-10 11-16 17-21 22-27 28-33 34-40 41-47 48-55 GE 56 ICTAL MEAN (DFGREFS) & WIND

  7. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather (Invited Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Veronig, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold H$\\alpha$ spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments, filament eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing H$\\alpha$ networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution H$\\alpha$ Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of H$\\alpha$ flares and filaments established at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the...

  8. The Roadmap of Marine Observation Development Fostering the Understanding of Weather-Climate Characteristics in the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakya, A. E.; Ramdhani, A.; Florida, N.; Nurhayati, N.

    2016-12-01

    Indonesian Maritime Continent (MC) territory has a unique characteristics of weather-climate variation, due to its geographical position. MC accommodates complex atmosphere-ocean interaction phenomena with huge impacts not only on inter-seasonal, but also on global weather and short-term climate variation like Monsoons, Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole Mode (IOD). These phenomena give major contribution to the dynamics of rainfall patterns and climate variability in Indonesian MC. The above complexities are more predictable because observations in the Central and Eastern Pacific (TAO/TRITON) and Indian Ocean (RAMA) are available. Moreover, global remote-sensing observations through satellites have also been developed and its data is easily accessed. At present, maritime weather observation in Indonesia relies on global cooperation, observations carried out using remote sensing equipment, and in-situ observations made by the National Ministries/Institution. However, availability of marine observation data in the MC is very limited, especially inside Indonesian waters. It thus serves a challenge to BMKG to become more active in participating national and international partnership programs to encourage continuous in-situ marine observations. BMKG and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration America (NOAA) has a joint cooperation to maintain RAMA array as part of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and to deliver in-situ oceanic and atmospheric data trhough so-called Indonesian Program Initiative on Maritime Observations and Analysis (Indonesia PRIMA). Within next 5 years, BMKG will focus to foster in-situ marine observation on surface as well as underwater through various observation methods. The development of which is framed within the relevant international programs such as - among others - Year of Maritime Continent (YMC) 2017, JCOMM 5 session 2017, and Tropical Pacific Observation System

  9. Paleomagnetic dating of paleo-weathering surfaces, North America and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, S. A.; Elmore, R. D.; Parnell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Permian-Triassic chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) have been reported in basement rocks below weathering surfaces in continental Europe and North America, and are attributed to weathering fluids which caused precipitation of authigenic hematite. Identification and dating of these paleotopographic surfaces can have implications for climatic conditions during the weathering event. In this study we report paleomagnetic and petrographic results from unconformity surfaces in North America and Scotland to determine the characteristics and extent of this weathering event. Red granites from the Wichita Mountains in southern Oklahoma hold a CRM in hematite that is late Permian in age. The red granites represent a weathering profile that is seen in the upper 200m of the granites, and is present throughout the Wichita Mountains. On the Kintyre peninsula in Scotland, reddened Dalradian schist below an unconformity overlain by Permian-Triassic sandstones contains a late Permian-early Triassic CRM with southwesterly declinations and up inclinations (D = 184.6°, I = -33.3°). The CRM resides in hematite that is intergrown with dolomite. The overlying red sandstone has a similar CRM. Grey Dalradian schist contains magnetite but does not contain a stable magnetization. At another locality, reddened and dolomitized Dalradian schist below an unconformity overlain by the Devonian Old Red Sandstone contains a CRM with northeasterly declinations and down inclinations. The Devonian sandstones contain a CRM with southwesterly declinations and moderate up inclinations that are approximately antipodal to the CRM in the schist. The CRMs in the schist and sandstones reside in hematite. The fluids which caused remagnetization must have penetrated below the Permian unconformity into the Devonian unconformity. Other unconformity surfaces in Scotland (Cambrian-Lewisian; Triassic-Torridonian; Torridonian-Lewisian) are also being investigated as part of this study to determine if similar

  10. Energy balance of a glacier surface: analysis of Automatic Weather Station data from the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Klok, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe and analyze a complete 1-yr data set from an automatic weather station (AWS) located on the snout of the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland. The AWS stands freely on the glacier surface and measures pressure, windspeed, wind direction, air temperature and humidity, incoming and reflected

  11. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  12. Additional Arctic observations improve weather and sea-ice forecasts for the Northern Sea Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Yamazaki, Akira; Ono, Jun; Dethloff, Klaus; Maturilli, Marion; Neuber, Roland; Edwards, Patti; Yamaguchi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    During ice-free periods, the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could be an attractive shipping route. The decline in Arctic sea-ice extent, however, could be associated with an increase in the frequency of the causes of severe weather phenomena, and high wind-driven waves and the advection of sea ice could make ship navigation along the NSR difficult. Accurate forecasts of weather and sea ice are desirable for safe navigation, but large uncertainties exist in current forecasts, partly owing to the sparse observational network over the Arctic Ocean. Here, we show that the incorporation of additional Arctic observations improves the initial analysis and enhances the skill of weather and sea-ice forecasts, the application of which has socioeconomic benefits. Comparison of 63-member ensemble atmospheric forecasts, using different initial data sets, revealed that additional Arctic radiosonde observations were useful for predicting a persistent strong wind event. The sea-ice forecast, initialised by the wind fields that included the effects of the observations, skilfully predicted rapid wind-driven sea-ice advection along the NSR.

  13. EVALUATION OF SURFACE QUALITY OF MEDIUM DENSITY FIBERBOARDS (MDF AND PARTICLEBOARDS AS FUNCTION OF WEATHERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniela GARCIA PEREZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate thesurface quality of commercially producedparticleboard and medium density fiberboard (MDFpanels as function of weathering. Four types ofpanels were exposed to three weathering cycles ofwater soaking, freezing, and heat exposures todetermine the influence of such conditions on theirsurface roughness. The stylus type equipment wasemployed to determine the roughness of controlsamples as well as after each one of the weatheringcycle. Two accepted roughness parameters, namelyaverage roughness (Ra and mean peak-to-valleyheight (Rz were used for the measurement of overallroughness changes of the specimens. Surfaces ofboth types of particleboard samples were adverselyinfluenced as a result of first cycle of weathering andthen they were reconditioned and subjected to twomore exposure cycles. In the case of MDF samplesthe first and the second weathering exposuresincreased roughness of the samples but they wererebalanced at the end of the third cycle. The highestRa value of 17.16μm was determined forparticleboard samples exposed to the first exposurecycle. Overall surface quality of MDF samples wereless influenced than those of particleboardspecimens. Based on the findings in this work itappears that stylus technique can effectively be usedto evaluate surface quality of such composite panelsas they are subjected to different weatheringexposures.

  14. Mars surface weathering products and spectral analogs: Palagonites and synthetic iron minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    There are several hypotheses regarding the formation of Martian surface fines. These surface fines are thought to be products of weathering processes occurring on Mars. Four major weathering environments of igneous rocks on Mars have been proposed; (1) impact induced hydrothermal alterations; (2) subpermafrost igneous intrusion; (3) solid-gas surface reactions; and (4) subaerial igneous intrusion over permafrost. Although one or more of these processes may be important on the Martian surface, one factor in common for all these processes is the reaction of solid or molten basalt with water (solid, liquid, or gas). These proposed processes, with the exception of solid-gas surface reactions, are transient processes. The most likely product of transient hydrothermal processes are layer silicates, zeolites, hydrous iron oxides and palagonites. The long-term instability of hydrous clay minerals under present Martian conditions has been predicted; however, the persistence of such minerals due to slow kinetics of dehydration, or entrapment in permafrost, where the activity of water is high, can not be excluded. Anhydrous oxides of iron (e.g., hematite and maghemite) are thought to be stable under present Martian surface conditions. Oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals associated with Martian basalts has been proposed. Weathering of sulfide minerals leads to a potentially acidic permafrost and the formation of Fe(3) oxides and sulfates. Weathering of basalts under acidic conditions may lead to the formation of kaolinite through metastable halloysite and metahalloysite. Kaolinite, if present, is thought to be a thermodynamically stable phase at the Martian surface. Fine materials on Mars are important in that they influence the surface spectral properties; these fines are globally distributed on Mars by the dust storms and this fraction will have the highest surface area which should act as a sink for most of the absorbed volatiles near the surface of Mars. Therefore

  15. Venus Surface Composition Constrained by Observation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha; Treiman, Allan; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-08-01

    New observations from the Venus Express spacecraft as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of Venus analogue materials have advanced our understanding of the petrology of Venus melts and the mineralogy of rocks on the surface. The VIRTIS instrument aboard Venus Express provided a map of the southern hemisphere of Venus at ˜1 μm allowing, for the first time, the definition of surface units in terms of their 1 μm emissivity and derived mineralogy. Tessera terrain has lower emissivity than the presumably basaltic plains, consistent with a more silica-rich or felsic mineralogy. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental production of melts with Venera and Vega starting compositions predict derivative melts that range from mafic to felsic. Large volumes of felsic melts require water and may link the formation of tesserae to the presence of a Venus ocean. Low emissivity rocks may also be produced by atmosphere-surface weathering reactions unlike those seen presently. High 1 μm emissivity values correlate to stratigraphically recent flows and have been used with theoretical and experimental predictions of basalt weathering to identify regions of recent volcanism. The timescale of this volcanism is currently constrained by the weathering of magnetite (higher emissivity) in fresh basalts to hematite (lower emissivity) in Venus' oxidizing environment. Recent volcanism is corroborated by transient thermal anomalies identified by the VMC instrument aboard Venus Express. The interpretation of all emissivity data depends critically on understanding the composition of surface materials, kinetics of rock weathering and their measurement under Venus conditions. Extended theoretical studies, continued analysis of earlier spacecraft results, new atmospheric data, and measurements of mineral stability under Venus conditions have improved our understanding atmosphere-surface interactions. The calcite-wollastonite CO2 buffer has been discounted due, among other things, to

  16. Weather Observers: A Manipulative Augmented Reality System for Weather Simulations at Home, in the Classroom, and at a Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Yau-Zng

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on how to enhance the interactivity and usefulness of augmented reality (AR) by integrating manipulative interactive tools with a real-world environment. A manipulative AR (MAR) system, which included 3D interactive models and manipulative aids, was designed and developed to teach the unit "Understanding Weather" in a…

  17. Effects of UV weathering on surface properties of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour, lignin, and cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yao; Liu, Ru; Cao, Jinzhen; Chen, Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the influence of accelerated weathering on polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour (WF), lignin, and cellulose at different loading levels were evaluated. Six groups of samples were exposed in a QUV accelerated weathering tester for a total of 960 h. The surface color, surface gloss, contact angle and flexural properties of the samples were tested. Besides, the weathered surface was characterized by SEM and ATR-FTIR. The results revealed that (1) the discoloration of composites was accelerated by the presence of lignin, especially at high content; (2) composites containing lignin showed less loss of flexural strength and modulus, less cracks, and better hydrophobicity on weathered surface than other groups, confirming its functions of stabilization and antioxidation; (3) cellulose-based composites exhibited better color stability but more significant deterioration in flexural properties after weathering compared to other composites, suggesting that such kind of composites could not be used as load-bearing structure in outdoor applications.

  18. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground

  19. Interactive Computing and Processing of NASA Land Surface Observations Using Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason; Bell, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Google's Earth Engine offers a "big data" approach to processing large volumes of NASA and other remote sensing products. h\\ps://earthengine.google.com/ Interfaces include a Javascript or Python-based API, useful for accessing and processing over large periods of record for Landsat and MODIS observations. Other data sets are frequently added, including weather and climate model data sets, etc. Demonstrations here focus on exploratory efforts to perform land surface change detection related to severe weather, and other disaster events.

  20. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-04-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help to improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology, but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability and understanding of climate system feedbacks. Orth, R., E. Dutra, I. F. Trigo, and G. Balsamo (2016): Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/hess-2016-628

  1. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface....... Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed...

  2. The Themis-Beagle families: Investigation of space-weathering processes on primitive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasier, S.; Perna, D.; Lantz, C.; Barucci, M.

    2014-07-01

    features associated to hydrated silicates, and, recently, water-ice and organics features have been detected on the surface of (24) Themis (Campins et al. 2010, Rivkin & Emery 2010). Hydrated silicates are produced by the aqueous-alteration process, which require low temperature (Beagle, formed less than 10 Myr ago, has been identified. This sub-family has 65 members up to 2 km of diameter (Nesvorny et al. 2008). So, the Themis family is very important to shed light on the asteroid-comet continuum, to constrain the abundances of water ices in the outer part of the main belt, and to probe space-weathering effects on old Themis and young Beagle families' members. To investigate all these aspects, we carried out a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near-infrared range at the 3.6-m Italian telescope TNG (La Palma, Spain) during 6 nights in February and December 2012. We got new spectra of 8 Beagle and 22 Themis members using the DOLORES (with the LR-R and LR-B grisms) and the NICS (with the Amici prism) instruments. To look for possible coma around the targets, we also performed deep imaging in the R filter. Data are currently under analysis, and the results will be presented at the ACM meeting. None of the investigated spectra show water-ice absorption features at 1.5 and 2 microns, while few Themis members have visible absorption bands associated with hydrated silicates. The best meteoritic analogues to both Themis and Beagle members are the carbonaceous chondrites, especially CM2. The spectra of Beagle and Themis asteroids show significant differences: 'old' Themis members exhibit a wide range of spectra, including asteroids with blue/neutral and moderately red spectra (relative to the Sun), while the young Beagle members investigated are bluer and brighter than the Themis ones. These preliminary results seem to indicate that the SW effects on primitive asteroids are similar to those observed on silicate asteroids, that is, they produce reddening of the spectra and

  3. Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) surface observation data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GMOS global surface elemental mercury (Hg0) observations from 2013 & 2014. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Sprovieri, F., N. Pirrone,...

  4. Characterization of surface chemistry and crystallization behavior of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour, cellulose, and lignin during accelerated weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yao; Liu, Ru; Cao, Jinzhen, E-mail: caoj@bjfu.edu.cn

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • AFM was firstly used to characterize the surface morphology and roughness of weathered wood–plastic composites. • Composites containing lignin showed less loss of flexural strength and modulus and less roughness on weathered surface compared with lignin-free composites. • ATR-FTIR and XPS analyses demonstrated in detail that significant chemistry changes occurred in wood flour, lignin, and cellulose. • The crystallinity of PP increased in all weathered samples due to chain scissions and recrystallization. • The stabilization and antioxidation effects of lignin were proved. - Abstract: In this study, six groups of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour (WF), cellulose, and lignin at different loading levels were exposed in a QUV accelerated weathering tester for a total duration of 960 h. The changes in surface morphology, chemistry, and thermal properties of weathered samples were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), respectively. The flexural properties of all samples were tested after different durations of weathering. The results showed that: (1) the surface roughness of all samples increased after weathering; (2) composites containing lignin showed less loss of flexural strength and modulus and less roughness on weathered surface compared with lignin-free composites, indicating the functions of stabilization and antioxidation of lignin; (3) the crystallinity of PP increased in all weathered samples due to chain scissions and recrystallization; (4) ATR-FTIR and XPS analyses demonstrated in detail that significant changes occurred in surface chemistry, accompanied by the photodegradation and photo-oxidation of lignin and cellulose with prolonged weathering time.

  5. On the dynamic estimation of relative weights for observation and forecast in numerical weather prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Grace; Deepak, A. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The problem of merging direct and remotely sensed (indirect) data with forecast data to get an estimate of the present state of the atmosphere for the purpose of numerical weather prediction is examined. To carry out this merging optimally, it is necessary to provide an estimate of the relative weights to be given to the observations and forecast. It is possible to do this dynamically from the information to be merged, if the correlation structure of the errors from the various sources is sufficiently different. Some new statistical approaches to doing this are described, and conditions quantified in which such estimates are likely to be good.

  6. State of Art in space weather observational activities and data management in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislawska, Iwona

    One of the primary scientific and technical goals of space weather is to produce data in order to investigate the Sun impact on the Earth and its environment. Studies based on data mining philosophy yield increase the knowledge of space weather physical properties, modelling capabilities and gain applications of various procedures in space weather monitoring and forecasting. Exchanging tailored individually and/or jointly data between different entities, storing of the databases and making data accessible for the users is the most important task undertaken by investigators. National activities spread over Europe is currently consolidated pursuant to the terms of effectiveness and individual contributions embedded in joint integrated efforts. The role of COST 724 Action in animation of such a movement is essential. The paper focuses on the analysis of the European availability in the Internet near-real time and historical collections of the European ground based and satellite observations, operational indices and parameters. A detailed description of data delivered is included. The structure of the content is supplied according to the following selection: (1) observations, raw and/or corrected, updated data, (2) resolution, availability of real-time and historical data, (3) products, as the results of models and theory including (a) maps, forecasts and alerts, (b) resolution, availability of real-time and historical data, (4) platforms to deliver data. Characterization of the networking of stations, observatories and space related monitoring systems of data collections is integrated part of the paper. According to these provisions operational systems developed for these purposes is presented and analysed. It concerns measurements, observations and parameters from the theory and models referred to local, regional collections, European and worldwide networks. Techniques used by these organizations to generate the digital content are identified. As the reference pan

  7. Data Assimilation of SMAP Observations and the Impact on Weather Forecasts and Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan; Blankenship, Clay; Crosson, William; White, Khristopher

    2014-01-01

    SPoRT produces real-time LIS soil moisture products for situational awareness and local numerical weather prediction over CONUS, Mesoamerica, and East Africa ?Currently interact/collaborate with operational partners on evaluation of soil moisture products ?Drought/fire ?Extreme heat ?Convective initiation ?Flood and water borne diseases ?Initial efforts to assimilate L2 soil moisture observations from SMOS (as a precursor for SMAP) have been successful ?Active/passive blended product from SMAP will be assimilated similarly and higher spatial resolution should improve on local-scale processes

  8. Coal mine spoil-water interaction: Ⅱ. Weathering concentrated metals in surface coal mine spoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党志; 万国江; 李德忍

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of metals are lower in coal shales collected from recently exposed surface mine wastes than in shales collected from spoils exposed to surface weathering for 45 a. In this period, the character of the spoils changes dramatically as a result of the accelerated breakdown of the freshly exposed minestones. Since the metals are held as unstable sulfides, it is suggested that enrichment may be caused by absorption of metals by colloid of iron or formation of organic complex compound with organic carbon existing in the remnant structure of coal mine spoil. This process may contribute to the triggering of soil contamination thresholds on coal-lands already heavily loaded with metals.

  9. A much warmer Earth surface for most of geologic time: implications to biotic weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, D. W.; McMenamin, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two scenarios for the temperature history of Earth. One scenario is conventional, the other relies on a warmer history. Both scenarios include surface cooling determined by the evolution of the biosphere and are similar until the Proterozoic period. The warmer scenario requires a higher plant/lichen terrestrial biota to increase weathering intensity. Justification for a warmer surface includes period temperatures from the oxygen isotope record of coexisting phosphates and cherts, an upper limit of 58 degrees C from primary gypsum precipitation, and the lack of fractionation of sulfur isotopes between sulfide and sulfates in Archean sediments.

  10. A much warmer Earth surface for most of geologic time: implications to biotic weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, D. W.; McMenamin, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two scenarios for the temperature history of Earth. One scenario is conventional, the other relies on a warmer history. Both scenarios include surface cooling determined by the evolution of the biosphere and are similar until the Proterozoic period. The warmer scenario requires a higher plant/lichen terrestrial biota to increase weathering intensity. Justification for a warmer surface includes period temperatures from the oxygen isotope record of coexisting phosphates and cherts, an upper limit of 58 degrees C from primary gypsum precipitation, and the lack of fractionation of sulfur isotopes between sulfide and sulfates in Archean sediments.

  11. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  12. Space Weather Observations by GNSS Radio Occultation: From FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC to FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S; Pedatella, Nicholas; Anthes, Richard A; Mannucci, Anthony J; Straus, Paul R; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2014-01-01

    The joint Taiwan-United States FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) mission, hereafter called COSMIC, is the first satellite constellation dedicated to remotely sense Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere using a technique called Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO). The occultations yield abundant information about neutral atmospheric temperature and moisture as well as space weather estimates of slant total electron content, electron density profiles, and an amplitude scintillation index, S4. With the success of COSMIC, the United States and Taiwan are moving forward with a follow-on RO mission named FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (COSMIC-2), which will ultimately place 12 satellites in orbit with two launches in 2016 and 2019. COSMIC-2 satellites will carry an advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO receiver that will track both GPS and Russian Global Navigation Satellite System signals, with capability for eventually tracking other GNSS signals from the Chinese BeiDou and European Galileo system, as well as secondary space weather payloads to measure low-latitude plasma drifts and scintillation at multiple frequencies. COSMIC-2 will provide 4–6 times (10–15X in the low latitudes) the number of atmospheric and ionospheric observations that were tracked with COSMIC and will also improve the quality of the observations. In this article we focus on COSMIC/COSMIC-2 measurements of key ionospheric parameters. PMID:26213514

  13. Implementation of Globally Simulated Dust within a Physical Sea Surface Temperature Retrievals for Numerical Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, M. I.; Nalli, N. R.; Lu, C. H.; Joseph, E.; Morris, V. R.; Campbell, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols are not the only source of error in sea surface temperature (SST) retrievals; however, it is nontrivial problem that requires attention. Simulation and validation of aerosol in radiative transfer models (RTM) is considered extremely challenging, especially in the infrared (IR); this is because brightness temperatures (BTs) retrievals -which are converted into SSTs- are highly influenced by changes in atmospheric composition. Tropospheric aerosols seem to have a persistent impact that may result in negative SST biases of 1K or more. Several questions arise around this topic, but most importantly: is it even possible to simulate aerosols using a RTM for a SST retrieval application? If so, what are the implications? This works presents the results for the first study to ever attempt to analyze the full potential and limitations of incorporating aerosols within a truly physical SST retrieval for operational weather forecasting purposes. This is accomplished through the application of a satellite sea surface temperature (SST) physical retrieval for split-window and hyperspectral infrared (IR) sensors that allows a better representation of the atmospheric state under aerosol-laden conditions. The new algorithm includes 1) accurate specification of the emissivity that characterizes the surface leaving radiance and 2) transmittance and physical characterization of the atmosphere by using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM). This project includes application of the NEMS-Global Forecasting System Aerosol Component (NGAC) fields, which corresponds to the first global interactive atmosphere-aerosol forecast system ever implemented at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). SST outputs are validated against a bulk and a parameterized SST derived from operational products and partly against observed measurements from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, which is dominated by Saharan dust throughout most of the year and that is also a genesis region

  14. Surface-Correlated Nanophase Iron Metal in Lunar Soils: Petrography and Space Weathering Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Space weathering is a term used to include all of the processes that act on material exposed at the surface of a planetary or small body. In the case of the Moon, it includes a variety of processes that formed the lunar regolith, caused the maturation of lunar soils, and formed patina on rock surfaces. The processes include micrometeorite impact and reworking, implantation of solar wind and flare particles, radiation damage and chemical effects from solar particles and cosmic rays, interactions with the lunar atmosphere, and sputtering erosion and deposition. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. Understanding these effects is critical in order to fully integrate the lunar sample collection with remotely sensed data from recent robotic missions (e.g., Lunar Prospector, Clementine, Galileo). Our objective is to determine the origin of space weathering effects in lunar soils through combined electron microscopy and microspectrophotometry techniques applied to individual soil particles from lunar soils. It has been demonstrated that it is the finest size fraction (lunar soils that dominates the optical properties of the bulk soils.

  15. An observed database to characterize the weather conditions associated with subtropical cyclogenesis over southern-southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, R.; Porfirio da Rocha, R.

    2012-04-01

    A project to study the climatic, dynamic and synoptic aspects of subtropical cyclones that develop in southern-southeastern coast of Brazil is in development. The weather conditions associated with such cyclones is an important question that must be answered in this project. However, for such characterization it is necessary to use the local meteorological observations of wind, wind gust, rainfall, air temperature, etc. The NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) reanalysis have spatial and time resolutions that provide elements to study the synoptic and dynamics of meteorological events (cyclone, anticyclones, troughs, ridges, monsoons circulations, etc) until the production of complex climatology. However, this analysis has coarse horizontal resolution (~250 Km) that often does not allow the identification of intense meteorological phenomena. A more precise characterization of location and intensity of weather conditions associated with subtropical cyclones would be performed using local observations. Therefore, this work describes the methodology to construct a database of surface weather observations using a relational database management system (RDBMS) MySQL. The data source are SYNOP (Surface Synoptic Observations), METAR (Meteorological Aerodrome Report), NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) and CETESB (Environmental Agency of Sao Paulo State) that are available online through dynamic web page. An iterative algorithm robot was developed to automate the data extraction. Most of the data source are encoded or at non-standard format, hence was developed an algorithm in C++, using the REGEX library, an engine of text pattern search, for decode and handle the exception (erroneous and corrupted data). After the data decoding and formatting it is stored into the MySQL database. The structure of database was divided into categories of tables: a table with the source of data definition, a table with stations information and two sets of tables (for hourly

  16. Weather and atmosphere observation with the ATOM all-sky camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowsky Felix

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Automatic Telescope for Optical Monitoring (ATOM for H.E.S.S. is an 75 cm optical telescope which operates fully automated. As there is no observer present during observation, an auxiliary all-sky camera serves as weather monitoring system. This device takes an all-sky image of the whole sky every three minutes. The gathered data then undergoes live-analysis by performing astrometric comparison with a theoretical night sky model, interpreting the absence of stars as cloud coverage. The sky monitor also serves as tool for a meteorological analysis of the observation site of the the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. This overview covers design and benefits of the all-sky camera and additionally gives an introduction into current efforts to integrate the device into the atmosphere analysis programme of H.E.S.S.

  17. Composition, origin and weathering process of surface sediment in Kumtagh Desert, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhiwei; LU Huayu; ZHAO Cunfa; WANG Xianyan; SU Zhizhua; WANG Zhenting; LIU Hongyi; WANG Lixin; LU Qi

    2011-01-01

    Kumtagh Desert is one of the eight biggest deserts in China,but poorly investigated before our interdisciplinary study because of the difficulty of access.In this paper,33 representative surface sediment samples were collected from the Kumtagh Desert and analyzed in the laboratory to obtain heavy mineral components and geochemical element contents.Results show that various kinds of heavy minerals are present in these samples,with high levels of epidote and hornblende.Si and AI take up a large part of chemical composition.Compared with the average composition of geochemical elements of the upper continental crust (UCC),except Si and Ca,all elements are depleted to a certain degree; Fe,Mg,Ca,P,Ti and Mn have high correlation coefficients in their contents.The mineral and geochemical composition of the Kumtagh Desert sediments have a similarity with that of rocks of Altyn Tagh Mountains,and the surface sediments of the alluvial/diluvial fans around the Altyn Tagh Mountains and that of the Taklamakan Desert,indicating that one major source of the Kumtagh Desert sediments is located in the Altyn Tagh Mountains.Alluvial deposits and lake sediments in Aqik valley and lower reaches of Shule River are prone to be eroded and transported by the strong northeasterly wind into the Kumtagh Desert,forming another source of the desert deposits.An A-CN-K ternary diagram shows that a weak degree chemical weathering by the loss of Na and K occurred in these sediments,whereas A-CNK-FM temary diagram suggests that Fe and Mg have undergone a significant chemical differentiation.Physical weathering processes cause easy erosion and enrichment in fine particles for mafic minerals,thus coarse desert sand particles can be relatively depleted in Fe and Mg.The mineral and geochemical composition of sediments in arid regions experiencing less chemical weathering are mostly affected by physical weathering.

  18. Optical effects of space weathering in lunar crustal magnetic anomaly regions based on CE-1 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wang, X.; Cui, J.; Fu, X.; Zhang, G.; Yao, M.; Liu, B.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Ouyang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of mini-magnetospheres above the lunar surface suggests that magnetic shielding could have led to anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) in magnetic anomaly regions. Using spectral data from Chang'E 1 Imaging Interferometer (IIM) and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer, we instigate the relationship between lunar crustal magnetic anomalies and the optical effects in those areas in association with space weathering. The IIM onboard China's Chang'E 1 (CE-1) spacecraft is a Fourier transform Sagnac imaging spectrometer operating in the visible to near infrared (0.48-0.96 μm) spectral range, with 32 channels at spectral intervals of 325.5 cm-1. We selected four regions with crustal magnetic anomalies to study their albedo properties: three lunar swirls (Gerasimovich, Mare Marginis, and Reiner Gamma) and the area antipodal to Herzsprung. We found that all three of the anomalous albedo areas are associated with magnetic anomalies, however, no anomalous albedo feature is found in the last magnetic anomaly area. In addition, we also studied the correlation between magnetic anomaly strength and albedo anomaly on a global scale. Our initial analysis suggests an overall tread of less darkening with increased magnetic anomaly.

  19. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  20. Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, Chile

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, in extreme southern Chile. WMO station ID 85934. Period of record 1896-1954. The original forms were scanned at the Museo...

  1. Biochemical evolution II: origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, I; Lee, M R; Smith, J V

    1998-12-22

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4-0.6 microm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 microm thick, with 2-3 x 10(6) intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth's surface by approximately 3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial "soup." Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria.

  2. Characterization of surface chemistry and crystallization behavior of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour, cellulose, and lignin during accelerated weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yao; Liu, Ru; Cao, Jinzhen

    2015-03-01

    In this study, six groups of polypropylene composites reinforced with wood flour (WF), cellulose, and lignin at different loading levels were exposed in a QUV accelerated weathering tester for a total duration of 960 h. The changes in surface morphology, chemistry, and thermal properties of weathered samples were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), respectively. The flexural properties of all samples were tested after different durations of weathering. The results showed that: (1) the surface roughness of all samples increased after weathering; (2) composites containing lignin showed less loss of flexural strength and modulus and less roughness on weathered surface compared with lignin-free composites, indicating the functions of stabilization and antioxidation of lignin; (3) the crystallinity of PP increased in all weathered samples due to chain scissions and recrystallization; (4) ATR-FTIR and XPS analyses demonstrated in detail that significant changes occurred in surface chemistry, accompanied by the photodegradation and photo-oxidation of lignin and cellulose with prolonged weathering time.

  3. Climate-dependent sediment production: numerical modeling and field observations of variable grain size distributions from heterogeneous hillslope weathering of fractured basalt flows, Kohala Peninsula, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. P.; Johnson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    in the length scale for the reduction in chemical weathering below the surface, or the flushing depth. The flushing depth is assumed to scale linearly with MAP, but decreases exponentially with increasing soil depth, as soil capillarity will imbibe infiltration. Modeling six MAP regimes between 500 and 3000 mm produces a non-linear increase in soil depths from 0.59 m soil to 5.15 m, which is broadly consistent with field observations from Kohala Peninsula. The median corestone grain size (D50) was calculated at model completion for the 20 blocks below the soil-rock interface. In the driest regime the D50 was 98% of that for the initial column, while the D50 for the wettest regime was 56% of the initial. This sediment preparation model predicts soil depths and tracks particle size reduction with variable climate-dependent weathering rates. Incorporating this type of model into sediment-transport dependent landscape evolution models may be the key to understanding the systematic differences in topography across spatially variable climate gradients, such as Kohala Peninsula.

  4. Surface degradation of CeO2 stabilized acrylic polyurethane coated thermally treated jack pine during accelerated weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sudeshna; Kocaefe, Duygu; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2013-07-01

    The thermally treated wood is a new value-added product and is very important for the diversification of forestry products. It drew the attention of consumers due to its attractive dark brown color. However, it loses its color when exposed to outside environment. Therefore, development of a protective coating for this value added product is necessary. In the present study, the efficiency of CeO2 nano particles alone or in combination with lignin stabilizer and/or bark extracts in acrylic polyurethane polymer was investigated by performing an accelerated weathering test. The color measurement results after accelerated weathering demonstrated that the coating containing CeO2 nano particles was the most effective whereas visual assessment suggested the coating containing CeO2 nano particles and lignin stabilizer as the most effective coating. The surface polarity changed for all the coatings during weathering and increase in contact angle after weathering suggested cross linking and reorientation of the polymer chain during weathering. The surface chemistry altered during weathering was evaluated by ATR-FTIR analysis. It suggested formation of different carbonyl byproducts during weathering. The chain scission reactions of the urethane linkages were not found to be significant during weathering.

  5. Ionospheric weather: cloning missed foF2 observations for derivation of variability index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A techique for filling the gaps of the missing F2-layer critical frequency is proposed and applied for the derivation of the ionospheric weather index, characterizing the degree of disturbance at each particular station. A daily-hourly analysis of ionosonde observations of foF2 for 16 stations at latitude range 37° to 70° N, longitudes of 10° W to 150° E, is performed during the solar minimum, 2006. Missed ionosonde observations are reconstructed by cloning data of another station. The process of gap filling considers hourly values of the F peak density NmF2 (deduced from foF2, normalized to the respective median, and assumes that this ratio remains the same for the parent and cloned data. It is shown that the correlation coefficient between cloned fcF2 and observed foF2 is greater than 0.75 for the positive and negative ionospheric disturbed days during a year at solar minimum, independent of the distance between the stations in high and middle latitudes. The quiet reference is determined as a running daily-hourly median for 27 days, preceding the day of observation calibrated for a seasonal trend with ITU-R foF2 predictions. The hourly deviation DNmF2 is defined as the logarithm of ratio of NmF2/NmF2med. A segmented logarithmic scale of the ionospheric weather index, W, is introduced, so that W=±1 refers to the quiet state, W=±2 to a moderate disturbance, W=±3 to the ionospheric storm, and W=±4 to the extreme or anomalous conditions. The catalog of the ionospheric disturbances for W exceeding ±2 at least during 3 consecutive hours is produced and presented online at the SRC and IZMIRAN web pages. It is found that the moderate disturbance is a prevailing state of the ionospheric weather for all stations. The stormy conditions comprise 1 to 20% of the times which occur more frequently at high latitudes, by night, during equinox and winter.

  6. Ionospheric weather: cloning missed foF2 observations for derivation of variability index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Stanislwska, I.; Tomasik, M.

    2008-02-01

    A techique for filling the gaps of the missing F2-layer critical frequency is proposed and applied for the derivation of the ionospheric weather index, characterizing the degree of disturbance at each particular station. A daily-hourly analysis of ionosonde observations of foF2 for 16 stations at latitude range 37° to 70° N, longitudes of 10° W to 150° E, is performed during the solar minimum, 2006. Missed ionosonde observations are reconstructed by cloning data of another station. The process of gap filling considers hourly values of the F peak density NmF2 (deduced from foF2), normalized to the respective median, and assumes that this ratio remains the same for the parent and cloned data. It is shown that the correlation coefficient between cloned fcF2 and observed foF2 is greater than 0.75 for the positive and negative ionospheric disturbed days during a year at solar minimum, independent of the distance between the stations in high and middle latitudes. The quiet reference is determined as a running daily-hourly median for 27 days, preceding the day of observation calibrated for a seasonal trend with ITU-R foF2 predictions. The hourly deviation DNmF2 is defined as the logarithm of ratio of NmF2/NmF2med. A segmented logarithmic scale of the ionospheric weather index, W, is introduced, so that W=±1 refers to the quiet state, W=±2 to a moderate disturbance, W=±3 to the ionospheric storm, and W=±4 to the extreme or anomalous conditions. The catalog of the ionospheric disturbances for W exceeding ±2 at least during 3 consecutive hours is produced and presented online at the SRC and IZMIRAN web pages. It is found that the moderate disturbance is a prevailing state of the ionospheric weather for all stations. The stormy conditions comprise 1 to 20% of the times which occur more frequently at high latitudes, by night, during equinox and winter.

  7. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    CERN Document Server

    An, Zhe; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the a...

  8. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  9. Combining Satellite Observations of Fire Activity and Numerical Weather Prediction to Improve the Prediction of Smoke Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. A.; Wang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Smoke emissions estimates used in air quality and visibility forecasting applications are currently limited by the information content of satellite fire observations, and the lack of a skillful short-term forecast of changes in fire activity. This study explores the potential benefits of a recently developed sub-pixel-based calculation of fire radiative power (FRPf) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which provides more precise estimates of the radiant energy (over the retrieved fire area) that in turn, improves estimates of the thermal buoyancy of smoke plumes and may be helpful characterizing the meteorological effects on fire activity for large fire events. Results show that unlike the current FRP product, the incorporation of FRPf produces a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.42) with smoke plume height data provided by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and several meteorological variables, such as surface wind speed and temperature, which may be useful for discerning cases where smoke was injected above the boundary layer. Drawing from recent advances in numerical weather prediction (NWP), this study also examines the meteorological conditions characteristic of fire ignition, growth, decay, and extinction, which are used to develop an automated, 24-hour prediction of satellite fire activity. Satellite fire observations from MODIS and geostationary sensors show that the fire prediction model is an improvement (RMSE reduction of 13 - 20%) over the forecast of persistence commonly used by near-real-time fire emission inventories. The ultimate goal is to combine NWP data and satellite fire observations to improve both analysis and prediction of biomass-burning emissions, through improved understanding of the interactions between fire activity and weather at scales appropriate for operational modeling. This is a critical step toward producing a global fire prediction model and improving operational forecasts of

  10. A twenty-first century California observing network for monitoring extreme weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.B.; Anderson, M.L.; Dettinger, M.D.; Ralph, F.M.; Hinojosa, A.; Cayan, D.R.; Hartman, R.K.; Reynolds, D.W.; Johnson, L.E.; Schneider, T.L.; Cifelli, R.; Toth, Z.; Gutman, S.I.; King, C.W.; Gehrke, F.; Johnston, P.E.; Walls, C.; Mann, Dorte; Gottas, D.J.; Coleman, T.

    2013-01-01

    During Northern Hemisphere winters, the West Coast of North America is battered by extratropical storms. The impact of these storms is of paramount concern to California, where aging water supply and flood protection infrastructures are challenged by increased standards for urban flood protection, an unusually variable weather regime, and projections of climate change. Additionally, there are inherent conflicts between releasing water to provide flood protection and storing water to meet requirements for water supply, water quality, hydropower generation, water temperature and flow for at-risk species, and recreation. In order to improve reservoir management and meet the increasing demands on water, improved forecasts of precipitation, especially during extreme events, is required. Here we describe how California is addressing their most important and costliest environmental issue – water management – in part, by installing a state-of-the-art observing system to better track the area’s most severe wintertime storms.

  11. How much does weather-driven vegetation dynamics matter in land surface modelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSM) are an essential part of weather and climate models as they provide the lower boundary condition for the atmospheric models. In state-of-the-art LSMs the seasonal vegetation dynamics is "frozen". The seasonal variation of vegetation state variables, such as leaf area index or green vegetation fraction, are prescribed in lookup tables. Hence, a year-by-year variation in the development of vegetation due to changing weather conditions cannot be considered. For climate simulations, this is obviously a severe drawback. The objective of the present study was to quantify the potential error in the simulation of land surface exchange processes resulting from "frozen" vegetation dynamics. For this purpose we simulated energy and water fluxes from a winter wheat stand and a maize stand in Southwest Germany. In a first set of simulations, six years (2010 to 2015) were simulated considering weather-driven vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, we coupled the generic crop growth model GECROS with the NOAH-MP model (NOAHMP-GECROS). In a second set of simulations all vegetation-related state variables of the 2010 simulation were written to an external file and were used to overwrite the vegetation-related state variables of the simulations of the years 2011-2015. The difference between both sets was taken as a measure for the potential error introduced to the LSM due to the assumption of a "frozen" vegetation dynamics. We will present first results and discuss the impact of "frozen" vegetation dynamics on climate change simulations.

  12. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  13. The impact of FORMOSAT-5/AIP observations on the ionospheric space weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assimilates the in-situ O+ fluxes observations obtained from the Advanced Ionospheric Probe (AIP onboard the upcoming FORMOSAT-5 (FS-5 satellite and evaluates its possible impact on the ionospheric space weather forecast model. The Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE, designed for the global O+ fluxes, is shown to improve the electron density specification in the vicinity of satellite orbits. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE of the ionospheric electron density obtained from assimilating the daytime O+ fluxes could be improved by ~10 and ~5% for the forecast and nowcast, respectively. Although the improvement of nighttime O+ flux assimilation is less significant compared to the daytime assimilation, it still reveals impacts on the model result. This suggests that nighttime observations might not be sufficient to alter the model trajectory in the positive direction as with the daytime result. Alternative data assimilation approaches, such as assimilation of the empirical model built by using the nighttime FS-5/AIP together with other existing satellite observations of O+ flux could obtain better accuracy of the electron density forecast.

  14. Verification of ensemble forecasts of Mediterranean high-impact weather events against satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Chaboureau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble forecasts at kilometre scale of two severe storms over the Mediterranean region are verified against satellite observations. In complement to assessing the forecasts against ground-based measurements, brightness temperature (BT images are computed from forecast fields and directly compared to BTs observed from satellite. The so-called model-to-satellite approach is very effective in identifying systematic errors in the prediction of cloud cover for BTs in the infrared window and in verifying the forecasted convective activity with BTs in the microwave range. This approach is combined with the calculation of meteorological scores for an objective evaluation of ensemble forecasts. The application of the approach is shown in the context of two Mediterranean case studies, a tropical-like storm and a heavy precipitating event. Assessment of cloud cover and convective activity using satellite observations in the infrared (10.8 μm and microwave regions (183–191 GHz provides results consistent with other traditional methods using rainfall measurements. In addition, for the tropical-like storm, differences among forecasts occur much earlier in terms of cloud cover and deep convective activity than they do in terms of deepening and track. Further, the underdispersion of the ensemble forecasts of the two high-impact weather events is easily identified with satellite diagnostics. This suggests that such an approach could be a useful method for verifying ensemble forecasts, particularly in data-sparse regions.

  15. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions in Africa (and other global locations), surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The US National Weather Service (NWS) International Activities Office (IAO) in partnership with University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The goal is to provide observations for environmental monitoring, and early warning alert systems that can be deployed at weather services in developing countries. Instrumentation is being designed using innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The initial effort is focused on designing a surface network using GIS-based tools, deploying an initial network in Zambia, and providing training to Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) staff. The presentation will provide an overview of the project concepts, design of the low cost instrumentation, and initial experiences deploying a surface network deployment in Zambia.

  16. An observational analysis: Tropical relative to Arctic influence on midlatitude weather in the era of Arctic amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judah

    2016-05-01

    The tropics, in general, and El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in particular are almost exclusively relied upon for seasonal forecasting. Much less considered and certainly more controversial is the idea that Arctic variability is influencing midlatitude weather. However, since the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Arctic has undergone the most rapid warming observed globally, referred to as Arctic amplification (AA), which has coincided with an observed increase in extreme weather. Analysis of observed trends in hemispheric circulation over the period of AA more closely resembles variability associated with Arctic boundary forcings than with tropical forcing. Furthermore, analysis of intraseasonal temperature variability shows that the cooling in midlatitude winter temperatures has been accompanied by an increase in temperature variability and not a decrease, popularly referred to as "weather whiplash."

  17. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  18. Inference of Surface Chemical and Physical Properties Using Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.

    2016-01-01

    Reflected or emitted energy from solid surfaces in the solar system can provide insight into thermo-physical and chemical properties of the surface materials. Measurements have been obtained from instruments located on Earth-based telescopes and carried on several space missions. The characteristic spectral features commonly observed in Mid-Infrared (MIR) spectra of minerals will be reviewed, along with methods used for compositional interpretations of MIR emission spectra. The influence of surface grain size, and space weathering processes on MIR emissivity spectra will also be discussed. Methods used for estimating surface temperature, emissivity, and thermal inertias from MIR spectral observations will be reviewed.

  19. Constraining Numerical Geodynamo Modeling with Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Numerical dynamo solutions have traditionally been generated entirely by a set of self-consistent differential equations that govern the spatial-temporal variation of the magnetic field, velocity field and other fields related to dynamo processes. In particular, those solutions are obtained with parameters very different from those appropriate for the Earth s core. Geophysical application of the numerical results therefore depends on correct understanding of the differences (errors) between the model outputs and the true states (truth) in the outer core. Part of the truth can be observed at the surface in the form of poloidal magnetic field. To understand these differences, or errors, we generate new initial model state (analysis) by assimilating sequentially the model outputs with the surface geomagnetic observations using an optimal interpolation scheme. The time evolution of the core state is then controlled by our MoSST core dynamics model. The final outputs (forecasts) are then compared with the surface observations as a means to test the success of the assimilation. We use the surface geomagnetic data back to year 1900 for our studies, with 5-year forecast and 20-year analysis periods. We intend to use the result; to understand time variation of the errors with the assimilation sequences, and the impact of the assimilation on other unobservable quantities, such as the toroidal field and the fluid velocity in the core.

  20. Mass discharge rate retrieval combining weather radar and thermal camera observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Ripepe, Maurizio; Valade, Sebastien

    2016-08-01

    The mass discharge rate is a key parameter for initializing volcanic ash dispersal models. Commonly used empirical approaches derive the discharge rate by the plume height as estimated by remote sensors. A novel approach based on the combination of weather radar observations and thermal camera imagery is presented here. It is based on radar ash concentration estimation and the retrieval of the vertical exit velocities of the explosive cloud using thermal camera measurements. The applied radar retrieval methodology is taken from a revision of previously presented work. Based on the analysis of four eruption events of the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) that occurred in December 2015, the proposed methodology is tested using observations collected by three radar systems (at C and X band) operated by the Italian Department of Civil Protection. The total erupted mass was estimated to be about 9·109 kg and 2.4·109 kg for the first and second events, respectively, while it was about 1.2·109 kg for both the last two episodes. The comparison with empirical approaches based on radar-retrieved plume height shows a reasonably good agreement. Additionally, the comparative analysis of the polarimetric radar measurements provides interesting information on the vertical structure of the ash plume, including the size of the eruption column and the height of the gas thrust region.

  1. Surface Temperature Variation Prediction Model Using Real-Time Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Vant-Hull, B.; Nazari, R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Combination of climate change and urbanization are heating up cities and putting the lives of millions of people in danger. More than half of the world's total population resides in cities and urban centers. Cities are experiencing urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. Hotter days are associated with serious health impacts, heart attaches and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Densely populated cities like Manhattan, New York can be affected by UHI impact much more than less populated cities. Even though many studies have been focused on the impact of UHI and temperature changes between urban and rural air temperature, not many look at the temperature variations within a city. These studies mostly use remote sensing data or typical measurements collected by local meteorological station networks. Local meteorological measurements only have local coverage and cannot be used to study the impact of UHI in a city and remote sensing data such as MODIS, LANDSAT and ASTER have with very low resolution which cannot be used for the purpose of this study. Therefore, predicting surface temperature in urban cities using weather data can be useful.Three months of Field campaign in Manhattan were used to measure spatial and temporal temperature variations within an urban setting by placing 10 fixed sensors deployed to measure temperature, relative humidity and sunlight. Fixed instrument shelters containing relative humidity, temperature and illumination sensors were mounted on lampposts in ten different locations in Manhattan (Vant-Hull et al, 2014). The shelters were fixed 3-4 meters above the ground for the period of three months from June 23 to September 20th of 2013 making measurements with the interval of 3 minutes. These high resolution temperature measurements and three months of weather data were used to predict temperature variability from weather forecasts. This study shows that the amplitude of spatial and temporal variation in temperature for each day can be predicted

  2. Improving Weather Research and Forecasting Model Initial Conditions via Surface Pressure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Obsgrid) that creates input data for the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-ARW) is modified to perform a...Configuration  The Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-ARW) V3.6.1 (Skamarock et al. 2008) is applied with 56 vertical...those with more benign weather. On 7 February a trough moved onshore and led to widespread precipitation in the region . More quiescent weather was in

  3. An observed connection between wintertime temperature anomalies over Northwest China and weather regime transitions in North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Qingyun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the association between wintertime temperature anomalies over Northwest China and the weather regime transitions in North Atlantic on synoptic scale is analyzed by using observational surface air temperature (SAT) data and atmospheric reanalysis data. Daily SAT anomaly and duration time are used in order to define SAT anomaly cases. Differences with regard to the circulation anomalies over the Ural Mountains and the upstream North Atlantic area are evident. It is found that the colder than normal SAT is caused by the enhanced Ural high and associated southward flow over Northwest China. Time-lagged composites reveal possible connections between the SAT anomalies and the different development phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The Ural highs tend to be strengthened during the negative phase of NAO (NAO-) to Atlantic ridge transition, which are closely related to the downstream-propagating Rossby wave activity. The opposite circulation patterns are observed in the warm SAT cases. A cyclonic circulation anomaly is distinctly enhanced over the Urals during the positive phase of NAO (NAO+) to Scandinavian blocking transition, which would cause warmer SAT over Northwest China. Further analyses suggest that the intensified zonal wind over North Atlantic would favor the NAO- to Atlantic ridge transition, while the weakened zonal wind may be responsible for the transition between NAO+ and Scandinavian blocking.

  4. An Observed Connection Between Wintertime Temperature Anomalies over Northwest China and Weather Regime Transitions in North Atlantic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李超; 张庆云

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the association between wintertime temperature anomalies over Northwest China and the weather regime transitions in North Atlantic on synoptic scale is analyzed by using observational surface air temperature (SAT) data and atmospheric reanalysis data. Daily SAT anomaly and duration time are used in order to defi ne SAT anomaly cases. Diff erences with regard to the circulation anomalies over the Ural Mountains and the upstream North Atlantic area are evident. It is found that the colder than normal SAT is caused by the enhanced Ural high and associated southward fl ow over Northwest China. Time-lagged composites reveal possible connections between the SAT anomalies and the diff erent development phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The Ural highs tend to be strengthened during the negative phase of NAO (NAO–) to Atlantic ridge transition, which are closely related to the downstream-propagating Rossby wave activity. The opposite circulation patterns are observed in the warm SAT cases. A cyclonic circulation anomaly is distinctly enhanced over the Urals during the positive phase of NAO (NAO+) to Scandinavian blocking transition, which would cause warmer SAT over Northwest China. Further analyses suggest that the intensifi ed zonal wind over North Atlantic would favor the NAO–to Atlantic ridge transition, while the weakened zonal wind may be responsible for the transition between NAO+and Scandinavian blocking.

  5. Snow on the Ross Ice Shelf: comparison of reanalyses and observations from automatic weather stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cohen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of precipitation from the ECMWF ERA-Interim and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis-2 datasets is developed using snow accumulation measurements from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS around the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS, Antarctica. The high temporal resolution of the AWS snow accumulation measurements allow for a new, event-based comparison of reanalyses precipitation to in-situ observations. Snow accumulation records from nine AWS provide multiple years of accumulation data between 2008–2012 over a relatively large, homogeneous region of Antarctica and provide the basis for a statistical evaluation of accumulation events. The analysis shows that ERA-Interim reproduces significantly more precipitation events than NCEP-2 and these events correspond to an average 8.2% more precipitation. Correlations between reanalyses and AWS event sizes are seen at several stations (at > 90% significance levels and show that ERA-Interim consistently produces larger precipitation events than NCEP-2. The significant and complex effects of wind on snow accumulation (which can both limit and enhance accumulation make determining biases in the reanalyses data not possible with the AWS data, however the analysis does illustrate significant and important differences between ERA-Interim and NCEP-2 precipitation.

  6. Distributed Sensor Network for meteorological observations and numerical weather Prediction Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Vas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of weather generally means the solution of differential equations on the base of the measured initial conditions where the data of close and distant neighboring points are used for the calculations. It requires the maintenance of expensive weather stations and supercomputers. However, if weather stations are not only capable of measuring but can also communicate with each other, then these smart sensors can also be applied to run forecasting calculations. This applies the highest possible level of parallelization without the collection of measured data into one place. Furthermore, if more nodes are involved, the result becomes more accurate, but the computing power required from one node does not increase. Our Distributed Sensor Network for meteorological sensing and numerical weather Prediction Calculations (DSN-PC can be applied in several different areas where sensing and numerical calculations, even the solution of differential equations, are needed.

  7. Earth surface erosion and weathering from the 10Be (meteoric)/9Be ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Wittmann, H.; Dannhaus, N.

    2012-12-01

    A perfect clock of the stability of the Earth surface is one that combines a first isotope the flux of which depends on the release rate during erosion, and a second isotope produced at constant rate. The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be is such a system. We provide a quantitative framework for its use. In a weathering zone some of the 9Be, present typically in 2.5ppm concentrations in silicate minerals, is released and partitioned between a reactive phase (adsorbed to clay and hydroxide surfaces, given the high partition coefficients at intermediate pH), and into the dissolved phase. The combined mass flux of both phases is defined by the soil formation rate and a mineral dissolution rate - and is hence proportional to the chemical weathering rate and the denudation rate. At the same time, the surface of the weathering zone is continuously exposed to fallout of meteoric 10Be. This 10Be percolates into the weathering zone where it mixes with dissolved 9Be. Both isotopes may exchange with the adsorbed Be, given that equilibration rate of Be is fast relative to soil residence times. Hence a 10Be/9Be(reactive) ratio results in soils from which the total denudation rate can be calculated. A prerequisite is that the flux of meteoric 10Be is known from field experiments or from global production models [1], that the 9Be concentration in bedrock (mostly 2.5ppm) is known [2], and that the reactive Be can be chemically extracted from soil or sediment [3]. In rivers, when reactive Be and dissolved Be equilibrate, a catchment-wide denudation rate can be determined from both sediment and a sample of filtered river water, where the sediment 10Be/9Be ratio is independent of grain size. We have tested this approach in sediment-bound Be and dissolved Be in water of the Amazon and Orinoco basin. The reactive Be was extracted from sediment by combined hydroxylamine and HCl leaches [2]. In the Amazon trunk stream, the Orinoco, Apure, and La Tigra river 10Be

  8. Surface dynamics of crude and weathered oil in the presence of dispersants: Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander V.; Haus, Brian. K.; McGauley, Michael G.; Dean, Cayla W.; Ortiz-Suslow, David G.; Laxague, Nathan J. M.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-05-01

    Marine oil spills can have dire consequences for the environment. Research on their dynamics is important for the well-being of coastal communities and their economies. Propagation of oil spills is a very complex physical-chemical process. As seen during the Deepwater Horizon event in the Gulf of Mexico during 2010, one of the critical problems remaining for prediction of oil transport and dispersion in the marine environment is the small-scale structure and dynamics of surface oil spills. The laboratory experiments conducted in this work were focused on understanding the differences between the dynamics of crude and weathered oil spills and the effect of dispersants. After deposition on the still water surface, a drop of crude oil quickly spread into a thin slick; while at the same time, a drop of machine (proxy for weathered) oil did not show significant evolution. Subsequent application of dispersant to the crude oil slick resulted in a quick contraction or fragmentation of the slick into narrow wedges and tiny drops. Notably, the slick of machine oil did not show significant change in size or topology after spraying dispersant. An advanced multi-phase, volume of fluid computational fluid dynamics model, incorporating capillary forces, was able to explain some of the features observed in the laboratory experiment. As a result of the laboratory and modeling experiments, the new interpretation of the effect of dispersant on the oil dispersion process including capillary effects has been proposed, which is expected to lead to improved oil spill models and response strategies.

  9. The Main Pillar: Assessment of Space Weather Observational Asset Performance Supporting Nowcasting, Forecasting and Research to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Arik; Hesse, Michael; SaintCyr, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Space weather forecasting critically depends upon availability of timely and reliable observational data. It is therefore particularly important to understand how existing and newly planned observational assets perform during periods of severe space weather. Extreme space weather creates challenging conditions under which instrumentation and spacecraft may be impeded or in which parameters reach values that are outside the nominal observational range. This paper analyzes existing and upcoming observational capabilities for forecasting, and discusses how the findings may impact space weather research and its transition to operations. A single limitation to the assessment is lack of information provided to us on radiation monitor performance, which caused us not to fully assess (i.e., not assess short term) radiation storm forecasting. The assessment finds that at least two widely spaced coronagraphs including L4 would provide reliability for Earth-bound CMEs. Furthermore, all magnetic field measurements assessed fully meet requirements. However, with current or even with near term new assets in place, in the worst-case scenario there could be a near-complete lack of key near-real-time solar wind plasma data of severe disturbances heading toward and impacting Earth's magnetosphere. Models that attempt to simulate the effects of these disturbances in near real time or with archival data require solar wind plasma observations as input. Moreover, the study finds that near-future observational assets will be less capable of advancing the understanding of extreme geomagnetic disturbances at Earth, which might make the resulting space weather models unsuitable for transition to operations.

  10. Observations of surface radon in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Piero Di; Pitari, Giovanni; de Luca, Natalia; Battisti, Domenico

    2009-07-01

    Two years of in situ radon concentration measurements in the atmospheric surface layer have been collected in a central Italy town (L’Aquila), located in the Aterno river valley. These data have been analyzed in order to study the controlling mechanisms of surface radon abundance; observations of coincident meteorological parameters confirmed the role of dynamics on the local removal rate of this tracer. The relatively high negative correlation of hourly data of surface wind speed and radon activity concentration ( R = -0.54, on annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon is one of the most important controlling processes of the tracer accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. An attempt is made to quantify the precipitation impact on radon soil fluxes. No anticorrelation of radon and precipitation comes out from the data ( R = -0.15), as in previous studies. However, since the main physical parameter affecting the ground radon release is expected to be the soil accumulation of water, snow or ice, the emission flux has also been correlated with soil moisture; in this way a much clearer anticorrelation is found ( R = -0.54).

  11. The ELDORA/ASTRAIA Airborne Doppler Weather Radar: High-Resolution Observations from TOGA COARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Walther, Craig A.; Frush, Charles; Randall, Mitchell; Loew, Eric; Neitzel, Richard; Parsons, Richard; Testud, Jacques; Baudin, François; Lecornec, Alain

    1996-02-01

    The ELDORA/ASTRAIA (Electra Doppler Radar/Analyese Stereoscopic par Impulsions Aeroporte) airborne Doppler weather radar was recently placed in service by the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the Centre d'étude des Environnements Terrestre et Planetaires in France. After a multiyear development effort, the radar saw its first field tests in the TOGA COARE (Tropical Oceans-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment) field program during January and February 1993. The ELDORA/ASTRAIA radar (herein referred to as ELDORA) is designed to provide high-resolution measurements of the air motion and rainfall characteristics of very large storms, storms that are frequently too large or too remote to be adequately observed by ground-based radars. This paper discusses the measurement requirements and the design goals of the radar and concludes with an evaluation of the performance of the system using data from TOGA COARE.The performance evaluation includes data from two cases. First, observations of a mesoscale convective system on 9 February 1993 are used to compare the data quality of the ELDORA radar with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration P-3 airborne Doppler radars. The large-scale storm structure and airflow from ELDORA are seen to compare quite well with analyses using data from the P-3 radars. The major differences observed between the ELDORA and P-3 radar analyses were due to the higher resolution of the ELDORA data and due to the different domains observed by the individual radars, a result of the selection of flight track past the storm for each aircraft. In a second example, the high-resolution capabilities of ELDORA are evaluated using observations of a shear-parallel mesoscale convective system (MCS) that occurred on 18 February 1993. This MCS line was characterized by shear-parallel clusters of small convective cells, clusters that were moving quickly with the low-level winds. High-resolution analysis of these

  12. Global surface-based cloud observation for ISCCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Visual observations of cloud cover are hindered at night due to inadequate illumination of the clouds. This usually leads to an underestimation of the average cloud cover at night, especially for the amounts of middle and high clouds, in climatologies on surface observations. The diurnal cycles of cloud amounts, if based on all the surface observations, are therefore in error, but they can be obtained more accurately if the nighttime observations are screened to select those made under sufficient moonlight. Ten years of nighttime weather observations from the northern hemisphere in December were classified according to the illuminance of moonlight or twilight on the cloud tops, and a threshold level of illuminance was determined, above which the clouds are apparently detected adequately. This threshold corresponds to light from a full moon at an elevation angle of 6 degrees or from a partial moon at higher elevation, or twilight from the sun less than 9 degrees below the horizon. It permits the use of about 38% of the observations made with the sun below the horizon. The computed diurnal cycles of total cloud cover are altered considerably when this moonlight criterion is imposed. Maximum cloud cover over much of the ocean is now found to be at night or in the morning, whereas computations obtained without benefit of the moonlight criterion, as in our published atlases, showed the time of maximum to be noon or early afternoon in many regions. Cloud cover is greater at night than during the day over the open oceans far from the continents, particularly in summer. However, near noon maxima are still evident in the coastal regions, so that the global annual average oceanic cloud cover is still slightly greater during the day than at night, by 0.3%. Over land, where daytime maxima are still obtained but with reduced amplitude, average cloud cover is 3.3% greater during the daytime. The diurnal cycles of total cloud cover we obtain are compared with those of ISCCP for a

  13. Influence of surface modified nano silica on alkyd binder before and after accelerated weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nguyen, Hiep Dinh; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of nano fillers in exterior wood coatings is not straight forward. Influence on aging of polymer binder needs to be taken into account along with possible benefits that nano fillers can provide immediately after application. This study shows the influence of two differently modified...... hydrophobic nano silica on an alkyd binder for exterior wood coatings. One month after application, the highest strength and energy required to break the films was obtained with addition of 3% disilazane modified silica. Changes in tensile properties were accompanied with a small increase in glass transition...... temperature. However, the highest stability upon accelerated weathering, measured by ATR-IR and DMA, was for nano composites with the highest amount of nano filler. The reasons for the observed changes are discussed together with the appearance of a feature that is possibly a secondary relaxation of alkyd...

  14. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  15. Decoupling of ground level pressures observed in Italian volcanoes: are they driven by space weather geo-effectiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Madonia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on correlation drops between near-ground atmospheric pressures measured at sea level and at higher altitudes on Italian volcanoes have been carried out. We looked for perturbations of the atmospheric pressure field driven by volcanic activity, but not excluding possible external triggers for the observed anomalies. Decorrelations between atmospheric pressures measured at Stromboli Island in stations located at different altitudes (years 2002-10 have been analysed and compared with data from other volcanic (Vesuvius and non volcanic (Mt. Soro orographic structures. We investigated as their possible triggers volcanic, meteorological and space weather parameters, with particular attention to Total Solar Irradiance (TSI, Kp index and Forbush decreases. Pressure decorrelations seems to be driven by astronomic cycles, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. A further contribution was found, seemingly assignable to TSI anomalies, with correlation minima occurring 12 hours after these but only during phases of high Sun activity. Moreover, during the same phases a main periodicity of about 27 days in pressure decorrelations was revealed by FFT analysis. This period is the same of the Sun Carrington rotation, expressing the periodic reappearance of sunspot groups on Sun’s surface. The strong similarity between recurrences of sunspot number and atmospheric pressure anomalies further supports the role of the former as a possible trigger for the latter.

  16. Weathering and vegetation controls on nickel isotope fractionation in surface ultramafic environments (Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, Nicolas; Cloquet, Christophe; Echevarria, Guillaume; Sterckeman, Thibault; Deng, Tenghaobo; Tang, YeTao; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    to be isotopically heavier than the soil (Δ60Niwhole plant-soil up to 0.40‰). Fractions of Ni extracted by DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) presented isotopically heavy compositions compared to the soil (Δ60NiDTPA-soil up to 0.89‰), supporting the hypothesis that the dissolved Ni fraction controlled by weathering has a heavy isotope signature. The non-hyperaccumulators (n = 2) were inclined to take up and translocate light Ni isotopes with a large degree of fractionation (Δ60Nileaves-roots up to - 0.60 ‰). For Ni-hyperaccumulators (n = 7), significant isotopic fractionation was observed in the plants in their early growth stages, while no fractionation occurred during later growth stages, when plants are fully loaded with Ni. This suggests that (i) the high-efficiency translocation process involved in hyperaccumulators does not fractionate Ni isotopes, and (ii) the root uptake process mainly controls the isotopic composition of the plant. In ultramafic contexts, vegetation composed of hyperaccumulators can significantly influence isotopic compositions through its remobilization in the upper soil horizon, thereby influencing the isotopic balance of Ni exported to rivers.

  17. Weather types across the Caribbean basin and their relationship with rainfall and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Vincent; Gouirand, Isabelle; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Eight weather types (WTs) are computed over 98.75°W-56.25°W, 8.75°N-31.25°N using cluster analysis of daily low-level (925 hPa) winds and outgoing longwave radiation, without removing the mean annual cycle, by a k-means algorithm from 1979 to 2013. The WTs can be firstly interpreted as snapshots of the annual cycle with a clear distinction between 5 "wintertime" and 3 "summertime" WTs, which account together for 70 % of the total mean annual rainfall across the studied domain. The wintertime WTs occur mostly from late November to late April and are characterized by varying intensity and location of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and transient synoptic troughs along the northern edge of the domain. Large-scale subsidence dominates the whole basin but rainfall can occur over sections of the basin, especially on the windward shores of the troughs associated with the synoptic waves. The transition between wintertime and summertime WTs is rather abrupt, especially in May. One summertime WT (WT 4) is prevalent in summer, and almost exclusive around late July. It is characterized by strong NASH, fast Caribbean low level jet and rainfall mostly concentrated over the Caribbean Islands, the Florida Peninsula, the whole Central America and the tropical Eastern Pacific. The two remaining summertime WTs display widespread rainfall respectively from Central America to Bermuda (WT 5) and over the Eastern Caribbean (WT 6). Both WTs combine reduced regional scale subsidence and weaker Caribbean low-level jet relatively to WT 4. The relationships between WT frequency and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events are broadly linear. Warm central and eastern ENSO events are associated with more WT 4 (less WT 5-6) during boreal summer and autumn (0) while this relationship is reversed during boreal summer (+1) for central events only. In boreal winter, the largest anomalies are observed for two WTs consistent with negative (WT 2) and positive (WT 8) phases of the

  18. Comparison of surface water chemistry and weathering effects of two lake basins in the Changtang Nature Reserve, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Zhaofei; Jiang, Liguang; Yao, Zhijun; Wang, Junbo; Ju, Jianting

    2016-03-01

    The geochemistry of natural waters in the Changtang Nature Reserve, northern Tibet, can help us understand the geology of catchments, and provide additional insight in surface processes that influence water chemistry such as rock weathering on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. However, severe natural conditions are responsible for a lack of scientific data for this area. This study represents the first investigation of the chemical composition of surface waters and weathering effects in two lake basins in the reserve (Lake Dogaicoring Qiangco and Lake Longwei Co). The results indicate that total dissolved solids (TDS) in the two lakes are significantly higher than in other gauged lakes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, reaching 20-40g/L, and that TDS of the tectonic lake (Lake Dogaicoring Qiangco) is significantly higher than that of the barrier lake (Lake Longwei Co). Na(+) and Cl(-) are the dominant ions in the lake waters as well as in the glacier-fed lake inflows, with chemical compositions mainly affected by halite weathering. In contrast, ion contents of inflowing rivers fed by nearby runoff are lower and concentrations of dominant ions are not significant. Evaporite, silicate, and carbonate weathering has relatively equal effects on these rivers. Due to their limited scope, small streams near the lakes are less affected by carbonate than by silicate weathering.

  19. Labrador Sea surface temperature control on the summer weather in the Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatiuk, Natalia; Vihma, Timo; Bobylev, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have addressed the linkages between the Arctic Amplification and mid-latitude weather patterns. Most of them have focused on the effects of changes in sea ice, terrestrial snow or open ocean SST on the air temperature in selected mid-latitude areas. However, when analysing such potential linkages, one should be aware that from the point of view of the atmosphere it is almost the same whether the thermal forcing originates from the sea ice melt, snowmelt, or changes in SST. Most important is to quantify how the atmosphere responds to anomalies in the surface temperature and then affects weather patterns in remote areas. For this purpose, we studied the hemispheric-scale relationships between anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere Earth surface temperature (Ts) and 2-m air temperature (T2m) in mid-latitudes (Central and Eastern Europe). Using regression analyses based on the ERA-Interim reanalysis data, we assessed the said temperature relationships with focus on the lagged monthly and inter-seasonal linkages. Technically we divided the Northern Hemisphere in equal areas with a size of 15x10 degrees and calculated correlation coefficients for the monthly mean temperatures between all defined regions from one side and the Central/East European study regions from another side over the period 1979-2014. Using this approach, we found that the strongest links in the considered kind of relationships take place between spring sea surface temperature in the Labrador Sea and summer air (T2m) temperature in the Eastern Europe. In order to confirm the correlation results obtained, to identify thermal forcing factors and to assess their relative importance, we analysed the multiyear averages and anomalies of various meteorological parameters for 10 coldest and 10 warmest springs and summers in the period 1979-2014: surface pressure, total precipitation, sea-ice and total cloud cover, wind components, surface solar radiation downwards, surface heat fluxes and air

  20. Soil, snow, weather, and sub-surface storage data from a mountain catchment in the rain-snow transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive hydroclimatic data set is presented for the 2011 water year to improve understanding of hydrologic processes in the rain-snow transition zone. Catchment soil depths and surface texture from 57 points are presented along with soil moisture, snow cover, weather data, and associated hy...

  1. Fundamental statistical relationships between monthly and daily meteorological variables: Temporal downscaling of weather based on a global observational dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Philipp; Kaplan, Jed

    2016-04-01

    Accurate modelling of large-scale vegetation dynamics, hydrology, and other environmental processes requires meteorological forcing on daily timescales. While meteorological data with high temporal resolution is becoming increasingly available, simulations for the future or distant past are limited by lack of data and poor performance of climate models, e.g., in simulating daily precipitation. To overcome these limitations, we may temporally downscale monthly summary data to a daily time step using a weather generator. Parameterization of such statistical models has traditionally been based on a limited number of observations. Recent developments in the archiving, distribution, and analysis of "big data" datasets provide new opportunities for the parameterization of a temporal downscaling model that is applicable over a wide range of climates. Here we parameterize a WGEN-type weather generator using more than 50 million individual daily meteorological observations, from over 10'000 stations covering all continents, based on the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) and Synoptic Cloud Reports (EECRA) databases. Using the resulting "universal" parameterization and driven by monthly summaries, we downscale mean temperature (minimum and maximum), cloud cover, and total precipitation, to daily estimates. We apply a hybrid gamma-generalized Pareto distribution to calculate daily precipitation amounts, which overcomes much of the inability of earlier weather generators to simulate high amounts of daily precipitation. Our globally parameterized weather generator has numerous applications, including vegetation and crop modelling for paleoenvironmental studies.

  2. Effect of Photostablizers on Surface Color and Mechanical Property of Wood-flour/HDPE Composites after Weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ping; JIA Mingyin; WANG Kejian; DING Yun; WANG Linna

    2012-01-01

    The effects of photostabilizers of ultraviolet absorbers (UVA),hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS) and pigment on surface color change and mechanical properties of weathered wood-flour/polyethylene (HDPE) composites were investigated.After being added UVA with high UV absorbance,the WPC exhibites better ability to resist color fading and mechanical property loss.High molecular weight HALS is found to be the most effective in controlling long term fading and yellowing changes.Pigments cover the composites for remaining the original color after weathering regardless of less contribution to mechanical property.Addition of photostabilizer and pigment together show great synergism in decreasing color fading and flexural property loss.

  3. Near-Real Time Satellite-Retrieved Cloud and Surface Properties for Weather and Aviation Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Nguyen, Louis; Palikonda, Rabindra; Hong, Gang; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chee, Thad; Scarino, Benjamin; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sun-Mack, Szedung; Fleeger, Cecilia; Ayers, J. Kirk; Chang, Fu-Lung; Heck, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Cloud properties determined from satellite imager radiances provide a valuable source of information for nowcasting and weather forecasting. In recent years, it has been shown that assimilation of cloud top temperature, optical depth, and total water path can increase the accuracies of weather analyses and forecasts. Aircraft icing conditions can be accurately diagnosed in near-­-real time (NRT) retrievals of cloud effective particle size, phase, and water path, providing valuable data for pilots. NRT retrievals of surface skin temperature can also be assimilated in numerical weather prediction models to provide more accurate representations of solar heating and longwave cooling at the surface, where convective initiation. These and other applications are being exploited more frequently as the value of NRT cloud data become recognized. At NASA Langley, cloud properties and surface skin temperature are being retrieved in near-­-real time globally from both geostationary (GEO) and low-­-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite imagers for weather model assimilation and nowcasting for hazards such as aircraft icing. Cloud data from GEO satellites over North America are disseminated through NCEP, while those data and global LEO and GEO retrievals are disseminated from a Langley website. This paper presents an overview of the various available datasets, provides examples of their application, and discusses the use of the various datasets downstream. Future challenges and areas of improvement are also presented.

  4. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  5. Weathering performance of surface of thermally modified wood finished with nanoparticles-modified waterborne polyacrylate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklečić, Josip; Turkulin, Hrvoje; Jirouš-Rajković, Vlatka

    2017-06-01

    In this research the samples of thermally modified (TMT) beech wood samples, finished with waterborne polyacrylate clear coatings modified with nano-sized ZnO and TiO2-rutil were naturally and artificially exposed to weathering conditions. To extend the lifetime of wood and maintain its natural look, the research and development of clear coatings with minimal use of harmful chemicals has become very important. Therefore nano-sized inorganic UV absorbers are increasingly used to enhance the durability of the coating and wood substrate, still retaining the transparency of the coating. During exposure the visual inspection was performed, further the changes of colour, gloss and adhesion were recorded. Interaction of the film with the thermally modified substrate surface were studied. Results showed that the addition of TiO2-rutil and ZnO nanoparticles to the waterborne polyacrylate coating improved the colour stability of thermally modified beech-wood. However, nano-sized ZnO increased the cracking and peeling, and caused the loss in adhesion strength of the film on thermally modified beech wood.

  6. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  7. Swarm Utilisation Analysis: LEO satellite observations for the ESA's SSA Space Weather network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Stolle, Claudia; Rauberg, Jan; Olsen, Nils; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Gullikstad Johnsen, Magnar; Hall, Chris

    2017-04-01

    ESA's (European Space Agency) constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites achieved their final constellation on 17 April 2014 and since then Swarm-A and Swarm-C orbiting the Earth at about 470 km (flying side-by-side) and Swarm-B at about 520 km altitude. Each of Swarm satellite carries instruments with high precision to measure magnetic and electric fields, neutral and plasma densities, and TEC (Total Electron Content) for which a dual frequency GPS receiver is used. SUA (Swarm Utilisation Analysis) is a project of the ESA's SSA (Space Situational Awareness) SWE (Space Weather) program. Within this framework GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany) and DTU (National Space Institute, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark) have developed two new Swarm products ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) and PEJ (Location and intensity level of Polar Electrojets), respectively. ROT is derived as the first time derivative from the Swarm measurements of TEC at 1 Hz sampling. ROT is highly relevant for users in navigation and communications: strong plasma gradients cause GPS signal degradation or even loss of GPS signal. Also, ROT is a relevant space weather asset irrespective of geomagnetic activity, e.g., high amplitude values of ROT occur during all geomagnetic conditions. PEJ is derived from the Swarm measurements of the magnetic field strength at 1 Hz sampling. PEJ has a high-level importance for power grid companies since the polar electrojet is a major cause for ground-induced currents. ROT and PEJ together with five existing Swarm products TEC, electron density, IBI (Ionospheric Bubble Index), FAC (Field-Aligned Current), and vector magnetic field build the SUA service prototype. This prototype will be integrated into ESA's SSA Space Weather network as a federated service and will be available soon from ESA's SSA SWE Ionospheric Weather and Geomagnetic Conditions Expert Service Centres (ESCs).

  8. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  9. Road Weather and Connected Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, P.; Boyce, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    On average, there are over 5.8 M vehicle crashes each year of which 23% are weather-related. Weather-related crashes are defined as those crashes that occur in adverse weather or on slick pavement. The vast majority of weather-related crashes happen on wet pavement (74%) and during rainfall (46%). Connected vehicle technologies hold the promise to transform road-weather management by providing improved road weather data in real time with greater temporal and geographic accuracy. This will dramatically expand the amount of data that can be used to assess, forecast, and address the impacts that weather has on roads, vehicles, and travelers. The use of vehicle-based measurements of the road and surrounding atmosphere with other, more traditional weather data sources, and create road and atmospheric hazard products for a variety of users. The broad availability of road weather data from mobile sources will vastly improve the ability to detect and forecast weather and road conditions, and will provide the capability to manage road-weather response on specific roadway links. The RWMP is currently demonstrating how weather, road conditions, and related vehicle data can be used for decision making through an innovative Integrated Mobile Observations project. FHWA is partnering with 3 DOTs (MN, MI, & NV) to pilot these applications. One is a mobile alerts application called the Motorists Advisories and Warnings (MAW) and a maintenance decision support application. These applications blend traditional weather information (e.g., radar, surface stations) with mobile vehicle data (e.g., temperature, brake status, wiper status) to determine current weather conditions. These weather conditions, and other road-travel-relevant information, are provided to users via web and phone applications. The MAW provides nowcasts and short-term forecasts out to 24 hours while the EMDSS application can provide forecasts up to 72 hours in advance. The three DOTs have placed readers and external

  10. Problems at the Leading Edge of Space Weathering as Revealed by TEM Combined with Surface Science Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Both transmission electron micros-copy (TEM) and surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were instrumen-tal in making the first characterizations of material generated by space weathering in lunar samples [1,2]. Without them, the nature of nanophase metallic Fe (npFe0) correlated with the surface of lunar regolith grains would have taken much longer to become rec-ognized and understood. Our groups at JSC and UVa have been using both techniques in a cross-correlated way to investigate how the solar wind contributes to space weathering [e.g., 3]. These efforts have identified a number of ongoing problems and knowledge gaps. Key insights made by UVa group leader Raul Barag-iola during this work are gratefully remembered.

  11. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, P.; Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J. M.; Gómez, M. A.; Hortal, A. R.; Martínez-Haya, B.

    2013-10-01

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  12. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, P., E-mail: mportcal@upo.es [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain); Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J.M. [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain); Gómez, M.A. [Instituto Andaluz de Patrimonio Histórico, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Hortal, A.R.; Martínez-Haya, B. [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  13. Modeling land-surface processes and land-atmosphere interactions in the community weather and regional climate WRF model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Barlage, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been widely used with high-resolution configuration in the weather and regional climate communities, and hence demands its land-surface models to treat not only fast-response processes, such as plant evapotranspiration that are important for numerical weather prediction but also slow-evolving processes such as snow hydrology and interactions between surface soil water and deep aquifer. Correctly representing urbanization, which has been traditionally ignored in coarse-resolution modeling, is critical for applying WRF to air quality and public health research. To meet these demands, numerous efforts have been undertaken to improve land-surface models (LSM) in WRF, including the recent implementation of the Noah-MP (Noah Multiple-Physics). Noah-MP uses multiple options for key sub-grid land-atmosphere interaction processes (Niu et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011), and contains a separate vegetation canopy representing within- and under-canopy radiation and turbulent processes, a multilayer physically-based snow model, and a photosynthesis canopy resistance parameterization with a dynamic vegetation model. This paper will focus on the interactions between fast and slow land processes through: 1) a benchmarking of the Noah-MP performance, in comparison to five widely-used land-surface models, in simulating and diagnosing snow evolution for complex terrain forested regions, and 2) the effects of interactions between shallow and deep aquifers on regional weather and climate. Moreover, we will provide an overview of recent improvements of the integrated WRF-Urban modeling system, especially its hydrological enhancements that takes into account the effects of lawn irrigation, urban oasis, evaporation from pavements, anthropogenic moisture sources, and a green-roof parameterization.

  14. Modelling surface drifting of buoys during a rapidly-moving weather front in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gästgifvars, Maria; Lauri, Hannu; Sarkanen, Annakaisa; Myrberg, Kai; Andrejev, Oleg; Ambjörn, Cecilia

    2006-12-01

    The Gulf of Finland is an elongated estuary located in the north-eastern extremity of the Baltic Sea. This semi-enclosed sea-area is subject to heavy sea traffic, and is one of the main risk areas for oil accidents in the Baltic. The continuous development and validation of operational particle drift and oil-spill forecasting systems is thus seen to be essential for this sea-area. Here, the results of a three-day drift experiment in May 2003 are discussed. The field studies were performed using GPS-positioned surface floating buoys. The aim of this paper is to evaluate how well models can reproduce the drift of these buoys. Model simulations, both in forecast and hindcast modes, were carried out by three different 3D hydrodynamic models, the results of which are evaluated by comparing the calculated drifts with observations. These models were forced by HIRLAM (High Resolution Limited Area Model) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological forecast fields. The simulated drift of the buoys showed a good agreement with observations even when, during the study period, a rapidly-changing wind situation was observed to affect the investigation area; in this situation the winds turned about 100 degrees in half an hour. In such a case it is a very complicated task to forecast the drifters' routes: there is a need to regularly update the meteorological forcing fields and to use these regularly-updated fields throughout the simulations. It is furthermore recommended that forecasts should be made using several circulation models and several meteorological forecasts, in order to get an overview of the accuracy of the forecasted drifts and related differences in between the forecasts.

  15. Assimilation of microwave, infrared, and radio occultation satellite observations with a weather research and forecasting model for heavy rainfall forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyuen, Pakornpop; Wu, Falin; Phunthirawuth, Parwapath; Zhao, Yan

    2016-10-01

    In this research, satellite observation data were assimilated into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) by using Three-dimensional Variational Data Assimilation System (3DVAR) to analyze its impacts on heavy rainfall forecasts. The weather case for this research was during 13-18 September 2015. Tropical cyclone VAMCO, forming in South China Sea near with Vietnam, moved on west direction to the Northeast of Thailand. After passed through Vietnam, the tropical cyclone was become to depression and there was heavy rainfall throughout the area of Thailand. Observation data, used in this research, included microwave radiance observations from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), infrared radiance observations from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and GPS radio occultation (RO) from the COSMIC and CHAMP missions. The experiments were designed in five cases, namely, 1) without data assimilation (CTRL); 2) with only RO data (RO); 3) with only AMSU-A data (AMSUA); 4) with only IASI data (IASI); and 5) with all of RO, AMSU-A and IASI data assimilation (ALL). Then all experiment results would be compared with both NCEP FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis and the observation data from Thai Meteorological Department weather stations. The experiments result demonstrated that with microwave (AMSU-A), infrared (IASI) and GPS radio occultation (RO) data assimilation can produce the positive impact on analyses and forecast. All of satellite data assimilations have corresponding positive effects in term of temperature and humidity forecasting, and the GPS-RO assimilation produces the best of temperature and humidity forecast biases. The satellite data assimilation has a good impact on temperature and humidity in lower troposphere and vertical distribution that very helpful for heavy rainfall forecast improvement.

  16. Architecture vision and technologies for post-NPOESS weather prediction system: two-way interactive observing and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Michael W.; Higgins, Glenn J.; Mahoney, Robert L.; Lutz, Robert; Mauk, Robin; Seablom, Michael; Talabac, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    A recently completed two-year NASA-sponsored study on Advanced Weather Forecasting Technologies envisions that given the opportunity to realize key technological advances over the next quarter century, and with judicious infrastructure and technology investments, it may be possible to significantly extend the skill range of model based weather forecasting via real-time two-way feedbacks between computer forecast models and highly networked, intelligent observing systems (Sensor Webs). Through this linkage, the observing system will have access to information about the present and evolving state of the atmosphere and, most importantly, have the intelligence to act on information about the future states of the atmosphere derived from the forecast model. An ultimate aim is full dynamic situation-driven observing system reconfigurability. The system is conceived to enable operational expression of optimized targeted observing. Ideas are presented on how the entire system might be designed and operated from the perspectives of the underlying science, technology evolution, and system engineering in order to provide the needed coordination between and among space- and ground-based observing and forecast model operations. The greatest challenges lay with the development of the large scale deep infrastructure on which the more advanced proposed forecast system functionality depends.

  17. Two Rare Northern Entoloma Species Observed in Sicily under Exceptionally Cold Weather Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Venturella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology and ecology of many Entoloma species is still poorly known as well as their geographical distribution. In Italy, there are no studies on the influence of weather on fungal abundance and richness and our knowledge on the ecology and distribution of Entoloma species needs to be improved. The discovery of two Entoloma species in Sicily (southern Italy, reported in the literature as belonging to the habitat of north European countries, was the basis leading to the assumption that anomalous climatic conditions could stimulate the growth of northern entolomas in the southernmost Mediterranean regions. The results of this study show that the presence of northern Entoloma species in Sicily is not influenced by the Mediterranean type of vegetation, by edaphic or altitudinal factors but by anomalous climatic trends of precipitations and temperatures which stimulate the fructification of basidiomata in correspondence with a thermal shock during autumn.

  18. Baumholder, Germany (West), Limited Surface Observations Climatic Summary (LISOCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-09

    precipitatiou, falling to the ground, not freezing. Freezing rain and/or freez4 ’!_Gdrizzle ( glaze ) - Precipitation falling in liquid form, but freezing...HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 1-l9c SAU𔃾HOLDER DL CF__________________ *flTW Stat. MAS nsa nUT ALL WEATHER CLALOG anN-i I-.0-k SPEED Ml1~7 1 7~ sAEAN (KNtS) 1.3 7

  19. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Patuxent River, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) SIm WTAT I@N M&IE VtlIM * 0KK ,L L LAT- - SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 1-3 4•6 7.10 11 -16 17 -21 22 • 27 28 - 33 34 -40 41...A• td * E.ŕ,I*2 __ ___ NAvAL WEATHER SERVICE DETACHW.!NT. ASHEVILLE. NC CEILING VERSUS

  20. Identification of weathered structures and aquifers from resistivity observations in the Strengbach catchment (Vosges, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance, Julien; Sailhac, Pascal; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Viville, Daniel; Pierret, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    In low mountain regions, natural water resources used for agriculture or drinking water generally come from natural sources. Management of these water resources is complex for some catchments where most of the water flows is exfiltrating from bedrock aquifers characterized by important spatial heterogeneity and different connectivity levels in space and time. The Strengbach catchment (Vosges, North East France) is a hydro-geochemical observatory monitored for more than 25 years. The numerous geochemical studies have highlighted the existence of different lithological and structural units in the catchment constituted by different weathered granitic aquifers. Their spatial extension has been determined through the measurement of the soil electrical resistivity using 20 Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles. The profiles have been inverted separately with the BERT software in 2D and compared to 2.5 D inversions, where the inversion accounts for the profile crossings. The comparison between 2D and 2.5D inversion results allows validating the 2-D assumption. The 20 profiles are distributed over the complete catchment and cover more densely the water source area of the Strengbach stream. The shallow resistivities (5-10 m) measured highlight several weathered zones possibly characterized by different porosity. A combined analysis with soil water conductivity measurements in boreholes allows proposing a map of the spatial extension of these units. The resistivity data are also used to assess the depth of the main reservoir at the scale of the catchment. The hypothesis of the existence of a deeper reservoir is brought out by Audio-Magneto Telluric (AMT) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurements.

  1. Simulations and Tests of Prototype Antenna System for Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) Space Payload for Space Weather Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.; Joshi, B. C.; Manoharan, P. K.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.

    2016-03-01

    Low frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) is a proposed space payload for space weather observations from space, operating between few kHz to 30 MHz. This paper presents preliminary design and practical implementation of LORE antenna systems, which consist of three mutually orthogonal mono-poles. Detailed computational electromagnetic simulations, carried out to study the performance of the antenna systems, are presented followed up by laboratory tests of the antennas as well as radiation tests with a long range test range, designed for this purpose. These tests form the first phase of the design and implementation of the full LORE prototype later in the year.

  2. Surface analysis and anti-graffiti behavior of a weathered polyurethane-based coating embedded with hydrophobic nano silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabea, A. Mohammad; Mohseni, M.; Mirabedini, S. M.; Tabatabaei, M. Hashemi

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a permanent anti-graffiti polyurethane coating was prepared using concomitant loading of an OH-functional silicone modified polyacrylate additive ranging from 2 to 15 mol% and hydrophobic silica nanoparticles from 1 to 5 wt%. UV-visible spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) analysis were conducted on selected samples to study the weathering performance of samples containing various amounts of silica nanoparticles before and after accelerated weathering conditions. The results showed that higher amounts of additive had inferior effects on the anti-graffiti performance of the coating samples after exposure. However, silica nanoparticles could positively affect the anti-graffiti performance against ageing cycles. This improvement was attributed to lower degradation of samples containing silica nanoparticles and barrier property of nanoparticles against graffiti penetration. The presence of silica nanoparticles did not have any significant effect on the surface free energy of the samples prior and after ageing.

  3. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  4. Meteorite Falls Observed in U.S. Weather Radar Data in 2015 and 2016 (To Date)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc; Fries, Jeffrey; Hankey, Mike; Matson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    To date, over twenty meteorite falls have been located in the weather radar imagery of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s NEXRAD radar network. We present here the most prominent events recorded since the last Meteoritical Society meeting, covering most of 2015 and early 2016. Meteorite Falls: The following events produced evidence of falling meteorites in radar imagery and resulted in meteorites recovered at the fall site. Creston, CA (24 Oct 2015 0531 UTC): This event generated 218 eyewitness reports submitted to the American Meteor Society (AMS) and is recorded as event #2635 for 2015 on the AMS website. Witnesses reported a bright fireball with fragmentation terminating near the city of Creston, CA, north of Los Angeles. Sonic booms and electrophonic noise were reported in the vicinity of the event. Weather radar imagery records signatures consistent with falling meteorites in data from the KMUX, KVTX, KHNX and KVBX. The Meteoritical Society records the Creston fall as an L6 meteorite with a total recovered mass of 688g. Osceola, FL (24 Jan 2016 1527 UTC): This daytime fireball generated 134 eyewitness reports on AMS report number 266 for 2016, with one credible sonic boom report. The fireball traveled roughly NE to SW with a terminus location north of Lake City, FL in sparsely populated, forested countryside. Radar imagery shows distinct and prominent evidence of a significant meteorite fall with radar signatures seen in data from the KJAX and KVAX radars. Searchers at the fall site found that recoveries were restricted to road sites by the difficult terrain, and yet several meteorites were recovered. Evidence indicates that this was a relatively large meteorite fall where most of the meteorites are unrecoverable due to terrain. Osceola is an L6 meteorite with 991 g total mass recovered to date. Mount Blanco, TX (18 Feb 2016 0343 UTC): This event produced only 39 eyewitness reports and is recorded as AMS event #635 for 2016. No

  5. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  6. Dyeing of Snow Surfaces to Observe Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    of freezeup problems important to obtain a clear visual perspective and with water. We found that both coloring agents to obtain good photographic...a dye of methanol coloring in with floodlights, whereas Figure 7b is a view of the water. Freezeup at the sprayer nozzle was one same area lighted...from behind, problem and the snow surface had a blemished appearance because of the addition of the water, which then froze. Freezeup may not be a

  7. From the surface to the deep critical zone: Linking soil carbon, fluid saturation and weathering rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, Jennifer; Lawrence, Corey; Oster, Jessica; Rempe, Daniella; Dietrich, William

    2017-04-01

    Shallow soils from a wide range of ecosystems demonstrate a clear and consistent relationship between effective fluid saturation and the rate at which organic carbon is converted to CO2. While the underlying mechanisms contributing to this dependence are diverse, a consistent pattern of maximum CO2 production at intermediate soil moisture supports a generalized functional relationship, which may be incorporated into a quantitative reactive transport framework. A key result of this model development is a prediction of the extent to which the inorganic carbon content of water in biologically active soils varies as a function of hydrologic parameters (i.e. moisture content and residence time), and in turn influences weathering reactions. Deeper in the CZ, the consistency of this relationship and the influence of hydrologically - regulated CO2 production on the rates of water - rock interaction are largely unknown. Here, we use a novel reactive transport model incorporating this functional relationship to consider how variations in the reactive potential of water entering the vadose zone influences subsurface weathering rates. We leverage two examples of variably saturated natural systems to consider (1) CO2 production and associated weathering potential regulated by seasonal hydrologic shifts and (2) the preservation of soil carbon signatures in the deep CZ over millennial timescales. First, at the Eel River CZ Observatory in Northern California, USA, a novel Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VMS) installed in a 14 - 20 m thick unsaturated section offers an unprecedented view into the physical, chemical and biological behavior of the depth profile separating soils from groundwater. Based on soil moisture, gas and fluid phase samples, we demonstrate a predictive relationship between seasonal hydrologic variations and the location and magnitude of geochemical weathering rates. Second, an environmental monitoring project in the Blue Springs Cave, Sparta, TN, USA, provides

  8. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on a land surface model (LSM) apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. In the West, higher latent heat fluxes prevailed, which enhanced the rates of evapotranspiration and soil moisture depletion in the LSM. By late Summer and Autumn, both the average sensible and latent heat fluxes increased in the West as a result of the more rapid soil drying and higher coverage of GVF. The impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP was also examined for a single severe weather case study using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate coupled LIS/WRF model simulations were made for the 17 July 2010 severe weather event in the Upper Midwest using the NCEP and SPoRT GVFs, with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and

  9. Retrieving Clear-Sky Surface Skin Temperature for Numerical Weather Prediction Applications from Geostationary Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojuan Shan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric models rely on high-accuracy, high-resolution initial radiometric and surface conditions for better short-term meteorological forecasts, as well as improved evaluation of global climate models. Remote sensing of the Earth’s energy budget, particularly with instruments flown on geostationary satellites, allows for near-real-time evaluation of cloud and surface radiation properties. The persistence and coverage of geostationary remote sensing instruments grant the frequent retrieval of near-instantaneous quasi-global skin temperature. Among other cloud and clear-sky retrieval parameters, NASA Langley provides a non-polar, high-resolution land and ocean skin temperature dataset for atmospheric modelers by applying an inverted correlated k-distribution method to clear-pixel values of top-of-atmosphere infrared temperature. The present paper shows that this method yields clear-sky skin temperature values that are, for the most part, within 2 K of measurements from ground-site instruments, like the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Infrared Thermometer and the National Climatic Data Center Apogee Precision Infrared Thermocouple Sensor. The level of accuracy relative to the ARM site is comparable to that of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS with the benefit of an increased number of daily measurements without added bias or increased error. Additionally, matched comparisons of the high-resolution skin temperature product with MODIS land surface temperature reveal a level of accuracy well within 1 K for both day and night. This confidence will help in characterizing the diurnal and seasonal biases and root-mean-square differences between the retrievals and modeled values from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5 in preparation for assimilation of the retrievals into GEOS-5. Modelers should find the immediate availability and broad coverage of these skin temperature

  10. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  11. Micro-mapping Meteorite Surfaces on Mars using Microscopic Imager Mosaics — A Tool for Unraveling Weathering History at Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Golombek, M. P.; Johnson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Meteorites found on Mars provide valuable insights into martian surface processes. During the course of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extended missions, Spirit and Opportunity have identified 17 confirmed and candidate meteorites on Mars, most of which are irons. The iron meteorites exhibit morphologies and coatings that communicate complex post-fall exposure histories relevant to an understanding of climate near the martian equator [1-4]. Both chemical and mechanical weathering effects are represented. Among the more significant of these are: 1) cm-scale hollowing, 2) surficial rounding, 3) mass excavation/dissolution and removal, 4) differential etching of kamacite plates and taenite lamellae, revealing Widmanstätten patterns, 5) discontinuous iron oxide coatings, and 6) the effects of cavernous weathering, which often penetrate to rock interiors. Determining the nature, magnitude, and timing of each process and its associated features is a complex problem that will be aided by laboratory experiments, image processing, and careful surface evaluation. Because some features appear to superpose others in ways analogous to stratigraphic relationships, Microscopic Imager (MI) mosaics are useful for sketching "geologic maps" of meteorite surfaces. Employing the techniques of conventional planetary mapping [5], each map was drafted manually using full-resolution MI mosaics and Adobe Photoshop software. Units were selected to represent the oxide coating, dust-coated surfaces, sand-coated surfaces, taenite lamellae, and uncoated metal. Also included are areas in shadow, and regions of blooming caused by specular reflection of metal. Regmaglypt rim crests are presented as lineations. As with stratigraphic relationships, noting embayments and other cross-cutting relationships assists with establishing the relative timing for observed weathering effects. In addition to suggesting alternating sequences of wind and water exposure [1], patterns in oxide coating occurrence show

  12. The Role of Model and Initial Condition Error in Numerical Weather Forecasting Investigated with an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments that explore the roles of model and initial condition error in numerical weather prediction are performed using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA/GMAO). The use of an OSSE allows the analysis and forecast errors to be explicitly calculated, and different hypothetical observing networks can be tested with ease. In these experiments, both a full global OSSE framework and an 'identical twin' OSSE setup are utilized to compare the behavior of the data assimilation system and evolution of forecast skill with and without model error. The initial condition error is manipulated by varying the distribution and quality of the observing network and the magnitude of observation errors. The results show that model error has a strong impact on both the quality of the analysis field and the evolution of forecast skill, including both systematic and unsystematic model error components. With a realistic observing network, the analysis state retains a significant quantity of error due to systematic model error. If errors of the analysis state are minimized, model error acts to rapidly degrade forecast skill during the first 24-48 hours of forward integration. In the presence of model error, the impact of observation errors on forecast skill is small, but in the absence of model error, observation errors cause a substantial degradation of the skill of medium range forecasts.

  13. Field observations, experiments, and modeling of sediment production from freeze and thaw action on a bare, weathered granite slope in a temperate region of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Daizo; Fujita, Masaharu

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, field observations and model simulations were conducted to examine the process of sediment production due to freeze and thaw action in a temperate climate region. Two small areas were designated and observations were conducted to determine the mechanisms of sediment production due to freeze and thaw action on a bare, weathered granite slope in the Tanakami Mountains in the southern part of Shiga Prefecture, Japan. During the cold season from 2004 to 2005, air, surface, and subsurface temperatures were measured at 10-min intervals. The sediment produced on plot 1 was collected and weighed once per week, whereas the sediment produced on plot 2 was left untouched until the end of the cold season. The freeze and thaw cycle occurred repeatedly, with the frozen zone (i.e., temperature Pinus densiflora); plot 2 was covered by no leaves to understand the effects of surface cover on the reduction in sediment production. The results showed that surface leaf cover dramatically decreased sediment production due to freeze and thaw action versus the no-surface cover. A simulation model combining a thermal conductivity analysis and a simple and empirical sediment production model was developed to estimate the amount of sediment produced by the freeze and thaw action. The observation results of temperature change and amount of sediment during the first season, from 2004 to 2005, were simulated with the model. The model assumption, that repeated freezing and thawing events are necessary for the production of sediment from saprolite (14 cycles of the freeze and thaw with a freezing threshold of - 1 °C), is supported by comparisons of the simulated results and the observations. From an engineering viewpoint, a freeze and thaw index that incorporates the freezing depth and the repetition number of freeze and thaw cycles is proposed to estimate total amount of sediment produced from a wide area, such as a catchment scale, over a long period.

  14. Vertical structure of the wind field during the Special Observing Period I of the Global Weather Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paegle, J. N.; Paegle, J.; Zhen, Z.; Sampson, G.

    1986-01-01

    The vertical structure of the global atmosphere is analyzed for selected periods of the Special Observing Period I (SOP-I) for the Global Weather Experiment (GWE). The analysis consists of projection of the stream-function and velocity potential at 200 and 850 mb on spherical harmonics and of the wind and height fields on the normal modes of a linearized form of the primitive equations for a basic state at rest. The kinematic vertical structure is discussed in terms of correlation coefficients of the 200 mb and 850 mb winds and analysis of the internal and external normal modes of the primitive equations. The reliability of the results is checked by applying the same analysis methods to data sets obtained from three different institutions: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), and Goddard Laboratory for the Atmospheres (GLA). It is found that, on a global basis, vertically reversing circulations are as important as the equivalent barotropic structures. For the verticaly reversing components, the gravity and mixed Rossby-gravity modes have contributions of the same order of magnitude as those of the Rossby modes in tropical latitudes.

  15. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Oneida Lake Weather Station (ESF7) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-07 to 2016-06-30 (NODC Accession 0123659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123659 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  16. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Sodus Bay Weather Station (ESF4) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-15 to 2016-06-30 (NODC Accession 0123656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123656 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  17. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  18. Evaluation of surface layer flux parameterizations using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeremy; Zhu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate calculation of surface turbulent fluxes between the atmosphere and the underlying ocean/land surface is one of the major challenges in geosciences. In practice, the surface turbulent fluxes are estimated from the mean surface meteorological variables based on the bulk transfer model combined with the Monnin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. Few studies have been done to examine the extent to which such a flux parameterization can be applied to different weather and surface conditions. A novel validation method is developed in this study to evaluate the surface flux parameterization using in-situ observations collected at a station off the coast of Gulf of Mexico. The main findings are: (a) the theoretical prediction that uses MOS theory does not match well with those directly computed from the observations. (b) The largest spread in exchange coefficients is shown in strong stable conditions with calm winds. (c) Large turbulent eddies, which depend strongly on the mean flow pattern and surface conditions, tend to break the constant flux assumption in the surface layer.

  19. A simple parameterization of the short-wave aerosol optical properties for surface direct and diffuse irradiances assessment in a numerical weather model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Ruiz-Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadband short-wave (SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances are not typically within the set of output variables produced by numerical weather prediction (NWP models. However, they are being more and more demanded in solar energy applications. A detailed representation of the aerosol optical properties is important to achieve an accurate assessment of these direct and diffuse irradiances. Nonetheless, NWP models typically oversimplify its representation or even neglect its effect. In this work, a flexible method to account for the SW aerosol optical properties in the computation of broadband SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances is presented. It only requires aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm and the type of predominant aerosol. The rest of parameters needed to consider spectral aerosol extinction, namely, Angström exponent, aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol asymmetry factor, are parameterized. The parameterization has been tested in the RRTMG SW scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF NWP model. However, it can be adapted to any other SW radiative transfer band model. It has been verified against a control experiment along five radiometric stations in the contiguous US. The control experiment consisted of a clear-sky evaluation of the RRTMG solar radiation estimates obtained in WRF when RRTMG is driven with ground-observed aerosol optical properties. Overall, the verification has shown very satisfactory results for both broadband SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances. It has proven effective to significantly reduce the prediction error and constraint the seasonal bias in clear-sky conditions to within the typical observational error in well-maintained radiometers.

  20. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data 1928-1948 (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of hourly U.S. surface airways observations (SAO). These observations extend as far back as 1928, from the time when commercial aviation began...

  1. A Global Analysis of the ZWD/PW Conversion Methods using Radiosonde Observations and Numerical Weather Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Water vapor plays an important role as a basic climate variable in the thermodynamics and dynamics of the storm systems at the atmosphere and in hydrological cycles of local, regional and global scales. Moreover, the distribution of atmospheric water vapor is difficult to determine because of its rapid change in spatial and temporal scales. Atmospheric water vapor can be estimated by the zenith delay derived from ground-based GNSS data. Ground-based GNSS receivers are a valuable source for determining total zenith delay (ZTD) and precipitable water vapor (PW) data for meteorology since they are portable, economic and provide measurements that are not affected by weather conditions. They cannot provide a humidity profile as radiosondes can, however they have the advantage of producing automated continuous data as opposed to operational radiosondes usually providing two measurements in a day. Therefore, tropospheric delay modeling methods for estimating precipitable water vapor using GNSS signals are being developed frequently. Wet and hydrostatic zenith delays can be computed by applying the mapping functions which are mathematical equations using elevation angles. The observed tropospheric delays can be used for monitoring the water vapor content of the troposphere. In several regions of the world GNSS derived products are already used on a routine basis for numerical weather prediction. In this study, PW values obtained from radiosonde profiles and the ones derived from ground-based GNSS data are processed both with BERNESE v5.0 using Niell mapping function and GAMIT/GLOBK using empirical model GPT (Global Pressure and Temperature) are compared with the values computed from radiosonde analysis algorithm under severe storm conditions. In order to convert the ZWD to PW new, locally fitted models are derived using local radiosonde observations and ECMWF model data.

  2. Coastal Observations of Weather Features in Senegal during the AMMA SOP-3 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, G.; Kucera, P.; Joseph, E.; Fuentes, J.; Gaye, A.; Gerlach, J.; Roux, F.; Viltard, N.; Papazzoni, M.; Protat, A.; Bouniol, D.; Reynolds, A.; Arnault, J.; Badiane, D.; Kebe, F.; Camara, M.; Sall, S.

    2009-01-01

    During 15 August through 30 September 2006, ground and aircraft measurements were obtained from a multi-national group of students and scientists in Senegal. Key measurements were aimed at investigating and understanding precipitation processes, thermodynamic and dynamic environmental conditions, cloud, aerosol and microphysical processes and spaceborne sensors (TRMM, CloudSat/Calipso) validation. Ground and aircraft instruments include: ground based polarimetric radar, disdrometer measurements, a course and a high-density rain gauge network, surface chemical measurements, a 10 m flux tower, broadband IR, solar and microwave measurements, rawinsonde and radiosonde measurements, FA-20 dropsonde, in situ microphysics and cloud radar measurements. Highlights during SOP3 include ground and aircraft measurements of squall lines, African Easterly Waves (AEWs), Saharan Air Layer advances into Senegal, and aircraft measurements of AEWs -- including the perturbation that became Hurricane Isaac.

  3. Doppler weather radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David J.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler C-band radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska that provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data captured during the Redoubt eruption. The MiniMax 250-C (MM-250C) radar detected seventeen of the nineteen largest explosive events between March 23 and April 4, 2009. Sixteen of these events reached the stratosphere (above 10 km) within 2-5 min of explosion onset. High column and proximal cloud reflectivity values (50 to 60 dBZ) were observed from many of these events, and were likely due to the formation of mm-sized accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Reflectivity data suggest that these pellets formed within the first few minutes of explosion onset. Rapid sedimentation of the mm-sized pellets was observed as a decrease in maximum detection cloud height. The volcanic cloud from the April 4 explosive event showed lower reflectivity values, due to finer particle sizes (related to dome collapse and related pyroclastic flows) and lack of significant pellet formation. Eruption durations determined by the radar were within a factor of two compared to seismic and pressure-sensor derived estimates, and were not well correlated. Ash dispersion observed by the radar was primarily in the upper troposphere below 10 km, but satellite observations indicate the presence of volcanogenic clouds in the stratosphere. This study suggests that radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  4. Doppler weather radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David J.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler C-band radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska that provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data captured during the Redoubt eruption. The MiniMax 250-C (MM-250C) radar detected seventeen of the nineteen largest explosive events between March 23 and April 4, 2009. Sixteen of these events reached the stratosphere (above 10 km) within 2–5 min of explosion onset. High column and proximal cloud reflectivity values (50 to 60 dBZ) were observed from many of these events, and were likely due to the formation of mm-sized accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Reflectivity data suggest that these pellets formed within the first few minutes of explosion onset. Rapid sedimentation of the mm-sized pellets was observed as a decrease in maximum detection cloud height. The volcanic cloud from the April 4 explosive event showed lower reflectivity values, due to finer particle sizes (related to dome collapse and related pyroclastic flows) and lack of significant pellet formation. Eruption durations determined by the radar were within a factor of two compared to seismic and pressure-sensor derived estimates, and were not well correlated. Ash dispersion observed by the radar was primarily in the upper troposphere below 10 km, but satellite observations indicate the presence of volcanogenic clouds in the stratosphere. This study suggests that radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  5. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Misawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    OS ADJ A151678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE ISMOS ) ’/4 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND DETACHMENT ASHEVILLE NC MAR...34 ... , , ,, . - Ali A151 678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE iSMOs ) 414 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND . DETACHMENT

  6. In situ observations from STEREO/PLASTIC: a test for L5 space weather monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. C. Simunac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Stream interaction regions (SIRs that corotate with the Sun (corotating interaction regions, or CIRs are known to cause recurrent geomagnetic storms. The Earth's L5 Lagrange point, separated from the Earth by 60 degrees in heliographic longitude, is a logical location for a solar wind monitor – nearly all SIRs/CIRs will be observed at L5 several days prior to their arrival at Earth. Because the Sun's heliographic equator is tilted about 7 degrees with respect to the ecliptic plane, the separation in heliographic latitude between L5 and Earth can be more than 5 degrees. In July 2008, during the period of minimal solar activity at the end of solar cycle 23, the two STEREO observatories were separated by about 60 degrees in longitude and more than 4 degrees in heliographic latitude. This time period affords a timely test for the practical application of a solar wind monitor at L5. We compare in situ observations from PLASTIC/AHEAD and PLASTIC/BEHIND, and report on how well the BEHIND data can be used as a forecasting tool for in situ conditions at the AHEAD spacecraft with the assumptions of ideal corotation and minimal source evolution. Preliminary results show the bulk proton parameters (density and bulk speed are not in quantitative agreement from one observatory to the next, but the qualitative profiles are similar.

  7. CYGNSS Observations of Surface Wind Speeds in Oceanic Tropical and Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, D. J.; Crespo, J.; Naud, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission is the first of the new generation of NASA Earth Venture missions, and consists of a constellation of eight small satellites scheduled for launch in November 2016. The mission utilizes GPS signals reflected from the Earth's surface to infer near-surface wind speeds over the global tropical oceans. The eight-satellite constellation will observe ocean-surface wind speeds in all weather conditions (including in heavy precipitation) with a median revisit time of approximately 3 hours. While CYGNSS is designed to measure wind speeds in the inner core of tropical cyclones, it will observe near-surface winds over all oceanic regions within the span of its orbit. The orbit inclination is 35 degrees, which means that the satellite will observe primarily the tropics and sub-tropics; however, because the antennae are angled 28 degrees off-nadir, the effective range of latitudes spans -40 to 40 degrees. As such, CYGNSS will observe regions known to be characterized by rapid extratropical cyclone development (e.g., the southern portion of the Gulf Stream off the U.S. East Coast). In this presentation, we discuss CYGNSS sampling characteristics, with an eye toward its potential to observe winds not only in tropical cyclones, but in extratropical cyclones as well. We simulate orbits over a historical extratropical storm, and also utilize a multi-year database of cyclone centers to determine CYGNSS sampling characteristics integrated over many storms.

  8. Estimation and correction of different flavors of surface observation biases in ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Plazas, Raquel; Hacker, Josua P.; Collins, Nancy; Lee, Jared A.

    2017-04-01

    The impact of assimilating surface observations has been shown in several publications, for improving weather prediction inside of the boundary layer as well as the flow aloft. However, the assimilation of surface observations is often far from optimal due to the presence of both model and observation biases. The sources of these biases can be diverse: an instrumental offset, errors associated to the comparison of point-based observations and grid-cell average, etc. To overcome this challenge, a method was developed using the ensemble Kalman filter. The approach consists on representing each observation bias as a parameter. These bias parameters are added to the forward operator and they extend the state vector. As opposed to the observation bias estimation approaches most common in operational systems (e.g. for satellite radiances), the state vector and parameters are simultaneously updated by applying the Kalman filter equations to the augmented state. The method to estimate and correct the observation bias is evaluated using observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. OSSEs are constructed for the conventional observation network including radiosondes, aircraft observations, atmospheric motion vectors, and surface observations. Three different kinds of biases are added to 2-meter temperature for synthetic METARs. From the simplest to more sophisticated, imposed biases are: (1) a spatially invariant bias, (2) a spatially varying bias proportional to topographic height differences between the model and the observations, and (3) bias that is proportional to the temperature. The target region characterized by complex terrain is the western U.S. on a domain with 30-km grid spacing. Observations are assimilated every 3 hours using an 80-member ensemble during September 2012. Results demonstrate that the approach is able to estimate and correct the bias when it is spatially invariant (experiment 1). More

  9. Surface area dependence of calcium isotopic reequilibration in carbonates: Implications for isotopic signatures in the weathering zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Potrel, A.; Jacobson, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of dynamic equilibrium carries the implicit assumption of continued isotopic exchange between a mineral and the surrounding fluid. While this effect has received much attention in the marine paleoproxy literature, it has been relatively overlooked in application to the terrestrial environment. In weathering systems, a potential consequence is that rapid reequilibration may alter or erase isotopic signatures generated during secondary mineral formation. The extent and timescale over which isotopic signatures are reset in these hydrologic systems is unknown. Using reactive transport modeling, we show isotopic reequilibration under conditions reflecting terrestrial hydrologic settings to be significant and dependent on the reactive surface area of the solid. In particular, we suggest that the non-traditional stable isotopes commonly used in application to carbonates (e.g., Ca, Mg, Sr) are sensitive to these effects due to their rapid reaction rates. We aim to characterize the dependence of Ca isotopic reequilibration on surface area during calcite precipitation via batch experiments conducted at ambient temperature over 48-hour time periods. Calcite precipitation was performed in a closed batch reactor utilizing a controlled free-drift method. The batch reactors contained mixed supersaturated solutions of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 at an initial pH of 8.54. Precipitation was initiated by seed inoculation of calcite crystals with two distinct, pre-constrained surface areas. All experiments achieved the same final state of chemical equilibrium, but as expected, the fastest approach to equilibrium occurred for experiments employing calcite seeds with the highest surface area. This implies that differences in equilibrated Ca isotope ratios (δ44/40Ca) should reflect differences in surface area. This prediction is upheld by models of the experiments, indicating a measureable difference in δ44Ca during calcite precipitation where the higher surface area corresponds to

  10. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries for Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    OBSERVATION CLIDIATC UMWARiES" OR ŜOCS" IN JULY 1969. UR NOCH (LIlM ITS PREDECESSORS) IS PREPARED BY USAFPNAC’ OPERATING LOCATION A AT ASHEVILLE, NC...26801-2723. HERE, CLMATOLOGISTS USE STA•R-OF-THE-ART C04- PUT•R URCENLOGY TO SUM4ARIZE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS COLLECTED FO SELECTED MIL - ITAR, CIVILIAN, AN...13 -M M. MIL IN u M I M M OR OR M OR go OR a OR Z as as FT 7 6 5 4 3 211/2 2 1 1/2 2 1/4 1 3/4 5/8 1/2 3/8 1/4 0 NO CuIT 35.3 48.6 55.7 58.2 59.9

  11. Impact of satellite-based lake surface observations on the initial state of HIRLAM. Part II: Analysis of lake surface temperature and ice cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kheyrollah Pour

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from a study on the impact of remote-sensing Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT observations in the analysis of lake surface state of a numerical weather prediction (NWP model. Data assimilation experiments were performed with the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM, a three-dimensional operational NWP model. Selected thermal remote-sensing LSWT observations provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR sensors onboard the Terra/Aqua and ENVISAT satellites, respectively, were included into the assimilation. The domain of our experiments, which focussed on two winters (2010–2011 and 2011–2012, covered northern Europe. Validation of the resulting objective analyses against independent observations demonstrated that the description of the lake surface state can be improved by the introduction of space-borne LSWT observations, compared to the result of pure prognostic parameterisations or assimilation of the available limited number of in-situ lake temperature observations. Further development of the data assimilation methods and solving of several practical issues are necessary in order to fully benefit from the space-borne observations of lake surface state for the improvement of the operational weather forecast. This paper is the second part of a series of two papers aimed at improving the objective analysis of lake temperature and ice conditions in HIRLAM.

  12. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries (SOCS) for Moody AFB, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Observation Climatic Summaries for Columbus AFB, Mississippi. USAFETAC/DS--91/264 4. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries for Williams AFB, Arizona...DB DRY BULB TEMPERATURE MEAS MEASURABLE DP DEW POINT TEMPERATURE NO. NUMBER EQ EQUAL OBS OBSERVATION F FAHRENHEIT OBST OBSTRUCTION FRZG FREEZING POF...PRECIP &/OR SNOW &/OR OBST NO. OF HAZE SAND TO VSN OBS ... ...... o.........o. o ............ ..... oo

  13. Correction of Sampling Errors in Ocean Surface Cross-Sectional Estimates from Nadir-Looking Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, I. Jeff; Meneghini, R.; Miller, L. S.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The return from the ocean surface has a number of uses for airborne meteorological radar. The normalized surface cross section has been used for radar system calibration, estimation of surface winds, and in algorithms for estimating the path-integrated attenuation in rain. However, meteorological radars are normally optimized for observation of distributed targets that fill the resolution volume, and so a point target such as the surface can be poorly sampled, particularly at near-nadir look angles. Sampling the nadir surface return at an insufficient rate results in a negative bias of the estimated cross section. This error is found to be as large as 4 dB using observations from a high-altitude airborne radar. An algorithm for mitigating the error is developed that is based upon the shape of the surface echo and uses the returned signal at the three range gates nearest the peak surface echo.

  14. Observed Asteroid Surface Area in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Wright, E. L.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  15. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  16. Assimilation of lake water surface temperature observations using an extended Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kourzeneva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new extended Kalman filter (EKF-based algorithm to assimilate lake water surface temperature (LWST observations into the lake model/parameterisation scheme Freshwater Lake (FLake has been developed. The data assimilation algorithm has been implemented into the stand-alone offline version of FLake. The mixed and non-mixed regimes in lakes are treated separately by the EKF algorithm. The timing of the ice period is indicated implicitly: no ice if water surface temperature is measured. Numerical experiments are performed using operational in-situ observations for 27 lakes and merged observations (in-situ plus satellite for 4 lakes in Finland. Experiments are analysed, potential problems are discussed, and the role of early spring observations is studied. In general, results of experiments are promising: (1 the impact of observations (calculated as the normalised reduction of the LWST root mean square error comparing to the free model run is more than 90% and (2 in cross-validation (when observations are partly assimilated, partly used for validation the normalised reduction of the LWST error standard deviation is more than 65%. The new data assimilation algorithm will allow prognostic variables in the lake parameterisation scheme to be initialised in operational numerical weather prediction models and the effects of model errors to be corrected by using LWST observations.

  17. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  18. Using Microwave Observations to Estimate Land Surface Temperature during Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and passive microwave observations (MW). TIR is the most commonly used approach and the method of choice to provide standard LST products for various satellite missions. MW-based LST retrievals on the other hand are not as widely adopted for land applications; currently their principle use is in soil moisture retrieval algorithms. MW and TIR technologies present two highly complementary and independent means of measuring LST. MW observations have a high tolerance to clouds but a low spatial resolution, and TIR has a high spatial resolution with temporal sampling restricted to clear skies. The nature of the temperature at the very surface layer of the land makes it difficult to combine temperature estimates between different methods. The skin temperature is characterized by a strong diurnal cycle that is dependant in timing and amplitude on the exact sensing depth and thermal properties of the vegetation. This paper builds on recent progress in characterizing the main structural components of the DTC that explain differences in TIR and MW estimates of LST. Spatial patterns in DTC timing (phase lag with solar noon) and DTC amplitude have been calculated for TIR, MW and compared to weather prediction estimates. Based on these comparisons MW LST can be matched to the TIR record. This paper will compare in situ measurements of LST with satellite estimates from (downscaled) TIR and (reconciled) MW products. By contrasting the validation results of clear sky days with those of cloudy days the expected tolerance to clouds of the MW observations will be tested. The goal of this study is to determine the weather conditions in which MW can supplement the TIR LST record.

  19. Experimental Observation of Dark Solitons on Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    vertical walls are made of transparent sections of glass supported by the metal frame. The water level of the free surface is measured with seven resistive...Experimental observation of dark solitons on water surface A. Chabchoub1,∗, O. Kimmoun2, H. Branger3, N. Hoffmann1, D. Proment4, M. Onorato4,5, and N...observation of dark solitons on the water surface. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation

  20. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  1. Observation of water condensate on hydrophobic micro textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Wook; Do, Sang Cheol; Ko, Jong Soo; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2013-07-01

    We visually observed that a dropwise condensation occurred initially and later changed into a filmwise condensation on hydrophobic textured surface at atmosphere pressure condition. It was observed that the condensate nucleated on the pillar side walls of the micro structure and the bottom wall adhered to the walls and would not be lifted to form a spherical water droplet using environmental scanning electron microscope.

  2. SEM and TEM Observation of the Surfaces of the Fine-Grained Particles Retrieved from the Muses-C Regio on the Asteroid 25413 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tanaka, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Konno, M.; Nakato, A.; Ogami, T.; Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Mukai, T.; Ueno, M.; Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Okazaki, R.

    2011-01-01

    Surface materials on airless solar system bodies exposed to interplanetary space are gradually changed their visible to near-infrared reflectance spectra by the process called "space weathering", which makes the spectra darker and redder. Hapke et al. proposed a model of space weathering: vapor deposition of nanophase reduced iron (npFe(sup 0)) on the surfaces of the grains within the very surface of lunar regolith. This model has been proved by detailed observation of the surfaces of the lunar soil grains by transmission electron microscope (TEM). They demonstrated that npFe(sup 0) was formed by a combination of vapor deposition and irradiation effects. In other words, both micrometeorite impacts and irradiation by solar wind and galactic cosmic ray play roles on the space weathering on the Moon. Because there is a continuum of reflectance spectra from those of Q-type asteroids (almost the same as those of ordinary chondrites) to those of S-type asteroids, it is strongly suggested that reflectance spectra of asteroids composed of ordinary chondrite-like materials were modified over time to those of S-type asteroids due to space weathering. It is predicted that a small amount of npFe(sup 0) on the surface of grains in the asteroidal regolith composed of ordinary chondrite-like materials is the main agent of asteroidal space weathering.

  3. An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Basri, Gibor; Pepper, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Surface gravity is one of a star's basic properties, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25-50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90-150 per cent photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about two per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for >150,000 stars provides an opportunity to investigate whether the variations can be used to determine surface gravities. The Fourier power of granulation on a star's surface correlates physically with surface gravity; if brightness variations on timescales of hours arise from granulation, then such variations should correlate with surface gravity. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an observational correlation between surface gravity and the root-mean-square brightness variations on timescales of less than eight hours for stars with temperatures ...

  4. Moody AFB, Georgia. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-21

    158 898. 8;8,඘{ 9080 9 80380 93 9]80 El L J AL CLIMATOLOGY ? ANCH SEF ICT A C CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITYt , EATH 9 SERVICE/MAC In7- P13? 0DY AFZ GA...L71 _ _ _ _ ? | II I Elt -tn (X) ZA, It w , No., Obl* Moon MRe. of Nemrsl ilbl Tolm tom 1 80b 2831497 41114 67 . 608I 416*5 226o 7?i W, ,b

  5. RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    3: 1 ... . 2 . . jb -3VI SO I 7.27b 6 . ( 5.764 5.103 4.571 4.47 1 4.367 .47 5.244 b.712 7.717 7.3< 7 5.4.7 1333 osJ 915 a37 91 ’ɘ 911 645 0. 92’ 1...LA II WE17,rY uSAFLTAC fqL" LUlLy CFS[kVATO.V AIR .LA IHfP SERVICC/MAC STATIO, NUMPER: 75 3- STAIIOf, NAME : R AF LAKtNI-ATH L91[EU KINGf0CM L CIEC

  6. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Schwaebisch Hall AAF, DL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-17

    S P f-AG ua U CE WINDS DCTIOH AMC SPEE (FOM HOURL OBSRAIIONS) am m Ink -n G- L_ L AT 1170f A Am__ -Th SURAC WINDS x I~~ CAI4MOUY~~ 1 ~A.= -Ti- SE~v~f...400 47. 7p56* -2.# 5 69 79 .5 1h c .9 90.6 93w8 9-. -#-a 91*93 "U>so 4 wa .6 2. 16919 7t4 𔄁S#1~99g69. 85,, 9~F 6.1 3t9 * 1 3 ± tLC at. 4 70::a io61 3

  7. Hill AFB, Ogden, Utah. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-26

    TRANSMITTER NECORDER GROUND 1 Sep 48 Located on top of operation hanger Selsyn ML-144B 132 ft 2 Jun 53 Located on top of aircraft hanger Same Same 124...8217 : - ’ .... .A:. -’o -*,j - )I | GLBIAL CLIHATULOCY 6RANCHUSAFFTAC CEILING VISIBILITY 2 AIR ’EATHER SERVICF/EIAC *_ HILL ArBUS )N UTAH o 7-70,73- 7 8 A

  8. Nakhon Phanom RTAFB, Thailand. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-12

    96.1 97.4 97.8 99,Z 99.4 99.5 99.110000 0 loot A0,00 1 td oo 93.1 95.3 96.1 97.4 97.8 99.2 99.4 99.5 99.1100.0 00.0 00.00O0.0 00.00l0.0 -> 0 93.1 95_3...96.1 96.5 96,5 98.1 98 3 98.3 98.6 99.1 99,1 99,100.0 0.OI00.0100.0.00.0 >500 .1 9 1 96.5 96.5 98.1 98.3 98.3 986_ 99.1 9911. 99- td 100,0 f 06l0L0,0* 00...92/ 91 , .0 li d _ -9Q1 .1 -i _21_]__ , R I1-, T a - 4 q 7 ____9_/_ _ _ £V HZj ii.I2 Be 8, • it 20 , 20,_ 3at ___ -- -DO/ b7’ -1 1’ be I$ ,2 ’ 11 5V

  9. Camp Casey, Tongduchon, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-10

    NV EC MNTHS 4 it Il P7 .n - i :Z a2~ .L T ~ Z1.9! I r ; 1 1L 5 ;. 1i; -1 .- 4 1 ~ i.j 7 _____ r! Lo: ?. .I~ - 3 . ~ El ~I~1. 9,j 14.1A.. -73 1 .76 11...64. 3 64.31 73.5 73.7 74.? 75.2 7c.21 75.2 75.?I 75.21 75.4 75.4 75.51 75.7 300 cs I o . $q-= S -. 77.; 14 9 e" E 72 2 m l .g .’ P7.2 1 ’= P7 - 1 8...cof-. .4r E0C >j a- -- =* C.j C . = ± (i3e!’ afl o oc- g Nta.. a .o.r3azdflloD2Coa.aoc a- f~ie~~z. n.!. G a 4 . ACca . . rx Co.--&Z3Er,0C i1DaI Da

  10. Marshall AAF, Manhattan, Kansas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-25

    1.0_ 10.7 C.3 3.6 3.7 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 3.6 Q.2 26.4 5.7, 2.7 3.0 .8 .0 .0 .0 .0 . 3.4 1.5 17.1 ,.0 21.7 17.5 TRAC [ . 0 . ,. .0 .0 .1 3.. It., 1.’ 7.2...11 13. 8. - / *,_ i_ I , ! ZII -i __ __ __ __ ___ __ __ __ __ __ . . 12 0 ’, E I 3 F A 6 7 1 I 0 3 1 I -:-. c . B P t e 1 • - t -- _ _ _ _ I , vtt

  11. George AFB Victorville, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-05

    indicated in the same manner as in the extreme tables above. If a trace becomes the extreme or monthly total in any of these tables it is printed as " TRAC ... TRAC .20RC f~C 2 12 :07 .00 .61 .58 * 61 68 0 .!0 *40 .18 .00 .01 032 .14 TRACE .06 .29 .07 :40,09 0 64 .05 .06 .291 .09 .10 TAEI *0 TRACE .08 TRACE...36 1 / l i 33 .1 I_* S 311518 o 0 31 19 9 _8 (0) 26 251 .1~ 313OTA 1 4 03 5 51 46i V4 -~ 31.~*..j., 73,761 4 EIo/n 293 Os.. M..n 3.. N4. 5.dTw~ vtt

  12. Hellenikon AB, Greece. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-29

    A I. N NTA ThO £ LRU*ITUDE L.4161Th I ISTAI’O E V( F I MLT$I C AI. m 167160 HE IKON AB GR N 37 54 E 23 44 90 FT VAT 16760 STA TION...8217 FATHFP SERVICF/MIAC OT. Hi,; -ELLLr, IKON AP &R 73-si S’ STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH PERCLNTA3E FPECUENCY OF OCCUPRENCE OF hE&ATHEO CONOITIONS...EAT1E4 SERVICE/MAC L61z hELLE- IKON AB GQ 73- ....81_ STATION STATION NkME YEARS *~~ PAGC I I21 T j NOUNS ,.. S. I. T emp. TWET BULB TEMPERATURE

  13. Seattle FWS, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-08-28

    34--- 7 - 8-9_ 1__ 7,2 ___ 3__ ___ 9109 NW ___ ___ 6_ 312 a 6 ___ WNW _1 __1 9B68? NWTOTA s Bl NUBE OF OBVAIN .9*7 NNW 6 18. 6 97s TTL ’ .1 il- *f 4...WIND DIR ISPEED NE 04,~. ~ ~>--- ENE It!! too .L 9 SE 1f7i 3y_ . ~ i - ~ ~ ~ 0 4i~ rI____ TOA NUBE Lea 9BEAIN 0 -SS w- Sol -9 -- I . .1 ’A-. a, NNW...DIRECOTIONAN SPE NA NNE 0E,11 0010 - ClAS UFL NEONDIWION NN I --- I . SSWM ID -_- OFOSEVTIN9.it ! - - I~- - -- - -CALM F~~~~0 6031FF-rR- M~ .~ ~~’ TOA NUBE OF

  14. McChord AFB, Tacoma, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-19

    4.0 4a4 8-5l6% WN WNW_ .2_ __1 3.4 NE .0 .0 .4 - 2*_ - ENW , . 1.~ .1 ___ ____ _ 1l 4.4 1 E AR- B_ __ 2Z,91 L 13 1 A 2.3..7 . 1 -n 0 7 TOA NUBE OFw...j w .3 .5 .5 .2 _ _ _ _ _ : .: 4 -_ WOTA NU3RO BEVTOSZB6 USMTOTAL NUBE OF5 OBERATON 286C7TJ OTON FTISFR iROS UAE A JI 0 85(LA RVOSEIIN FI

  15. Sewart AFB, Smyrna, Tennessee. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-07-10

    1.4 R,6 .0 ___ 21 o4_ t,_ . NE I* .1h ____ __0 _ -4__1____ .3 7.0 WN __3_ 1 . 01 __ ___0I_ _ R, .0 4.4 ’ 2. 23. .8. !5. __--T . TOTAL NUBE OF...1_1__So2 IS ___ * ___ 13.6 24.3 1~1. ..5 .0 ___ ____ _ __0_ 1004.0 6.0 WONA NUBE OP O1.RATON 1712 e 4S 90 NW lreX2ir 1.9 22 F-2 -. - .-- "NNW 8 17 2o

  16. Luke AFB, Phoenix, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-13

    10.100.000,00,0106,001Q0000. -,0a l I 0 TO2AL NUBE OBERATON USAF~ ~ ~ ~~~~~4 pTA Loa,. 0O A)UwV b~~SO TI ~ l 0(TLC __09*1000610000109 0 0Q0,1000 ’iloo...j 00.0 Q Llolo.±1~, oo. 1.gjo 300 ~ ~ ~ -LD 99, a97 99 d00oo~j~ooo.o~100.o .o1 0100.010LokQ-a1O1o~9 9 7 9 t 0 9 LZ 600 p949, TOA NUBE OF OBEVAINS

  17. Ramstein AB, Landstuhl, Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-10

    L-)’~etSW 4CA~ CMA 1A VARB 11 19 - 1 Z 6, o’ 2 9 f CAL 7.6 1= 1_1_-.1 2 *1 7 l 3 3 1100 __A NUBE OF OBSRVAIONs4 A IjRc s 4 E1A(US~FSURFACE WINDS...1 10 _ _l 1_ 4.0 4.71 1w 4.51 17.6 15.0 2.71! 2.01 IT 77__ ___ ___ l- - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA NUBE :.4 OBSERVAT113w j___ ______ _____ I 8 941 wrj...904. 4.1 .g0.0100010000Go0.Q0010o Og0100 0100 0o-i~ 91 .7 94, 97.21 991 9#41 9 -92uo.0100 0100 C -0.,Olgo.o.90o 0 00.0 TOTA NUBE OF OBERATON - = --- r

  18. Johnston Island Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    8217]’.9G. TfNA S CI OfssiVAT0NS_ USAF F ’A 0. 14s5 10L A . iosr ’. ’’s c,. *or 4 ~~ AL .L:~~K I CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY - :"- T ;, - ’ir " ’ . PERCENTAGE

  19. Plattsburgh, AFB, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-24

    45.4 5 45.1 45.1 45.1! 45.1 451 ’ 45.1 4S.1 45.2 45.2 45.3’ 45.,, .6 48.1 48. i4 1 48.4 4 8.6 1, 48 48.61 48.6 48.61 48.6 48.61 487T 48. 48.8 ,,8.9...tabuettions provide the cumulative percentage frequency to tenths of temperivture by 5-deFree Farenheit inremsnts, plue mean temperature, standard...4 - 2 451 47 ,3. 3.4 1.7o 1.2 o2 l u4 6 99 3 4𔃻 r, .1 2.8 2.21 1. .5 5 6 ’I4/ 43 , 3 .9 3 5 7 3 7 1 6 4. 2/ 41. .9 2. 3.31 1.8- 75 7 6 6 4

  20. Kansas City IAP, Missouri. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-09

    8217 - _ , " _ 5𔄀 -’. . 4’ " 3. 57. 51.r. 51.5 51.7 51.7 51.7 51.7 51.7 51.7 51.? 51.7 n.l.7 51.7 51.7 51 .7 _ ’ 451 . 53.] 55.3 55.3 55.4 55,55 5 55.4 5...provide the cumulative percentage frequency to .ertl ’ of temperature by 5-deg-ee Farenheit inorements, plus mean temperature, standard deviations, and te...8217,71 " J . 75 9 4 7i .3 . .I ., 3 6 7𔃾/ 7T 1. 1 ___ 2. 3.8 . , . 3 443 __I1 4 45’ 9 I 33 3 7,_/ 71 . 1. 2 . 4 .. .9 . o 451 ’ 4 1 i :4 574 7 L. / 69 . 1

  1. Osan AB, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-14

    18-2-1 3.3 5.7 9.0 9.0 20.0 26.9 837 C TOTALS 2.6- 5.9 8.%- 20.4 16.0- 41 36.6 6667 (6 ( WADAC 0.031LA .~ S.O-a(. aj n wu m~ nIf 𔃺" 60 0 - i ’ej...8.7 57.1 609 09-11 8.1 6.1 13.3 11.*9 _______ 29.3 B10 12-14. 8.0 g.0 1.8k 10.3 _______ 11.9 809 *15-17 .1 10.1 10.1 07.41L0 7.5 810 18-20 .’. 1100___...37.2 i 59.7 !,-14 S D 8.556 9.213 8.066 7.520 7.042 5.13 5.986 5.424 5.002 7.398 9.547 9.051 19.115 TOTAL 08s 836 761 837 806 829 807 834 835 B10 ’ 835

  2. Williams AFB, Chandler, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-16

    4 .0 .4 .1 .2 .3 21139 ( JUN .3 .4 .4 * 0 2 .3 20543 JUL 1.4 2.0 2.0 .0 61 .8 .9 21021 AUG 1.5 2.3 2,3 .1 .11 .7 .9 21506 SEP .6 1.3 1.3 .1 .0 .3 .4...1.9 1.9 2423 C𔃻---- [TOTALS J1.4 202.0 00 . .8 .9 21021 6’USAFETAC Jly 6A O.IO.5(OL A), NtOUSt 1OS OTjM OF Al 15= T7

  3. Chu Lai MCAF, Vietnam. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-03-01

    99o.I so~i 99.I 99.II 9988 99.1 9968I el90 990a 99.1 L99’s260.9’? 9 , ,,. - MAL ,,,& ,,. ,,., ,,; ,; ,,o ,,a ,,; ,,. 9’s ~t ?t 400 & 300 o1 8 9 9 .,1 9 9...99,6 99.6 99.6 99*6 99,4 99.6 99,6 99*6 ?: 1000 17 97.191,1,. ŕ 9-J 9.B Qt9f I law Af.0. MO M4 MAl > 900 97.1 98,4 98.9 99.5 99,5 9I7 oi ,lOO, 00...97.1 9i.I 9 99 , - d - 99. a9nO. LO . l O OjO . O ,i-l IO0, L 0.01- , , , 7,1 6 6 9,0 99,6 99,6 99,6 00.0 0,000,00000 000000,0 00.0 2tD~ 0k. 61:00 0

  4. Bardenas Reales Range, Spain. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (Russwo). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-30

    98.4 98.4 98.4 98.4;qd.4 98.4 c i 4o.ou.qo.00.QA.u 0 00. 01 00. 0 0.0 100. 0 00o.0 .00.0 )00.0449. -0 luo.ol~. OjO .0000l.0 00.0 00oi.0 0.00 00o.0 00.0...0 0. 0 .000.0 09o 00.000.0 0000. Y7.2100.O10oloo.o 00.0100.0 00.01o. 000.010 0 00.0 i 00.0100.0 97.2100.0100.0100.r.0 oo. ojo 0.nou0.0loqoo~ 00.0 00...DEC. MAL YEAR MONTHS 7 * 57 62 o -0*) 9* 9tw’ 9(* d7w "’ 9wR 59 7? 5 4 i* 73*g 7~i 49 * 67* 9n* 9i6* b4 71* 66* c,? 90~ 73 4~5,;4 bz* 6& 8 31, a 749

  5. Williams AFB, Arizona Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-21

    126 92 0 2I 6F1&3 N 1F 1 Te "I 19__ 18--- - - - - - - -9- - - - - - - -Go12.1 1 @_b 23M 4594145(N 90*19 P-’ T P 3 31% 3331o10 J z 96 ,L ORAL ...19- 20 21 -22 22.24 25.245 27. 2, 29.0 31 O.8.s. Dy Bulb I W vIh 0 Poim .4 1 9 3 .1 611 J 91 , .1 .1 .3 1 3 6 . / 89 .1 .3 . .8 12 12 6/ 87 I 1.0 2.4...1 - *L 23* -2.4 25 - 2 2 -U 29- bul*Oyi.b o.Ib POW. 4~ 23 3 / 191 C 3 I a _____ Z___ 1 4-Z - --- If -s -3 *3 * pa__ - -- - - -- - - O 7 C7 61 ORAL

  6. Pusan East AFS K-9, Pusan, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-02-26

    the ground, not freezing. Freezing rain and/or freezing drizzle ( glaze ) - Precipitation falling in liquid form, but freezing on contact with an...H R _R_ 6.1 25.5 128.o10 2 ____ 100*0 1_ _______ TOM WE T 0ERATIIM81 I ¢(MAMS OF ,a O L 1mm4~ 4... ~ ~ .v. nut .... i i

  7. Blytheville AFB, Arkansas, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Personal Author(s): 13a Type of Report: Data Summary 13b Time Covered: Sep 42-Dec 45, Nov 55-May 58, Dec 59-Jun 87. 14 Date of Report: Oct 87 15 Page...6 4 7.6 67.132 69.:0 8!.9 Pit . 5 91.5 95. 7 9 4. q Q6 .3 96.6 96.6 96.7 97.0 97.2 97 .2 4• t ut I .6 48.3 60.6 69.b 41.9 87.L 92.3 96.2 96.5 96. 9 1...E.4R1NCI- PIH CI ’T. t Frut PT1 61 (61 .9 L 664 ’.CL OF (I II, 1’l, Vr’ us V16 f1Lj rv A 41t f A14 ft , V IC3E/ -AC S I aT r. ’I1U i ’: 7tI- J4 STAT

  8. Niagara Falls IAP, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-30

    TOTAL NUMPIS aOf01 OS E AV A I104S: 93C j L - GLO-,AL CLIPMAIOLOtY PRA-ACH PERCENTIAGE FRLGLLNCY OF OCCURRENICE Of SUPFACE WIND...1011L NUMPI q OF CSEP...0. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....0 * * .0.. . 0 TOTAL NUMPI " Of O"SERVIIONS: 960

  9. Dyess AFB, Texas, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-21

    0a ,. .1 _.c_ 3.__ 9313 rg-i1 .5 3.1 3.___ ____ .1__ 1 ____ ____ ____ ________C_____ S12-14’ 1.44 _ 2.3;_ b Ir .6 93o 15-17 2.9, 4.21 _ _ __ _ 1...I GL’AL CLIMATCLOGY 3PANCH A EA T C EXTREME VALUES AT> .EAT𔃻ER Sr’RVICE/WAC So PFAlC " 4.: " FROM DAILY OSEtvAfn(,,IS 222 ~ -Y --. _ ~F AEP Ty...o1 oz. ,- W j_+ i., __. ________ .- USAFETAC . -.-, .A t la s iQlYOhl I ’"$ 10 Ol UOllLIO I h w C LL IS; EA -A- - S "o Mi c*+ ;A AL CLIMATCLOGY RR_

  10. Cape Romanzof AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    Sme S 457 Save 24 MIENt 1111 SVIFACE W11UC 01UPT IFUIIMMI OF C Of TYPE If NT AM KOuM . ASINOKiI [UIPIEMT. H 1REAM IN CRE C NAiCE LOCATION T YP hTTES NiUS...crystals, and ice pellets from Jan 6 an iater. (Snow pellets also known as soft hall) ei - Occurrences of hall and small hall are included. PercentaGe of...P’P4ANZOF AFS AK 73-81 JAN TATISTON NIAME YEARS MONH PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCUPREt’CE OF wEATHEP CONDITIONS FROM HOURLY 08SER VATIONS RAIN FREEZING

  11. Davis Monthan AFB Tucson, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    SITATIOM STATION AMl MIAS NORTH At L WrA T,Ir-V ALL CLASS NOURS (.?LT.) CONDITION SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 1-3 4-6 7.10 11 -16 17.21 22-27 28.- 34 -40 41 -47 48-55...TUCSON) ctl -45,,4-75 SbP STA?.ON STATION NAME ARS MONTH PAGE I 1800-2000 HOURS It lp. T.I Trp, WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESSION (F) TOTAL TOTAL 5-6 1 1 D

  12. Patrick AFB, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-21

    a 0 " F’ -. W lf ci o 0 c1 0 rI k - celO .00 o At r- !-* ’ ’Ot ’ r-F~ Gr ~ 0 0’ o r- 0.1 o 0Ŕ’ o a. Ua". a, 0 a0 0c 7 "Mm ’ - - - f. W- cc Ww Q’ (t

  13. Mildenhall RAF, United Kingdom Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    2 . 234. 2. 310* 30.5 33. 3Ś 35. 35.3 35.7 35.7 35.8 35.9 36. 󈧨.1 26000 * 24.1 29.9 3 . 30.6 33. 316. 35.1 35.3 35.7 35.7 35.8 35.9 36o2 36.1 400...IS * 9,". -30 93.2 3 . 94.a 94 0T 94.1 94.1 94.1 94.1 94.1 94.1 94.1 ’am Iso .9V3 ;3 . 1 𔄃 q4. 94, 94.3 94.3 94.3 94.3 94.! 94.3 94.3 :. 91 94 . 94.0...57 5 57.0 57.0 57.0 57.C 57. ’ 51. > .5 51 56. 56. 561 58. ;e. Sl 58A ISo * S8j 58.l 58 2 58.2 3k > oo 1. 54. 56. 57. c7. 58, e.8 58. 58.8 58.8 58.8

  14. Kwang Ju AB, Korea, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A, C - F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    97. 97. 970 99,, - lb56, 66,a 6A, il5 ,; SA ,.. 9, 920 .92 la. 511...0 970.. .97o. 9707 .9.7 99.6 56.1 66. 66. 65. 86*- 69. 92. 92: 95.1 96. 97.i 97.7...2.6 ’..3 1.:41 0 i 59 601 99 IL5 7,/ 69 2 2 , 3.l----------------------------------45 45 55 b8 * i/ 67 o3 1.3 .9 *1 18 18 37 32 tb/ 65 .4 o6 __ .3 9 9

  15. Hickam AFB, Hawaii Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    I -t, _ _ _ i ..r l __ __ __ __ __ 4 I o,,.,, 528a703R 70)05 75.3 3.295 I 930 I I 92.21 71..7j 7"s1 i s’ ) 0 . .. , 389 5083 60071 . 68..6 1...ARVICL/MAic -!1𔃼) rilCkAe AF3 Hi 74-c3 iEc STATION STATION NAME YtAS .OT. Temp. I WET BULB TEMPERATURE OEPRESSION (F) TOTAL TOTAL (F 0 1.:34 .6 7

  16. Randolph AFB, San Antonio, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-19

    isA 606 4 , 4A 1A Luk QI o l :5711 , 58 1,3 .1,9B .36 116 1,50 63 1,29 p2l 227 1,14 90 29 2.27, 59 ,0 8 66 ,I2 2 1,02 1,99 1,21 w53 4,1t 610 1 A95...u s w ith T e m p e rtu re R, e..u. 18693 ,95 2kLj36.b 1, 9538 3404 a0F Ti-32F :6 T ~73F~ "’F e3F a . D,y Bulb 8600424 1674741 49901.1,746 3418 6@7 4

  17. Watertown, New York Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    CLASSIFICTION jOCmAssIIwimumuTo 03 SAME As RPT. C3DTic USERS Unclassified Ila. NAME OF RESPONS1ILE INOEVICIAL 󈧚b. TELEPONFEcu kk s jZ.c OFFICE SRM I r...47.0 47.0 4 q . 56. 57.t 5. 57.1 57. 57. 57.1 57E . 57.1 57. 57.8 57. 57.8, !7.8 S., n, i , ’. 79. 1q,’ ; a= 9 1, f2 64. 9aE 9hit 97. 9B 69-Ai im . 2 994

  18. Ellington AFB, Houston, Texas Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-14

    Texas 7 AUTHOR(e) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUjMBER(O) 9, PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK USAFETAC/OL-A AREA 6...I m mmmmummmmmt~l m ili mim l -,- mm mm lm ml m ,-L .AL L T CL MUCL b Y aP ACH ’ T,4 r Sc EXTREME VALUES C’’FLI !TAT IL

  19. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), March AFB, Riverside, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-28

    4 ____ _ _ _ _ I 1_ _ _ _ _ _ _ I -I-_, .. , Ii Elemnt (X) :1___________ Z XX rj No. bs Neon No. of louars witha Temoerwturo oa Baab 3225467 53649...b/ We 151 BulI 3 E.., ,t (X) 1 z I I N.. Obs. Neon No. of Hours wth Temper .. U RIN Mo. 32 F 67 F .73 F 8 F 9 Total U -6,y8Bulb _ _ I’ D Do.-- Point...2..3 .1 8 b4/ 63 . 1 . .1 .1 .2 .2- 0 10 o2/ ol .i .i .I . * ’ 4 15 15 bOi 5 9 ____3 ,z ._ ,3 .4;_ .2 24 24 58/ 57 .1.0 . .7 .6 .4 0o .3j Si’ 58 54

  20. Hahn AB, Germany (West). Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-09

    TOTAL M HNDE R IL & ORE NO HAIL 0 WIT F ADOWN AMD O WITH ORST NO OFTOMONT AECHIIO s M DRIZZLE OD R ADO I 015 W G HAZE SAND ’C VISION 015 DEC 0-0I...31 4 / 3 .. .0! 3 3 5 34 I 4 - .~_ __ _ __ _ _3 _ _3 3 -6 - -4/ -5 ____ E, ..... (x , Z,’ 2 1 . N.. Ob.. M. N.. . N... wit T... ... , 4 R.I.... 61575...2 18 61 3 (/ 33 6 46 -2/ 31 .. .. .. 6. 31 3( 29 32 2k/ 27 . 3 0 7()/ 25, 10 ZL , / 23_ S . "-2/ 21 1 * l TOTe 1 1 51615. B17 .,14.94 8.8 6-9 1.2 1.0

  1. Grissom AFB, Indiana. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    0 . JLD0- .,.20 . .D0. .. 7. i..IBD. 2.3-a 1.all TOTAL O6 .29 763 s35 1, _ 837 1 1 37 U3. II’ - b17 a9 A Ii 9P𔄃 NOT, * t3ASL) ON L[5S THAN FJLL 4ONT-S...34 +’ / + 1.’ . • ’ . * . .--. :.I_ ,j -4 Ii". : . ’ ,. . > . . -, -7. El..,.. . . N. . . . N. . N wiT .. . .pr. ..,.. . ’ - . + . : ~ + ’ + +N 0 / B...0 ____ __________________ lm, X ’ Z I *.$1 N.l. Ob.. Moon N.. of ?1ouri wIt Temp.oltu,. *( RI.H. - -1 :𔃻 " -1 2

  2. Fresno Air Terminal, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-15

    ESC A TrPM A~ EjL it73 J UL STA ,ON STATIOn wW-u YCARS I&OWTH ~MS I L S. TO To ~WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F)TOA 0 F 1-.2 3. 5-6 7.6 9. 10 11...TEARS momyK - i 2 ICJ- 23CC NOIWS ML. S. T.) _______________ WET SULD TEPATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL 0 1F -2 3. - 4 .6 -9. 9 o0ill- 1213...xMINLL CL 72-79 O STATIC. STATION NAME TZAR NPONTW NPOU 1L. S. T. T etp. W__________ ET &ULS TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) ITOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1.2 3-4 5-6 7

  3. Cape Newenham AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESION F, ’O.AL 3 - 4 5- 6 8 9- 1 11 12 13 14 𔃿 t 11 1 9 :," 2. 4 :.! 2 2 5 . . I TAL .4’ 373 - .. .. 776 7 7 8 * ... .. H- j4 93 4 5 7...H ;AVETA: PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY; A:Z, %EAT ER SER VCLPI ’ 7 CARUP li i.L -AF -- AM---.- 7-. - _ PAGE 1 2 WET BLLB TEmPEPATURE DEPRESION F, " AL .’ 3

  4. Kwangju, K-57, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-06

    T, WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION F TOTAL TOTAL 1 2 3-a 4 5 6 7 -8 9. 0 1 - 2 󈧑 14 15 15 𔄁-1819-20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 " 31’ 31 D DR. wB B.rb wet...S_ _ .59,6-."/. . . . .. . U : Ij’ C4300- -5C0 T, - WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION F1 TO’AL 70T.L. 0 I-2 3 4 5 6 7-8 9 - 0 Ii -1 2 13 - 4 5. I ’ F

  5. Tyndall AFB, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-03

    8.. 4𔃾. o.0I 44 ’ ’O 󈧤 I6F .3 16 .J PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY T-WET BULB TEM4PERATURE DEPRESION JF) TOTAL TOTAL F 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 T10 12 13 ]A 15 6...STATION VATON AM.3 WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION F1 TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-. 9 10 11. 2 13 14 151. 6 17 1 19 20 21 22 23 24.25-26.27 2.29 30 31

  6. Homestead AFB, Florida Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (P) _ TOTAL. TOTAL IF) 0 1.2 3-4 1 5- 7.6 19-10 11-1 12 -14 IS- 10 17 -i8 It-20121-22 23-24 2S.3627. S 294-01 hJ3-02W.U- o,,m61b Wo...I 1ll91 T.pWIT SULIS TIMPURATURN DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1.2 3.-4 15.6 7. - 0- 0 132Oi $.16212223-24 25 2 S 2 . 2- .31 .AdW11. My O 11S.IbfvWS

  7. Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    SERVICk:/.AC 4 L’ 4 .1 LHAHAN SAUDI ARABIA 4A6-6? MA STA~N STATION HANW YCA*IS MONTH PACE __9__-_)__ NOIS IL. S. T.) WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F...TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 2 3 4 .- 7. 9.0- I213 4 -1S. 1.jl7 - 16j19 .20121.22123-24i2S.2 272 292 I 0 *. w.a. 0 P.... 0’ 1 0 1 1TJ- / 4

  8. Malmstrom AFB, Montana. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    FREEZING SNOW I % OF SMOKE OUST % OF ORS TOTAL MONTH IST STORS AND OR RAIN & OR ANDOR HAIL OIS WITH FOG AND OR AND OR WTH OEST NO OF DRIZZLE DRIZZLE...8217 VIAJ AO.? .DUiS 1L. S. 1., WET BULB TEMPERATURE ODPRESSION (F) TOTAL i TOTAL (F) 0 1.2 3.4 5 6 7.- 9.-10 it - 12,13. 14 IS. 16117,. 119 2021 22j23

  9. Altus AFB, Oklahoma Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    ABSTRACT SECURIT CLASSIFICATION DUNCLASSFIED0UNLIMITED ji SAME AS RPT. C3 OTI USERS Unclassified 120. NAE OF RESPONSIM. INOIVI11UA22b TELEPHONE ;=k Area...2.72 S 7. .3 b 1.36. .47. 2.33. .! .W . .7. . .i. 5 .4e . 4g .. .2. 1. *7b .5 .,7 .2 1t1 9. ,g , .8’b 1.44 j.J ,9C *5 .17. .9. . . . -........ 6T Ii 4

  10. Bergstrom AFB, Austin, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-02-21

    SECRIT CLSIICTO OFTI AESh .. Ft SECURIT POCLASSCUICATION O N ~l PAGE BEFORE COMPETIN FORM..d I REPORT NIUMBER 2 GOVT ACCESSION No. 3 RECIPIENT’S...200 1:; 93. 9 5. 97.q 98@4. 𔄃. 99 4g ~ 99. 99. 1 99 99 99 99.: 99. 990..y 99. 81. 93. _95. 97. 98. 98 99.19901 99. 9. 9.a1 99. 1of o de, i.100e~O...rEAT4ER. SEVjCF/’AC 139oi4 -’ 4g (STRU-ki AP-B Tr-.XAS/A~USŕ!j /42-71 !C STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH 4 ’Arl. 2 -1200-140HOURS I., S. T,) T-nP. W__ ET

  11. Gila Bend AAF, Gila Bend, Arizona, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-23

    temperature, means and standard dviatin of dr-hllh, wmt-hlh (nypIre) DD IJ 1473 UNCLASSIFIED SECURIT . SIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Wh.n Dfl. ntr.d) 19...o80F &93 F Toa WetB 14306 212 68. 5.310 310 67.5 21.0 91 93 10- DoPo.t 1095480 17L 50.0 9.894 3.0 1. 18. , 3.6 931 .. .. .... i r C DATA PRbCCSS! 4G

  12. Edmonton IAP, Alberta, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-30

    66.9 6f. 66.9 660 ?o000 t5 . 66. 66 669 67. 67.3 67, 67. 67. 6766 " 8 0 b6-.3 65-1 IS o1 ’"-’ 70. 71. 71. 71. 71. 71.9 72, 72. 72, 72.2 72 ti 72.6 72...60 60.2 60a 60- 60 Q 60e3 60.3 603 63.3 60.3 6063 > 40 59.f 6-i. 60 60. 61.3 61. 61.5 61. 61.5 61.5 61.6 61:6 61.6 61.b 61f6 61.6 ’o00 t c 64 64 6...66’ S,, S2/S1 |1 l IS 1.5 . 72 72! 701 6 SO/* 󈨟 1,0 Sao l1 101 11 -, / s.t 6.6 .1 .3 I is t5 o 97 061 *5 41*i 3 *a I , 96 96 82 8 **/ i3 3.3 00 *1 63

  13. Niagara Falls, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-08

    to gpara Lu tem, M to"es. =Mks A - , - 5 of *WtaIn Wo td . qpe wi ame orss move sourthms wwaafti tot Ofesafo nii Old SUMM 69Sm R 40 a~ wa*2s INAVlbt...6t*M. CLVMTOS, GAH sup., 0t Sol at 1-o a - .. - - - - - .71 I - , assu~~*~- eL-LO on 8.61 -o 0kk wow Uo oko 0 -- 0---poko Oo

  14. Use of weather research and forecasting model outputs to obtain near-surface refractive index structure constant over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xuebin; Zhu, Wenyue; Qiao, Chunhong; Rao, Ruizhong; Mei, Haipin

    2016-06-13

    The methods to obtain atmospheric refractive index structure constant (Cn2) by instrument measurement are limited spatially and temporally and they are more difficult and expensive over the ocean. It is useful to forecast Cn2 effectively from Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) outputs. This paper introduces a method that WRF Model is used to forecast the routine meteorological parameters firstly, and then Cn2 is calculated based on these parameters by the Bulk model from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) over the ocean near-surface. The corresponding Cn2 values measured by the micro-thermometer which is placed on the ship are compared with the ones forecasted by WRF model to determine how this method performs. The result shows that the forecasted Cn2 is consistent with the measured Cn2 in trend and the order of magnitude as a whole, as well as the correlation coefficient is up to 77.57%. This method can forecast some essential aspects of Cn2 and almost always captures the correct magnitude of Cn2, which experiences fluctuations of two orders of magnitude. Thus, it seems to be a feasible and meaningful method that using WRF model to forecast near-surface Cn2 value over the ocean.

  15. On the contribution of lakes in predicting near-surface temperature in a global weather forecasting model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stockdale

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of lakes in numerical weather prediction is investigated in a set of global simulations performed with the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. A Fresh shallow-water Lake model (FLake is introduced allowing the coupling of both resolved and subgrid lakes (those that occupy less than 50% of a grid-box to the IFS atmospheric model. Global fields for the lake ancillary conditions (namely lake cover and lake depth, as well as initial conditions for the lake physical state, have been derived to initialise the forecast experiments. The procedure for initialising the lake variables is described and verified with particular emphasis on the importance of surface water temperature and freezing conditions. The response of short-range near surface temperature to the representation of lakes is examined in a set of forecast experiments covering one full year. It is shown that the impact of subgrid lakes is beneficial, reducing forecast error over the Northern territories of Canada and over Scandinavia particularly in spring and summer seasons. This is mainly attributed to the lake thermal effect, which delays the temperature response to seasonal radiation forcing.

  16. Mechanics of weathered clay-marl rock masses along the rupture surface in homogeneous dry slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Srđan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors analyze stress-strain distribution within slope using the shear stress reduction technique based on finite element method, which was previously confirmed to provide approximately the same results as the Janbu's corrected limit equilibrium method. Results obtained indicate that the largest vertical displacements occur at the slope base and crest, while central part of the slope is exposed to the largest horizontal displacements. Normal and shear stress show maximum values in the middle part of the slope. It was also determined that separate stress-strain relations could be derived for the exact upper and lower part of the rupture surface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 37005

  17. Global chemical weather forecasts for field campaign planning: predictions and observations of large-scale features during MINOS, CONTRACE, and INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The first global tropospheric forecasts of O3 and its precursors have been used in the daily flight planning of field measurement campaigns. The 3-D chemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC is driven by meteorological data from a weather center (NCEP to produce daily 3-day forecasts of the global distributions of O3 and related gases, as well as regional CO tracers. This paper describes the forecast system and its use in three field campaigns, MINOS, CONTRACE and INDOEX. An overview is given of the forecasts by MATCH-MPIC and by three other chemical weather forecast models (EURAD, ECHAM, and FLEXPART, focusing on O3 and CO. Total CO and regional CO tracers were found to be the most valuable gases for flight planning, due to their relatively well-defined anthropogenic source regions and lifetimes of one to a few months. CO was in good agreement with the observations on nearly all the flights (generally  r > 0.7, RMS  < 20%. In every case in which the chemical weather forecasts were primarily responsible for the flight plans, the targeted features were observed. Two forecasted phenomena are discussed in detail: outflow from Asia observed in the Mediterranean upper troposphere during MINOS, and outflow from North America observed in the middle troposphere over northern Europe during CONTRACE. It is shown that although such pollution plumes occur repeatedly during the months around the campaigns, their frequency is sufficiently low (~10--30% of the time that global chemical weather forecasts are important for enabling them to be observed during limited-duration field campaigns. The MATCH-MPIC chemical weather forecasts, including an interface for making customized figures from the output, are available for community use via  http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~lawrence/forecasts.html .

  18. Multi-decadal classification of synoptic weather types, observed trends and links to rainfall characteristics over Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.

    2014-09-15

    An automated version of the Lamb weather type classification scheme was employed to characterize daily circulation conditions in Saudi Arabia from 1960 to 2005. Daily gridded fields of sea level pressure (SLP) from both the NCEP/NCAR and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA40) were used as input data for this classification. The output catalog included 10 basic types, which describe the direction and vorticity of airflow in the region (i.e., cyclonic, anti-cyclonic, and directional). In general, our findings indicate that cyclonic (C) days represent the most frequent type among all days, with 69.2% of the annual count of days from 1960 to 2005, followed by SE directional flows (21%). It was also determined that airflows originating from the Indian Ocean (i.e., S, SE, and E) are more frequent than those from the Mediterranean and Red Seas (i.e., W, NW, and SW). The defined weather types were assessed for the presence of inter-annual and intra-annual trends using the Mann–Kendall tau statistic. The trend analysis suggests statistically significant changes in the frequencies of a majority of the weather types from 1960 to 2005. The relationship between the daily occurrence of rainfall and the frequency of individual weather types was also described using daily rainfall data from a network of 87 weather observatories. Results demonstrate that increasing frequencies of weather types connected to easterly inflows support higher precipitation amounts over the study domain. Characterizing the association between atmospheric circulation patterns and rainfall in Saudi Arabia is important for understanding potential impacts related to climate variability and also for developing circulation-based downscaling methods.

  19. Geostatistical improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information using satellite land surface and weather stations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Alves, Marcelo; de Carvalho, Luiz Gonsaga; Vianello, Rubens Leite; Sediyama, Gilberto C.; de Oliveira, Marcelo Silva; de Sá Junior, Arionaldo

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to use the simple cokriging methodology to characterize the spatial variability of Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration and Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration methods based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer (MODIS) global evapotranspiration products and high-resolution surfaces of WordClim temperature and precipitation data. The climatic element data referred to 39 National Institute of Meteorology climatic stations located in Minas Gerais state, Brazil and surrounding states. The use of geostatistics and simple cokriging technique enabled the characterization of the spatial variability of the evapotranspiration providing uncertainty information on the spatial prediction pattern. Evapotranspiration and precipitation surfaces were implemented for the climatic classification in Minas Gerais. Multivariate geostatistical determined improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information. The regions in the south of Minas Gerais derived from the moisture index estimated with the MODIS evapotranspiration (2000-2010), presented divergence of humid conditions when compared to the moisture index derived from the simple kriged and cokriged evapotranspiration (1961-1990), indicating climate change in this region. There was stronger pattern of crossed covariance between evapotranspiration and precipitation rather than temperature, indicating that trends in precipitation could be one of the main external drivers of the evapotranspiration in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

  20. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather

  1. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather predictio

  2. Rapid Retrieval and Assimilation of Ground Based GPS-Met Observations at the NOAA Forecast Systems Laboratory: Impact on Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, S.

    2003-04-01

    shorter forecast cycles and higher spatial resolution in mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and the use by weather forecasters in subjective forecasting and/or model verification. GPS and ancillary surface meteorological observations, and improved satellite orbits, must be available on demand. Data processing hardware and techniques must provide GPS-Met retrievals in sufficient time to be assimilated into the current model cycle. Model data assimilation techniques must minimize the errors in estimating the initial state of a numerical forecast that come from spatial and temporal aliasing when interpolating discrete observations into an "analysis increment" field. While more GPS-Met retrievals can minimize horizontal aliasing, they can do little to minimize vertical aliasing that comes from assimilating any vertically integrated quantity (e.g. satellite radiances, zenith tropospheric signal delays, or GPS-IPW retrievals) into an NWP model. This is primarily because the forecast background error at a discrete vertical level must be estimated from the difference between observed and forecast integrated quantities. Absent the development of a new observing system or measurement technique, we must rely on improved data assimilation techniques, coupled with the more efficient use of complementary observing systems, to improve the three-dimensional description of moisture in the atmosphere. NOAA/FSL has conducted data denial experiments since 1998 to determine the statistical impact that GPS-IPW retrievals have on 3-hour moisture and precipitation forecasts in the central United States. Results from 5-years of experiments indicate more or less continuous improvement in forecast skill as the GPS-Met network expands. Improvements are observed in relative humidity forecast accuracy at all levels below 500 hPa, and all precipitation levels above “trace”. The impact steadily decreases with the length of the forecast; it is usually substantial from 0-3 hours, and

  3. Progress in Space Weather Modeling and Observations Needed to Improve the Operational NAIRAS Model Aircraft Radiation Exposure Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, C. J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Tobiska, W.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. Addressing these science questions require improvements in both space weather modeling and observations. The focus of this talk is to present these science questions, the proposed methodologies for addressing these science questions, and the anticipated improvements to the operational predictions of atmospheric radiation exposure. The overarching goal of this work is to provide a decision support tool for the aviation industry that will enable an optimal balance to be achieved between minimizing health risks to passengers and aircrew while simultaneously minimizing costs to the airline companies.

  4. Wavegliders for Arctic Surface Observations and Navigation Support (DURIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    research, in particular the ONR Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) Departmental Research Initiative (DRI). The use of ships in the Arctic Ocean, even during...interacts with the surface and ice as it propagates to the Seagliders in the MIZ. 7 Figure 7. Modeled transmission loss for an acoustic...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Wavegliders for Arctic Surface Observations and

  5. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR): Steps Towards Improving Space-Weather Forecasting Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Sobey, C.; Eftekhari, T.; Jensen, E. A.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Hick, P. P.; Odstrcil, D.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather which describes the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such changes on the Earth's magnetosphere, radiation belts, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects which includes its forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather in the near-Earth environment is vitally important to protecting our modern-day reliance (militarily and commercially) on satellites, global-communication and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. Two ground-based radio-observing remote-sensing techniques that can aid our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a next-generation 'software' radio telescope centered in The Netherlands with international stations spread across central and northwest Europe. For several years, scientific observations of IPS on LOFAR have been undertaken on a campaign basis and the experiment is now well developed. More recently, LOFAR has been used to attempt scientific heliospheric FR observations aimed at remotely sensing the magnetic field of the plasma traversing the inner heliosphere. We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modeling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input

  6. Using Forecasting to Teach Weather Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Y.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-09-01

    Weather affects our lives and hence, is a popular topic in daily conversations and in the media. Therefore, it is not only important to teach weather, but is also a good idea to use 'weather' as a topic in science teaching. Science education has two main objectives: to acquire scientific concepts and methods. Weather forecasting is an adequate theme to teach scientific methods because it is dependent on observation. However, it is not easy to forecast weather using only temporal observation. We need to know the tendency of 'weather change' via consecutive and/or continuous weather observation. Students will acquire scientific-observation skills through weather observation. Data-processing skills would be enhanced through a weather-forecasting contest. A contest should be announced within 5 days of school events, such as a school excursion and field day. Students submit their own weather forecast by gathering weather information through the internet, news paper and so on. A weather-forecasting contest compels the student to observe the weather more often. We currently have some different weather forecasts. For example, American weather-related companies such as ACCU weather and Weather Channel provide weather forecast for the many locations all over the world. Comparing these weather forecasting with actual weather, participants such as students could evaluate the differences between forecasted and actual temperatures. Participants will judge the best weather forecast based on the magnitude of the difference. Also, participants evaluate the 'hitting ratio' of each weather forecast. Students can learn elementary statistics by comparing various weather forecasts. We have developed our weather web-site that provides our own weather forecasting and observation. Students acquire science skills using our weather web-site. We will report our lessen plans and explain our weather web-site.

  7. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  8. Observation and modeling of land surface state and convective activity over the Qinghai - Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Colin, J.; Jia, L.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Sobrino, J. A.; Wang, J.; Shen, X.; Ueno, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Qinghai - Tibet Plateau is characterized by a significant intra-annual variability and spatial heterogeneity of surface conditions. Snow and vegetation cover, albedo, surface temperature and wetness change very significantly during the year and from place to place. The influence of temporal changes on convective events and the onset of the monsoon has been documented by ground based measurements of land - atmosphere exchanges of heat and water. The state of the land surface over the entire Plateau can be determined by space observation of surface albedo, temperature, snow and vegetation cover and soil moisture. This provides spatial patterns in the land surface drivers of atmospheric instability: radiative forcing, land surface temperature and soil moisture contribute to trigger convective events. Heat and vapour fluxes at the land surface have been mapped at high spatial resolution and over periods of time representative of seasonal variability using MODIS and AATSR multispectral radiometric data. The response of surface temperature to vegetation phenology has been studied by using 25 years of AVHRR observations. Snow cover has been monitored by improving and re-calibrating the MODIS snow cover product. The snow water equivalent has been monitored over a period of 28 years using SMMR and SSM/I 18 and 37 GHz data and an improved algorithm. Linkages between land surface conditions, convective events and the onset of the Asian Monsoon have been investigated using two Numerical Weather Prediction Models: GRAPES in China and WRF in Japan to analyze a set of case-studies. These first experiments were aimed at evaluating the linkages of land surface conditions with intense rainfall events in the region. Using the modeling and data assimilation system GRAPES a series of experiments was performed to assess the sensitivity to different types of Land Surface Models. Combined use of medium resolution thermal infrared sensors like AATSR or MODIS with GRAPES in a Multi

  9. Observational & modeling analysis of surface heat and moisture fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An observational and modeling study was conducted to help assess how well current GCMs are predicting surface fluxes under the highly variable cloudiness and flow conditions characteristic of the real atmosphere. The observational data base for the study was obtained from a network of surface flux stations operated during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The study included examination of a surface-driven secondary circulation in the boundary layer resulting from a persistent cross-site gradient in soil moisture, to demonstrate the sensitivity of boundary layer dynamics to heterogeneous surface fluxes, The performance of a biosphere model in reproducing the measured surface fluxes was evaluated with and without the use of satellite retrieval of three key canopy variables with RMS uncertainties commensurate with those of the measurements themselves. Four sensible heat flux closure schemes currently being used in GCMs were then evaluated against the FIFE observations. Results indicate that the methods by which closure models are calibrated lead to exceedingly large errors when the schemes are applied to variable boundary layer conditions. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. ISS observations of aluminium surfaces under hydrogen ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, A.; Kamada, K.; Higashida, Y.

    1984-12-01

    The shadowing effect of ISS was applied to observe the surface behavior of H atoms implanted with 500 eV/atom on a high-purity Al sample. This study confirmed that this technique is powerful to observe the retention kinetics of H atoms especially on the topmost material surface with simultaneous analysis for surface contaminants such as oxygen during irradiation with hydrogen ions. The result obtained from the initially cleaned surface showed a remarkable increase in the H retention with increasing fluence of H/sub 2//sup +/ up to about 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ at room temperature, depending on the fluence of predamage given by He/sup +/ ions, but showed no increase in the retention at the temperatures above 100/sup 0/C. Therefore, because Al is a metal well known to be passive for chemisorption of H/sub 2/ molecules and H atoms, it was concluded that the observed H retention originates from the traps produced by radiation damage. The activation energy for thermal desorption of the trapped H atoms was estimated to be 1.1 +- 0.4 eV by ISS measurements. The oxygen-covered surface showed a rapid increase in the retention at fluence of less than 10/sup 17/ H/cm/sup 2/. (orig.).

  11. Iss observations of aluminum surfaces under hydrogen ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, A.; Kamada, K.; Higashida, Y.

    1984-12-01

    The shadowing effect of ISS was applied to observe the surface behavior of H atoms implanted with 500 eV/atom on a high-purity A1 sample. This study confirmed that this technique is powerful to observe the retention kinetics of H atoms especially on the topmost material surface with simultaneous analysis for surface contaminants such as oxygen during irradiation with hydrogen ions. The result obtained from the initially cleaned surface showed a remarkable increase in the H retention with increasing fluence of H2+ up to about 1018 H/cm2 at room temperature, depending on the fluence of predamage given by He+ ions, but showed no increase in the retention at the temperatures above 100 ° C. Therefore, because Al is a metal well known to be passive for chemisorption of H2 molecules and H atoms, it was concluded that the observed H retention originates from the traps produced by radiation damage. The activation energy for thermal desorption of the trapped H atoms was estimated to be 1.1±0.4 eV by ISS measurements. The oxygen-covered surface showed a rapid increase in the retention at fluence of less than 1017 H/cm2.

  12. ISS observations of aluminium surfaces under hydrogen ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, A.; Kamada, K. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Plasma Physics); Higashida, Y. (Seiun Senior High School (Japan))

    1984-12-01

    The shadowing effect of ISS was applied to observe the surface behavior of H atoms implanted with 500 eV/atom on a high-purity Al sample. This study confirmed that this technique is powerful to observe the retention kinetics of H atoms especially on the topmost material surface with simultaneous analysis for surface contaminants such as oxygen during irradiation with hydrogen ions. The result obtained from the initially cleaned surface showed a remarkable increase in the H retention with increasing fluence of H/sub 2//sup +/ up to about 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ at room temperature, depending on the fluence of predamage given by He/sup +/ ions, but showed no increase in the retention at the temperatures above 100/sup 0/C. Therefore, because Al is a metal well known to be passive for chemisorption of H/sub 2/ molecules and H atoms, it was concluded that the observed H retention originates from the traps produced by radiation damage. The activation energy for thermal desorption of the trapped H atoms was estimated to be 1.1 +- 0.4 eV by ISS measurements. The oxygen-covered surface showed a rapid increase in the retention at fluence of less than 10/sup 17/ H/cm/sup 2/.

  13. Intercomparison of the Performance of CLM3, NOAH, RUC, and STD Land Surface Schemes in the Weather and Research Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.

    2007-12-01

    The Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) was coupled into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model version 2.2. The performance of WRF-CLM3 in predicting regional climate was quantitatively compared with that of WRF coupled to the soil thermal diffusion (STD), Rapid Update Cycle, and NOAH Land Surface Schemes. These land surface schemes represent a range of complexity within land-surface schemes. CLM3 is the most sophisticated model, with detailed snow and vegetation processes. The STD scheme is oversimplified, which only calculates soil temperature and neglects vegetation and snow physics. The RUC and NOAH schemes are intermediate in the detail, and the major deference between them is that RUC has a multi-layer snow scheme, and Noah has a single snow layer lumped with the topmost soil layer. WRF was driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis data II with each of these land surface schemes for one-year simulations over the period, 1 October 1995 to 30 September 1996, resulting in four one-year simulations for intercomparison. Each simulation has 30km-10km two-way nested domains. The 30 km domain includes the western U.S. and eastern Pacific, and the inner domain includes California and parts of Nevada, Oregon, and the eastern Pacific. Our analysis shows that WRF-CLM3 outperforms WRF-RUC, WRF-NOAH, and WRF-STD in simulating temperature and snow when compared with observations. The WRF-STD scheme, which does not include snow and vegetation processes resulted in the poorest results, with a dramatic overestimation of surface air temperature. However, regardless of the land surface scheme chosen, WRF reasonably well reproduces the winter precipitation, a major water resource for California, suggesting that the linkage between land surface processes and precipitation is not explicit. In general, land surface schemes play a significant role in the simulation of regional

  14. Impact of satellite-based lake surface observations on the initial state of HIRLAM. Part I: evaluation of remotely-sensed lake surface water temperature observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kheyrollah Pour

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT observations are used to improve the lake surface state in the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM, a three-dimensional numerical weather prediction (NWP model. In this paper, satellite-derived LSWT observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR are evaluated against in-situ measurements collected by the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE for a selection of large- to medium-size lakes during the open-water season. Data assimilation of these LSWT observations into the HIRLAM is in the paper Part II. Results show a good agreement between MODIS and in-situ measurements from 22 Finnish lakes, with a mean bias of −1.13°C determined over five open-water seasons (2007–2011. Evaluation of MODIS during an overlapping period (2007–2009 with the AATSR-L2 product currently distributed by the European Space Agency (ESA shows a mean (cold bias error of −0.93°C for MODIS and a warm mean bias of 1.08°C for AATSR-L2. Two additional LSWT retrieval algorithms were applied to produce more accurate AATSR products. The algorithms use ESA's AATSR-L1B brightness temperature product to generate new L2 products: one based on Key et al. (1997 and the other on Prata (2002 with a finer resolution water mask than used in the creation of the AATSR-L2 product distributed by ESA. The accuracies of LSWT retrievals are improved with the Key and Prata algorithms with biases of 0.78°C and −0.11°C, respectively, compared to the original AATSR-L2 product (3.18°C.

  15. Technical Note: Surface water velocity observations from a camera: a case study on the Tiber River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tauro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring surface water velocity during flood events is a challenging task. Techniques based on deploying instruments in the flow are often unfeasible due to high velocity and abundant sediment transport. A low-cost and versatile technology that provides continuous and automatic observations is still not available. LSPIV (large scale particle imaging velocimetry is a promising approach to tackle these issues. Such technique consists of developing surface water velocity maps analyzing video frame sequences recorded with a camera. In this technical brief, we implement a novel LSPIV experimental apparatus to observe a flood event in the Tiber river at a cross-section located in the center of Rome, Italy. We illustrate results from three tests performed during the hydrograph flood peak and recession limb for different illumination and weather conditions. The obtained surface velocity maps are compared to the rating curve velocity and to benchmark velocity values. Experimental findings confirm the potential of the proposed LSPIV implementation in aiding research in natural flow monitoring.

  16. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  17. Preliminary observations on the impact of complex stress histories on sandstone response to salt weathering: laboratory simulations of process combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, S.; Smith, B. J.; Warke, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    Historic sandstone structures carry an inheritance, or a ‘memory’, of past stresses that the stone has undergone since its placement in a façade. This inheritance, which conditions present day performance, may be made up of long-term exposure to a combination of low magnitude background environmental factors (for example, salt weathering, temperature and moisture cycling) and, superimposed upon these, less frequent but potentially high magnitude events or ‘exceptional’ factors (for example, lime rendering, severe frost events, fire). The impact of complex histories on the decay pathways of historic sandstone is not clearly understood, but this paper seeks to improve that understanding through the use of a laboratory ‘process combination’ study. Blocks of quartz sandstone (Peakmoor, from NW England) were divided into subsets that experienced different histories (lime rendering and removal, fire and freeze-thaw cycles in isolation and combination) that reflected the event timeline of a real medieval sandstone monument in NE Ireland, Bonamargy Friary (McCabe et al. 2006b). These subsets were then subject to salt weathering cycles using a 10% salt solution of NaCl and MgSO4 that represents the ‘every-day’ stress environment of, for example, sandstone structures in coastal, or polluted urban, location. Block response to salt weathering was monitored by collecting, drying and weighing the debris that was released as blocks were immersed in the salt solution at the beginning of each cycle. The results illustrate the complexity of the stone decay system, showing that seemingly small variations in stress history can produce divergent response to salt weathering cycles. Applied to real-world historic sandstone structures, this concept may help to explain the spatial and temporal variability of sandstone response to background environmental factors on a single façade, and encourage conservators to include the role of stress inheritance when selecting and

  18. Global chemical weather forecasts for field campaign planning: predictions and observations of large-scale features during MINOS, CONTRACE, and INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The first global tropospheric forecasts of O3 and its precursors have been used in the daily flight planning of field measurement campaigns. The 3-D chemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC is driven by meteorological data from a weather center (NCEP to produce daily 3-day forecasts of the global distributions of O3 and related gases, as well as regional CO tracers. This paper describes the forecast system and its use in three field campaigns, MINOS, CONTRACE and INDOEX. An overview is given of the forecasts by MATCH-MPIC and by three other chemical weather forecast models (EURAD, ECHAM, and FLEXPART, focusing on O3 and CO. Total CO and regional CO tracers were found to be the most valuable gases for flight planning, due to their relatively well-defined anthropogenic source regions and lifetimes of one to a few months. CO was in good agreement with the observations on nearly all the flights (generally  r > 0.7, and the relative RMS differences for the deviations from the means was less than 20%. In every case in which the chemical weather forecasts were primarily responsible for the flight plans, the targeted features were observed. Three forecasted phenomena are discussed in detail: outflow from Asia observed in the Mediterranean upper troposphere during MINOS, outflow from North America observed in the middle troposphere over northern Europe during CONTRACE, and the location of the "chemical ITCZ'' over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX. In particular it is shown that although intercontinental pollution plumes such as those observed during MINOS and CONTRACE occur repeatedly during the months around the campaigns, their frequency is sufficiently low (~10--30% of the time that global chemical weather forecasts are important for enabling them to be observed during limited-duration field campaigns. The MATCH-MPIC chemical weather forecasts, including an interface for making customized figures from the output, are available for community use via http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~lawrence/forecasts.html.

  19. Clinical observation on lidocaine's application in phacoemulsification as surface anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of surface anesthesia for phacoemulsification using 20g/L lidocaine.METHODS: There were 1 850 patients(2 600 eyeswho underwent phacoemulsification via surface anesthesia using 20g/L lidocaine. The analgesic effect was observed. RESULTS: Totally 93% of 1 850 patients had not any pain during the surgery, a nice analgesic effect was showed, there was no complications duo to anaesthesia. Seven percent of all patients felt swelling pain during surgery but could tolerate. The naked or corrected visual acuity of 89.4% eyes was ≥0.6 one month after surgery.CONCLUSION: Surface anesthesia of using 20g/L lidocaine is safe and painless for phacoemulsification.

  20. Quantifying the surface energy fluxes in South Greenland during the 2012 high melt episodes using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausto, Robert; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason; Colgan, William; Langen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Two high melt episodes occurred on the Greenland ice sheet in July 2012, during which nearly the entire ice sheet surface experienced melting. Observations from an automatic weather station (AWS) in the lower ablation area in South Greenland reveal the largest daily melt rates (up to 28 cm d-1 ice equivalent) ever recorded on the ice sheet. The two melt episodes lasted 6 days, equivalent to 6% of the June-August melt period, but contributed 14 % to the total annual ablation of 8.5 m ice equivalent. We employ a surface energy balance model driven by AWS data to quantify the relative importance of the energy budget components contributing to melt through the melt season. During the days with largest daily melt rates, surface turbulent heat input peaked at 552 Wm-2, 77 % of the surface melt energy, which is otherwise typically dominated by absorbed solar radiation. We find that rain contributed ca. 7 % to melt during these episodes.

  1. Experimental Observation of Bohr’s Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η2 for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr’s hydrodynamic theory.

  2. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-25

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory.

  3. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  4. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  5. Attribution of observed surface humidity changes to human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Katharine M; Gillett, Nathan P; Jones, Philip D; Thorne, Peter W

    2007-10-11

    Water vapour is the most important contributor to the natural greenhouse effect, and the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere is expected to increase under conditions of greenhouse-gas-induced warming, leading to a significant feedback on anthropogenic climate change. Theoretical and modelling studies predict that relative humidity will remain approximately constant at the global scale as the climate warms, leading to an increase in specific humidity. Although significant increases in surface specific humidity have been identified in several regions, and on the global scale in non-homogenized data, it has not been shown whether these changes are due to natural or human influences on climate. Here we use a new quality-controlled and homogenized gridded observational data set of surface humidity, with output from a coupled climate model, to identify and explore the causes of changes in surface specific humidity over the late twentieth century. We identify a significant global-scale increase in surface specific humidity that is attributable mainly to human influence. Specific humidity is found to have increased in response to rising temperatures, with relative humidity remaining approximately constant. These changes may have important implications, because atmospheric humidity is a key variable in determining the geographical distribution and maximum intensity of precipitation, the potential maximum intensity of tropical cyclones, and human heat stress, and has important effects on the biosphere and surface hydrology.

  6. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12 μm{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  7. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Sensitivity of surface meteorological analyses to observation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Daniel Paul

    A computationally efficient variational analysis system for two-dimensional meteorological fields is developed and described. This analysis approach is most efficient when the number of analysis grid points is much larger than the number of available observations, such as for large domain mesoscale analyses. The analysis system is developed using MATLAB software and can take advantage of multiple processors or processor cores. A version of the analysis system has been exported as a platform independent application (i.e., can be run on Windows, Linux, or Macintosh OS X desktop computers without a MATLAB license) with input/output operations handled by commonly available internet software combined with data archives at the University of Utah. The impact of observation networks on the meteorological analyses is assessed by utilizing a percentile ranking of individual observation sensitivity and impact, which is computed by using the adjoint of the variational surface assimilation system. This methodology is demonstrated using a case study of the analysis from 1400 UTC 27 October 2010 over the entire contiguous United States domain. The sensitivity of this approach to the dependence of the background error covariance on observation density is examined. Observation sensitivity and impact provide insight on the influence of observations from heterogeneous observing networks as well as serve as objective metrics for quality control procedures that may help to identify stations with significant siting, reporting, or representativeness issues.

  9. The early-warning effects of assimilation of the observations over the large-scale slope of the "World Roof" on its downstream weather forecasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG ShiQiu; XU XiangDe; SHI XiaoHui; WANG DongXiao; ZHU YuXiang; PU JingJiao

    2009-01-01

    To improve the numerical simulation of the severe snow storms occurred in the south of China and the middle/lower reaches of Changjiang River during January of 2008, the observations from the automatic weather stations (AWS) over the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau (QXP) and its surrounding areas were assimi-lated into the Weather Research and Forecasts (WRF) model using multi-cycle 3-dimensional varia-tional data assimilation (3DVAR). Due to the large-scale special topography of the QXP and its sur-rounding areas which may reach up to the mid-troposphere, the AWS located at different height on the deep slope of the plateau are different to those located on plains and take e role analogous in some extent to that of radio soundings in obtaining the vertical "profile" information of the atmosphere, and have the advantages in the aspects of sampling frequency, location/height fixing, and synchronization. The information captured by these AWS may carry the early-warning "strong signals" in the upstream sensitive area for the downstream weather systems to the east of the plateau and thus the assimilation of these AWS data is expected to lead to significant improvements on the simulation of the severe weather system occurred in its downstream areas through adjusting the 3-dimensional structures of the atmospheric thermal-dynamics for the initial conditions of the model. This study indicates that the assimilated information of moisture, temperature and pressure carried in the observations of AWS over the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau and its surrounding areas is very important and useful in the forecasting of precipitation in its downstream areas.

  10. Geochemical investigation of weathering processes in a forested headwater catchment: Mass-balance weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Herman, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical research on natural weathering has often been directed towards explanations of the chemical composition of surface water and ground water resulting from subsurface water-rock interactions. These interactions are often defined as the incongruent dissolution of primary silicates, such as feldspar, producing secondary weathering products, such as clay minerals and oxyhydroxides, and solute fluxes (Meunier and Velde, 1979). The chemical composition of the clay-mineral product is often ignored. However, in earlier investigations, the saprolitic weathering profile at the South Fork Brokenback Run (SFBR) watershed, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, was characterized extensively in terms of its mineralogical and chemical composition (Piccoli, 1987; Pochatila et al., 2006; Jones et al., 2007) and its basic hydrology. O'Brien et al. (1997) attempted to determine the contribution of primary mineral weathering to observed stream chemistry at SFBR. Mass-balance model results, however, could provide only a rough estimate of the weathering reactions because idealized mineral compositions were utilized in the calculations. Making use of detailed information on the mineral occurrence in the regolith, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compositional variation on mineral-solute mass-balance modelling and to generate plausible quantitative weathering reactions that support both the chemical evolution of the surface water and ground water in the catchment, as well as the mineralogical evolution of the weathering profile. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  11. Cape Kennedy Weather Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from original weather observations taken at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida. Elements recorded are wind speed and direction,...

  12. Ocean Surface Carbon Dioxide Fugacity Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and validated a statistical model to estimate the fugacity (or partial pressure) of carbon dioxide (CO2) at sea surface (pCO2sea) from space-based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll, and salinity. More than a quarter million in situ measurements coincident with satellite data were compiled to train and validate the model. We have produced and made accessible 9 years (2002-2010) of the pCO2sea at 0.5 degree resolutions daily over the global ocean. The results help to identify uncertainties in current JPL Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) model-based and bottom-up estimates over the ocean. The utility of the data to reveal multi-year and regional variability of the fugacity in relation to prevalent oceanic parameters is demonstrated.

  13. Atomic force microscopic observation of surface-supported human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Kuo, Feng-Jia; Lee, Yu-Siang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2007-07-01

    The nanomechanical characteristics of the membrane cytoskeleton of human erythrocytes were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembly, fine structure, cell diameter, thickness, and reticulate cytoskeleton of erythrocytes on the mica surface were investigated. The adhesive forces that correspond to the membrane elasticity of various parts of the erythrocyte membrane surface were measured directly by AFM to be 0.64±0.14nN for cell indentation, 4.2±0.7nN for cell hump, and 11.5nN for side waist, respectively. The deformation of erythrocytes was discussed. Standing waves on the membrane that were set up by increased AFM amplitude were observed. The propagating velocity on the erythrocyte membrane was estimated to be ˜2.02×10-2m/s. Liquid physiological conditions were considered throughout.

  14. Land surface controls on afternoon precipitation diagnosed from observational data: Uncertainties and confounding factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feedback between soil moisture and precipitation has long been a topic of interest due to its potential for improving weather and seasonal forecasts. The generally proposed mechanism assumes a control of soil moisture on precipitation via the partitioning of the surface fluxes (the Evaporative F...

  15. Observation and research of weathered rock subgrade settlement%风化岩路基填料沉降观测试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩伟

    2011-01-01

    为了揭示风化岩填料路基的工程性质,结合室内击实实验与施工段现场沉降观测实验,深入分析了风化岩路基沉降随时间的变化规律,同时,对风化岩填料路基的边坡防护进行了概述.该研究成果可用于指导、评价山区高速公路风化岩路基填筑,这不仅是对保护环境、实施可持续发展战略的双重要求,而且具有较高的经济和社会效益.%In order to reveal the weathered rock subgrade engineering properties of packing, combining with the compaction test and construction of indoor experiment site settlement observation period, in-depth analysis of the rock embankment settlement may chang with time and the weathered rock fill embankment slope protection is also taken into consideration.Therefore this research results can be used to guide mountainous highway roadbed compactness of a weathered rock,which not only benefits environmental protection and sustainable development strategy, but also meats the dual requirement with high economic and social benefits.

  16. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  17. Interannual Variation of the Surface Temperature of Tropical Forests from Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperatures (LSTs within tropical forests contribute to climate variations. However, observational data are very limited in such regions. This study used passive microwave remote sensing data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS, providing observations under all weather conditions, to investigate the LST over the Amazon and Congo rainforests. The SSM/I and SSMIS data were collected from 1996 to 2012. The morning and afternoon observations from passive microwave remote sensing facilitate the investigation of the interannual changes of LST anomalies on a diurnal basis. As a result of the variability of cloud cover and the corresponding reduction of solar radiation, the afternoon LST anomalies tend to vary more than the morning LST anomalies. The dominant spatial and temporal patterns for interseasonal variations of the LST anomalies over the tropical rainforest were analyzed. The impacts of droughts and El Niños on this LST were also investigated. Differences between early morning and late afternoon LST anomalies were identified by the remote sensing product, with the morning LST anomalies controlled by humidity (according to comparisons with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data.

  18. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore......, the capacity of the highway seems to be reduced in bad weather and there are indications that travel time variability is also increased, at least in free-flow conditions. Heavy precipitation reduces speed and capacity by around 5-8%, whereas snow primarily reduces capacity. Other weather variables......-parametrically against traffic density and in step 2 the residuals from step 1 are regressed linearly against the weather variables. The choice of a non-parametric method is made to avoid constricting ties from a parametric specification and because the focus here is not on the relationship between traffic flow...

  19. Surface Material Characterization from Multi-band Optical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.

    2010-09-01

    Ground-based optical and radar sites routinely acquire resolved images of satellites. These resolved images provide the means to construct accurate wire-frame models of the observed body, as well as an understanding of its orientation as a function of time. Unfortunately, because such images are typically acquired in a single spectral band, they provide little information on the types of materials covering the satellite's various surfaces. Detailed surface material characterization generally requires spectrometric and/or multi-band photometric measurements. Fortunately, many instruments provide such multi-band information (e.g., spectrographs and multi-channel photometers). However, these sensors often measure the brightness of the entire satellite, with no spatial resolution at all. Because such whole-body measurements represent a summation of contributions from many reflecting surfaces, an ―un-mixing‖ or inversion process must be employed to determine the materials covering each of the satellite's individual sub-components. The first section of this paper describes the inversion theory required to retrieve satellite surface material properties from temporal sequences of whole-body multi-band brightness measurements. The inversion requires the following as input: 1) a set of multi-band measurements of a satellite's reflected-sunlight brightness, 2) the satellite's wire-frame model, including each major component capable of reflecting sunlight, 3) the satellite's attitude, specifying the body’s orientation at the time of each multi-band measurement, and 4) a database of bi-directional reflection distribution functions for a set of candidate surface materials. As output, the inversion process yields estimates of the fraction of each major satellite component covered by each candidate material. The second section of the paper describes several tests of the method by applying it to simulated multi-band observations of a cubical satellite with different materials

  20. Observation of 2nd Schumann eigenmode on Titan's surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Béghin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This works presents the results obtained from an updated data analysis of the observations of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF electromagnetic waves performed with the HASI-PWA (Huygens Atmospheric Structure and Permittivity, Wave and Altimetry instrumentation after Huygens Probe landing on Titan surface in January 2005. The most significant signals observed at around 36 Hz throughout the descent in the atmosphere have been extensively analyzed for several years, and subsequently interpreted as the signature of a Schumann resonance, although the latter exhibits atypical peculiarities compared with those known on Earth. The usual depicting methods of space wave data used so far could not allow retrieving the presence of weak signals when Huygens was at rest for 32 min on Titan's surface. Whereas the expected signal seems hidden within the instrumental noise, we show that a careful statistical analysis of the amplitude distribution of the 418 spectral density samples of the 36 Hz line reveals abnormal characteristics compared to other frequencies. This behavior is shown to occur under propitious circumstances due to the characteristics of the onboard data conversion processes into digital telemetry counts, namely 8-bit dynamic after logarithm compression of the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform of ELF waveforms. Since this phenomenon is observed only at the frequency bin around 36 Hz, we demonstrate that the Schumann resonance, seen in the atmosphere within the same band, is still present on the surface, albeit with a much smaller amplitude compared to that measured before and a few seconds after the impact, because the electric dipole is thought to have been stabilized ten seconds later almost horizontally until the end of the measurements.

  1. Space Weathering Rates in Lunar and Itokawa Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering alters the chemistry, microstructure, and spectral proper-ties of grains on the surfaces of airless bodies by two major processes: micrometeorite impacts and solar wind interactions. Investigating the nature of space weathering processes both in returned samples and in remote sensing observations provides information fundamental to understanding the evolution of airless body regoliths, improving our ability to determine the surface composition of asteroids, and linking meteorites to specific asteroidal parent bodies. Despite decades of research into space weathering processes and their effects, we still know very little about weathering rates. For example, what is the timescale to alter the reflectance spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope from an S-type asteroid? One approach to answering this question has been to determine ages of asteroid families by dynamical modeling and determine the spectral proper-ties of the daughter fragments. However, large differences exist between inferred space weathering rates and timescales derived from laboratory experiments, analysis of asteroid family spectra and the space weathering styles; estimated timescales range from 5000 years up to 108 years. Vernazza et al. concluded that solar wind interactions dominate asteroid space weathering on rapid timescales of 10(exp 4)-10(exp 6) years. Shestopalov et al. suggested that impact-gardening of regolith particles and asteroid resurfacing counteract the rapid progress of solar wind optical maturation of asteroid surfaces and proposed a space weathering timescale of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) years.

  2. SNOM Observations of Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Metal Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KITAZAWA Tazuko; MIYANISHI Shintaro; MURAKAMI Yoshiteru; KOJIMA Kunio; TAKAHASHI Akira

    2007-01-01

    We observe surface plasmon polariton (SPP) refraction on a metal heterostructured sample with a scattered-type scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The sample consists of Al and Au in-plane whose boundary is smooth enough with proper etching time. SPPs excited on the Al film travel to the boundary and a portion of SPPs propagates into the Au film. In addition, interference fringes appear in the SNOM image bent at the boundary. The result is analysed with effective index method and the refracted angle is explained by Snell's law.

  3. Surface composition of Europa based on VLT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligier, N.; Poulet, F.; Carter, J.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa may harbor a global salty ocean under an 80-170 km thick outer layer consisting of an icy crust (Anderson et al. 1998). Meanwhile, the 10-50 My old surface, dated by cratering rates (Pappalardo et al. 1999) implies rapid surface recycling and reprocessing that could result in tectonic activity (Kattenhorn et al. 2014) and plumes (Roth et al. 2014). The surface could thus exhibit fingerprints of chemical species, as minerals characteristics of an ocean-mantle interaction and/or organics of exobiological interest, directly originating from the subglacial ocean. In order to re-investigate the composition of Europa's surface, a global mapping campaign of the satellite was performed with the near-infrared integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. The high spectral binning of this instrument (0.5 nm) and large signal noise ratio in comparison to previous observations are adequate to detect sharp absorptions in the wavelength range 1.45-2.45 μm. In addition, the spatially resolved spectra we obtained over five epochs nearly cover the entire surface of Europa with a pixel scale of 12.5 by 25 m.a.s ( 35 by 70 km on Europa's surface), thus permitting a global scale study. Several icy and non-icy compounds were detected and mapped at process likely engendered by the Io plasma torus, the crystalline form is found to be approximately twice as abundant as the amorphous ice based on the analysis of the 1.65 μm band. If the surface is dominated by small and mid-sized water ice grains (25-200 μm), crystalline water-ice grains exhibit spatial inhomogeneities in their distribution. The sulfuric acid hydrate distribution exhibits the typical "bullseye" feature on the trailing hemisphere. The presence of Mg-bearing chlorinated salts (chloride, chlorate, and perchlorate) is supported by linear spectral modeling of the data, while the presence of sulfate salts is challenged. The distribution of some of these species is

  4. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  5. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  6. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  7. Isotopic excesses of proton-rich nuclei related to space weathering observed in a gas-rich meteorite Kapoeta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yoneda, Shigekazu, E-mail: hidaka@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: s-yoneda@kahaku.go.jp [Department of Science and Engineering, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba 305-0005 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    The idea that solar system materials were irradiated by solar cosmic rays from the early Sun has long been suggested, but is still questionable. In this study, Sr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm, and Gd isotopic compositions of sequential acid leachates from the Kapoeta meteorite (howardite) were determined to find systematic and correlated variations in their isotopic abundances of proton-rich nuclei, leading to an understanding of the irradiation condition by cosmic rays. Significantly large excesses of proton-rich isotopes (p-isotopes), {sup 84}Sr, {sup 130}Ba, {sup 132}Ba, {sup 136}Ce, {sup 138}Ce, and {sup 144}Sm, were observed, particularly in the first chemical separate, which possibly leached out of the very shallow layer within a few μm from the surface of regolith grains in the sample. The results reveal the production of p-isotopes through the interaction of solar cosmic rays with the superficial region of the regolith grains before the formation of the Kapoeta meteorite parent body, suggesting strong activity in the early Sun.

  8. Constraints on surface evapotranspiration: implications for modeling and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The continental hydrological cycle and especially evapotranspiration are constrained by additional factors such as the energy availability and the carbon cycle. As a results trying to understand and predict the surface hydrologic cycle in isolation might be highly unreliable. We present two examples were constraints induced by 1) radiation control through cloud albedo feedback and 2) carbon control on the surface water use efficiency are essential to correctly predict the seasonal hydrologic cycle. In the first example we show that correctly modeling diurnal and seasonal convection and the associated cloud-albedo feedback (through land-atmosphere and convection-large-scale circulation feedbacks) is essential to correctly model the surface hydrologic cycle in the Amazon, and to correct biases observed in all general circulation models. This calls for improved modeling of convection to correctly predict the tropical continental hydrologic cycle.In the second example we show that typical drought index based only on energy want water availability misses vegetation physiological and carbon feedback and cannot correctly represent the seasonal cycle of soil moisture stress. The typical Palmer Drought Stress Index is shown to be incapable of rejecting water stress in the future. This calls for new drought assessment metrics that may include vegetation and carbon feedback.

  9. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch when the wind duration was sufficient for the conditions to be considered stationary. The scaling of wave energy and frequency with open water distance demonstrated the indirect effects of ice cover on regional wave evolution. Waves in partial ice cover could be similarly categorized as distance-limited by applying the same open water scaling to determine an ‘effective fetch’. The process of local wave generation in ice appeared to be a strong function of the ice concentration, wherein the ice cover severely reduces the effective fetch. The wave field in the Beaufort Sea is thus a function of the sea ice both locally, where wave growth primarily occurs in the open water between floes, and regionally, where the ice edge may provide a more classic fetch limitation. Observations of waves in recent years may be indicative of an emerging trend in the Arctic Ocean, where we will observe increasing wave energy with decreasing sea ice extent.

  10. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  11. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  12. Thermophysical Properties of the Lunar Surface from Diviner Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Paul; Bandfield, Joshua; Vasavada, Ashwin; Ghent, Rebecca; Siegler, Matthew; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Aharonson, Oded; Paige, David

    2013-04-01

    Orbital thermal infrared measurements are sensitive to a variety of properties of the Moon's surface layer, including rock abundance, regolith cover and porosity, and small-scale surface roughness. With its multiple spectral channels and large dynamic temperature range, the Diviner Lunar Radiometer [1] on NASA's LRO spacecraft has enabled the first global, high-resolution maps of these important thermophysical properties. Here we present a summary of the results of Diviner's thermophysical investigation thus far. Maps of surface rock abundance show low typical values of decrease systematically with crater age, and rocky surfaces are only preserved on the youngest craters (decrease from ~10 kg m-2 yr-1 for crater ages of ~1 Ma to ~1 mg m-2 yr-1 at ~1 Ga [4]. Variations in upper regolith density correlate with the ages of individual mare basalt units, suggesting this layer is actively processed by impacts on geologically short timescales, which may reveal age relationships previously unseen [5]. Vast cold regions surrounding fresh impact craters during lunar night (termed "cold spots") are only apparent in thermal infrared data [2]. These features cannot be explained by the emplacement of ejecta, and instead are well modeled by the in situ decompression of the top ~1-10 cm of regolith. Among a variety of explanations for this phenomenon, a model of grain lifting and turbulent mixing within an expanding vapor cloud best matches observations. The Diviner observations suggest impact vaporization leads to prominent yet ephemeral scars in the upper regolith that may be common on airless bodies in the Solar System. Surface roughness at scales smaller than the ~250 m Diviner footprint affects the measured spectral slope in brightness temperatures. We used Diviner brightness temperature spectra measured at a variety of solar illumination and viewing geometries to constrain and map the RMS slopes of the Moon's surface [6]. Due to the general increase in roughness at smaller

  13. Investigating Surface Bias Errors in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model using a Geographic Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    horizontal grid spacing inner domain centered near San Diego, California. The San Diego area contains a mixture of urban , suburban, agricultural, and...Global Forecast System (GFS) model (Environmental Modeling Center 2003). The WRE–N is envisioned to be a rapid-update cycling application of WRF–ARW...surface– hydrology model with the Penn State-NCAR MM5 modeling system. Part I: Model implementation and sensitivity. Monthly Weather Review. 2001a

  14. Observing mass exchange with the Lofoten Basin using surface drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugstad, Johannes S.; LaCasce, Joe; Koszalka, Inga M.; Fer, Ilker

    2017-04-01

    The Lofoten Basin in the Nordic Seas plays a central role in the global overturning circulation, acting as a reservoir for northward-flowing Atlantic water. Substantial heat loss occurs here, permitting the waters to become denser and eventually sink nearer the Arctic. Idealized modeling studies and theoretical arguments suggest the warm water enters the Lofoten Basin via eddy transport from the boundary current over the adjacent continental slope. But there is no observational evidence that this is the major contribution to mass exchange between the warm Atlantic Current and the Basin. How the basin waters exit also remains a mystery. Surface drifters offer an unique possibility to study the pathways of the boundary-basin exchange of mass and heat. We thereby examine trajectories of surface drifters released in the Nordic Seas in the POLEWARD and PROVOLO experiments, and supplemented by historical data from the Global Drifter Array. Contrary to the idea that the boundary current eddies are the main source, the results suggest that fluid is entering the Lofoten Basin from all sides. However, the drifters exit preferentially in the northeast corner of the basin. This asymmetry likely contributes to the extended residence times of the warm Atlantic waters in the Lofoten Basin. We consider various measures to quantify the effect, and test whether this is captured in a high resolution numerical model.

  15. Ocean Surface Wind Speed of Hurricane Helene Observed by SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Cheng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high-resolution hur......The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high......-resolution hurricane was conducted. A case study was carried out to retrieve ocean surface wind field from C-band RADARSAT-1 SAR image which captured the structure of hurricane Helene over the Atlantic Ocean on 20 September, 2006. With wind direction from the outputs of U.S. Navy Operational Global Atmospheric...... CIWRAP models have been tested to extract wind speed from SAR data. The SAR retrieved ocean surface winds were compared to the aircraft wind speed observations from stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR). The results show the capability of hurricane wind monitoring by SAR....

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, weather conditions and air pollution in an Italian urban area: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Raffaella; Evangelisti, Melania; Frassanito, Antonella; Scagnolari, Carolina; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Antonelli, Guido; Nicolai, Ambra; Arima, Serena; Moretti, Corrado; Papoff, Paola; Villa, Maria Pia; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    In this study we sought to evaluate the association between viral bronchiolitis, weather conditions, and air pollution in an urban area in Italy. We included infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis from 2004 to 2014. All infants underwent a nasal washing for virus detection. A regional agency network collected meteorological data (mean temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity) and the following air pollutants: sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, benzene and suspended particulate matter measuring less than 10µm (PM10) and less than 2.5µm (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter. We obtained mean weekly concentration data for the day of admission, from the urban background monitoring sites nearest to each child's home address. Overdispersed Poisson regression model was fitted and adjusted for seasonality of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, to evaluate the impact of individual characteristics and environmental factors on the probability of a being positive RSV. Of the 723 nasal washings from the infants enrolled, 266 (68%) contained RSV, 63 (16.1%) rhinovirus, 26 (6.6%) human bocavirus, 20 (5.1%) human metapneumovirus, and 16 (2.2%) other viruses. The number of RSV-positive infants correlated negatively with temperature (p bronchiolitis epidemics in an Italian urban area. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Weathering behaviour of overburden-coal ash blending in relation to overburden management for acid mine drainage prevention in coal surface mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautama, R.S.; Kusuma, G.J.; Lestari, I.; Anggana, R.P. [Bandung Inst. Teknologi (Indonesia). Dept. of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Potentially acid forming (PAF) materials are encapsulated with non-acid forming materials (NAF) in order to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD) in surface coal mines. NAF compaction techniques with fly and bottom ashes from coal-fired power plants are used in mines with limited amounts of NAF materials. This study investigated the weathering behaviour of blended overburden and coal combustion ash in laboratory conditions. Free draining column leach tests were conducted on different blending schemes. The weathering process was simulated by spraying the samples with de-ionized water once per day. The leachates were then analyzed using X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analyses in order to identify the mineral composition of the samples over a 14 week period. Results of the study indicated that the weathering process plays a significant role in controlling infiltration rates, and may increase the capability of capping materials to prevent infiltration into PAF materials. Fly- and bottom-ash additions improved the performance of the encapsulation materials. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Determination of Granite Rock Massif Weathering and Cracking of Surface Layers in the Oldest Parts of Medieval Mine Depending on Used Mining Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the use of selected non-destructive testing methods for the purpose of specifying information on weathering and cracking of surface layers of granite rock massif in the medieval Jeroným Mine (the Czech Republic). This mine has been declared the National Heritage Site of the Czech Republic and its opening as a mining museum to the public is gradually prepared. Geological and geomechanical evaluation documents the possibility to find all kinds of weathering grades of rock massif in this mine. Two non-destructive methods have been tested, namely the measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and the measurement of Schmidt hammer rebound value. Field measurements were performed in two selected galleries to verify the application of such methods in specific conditions of underground spaces. Used mining method is one of the parameters later influencing cracking of rock massif. In selected galleries, two different mining methods were used which means that a part of a gallery profile was mined out by hand tools in the Middle Ages and another part of the profile was later mined out by blasting. Measurements in these galleries have enabled to analyse the influence of used mining methods on cracking of rock massif in the impaired zone, and, consequently, on ongoing weathering processes in those zones.

  19. Mirador - Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Our weather system includes the dynamics of the atmosphere and its interaction with the oceans and land. The improvement of...

  20. Observations of an aeolian landscape: From surface to orbit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary

    2016-12-01

    Landscapes derived solely from aeolian processes are rare on Earth because of the dominance of subaqueous processes. In contrast, aeolian-derived landscapes should typify Mars because of the absence of liquid water, the long exposure times of surfaces, and the presence of wind as the default geomorphic agent. Using the full range of available orbital and Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity images, wind-formed features in Gale Crater were cataloged and analyzed in order to characterize the aeolian landscape and to derive the evolution of the crater wind regime over time. Inferred wind directions show a dominance of regional northerly winds over geologic time-scales, but a dominance of topography-driven katabatic winds in modern times. Landscapes in Gale Crater show a preponderance of aeolian features at all spatial scales. Interpreted processes forming these features include first-cycle aeolian abrasion of bedrock, pervasive deflation, organization of available sand into bedforms, abundant cratering, and gravity-driven wasting, all of which occur over a background of slow physical weathering. The observed landscapes are proposed to represent a spectrum of progressive surface denudation from fractured bedrock, to retreating bedrock-capped mesas, to remnant hills capped by bedrock rubble, to desert pavement plains. This model of landscape evolution provides the mechanism by which northerly winds acting over ∼3 Ga excavated tens of thousands of cubic kilometers of material from the once sediment-filled crater, thus carving the intra-crater moat and exhuming Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons). The current crater surface is relatively sand-starved, indicating that potential sediment deflation from the crater is greater than sediment production, and that most exhumation of Mount Sharp occurred in the ancient geologic past.

  1. Suzaku observations of the low surface brightness cluster A76

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, N; Ibaraki, Y; Boehringer, H; Chon, G

    2013-01-01

    Context: We present results of Suzaku observations of a nearby galaxy cluster A76 at z=0.0395. This cluster is characterized by extremely low X-ray surface brightness and is hereafter referred to as the LSB cluster. Aims: To understand the nature and thermodynamic evolution of the LSB cluster by studying the physical properties of the hot intracluster medium in A76. Methods: We conducted two-pointed Suzaku observations of A76 and examined the global gas properties of the cluster by XIS spectral analysis. We also performed deprojection analysis of annular spectra and derived radial profiles of gas temperature, density and entropy out to approximately 850 kpc (~ 0.6 r_200) and 560 kpc (~0.4 r_200) in A76 East and A76 West, respectively. Results: The measured global temperature and metal abundance are approximately 3.3 keV and 0.24 solar, respectively. From the deprojection analysis, the entropy profile is found to be flat with respect to radius. The entropy within the central region (r < 0.2r_200) is excepti...

  2. Surface-focused Seismic Holography of Sunspots: I. Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, D C

    2008-01-01

    We present a comprehensive set of observations of the interaction of p-mode oscillations with sunspots using surface-focused seismic holography. Maps of travel-time shifts, relative to quiet-Sun travel times, are shown for incoming and outgoing p modes as well as their mean and difference. We compare results using phase-speed filters with results obtained with filters that isolate single p-mode ridges, and further divide the data into multiple temporal frequency bandpasses. The f mode is removed from the data. The variations of the resulting travel-time shifts with magnetic-field strength and with the filter parameters are explored. We find that spatial averages of these shifts within sunspot umbrae, penumbrae, and surrounding plage often show strong frequency variations at fixed phase speed. In addition, we find that positive values of the mean and difference travel-time shifts appear exclusively in waves observed with phase-speed filters that are dominated by power in the low-frequency wing of the p1 ridge....

  3. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  4. On the correspondence between surface UV observations and TOMS determinations of surface UV: a potential method for quality evaluating world surface UV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cornwall

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of erythemally weighted surface UV irradiance observations with similar NASA TOMS surface UV determinations is described. Comparisons are made for two observation periods: the Robertson-Berger (R-B meter period from 1974 to the late 1980s and the current period from 1996 to the present when more sophisticated UVB-1 instruments were used. The more primitive R-B meter observations that comprised the fi rst U.S. UV network are seen to drift downward with respect to those of the TOMS. While the UVB-1 observations did not appear to drift, a substantial bias is noted to exist between the TOMS and the UVB-1 stations collecting observations; the TOMS estimations tend to be higher. A portion of the bias may be attributed to errors in calibration, total ozone, and cosine response of the surface instrumentation. Unaccounted aerosol effects, although not considered to be large in the TOMS estimations, present another source of error. Comparisons are fi rst done for all sky conditions and then for clear sky conditions. The biases typically agree for all sky conditions within the uncertainties of the surface instruments' calibrations, liberally defi ned as ± 5%, implying that the TOMS cloud correction scheme performs reasonably well. Snow cover severely impacts the TOMS observations, giving considerably higher estimations. The biases for clear sky conditions ranged from 15% to 19% with no obvious drifts between the satellite and surface observations. The variation in the biases among stations is within the calibration uncertainties of the instruments, but the absolute bias is unexpectedly large. The standard deviations of the clear sky comparisons among all stations are steady at 4.8% ± 0.7%. A plot of the TOMS/UVB-1 ratio versus TOMS cloud refl ectivity observations is noisy, but qualitatively suggestive of a possible slight increase (~ 5% or greater over the range of clear to overcast skies. The results from these comparisons

  5. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  6. Improving solar wind persistence forecasts: Removing transient space weather events, and using observations away from the Sun-Earth line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohutova, Petra; Bocquet, François-Xavier; Henley, Edmund M.; Owens, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates two significant ways of improving persistence forecasts of the solar wind, which exploit the relatively unchanging nature of the ambient solar wind to provide 27 day forecasts, when using data from the Lagrangian L1 point. Such forecasts are useful as a prediction tool for the ambient wind, and for benchmarking of solar wind models. We show that solar wind persistence forecasts can be improved by removing transient solar wind features such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using CME indicators to automatically identify CME-contaminated periods in ACE data from 1998 to 2011, and replacing these with solar wind from a previous synodic rotation, persistence forecasts improve (relative to a baseline): skill scores for Bz, a crucial parameter for determining solar wind geoeffectiveness, improve by 7.7 percentage points when using a proton temperature-based indicator with good operational potential. We also show that persistence forecasts can be improved by using measurements away from L1, to reduce the requirement on coronal stability for an entire synodic period, at the cost of reduced lead time. Using STEREO-B data from 2007 to 2013 to create such a reduced lead time persistence forecast, we show that Bz skill scores improve by 17.1 percentage points relative to ACE. Finally, we report on implications for persistence forecasts from any future missions to the L5 Lagrangian point and on the successful operational implementation (in spring 2015) of the normal (ACE-based) and reduced lead time (STEREO-based) persistence forecasts in the Met Office's Space Weather Operations Centre, as well as plans for future improvements.

  7. Development of a New Data Tool for Computing Launch and Landing Availability with Respect to Surface Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K. Lee; Altino, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch has a long history of expertise in the modeling and computation of statistical launch availabilities with respect to weather conditions. Their existing data analysis product, the Atmospheric Parametric Risk Assessment (APRA) tool, computes launch availability given an input set of vehicle hardware and/or operational weather constraints by calculating the climatological probability of exceeding the specified constraint limits, APRA has been used extensively to provide the Space Shuttle program the ability to estimate impacts that various proposed design modifications would have to overall launch availability. The model accounts for both seasonal and diurnal variability at a single geographic location and provides output probabilities for a single arbitrary launch attempt. Recently, the Shuttle program has shown interest in having additional capabilities added to the APRA model, including analysis of humidity parameters, inclusion of landing site weather to produce landing availability, and concurrent analysis of multiple sites, to assist in operational landing site selection. In addition, the Constellation program has also expressed interest in the APRA tool, and has requested several additional capabilities to address some Constellation-specific issues, both in the specification and verification of design requirements and in the development of operations concepts. The combined scope of the requested capability enhancements suggests an evolution of the model beyond a simple revision process. Development has begun for a new data analysis tool that will satisfy the requests of both programs. This new tool, Probabilities of Atmospheric Conditions and Environmental Risk (PACER), will provide greater flexibility and significantly enhanced functionality compared to the currently existing tool.

  8. Weather Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  9. Cockpit weather information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  10. Some Observations on Gold in the Weathering Profile at Garimpo Porquinho, an Artisanal Mine in the Tapajós Region, Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Barros de Oliveira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available At Garimpo Porquinho (Tapajós Province, Brazilian Amazon gold-bearing quartz veins containing sulfides occur in anarrow zone affected by hydrothermal alteration. The artisanally mined veins are exposed in a saprolite zone extending downat least 9 m to the fresh rock and are covered by a 1 m thick residual soil. Lateral gold dispersion in the saprolite is notnoticeable whereas in the soil gold dispersion has been observed as far as 2 m from the vein. Trace metals associated with goldinclude Ag, Bi, As and Sb. Copper and lead, present in sulfides, can also indicate the presence of gold. The study of goldparticles in different levels of the profile shows that gold has been affected by weathering. In the upper levels of the profile,particles are smaller, more rounded and pitted by dissolution. Grains of primary gold containing up to 20% Ag are commonlyexhibit silver-poor rims which may penetrate deep into the grain. The interface between the Ag-poor rims and the interior isvery sharp. Such gold-rich rims likely formed by self-electrorefining of electrum grains during weathering

  11. Subarctic physicochemical weathering of serpentinized peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, O. I.; Beinlich, A.; Hövelmann, J.; Austrheim, H.; Jamtveit, B.

    2017-06-01

    Frost weathering is effective in arctic and subarctic climate zones where chemical reactions are limited by the reduced availability of liquid water and the prevailing low temperature. However, small scale mineral dissolution reactions are nevertheless important for the generation of porosity by allowing infiltration of surface water with subsequent fracturing due to growth of ice and carbonate minerals. Here we combine textural and mineralogical observations in natural samples of partly serpentinized ultramafic rocks with a discrete element model describing the fracture mechanics of a solid when subject to pressure from the growth of ice and carbonate minerals in surface-near fractures. The mechanical model is coupled with a reaction-diffusion model that describes an initial stage of brucite dissolution as observed during weathering of serpentinized harzburgites and dunites from the Feragen Ultramafic Body (FUB), SE-Norway. Olivine and serpentine are effectively inert at relevant conditions and time scales, whereas brucite dissolution produces well-defined cm to dm thick weathering rinds with elevated porosity that allows influx of water. Brucite dissolution also increases the water saturation state with respect to hydrous Mg carbonate minerals, which are commonly found as infill in fractures in the fresh rock. This suggests that fracture propagation is at least partly driven by carbonate precipitation. Dissolution of secondary carbonate minerals during favorable climatic conditions provides open space available for ice crystallization that drives fracturing during winter. Our model reproduces the observed cm-scale meandering fractures that propagate into the fresh part of the rock, as well as dm-scale fractures that initiate the breakup of larger domains. Rock disintegration increases the reactive surface area and hence the rate of chemical weathering, enhances transport of dissolved and particulate matter in the weathering fluid, and facilitates CO2 uptake by

  12. Recent Variability Observations of Solar System Giant Planets: Fresh Context for Understanding Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years a number of high cadence photometric observations of solar system giant planets have been acquired by various platforms. Such observations are of interest as they provide points of comparison to the already expansive set of brown dwarf variability observations and the small, but growing, set of exoplanet variability observations. By measuring how rapidly the integrated light from solar system giant planets can evolve, variability observations of substellar objects that are unlikely to ever be resolved can be placed in a fuller context. Examples of brown dwarf variability observations include extensive work from the ground (e.g., Radigen et al. 2014), Spitzer (e.g., Metchev et al. 2015), Kepler (Gizis et al. 2015), and HST (Yang et al. 2015).Variability has been measured on the planetary mass companion to the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207b (Zhou et al. 2016) and further searches are planned in thermal emission for the known directly imaged planets with ground based telescopes (Apai et al. 2016) and in reflected light with future space based telescopes. Recent solar system variability observations include Kepler monitoring of Neptune (Simon et al. 2016) and Uranus, Spitzer observations of Neptune (Stauffer et al. 2016), and Cassini observations of Jupiter (West et al. in prep). The Cassini observations are of particular interest as they measured the variability of Jupiter at a phase angle of approximately 60 deg, comparable to the viewing geometry expected for space based direct imaging of cool extrasolar Jupiters in reflected light. These solar system analog observations capture many of the characteristics seen in brown dwarf variability, including large amplitudes and rapid light curve evolution on timescales as short as a few rotation periods. Simon et al. (2016) attribute such variations at Neptune to a combination of large scale, stable cloud structures along with smaller, more rapidly varying, cloud patches. The observed brown dwarf and

  13. Recent Variability Observations of Solar System Giant Planets: Fresh Context for Understanding Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.; Kepler Giant Planet Variability Team, Spitzer Ice Giant Variability Team

    2016-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of of high cadence photometric observations of solar system giant planets have been acquired by various platforms. Such observations are of interest as they provide points of comparison to the already expansive set of brown dwarf variability observations and the small, but growing, set of exoplanet variability observations. By measuring how rapidly the integrated light from solar system giant planets can evolve, variability observations of substellar objects that are unlikely to ever be resolved can be placed in a fuller context. Examples of brown dwarf variability observations include extensive work from the ground (e.g., Radigan et al. 2014), Spitzer (e.g., Metchev et al. 2015), Kepler (Gizis et al. 2015), and HST (Yang et al. 2015). Variability has been measured on the planetary mass companion to the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207b (Zhou et al. 2016) and further searches are planned in thermal emission for the known directly imaged planets with ground based telescopes (Apai et al. 2016) and in reflected light with future space based telescopes. Recent solar system variability observations include Kepler monitoring of Neptune (Simon et al. 2016) and Uranus, Spitzer observations of Neptune (Stauffer et al. 2016), and Cassini observations of Jupiter (West et al. in prep). The Cassini observations are of particular interest as they measured the variability of Jupiter at a phase angle of ˜60○, comparable to the viewing geometry expected for space based direct imaging of cool extrasolar Jupiters in reflected light. These solar system analog observations capture many of the characteristics seen in brown dwarf variability, including large amplitudes and rapid light curve evolution on timescales as short as a few rotation periods. Simon et al. (2016) attribute such variations at Neptune to a combination of large scale, stable cloud structures along with smaller, more rapidly varying, cloud patches. The observed brown dwarf and exoplanet

  14. Impacts of Weather Conditions Modified by Urban Expansion on Surface Ozone:Comparison between the Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuemei; CHEN Fei; WU Zhiyong; ZHANG Meigen; Mukul TEWARI; Alex GUENTHER; Christine WIEDINMYER

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the online weather research and forecasting and chemistry (WRF-Chem) model is used to explore the impacts of urban expansion on regional weather conditions and its implication on surface ozone concentrations over the Pearl River Delta(PRD) and Yangtze River Delta(YRD) regions.Two scenarios of urban maps are used in the WRF-Chem to represent the early 1990s (pre-urbanization) and the current urban distribution in the PRD and the YRD.Month-long simulation results using the above land-use scenarios for March 2001 show that urbanization increases both the day- and night-time 2-m temperatures by about 0.6℃ and 1.4℃,respectively. Daytime reduction in the wind speed by about 3.0 m s-1 is larger than that for the nighttime (0.5 to 2 m s-1).The daytime increase in the PBL height (>200 m) is also larger than the nighttime (50-100 m).The meteorological conditions modified by urbanization lead to detectable ozone-concentration changes in the PRD and the YRD.Urbanization increases the nighttime surface-ozone concentrations by about 4.7%-8.5% and by about 2.9%-4.2% for the daytime.In addition to modifying individual meteorological variables,urbanization also enhances the convergence zones,especially in the PRD.More importantly,urbanization has different effects on the surface ozone for the PRD and the YRD,presumably due to their urbanization characteristics and geographical locations.Even though the PRD has a smaller increase in the surface temperature than the YRD,it has (a) weaker surface wind speed,(b)smaller increase in PBL heights,and (c) stronger convergence zones.The latter three factors outweighed the temperature increase and resulted in a larger ozone enhancement in the PRD than the YRD.

  15. Mesoscale dynamics on the Sun's surface from HINODE observations

    CERN Document Server

    Roudier, T; Brito, D; Rincon, F; Malherbe, J M; Meunier, N; Berger, T; Frank, Z; 10.1051/0004-6361:200811101

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The interactions of velocity scales on the Sun's surface, from granulation to supergranulation are still not understood, nor are their interaction with magnetic fields. We thus aim at giving a better description of dynamics in the mesoscale range which lies between the two scales mentioned above. Method: We analyse a 48h high-resolution time sequence of the quiet Sun photosphere at the disk center obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode. The observations, which have a field of view of 100 \\arcsec$\\times$ 100 \\arcsec, typically contain four supergranules. We monitor in detail the motion and evolution of granules as well as those of the radial magnetic field. Results: This analysis allows us to better characterize Trees of Fragmenting Granules issued from repeated fragmentation of granules, especially their lifetime statistics. Using floating corks advected by measured velocity fields, we show their crucial role in the advection of the magnetic field and in the build up of the network. Fi...

  16. Observations of surface waves interacting with ice using stereo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alexander J.; Bechle, Adam J.; Wu, Chin H.

    2014-06-01

    A powerful Automated Trinocular Stereo Imaging System (ATSIS) is used to remotely measure waves interacting with three distinct ice types: brash, frazil, and pancake. ATSIS is improved with a phase-only correlation matching algorithm and parallel computation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution 3-D profiles of the water/ice surface, from which the wavelength, frequency, and energy flux are calculated. Alongshore spatial frequency distributions show that pancake and frazil ices differentially attenuate at a greater rate for higher-frequency waves, causing a decrease in mean frequency. In contrast, wave propagation through brash ice causes a rapid increase in the dominant wave frequency, which may be caused by nonlinear energy transfer to higher frequencies due to collisions between the brash ice particles. Consistent to the results in frequency, the wavelengths in pancake and frazil ices increase but decrease in brash ice. The total wave energy fluxes decrease exponentially in both pancake and frazil ice, whereas the overall energy flux remain constant in the brash ice due to thin layer thickness. The spatial energy flux distributions also reveal that wave reflection occurs at the boundary of each ice layer, with reflection coefficient decaying exponentially away from the ice interface. Reflection is the strongest at the pancake/ice-free and frazil/brash interfaces and the weakest at the brash/ice-free interface. These high resolution observations measured by ATSIS demonstrate the spatially variable nature of waves propagating through ice.

  17. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface.

  18. Snowmelt and Surface Freeze/Thaw Timings over Alaska derived from Passive Microwave Observations using a Wavelet Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Dinardo, S. J.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost soils contain a vast amount of organic carbon that will be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide or methane when thawed. Surface to air greenhouse gas fluxes are largely dependent on such surface controls as the frozen/thawed state of the snow and soil. Satellite remote sensing is an important means to create continuous mapping of surface properties. Advances in the ability to determine soil and snow freeze/thaw timings from microwave frequency observations improves upon our ability to predict the response of carbon gas emission to warming through synthesis with in-situ observation, such as the 2012-2015 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Surface freeze/thaw or snowmelt timings are often derived using a constant or spatially/temporally variable threshold applied to time-series observations. Alternately, time-series singularity classifiers aim to detect discontinuous changes, or "edges", in time-series data similar to those that occur from the large contrast in dielectric constant during the freezing or thaw of soil or snow. We use multi-scale analysis of continuous wavelet transform spectral gradient brightness temperatures from various channel combinations of passive microwave radiometers, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, AMSR2) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I F17) gridded at a 10 km posting with resolution proportional to the observational footprint. Channel combinations presented here aim to illustrate and differentiate timings of "edges" from transitions in surface water related to various landscape components (e.g. snow-melt, soil-thaw). To support an understanding of the physical basis of observed "edges" we compare satellite measurements with simple radiative transfer microwave-emission modeling of the snow, soil and vegetation using in-situ observations from the SNOw TELemetry (SNOTEL) automated weather stations. Results of freeze/thaw and snow-melt timings and trends are

  19. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Genetically optimizing weather predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. B.; Staats, Kai; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni

    2016-07-01

    humidity, air pressure, wind speed and wind direction) into a database. Built upon this database, we have developed a remarkably simple approach to derive a functional weather predictor. The aim is provide up to the minute local weather predictions in order to e.g. prepare dome environment conditions ready for night time operations or plan, prioritize and update weather dependent observing queues. In order to predict the weather for the next 24 hours, we take the current live weather readings and search the entire archive for similar conditions. Predictions are made against an averaged, subsequent 24 hours of the closest matches for the current readings. We use an Evolutionary Algorithm to optimize our formula through weighted parameters. The accuracy of the predictor is routinely tested and tuned against the full, updated archive to account for seasonal trends and total, climate shifts. The live (updated every 5 minutes) SALT weather predictor can be viewed here: http://www.saao.ac.za/ sbp/suthweather_predict.html

  1. Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.; Short, David A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a 15-year climatological study of severe weather events and related severe weather atmospheric parameters. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. The local forecast rules were used to set threat assessment thresholds for stability parameters that were derived from the sounding data. The severe weather events databases were used to identify days with reported severe weather and the CGLSS data was used to differentiate between lightning and non-lightning days. These data sets provided the foundation for analyzing the stability parameters and synoptic patterns that were used to develop an objective tool to aid in forecasting severe weather events. The period of record for the analysis was May - September, 1989 - 2003. The results indicate that there are certain synoptic patterns more prevalent on days with severe weather and some of the stability parameters are better predictors of severe weather days based on locally tuned threat values. The results also revealed the stability parameters that did not display any skill related to severe weather days. An interactive web-based Severe Weather Decision Aid was developed to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters, CGLSS data, and synoptic-scale dynamics. The tool will be tested and evaluated during the 2005 warm season.

  2. Oil sheen weathering post Deepwater Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, M. Y.; Redmond, M. C.; Reddy, C. M.; Aeppli, C.; Nelson, R. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    A recently published study identified the source of the reoccurred oil sheens close to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster site as a finite contamination most likely derived from tanks and pits on the DWH wreckage itself. Here we use geochemical fingerprinting and microbial community analysis to better understand the fate and weathering processes affecting these surface oils. Both, alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are shown to reflect a linear decrease of hydrocarbon compounds with increasing distance to the DWH wreckage site (equivalent to exposure time on the sea surface). These results indicate that in the early stage of weathering the combined effects of dissolution and evaporation dominate the degradation of these surface oils. Sheen microbial communities were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Flavobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, with low relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria likely to be hydrocarbon degraders (no more than 15% of sequences in each sample). However, some of these Gammaproteobacteria were closely related to putative hydrocarbon degraders observed in abundance in deep water plumes during the primary Deepwater Horizon spill, suggesting that very low levels of biodegradation may be also occurring. This in situ weathering experiment provides new insights in hydrocarbon weathering dynamics and shows how chemical and biological changes can potentially be masked by large evaporative losses of compounds smaller than C18 n-alkanes.

  3. Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter New Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    have suggested that it may be finely structured on a subarcsecond scale representing a mix of hot and cool plasma elements. In this study...Yurchyshyn, 2012, Phys. Scr ., 86, 018402   Observation of a Non-radial Penumbral in a Flux Emerging Region under Chromospheric Canopy Fields

  4. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  5. If ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances observed before strong earthquakes may result from simultaneous impact of space weather on all geospheres including solid earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachikyan, Galina

    2016-07-01

    It is revealed in previous decades that ionospheric disturbances precede strong earthquakes, thus, the ionospheric precursors of strong earthquakes are now under developing [Pulinets and Boyarchuk, 2004]. Simultaneously, it is revealed that strong earthquakes may be preceded by geomagnetic disturbances as well, as a result, the geomagnetic variations, for example, in the ULF band, are considered now as precursory signals [Fraser-Smith, 1990, doi/10.1029/GL017i009p01465]. At the same time, there is currently no reliable theory nor for ionospheric or to magnetic precursors of earthquakes. Moreover, several researches have reexamined some of above results and concluded that observed magnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes could be generated by other sources, such as global magnetic activity [e.g. Campbell, 2009, doi/10.1029/2008JA013932], and that ionospheric anomalies can also be an effect of the increase of the global magnetic activity [e. g. Masci and Thomas, 2015, doi:10.1002/2015RS005734]. Taking into account such conclusions, one may suggest that the observed ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes might be due to simultaneous influence of a space weather on the complicated surrounding system including the solid earth. This report presents some statistical results to prove such suggestion. In particular, it is shown [Khachikyan et al., 2012, doi:10.4236/ijg.2012.35109] that maximal possible earthquake magnitude (seismic potential) can be determined, in first approximation, on the base of geomagnetic Z-component measured in the Geocentric Solar Magnetosphere (GSM) coordinate system, in which the space weather impact on the earth's environment, due to reconnection of the solar wind magnetic field with the earth's magnetic field, is more ordered.

  6. Land-surface controls on afternoon precipitation diagnosed from observational data: uncertainties and confounding factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Guillod

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between soil moisture and precipitation has long been a topic of interest due to its potential for improving weather and seasonal forecasts. The generally proposed mechanism assumes a control of soil moisture on precipitation via the partitioning of the surface turbulent heat fluxes, as assessed via the evaporative fraction (EF, i.e., the ratio of latent heat to the sum of latent and sensible heat, in particular under convective conditions. Our study investigates the poorly understood link between EF and precipitation by relating the before-noon EF to the frequency of afternoon precipitation over the contiguous US, through statistical analyses of multiple EF and precipitation data sets. We analyze remote-sensing data products (Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM for EF, and radar precipitation from the NEXt generation weather RADar system (NEXRAD, FLUXNET station data, and the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR. Data sets agree on a region of positive relationship between EF and precipitation occurrence in the southwestern US. However, a region of strong positive relationship over the eastern US in NARR cannot be confirmed with observation-derived estimates (GLEAM, NEXRAD and FLUXNET. The GLEAM–NEXRAD data set combination indicates a region of positive EF–precipitation relationship in the central US. These disagreements emphasize large uncertainties in the EF data. Further analyses highlight that much of these EF–precipitation relationships could be explained by precipitation persistence alone, and it is unclear whether EF has an additional role in triggering afternoon precipitation. This also highlights the difficulties in isolating a land impact on precipitation. Regional analyses point to contrasting mechanisms over different regions. Over the eastern US, our analyses suggest that the EF–precipitation relationship in NARR is either atmospherically controlled (from precipitation persistence and

  7. Impacts of uncertainties in weather and streamflow observations in calibration and evaluation of an elevation distributed HBV-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeland, K.; Steinsland, I.; Petersen-Øverleir, A.; Johansen, S.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the uncertainties in streamflow simulations when uncertainties in both observed inputs (precipitation and temperature) and streamflow observations used in the calibration of the hydrological model are explicitly accounted for. To achieve this goal we applied the elevation distributed HBV model operating on daily time steps to a small catchment in high elevation in Southern Norway where the seasonal snow cover is important. The uncertainties in precipitation inputs were quantified using conditional simulation. This procedure accounts for the uncertainty related to the density of the precipitation network, but neglects uncertainties related to measurement bias/errors and eventual elevation gradients in precipitation. The uncertainties in temperature inputs were quantified using a Bayesian temperature interpolation procedure where the temperature lapse rate is re-estimated every day. The uncertainty in the lapse rate was accounted for whereas the sampling uncertainty related to network density was neglected. For every day a random sample of precipitation and temperature inputs were drawn to be applied as inputs to the hydrologic model. The uncertainties in observed streamflow were assessed based on the uncertainties in the rating curve model. A Bayesian procedure was applied to estimate the probability for rating curve models with 1 to 3 segments and the uncertainties in their parameters. This method neglects uncertainties related to errors in observed water levels. Note that one rating curve was drawn to make one realisation of a whole time series of streamflow, thus the rating curve errors lead to a systematic bias in the streamflow observations. All these uncertainty sources were linked together in both calibration and evaluation of the hydrologic model using a DREAM based MCMC routine. Effects of having less information (e.g. missing one streamflow measurement for defining the rating curve or missing one precipitation station

  8. Space weathering of asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Shestopalov, D I; Cloutis, E A

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of laboratory experiments simulating space weathering optical effects on atmosphereless planetary bodies reveals that the time needed to alter the spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope of an S-type asteroid is about ~ 0.1 Myr. The time required to reduce the visible albedo of samples to ~ 0.05 is ~ 1 Myr. Since both these timescales are much less than the average collisional lifetime of asteroids larger than several kilometers in size, numerous low-albedo asteroids having reddish spectra with subdued absorption bands should be observed instead of an S-type dominated population. It is not the case because asteroid surfaces cannot be considered as undisturbed, unlike laboratory samples. We have estimated the number of collisions occurring in the time of 105 yr between asteroids and projectiles of various sizes and show that impact-activated motions of regolith particles counteract the progress of optical maturation of asteroid surfaces. Continual r...

  9. The weathering of oil after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: insights from the chemical composition of the oil from the sea surface, salt marshes and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Jiqing; Zhu, Qingzhi; Wu, Wei

    2012-09-01

    The oil released during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill may have both short- and long-time impacts on the northern Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. An understanding of how the composition and concentration of the oil are altered by weathering, including chemical, physical and biological processes, is needed to evaluate the oil toxicity and impact on the ecosystem in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This study examined petroleum hydrocarbons in oil mousse collected from the sea surface and salt marshes, and in oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead after the DWH oil spill. Oil mousses were collected at two stations (OSS and CT, located 130 and 85 km away from the wellhead, respectively) in May 2010, and two sediment samples from stations SG and SC, within 6 km of the wellhead, in May 2011. We also collected oil mousse from salt marshes at Marsh Point (MP), Mississippi, 186 km away from the wellhead in July 2010. In these samples, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-, m-, and o-xylenes), C3-benzenes and trace metals were measured to examine how the oil was altered chemically. The chemical analysis indicates that the oil mousses underwent different degrees of weathering with the pattern of OSS Petroleum hydrocarbon data reveal that the oil deposited in sediments underwent only light to moderate degradation one year after the DWH oil spill, as supported by the presence of short-chained n-alkanes (C10-C 15), BTEX and C 3-benzenes. The weathering of oil in sediment may result from biological degradation and dissolution, evidenced by the preferential loss of mid-chained n-alkanes C16-C 27, lower ratios of n-C 17/Pr and n-C 18/Ph , and preferential loss of PAHs relative to alkylated PAHs.

  10. Comparative Analysis on Observation Data of the Transfer Station in Anqing National Basic Weather Station%安庆国家基本气象观测站迁站对比观测资料差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳小群; 顾卫; 郑皖生; 周宏健; 吴福正

    2016-01-01

    利用2013年安庆国家基本气象观测站新旧站的气温、相对湿度、风、深层地温等资料,对安庆气象站迁站观测资料进行统计对比分析,总结了新、旧站址各气象要素差值的形成原因,认为新旧站址周围环境不同、下垫面性质不同、观测场海拔高度不同是造成观测数据有一定差异的主要原因,为国家基本气象站的资料序列延续和订正提供参考,为有关气象科技服务提供新、旧站址气象资料差异性订正依据。%Based on observation data of temperature, relative humidity, wind, deep soil temperature from the old and new Anqing national basic weather sta-tion in 2013, difference of each meteoro-logical factor was contrasted, and main reason for difference of each meteorologi-cal factor was analyzed. Main reasons for obvious difference of the meteorological factor were that observation environment, underlaying surface property, altitude at new and old stations were different. The research provided basis for continuity and homogeneity correction of the data sequence at Anqing national basic weather station.

  11. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  12. Selective detection of Fe and Mn species at mineral surfaces in weathered granite by conversion electron yield X-ray absorption fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)], E-mail: itai-epss@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Yoshio [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Iida, Atsuo [Photon Factory, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, O-ho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    A new method for the speciation of Fe and Mn at mineral surfaces is proposed using X-ray absorption fine structure in conversion electron yield mode (CEY-XAFS). This method generally reflects information on the species at the sub-{mu}m scale from the particle surface due to the limited escape depth of the inelastic Auger electron. The surface sensitivity of this method was assessed by experiments on two samples of granite showing different degrees of weathering. The XANES spectra of the Fe-K and Mn-K edge clearly gave different information for CEY and fluorescence (FL) modes. These XANES spectra of Fe and Mn show a good fit upon application of least-squares fitting using ferrihydrite/MnO{sub 2} and biotite as the end members. The XANES spectra collected by CEY mode provided more selective information on the secondary phases which are probably present at the mineral surfaces. In particular, CEY-XANES spectra of Mn indicated the presence of Mn oxide in unweathered granite despite a very small contribution of Mn oxide being indicated by FL-XANES and selective chemical-extraction analyses. Manganese oxide could not be detected by micro-beam XANES (beam size: 5 x 5 {mu}m{sup 2}) in unweathered granite, suggesting that Mn oxide thinly and ubiquitously coats mineral surface at a sub-{mu}m scale. This information is important, since Mn oxide can be the host for various trace elements. CEY-XAFS can prove to be a powerful tool as a highly sensitive surface speciation method. Combination of CEY and FL-XAFS will help identify minor phases that form at mineral surfaces, but identification of Fe and Mn oxides at mineral surfaces is critical to understand the migration of trace elements in water-rock interaction.

  13. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Songky; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of $0.41\\dot{6}\\eta^2$ for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of $\\eta$ much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained...

  14. Comparison of interplanetary type 2 radio burst observations by ISEE-3, Ulysses, and WIND with applications to space weather prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Klimas, A. J.; Lengyel-Frey, D.; Stone, R. G.; Thejappa, G.

    1997-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) type 2 radio bursts are produced by IP shocks driven by solar ejecta, presumably involving shock acceleration of electrons that leads to radio emission. These radio bursts, which can be detected remotely by a sensitive spacecraft radio receiver, provide a method of tracking the leading edge of solar ejecta moving outward from the sun. Consequently, observations of these bursts sometimes provide advance warning of one or more days prior to the onset of geomagnetic activity induced by the solar ejecta. A robust lower limit on the fraction of intense geomagnetic storms, that are preceded by IP type 2 bursts, is provided. It is shown that 41 percent of the geomagnetic storms occurring during the interval September 1978 to February 1983 were preceded by type 2 events in this catalog, and reasons why the fraction is not larger are addressed. Differences in the observing capabilities of the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3, Ulysses, and WIND, to explain why each of these similar spacecraft radio investigations provides a different perspective of IP type 2 emissions are reviewed.

  15. Aerosol Observability and Predictability: From Research to Operations for Chemical Weather Forecasting. Lagrangian Displacement Ensembles for Aerosol Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    A challenge common to many constituent data assimilation applications is the fact that one observes a much smaller fraction of the phase space that one wishes to estimate. For example, remotely sensed estimates of the column average concentrations are available, while one is faced with the problem of estimating 3D concentrations for initializing a prognostic model. This problem is exacerbated in the case of aerosols because the observable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not only a column integrated quantity, but it also sums over a large number of species (dust, sea-salt, carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. An aerosol transport model when driven by high-resolution, state-of-the-art analysis of meteorological fields and realistic emissions can produce skillful forecasts even when no aerosol data is assimilated. The main task of aerosol data assimilation is to address the bias arising from inaccurate emissions, and Lagrangian misplacement of plumes induced by errors in the driving meteorological fields. As long as one decouples the meteorological and aerosol assimilation as we do here, the classic baroclinic growth of error is no longer the main order of business. We will describe an aerosol data assimilation scheme in which the analysis update step is conducted in observation space, using an adaptive maximum-likelihood scheme for estimating background errors in AOD space. This scheme includes e explicit sequential bias estimation as in Dee and da Silva. Unlikely existing aerosol data assimilation schemes we do not obtain analysis increments of the 3D concentrations by scaling the background profiles. Instead we explore the Lagrangian characteristics of the problem for generating local displacement ensembles. These high-resolution state-dependent ensembles are then used to parameterize the background errors and generate 3D aerosol increments. The algorithm has computational complexity running at a resolution of 1/4 degree, globally. We will present the result of

  16. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  17. Characteristics of the 14 April 1999 Sydney hailstorm based on ground observations, weather radar, insurance data and emergency calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Schuster

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hailstorms occur frequently in metropolitan Sydney, in the eastern Australian State of New South Wales, which is especially vulnerable due to its building exposure and geographical location. Hailstorms challenge disaster response agencies and pose a great risk for insurance companies. This study focuses on the Sydney hailstorm of 14 April 1999 – Australia's most expensive insured natural disaster, with supporting information from two other storms. Comparisons are drawn between observed hailstone sizes, radar-derived reflectivity and damage data in the form of insurance claims and emergency calls. The 'emergency response intensity' (defined by the number of emergency calls as a proportion of the total number of dwellings in a Census Collection District is a useful new measure of the storm intensity or severity experienced. The area defined by a radar reflectivity ≥55 dBZ appears to be a good approximation of the damage swath on ground. A preferred area for hail damage is located to the left side of storm paths and corresponds well with larger hailstone sizes. Merging hail cells appear to cause a substantially higher emergency response intensity, which also corresponds well to maximum hailstone sizes. A damage threshold could be identified for hailstone sizes around 2.5 cm (1 cm, based on the emergency response intensity (insurance claims. Emergency response intensity and claims costs both correlate positively with hailstone sizes. Higher claim costs also occurred in areas that experienced higher emergency response intensities.

  18. Assimilation of Doppler weather radar observations in a mesoscale model for the prediction of rainfall associated with mesoscale convective systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Abhilash; Someshwar Das; S R Kalsi; M Das Gupta; K Mohankumar; J P George; S K Banerjee; S B Thampi; D Pradhan

    2007-08-01

    Obtaining an accurate initial state is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in accurate model prediction of convective events. This work is the first attempt in utilizing the India Meteorological Department (IMD) Doppler radar data in a numerical model for the prediction of mesoscale convective complexes around Chennai and Kolkata. Three strong convective events both over Chennai and Kolkata have been considered for the present study. The simulation experiments have been carried out using fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) version 3.5.6. The variational data assimilation approach is one of the most promising tools available for directly assimilating the mesoscale observations in order to improve the initial state. The horizontal wind derived from the DWR has been used alongwith other conventional and non-conventional data in the assimilation system. The preliminary results from the three dimensional variational (3DVAR) experiments are encouraging. The simulated rainfall has also been compared with that derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The encouraging result from this study can be the basis for further investigation of the direct assimilation of radar reflectivity data in 3DVAR system. The present study indicates that Doppler radar data assimilation improves the initial field and enhances the Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) skill.

  19. Stormy Weather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the deep abyss of the unknown; a constant source for investigation and discovery, heating and destruction, all simultaneously. Beneath the deep darkness, millions of species vibrantly thrive in another universe wholly untouched by human hands, though affected by their choices. The weathered pieces and people associated with seaside villages, the deep wrinkles that tell a story of one's life and experiences like

  20. Quantifying bone weathering stages using the average roughness parameter Ra measured from 3D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietti, Laura A.

    2016-09-01

    Bone surface texture is known to degrade in a predictable fashion due to subaerial exposure, and can thus act as a relative proxy for estimating temporal information from modern and ancient bone assemblages. To date, the majority of bone weathering data is collected on a categorical scale based on descriptive terms. While this qualitative classification of weathering data is well established, textural analyses of bone surfaces may provide means to quantify weathering stages but have yet to be tested. Here, I examined the suitability of textural analyses for bone weathering studies by first establishing bone surface regions most appropriate for weathering analyses. I then measured and compared the roughness texture of weathered bones at different stages. To establish regions of bone most suitable for textural analyses, Ra was measured from 3D scans of dorsal ribs of four adult ungulate taxa. Results indicate that the rib-shafts from unweathered ungulate skeletons were similar and are likely good candidates because differences in surface texture will not be due to differences in initial bone texture. To test if textural measurements could reliably characterize weathering stages, the average roughness values (Ra) were measured from weathered ungulate rib-shafts assigned to four descriptive weathering stages. Results from analyses indicate that the Ra was statistically distinct for each weathering stage and that roughness positively correlates with the degree of weathering. As such, results suggest that textural analyses may provide the means for quantifying bone-weathering stages. Using Ra and other quantifiable texture parameters may enable more reliable and comparative taphonomic analyses by reducing inter-observer variations and by providing numerical data more compatible for multivariate statistics.

  1. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  2. Space Weather Effects on Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    www.windows2universe.org/space_weather/space_weather.html What are scientists talking about when they say “space weather”? How is it like weather on...particle events observed by ground level, high latitude neutron monitors and the Concorde observations are summarised in Table 1 (Refs. 12 & 13), which

  3. The Early Years: The Wonders of Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the wonders of winter weather, as it often inspires teachers' and students' interest in collecting weather data, especially if snow falls. Beginning weather data collection in preschool will introduce children to the concepts of making regular observations of natural phenomena, recording the observations (data),…

  4. Evaluation of summertime surface ozone in Kanto area of Japan using a semi-regional model and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tran Thi Ngoc; Goto, Daisuke; Yashiro, Hisashi; Murata, Ryo; Sudo, Kengo; Tomita, Hirofumi; Satoh, Masaki; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2017-03-01

    Surface ozone is an air pollutant and harmful to human life. The spatial distribution of the air pollution has been estimated by chemical transport models, but still there are large uncertainties depending on detailed condition of the region. In this study, we extended Goto et al. (2015a) for implementing a chemical transport model to simulate short-lived gases such as ozone over Kanto area (around Tokyo in Japan) for August 2010. Comparison of simulation results with observed data indicated that the model had ability to capture observed ozone diurnal cycles over the target region with high correlation coefficients (0.69-0.81). The simulation result showed a vital role of meteorological conditions in the model performance. The correlation coefficients were much higher (0.78-0.87) and biases were lower (ozone concentrations in the unstable weather conditions. This study helped achieve a better understanding of the chemistry transport model performance under unstable meteorological conditions in the Kanto area. Maximal association between meteorological factors and surface ozone distribution was revealed. In addition, uncertainty of emission inventories of ozone precursors especially the underestimate NOx level certainly contributed to high level surface ozone during nighttime in this study.

  5. Meteorologically-adjusted trend analysis of surface observed ozone at three monitoring sites in Delhi, India: 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, J.; Farooqui, Z.; Guttikunda, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that meteorological parameters have significant impact on surface ozone concentrations. Therefore it is important to remove the effects of meteorology on ozone concentrations to correctly estimate long-term trends in ozone levels due to the alterations in precursor emissions. This is important for the development of effectual control strategies. In this study surface observed ozone trends in New Delhi are analyzed using Komogorov-Zurbenko (KZ) filter, US EPA ozone adjustment due to weather approach and the classification and regression tree method. The statistical models are applied to the ozone data at three observational sites in New Delhi metropolitan areas, 1) Income Tax Office (ITO) 2) Sirifort and 3) Delhi College of Engineering (DCE). The ITO site is located adjacent to a traffic crossing, Sirifort is an urban site and the DCE site is located in a residential area. The ITO site is also influenced by local industrial emissions. DCE has higher ozone levels than the other two sites. It was found that ITO has lowest ozone concentrations amongst the three sites due to ozone titrating due to industrial and on-road mobile NOx emissions. The statistical methods employed can assess ozone trends at these sites with a high degree of confidence and the results can be used to gauge the effectiveness of control strategies on surface ozone levels in New Delhi.

  6. Estimation of Swiss methane emissions by near surface observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Stephan; Brian, Oney; Leuenberger, Markus; Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Steinbacher, Martin; Meinhardt, Frank; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. It is released from both natural and anthropogenic processes and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since preindustrial times. Current CH4 emission estimates are associated with comparatively large uncertainties both globally and regionally. For example, the Swiss national greenhouse gas inventory assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total anthropogenic CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In Switzerland, CH4 is thought to be mainly released by agricultural activities (ruminants and manure management >80%), while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals represent a minor source (~3 %). The country total and especially the spatial distribution of CH4 emission within Switzerland strongly differs between the national and different European scale inventories. To validate the 'bottom-up' Swiss CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty both in total and spatially, 'top-down' methods combining atmospheric CH4 observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we analyse continuous, near surface observations of CH4 concentrations as collected within the newly established CarboCountCH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). The network consists of 4 sites situated on the Swiss Plateau, comprising a tall tower site (217 m), two elevated (mountaintop) sites and a small tower site (32 m) in flat terrain. In addition, continuous CH4 observations from the nearby high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (Alps) and the mountaintop site Schauinsland (Germany) were used. Two inversion frameworks were applied to the CH4 observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the regional scale version of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. One inversion system was based on a Bayesian framework, while the other utilized an extended Kalman filter approach. The transport

  7. World War II Weather Record Transmittances

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World War II Weather Record Transmittances are a record of the weather and meteorological data observed during World War II and transferred to the archive. It...

  8. Japanese space weather research activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present existing and planned Japanese space weather research activities. The program consists of several core elements, including a space weather prediction system using numerical forecasts, a large-scale ground-based observation network, and the cooperative framework "Project for Solar-Terrestrial Environment Prediction (PSTEP)" based on a Grant-in Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas.

  9. PETROCHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGY EVIDENCES FOR THE WEATHERING PROCESS OF THE WEATHERING PITS ON ROCK SURFACES OF MOUNTAIN LAOSHAN,CHINA%崂山山顶风化坑化学风化过程的岩石化学与矿物学证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王为; 周尚哲; 李炳元; 林志海; 刘志鹏; 黄日辉; 赖宜讯; 陈科景

    2012-01-01

    After the first field trip in July of 2010,the authors made a second field trip in May of 2011 to investigate the weathering pits on the top of Mountain Laoshan, which is composed of Mesozoic granite with its highest peak 1132. 7meters above sea level and located on the shore of the Yellow Sea, China. The conclusion of the first investigation is that the so-called glacial potholes in Mountain Laoshan are nothing but weathering pits as are generally found in the other granite areas around the world and then the pits on the rock surface of Mountain Laoshan are not originated from glaciers. In this paper, the evidence collected in this field investigation for the weathering origin of the pits is discussed.The detritus in the weathering pits and the surface rock outside the pits were taken from 7 weathering pits ,4 of which at Laoding,the top of the mountain about l000m's high, and 3 in Hualou area, northwest of Laoding with elevations of 280 ~340m. X-Ray fluorescence(XRF) and X-ray diffraction ( XRD ) methods are used to measure the type and the amount of minerals and chemical elements of the rock samples. Based on the result of XDF and XDR, the samples' chemical index CIA, weathering ratios and element transformation ratio were calculated. The weathering process of the pits was analyzed and discussed in the following aspects: 1) The relation of the chemical weathering to the mineral weathering of the pit detritus; 2)Chemical element transferring between the pit detritus and the surface rock; 3)The different weathering intensity of the pits and the surface rock of Mountain Laoshan and its cause. The result of the study shows that: l)The ratio between quartz and feldspar of the detritus is higher than those of the surface rock, indicating the feldspar being degenerated by weathering while the quartz remaining the same in the pits; 2)The weathered feldspars in the pit are mainly perthite and potassium feldspars owing to a lack of plagioclase in their original rocks; 3

  10. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  11. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  12. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height winds to 26 parameters applied in a planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme and a surface layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over an area of complex terrain during the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. An efficient sampling algorithm and a generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of modeled turbine-height winds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is contributed by parameters related to the dissipation of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulence length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be the most important one, and a larger dissipation rate can produce larger hub-height winds. A larger Prandtl number results in weaker nighttime winds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong winds, implying a reduction in the variability of the wind speed. All of the above parameters can significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed, the altitude of the low-level jet and the magnitude of the wind shear strength. The wind direction is found to be modulated by the same subset of influential parameters. Remainder of abstract is in attachment.

  13. Dynamical contibution of Mean Potential Vorticity pseudo-observations derived from MetOp/GOME2 Ozone data into weather forecast, a Mediterranean High Precipitation Event study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbii, Siham; Zazoui, Mimoun; Semane, Noureddine

    2015-04-01

    In the absence of observations covering the upper troposphere - lower stratophere, headquarters of several disturbances, and knowing that satellites are uniquely capable of providing uniform data coverage globally, a methodology is followed [1] to convert Total Column Ozone, observed by MetOp/GOME2, into pseudo-observations of Mean Potential Vorticity (MPV). The aim is to study the dynamical impact of Ozone data in the prediction of a Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Event observed during 28-29 September 2012 in the context of HYMEX1. This study builds on a previously described methodology [2] that generates numerical weather prediction model initial conditions from ozone data. Indeed, the assimilation of MPV in a 3D-var framework is based on a linear regression between observed Ozone and vertical integrated Ertel PV. The latter is calculated using dynamical fields from the moroccan operational limited area model ALADIN-MAROC according to [3]: δθ fp p0 -R δU δV P V = - gξaδp- g-R-(p )Cp [(δp-)2 + (δp-)2] (1) Where ξa is the vertical component of the absolute vorticity, U and V the horizontal wind components, θ the potential temperature, R gas constant, Cp specific heat at constant pressure, p the pressure, p0 a reference pressure, g the gravity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The MPV is estimated using the following expression: --1--∫ P2 M PV = P1 - P2 P P V.δp 1 (2) With P1 = 500hPa and P2 = 100hPa In the present study, the linear regression is performed over September 2012 with a correlation coefficient of 0.8265 and is described as follows: M P V = 5.314610- 2 *O3 - 13.445 (3) where O3 and MPV are given in Dobson Unit (DU) and PVU (1 PV U = 10-6 m2 K kg-1 s-1), respectively. It is found that the ozone-influenced upper-level initializing fields affect the precipitation forecast, as diagnosed by a comparison with the ECMWF model. References [1] S. Sbii, N. Semane, Y. Michel, P. Arbogast and M. Zazoui (2012). Using METOP/GOME-2 data and MSG ozone

  14. Martian surface microtexture from orbital CRISM multi-angular observations: A new perspective for the characterization of the geological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.

    2016-09-01

    The surface of Mars has a high morphological and mineralogical diversity due to the intricacy of external, internal processes, and exchanges with the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the cryosphere. In particular, liquid water played an important role in surface evolution. However, the origin, duration and intensity of those wet events have been highly debated, especially in the clay-bearing geological units. Similarly, questions still remain about magma crystallization and volatile quantity of the dominant basaltic crust. In this work, six sites having hydrated minerals, salts and basaltic signatures (i.e., Mawrth Vallis, Holden crater, Eberswalde crater, Capri mensa, Eridania basin, Terra Sirenum) are investigated in order to better characterize the geological processes responsible for their formation and evolution (e.g., fluvial, lacustrine, in situ weathering, evaporitic, volcanic and aeolian processes). For that purpose, we use orbital multi-angular measurements from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft to analyze the manner in which light is scattered by the surface materials (photometry) in the near-infrared range (at 750 nm). The surface bidirectional reflectance depends on the composition but also on the surface microtexture such as the grain size distribution, morphology, internal structure and surface roughness, tracers of the geological processes. The Hapke semi-analytical model of radiative transfer in granular medium is used to model the surface bidirectional reflectance estimated at 750 nm from the orbital measurements after an atmospheric correction. The model depends on different radiative properties (e.g., single scattering albedo, grain phase function and regolith roughness) related to the surface composition and microtexture. In particular previous laboratory works showed that the particle phase function parameters, which describe the characteristics of the

  15. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  16. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  17. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) Beaufort, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    7 * -i7 1- 371 > 1209 pq 7 1A1.0 ,38 9 uARY Of UEIEOROtOGICAL ORSERVAIIONS SURFACE ismos ) , IAU!OR! SOUtH CAROL INAIU) NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COUMANI...71.5 t k20M0 4 9. 77, 75, 77, 77. 7m*. ?903 l~ 790 to 11±. ?9: . c 80.3i P- S91oo 72.4 795 77 ITS T907 7961 79.( 796? 7900 790? 79.7 800 $063 IC. IsmO 1

  18. Direct observation of localized dipolar excitations on rough nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Markel, V.A.; Coello, V.;

    1998-01-01

    spatially localized (within 150-250 nm) intensity enhancement by one to two orders of magnitude. These bright light spots are found to be sensitive to the light wavelength, polarization, and angle of incidence. We relate the observed phenomenon to the localization of resonant dipolar excitations in random......Using a photon scanning tunneling microscope (operating alternatively at the wavelengths of 594 and 633 nm) with shear-force feedback we image the topography of silver colloid fractals simultaneously with a near-field intensity distribution. We observe that near-field optical images exhibit...

  19. Extraordinarily Warm Northeast Pacific Surface Waters: 2014 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Freeland, H.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of sea surface temperatures (SST) from January 2014 revealed a massive region in the northeast Pacific with extraordinarily warm conditions, exceeding all anomalies over the last several decades. Profile data from both Argo and Line-P surveys supports the Reynolds SSTa analysis and further indicates that the anomaly was, and continues to be, confined to the upper ocean, above approximately 100 m depth. The anomaly has lasted for many months, exceeding 4 standard deviations above the multi-decadal mean, a feature that would not be expected more than once in several millennia. The "blob", as it is dubbed, drifted first off and then towards shore during the spring and fall of 2014 driven by, among other forces, the seasonal up and down-welling winds, respectively that occur along the west coast of North America. By November 2014, when winter down-welling winds became prevalent, the warm surface waters encroached all the way into Barkley Sound along western Vancouver Island, as measured by the continuous temperature measurements on the NEPTUNE ocean observatory of Ocean Networks Canada. The analysis includes some of the known dynamical variations which contributed to the formation of the blob, with an emphasis on mid to high latitude atmosphere-ocean conditions, avoiding the temptation to link the development processes occurring in the Gulf of Alaska in the winter of 2013 to equatorial phenomena.

  20. Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    period WSS (30,90) instrument at Golden, Colorado. Figure 2. Three component observation of the San Fernando earthquake recorded at ALQ, Nev Mexico ...Planet. tat., 13, 85-96. . . . . . -, .. _ . 101 Console, R. (1976). ?%ccanismo focal* del terremoto del Friuli del 6 Maggio 1976, Ann. di Geof., 9

  1. Accuracy of surface heat fluxes from observations of operational satellites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Sugimori, Y.

    with uncertainties for same flux values resulting from climatological ship observations. For net satellite derived heat flux varying from 0 to 300 w/m sup(2) the uncertainties were found to be of the order of 50-90 w/m sup(2). For the same range of flux values...

  2. The effect of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer growth on observed and modeled surface ozone in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Patton, E. G.; Pfister, G. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Flocke, F.; Thompson, A. M.; Stauffer, R. M.; Halliday, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Ozone concentrations at the Earth's surface are controlled by meteorological and chemical processes and are a function of advection, entrainment, deposition, and net chemical production/loss. The relative contributions of these processes vary in time and space. Understanding the relative importance of these processes controlling surface ozone concentrations is an essential component for designing effective regulatory strategies. Here we focus on the diurnal cycle of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth in the Colorado Front Range. Aircraft soundings and surface observations collected in July/August 2014 during the DISCOVER-AQ/FRAPPÉ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality/Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment) campaigns and equivalent data simulated by a regional chemical transport model are analyzed. Entrainment through ABL growth is most important in the early morning, fumigating the surface at a rate of 5 ppbv/h. The fumigation effect weakens near noon and changes sign to become a small dilution effect in the afternoon on the order of -1 ppbv/h. The chemical transport model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry) underestimates ozone at all altitudes during this study on the order of 10-15 ppbv. The entrainment through ABL growth is overestimated by the model in the order of 0.6-0.8 ppbv/h. This results from differences in boundary layer growth in the morning and ozone concentration jump across the ABL top in the afternoon. This implicates stronger modeled fumigation in the morning and weaker modeled dilution after 11:00 LT.

  3. Soil, snow, weather, and sub-surface storage data from a mountain catchment in the rain–snow transition zone

    OpenAIRE

    P. R. Kormos; Marks, D.; Williams, C J; H. P. Marshall; P. Aishlin; D. G. Chandler; J. P. McNamara

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive hydroclimatic data set is presented for the 2011 water year to improve understanding of hydrologic processes in the rain–snow transition zone. This type of data set is extremely rare in scientific literature because of the quality and quantity of soil depth, soil texture, soil moisture, and soil temperature data. Standard meteorological and snow cover data for the entire 2011 water year are included, which include several rain-on-snow (ROS) events. Surface so...

  4. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  5. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Midway Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    7Ld VARK 1I.1 21 .. 4-." . ’. _ _. _ __ __ I -.- inZ. TOTAL. NUIt Of OI ONS ’ NWs....L ..... n. a ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ANL...CEILING VISIBILITY (STATUTE MilLES ) -CEILING _____7__6.293 . -r -s,.77 (P"? ’, .) I ~ ~~ ",,. 1,. ?46, . ., .. .I , , o. 1 49 &1 4. ,,, 1 ?8;oz 𔃻...CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY ST ti ~flH Ig11 V.A.. nuIT . PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE . 9 (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) CE N VISISILITY (STATUTE MILES

  6. John Rodgers WBAS, Honolulu, Hawaii. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-12-05

    EDITIONS OF 114S FORM ARE OBSOLETE ... ..... , TOM: - ____________ -w! - ’r.-* 4 W- - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- - * DTAt URSS IISO CEILING...THIS FORM ARE OBSOLETE I 4. L2 -v - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- -- * DTAt URSS IISO CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY ASHEVILL19 No...yA, 4 e #~;0 i-*iWN WA PRCSSN DIISO OMAv URSS IISO CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY41 ASHFVILLE# No C. 28801 22S21L. W0LULU OANU/JOHN RODG0ERS jIOAS 40

  7. Ft Nelson, Muskwa Apt, British Columbia, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-17

    i 93--h9 -.o D P-9., ,,,b I v 3 T No. 16 92 - -. o. -- 43o ’ATA PR( ESSIK’ IPIVISIN’N SA ETA’ PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY I k*EAT"’ . E~VLE/C/ WA 7011 FP ...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT ACCESSION FOR NTIS GRAI TAB oDTIC UNANNOUNCED [] ELECTE JUSTIFICATION JUN 16 981 BY D DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY CODES DIST J AVAIL...Hail Occurrences of hail and s::all hail are included. Prceta .e ,f uLzervatI.ns with reci-eitacion - Included in this cateL ,)ry are the ,tsrvations

  8. White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    61-47 %8-55 GE 5b ICTAL MEAN IDEGREESI I MIUND N1.2 .3 o3 1.7 ’.. NNE .3 .5 .1 .9 4.6 ME .5 .€ 1.0 3.F ENE .1 .1 .3 3.C E I .4 .3 . .11.2 6.1 :1 ESE I...WIND SPEED IN KNOTS DIRECTION i 1-3 4-6 7-10 11o16 17-21 22-27 2P-33 30610 ol-17 48-55 GE 56 ICTAL MEAN " IOE GREES1 I WINO...DJECTION 1 -3 4-6 7-10 11-16 1-21 22-27 28-33 3-00 % 4-7 48-55 GE 56 ICTAL MEAN• .sIOEGRE(S

  9. Grand Forks AFB North Dakota. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    zR 2*k b.oo- * 22. 69 l3o 8.1 1.5 TRACE *0 .0 0 . *a lob 5* 6.2 * 31. 7 .7 -- 1 q 9,It 14._ TRAC . el. : .4 .4 TRAC -E i34 1b- Ŕ 71 7.J 2.4 9.0 .7 TRACE...5 TRAC - eq e4 . _ q-. 1.4- . 3.6 4.2o. 91 1.9 (4.0 TRACE6 TRAC TRACE .4 o.3 .0 .0 1 2.5 1.3 11. 82 184 5.3 ’,. .q.4 .4 . __ - TRAC 5.k 41 .s 35...3 93.3 9404 90. 0 93.66 95.3 95. 95.0 950 95.0 95. 95. 95.4 95.6 9560 95*4 95.4 95.4 so V6ITW~14W. 9 977 9T7. 1 97:; VTT 97*7 97.1 97.11 97.11 97.7 97

  10. Koon-ni Range, Osan, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-24

    4- . ___.___ -W t",I-l i ( 4 __ _ ___ N_1 1 SEOTA__L NUBE OF OSERVT___ 6 , 13.___ ___ SSE _ _ - _ _1 _ _ -S~ 1. 3____ 2 __ _1 _w aL 111± 2...LE 8 I __ _ ____"___ ___,,,_ SSE _1 4._ _ _ __. __1 NW _ ,, ____ _. _______ _ __--_ - TOTA NUBE 1OF ISEVAIN a 1, 4 -- A S_ W_ 2_ 711 t IW Nw IS 6

  11. Tai-Nan Formosa/Neu-Cheu-tze. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-06-15

    Service (MAC) III NUMBER OF PAGES Scott AFB IL 62225 14 MONITORING AGENCY NANE 6 AODRESS(il different from, Contr~oling Office) IS SECURITY CLASS. (.1 thl...Y2 6F u3 EP u3 oa - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - 5 . ,I. DATA DRUC6SSING OIVISION USAF ETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY AIR WArER

  12. Fort Leavenworth, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-20

    3 .71S 1 11__r_go/ 891 TD B -Tl 86/ 851 11 ’so__ 941 B-34 6 18 82/ 811 ,[L 9 ___,_ _ __ ___, _ 01 79 .... 11 -l 251 .2 5; : 1 0._ ,_ _ _ _ 7 1 74...13,55711,549t,14 O,9 84 9.595 .i17 6.742! 7.533 9.748o.763l .35312.013 21.603 C TOTAL oES 2380! 21Sni 23671344 24n 23661 24981 2486 2443 25n2 23541...FRQECYOFCCREC ( ) 1% 2% 30% TD 0 0 70% 0% 9% HUMIDITY 065 SEP_ 00__0_ 1000.O~ LD 0 99.8 98.6 96.3 91.0 77si 4*6 6.5 2i09 o__ 3I;05 100.0 i00.0 100.0 99.7 99.3

  13. Cannon AFB, Clovis, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-16

    4, 54 -3-Tj 4," 9- 8814 - 4 , 84,, 1694o,41 85pa:0 -:fo 83.1 84.61 84. 85.0 65.1 85.1 85.2 8.2 85. 85. 65. 85: 85.; 65 8.4 8so 1ooo l0 8 1 8.6 1601...9"-i-rg1500 81.1 8 .6 5.3 5.9 86.9 86.9 87.6 67.7 87.7 8.4 88. 2 88.2 88.* 68.6 88.7 88. Z 1200 It 57 15#3 .o 86o6 876 87:0 88p) 8814 98. 7 8 8 et

  14. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) for Wheeler AFB, Wahiawa, Hawaii. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-11

    least mln~ Mal &ts (The lest throe statistics are omitted from the snow depth summary because of their doubtf’ul Unliited value.) A total coln of...71.4 71.4 71,4 71.4 71o4 71.41 5. 57. 57.1 57. 5710 5.1 51 . ___ . __ ______ -3000 j0 IO .O . 1 0. iO0. 0. 04. 010. Ol 00.£ lrO.0100. OJO .0IO0.O

  15. McConnell AFB, Witchita, Kansas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-14

    NUMP’N 03923 CCOt ELL AFB KANSAS IN 37 37 W 097 16 1371 IAB STATION LOCATION AND INSTRUMENTATION HISTORY RUNNER TYPE At IN*. LOCATION EtEVATIOI AlOVE 151...SOWING AND/Of WITH OSN OSSF DRIZZLE DRIZZLE SLEET FtECIP. MAZE SHOW SAND TO VISION DbS. " .P ,.0-7 .4o21 1,,7 6.7 8,&6 1o4 .3 0 .3’ , 7-; 1 el 7.4 7,,4 12... MAZE SNOW SAND TO VISION OBS. )A__- .7 .T " . 2 1X 7 2h _2 1 37 2 . 7 1. 4 7.o,. .o _______ .3 24.1 7.8- ~1 *4 * 37*3~ 𔄂.1 12. 5.S .1, 41. 3 7441

  16. Hancock IAP, Syracuse, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-06

    SUMMARY OF SURPR b2ti UNC.LASSIFIED U SAFETAC/OS-82/ O2O SB1-AD-ESSO 164 N I hh Ih,,h ii1 111111111m 4I o5 AO_ IWA 1008 ’LAL CLIMATCLOGY BRACH -LTAC EXTREME...OS-82/ O2O S81-AD-ESSO 164 NL ,,,MENNEN/II o’II1 _ AO11 _ ,A130088 GLL9AL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH LS Z.TAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY A!- :,EATHER SERVICL/MAC

  17. Fort Knox/Godman AAF, Kentucky. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-13

    88.6 88.6 88.6 83.6 88.6 88.6 ea .6 52.9 53. 58. 56. 58.2 60.2 64.1 65 67.2 69.C 69. 9 71 73.1 78.6 81.9 84.3 86. 88.7 89.6...ISSHT |T.«|I«ID«| 885 11. 1 77.6 i i • / < 0 i ’is j I ( J A L C • tlTAC A . EA 7 r2 2*c STATION...59.3 63.8 62.1 56.5 «2.9 33.9 26.7 «3.3 so 1«.<» 9313 . 1<»812. Pill. 377 9.«68 6.991 5.917 6.6«« 8 . 5051 Z. 83812

  18. McGhee-Tyson Airport, Tennessee. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-30

    2.3 14.0 13.7 .4 13.8 9313 03-05] .2 14.1 3.Z; 17.:, 16.6 .9! 17.11 930 0 6-38 . 1. 303J 17 20.6 l 21.2 93’i i09-11> oifi.5 .=1T 2.5 15.7* ZO., 0.0O...4 4 6 6 34 08 103. 2. t 3 . S 25 1 .104 S V4 1 . EA B E 0T DEFT. NONE TIACE I i 2 3 4.6 7.12 1 2536 37.8 AMTS JAN 77.5i 1,.4[ 2. 2.1 ,.01 1.3 -2 1i...ALL uN pT-q SPEE D M EA N (KNTS) 1 .3 4.6 7 10 i. 16 17 21 22. 27 21-33 3. 40 41 -47 48 55 -_ WIND NNE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ___ _ _ _ ___ [ ±se

  19. Gray AAF/Fort Lewis, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-14

    with dust ad/or sand is included in this summary only when visibility is reduced to A- 3 / TLAL CLT vTCLC3Y DPOH " , AT-r, SEQvI’T/ AO STATJCN NAME , EA ;s...93.5 94 .. .. 95.I 95.9 96.5 97. .97.7 97.8 98 .1 98.2 , 99.,.,. TOTAk NU BER OF OSFVATION, - -- -- - - -- LCEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY T - S Rv. F EA ...88.6 88.6 868.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 R8.6 5 . _,𔃿, , 93.1 9 3. 1 .. 93o41. 3 9313 93.3 93.3 1 9𔃻.13 91.3 93.3 9.3-1A-2.lT -5.3 ;3.9 95.5 95.7 9S7

  20. Surface Weather Observations Log Sheets from the USS John Paul Jones, April 12 - 23, 2004 (NODC Accession 0001512)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Meteorological data were collected using meteorological sensors from the USS JOHN PAUL JONES in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data were collected and recorded into...

  1. Hector Field, Fargo North Dakota. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    fMar61 Located 1500 ft NW of Came NAI Simr, to Iec 68 1Adm Bldg FORMa USAFETAC Nov75 0 -19 (OL A) vPtivious toui,.~s or ivis loAN ARt AIsoLEtr...62.9 62.Y (,’. (3.3 CE 7 lol 3., t3.7 69.3 64.6 64.9 69.2 5.7 65.7 65.7 65.8 66.0 66.1 . b.1 66.1 b6., t6.6 UE 60071 61.2 96.4 65.9 65b 66.1 66.3 66

  2. Patrick AFB, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-14

    CLA5SIFICATIO4 OF TH:S PAGE (Wen D,4 Enred _ JUN ACSSIT :r) SjW ’r .ASSIFICAtON :F T.IS PACIE-"ITitn Dfat . Fnrerd) 19. Percentage frenquency of distribution...which ti statiot was meeting or exceeding any given cet of minima may be determined from the figure at the interasect of the appropriate celling

  3. Resolute Apt, Northwest Territories, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-17

    58 7 𔄂o 59m 1 9. 9.1 > t I ’ol1, 1 6’.i 2! 2500 𔃻" - , t 6L -Ole 6 1 i h u 1TI v 7 61 61,9b 6297 1 tZ. 2 , # 2 h boi 0,,> 2000 -3 , A %L . 65.5 6...179 57.7 d@6 860 12-14 00 𔄃L i.4 4.2 i io d a9 2*9 3.12 7.0 13. 55.3 8.3 660 0.-17 boy 3.9 497 to 4.4 294 4.7 697 lb* 4~e 9 9 6*0 11 -z!0 .0 b.5 3.8...98- 59,11 El.-., I 2, x ’ No. 06.. Neon No. of Hoors ith Tonmperotor .~l H- 5&3 lt6 _3 7 ".O 2F1 67 F 1 73F 80 F 93 FF ooi 4 B ~ 11193

  4. MacDill AFB, Tampa Bay, Florida. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-05

    930 ____ I _ I I I9301 0 ._._ ,,x,---_ I .- _________..o,.._ I . .0... ... .... ,, -,,- .. - 4, _ _ _,n ( Z ,1 9 I _ _. Ob"° Neon No. of Hu w T r Rol...O.BJWV.B. Oy BOIS Wet B.i;bjO.. P.,.# 7.i9 4/_ e3; 21 : 1 1 c_ b2/, 81 31 2: 2.o91 1 4F 4j Z’ .z’ .- ’ .i",i - -. .-.Q/ 7 si. zi i I f I, 1 1, , , ’ I 1 5

  5. Frobisher Bay, Baffin Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-29

    13-21 25 A A0 AMTS I .E. 37 4. . .. . ........ 10 EREN TO T VR MAR . .. . . 3 I.... . . IF... ... .. * WIT APR 49 00 IFR9 90 IFVRR2 MAY 4 i. IF 219 1... b17 , F 17 , 113 117, q-. -V I .& 14.A 10 . A 19t , ,% 1. l- A Q, 40. I Q- 1 . 19.- 19,/ IC9, 1i. 19 l 0.00 9� 19.6 19.6 19.6 90?6 h963. 19 6 19.6...8217 -3 Ř - . - +t O Obt. oon o.-of-ur wit Temperature 34/ ~~&k i ’L -... - --- -- -- -.---- 1 1+ 221r’. se o Z6/ 4 ’ t j TO L I iot _12 "f’)l_,6 s 4 I

  6. Stuttgart Germany/Echterdingen Apt. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-10-31

    7 F9 I ’ma I. i We &16~I 353_1-754 7 45170 4 3 8 1470 170036 5 7 722131 2 1’ 2 61 1 8760 D.Po ~ 746-’ b?771 0.’ 29 17004.5- 17,22413A8 2 .!86 it~Ti...c 2 -9 31 3 -3 ____T_ __. ___, ___-4__-_ ,__ __ _ _-" _ _ __ _ __-- ___: : !797! _ 239 11 1 F9 9 r 12 -2 7 1 2- a .- 4/5.’ 2 0 7 a . I...31 8 ~ BPP : A2’- 63 -Z/ -ei z&3e i - - - ’ i i ’ i : i : i" _ _ _ _’ ri i I _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , i ! a Z , I 1 N i Rol H.. 8 = tu I 175

  7. O’Hare International Airport, Chicago Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    O’h6RE IAP IL p STATImN 6.4411 vAlls u WIT BULS TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (P) TOTAL TOTAL 0 1.2 3.4 5.4 7.8 It.0 )@ll.12113.1d 115-1617-11 -~.22 .42 .4 ?.lt...SCRMT jS 1ATCIIYHO RC SUMMARY ATk -F>AT,, S i~JlrMfAf 72 L1 iJCA’IJ-CltAiL IAP IL I. ) AL.E 1 "Tlf ________________ WIT BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (P

  8. Pope AFB, Fayetteville, North Carolina Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (P) ITOTAL TOTAL ___ (F) * 1 .2 3.4 9.6 7-L 9.10 11.121* 1 3-1 I5 171,,IV.2021.2223.,42S.2627.209.2S 831 .S..SDyBb hWet b.Ib...WEATHIER SERVICE/MAC 723030 POPE AFB MC STINNM74-83 vm * PAGE I wnEDnn. T.... ____ ___ WET SUL& TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL ___TOTAL *(F) 0 1.2

  9. Phelps-Collins, Alpena, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-19

    PSYCH4ROMETRIC SUMMARY 7de639U P,4ELPS-COLLIPES/ALPE4* ŕ 73-Si1FE STA.Ow STATION NAM11 TtM5k MONTI. WIT __ SULD TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL...TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL i TOTAL (F)___ 0 .1.2 34.02.2 12625.317.n 2 - 30- 31D -W&j 0.8./ A BbI-Ps., (F 5~ ~~~6 7- 19. IP 11.1213-U1 .O5-117 199~ .. 22...13-61No STATION .. . STATION NAME YEARS woAT. tA b: L 2 LU u -41AML H U S1.S. T., IWET GULN TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) * ITOTAL TOTAL V TAL 21.u 47.Z

  10. Maui Optical Site, Mt. Halekulia, Hawaii, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts C, E-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-23

    T.) * TOTAL LI TOOOTBRNC Tmp. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TONT 3TOTL (F) 0 1 2 3 4 5 76 . 9 .10 11- 12 13 14 15 .16 17 .1 19. 20 21 .2223 24...BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1 .-2 3 .4 5.6 7 .8 9. 10 11. 12113. 14 15 .16 17 .111 9-2 21. 22 l . 2 3.24 25 .26 27.20 29 .30] a31.06

  11. Colorado Springs, Colorado, Peterson Field. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-07-22

    lk AORtES91I diII1I-I I C-fIo - 0.1-- i SECURIT ~Y C%.ASS ~ UNCLASSIFIED 15$ tXSTAS IOUIO TIOA S - Eo3% Approved for public release; distribution...7,6 1 - S 1 .47 .5I&.5ii.6I . iIU.ol t . 120WS k . 4g 5vvniian.on 2W - :.- 7.3 m - .7 ." is, 6: 1__ ’ . .. 14- 5 t. .. .1. .5+ & + +TOM +U OF . , M...2 3 0 j 904 90& ’p3q -q 9 na 9~. 0* 4g ’ & ga’ 9i, 130 9 . 31- - Ag0 5 03 I -o ll+ ; t+ +-I + -++ z+ I" ++ ++ .++ .I+ ,i+ + + -i+z+ +’I+ . a:oo 7000 9

  12. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) for Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-31

    temperature depressi.on versus ’dry-bulb teate iens and standaid dgviatinniz nf rdry-hsih .whlk ny An,~17 UNCLASSIFIED 5_~ -12 z--.F SECURIT "FSI...98.8 .98.8 9 9 0 99,2 99.51000 0T 4-- ATt PcOCESSI’ 4G EPANCH V -CC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY 11A: C .fTt;R SERVICCELIAC 2 C; rIRTLAND AF5 NM 63-70,73...100 99.9100 0 00.0 1000=0 00000.000.00.0 8400 99~ 99: 99. 4G AOO :100 0.10 99~ 9~ t~o tOO.iaO.Oboj0o.OOoa lOO.OL00.OLO0oaT 0. 8o 9 90 9 99. 99o 999

  13. Whitehorse Apt, Yukon Territory, Canada. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-28

    1473 UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLSSFIATO 7C’S PAGE A*1- 1)-l Esesd, .___1Nr1 AqTETFn SECuRIT ’ CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(W@n o(, Enfred) 19. Percentage... 4g ,, 42. 4 ,o 43.’ ., ,44.4 44. 4 4 ,. 4 -1, 61 1 f, 4.-’ d. .. t.L..r 18000 j.7 ? . 45 4 . 4 1 𔃼 4 . 4L.. ? L. 4 p 4k 16000 7 , d. q~ 4. k i LL 000_...o 40.L 4 1 4d.e 49,2 4a,2 4b,? 4,o,, 4 , 41. 4g .’ 4qo ,2000 I _ __ _5Z.7 2 ) 5i l 1? .253.( 53. 53. , 53. 53, 51. SI, 53. ;0000 .6 5 3’), 51.! 9* 9 7

  14. Itazuke AB, Fukoka Kyushu, Japan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-06-16

    percentage frequency of occuring tables. 44 -7 . [ N L SS F E 2,. L SECURIT -;A|F~ ’TO - F T-SP G(hND~ aIi~ t 7t2 i’ - - -. - , R E V I S E D ADDITIONAL...NUMIER OF OSI|VATIONS I 71 fl 121OWS J ,U25m.I 0-14-5 (Dot 50) PI.vIou. ,DITION OF THIS FORM AR OlOLTIK V! - -7 -r ti" I LATA PROCFSSI? 4G DIVISION ETAC...1! .. .. .1 _ IATA PR0CLSSI’ 4G UIVII(JN S C ETAC, WSAF SKY COVER ASI-[VILLT, N.C. 28S01 4331C FUKUCKA KYUSHIJ JAPAN/I IAZUKI: Ab 48-,4 f_

  15. Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    1.2 .6 2. S.3 |It . 3 . 7 1. 3. 6.. n I. ~ ,2 ,Vm , IIS T5 + S E ? 1 2 9 0 3.1 .2 9 2 0 0 b .6 1.3 3.0 3.3 1.2 .3 10.6 11.• •s 2 1l,* .4 1.2 .4 .4 3.S...6.2S1 6063 11.944 13.610 23.603 05OTAL CBS o 791 60 80 68 690 668 831 890 66 690 66 10196 I ................ ii. GLOBAL CLIMATOLOGY $RANCH CUMULAIIVE

  16. KI Sawyer AFB, Gwinn, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-26

    lU.t nIf Itoil t ALL nrTrzc. ALL CON.:?.. SPED Ii i MEA I I - CENTS) 1-1.3 4.6 7-10 11.16 17.21 22-27 28-331 34.40 41-47 48-53 2 :56 % WIND D12...4-3 -4-6 845-j 111______ 54 -6- _ -- I- 62t- _ _6 I- _4 -2 - 1, 8 ___ -A46 - 3 � 7_ -354 01 L {Fi -0- j ~.. c1 C? _ I z ____ _ I 1 11 - -I 1 E~omnI...I ’ 4 ,oI 1 91 2- 1 9 -: iZ 11’ - £ ___ __ i ’. 1 i .I c1 .. SR LI,..~ IIOF ,32F -67 F 1 73F .0F 9 3F 1 T...-- O,, - 3 .b I _ _ _ _ _ -_ _ _ _ I

  17. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) for Yucca Flat Air Strip, Mercury, Nevada. Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-28

    S[RV¢TCFi𔃻AC 031L33 YUCA FLATj AJLTKIi- tV ,7-7__ ,MA__Y_ STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH i* PAGE 2 ogon-1 o iD HOURS (L. S. T.) Tem. _ _WET BULB...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY, 93s3 YUCA ~hTA!K STkji’ *V -77 STATSOX44 A~n &@OWTn Ma"-S. 1.1 V. ET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESSION (F) jTOTAL I TOTALs *(F) 0 1- 2 3

  18. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Ice Sheet Surface Elevation at the Summit of Greenland: Observed and Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Jun, Li; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observed seasonal and interannual variations in the surface elevation over the summit of the Greenland ice sheet are modeled using a new temperature-dependent formulation of firn-densification and observed accumulation variations. The observed elevation variations are derived from ERS (European Remote Sensing)-1 and ERS-2 radar altimeter data for the period between April 1992 and April 1999. A multivariate linear/sine function is fitted to an elevation time series constructed from elevation differences measured by radar altimetry at orbital crossovers. The amplitude of the seasonal elevation cycle is 0.25 m peak-to-peak, with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. Inter-annually, the elevation decreases to a minimum in 1995, followed by an increase to 1999, with an overall average increase of 4.2 cm a(exp -1) for 1992 to 1999. Our densification formulation uses an initial field-density profile, the AWS (automatic weather station) surface temperature record, and a temperature-dependent constitutive relation for the densification that is based on laboratory measurements of crystal growth rates. The rate constant and the activation energy commonly used in the Arrhenius-type constitutive relation for firn densification are also temperature dependent, giving a stronger temperature and seasonal amplitudes about 10 times greater than previous densification formulations. Summer temperatures are most important, because of the strong non-linear dependence on temperature. Much of firn densification and consequent surface lowering occurs within about three months of the summer season, followed by a surface build-up from snow accumulation until spring. Modeled interannual changes of the surface elevation, using the AWS measurements of surface temperature and accumulation and results of atmospheric modeling of precipitation variations, are in good agreement with the altimeter observations. In the model, the surface elevation decreases about 20 cm over the seven years due

  19. Land plants, weathering, and Paleozoic climatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddéris, Yves; Maffre, Pierre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Carretier, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    At the end of the Paleozoic, the Earth plunged into the longest and most severe glaciation of the Phanerozoic eon (Montanez et al., 2013). The triggers for this event (called the Late Paleozoic Ice Age, LPIA) are still debated. Based on field observations and laboratory experiments showing that CO2 consumption by rock weathering is enhanced by the presence of plants, the onset of the LPIA has been related to the colonization of the continents by vascular plants in the latest Devonian. By releasing organic acids, concentrating respired CO2 in the soil, and by mechanically breaking rocks with their roots, land plants may have increased the weatherability of the continental surfaces. The "greening" of the continents may also have contributed to an enhanced burial of organic carbon in continental sedimentary basins, assuming that lignin decomposers have not yet evolved (Berner, 2004). As a consequence, CO2 went down, setting the conditions for the onset of the LPIA. This scenario is now widely accepted in the scientific community, and reinforces the feeling that biotic evolutionary steps are main drivers of the long-term climatic evolution. Although appealing, this scenario suffers from some weaknesses. The timing of the continent colonization by vascular plants was achieved in the late Devonian, several tens of million years before the onset of the LPIA (Davies and Gibling, 2013). Second, lignin decomposer fungi were present at the beginning of the Carboniferous, 360 million years ago while the LPIA started around 340-330 Ma (Nelsen et al., 2016). Land plants have also decreased the continental albedo, warming the Earth surface and promoting runoff. Weathering was thus facilitated and CO2 went down. Yet, temperature may have stayed constant, the albedo change compensating for the CO2 fall (Le Hir et al., 2010). From a modelling point of view, the effect of land plants on CO2 consumption by rock weathering is accounted for by forcing the weatherability of the

  20. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.