WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface wave effects

  1. Surface tension effects in breaking wave noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B

    2012-08-01

    The role of surface active materials in the sea surface microlayer on the production of underwater noise by breaking waves is considered. Wave noise is assumed to be generated by bubbles formed within actively breaking whitecaps, driven into breathing mode oscillation at the moment of their formation by non-equilibrium, surface tension forces. Two significant effects associated with surface tension are identified-a reduction in low frequency noise (bubbles by fluid turbulence within the whitecap and a reduction in overall noise level due to a decrease in the excitation amplitude of bubbles associated with reduced surface tension. The impact of the latter effect on the accuracy of Weather Observations Through Ambient Noise estimates of wind speed is assessed and generally found to be less than ±1 m s(-1) for wind speeds less than 10 m s(-1) and typical values of surfactant film pressure within sea slicks.

  2. NUMERICAL STUDY ON EFFECT OF WAVING BED ON THE SURFACE WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zheng-ren; CHENG You-liang; WANG Song-ling

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the waving bed on the surface wave was investigated. The wave equation was reduced from the potential flow theory with the perturbation technique, and then was solved by using the pseudo-spectral method. The waterfall of the surface wave was simulated with the Matlab. It is shown that for the waving bed, an additional harmonic wave appears on the surface together with the solitary wave existing for the non-waving bed, and two kinds of waves do not interfere with each other. With the development of time, the waveform for the waving bed is kept invariable, and just the amplitude is reduced gradually. Wave-breaking phenomenon for the non-waving bed does not appear, so the waving bed seems useful to prevent the breaking of the wave.

  3. Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water

    CERN Document Server

    Rousseaux, Germain; Mathis, Christian; Coullet, Pierre; Philbin, Thomas G; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered, in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity [R. Schuetzhold and W. G. Unruh W G, Phys. Rev. D 66 (2002) 044019]. A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/long wavelength case kh>>1 where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

  4. Horizon effects for surface waves in wave channels and circular jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Jannes, Gil; Chaline, Jennifer; Maïssa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian; Rousseaux, Germain

    2011-01-01

    Surface waves in classical fluids experience a rich array of black/white hole horizon effects. The dispersion relation depends on the characteristics of the fluid (in our case, water and silicon oil) as well as on the fluid depth and the wavelength regime. In some cases, it can be tuned to obtain a relativistic regime plus high-frequency dispersive effects. We discuss two types of ongoing analogue white-hole experiments: deep water waves propagating against a counter-current in a wave channel and shallow waves on a circular hydraulic jump.

  5. Surface wave propagation effects on buried segmented pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with surface wave propagation (WP effects on buried segmented pipelines. Both simplified analytical model and finite element (FE model are developed for estimating the axial joint pullout movement of jointed concrete cylinder pipelines (JCCPs of which the joints have a brittle tensile failure mode under the surface WP effects. The models account for the effects of peak ground velocity (PGV, WP velocity, predominant period of seismic excitation, shear transfer between soil and pipelines, axial stiffness of pipelines, joint characteristics, and cracking strain of concrete mortar. FE simulation of the JCCP interaction with surface waves recorded during the 1985 Michoacan earthquake results in joint pullout movement, which is consistent with the field observations. The models are expanded to estimate the joint axial pullout movement of cast iron (CI pipelines of which the joints have a ductile tensile failure mode. Simplified analytical equation and FE model are developed for estimating the joint pullout movement of CI pipelines. The joint pullout movement of the CI pipelines is mainly affected by the variability of the joint tensile capacity and accumulates at local weak joints in the pipeline.

  6. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  7. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  8. Effect of attenuation correction on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Some selected wave profiles recorded using a ship borne wave recorder are analysed to study the effect of attenuation correction on the distribution of the surface amplitudes. A new spectral width parameter is defined to account for wide band...

  9. NUMERICAL STUDY OF WAVE EFFECTS ON SURFACE WIND STRESS AND SURFACE MIXING LENGTH BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL CIRCULATION MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bing-chen; LI Hua-jun; LEE Dong-yong

    2006-01-01

    The effects of waves on Surface Drag Coefficient (SDC) and surface mixing length were analyzed and discussed by carrying out three-dimensional current modeling for the Bohai Sea in the present work. A three- dimensional coupled hydrodynamical-ecological model for regional and shelf seas (COHERENS) incorporating the influences of wave-current interactions was coupled with the third-generation wave model swan taking into account time-varying currents. The effects of waves on currents were included in the SDC, surface mixing length and bottom drag coefficient. Firstly, the formulations in Donelan were incorporated into the COHERENS to account for wave-dependent SDC. In order to compare simulation results for the wave-dependent SDC, the simulation for wind-dependent SDC was also carried out. Second, Wave-Induced Surface Mixing Length (described as WISML sometimes in this paper) was incorporated into the COHERENS. Four numerical experiments were conducted to discuss the effects of two kinds of wave processes. Generally, the values of time series of current velocity and water surface elevation given by the simulation with all of the three wave processes have a good agreement with observed data. The existence of WISML changes obviously current vertical profiles and the existence of the wave dependent SDC modifies the current field of both top and bottom layers with the wind-dependent SDC.

  10. Study on the shadowing effect for optical wave scattering from randomly rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixin Guo(郭立新); Yunhua Wang(王运华); Zhensen Wu(吴振森)

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Kirchhoff approximation for rough surface scattering and by calculating the shadowing function of the rough surface, the formula of the scattering cross section of the dielectric rough surface is presented with consideration of the shadowing effect for the optical wave incidence. It is obtained that in comparison with the conventional Kirchhoff solution, the shadowing effect should not be neglected for the optical wave scattering from the rough surface. The influence of the shadowing effect for different incidence angle, surface root mean square slope, and surface roughness on the scattering cross section is discussed in detail.

  11. Effect of shock wave risetime on material ejection from aluminum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J.R.

    1977-09-15

    The effect of shock wave risetime on material ejection in aluminum has been studied for loading stresses of 21 GPa. Uniform loading was accomplished with plate impact techniques by mounting specimens on a ramp wave generator. Projectile impact on one side of the wave generator produced a wave which dispersed with propagation distance. This wave was then made incident to an aluminum specimen, so that the specimen experienced non-shock loading. It was found that mass ejection from aluminum surfaces can be reduced by over two orders of magnitude relative to shock loading conditions by accelerating the surface with a wave risetime greater than about 35 ns. These results suggest an explanation for the apparent discrepancies which are sometimes observed in mass ejection measurements utilizing either plate impact or electron beam deposition to generate stress waves.

  12. Effects of winds, tides and storm surges on ocean surface waves in the Sea of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; TIAN Jiwei; LI Peiliang; HOU Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are strongly forced by high wind conditions associated with winter storms in the Sea of Japan. They are also modulated by tides and storm surges. The effects of the variability in surface wind forcing, tides and storm surges on the waves are investigated using a wave model, a high-resolution atmospheric mesoscale model and a hydrodynamic ocean circulation model. Five month-long wave model simulations are inducted to examine the sensitivity of ocean waves to various wind forcing fields, tides and storm surges during January 1997. Compared with observed mean wave parameters, results indicate that the high frequency variability in the surface wind filed has very great effect on wave simulation. Tides and storm surges have a significant impact on the waves in nearshores of the Tsushima-kaihyō, but not for other regions in the Sea of Japan. High spatial and temporal resolution and good quality surface wind products will be crucial for the prediction of surface waves in the JES and other marginal seas, especially near the coastal regions.

  13. Effect of Viscosity on Free-Surface Waves in Oseen Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢东强

    2004-01-01

    Based on the complex dispersion relation for the two-dimensional free-surface waves generated by a moving body in the steady Oseen flows, the effect of viscosity on wavelength and wave amplitude was investigated by means of an asymptotic method and a numerical analysis. A comparison between the asymptotic and numerical analysis for the viscous decay factor demonstrates the validity of the perturbation expansions for the wave profile. The numerical result shows that the wavelength of viscous wave is slightly elongated in comparison with that of inviscid wave.

  14. Surface/interface effects on the effective propagation constants of coherent waves in composites with random parallel nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhi; Wei, Peijun; Jiao, Fengyu

    2016-07-01

    The effective propagation constants of elastic waves in an inhomogeneous medium with randomly distributed parallel cylindrical nanofibers are studied. First, the surface energy theory proposed by Huang and Wang (Handbook of Micromechanics and Nanomechanics, 2013) is used to derive the nontraditional boundary conditions on the surfaces of the nanoholes and the interfaces between the nanofibers and the host. Then, the scattering matrix of individual scatterer (cylindrical hole or nanofiber) is derived from the nontraditional boundary condition. The total wave field is obtained by considering the multiple scattering processes among the dispersive scatterers. The configuration average of the total wave field results in the coherent waves or the averaged waves. By using the corrected Linton-Martin formula, the effective propagation constants (effective speed and effective attenuation) of the coherent waves are estimated. The in-plane waves (P and SV waves) and the anti-plane waves (SH wave) are considered, respectively, and the numerical results are shown graphically. Apart from the effects of surface elasticity, the effects of inertia of surface/interface and the effects of residual surface tension (which are often ignored in the previous literature) are also considered. Moreover, the influences of the nonsymmetric parts of in-plane surface stress and the out-of-plane parts of the surface stress are both discussed first based on the numerical examples. These investigations show the underestimation and overestimation of effective propagation constants caused by various simplifications.

  15. CAPILLARY EFFECT ON VERTICALLY EXCITED SURFACE WAVE IN CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL VESSEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN Yong-jun; E Xue-quan; ZHANG Jie

    2006-01-01

    In a vertically oscillating circular cylindrical container, singular perturbation theory of two-time scale expansions was developed in inviscid fluids to investigate the motion of single free surface standing wave including the effect of surface tension. A nonlinear slowly varying amplitude equation, which incorporates cubic nonlinear term,external excitation and the influence of surface tension, was derived from potential flow equation. The results show that, when forced frequency is lower, the effect of surface tension on mode selection of surface wave is not important. However, when forced frequency is higher, the surface tension can not be neglected. This proved that the surface tension causes free surface returning to equilibrium location. In addition, due to considering the effect of surface tension, the theoretical result approaches to experimental results much more than that of no surface tension.

  16. Quantum electrostatic surface waves in a hybrid plasma waveguide: Effect of nano-sized slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mahmodi Moghadam, M.

    2017-10-01

    The propagation properties of surface plasmon (SP) waves are studied in a hybrid plasma waveguide (consisting of plasma-gap-dielectric layers) with quantum effects including the Fermi-pressure, the Bohm potential and the exchange-correlation interaction. By using a quantum hydrodynamic model and Maxwell's equations, the dispersion relation of SP waves is derived, which describes the quantum corrected features of the dispersion properties of such surface waves. Previous results in this context are recovered. It is found that the exchange-correlation interactions and the presence of the second dielectric layer drastically modify the behaviors of the surface plasmon waves. The implications of our finding are discussed in some particular cases of interest. Our finding is applicable for understanding the surface wave behaviors in nano-scale systems.

  17. Effect of surface tension on the mode selection of vertically excited surface waves in a circular cylindrical vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yong-Jun; E Xue-Quan; Zhang Jie; Meng Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Singular perturbation theory of two-time-scale expansions was developed in inviscid fluids to investigate patternforming, structure of the single surface standing wave, and its evolution with time in a circular cylindrical vessel subject to a vertical oscillation. A nonlinear slowly varying complex amplitude equation, which involves a cubic nonlinear term,an external excitation and the influence of surface tension, was derived from the potential flow equation. Surface tension was introduced by the boundary condition of the free surface in an ideal and incompressible fluid. The results show that when forced frequency is low, the effect of surface tension on the mode selection of surface waves is not important.However, when the forced frequency is high, the surface tension cannot be neglected. This manifests that the function of surface tension is to cause the free surface to return to its equilibrium configuration. In addition, the effect of surface tension seems to make the theoretical results much closer to experimental results.

  18. The surface effect on axisymmetric wave propagation in piezoelectric cylindrical shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunying Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the surface piezoelectricity theory and first-order shear deformation theory, the surface effect on the axisymmetric wave propagating in piezoelectric cylindrical shells is analyzed. The Gurtin–Murdoch theory is utilized to get the nontraditional boundary conditions and constitutive equations of the surface, in company with classical governing equations of the bulk, from which the basic formulations are obtained. Numerical results show that the surface layer has a profound effect on wave characteristics in nanostructure at a higher mode.

  19. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich platf...

  20. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee;

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich platf...

  1. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær;

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special......, the existence of these surface waves in specific material examples is analyzed, discussing the challenge posed by their experimental observation....

  2. Terahertz Wave Propagation in a Nanotube Conveying Fluid Taking into Account Surface Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In nanoscale structure sizes, the surface-to-bulk energy ratio is high and the surface effects must be taken into account. Surface effect plays a key role in accurately predicting the vibration behavior of nanostructures. In this paper, the wave behaviors of a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT conveying fluid are studied. The nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory is used and the surface effect is taken into account. It is found that the fluid can flow at a very high flow velocity and the wave propagates in the terahertz frequency range. The surface effects can significantly enhance the propagating frequency. This finding is different from the classical model where the surface effect is neglected.

  3. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes with surface and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Ya-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes is investigated based on nonlocal elasticity theory with consideration of surface effect. The governing equation is formulated utilizing nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin-Voigt model. Explicit wave dispersion relation is developed and wave phase velocities and frequencies are obtained. The effect of the fluid flow velocity, structural damping, surface effect, small scale effects and tube diameter on the wave propagation properties are discussed with different wave numbers. The wave frequency increases with the increase of fluid flow velocity, but decreases with the increases of tube diameter and wave number. The effect of surface elasticity and residual surface tension is more significant for small wave number and tube diameter. For larger values of wave number and nonlocal parameters, the real part of frequency ratio raises.

  4. Effects of Steady Flow on Magnetoacoustic-Gravity Surface Waves: I. The Weak Field Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, R.; Mather, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetoacoustic gravity (MAG) waves have been studied for some time. In this article, we investigate the effect that a shear flow at a tangential discontinuity embedded in a gravitationally stratified and magnetised plasma has on MAG surface waves. The dispersion relation found is algebraically analogous to the relation of the non-flow cases obtained by Miles and Roberts ( Solar Phys. 141, 205, 1992), except for the introduction of a Doppler-shifted frequency for the eigenvalue. This feature, however, introduces rather interesting physics, including the asymmetric presence of forward- and backward-propagating surface waves. We find that increasing the equilibrium flow speed leads to a shift in the permitted regions of propagation for surface waves. For most wave number combinations this leads to the fast mode being completely removed, as well as more limited phase speed regimes for slow-mode propagation. We also find that upon increasing the flow, the phase speeds of the backward propagating waves are increased. Eventually, at high enough flow speeds, the wave's direction of propagation is reversed and is in the positive direction. However, the phase speed of the forward-propagating wave remains mainly the same. For strong enough flows we find that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can also occur when the forward- and backward-propagating modes couple.

  5. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special conditi...

  6. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  7. Shukla-Spatschek diffusion effects on surface plasma waves in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    The effects of Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion on a temporal mode of surface waves propagating at the interface of an astrophysical turbulent plasma are investigated. The damping rates for high and low modes of surface wave are kinetically derived by employing the Vlasov-Poisson equation and the specular reflection boundary condition. We found that the diffusion caused by the fluctuating electric fields leads to damping for both high and low modes of surface waves. The high-mode damping is enhanced with an increase of the wavenumber and the diffusion coefficient, but suppressed by an increase of electron thermal energy. By contrast, the low-mode damping is suppressed as the wavenumber and the thermal energy increase although it is enhanced as the diffusion increases. The variation of the damping rate due to the Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion is also discussed.

  8. Effects of surface drag on low-level frontogenesis within baroclinic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; TAN ZheMin

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5), the evolution and structures of baroclinic waves with and without surface drag in case of dry and moist atmosphere are simulated, with special emphases on the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontal structure and frontogenesis. There are two different effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis in the dry case. On one hand, the surface drag weakens the low-level frontogenesis and less inclined to develop the baroclinic wave due to the dissipation. But on the other hand, the surface drag induces a strong ageostrophic flow, which prolongs the low-level frontogenesis and finally leads to the enhancement of cold front. Compared with the no surface drag case, the surface drag increases the frontal slope especially in the boundary layer, where the front is almost vertical to the surface, and then enhances the prefrontal vertical motion. All these conclusions expanded the analytical theory of Tan and Wu (1990). In the moist atmosphere, the influence of surface drag on frontal rainbands is also obvious. The surface drag weakens the convection, and reduces the energy dissipation near the surface when the initial relative humidity is relatively weak. At this time, the confluence induced post-frontal updrafts moves across the cold front and reinforces the prefrontal convection, which is beneficial to the maintenance of the rainband in cold sector. Given the enhancement of relative humidity, the moist convection dominates the low-level frontogenesis while the retardation of surface drag on energy dissipation is not obvious, therefore the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis and precipitation are reduced.

  9. Effects of surface drag on low-level frontogenesis within baroclinic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5), the evolution and structures of baroclinic waves with and without surface drag in case of dry and moist atmosphere are simulated, with special emphases on the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontal structure and frontogenesis. There are two different effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis in the dry case. On one hand, the surface drag weakens the low-level frontogenesis and less inclined to develop the baroclinic wave due to the dissipation. But on the other hand, the surface drag induces a strong ageostrophic flow, which prolongs the low-level frontogenesis and finally leads to the enhancement of cold front. Compared with the no surface drag case, the surface drag increases the frontal slope espe- cially in the boundary layer, where the front is almost vertical to the surface, and then enhances the prefrontal vertical motion. All these conclusions expanded the analytical theory of Tan and Wu (1990). In the moist atmosphere, the influence of surface drag on frontal rainbands is also obvious. The surface drag weakens the convection, and reduces the energy dissipation near the surface when the initial relative humidity is relatively weak. At this time, the confluence induced post-frontal updrafts moves across the cold front and reinforces the prefrontal convection, which is beneficial to the maintenance of the rainband in cold sector. Given the enhancement of relative humidity, the moist convection domi- nates the low-level frontogenesis while the retardation of surface drag on energy dissipation is not obvious, therefore the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis and precipitation are re- duced.

  10. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  11. Conversion from surface wave to surface wave on reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the reflection and transmission of an incident surface wave to a pure surface wave state at another interface. This is allowed only for special media parameters: at least one of the media must be magnetic. We found such material characteristics that the obliquely incident surface wave...... can be transmitted without changing its direction (nevertheless the amplitude varies). For other media parameters, only normally incident surface waves can be converted to surface waves. We propose applications of the predicted conversion as a beam splitter and polarization filter for surface waves....

  12. Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2015-01-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

  13. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  14. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  15. Effect of phase coupling on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Nonlinear features of wind generated surface waves are considered here to be caused by nonrandomness (non-Uniform) in the phase spectrum. Nonrandomness in recorded waves, if present, would be generally obscured within the error level of observations...

  16. Super-resolution Imaging by Evanescent Wave Coupling to Surface States on Effective Gain Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Prateek; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Higher resolution demands for semiconductor lithography may be fulfilled by higher numerical aperture (NA) systems. However, NAs more than the photoresist refractive index (~1.7) cause surface confinement of the image. In this letter we describe how evanescent wave coupling to effective gain medium surface states beneath the imaging layer can counter this problem. At {\\lambda}=193 nm a layer of sapphire on SiO2 counters image decay by an effective-gain-medium resonance phenomena allowing evanescent interferometric lithography to create high aspect ratio structures at NAs of 1.85 (26-nm) and beyond.

  17. Magnetism and rotation effect on surface waves in fibre-reinforced anisotropic general viscoelastic media of higher order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Dahab, S. M. [Taif University, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Abd-Alla, A. M. [SVU, Qena (Egypt); Khan, Aftab [Sohag University, Sohag (Egypt)

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the propagation of surface waves in a rotating fibre-reinforced viscoelastic media of higher order under the influence of magnetic field. The general surface wave speeds derived to study the effects of rotation and magnetic field on surface waves. Particular cases for Stoneley, Love and Rayleigh waves are also discussed and dispersion relation for the waves has been deduced. The results obtained in this investigation are more general in the sense that some earlier published results are obtained from our result as special cases. For order zero our results are well agreement to fibre-reinforced materials. Also by neglecting the reinforced elastic parameters, the results reduce to well known isotropic medium. It is observed that in a rotating medium the surface waves are dispersive. Also magnetic effects play a significant roll. It is observed that Love wave remain unaffected in a rotating medium but remain under the influence of magnetic field. Rayleigh waves are affected by rotation and magnetic field whereas Stoneley waves are independent of Maxwell stresses. It is also observed that, surface waves cannot propagate in a fast rotating medium or in the presence of magnetic field of high intensity. Numerical results for particular materials are given and illustrated graphically. The results indicate that the effect of rotation and magnetic field are very pronounced.

  18. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). This is an optical device consisting if one waveguide that is split into two waveguide arms which are assembled again later on. By applying the mechanical field from a SAW the light in the two arms can be modulated and interfere constructively and destructively......The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model...

  19. Surface waves in three-dimensional electromagnetic composites and their effect on homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Markel, Vadim A; Tsukerman, Igor

    2013-05-06

    Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at the boundaries of periodic composites (electromagnetic/optical metamaterials) depends in general on both bulk and surface waves. We investigate the interplay of these two contributions using three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations and a recently developed non-asymptotic homogenization theory.

  20. Surface-wave photonic quasicrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Youming; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    In developing strategies of manipulating surface electromagnetic waves, it has been recently recognized that a complete forbidden band gap can exist in a periodic surface-wave photonic crystal, which has subsequently produced various surface-wave photonic devices. However, it is not obvious whether such a concept can be extended to a non-periodic surface-wave system that lacks translational symmetry. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a surface-wave photonic quasicrystal that lacks periodicity can also exhibit a forbidden band gap for surface electromagnetic waves. The lower cutoff of this forbidden band gap is mainly determined by the maximum separation between nearest neighboring pillars. Point defects within this band gap show distinct properties compared to a periodic photonic crystal for the absence of translational symmetry. A line-defect waveguide, which is crafted out of this surface-wave photonic quasicrystal by shortening a random row of metallic rods, is also demonstrated to guide and bend sur...

  1. Site effects in Mexico City: Constraints from surface wave inversion of shallow refraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, J.; Chávez-García, F. J.; Romero-Jiménez, E.; Rodríguez-Zúñiga, J. L.; Gómez-González, J. M.

    1997-03-01

    In order to understand and simulate site effects on strong ground motion records of recent earthquakes in Mexico City, it is fundamental to determine the in situ elastic and anelastic properties of the shallow stratigraphy of the basin. The main properties of interest are the shear wave velocities and Q-quality factors and their correlation with similar parameters in zones of the city. Despite population density and paved surfaces, it is feasible to gather shallow refraction data to obtain laterally homogeneous subsoil structures at some locations. We focused our analysis in the Texcoco Lake region of the northeastern Mexico City basin. This area consists of unconsolidated clay sediments, similar to those of the lake bed zone in Mexico City, where ground motion amplification and long duration disturbances are commonly observed. We recorded Rayleigh and Love waves using explosive and sledgehammer sources and 4.5 Hz vertical and horizontal geophones, respectively. Additionally, for the explosive source, we recorded three-component seismograms using 1 Hz seismometers. We obtained phase velocity dispersion curves from ray parameter-frequency domain analyses and inverted them for vertical distribution of S wave velocity. The initial model was obtained from a standard first-break refraction analysis. We also obtained an estimation of the QS shear wave quality factor for the uppermost stratigraphy. Results compare well with tilt and cone penetrometer resistance measurements at the same test site, emphasizing the importance of these studies for engineering purposes.

  2. Nonlinear surface waves over topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.T.

    2006-01-01

    As ocean surface waves radiate into shallow coastal areas and onto beaches, their lengths shorten, wave heights increase, and the wave shape transforms from nearsinusoidal to the characteristic saw-tooth shapes at the onset of breaking; in the ensuing breaking process the wave energy is cascaded to

  3. Surface waves on metal-dielectric metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee;

    2016-01-01

    of surface waves and, therefore, can serve as a platform allowing many applications for surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and their propagation direction is sensitive to permittivities of the media forming the interface. Hence, their propagation can be effectively controlled...... by changing a wavelength or material parameters. We discover that two new types of surface waves with complex dispersion exist for a uniaxial medium with both negative ordinary and extraordinary permittivities. Such new surface wave solutions originate from the anisotropic permittivities of the uniaxial media......, resulting in unique hyperbolic–like wavevector dependencies....

  4. Effect of surface waves on the irradiance distribution in the upper ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekera, Hemantha; Pegau, W Scott; Boyd, Timothy

    2005-11-14

    The distribution of irradiance in the upper ocean was examined from sensors mounted on an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). Apparent and inherent optical properties along with physical variability ranging from scales O(10 cm) to O(1 km) were collected off the coast of Oregon during the summer of 2004. Horizontal wavenumber spectra of downwelling irradiance showed that irradiance varied as a function of wavenumber and depth. The analysis indicates that irradiance variability between 1 and 20 m spatial scales was attributed to the focusing effects of surface wave geometry. The dominant wavelength of focusing at depths of 2 - 6 m was about 2 m for ~6 m s-1 wind speeds.

  5. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  6. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  7. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  8. Effects of Rotation and Gravity Field on Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Thermoelastic Media under Four Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation is done to investigate the gravitational and rotational parameters effects on surface waves in fibre-reinforced thermoelastic media. The theory of generalized surface waves has been firstly developed and then it has been employed to investigate particular cases of waves, namely, Stoneley waves, Rayleigh waves, and Love waves. The analytical expressions for surface waves velocity and attenuation coefficient are obtained in the physical domain by using the harmonic vibrations and four thermoelastic theories. The wave velocity equations have been obtained in different cases. The numerical results are given for equation of coupled thermoelastic theory (C-T, Lord-Shulman theory (L-S, Green-Lindsay theory (G-L, and the linearized (G-N theory of type II. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of gravity, rotation, and parameters for fibre-reinforced of the material media. The results obtained are displayed by graphs to clear the phenomena physical meaning. The results indicate that the effect of gravity, rotation, relaxation times, and parameters of fibre-reinforced of the material medium is very pronounced.

  9. Wave scattering from statistically rough surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, F G; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Wave Scattering from Statistically Rough Surfaces discusses the complications in radio physics and hydro-acoustics in relation to wave transmission under settings seen in nature. Some of the topics that are covered include radar and sonar, the effect of variations in topographic relief or ocean waves on the transmission of radio and sound waves, the reproduction of radio waves from the lower layers of the ionosphere, and the oscillations of signals within the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The book begins with some fundamental idea of wave transmission theory and the theory of random processes a

  10. Response of water temperature to surface wave effects in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The effects of wind waves on the Baltic Sea water temperature has been studied by coupling the hydrodynamical model NEMO with the wave model WAM. The wave forcing terms that have been taken into consideration are: Stokes-Coriolis force, seastate dependent energy flux and sea-state dependent momentum flux. The combined role of these processes as well as their individual contributions on simulated temperature is analysed. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwellinǵs. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data. The warming is primarily caused by sea-state dependent energy flux. Wave induced cooling is mostly observed in near coastal areas and is mainly due to Stokes-Coriolis forcing. The latter triggers effect of intensifying upwellings near the coasts, depending on the direction of the wind. The effect of sea-state dependent momentum flux is predominantly to warm the surface layer. During the summer the wave induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C.

  11. Tamm-Langmuir surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenitskii, K. Â. Yu.; Koshelev, K. Â. L.; Bogdanov, A. Â. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we develop a theory of surface electromagnetic waves localized at the interface of periodic metal-dielectric structures. We have shown that the anisotropy of plasma frequency in metal layers lifts the degeneracy of plasma oscillations and opens a series of photonic band gaps. This results in appearance of surface waves with singular density of states—we refer to them as Tamm-Langmuir waves. Such naming is natural since we have found that their properties are very similar to the properties of both bulk Langmuir and surface Tamm waves. Depending on the anisotropy parameters, Tamm-Langmuir waves can be either forward or backward waves. Singular density of states and high sensitivity of the dispersion to the anisotropy of the structure makes Tamm-Langmuir waves very promising for potential applications in nanophotonics and biosensing.

  12. Tamm-Langmuir surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Golenitskii, K U; Bogdanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we develop a theory of surface electromagnetic waves localized at the interface of periodic metal-dielectric structures. We have shown that the anisotropy of plasma frequency in metal layers lifts the degeneracy of plasma oscillations and opens a series of photonic band gaps. This results in appearance of surface waves with singular density of states - we refer to them as Tamm-Langmuir waves. Such naming is natural since we have found that their properties are very similar to the properties of both bulk Langmuir and surface Tamm waves. Depending on the anisotropy parameters, Tamm-Langmuir waves can be either forward or backward waves. Singular density of states and high sensitivity of the dispersion to the anisotropy of the structure makes Tamm-Langmuir waves very promising for potential applications in nanophotonics and biosensing.

  13. High-frequency normal-mode statistics in shallow water: the combined effect of random surface and internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2015-05-01

    In an earlier article, the statistical properties of mode propagation were studied at a frequency of 1 kHz in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves, using a hybrid transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulations. Here, the analysis is extended to include the effects of random linear surface waves, in isolation and in combination with internal waves. Mode coupling rates for both surface and internal waves are found to be significant, but strongly dependent on mode number. Mode phase randomization by surface waves is found to be dominated by coupling effects, and therefore a full transport theory treatment of the range evolution of the cross mode coherence matrix is needed. The second-moment of mode amplitudes is calculated using transport theory, thereby providing the mean intensity while the fourth-moment is calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, which provides the scintillation index. The transport theory results for second-moment statistics are shown to closely reproduce Monte Carlo simulations. Both surface waves and internal waves strongly influence the acoustic field fluctuations.

  14. Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

  15. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  16. Databases of surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Boschi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of seismic surface waves provide the most important constraint on the elastic properties of the Earth’s lithosphere and upper mantle. Two databases of fundamental mode surface wave dispersion were recently compiled and published by groups at Harvard (Ekström et al., 1997 and Utrecht/Oxford (Trampert and Woodhouse, 1995, 2001, and later employed in 3-d global tomographic studies. Although based on similar sets of seismic records, the two databases show some significant discrepancies. We derive phase velocity maps from both, and compare them to quantify the discrepancies and assess the relative quality of the data; in this endeavour, we take careful account of the effects of regularization and parametrization. At short periods, where Love waves are mostly sensitive to crustal structure and thickness, we refer our comparison to a map of the Earth’s crust derived from independent data. On the assumption that second-order effects like seismic anisotropy and scattering can be neglected, we find the measurements of Ekström et al. (1997 of better quality; those of Trampert and Woodhouse (2001 result in phase velocity maps of much higher spatial frequency and, accordingly, more difficult to explain and justify geophysically. The discrepancy is partly explained by the more conservative a priori selection of data implemented by Ekström et al. (1997. Nevertheless, it becomes more significant with decreasing period, which indicates that it could also be traced to the different measurement techniques employed by the authors.

  17. Effect of thin film on the generation of vorticity by surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenyev, V M; Lebedev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Recently a theoretical scheme explaining the vorticity generation by surface waves in liquids was developed [S. Filatov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 054501 (2016)]. Here we study how a thin (monomolecular) film presented at the surface of liquid affects the generated vorticity. We demonstrate that the vorticity becomes parametrically larger than for the case with a clean surface and now it depends on viscosity of the liquid. We also discuss the motion of particles passively advected by the generated surface flow. The results can be used in different applications: from the analysis of pollutants' diffusion on the ocean surface till the reconstruction of vorticity based on the particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements.

  18. Effect of thickness disorder on the performance of photonic crystal surface wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anopchenko, Aleksei; Occhicone, Agostino; Rizzo, Riccardo; Sinibaldi, Alberto; Figliozzi, Giovanni; Danz, Norbert; Munzert, Peter; Michelotti, Francesco

    2016-04-04

    We investigated experimentally and numerically the robustness of optical sensors based on Bloch waves at the surface of periodic one-dimensional photonic crystals. The distributions of sensor characteristics caused by the fabrication uncertainties in dielectric layer thicknesses have been analyzed and robustness criteria have been set forth and discussed. We show that the performance of the surface wave sensors is sufficiently robust with respect to the changes of the photonic crystal layer thicknesses. Layer thickness optimization of the photonic crystal, carried out to achieve low limit of detection, leads to an improvement of the robustness of the surface wave sensors that is attributed to Bloch states lying deeper in the photonic band gap.

  19. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The small scale ocean-atmosphere interaction at the water-air interface is one of the most important factors determining the processes of heat, mass, and energy exchange in the boundary layers of both geospheres. Another important aspect of the air-sea interaction is excitation of surface waves. One of the most debated open questions of wave modeling is concerned with the wind input in the wave field, especially for the case of steep and breaking waves. Two physical mechanisms are suggested to describe the excitation of finite amplitude waves. The first one is based on the treatment of the wind-wave interaction in quasi-linear approximation in the frameworks of semi-empirical models of turbulence of the low atmospheric boundary layer. An alternative mechanism is associated with separation of wind flow at the crests of the surface waves. The "separating" and "non-separating" mechanisms of wave generation lead to different dependences of the wind growth rate on the wave steepness: the latter predicts a decrease in the increment with wave steepness, and the former - an increase. In this paper the mechanism of the wind-wave interaction is investigated basing on physical and numerical experiments. In the physical experiment, turbulent airflow over waves was studied using the video-PIV method, based on the application of high-speed video photography. Alternatively to the classical PIV technique this approach provides the statistical ensembles of realizations of instantaneous velocity fields. Experiments were performed in a round wind-wave channel at Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences. A fan generated the airflow with the centerline velocity 4 m/s. The surface waves were generated by a programmed wave-maker at the frequency of 2.5 Hz with the amplitudes of 0.65 cm, 1.4 cm, and 2 cm. The working area (27.4 × 10.7 cm2) was at a distance of 3 m from the fan. To perform the measurements of the instantaneous velocity fields, spherical polyamide

  20. Recoverable stress induced two-way shape memory effect on NiTi surface using laser-produced shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyitliyev, Dovletgeldi; Li, Peizhen; Kholikov, Khomidkhodza; Grant, Byron; Thomas, Zachary; Alal, Orhan; Karaca, Haluk E.; Er, Ali O.

    2017-02-01

    The surfaces of Ni50Ti50 shape memory alloys (SMAs) were patterned by laser scribing. This method is more simplistic and efficient than traditional indentation techniques, and has also shown to be an effective method in patterning these materials. Different laser energy densities ranging from 5 mJ/pulse to 56 mJ/pulse were used to observe recovery on SMA surface. The temperature dependent heat profiles of the NiTi surfaces after laser scribing at 56 mJ/pulse show the partially-recovered indents, which indicate a "shape memory effect (SME)" Experimental data is in good agreement with theoretical simulation of laser induced shock wave propagation inside NiTi SMAs. Stress wave closely followed the rise time of the laser pulse to its peak values and initial decay. Further investigations are underway to improve the SME such that the indents are recovered to a greater extent.

  1. Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion and Dynamical Casimir Effect for Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hižnjakov V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of biphotons states generated via spontaneous four-wave mixing in nanofibers with a variable cross-section are studied. The spectral amplitude of the biphoton field is calculated and the effects of interference and phase modulation of the biphoton field in such structures is discussed.

  2. Effect of wave-function localization on the time delay in photoemission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We investigate streaking time delays in the photoemission from a solid model surface as a function of the degree of localization of the initial-state wave functions. We consider a one-dimensional slab with lattice constant a{sub latt} of attractive Gaussian-shaped core potentials of width {sigma}. The parameter {sigma}/a{sub latt} thus controls the overlap between adjacent core potentials and localization of the electronic eigenfunctions on the lattice points. Small values of {sigma}/a{sub latt}<<1 yield lattice eigenfunctions that consist of localized atomic wave functions modulated by a ''Bloch-envelope'' function, while the eigenfunctions become delocalized for larger values of {sigma}/a{sub latt} > or approx 0.4. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we calculate photoemission spectra from which we deduce a characteristic bimodal shape of the band-averaged photoemission time delay: as the slab eigenfunctions become increasingly delocalized, the time delay quickly decreases near {sigma}/a{sub latt}=0.3 from relatively large values below {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.2 to much smaller delays above {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.4. This change in wave-function localization facilitates the interpretation of a recently measured apparent relative time delay between the photoemission from core and conduction-band levels of a tungsten surface.

  3. Exploring surface waves vortex interaction in deep water: a classical analog of the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vivanco, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple experiment to study the interaction of surface waves with a vertical vortex in the deep water regime. Similarly to what occurs in the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm problem for electron interacting with a magnetic potential, the effect of the vortex circulation is to introduce dislocations in the wavefront. These defects are explained taken into account the effects of advection on the propagating wavefront, due to the fluid motion. (Author)

  4. Hall Effect in the Vortex Lattice of d-Wave Superconductors with Anisotropic Fermi Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Wataru; Ueki, Hikaru; Kita, Takafumi

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the augmented quasiclassical theory of superconductivity with the Lorentz force, we study the magnetic field dependence of the charge distribution due to the Lorentz force in a d-wave vortex lattice with anisotropic Fermi surfaces. Owing to the competition between the energy-gap and Fermi surface anisotropies, the charge profile in the vortex lattice changes dramatically with increasing magnetic field because of the overlaps of each nearest vortex-core charge. In addition, the accumulated charge in the core region may reverse its sign as a function of magnetic field. This strong field dependence of the vortex-core charge cannot be observed in the model with an isotropic Fermi surface.

  5. Surface effect on Bleustein-Gulyaev wave in a piezoelectric half-space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Surface effect,which is attributed to the different environment surrounding the surface or near-surface atoms from that embracing the bulk atoms,may become significant when the surface-to-volume ratio of a body is large.This paper considers the effect of a plane boundary of a piezoelectric body modeled as a thin layer with specified material properties,for which a transfer relation between the state vectors at the top and bottom surfaces is derived based on the state-space formulations.The equations of surf...

  6. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Louise R; Baker, Andrew T; Elias, Damian O; Dammann, John F; Zielinski, Mark C; Polashock, Vicky S; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-01-01

    Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  7. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise R Manfredi

    Full Text Available Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  8. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  9. Effects of surface drag on upper-level frontogenesis within a developing baroclinic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tan, Zhemin; Chu, Kekuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface drag on upper-level front with a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5). To this end, a new and simple potential vorticity intrusion (PVI) index is proposed to quantitatively describe the extent and path that surface drag affects upper-level front. From a PV perspective, the formation of the upper-level front is illustrated as the tropopause folding happens from the stratosphere. The PVI index shows a good correlation with the minimum surface pressure, and tends to increase with the deepening of the surface cyclone and upper-level front. The surface drag acts to damp and delay the development of upper-level front, which could reduce the growth rate of the PVI index. However, the damping presents different effects in different development stages. It is the most significant during the rapid development stage of the surface cyclone. Compared with no surface drag cases, the tropopause is less inclined to intrude into the troposphere due to the surface drag. Positive feedback between the surface cyclone and upper-level front could accelerate the development of the frontal system.

  10. Effect of surface deposits on electromagnetic waves propagating in uniform ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation was used to study the effect of material surface deposits on the reflective characteristics of straight uniform ducts with PEC (perfectly electric conducting) walls. Over a wide frequency range, the effect of both single and multiple surface deposits on the duct reflection coefficient were examined. The power reflection coefficient was found to be significantly increased by the addition of deposits on the wall.

  11. Surface acoustic wave mode conversion resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. J.; Gunshor, R. L.; Melloch, M. R.; Datta, S.; Pierret, R. F.

    1983-08-01

    The fact that a ZnO-on-Si structure supports two distinct surface waves, referred to as the Rayleigh and the Sezawa modes, if the ZnO layer is sufficiently thick is recalled. A description is given of a unique surface wave resonator that operates by efficiently converting between the two modes at the resonant frequency. Since input and output coupling is effected through different modes, the mode conversion resonator promises enhanced out-of-band signal rejection. A Rayleigh wave traversing the resonant cavity in one direction is reflected as a Sezawa wave. It is pointed out that the off-resonance rejection of the mode conversion resonator could be enhanced by designing the transducers to minimize the level of cross coupling between transducers and propagating modes.

  12. Nonlinear hydrodynamic effects induced by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave in sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghane, M; Chen, B X; Fu, Y Q; Li, Y; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mohammed, M I; Walton, A J

    2012-11-01

    We report an experimental and numerical characterization of three-dimensional acoustic streaming behavior in small droplets of volumes (1-30 μl) induced by surface acoustic wave (SAW). We provide a quantitative evidence of the existence of strong nonlinear nature of the flow inertia in this SAW-driven flow over a range of the newly defined acoustic parameter F{NA}=Fλ/(σ/R_{d})≥0.01, which is a measure of the strength of the acoustic force to surface tension, where F is the acoustic body force, λ is the SAW wavelength, σ is the surface tension, and R{d} is the droplet radius. In contrast to the widely used Stokes model of acoustic streaming, which generally ignores such a nonlinearity, we identify that the full Navier-Stokes equation must be applied to avoid errors up to 93% between the computed streaming velocities and those from experiments as in the nonlinear case. We suggest that the Stokes model is valid only for very small acoustic power of ≤1 μW (F{NA}droplets.

  13. Broadband transverse electric surface wave in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhtary, M. Shoufie; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-08-01

    Transverse electric (TE) surface wave in silicine is theoretically investigated. The TE surface wave in silicene is found to exhibit better characteristics compared with that in graphene, in terms of a broader frequency range and more confinement to the surface which originate from the buckled structure of silicene. We found that even undoped silicene can support the TE surface wave. We expect the similar characteristics of the TE surface wave in other two-dimensional materials that have a slightly buckled honeycomb lattice.

  14. Wave Equation Inversion of Skeletonized SurfaceWaves

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2015-08-19

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  15. The effect of foam on waves and the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface at high winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling at extreme winds is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients was then confirmed by a number of field (e.g.[2]) and laboratory [3] experiments, which showed that the sea surface drag coefficient was significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. The theoretical explanations of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction exploit either peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves (e.g.[4,5]) or the effect of sea drops and spray on the wind-wave momentum exchange (e.g. [6,7]). Recently an alternative hypothesis was suggested in [8], where the surface drag reduction in hurricanes was explained by the influence of foam covering sea surface on its aerodynamic roughness. This paper describes a series of laboratory experiments in Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) of IAP directed to investigation of the foam impact on the short-wave part of the surface waves and the momentum exchange in the atmospheric boundary layer at high winds in the range of equivalent 10-m wind speed from 12 to 38 m/s. A special foam generator was designed for these experiments. The air flow parameters were retrieved from measurements of the velocity profiles. The frequency-wavenumber spectra of surface waves were retrieved from the measurements of water surface elevation by the array 3-channel wave gauge. Foam coverage of water surface was controlled by video filming of the water surface. The results of measurements were compared with predictions of the quasi-linear model of atmospheric boundary layer over

  16. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm.

  17. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  18. The Effect of Surface Waves on the Performance Characteristics of a Model Tidal Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, K.; Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Taylor, K.

    2011-12-01

    A 0.5 m diameter 3-bladed horizontal axis model tidal turbine has been designed and tested at the United States Naval Academy Hydrodynamics Laboratory. The blades section for the turbine is based on the E387 foil and includes a 50% taper and 20 degree twist from root to tip. Tests were conducted in the 120 ft tow tank for a range of tow speeds of 0.5 - 1.5 m/s. The experimental rig consists of the following parts: a 90 degree gear box attached to the turbine shaft, a rotary encoder to measure RPM, a torque meter, and a differential electromagnetic brake to apply a load to the shaft. The turbine was placed 1 diameter below the free surface. Preliminary results show excellent agreement of the experimentally measured power coefficient as a function of tip-speed ratio with predicted results from blade-element-momentum theory. Additional experiments are being conducted which include the influence of surface waves on tidal turbine performance. A full uncertainty analysis of the experimental results will also be included. This is part of larger effort at the Naval Academy to develop a testing program for tidal turbine research in the large tow tank facilities.

  19. Surface waves on metal-dielectric metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at an interface between an isotropic medium and an effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectric layers with deep subwavelength thicknesses. This configuration can host various types of...

  20. Oseen流动中粘性对自由表面波的影响%Effect of Viscosity on Free-Surface Waves in Oseen Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢东强

    2004-01-01

    Based on the complex dispersion relation for the two-dimensional free-surface waves generated by a moving body in the steady Oseen flows, the effect of viscosity on wavelength and wave amplitude was investigated by means of an asymptotic method and a numerical analysis.A comparison between the asymptotic and numerical analysis for the viscous decay factor demonstrates the validity of the perturbation expansions for the wave profile.The numerical result shows that the wavelength of viscous wave is slightly elongated in comparison with that of inviscid wave.

  1. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  2. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry, E-mail: rochtch@iptm.ru; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Ortega, Luc [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei [Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula [Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, 53 Kabanbay Batyr St., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  3. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Irzhak, Dmitry; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Frequency Comb

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenkov, A A; Ilchenko, V S; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2011-01-01

    We report on realization of an efficient triply-resonant coupling between two long lived optical modes and a high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode of the same monolithic crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. The coupling results in an opto-mechanical oscillation and generation of a monochromatic SAW. A strong nonlinear interaction of this mechanical mode with other equidistant SAW modes leads to mechanical hyper-parametric oscillation and generation of a SAW pulse train and associated frequency comb in the resonator. We visualized the comb observing the modulation of the modulated light escaping the resonator.

  5. Modeling waves, currents and sandbars on natural beaches: The effect of surface rollers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, F.; de Swart, H.E.; Calvete, D.; Falqués, A.

    2011-01-01

    A morphodynamic model has been extended to gain more fundamental knowledge about the formation of nearshore sand bars. The model describes feedbacks between waves, rollers, depth-averaged currents and bed evolution, so that self-organized processes can develop. Offshore wave, wind and tide condition

  6. Effect of Shock Wave on Fabricated Anti-Blast Wall and Distribution Law Around the Wall Under Near Surface Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi

    2008-01-01

    The loads of shock wave effect on fabricated anti-blast wall and distribution law around the wall were investigated by using near surface explosion test method and FEM.The pressure-time histories and variety law on the foreside and backside of the anti-blast wall were adopted in the tests of variety of different explosion distances and dynamites,as well as in the comparison between the test and numerical calculation.The test results show that the loads of shock wave effect on the anti-blast wall were essen-tially consistent with calculation results using criterion under surface explosion when explosion distances exceed 2 m,the distribution of overpressure behind wall was gained according to variety law based on small-large-small.It is also demonstrated that the peak overpressure behind wall had commonly appeared in wall height by 1.5--2.5 multiples,and the peak overpressures of protective building behind wall could be reduced effectively by using the fabricated anti-blast wall.

  7. An Internal Wave as a Frequency Filter for Surface Gravity Waves on Water

    CERN Document Server

    Lossow, K

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional model of the interaction between surface and the internal gravity water waves. The internal wave is modeled by its basic form: a non-dispersive field with a horizontal current that is uniform over all depth, insignificantly affected by the surface waves, while ignoring surface tension and wind growth/decay effects. The depth is infinite. Approximation for the height of the surface wave on the flow by the "elementary quasi stationary" solutions was found. It was shown that the flow acts as a frequency filter for gravitational waves on water.

  8. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic carbon nanotubes under longitudinal magnetic field with thermal and surface effect via nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yaxin; Zhou, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Based on nonlocal strain gradient theory, wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied in this paper. With consideration of thermal effect and surface effect, wave equation is derived for fluid-conveying viscoelastic SWCNTs under longitudinal magnetic field utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The closed-form expressions are derived for the frequency and phase velocity of the wave motion. The influences of fluid flow velocity, structural damping coefficient, temperature change, magnetic flux and surface effect are discussed in detail. SWCNTs’ viscoelasticity reduces the wave frequency of the system and the influence gets remarkable with the increase of wave number. The fluid in SWCNTs decreases the frequency of wave propagation to a certain extent. The frequency (phase velocity) gets larger due to the existence of surface effect, especially when the diameters of SWCNTs and the wave number decrease. The wave frequency increases with the increase of the longitudinal magnetic field, while decreases with the increase of the temperature change. The results may be helpful for better understanding the potential applications of SWCNTs in nanotechnology.

  9. Parabolic Wave Equation for Surface Water Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    extended to wave propagation problems in other fields of physical sciences, such as nonlinear optics ( Svelto , 1974), plasma physics (Karpman, 1975...34 Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 72, pp. 373-384. Svelto , 0., 1974, Progress in Optics, North-Holland Pub., Chapter 1, pp. 1-51. Tappert, F.D., 1977, "The

  10. Propagation of Love waves with surface effects in an electrically-shorted piezoelectric nanofilm on a half-space elastic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sijia; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Hongbin; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Pan, Rongying; Alamusi; Hu, Ning

    2016-03-01

    The propagation of Love waves in the structure consisting of a nanosized piezoelectric film and a semi-infinite elastic substrate is investigated in the present paper with the consideration of surface effects. In our analysis, surface effects are taken into account in terms of the surface elasticity theory and the electrically-shorted conditions are adopted on the free surface of the piezoelectric film and the interface between the film and the substrate. This work focuses on the new features in the dispersion relations of different modes due to surface effects. It is found that with the existence of surface effects, the frequency dispersion of Love waves shows the distinct dependence on the thickness and the surface constants when the film thickness reduces to nanometers. In general, phase velocities of all dispersion modes increase with the decrease of the film thickness and the increase of the surface constants. However, surface effects play different functions in the frequency dispersions of different modes, especially for the first mode dispersion. Moreover, different forms of Love waves are observed in the first mode dispersion, depending on the presence of the surface effects on the surface and the interface.

  11. Broadband wave manipulation in surface-wave photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perfectly guide surface electromagnetic waves around ultra-sharp corners without back-scattering and radiation is in great demand for various photonic and plasmonic applications. This is fundamentally difficult to realize because of the dramatic momentum mismatch and wave nature of radiation at the sharp corners. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a simple photonic structure, a periodic square array of metallic cylinders standing on a metal surface, can behaves as a surface-wave photonic crystal with complete photonic band gap to overcome this bottleneck simply. A line-defect waveguide can support and guide surface waves around ultra-sharp corners without perceptible radiation and reflection, achieving almost perfect transmission efficiency in a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate an ideal T-shaped splitter to split input surface waves equally into two arms and a square radiation-suppressed plasmonic open resonator with high quality factors by simply inducing line-defects in this fu...

  12. Dyakonov surface waves in lossy metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Sorni, A J; Zapata-Rodríguez, C J; Miret, J J

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the existence of localized waves in the vicinities of the interface between two dielectrics, provided one of them is uniaxial and lossy. We found two families of surface waves, one of them approaching the well-known Dyakonov surface waves (DSWs). In addition, a new family of wave fields exists which are tightly bound to the interface. Although its appearance is clearly associated with the dissipative character of the anisotropic material, the characteristic propagation length of such surface waves might surpasses the working wavelength by nearly two orders of magnitude.

  13. Generation of long subharmonic internal waves by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvildari, Navid; Kaihatu, James M.; Saric, William S.

    2016-10-01

    A new set of Boussinesq equations is derived to study the nonlinear interactions between long waves in a two-layer fluid. The fluid layers are assumed to be homogeneous, inviscid, incompressible, and immiscible. Based on the Boussinesq equations, an analytical model is developed using a second-order perturbation theory and applied to examine the transient evolution of a resonant triad composed of a surface wave and two oblique subharmonic internal waves. Wave damping due to weak viscosity in both layers is considered. The Boussinesq equations and the analytical model are verified. In contrast to previous studies which focus on short internal waves, we examine long waves and investigate some previously unexplored characteristics of this class of triad interaction. In viscous fluids, surface wave amplitudes must be larger than a threshold to overcome viscous damping and trigger internal waves. The dependency of this critical amplitude as well as the growth and damping rates of internal waves on important parameters in a two-fluid system, namely the directional angle of the internal waves, depth, density, and viscosity ratio of the fluid layers, and surface wave amplitude and frequency is investigated.

  14. Symmetric waves are traveling waves for a shallow water equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Following a general principle introduced by Ehrnstr\\"{o}m et.al. we prove that for an equation modeling the free surface evolution of moderate amplitude waves in shallow water, all symmetric waves are traveling waves.

  15. Symmetric waves are traveling waves for a shallow water equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Following a general principle introduced by Ehrnstr\\"{o}m et.al. we prove that for an equation modeling the free surface evolution of moderate amplitude waves in shallow water, all symmetric waves are traveling waves.

  16. Surface Shear, Persistent Wave Groups and Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of waves with surface flows by considering the full set of conserved quantities, subtle but important surface elevations induced by wave packets and by directly considering the necessary forces to prevent packet spreading in the deep water limit. Narrow surface shear flows are shown to exert strong localizing and stabilizing forces on wavepackets to maintain their strength and amplify their intensity even in the linear regime. Necessary criticisms of some earlier notions of stress and angular momentum of waves are included and we argue that nonlinearity enters the system in a way that makes the formation of rogue waves nonperturbative. Quantitative bounds on the surface shear flow necessary to stabilize packets of any wave amplitude are given.

  17. Improvements on Mean Free Wave Surface Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国海; 滕斌; 程亮

    2002-01-01

    Some new results of the modeling of mean free surface of waves or wave set-up are presented. The stream function wave theory is applied to incident short waves. The limiting wave steepness is adopted as the wave breaker index in the calculation of wave breaking dissipation. The model is based on Roelvink (1993), but the numerical techniques used in the solution are based on the Weighted-Average Flux (WAF) method (Watson et al., 1992), with Time-Operator-Splitting (TOS) used for the treatment of the source terms. This method allows a small number of computational points to be used, and is particularly efficient in modeling wave set-up. The short wave (or incident primary wave) energy equation issolved by use of a traditional Lax-Wendroff technique. The present model is found to be satisfactory compared with the measurements conducted by Stive (1983).

  18. Impacts of tropical cyclone inflow angle on ocean surface waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; HONG Xin

    2011-01-01

    The inflow angle of tropical cyclones (TC) is generally neglected in numerical studies of ocean surface waves induced by TC. In this study, the impacts of TC inflow angle on ocean surface waves were investigated using a high-resolution wave model. Six numerical experiments were conducted to examine, in detail, the effects of inflow angle on mean wave parameters and the spectrum of wave directions. A comparison of the waves simulated in these experiments shows that inflow angle significantly modifies TC-induced ocean surface waves. As the inflow angle increases, the asymmetric axis of the significant wave height (SWH) field shifts 30° clockwise, and the maximum SWH moves from the front-right to the rear-right quadrant. Inflow angle also affects other mean wave parameters, especially in the rear-left quadrant, such as the mean wave direction, the mean wavelength, and the peak direction. Inflow angle is a key factor in wave models for the reproduction of double-peak or multi-peak patterns in the spectrum of wave directions. Sensitivity experiments also show that the simulation with a 40° inflow angle is the closest to that of the NOAA statistical SLOSH inflow angle. This suggests that 40° can be used as the inflow angle in future TC-induced ocean surface wave simulations when SLOSH or observed inflow angles are not available.

  19. Thermal annealing effect on ZnO surface acoustic wave-based ultraviolet light sensors on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Gu, Hang; He, Xingli; Xuan, Weipeng; Chen, Jinkai; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, J. K.

    2014-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based ultraviolet (UV) light sensors have a high sensitivity and have been extensively studied and explored for application. However, all of them were made of piezoelectric (PE) bulk materials or PE thin films on crystalline substrates such as Si and sapphire. This paper reports the fabrication of ZnO thin film SAW UV-light sensors on glass substrates and the effect of post-deposition thermal annealing on the sensing performance. It was found that annealing at temperatures higher than 300 °C can improve the properties of ZnO films and the sensing performance of the UV-sensors remarkably. When the ZnO film annealed at 400 °C was used for sensors, the UV light induced resonant frequency shift increased more than 20 times with the response speed reduced to less than 2.4 s, much better than those made on ZnO films with lower temperature annealing.

  20. A Wave Modulation Model of Ripples over Long Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Peixiu; ZHENG Guizhen

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the modulation of ripples induced by a long surface wave (LW) and a new theoretical modulation model is proposed. In this model, the wind surface stress modulation is related to the modulation of tipple spectrum. The model results show that in the case of LW propagating in the wind direction with the wave age parameter of LW increasing, the area with enhanced shear stress shifts from the region near the LW crest on the upwind slope to the LW trough. With a smaller wave age parameter of LW, the tipple modulation has the maximum on the upwind slope in the vicinity of LW crest, while with a larger parameter the enhancement of ripple spectrum does not occur in that region. At low winds the amplitude of ripple modulation transfer function (MTF) is larger in the gravity wave range, while at moderate or high winds it changes little in the range from short gravity waves to capillary waves.

  1. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  2. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  3. Illusions and Cloaks for Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, T. M.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hao, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Ever since the inception of Transformation Optics (TO), new and exciting ideas have been proposed in the field of electromagnetics and the theory has been modified to work in such fields as acoustics and thermodynamics. The most well-known application of this theory is to cloaking, but another equally intriguing application of TO is the idea of an illusion device. Here, we propose a general method to transform electromagnetic waves between two arbitrary surfaces. This allows a flat surface to reproduce the scattering behaviour of a curved surface and vice versa, thereby giving rise to perfect optical illusion and cloaking devices, respectively. The performance of the proposed devices is simulated using thin effective media with engineered material properties. The scattering of the curved surface is shown to be reproduced by its flat analogue (for illusions) and vice versa for cloaks.

  4. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  5. Megaquakes, prograde surface waves and urban evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.; Castaños, H.

    2013-05-01

    Cities grow according to evolutionary principles. They move away from soft-ground conditions and avoid vulnerable types of structures. A megaquake generates prograde surface waves that produce unexpected damage in modern buildings. The examples (Figs. 1 and 2) were taken from the 1985 Mexico City and the 2010 Concepción, Chile megaquakes. About 400 structures built under supervision according to modern building codes were destroyed in the Mexican earthquake. All were sited on soft ground. A Rayleigh wave will cause surface particles to move as ellipses in a vertical plane. Building codes assume that this motion will be retrograde as on a homogeneous elastic halfspace, but soft soils are intermediate materials between a solid and a liquid. When Poisson's ratio tends to ν→0.5 the particle motion turns prograde as it would on a homogeneous fluid halfspace. Building codes assume that the tilt of the ground is not in phase with the acceleration but we show that structures on soft ground tilt into the direction of the horizontal ground acceleration. The combined effect of gravity and acceleration may destabilize a structure when it is in resonance with its eigenfrequency. Castaños, H. and C. Lomnitz, 2013. Charles Darwin and the 1835 Chile earthquake. Seismol. Res. Lett., 84, 19-23. Lomnitz, C., 1990. Mexico 1985: the case for gravity waves. Geophys. J. Int., 102, 569-572. Malischewsky, P.G. et al., 2008. The domain of existence of prograde Rayleigh-wave particle motion. Wave Motion 45, 556-564.; Figure 1 1985 Mexico megaquake--overturned 15-story apartment building in Mexico City ; Figure 2 2010 Chile megaquake Overturned 15-story R-C apartment building in Concepción

  6. Effects of the surface waves on air-sea interactions of the sea spray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francius, M.J.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols are important to a large number of processes in the marine boundary layer. On a micro-meteorological scale, they influence the heat and moisture budgets near the sea surface. Since the ocean acts both as a source and a sink for aerosols, the sea spray droplets may transfer water vapour and

  7. Skeletonized wave-equation Qs tomography using surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-08-17

    We present a skeletonized inversion method that inverts surface-wave data for the Qs quality factor. Similar to the inversion of dispersion curves for the S-wave velocity model, the complicated surface-wave arrivals are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the amplitude spectra of the windowed Rayleigh-wave arrivals. The optimal Qs model is then found that minimizes the difference in the peak frequencies of the predicted and observed Rayleigh wave arrivals using a gradient-based wave-equation optimization method. Solutions to the viscoelastic wave-equation are used to compute the predicted Rayleigh-wave arrivals and the misfit gradient at every iteration. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation Qs tomography (WQs), does not require the assumption of a layered model and tends to have fast and robust convergence compared to Q full waveform inversion (Q-FWI). Numerical examples with synthetic and field data demonstrate that the WQs method can accurately invert for a smoothed approximation to the subsur-face Qs distribution as long as the Vs model is known with sufficient accuracy.

  8. Wave-equation Qs Inversion of Skeletonized Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-02-08

    We present a skeletonized inversion method that inverts surface-wave data for the Qs quality factor. Similar to the inversion of dispersion curves for the S-wave velocity model, the complicated surface-wave arrivals are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the amplitude spectra of the windowed Rayleigh-wave arrivals. The optimal Qs model is the one that minimizes the difference in the peak frequencies of the predicted and observed Rayleigh wave arrivals using a gradient-based wave-equation optimization method. Solutions to the viscoelastic wave-equation are used to compute the predicted Rayleigh-wave arrivals and the misfit gradient at every iteration. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation Qs inversion (WQs), does not require the assumption of a layered model and tends to have fast and robust convergence compared to full waveform inversion (FWI). Numerical examples with synthetic and field data demonstrate that the WQs method can accurately invert for a smoothed approximation to the subsurface Qs distribution as long as the Vs model is known with sufficient accuracy.

  9. Skeletonized wave equation of surface wave dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-09-06

    We present the theory for wave equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. Similar to wave-equation travel-time inversion, the complicated surface-wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the (kx,ω) domain. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2D or 3D velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is less prone to the cycle skipping problems of full waveform inversion (FWI). The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can accurately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distribution in laterally heterogeneous media.

  10. Tapping of Love waves in an isotropic surface waveguide by surface-to-bulk wave transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Chang, C.-P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical study of tapping a Love wave in an isotropic microacoustic surface waveguide is given. The surface Love wave is tapped by partial transduction into a bulk wave at a discontinuity. It is shown that, by careful design of the discontinuity, the converted bulk wave power and the radiation pattern may be controlled. General formulas are derived for the calculation of these important characteristics from a relatively general surface contour deformation.

  11. Superdirected Beam of the Surface Spin Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, Alexander Yu; Lock, Edwin H

    2016-01-01

    Visualized diffraction patterns of the surface spin wave excited by arbitrarily oriented linear transducer in tangentially magnetized ferrite film are investigated experimentally in the plane of ferrite film for the case where the transducer length D is much larger than the wavelength L. Superdirected (nonexpanding) beam of the surface spin wave with noncollinear wave vector k and group velocity vector V was observed experimentally: the angular width of this beam was about zero, the smearing of the beam energy along the film plane was minimal and the length of the beam trajectory was maximal (50 mm). Thus it was shown that such phenomenon as superdirected propagation of the wave exists in the nature.

  12. Nonlinear surface waves in photonic hypercrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2017-08-01

    Photonic crystals and hyperbolic metamaterials are merged to give the concept of photonic hypercrystals. It combines the properties of its two constituents to give rise to novel phenomena. Here the propagation of Transverse Magnetic waves at the interface between a nonlinear dielectric material and a photonic hypercrystal is studied and the corresponding dispersion relation is derived using the uniaxial parallel approximation. Both dielectric and metallic photonic hypercrystals are studied and it is found that nonlinearity limits the infinite divergence of wave vectors of the surface waves. These states exist in the frequency region where the linear surface waves do not exist. It is also shown that the nonlinearity can be used to engineer the group velocity of the resulting surface wave.

  13. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  14. Ruts and waves in the road surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, J.P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of a road and a road surface should not unexpectedly change, if the traffic process is to be kept safe and under control. Knowledge on accidents, in which ruts and waves played a part does not seem to exist. Knowledge on driver behaviour due to the occurrence of waves or ruts is

  15. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anup Saha; Santimoy Kundu; Shishir Gupta; Pramod Kumar Vaishnav

    2016-06-01

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of torsional surface waves in an initially stressedanisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space. We assumethe quadratic inhomogeneity in rigidity and density in the lower half-space and irregularity is taken inthe form of rectangle at the interface separating the layer from the lower half-space. The dispersionequation for torsional waves has been obtained in a closed form. Velocity equation is also obtained inthe absence of irregularity. The study reveals that the presence of irregularity, initial stress, porosity,inhomogeneity and anisotropy factor in the dispersion equation approves the significant effect of theseparameters in the propagation of torsional waves in porous medium. It has also been observed that fora uniform media, the velocity equation reduces to the classical result of Love wave.

  16. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anup; Kundu, Santimoy; Gupta, Shishir; Vaishnav, Pramod Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space. We assume the quadratic inhomogeneity in rigidity and density in the lower half-space and irregularity is taken in the form of rectangle at the interface separating the layer from the lower half-space. The dispersion equation for torsional waves has been obtained in a closed form. Velocity equation is also obtained in the absence of irregularity. The study reveals that the presence of irregularity, initial stress, porosity, inhomogeneity and anisotropy factor in the dispersion equation approves the significant effect of these parameters in the propagation of torsional waves in porous medium. It has also been observed that for a uniform media, the velocity equation reduces to the classical result of Love wave.

  17. River dykes investigation using seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitri, Adnand; Jousset, Philippe; Samyn, Kévin; Naylor, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Natural underground caves such as karsts are quite common in the region "Centre", France. These subsurface perturbations can be found underneath the protection dykes around "the Loire" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can be used for locating voids or karsts systems, but its efficiency on surface with strong topography such as dykes is not certain. Three dimensional Rayleigh wave modelling was used to understand the role of topography in the propagation of surface waves and with the aim of determining the best way for MASW investigations of surfaces with strong topography such as river dykes. Numerical modelling shows that surface waves propagation is not strongly affected by topography for an array parallel to the dyke. For homogeneous models with topography, a diminution of surface waves amplitude is observed while higher propagation modes are amplified in the dispersion curves in the case of heterogeneous models with topography. For an array perpendicular to the dyke, numerical modeling shows that Rayleigh waves' velocity is lower. MASW investigations can then be applied if lateral variations of the topography are not too strong along the seismic line. Diffraction hyperbolas created by a full of water cavity were identified in numerical modelling with topography. According to these elements, a MASW survey has been performed on the dykes of "the Loire" river close to a collapsed cavity and potential karstic systems were discovered.

  18. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-09-12

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Surface waves of Min-proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Nguyen van yen, Romain; Kruse, Karsten

    2007-03-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the Min-proteins show pronounced pole-to-pole oscillations. They are functional for suppressing cell division at the cell ends, leaving the center as the only possible site for division. Analyzing different models of Min-protein dynamics in a bacterial geometry, we find waves on the cytoplasmic membrane. Interestingly, the surface wave solutions of different models belong to different symmetry classes. We suggest that experiments on Min-protein surface waves in vitro are helpful in distinguishing between different classes of models of Min-protein dynamics.

  20. Surface Wave Cloak from Graded Refractive Index Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spada, L.; McManus, T. M.; Dyke, A.; Haq, S.; Zhang, L.; Cheng, Q.; Hao, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been re-emerged on the possibility to manipulate surface waves, in particular, towards the THz and optical regime. Both concepts of Transformation Optics (TO) and metamaterials have been regarded as one of key enablers for such applications in applied electromagnetics. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a dielectric surface wave cloak from engineered gradient index materials to illustrate the possibility of using nanocomposites to control surface wave propagation through advanced additive manufacturing. The device is designed analytically and validated through numerical simulations and measurements, showing good agreement and performance as an effective surface wave cloak. The underlying design approach has much wider applications, which span from microwave to optics for the control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and radiation of nanoantennas.

  1. Surface Waves in the paritally ionized solar plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2013-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in the partially ionized, incompressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in the present work. The waves are affected by the non ideal MHD effects which causes the finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the finite drift of the magnetic field is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in the partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization of the medium. In the presence of Hall diffusion, the propagation of the sausage and kink surface waves depends on the level of fractional ionization of the medium. When both the Hall and Pedersen diffusion are present in the medium, the waves undergoes damping. For typical solar parameters, waves may damp over few minutes.

  2. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  3. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch when the wind duration was sufficient for the conditions to be considered stationary. The scaling of wave energy and frequency with open water distance demonstrated the indirect effects of ice cover on regional wave evolution. Waves in partial ice cover could be similarly categorized as distance-limited by applying the same open water scaling to determine an ‘effective fetch’. The process of local wave generation in ice appeared to be a strong function of the ice concentration, wherein the ice cover severely reduces the effective fetch. The wave field in the Beaufort Sea is thus a function of the sea ice both locally, where wave growth primarily occurs in the open water between floes, and regionally, where the ice edge may provide a more classic fetch limitation. Observations of waves in recent years may be indicative of an emerging trend in the Arctic Ocean, where we will observe increasing wave energy with decreasing sea ice extent.

  4. Temperature-mediated transition from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves to surface-plasmon-polariton waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Mackay, Tom G.; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-08-01

    The effect of changing the temperature on the propagation of electromagnetic surface waves (ESWs), guided by the planar interface of a homogeneous isotropic temperature-sensitive material (namely, InSb) and a temperature-insensitive structurally chiral material (SCM) was numerically investigated in the terahertz frequency regime. As the temperature rises, InSb transforms from a dissipative dielectric material to a dissipative plasmonic material. Correspondingly, the ESWs transmute from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves into surface-plasmon-polariton waves. The effects of the temperature change are clearly observed in the phase speeds, propagation distances, angular existence domains, multiplicity, and spatial profiles of energy flow of the ESWs. Remarkably large propagation distances can be achieved; in such instances the energy of an ESW is confined almost entirely within the SCM. For certain propagation directions, simultaneous excitation of two ESWs with (i) the same phase speeds but different propagation distances or (ii) the same propagation distances but different phase speeds are also indicated by our results.

  5. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer theory.

  6. Bidirectional surface wave splitter at visible frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2010-12-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a metal-film bidirectional surface wave splitter for guiding light at two visible wavelengths in opposite directions. Two nanoscale gratings were patterned on opposite sides of a subwavelength slit. The metallic surface grating structures were tailored geometrically to have different plasmonic bandgaps, enabling each grating to guide light of one wavelength and prohibit propagation at the other wavelength. The locations of the bandgaps were experimentally confirmed by interferometric measurements. Based on these design principles, a green-red bidirectional surface wave splitter is demonstrated, and the observed optical properties are shown to agree with theoretical predictions.

  7. Some aspects of dispersive horizons: lessons from surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chaline, J; Maïssa, P; Rousseaux, G

    2012-01-01

    Hydrodynamic surface waves propagating on a moving background flow experience an effective curved space-time. We discuss experiments with gravity waves and capillary-gravity waves in which we study hydrodynamic black/white-hole horizons and the possibility of penetrating across them. Such possibility of penetration is due to the interaction with an additional "blue" horizon, which results from the inclusion of surface tension in the low-frequency gravity-wave theory. This interaction leads to a dispersive cusp beyond which both horizons completely disappear. We speculate the appearance of high-frequency "superluminal" corrections to be a universal characteristic of analogue gravity systems, and discuss their relevance for the trans-Planckian problem. We also discuss the role of Airy interference in hybridising the incoming waves with the flowing background (the effective spacetime) and blurring the position of the black/white-hole horizon.

  8. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. II. LAMB, SURFACE, AND CENTRIFUGAL WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the second in a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases where the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this second part, we study the waves' solutions when several atmospheric approximations are applied: Lamb, surface, and centrifugal waves. Lamb and surface waves are found to be quite similar to those in a geostrophic regime. By contrast, centrifugal waves turn out to be a special case of Rossby waves that arise in atmospheres in cyclostrophic balance. Finally, we use our results to identify the nature of the waves behind atmospheric periodicities found in polar and lower latitudes of Venus's atmosphere.

  9. Automated detection and association of surface waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. D. Woodgold

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the automatic detection and association of surface waves has been developed and tested over an 18 month interval on broad band data from the Yellowknife array (YKA. The detection algorithm uses a conventional STA/LTA scheme on data that have been narrow band filtered at 20 s periods and a test is then applied to identify dispersion. An average of 9 surface waves are detected daily using this technique. Beamforming is applied to determine the arrival azimuth; at a nonarray station this could be provided by poIarization analysis. The detected surface waves are associated daily with the events located by the short period array at Yellowknife, and later with the events listed in the USGS NEIC Monthly Summaries. Association requires matching both arrival time and azimuth of the Rayleigh waves. Regional calibration of group velocity and azimuth is required. . Large variations in both group velocity and azimuth corrections were found, as an example, signals from events in Fiji Tonga arrive with apparent group velocities of 2.9 3.5 krn/s and azimuths from 5 to + 40 degrees clockwise from true (great circle azimuth, whereas signals from Kuriles Kamchatka have velocities of 2.4 2.9 km/s and azimuths off by 35 to 0 degrees. After applying the regional corrections, surface waves are considered associated if the arrival time matches to within 0.25 km/s in apparent group velocity and the azimuth is within 30 degrees of the median expected. Over the 18 month period studied, 32% of the automatically detected surface waves were associated with events located by the Yellowknife short period array, and 34% (1591 with NEIC events; there is about 70% overlap between the two sets of events. Had the automatic detections been reported to the USGS, YKA would have ranked second (after LZH in terms of numbers of associated surface waves for the study period of April 1991 to September 1992.

  10. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Enamel Parameters on Laser-Induced Surface Acoustic Waves in Human Incisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ling; Sun, Kaihua; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The laser ultrasound technique has great potential for clinical diagnosis of teeth because of its many advantages. To study laser surface acoustic wave (LSAW) propagation in human teeth, two theoretical methods, the finite element method (FEM) and Laguerre polynomial extension method (LPEM), are presented. The full field temperature values and SAW displacements in an incisor can be obtained by the FEM. The SAW phase velocity in a healthy incisor and dental caries is obtained by the LPEM. The methods and results of this work can provide a theoretical basis for nondestructive evaluation of human teeth with LSAWs.

  11. Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2007-06-15

    We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  12. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  13. Terahertz-wave generation by surface-emitted four-wave mixing in optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Zhou; Dianyuan Fan

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel terahertz-wave source through the four-wave mixing effect in a conventional singlemode optical fiber pumped by a dual-wavelength laser whose difference frequency lies in the terahertz range.Surface-emitted geometry is employed to decrease absorption loss.A detailed derivation of the terahertz-wave power expression is presented using the coupled-wave theory.This is a promising way for realizing a reasonable narrow-band terahert-wave source.%@@ We propose a novel terahertz-wave source through the four-wave mixing effect in a conventional singlemode optical fiber pumped by a dual-wavelength laser whose difference frequency lies in the terahertz range.Surface-emitted geometry is employed to decrease absorption loss.A detailed derivation of the terahertz-wave power expression is presented using the coupled-wave theory.This is a promising way for realizing a reasonable narrow-band terahertz-wave source.

  14. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and comp...

  15. Acoustomicrofluidic application of quasi-shear surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2017-02-20

    The paper analyzes the possibility of using predominantly boundary polarized surface acoustic waves for actuating fluidic effects in microchannels fabricated inside containers made of PDMS. The aim is to remove a shortcoming peculiar to conventionally utilized predominantly vertically polarized waves. Such waves strongly attenuate while they propagate under container side walls because of the leakage into them. Due to a specific feature of PDMS - extremely small shear elastic modulus - losses of boundary polarized modes should be far smaller. The amplitude of vertical mechanical displacements can be increased right inside the channel owing to the scattering of acoustic fields. As an example, the predominantly vertically polarized surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 is compared with the quasi-shear leaky wave on 64YX LiNbO3. Our computations predict that, given the electric power supplied to the launching transducer, the quasi-shear wave will drive the fluid more efficiently than the surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 when the container wall thickness is larger than 25-30 wavelengths, if there are no additional scatterers inside the channel. In the presence of a scatterer, such as a thin gold strip, the quasi-shear wave can be more efficient when the wall thickness exceeds 10-15 wavelengths.

  16. Interaction of Waves, Surface Currents, and Turbulence: the Application of Surface-Following Coordinate Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Surface waves comprise an important aspect of the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean, so a dynamically consistent framework for modelling atmosphere-ocean interaction must take account of surface waves, either implicitly or explicitly. In order to calculate the effect of wind forcing on waves and currents, and vice versa, it is necessary to employ a consistent formulation of the energy and momentum balance within the airflow, wave field, and water column. It is very advantageous to apply surface-following coordinate systems, whereby the steep gradients in mean flow properties near the air-water interface in the cross-interface direction may be resolved over distances which are much smaller than the height of the waves themselves. We may account for the waves explicitly by employing a numerical spectral wave model, and applying a suitable theory of wave-mean flow interaction. If the mean flow is small compared with the wave phase speed, perturbation expansions of the hydrodynamic equations in a Lagrangian or generalized Lagrangian mean framework are useful: for stronger flows, such as for wind blowing over waves, the presence of critical levels where the mean flow velocity is equal to the wave phase speed necessitates the application of more general types of surface-following coordinate system. The interaction of the flow of air and water and associated differences in temperature and the concentration of various substances (such as gas species) gives rise to a complex boundary-layer structure at a wide range of vertical scales, from the sub-millimetre scales of gaseous diffusion, to several tens of metres for the turbulent Ekman layer. The balance of momentum, heat, and mass is also affected significantly by breaking waves, which act to increase the effective area of the surface for mass transfer, and increase turbulent diffusive fluxes via the conversion of wave energy to turbulent kinetic energy.

  17. Research into surface wave phenomena in sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, G. L.; Isenberg, J.; Ma, F.; Richardson, E.

    1981-12-01

    This study is a continuation of an engineering seismology research effort prompted by the sensitivity of guidance sets in Minuteman Wing V to distant earthquakes. An earlier report considers the probable cause of anomalous patterns of seismic alarms triggered by two North American earthquakes. This report extends the previous study by examining the propagation of surface waves from the 1975 Pocatello Valley, Idaho earthquake sequence across Wyoming to Wing V. In addition, the more general question of surface wave phenomena in sedimentary basins is addressed, particularly the effect of laterally inhomogeneous (dipping) basin-bedrock interfaces. Findings indicate that fundamental and first overtone surface waves are significantly modified by the travel path. In contrast, higher modes are relatively unchanged by the travel path, and affect Wing V in much the same way as body waves considered in the previous study.

  18. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  19. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Viscoelastic love-type surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    The general theoretical solution for Love-Type surface waves in viscoelastic media provides theoreticalexpressions for the physical characteristics of the waves in elastic as well as anelastic media with arbitraryamounts of intrinsic damping. The general solution yields dispersion and absorption-coefficient curves for the waves as a function of frequency and theamount of intrinsic damping for any chosen viscoelastic model.Numerical results valid for a variety of viscoelastic models provide quantitative estimates of the physicalcharacteristics of the waves pertinent to models of Earth materials ranging from small amounts of damping in the Earth’s crust to moderate and large amounts of damping in soft soils and water-saturated sediments. Numerical results, presented herein, are valid for a wide range of solids and applications.

  1. Chiral Surface Waves for Enhanced Circular Dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Celebrano, Michele; Duò, Lamberto; Biagioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel chiral sensing platform that combines a one-dimensional photonic crystal design with a birefringent surface defect. The platform sustains simultaneous transverse electric and transverse magnetic surface modes, which are exploited to generate chiral surface waves. The present design provides homogeneous and superchiral fields of both handednesses over arbitrarily large areas in a wide spectral range, resulting in the enhancement of the circular dichroism signal by two orders of magnitude, thus paving the road toward the successful combination of surface-enhanced spectroscopies and electromagnetic superchirality.

  2. Chiral surface waves for enhanced circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Finazzi, Marco; Celebrano, Michele; Duò, Lamberto; Biagioni, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel chiral sensing platform that combines a one-dimensional photonic crystal design with a birefringent surface defect. The platform sustains simultaneous transverse electric and transverse magnetic surface modes, which are exploited to generate chiral surface waves. The present design provides homogeneous and superchiral fields of both handednesses over arbitrarily large areas in a wide spectral range, resulting in the enhancement of the circular dichroism signal by more than two orders of magnitude, thus paving the road toward the successful combination of surface-enhanced spectroscopies and electromagnetic superchirality.

  3. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  4. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  5. Some Applications of Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the evaluation of thin amorphous magnetic film by using of surface acoustic waves on piezo electric substrate. The obtained experimental data show strong dependence of material parameters on the annealing temperature. The mixed ferromagnetic/SAW devices for electronic applications will be also discussed.

  6. Effect of technique parameters on characteristics of hydrogen-free DLC films deposited by surface wave-sustained plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Diao, Dongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a new-type surface wave-sustained plasma physical vapor deposition (SWP-PVD) system under various technique conditions. Electron density was measured by a Langmuir probe, while the film thickness and hardness were characterized using a surface profilometer and a nanoindenter, respectively. Surface morphology was investigated by an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that the electron density and deposition rate increased following the increase in microwave power, target voltage, or gas pressure. The typical electron density and deposition rate were about 1.87-2.04×10 11 cm -3 and 1.61-14.32 nm/min respectively. AFM images indicated that the grains of films changes as the technique parameters vary. The optical constants, refractive index n and extinction coefficient k, were obtained using an optical ellipsometry. With the increase in microwave power from 150 to 270 W, the extinction coefficient of DLC films increased from 0.05 to 0.27 while the refractive index decreased from 2.31 to 2.18.

  7. Determining surface wave arrival angle anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erik W. F.; Ekström, Göran

    2002-06-01

    A new method for measuring arrival angles of teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves is developed. The new method utilizes estimates of surface wave dispersion to create a phase-matched filter to isolate the Love or Rayleigh wave in three-component recordings. The polarization of the filtered wave group is determined in the time domain by application of a variation of the complex polarization method of Vidale [1986]. Orientation, linearity, and ellipticity of particle motion are estimated in several frequency bands to determine the frequency-dependent polarization. The method employs an iterative scheme, by which a predicted Love wave, based on the estimated dispersion and polarization, is subtracted from the three-component data prior to the estimation of Rayleigh wave polarization, and vice versa. The method is applied to an extensive set of Global Seismographic Network data covering the years 1989-1998. Between 4244 and 15,075 measurements are collected for fundamental mode Love and Rayleigh waves at nine different periods (37 to 150 s). Measurement uncertainties are estimated using the statistics of observations for pairwise similar paths and are generally of the order of 15-50% of the total signal, depending on the period and the wave type. Large and azimuthally invariant angle anomalies are documented for several stations and are consistent with misorientation of the horizontal seismometers. Two schemes are employed to determine the misorientations: (1) an azimuthally weighted average at each station, and (2) a joint inversion for seismometer misorientation and globally heterogeneous phase velocities. The determined corrections are robust and correlate well with those reported in earlier studies. Azimuthally varying arrival angle anomalies are shown to agree qualitatively with predictions of wave refraction calculated for recent phase velocity maps, which explain up to 30% of the variance in the new measurements.

  8. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  9. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drop excited by surface acoustic waves: gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussonière, Adrien; Brunet, Philippe; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2016-01-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or more generally by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In...

  10. Surface properties of solids and surface acoustic waves: Application to chemical sensors and layer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    A general phenomenological approach is given for the description of mechanical surface properties of solids and their influence on surface acoustic wave propogation. Surface properties under consideration may be changes of the stress distribution in subsurface atomic layers, the presence of adsorbed gas molecules, surface degradation as a result of impacts from an aggressive environment, damage due to mechanical manufacturing or polishing, deposition of thin films or liquid layers, surface corrugations, etc. If the characteristic thickness of the affected layers is much less than the wavelengths of the propagating surface waves, then the effects of all these irregularities can be described by means of non-classical boundary conditions incorporating the integral surface parameters such as surface tension, surface moduli of elasticity and surface mass density. The effect of surface properties on the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves is analysed in comparison with the results of traditional approaches, in particular with Auld's energy perturbation method. One of the important implications of the above-mentioned boudnary conditions is that they are adequate for the description of the effect of rarely distributed adsorbed atoms or molecules. This allows, in particular, to obtain a rigorous theoretical description of chemical sensors using surface acoustic waves and to derive analytical expressions for their sensitivity.

  11. Linear surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves on a current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hu

    2008-01-01

    One of the forward situations in the study of water waves is the basic three-dimensional surface wave motion of short-crested waves. Capillary waves result in rich effects concerned closely with remote sensing in the open ocean. Ocean currents experience a complete process in surface wave motion. Based on the above ideas, a linear dynamical system of surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves is developed by considering the current effects, thus leading to the following analytical expressions of the kinematic and dynamic variables: the wave height, the wave steepness, the phase velocity, the wave-particle velocities, accelerations and trajectories and the wave pressure. A number of the classi-cal, typical and latest special wave cases can arise from these expressions.

  12. Effect of a gas on the ejection of particles from the free surface of a sample subjected to a shock wave with various intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, V. A.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Sasik, V. S.; Erunov, S. V.; Syrunin, M. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nevmerzhitskii, N. V.; Kulakov, E. V.; Kleshchevnikov, O. A.; Antipov, M. V.; Yurtov, I. V.; Rudnev, A. V.; Chapaev, A. V.; Pupkov, A. S.; Sen'kovskii, E. D.; Sotskov, E. A.; Glushikhin, V. V.; Kalashnik, I. A.; Finyushin, S. A.; Chudakov, E. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the possible effect of contamination of a plasma by metal particles on the operation of a number of facilities or on the detection of the motion of liners by Doppler methods, a particular attention has been recently focused on the problem of the ejection of particles from the shock-loaded free surface of a sample or on the "dusting" problem. Most information concerns the dusting source associated with the roughness of the surface, manufacturing technology, and the defectiveness and aging of a material. Factors affecting this process such as the profile and amplitude of the pressure on the front of the shock wave arriving at the free surface of the sample, the presence of the gas in front of the free surface, and the pressure in this gas are less studied.

  13. Linear and Nonlinear Surface Waves in Electrohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Matthew; Vanden-broeck, Jean-Marc; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    The problem of interest in this article are waves on a layer of finite depth governed by the Euler equations in the presence of gravity, surface tension, and vertical electric fields. Perturbation theory is used to identify canonical scalings and to derive a Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation withan additional non-local term arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics.When the Bond number is equal to 1/3, dispersion disappears and shock waves could potentially form. In the additional limit of vanishing electric fields, a new evolution equation is obtained which contains third and fifth-order dispersion as well as a non-local electric field term.

  14. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  15. Magnetoacoustic surface gravity waves at a spherical interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballai, I.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Douglas, M.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: The plasma structured by magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere is a perfect medium for the propagation of guided magnetic and magnetoacoustic waves. Geometrical restriction of wave propagation is known to confer a dispersive character for waves. In addition, waves propagating along discontinuities in the medium are known to remain localized. As an extension to theories of guided waves in magnetic slabs and cylinders under solar and stellar conditions, we aim to study the propagation of magnetoacoustic-gravity waves at a spherical interface in the low solar corona (considered here as a density discontinuity), modelling global waves recently observed in the corona in EUV wavelengths. Methods: Using conservation laws at the interface we derive the dispersion relation in spherical geometry with a radially expanding magnetic field in the presence of gravitational stratification. The obtained dispersion relation describing fast magnetoacoustic-gravity surface waves is derived using an approximative method taking into account that propagation takes place near the solar surface. Results: Theoretical results obtained in the present study are applied to investigate the propagation of EIT waves in the low corona. The frequency of waves is shown to increase with decreasing density contrast at the interface. We also show that, for a given azimuthal wavenumber, the magnetic field has a very small effect on the value of the frequency of waves. When plotted against the location of the interface (in the radial direction) the frequency varies inversely proportional to the distance, while for a fixed density ratio and location of the interface the frequency is obtained to be defined in a very narrow region.

  16. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  17. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  18. Blackfolds, Plane Waves and Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid...

  19. Watching surface waves in phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Oliver B; Matsuda, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    In this paper, we review results obtained by ultrafast imaging of gigahertz surface acoustic waves in surface phononic crystals with one- and two-dimensional periodicities. By use of quasi-point-source optical excitation, we show how, from a series of images that form a movie of the travelling waves, the dispersion relation of the acoustic modes, their corresponding mode patterns and the position and widths of phonon stop bands can be obtained by temporal and spatio-temporal Fourier analysis. We further demonstrate how one can follow the temporal evolution of phononic eigenstates in k-space using data from phononic-crystal waveguides as an example. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  1. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by surface acoustic waves: Gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussonnière, A.; Baudoin, M.; Brunet, P.; Matar, O. Bou

    2016-05-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed, the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or, more generally, by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In turn, we elucidate the origin of the resonance frequency shift, as well as the origin of the strong correlation between oscillatory and translational motion. We show that for sessile drops, the velocity is mainly determined by the amplitude of oscillation and that the saturation observed is due to the nonlinear dependence of the drop response frequency on the dynamically induced stretching.

  2. Wave groups in uni-directional surface-wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groesen, van E.

    1998-01-01

    Uni-directional wave models are used to study wave groups that appear in wave tanks of hydrodynamic laboratories; characteristic for waves in such tanks is that the wave length is rather small, comparable to the depth of the layer. In second-order theory, the resulting Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) eq

  3. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. This work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits. PMID:26056299

  4. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  5. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  6. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  7. Monolithic ZnO SAW (Surface Acoustic Waves) structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunshor, R. L.; Pierret, R. F.

    1983-07-01

    ZnO-on-silicon surface acoustic wave devices have been fabricated and tested. Electronic erasure of a stored correlator reference was demonstrated, the effect of laser annealing on propagation loss was examined, preliminary ageing studies were performed, and a conceptually new mode conversion resonator configuration was reported.

  8. Surface waves on a quantum plasma half-space

    CERN Document Server

    Lázár, M; Smolyakov, A

    2007-01-01

    Surface modes are coupled electromagnetic/electrostatic excitations of free electrons near the vacuum-plasma interface and can be excited on a sufficiently dense plasma half-space. They propagate along the surface plane and decay in either sides of the boundary. In such dense plasma models, which are of interest in electronic signal transmission or in some astrophysical applications, the dynamics of the electrons is certainly affected by the quantum effects. Thus, the dispersion relation for the surface wave on a quantum electron plasma half-space is derived by employing the quantum hydrodynamical (QHD) and Maxwell-Poison equations. The QHD include quantum forces involving the Fermi electron temperature and the quantum Bohm potential. It is found that, at room temperature, the quantum effects are mainly relevant for the electrostatic surface plasma waves in a dense gold metallic plasma.

  9. Multichannel analysis of surface wave method with the autojuggie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, G.; Steeples, D.W.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Spikes, K.T.; Ralston, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The shear (S)-wave velocity of near-surface materials and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many engineering, environmental, and groundwater studies. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method provides a robust, efficient, and accurate tool to observe near-surface S-wave velocity. A recently developed device used to place large numbers of closely spaced geophones simultaneously and automatically (the 'autojuggie') is shown here to be applicable to the collection of MASW data. In order to demonstrate the use of the autojuggie in the MASW method, we compared high-frequency surface-wave data acquired from conventionally planted geophones (control line) to data collected in parallel with the automatically planted geophones attached to steel bars (test line). The results demonstrate that the autojuggie can be applied in the MASW method. Implementation of the autojuggie in very shallow MASW surveys could drastically reduce the time required and costs incurred in such surveys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-01

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  11. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-20

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  12. The effect of small-scale heterogeneity on the propagation of waves : with applications to forward modeling and inversion in global surface wave tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity alters the arrival time of waves in a way that cannot be explained by ray theory. It is because ray theory is a high-frequency approximation that does not take the finite-frequency of wavefields into account. A theory based on the first Rytov approximation is develope

  13. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-09-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  14. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H; Wright, Oliver B

    2016-09-19

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3-50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  15. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  16. Interaction of Vortices with a progressive Surface Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinlinWANG; HuiyangMA

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of submerged vortices with a progressive surface wave is investigated by the finite-difference numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations.The progressive wave is the surface gravity water wave in a finite depth.The initial vortex model is Oseen vortex.The numerical computations show that a special pattern of the wave surface may be observed by the interaction from the submerged vortices.The influences of Froude number,the initial geometric configuration of vortices,and the amplitude,inital phase of surface wave on the wave pattern are discussed.

  17. Effect of surface stress and irregularity of the interface on the propagation of SH-waves in the magneto-elastic crustal layer based on a solid semi space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Acharya; Indrajit Roy

    2009-04-01

    The object of the present paper is to investigate plane SH waves through a magneto-elastic crustal layer based over an elastic, solid semi space under the influence of surface stress on the free surface of the crustal layer and irregularity of the interface. Two types of irregularities of the interface namely, rectangular and parabolic have been considered. Modulations of wave velocity due to the presence of surface stress, irregularity and the magnetic field have been studied separately. Their combined effect has also been investigated. Graphs are drawn to highlight some important peculiarities. It is observed that surface stress, irregularity and magnetic field have their respective role to play in the propagation of SH waves in the crustal layer. Further modulation of wave velocity occurs due to their combined effect.

  18. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices.

  19. Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

  20. The study of the effect of the surface wave on turbulent stably-stratified boundary layer air-flow by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Troitskaya, Yliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the interaction of surface water waves with the wind flow is of primary importance for correct parameterization of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes which define the energy and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The objective of the present study is to investigate the properties of the stably stratified turbulent boundary-layer (BL) air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation (DNS) at a bulk Reynolds number varying from 15000 to 80000 and the surface-wave slope up to ka = 0.2. The DNS results show that the BL-flow remains in the statistically stationary, turbulent regime if the Reynolds number (ReL) based on the Obukhov length scale and friction velocity is sufficiently large (ReL > 100). In this case, mean velocity and temperature vertical profiles are well predicted by log-linear asymptotic solutions following from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory provided the velocity and temperature roughness parameters, z0U and z0T, are appropriately prescribed. Both z0U and z0T increase for larger surface-wave slope. DNS results also show that turbulent momentum and heat fluxes and turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations are increased for larger wave slope (ka) whereas the mean velocity and temperature derivatives remain practically the same for different ka. Thus, we conclude that the source of turbulence enhancement in BL-flow are perturbations induced by the surface wave, and not the shear instability of the bulk flow. On the other hand, if stratification is sufficiently strong, and the surface-wave slope is sufficiently small, the BL-flow over waved surface relaminarizes in the bulk of the domain. However, if the surface-wave slope exceeds a threshold value, the velocity and temperature fluctuations remain finite in the vicinity of the critical-layer level, where the surface-wave phase velocity coincides with the mean flow velocity. We call this new stably-stratified BL-flow regime observed in

  1. Features of electromagnetic waves in a complex plasma due to surface plasmon resonances on macroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations significantly modifies plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The results are discussed in the context of dusty plasma experiments.

  2. Development of Surface Acoustic Wave Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Jha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an effective method to design and develop surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array-based electronic nose systems for specific target applications. The paper suggests that before undertaking full hardware development empirically through hit and trial for sensor selection, it is prudent to develop accurate sensor array simulator for generating synthetic data and optimising sensor array design and pattern recognition system. The latter aspects are most time-consuming and cost-intensive parts in the development of an electronic nose system. This is because most of the electronic sensor platforms, circuit components, and electromechanical parts are available commercially-off-the-shelve (COTS, whereas knowledge about specific polymers and data analysis software are often guarded due to commercial or strategic interests. In this study, an 11-element SAW sensor array is modelled to detect and identify trinitrotoluene (TNT and dinitrotoluene (DNT explosive vapours in the presence of toluene, benzene, di-methyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP and humidity as interferents. Additive noise sources and outliers were included in the model for data generation. The pattern recognition system consists of: (i a preprocessor based on logarithmic data scaling, dimensional autoscaling, and singular value decomposition-based denoising, (ii principal component analysis (PCA-based feature extractor, and (iii an artificial neural network (ANN classifier. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated by presenting detailed PCA analysis and classification results under varied conditions of noise and outlier, and by analysing comparative performance of four classifiers (neural network, k-nearest neighbour, naïve Bayes, and support vector machine.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(4, pp.364-376, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.493

  3. Langasite surface acoustic wave gas sensors: modeling and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Zheng,; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  4. Multiple-frequency surface acoustic wave devices as sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Martin, Stephen J.

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a multiple-frequency acoustic wave (MUFAW) device on ST-cut quartz with nominal surface acoustic wave (SAW) center frequencies of 16, 40, 100, and 250 MHz. The four frequencies are obtained by patterning four sets of input and output interdigital transducers of differing periodicities on a single substrate. Such a device allows the frequency dependence of AW sensor perturbations to be examined, aiding in the elucidation of the operative interaction mechanism(s). Initial measurements of the SAW response to the vacuum deposition of a thin nickel film show the expected frequency dependence of mass sensitivity in addition to the expected frequency independence of the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect. By measuring changes in both wave velocity and attenuation at multiple frequencies, extrinsic perturbations such as temperature and pressure changes are readily differentiated from one another and from changes in surface mass.

  5. Drops subjected to surface acoustic waves: flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Dynamique Des Systèmes Hors Equilibre Team; Aiman-Films Team

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves of frequency beyond the MHz are known to induce streaming flow in fluids that can be suitable to perform elementary operations in microfluidics systems. One of the currently appealing geometry is that of a sessile drop subjected to surface acoustic waves (SAW). Such Rayleigh waves produce non-trival actuation in the drop leading to internal flow, drop displacement, free-surface oscillations and atomization. We recently carried out experiments and numerical simulations that allowed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms that couple acoustic propagation and fluid actuation. We varied the frequency and amplitude of actuation, as well as the properties of the fluid, and we measured the effects of these parameters on the dynamics of the flow. We compared these results to finite-elements numerical simulations.

  6. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  7. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dutykh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion that govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced that is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It is also found that the finite fluid domain has a significant impact on the behavior of the wave run-up.

  8. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  9. Piezoelectric Film Waveguides for Surface Acoustic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Zhovnir

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of mathematical modeling of piezoelectric film waveguide structures for surface acoustic waves (SAW. Piezoelectric ZnO film is supposed to be placed on a fused quartz substrate. The analytical ratios and numerical results allow to determine the design parameters of the waveguide structures to provide a single-mode SAW propagation mode. The results of amplitude and phase experimental studies of the SAW in the waveguide structures that were carried out on the laser optical sensing set up confirm the theoretical calculations.

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  11. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Zhang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs. We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  12. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  13. Surface waves in fibre-reinforced anisotropic elastic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P R Sengupta; Sisir Nath

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate surface waves in anisotropic fibre-reinforced solid elastic media. First, the theory of general surface waves has been derived and applied to study the particular cases of surface waves – Rayleigh, Love and Stoneley types. The wave velocity equations are found to be in agreement with the corresponding classical result when the anisotropic elastic parameters tends to zero. It is important to note that the Rayleigh type of wave velocity in the fibre-reinforced elastic medium increases to a considerable amount in comparison with the Rayleigh wave velocity in isotropic materials.

  14. Wave-equation dispersion inversion of surface waves recorded on irregular topography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-08-17

    Significant topographic variations will strongly influence the amplitudes and phases of propagating surface waves. Such effects should be taken into account, otherwise the S-velocity model inverted from the Rayleigh dispersion curves will contain significant inaccuracies. We now show that the recently developed wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) method naturally takes into account the effects of topography to give accurate S-velocity tomograms. Application of topographic WD to demonstrates that WD can accurately invert dispersion curves from seismic data recorded over variable topography. We also apply this method to field data recorded on the crest of mountainous terrain and find with higher resolution than the standard WD tomogram.

  15. Resonant surface acoustic wave chemical detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert W.; Brocato, Terisse; Stotts, Larry G.

    2017-08-08

    Apparatus for chemical detection includes a pair of interdigitated transducers (IDTs) formed on a piezoelectric substrate. The apparatus includes a layer of adsorptive material deposited on a surface of the piezoelectric substrate between the IDTs, where each IDT is conformed, and is dimensioned in relation to an operating frequency and an acoustic velocity of the piezoelectric substrate, so as to function as a single-phase uni-directional transducer (SPUDT) at the operating frequency. Additionally, the apparatus includes the pair of IDTs is spaced apart along a propagation axis and mutually aligned relative to said propagation axis so as to define an acoustic cavity that is resonant to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the operating frequency, where a distance between each IDT of the pair of IDTs ranges from 100 wavelength of the operating frequency to 400 wavelength of the operating frequency.

  16. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  17. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn;

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  18. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  19. Photon management assisted by surface waves on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Angelini, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    This book illustrates original pathways to manipulate light at the nanoscale by means of surface electromagnetic waves (here, Bloch surface waves, BSWs) on planar dielectric multilayers, also known as one-dimensional photonic crystals. This approach is particularly valuable as it represents an effective alternative to the widely exploited surface plasmon paradigm. After a brief overview on the fundamentals of BSWs, several significant applications of BSW-sustaining structures are described. Particular consideration is given to the propagation, guiding, and diffraction of BSW-coupled radiation. Further, the interaction of organic emitters with BSWs on planar and corrugated multilayers is investigated, including fluorescence beaming in free space. To provide greater insight into sensing applications, an illustrative example of fluorescent microarray-based detection is presented. The book is intended for scientists and researchers working on photon management opportunities in fields such as biosensing, optical c...

  20. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by bu...

  1. On elliptic cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Khusnutdinova, K R; Matveev, V B; Smirnov, A O

    2012-01-01

    The `elliptic cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation' is derived for surface gravity waves with nearly-elliptic front, generalising the cylindrical KP equation for nearly-concentric waves. We discuss transformations between the derived equation and two existing versions of the KP equation, for nearly-plane and nearly-concentric waves. The transformations are used to construct important classes of exact solutions of the derived equation and corresponding approximate solutions for surface waves.

  2. Electromagnetic fields induced by surface ring waves in the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic effects associated with a radially symmetric system of progressive surface waves in the deep sea, induced by underwater oscillating sources or by dispersive decay of the initial localized perturbations of the sea surface.

  3. Surface wave inversion for a p-wave velocity profile: Estimation of the squared slowness gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves can be used to obtain a near-surface shear wave profile. The inverse problem is usually solved for the locally 1-D problem of a set of homogeneous horizontal elastic layers. The output is a set of shear velocity values for each layer in the profile. P-wave velocity profile can be estim

  4. Surface-wave mode coupling : modelling and inverting waveforms including body-wave phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a similar problem as addressed by Li & Tanimoto (1993) in the surfacewave mode approach. In this thesis it is shown that surface-wave mode coupling is required when body-wave phases in laterally heterogeneous media are modelled by surface-wave mode summation. An efficie

  5. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2013-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion which govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced which is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It also found that the fi...

  6. Impact of density information on Rayleigh surface wave inversion results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Julian; Tsoflias, Georgios; Miller, Richard D.; Peterie, Shelby; Morton, Sarah; Xia, Jianghai

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the impact of density on the estimation of inverted shear-wave velocity (Vs) using the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method. We considered the forward modeling theory, evaluated model sensitivity, and tested the effect of density information on the inversion of seismic data acquired in the Arctic. Theoretical review, numerical modeling and inversion of modeled and real data indicated that the density ratios between layers, not the actual density values, impact the determination of surface-wave phase velocities. Application on real data compared surface-wave inversion results using: a) constant density, the most common approach in practice, b) indirect density estimates derived from refraction compressional-wave velocity observations, and c) from direct density measurements in a borehole. The use of indirect density estimates reduced the final shear-wave velocity (Vs) results typically by 6-7% and the use of densities from a borehole reduced the final Vs estimates by 10-11% compared to those from assumed constant density. In addition to the improved absolute Vs accuracy, the resulting overall Vs changes were unevenly distributed laterally when viewed on a 2-D section leading to an overall Vs model structure that was more representative of the subsurface environment. It was observed that the use of constant density instead of increasing density with depth not only can lead to Vs overestimation but it can also create inaccurate model structures, such as a low-velocity layer. Thus, optimal Vs estimations can be best achieved using field estimates of subsurface density ratios.

  7. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  8. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  9. Surface Waves in Almost Incompressible Elastic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Virta, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    A recent study shows that the classical theory concerning accuracy and points per wavelength is not valid for surface waves in almost incompressible elastic materials. The grid size must instead be proportional to $(\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda})^{(1/p)}$ to achieve a certain accuracy. Here $p$ is the order of accuracy the scheme and $\\mu$ and $\\lambda$ are the Lame parameters. This accuracy requirement becomes very restrictive close to the incompressible limit where $\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda} \\ll 1$, especially for low order methods. We present results concerning how to choose the number of grid points for 4th, 6th and 8th order summation-by-parts finite difference schemes. The result is applied to Lambs problem in an almost incompressible material.

  10. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  11. Generation of unsteady waves by concentrated disturbances in an inviscid fluid with an inertial surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Q. Lu; S. Q. Dai

    2008-01-01

    The surface waves generated by unsteady concentrated disturbances in an initially quiescent fluid of infinite depth with an inertial surface are analytically investigated for two- and three-dimensional cases. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid, incompressible and homogenous. The inertial surface represents the effect of a thin uniform distribution of non-interacting floating matter. Four types of unsteady concentrated disturbances and two kinds of initial values are considered, namely an instantaneous/oscillating mass source immersed in the fluid, an instantaneous/oscillating impulse on the surface, an initial impulse on the surface of the fluid, and an initial displacement of the surface. The linearized initial-boundary-value problem is formulated within the framework of potential flow. The solutions in integral form for the surface elevation are obtained by means of a joint Laplace-Fourier transform. The asymptotic representations of the wave motion for large time with a fixed distance-to-time ratio are derived by using the method of stationary phase. The effect of the presence of an inertial surface on the wave motion is analyzed. It is found that the wavelengths of the transient dispersive waves increase while those of the steady-state progressive waves decrease. All the wave amplitudes decrease in comparison with those of conventional free-surface waves. The explicit expressions for the free-surface gravity waves can readily be recovered by the present results as the inertial surface disappears.

  12. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  13. Characterization of surface properties of a solid plate using nonlinear Lamb wave approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingxi

    2006-12-22

    A nonlinear Lamb wave approach is presented for characterizing the surface properties of a solid plate. This characterization approach is useful for some practical situations where ultrasonic transducers cannot touch the surfaces to be inspected, e.g. the inside surfaces of sealed vessels. In this paper, the influences of changes in the surface properties of a solid plate on the effect of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation were analyzed. A surface coating with the different properties was used to simulate changes in the surface properties of a solid plate. When the areas and thicknesses of coatings on the surface of a given solid plate changed, the amplitude-frequency curves both of the fundamental waves and the second harmonics by Lamb wave propagation were measured under the condition that Lamb waves had a strong nonlinearity. It was found that changes in the surface properties might clearly affect the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation. The Stress Wave Factors (SWFs) in acousto-ultrasonic technique were used for reference, and the definitions of the SWFs of Lamb waves were introduced. The preliminary experimental results showed that the second-harmonic SWF of Lamb wave propagation could effectively be used to characterize changes in the surface properties of the given solid plate.

  14. Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2009-01-01

    Optical biosensors have played a key role in the selective recognition of target biomolecules and in biomolecular interaction analysis, providing kinetic data about biological binding events in real time without labeling. The advantages of the label-free concept are the elimination of detrimental effects from labels that may interfere with fundamental interaction and the absence of a time-consuming pretreatment. The disadvantages of all label-free techniques--including the most mature one, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique, are a deficient sensitivity to a specific signal and undesirable susceptibilities to non-specific signals, e.g., to the volume effect of refraction index variations. These variations arise from temperature fluctuations and drifts and they are the limiting factor for many state-of-the-art optical biosensors. Here we describe a new optical biosensor technique based on the registration of dual optical s-polarized waves on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two different optical modes from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface signals, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. The technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with a signal/noise ratio of about 15 at 1 s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is about 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  15. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  16. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  17. Simulation and Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave Devises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method to model the interaction of the mechanical field from a surface acoustic wave and the optical field in the waveguides of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is presented. The surface acoustic waves are generated by interdigital transducers using a plane strain model of a piezoele......In this paper a method to model the interaction of the mechanical field from a surface acoustic wave and the optical field in the waveguides of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is presented. The surface acoustic waves are generated by interdigital transducers using a plane strain model...

  18. Surface acoustic waves enhance neutrophil killing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loike, John D; Plitt, Anna; Kothari, Komal; Zumeris, Jona; Budhu, Sadna; Kavalus, Kaitlyn; Ray, Yonatan; Jacob, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm(2), significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria.

  19. Surface acoustic waves enhance neutrophil killing of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Loike

    Full Text Available Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm(2, significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria.

  20. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  2. An Efficient Hydrodynamic Model for Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; JIN Sheng; LU Gang

    2009-01-01

    In the present study,a semi-implicit finite difference model for non-bydrostatic,free-surface flows is analyzed and discussed.The governing equations are the three-dimensional free-surface Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations defined on a general,irregular domain of arbitrary scale.At outflow,a combination of a sponge layer technique and a radiation boundary condition is applied to minimize wave reflection.The equations are solved with the fractional step method where the hydrostatic pressure component is determined first,while the non-hydrostatic component of the pressure is computed from the pressure Poisson equation in which the coefficient matrix is positive definite and symmetric.The advectiou and horizontal viscosity terms are discretized by use of a semi-Lagrangian approach.The resulting model is computationally efficient and unrestricted to the CFL condition.The developed model is verified against analytical solutions and experimental data,with excellent agreement.

  3. Statistical model on the surface elevation of waves with breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the surface wind drift layer with constant momentum flux, two sets of the consistent surface eleva- tion expressions with breaking and occurrence conditions for breaking are deduced from the first in- tegrals of the energy and vortex variations and the kinetic and mathematic breaking criterions, then the expression of the surface elevation with wave breaking is established by using the Heaviside function. On the basis of the form of the sea surface elevation with wave breaking and the understanding of small slope sea waves, a triple composite function of real sea waves is presented including the func- tions for the breaking, weak-nonlinear and basic waves. The expression of the triple composite func- tion and the normal distribution of basic waves are the expected theoretical model for surface elevation statistics.

  4. Spoof surface plasmon Fabry-Perot open resonators in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We report on the proposal and experimental realization of a spoof surface plasmon Fabry-Perot (FP) open resonator in a surface-wave photonic crystal. This surface-wave FP open resonator is formed by introducing a finite line defect in a surface-wave photonic crystal. The resonance frequencies of the surface-wave FP open resonator lie exactly within the forbidden band gap of the surface-wave photonic crystal and the FP open resonator uses this complete forbidden band gap to concentrate surface waves within a subwavelength cavity. Due to the complete forbidden band gap of the surface-wave photonic crystal, a new FP plasmonic resonance mode that exhibits monopolar features which is missing in traditional FP resonators and plasmonic resonators is demonstrated. Near-field response spectra and mode profiles are presented in the microwave regime to characterize properties of the proposed FP open resonator for spoof surface plasmons.

  5. Surface Wave Propagation in non--ideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2015-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few percent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall diffusion dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut off is introduce...

  6. A microwave emissivity model of sea surface under wave breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei En-Bo; Ge Yong

    2005-01-01

    With the effective medium approximation theory of composites, a remedial model is proposed for estimating the microwave emissivity of sea surface under wave breaking driven by strong wind on the basis of an empirical model given by Pandey and Kakar. In our model, the effects of the shapes of seawater droplets and the thickness of whitecap layer (i.e. a composite layer of air and sea water droplets) over the sea surface on the microwave emissivity are investigated by calculating the effective dielectric constant of whitecaps layer. The wind speed is included in our model, and the responses of water droplets shapes, such as sphere and ellipsoid, to the emissivity are also discussed at different microwave frequencies. The model is in good agreement with the experimental data of microwave emissivity of sea surface at microwave frequencies of 6.6, 10.7 and 37GHz.

  7. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the SEAWs.

  8. Effects of VUV/UV radiation and oxygen radicals on low-temperature sterilization in surface-wave excited O{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Ying; Singh, Mrityunjai K.; Ogino, Akihisa [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Nagatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.j [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2010-04-30

    Effects of VUV/UV radiation and oxygen radicals on low-temperature sterilization in surface-wave excited O{sub 2} plasma were studied. To examine the effect of VUV/UV radiation on the inactivation of microorganisms, a small metal chamber covered with an optical filter at the top to block the radicals and allow the VUV/UV radiation was placed inside the plasma chamber. With a LiF and a glass filter, two different emission spectra above 120 nm (LiF filter) and above 300 nm (glass filter) were examined. The spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus with a population of 2.5 x 10{sup 6} were put below the optical filter in the small chamber, which was filled with the oxygen gas at appropriate pressure or pumped down to 10{sup -3} Pa. The survival curve showed that the vacuum condition inside a small chamber with a LiF filter was more efficient than the same O{sub 2} gas pressure as that outside plasma chamber. From the SEM analysis of the spores, there was no obvious change in shape after plasma treatment with filter at vacuum condition. According to the present results, it is concluded that the etching effect by the oxygen radical is more efficient in inactivation process than the sterilizing effect by the VUV emission in the oxygen plasma.

  9. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  10. Opportunities and pitfalls in surface-wave interpretation

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-21

    Many explorationists think of surface waves as the most damaging noise in land seismic data. Thus, much effort is spent in designing geophone arrays and filtering methods that attenuate these noisy events. It is now becoming apparent that surface waves can be a valuable ally in characterizing the near-surface geology. This review aims to find out how the interpreter can exploit some of the many opportunities available in surface waves recorded in land seismic data. For example, the dispersion curves associated with surface waves can be inverted to give the S-wave velocity tomogram, the common-offset gathers can reveal the presence of near-surface faults or velocity anomalies, and back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect the location of near-surface faults. However, the main limitation of surface waves is that they are typically sensitive to S-wave velocity variations no deeper than approximately half to one-third the dominant wavelength. For many exploration surveys, this limits the depth of investigation to be no deeper than approximately 0.5-1.0 km.

  11. Determination of ocean surface wave shape from forward scattered sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-08-01

    Forward scattered sound from the ocean surface is inverted for wave shape during three periods: low wind, mix of wind and swell, and stormy. Derived wave profiles are spatially limited to a Fresnel region at or near the nominal surface specular reflection point. In some cases, the surface wave profiles exhibit unrealistic temporal and spatial properties. To remedy this, the spatial gradient of inverted waves is constrained to a maximum slope of 0.88. Under this global constraint, only surface waves during low wind conditions result in a modeled surface multipath that accurately matches data. The power spectral density of the inverted surface wave field saturates around a frequency of 8 Hz while upward looking SONAR saturates at 1 Hz. Each shows a high frequency spectral slope of -4 that is in agreement with various empirical ocean wave spectra. The improved high frequency resolution provided by the scattering inversion indicates that it is possible to remotely gain information about high frequency components of ocean waves. The inability of the inversion algorithm to determine physically realistic surface waves in periods of high wind indicates that bubbles and out of plane scattering become important in those operating scenarios.

  12. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa, E-mail: ghozlanib@yahoo.fr [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, Laboratoire de Modelisation en ' Hydraulique et Environnement, BP 37, Le Belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45 Degree-Sign slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly on the specific gravity. The maximum wave amplitude and the time at which it occurred are also presented as a function of the initial submergence and specific gravity

  13. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  14. Experimental and numerical studies of terahertz surface waves on a thin metamaterial film

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhard, Benjamin; Beigang, Rene; Rahm, Marco

    2009-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical studies of localized terahertz surface waves on a subwavelength-thick metamaterial film consisting of in-plane split-ring resonators. A simple and intuitive model is derived that describes the propagation of surface waves as guided modes in a waveguide filled with a Lorentz-like medium. The effective medium model allows to deduce the dispersion relation of the surface waves in excellent agreement with the numerical data obtained from 3-D full-wave calculations. Both the accuracy of the analytical model and the numerical calculations are confirmed by spectroscopic terahertz time domain measurements.

  15. Temporal characteristics of surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, J. R.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J.; Atkinson, P.; Bremner, S. P.; Anderson, D.; Kataoka, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2007-07-01

    Short radio frequency pulses were used to study the surface-acoustic-wave-driven light emission from a molecular beam epitaxy regrown GaAs /AlGaAs lateral p-n junction. The luminescence provides a fast probe of the signals arriving at the junction allowing the authors to temporally separate the effect of the surface-acoustic-wave from pickup of the free space electromagnetic wave. Oscillations in the light intensity are resolved at the resonant frequency of the transducer, suggesting that the surface-acoustic-wave is transporting electrons across the junction in packets.

  16. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingnan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity ϵ, magnetic permeability μ are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective μ < 1 or even μ < 0. Varactor based

  17. Surface characters of internal waves generated by Rankine ovoid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoting Xu; Xu Chen; Izolda V. Sturova

    2006-01-01

    A linear theory on the internal waves generated in the stratified fluid with a pycnocline is presented in this paper. The internal wave fields such as the velocity fields in the stratified fluid and velocity gradient fields at the free surface are also investigated by means of the theoretical and numerical method. From the numerical results, it is shown that the internal wave generated by horizontally moving Rankine ovoid is a sort of trapped wave which propagates in a wave guide, and its waveform is a kind of Mach front-type internal wave in the pycnocline. Influence of the internal wave on the flow fields at the free surface is represented by the velocity gradient fields resulted from the internal waves generated by motion of the Rankine ovoid. At the same time, it is also shown that under the hypothesis of inviscid fluid, the synchronism between the surface velocity gradient fields at the free surface and the internal wave fields in the fluid is retained. This theory opens a possibility to study further the modulated spectrum of the Bragg waves at the free surface.

  18. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  19. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  20. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  1. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2017-03-01

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals—as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work—we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

  2. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Zhang, Baile, E-mail: blzhang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk.

  3. Anomalous wave as a result of the collision of two wave groups on sea surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, V P

    2016-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of the sea surface has shown that the collision of two groups of relatively low waves with close but noncollinear wave vectors (two or three waves in each group with a steepness of about 0.2) can result in the appearance of an individual anomalous wave whose height is noticeably larger than that in the linear theory. Since such collisions quite often occur on the ocean surface, this scenario of the formation of rogue waves is apparently most typical under natural conditions.

  4. Impact of surface waves in a Regional Climate Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgersson, Anna; Sætra, Oyvind; Semedo, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    A coupled regional atmosphere-wave model system is developed with the purpose of investigating the impact of climate changes on the wave field, as well as feed-back effects of the wave field on the atmospheric parameters. This study focuses on the effects of introducing a two-way atmosphere-wave...... coupling on the atmosphere as well as on wave parameters. The model components are the regional climate model RCA, and the third generation wave model WAM. Two different methods are used for the coupling, using the roughness length and only including the effect of growing sea, and using the wave age...... and introducing the reduction of roughness due to decaying sea (swell). Introducing a two-way coupling results in an altered frequency distribution of wind speed and wave heights. When only including growing sea the impact of waves on the long term mean atmospheric parameters is limited, inducing a reduction...

  5. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves Lian Shen St. Anthony Falls Laboratory and Department of Mechanical...on studying surface gravity wave evolution and spectrum in the presence of surface currents caused by strongly nonlinear internal solitary waves...interaction of surface and internal gravity waves in the South China Sea. We will seek answers to the following questions: 1) How does the wind-wave

  6. One pot synthesis of nanosized anion doped TiO{sub 2}: Effect of irradiation of sound waves on surface morphology and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharotri, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhisliet11@gmail.com; Sud, Dhiraj, E-mail: author-suddhiraj@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, (Deemed University), Longowal 148106, Sangrur, Punjab (India)

    2015-08-28

    Commercialization of AOP’s for remediation of pollutants from environmental matrix required the process to be operated by solar light. Semiconductor TiO{sub 2} has emerged as an effective and preferred photocatalyst in the field of environmental photocatalysis due to its; (i) biological and chemical inertness (ii) resistance to chemical and photo corrosion, (iii) can absorb natural UV light due to appropriate energetic separation between its valence and conduction band. However, unfortunately the optical band gap of TiO{sub 2} (3.0-3.23 eV) with absorption cut off ∼ 380 nm, enables it to harness only a small fraction (∼ 5%) of the entire solar spectrum. One of the current areas of research is modification of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. In present paper one pot greener synthesis from titanium isopropoxide and hydroxylamine hydrochloride has been used as titanium and nitrogen precursor under ultrasonic waves. The as synthesized TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials were dried at 100°C and further calcinated at different temperatures. The effect of reaction parameters such as ultrasonication time on the yield, surface morphology, spectroscopic data and optical properties was also investigated. The results confirm that the anatase phase is a main phase with a crystallite size of 35-77 nm and the calculated band gap of nanomaterials varies from 2.10-3.1 eV.

  7. One pot synthesis of nanosized anion doped TiO2: Effect of irradiation of sound waves on surface morphology and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharotri, Nidhi; Sud, Dhiraj

    2015-08-01

    Commercialization of AOP's for remediation of pollutants from environmental matrix required the process to be operated by solar light. Semiconductor TiO2 has emerged as an effective and preferred photocatalyst in the field of environmental photocatalysis due to its; (i) biological and chemical inertness (ii) resistance to chemical and photo corrosion, (iii) can absorb natural UV light due to appropriate energetic separation between its valence and conduction band. However, unfortunately the optical band gap of TiO2 (3.0-3.23 eV) with absorption cut off ˜ 380 nm, enables it to harness only a small fraction (˜ 5%) of the entire solar spectrum. One of the current areas of research is modification of TiO2 photocatalyst. In present paper one pot greener synthesis from titanium isopropoxide and hydroxylamine hydrochloride has been used as titanium and nitrogen precursor under ultrasonic waves. The as synthesized TiO2 nanomaterials were dried at 100°C and further calcinated at different temperatures. The effect of reaction parameters such as ultrasonication time on the yield, surface morphology, spectroscopic data and optical properties was also investigated. The results confirm that the anatase phase is a main phase with a crystallite size of 35-77 nm and the calculated band gap of nanomaterials varies from 2.10-3.1 eV.

  8. Splitting the surface wave in metal/dielectric nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Song; Wu Jian

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a modified surface wave splitter with a double-layer structure, which consists of symmetrical metallic grating and an asymmetrical dielectric, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation method.The metal/dielectric interface structure at this two-side aperture can support bound waves of different wavelengths,thus guiding waves in opposite directions. The covered dielectric films play an important role in the enhancement and confinement of the diffraction wave by the waveguide modes. The simulation result shows that the optical intensities of the guided surface wave at wavelengths of 760-nm and 1000-nm are about 100 times and 4~5 times those of the weaker side, respectively, which means that the surface wave is split by the proposed device.

  9. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  10. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  11. Effect of Surface waves On air-sea momentum flux in high wind conditions for typhoons in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangming Zhou; Aifang Wang; Peifang Guo; Zhifeng Wang

    2008-01-01

    The WAVEWATCH-Ⅲ wave model is implemented in the South China Sea to investigate the air-sea momentum flux in high wind conditions during 23 passages of typhoon occurred in 2005.The wave model is driven by the reanalyzed surface winds assimilated by sevcral meteorologic data sources.The friction velocity was calculated and the relationships between different air-sea momentum param. eters were studied.The results show that the drag coefficient decreases with the wave age generally and levels off for wind speeds higher than 35 m/s under typhoon wind forcing.The spatial variations of air-sea momentum flux parameters in high wind conditions forced by typhoons are completely different from those at weak wind speeds and significantly depend on the relative position from the typhoon center.

  12. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  13. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  14. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  15. P-wave and surface wave survey for permafrost analysis in alpine regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godio, A.; Socco, L. V.; Garofalo, F.; Arato, A.; Théodule, A.

    2012-04-01

    In various high mountain environments the estimate of mechanical properties of slope and sediments are relevant for the link of the geo-mechanical properties with the climate change effects. Two different locations were selected to perform seismic and georadar surveying, the Tsanteleina glacier (Gran Paradiso) and the Blue Lake in Val d'Ayas in the massif of Monterosa. The analysis of the seismic and GPR lines allowed to characterize the silty soil (top layer) and underlying bedrock. We applied seismic survey in time lapse mode to check the presence of "active" layer and estimate the mechanical properties of the moraines material and their sensitivity to the permafrost changes. Mechanical properties of sediments and moraines in glacial areas are related to the grain-size, the compaction of the material subjected to the past glacial activity, the presence of frozen materials and the reactivity of the permafrost to the climate changes. The test site of Tsanteleina has been equipped with sensors to monitor the temperature of soil and air and with time domain reflectometry to estimate the soil moisture and the frozen and thawing cycle of the uppermost material. Seismic reflections from the top of the permafrost layer are difficult to identify as they are embedded in the source-generated noise. Therefore we estimate seismic velocities from the analysis of traveltime refraction tomography and the analysis of surface wave. This approach provides information on compressional and shear waves using a single acquisition layout and a hammer acts as source. This reduces the acquisition time in complex logistical condition especially in winter period. The seismic survey was performed using 48 vertical geophones with 2 m spacing. The survey has been repeated in two different periods: summer 2011 and winter 2011. Common offset reflection lines with a 200 MHz GPR system (in summer) permitted to investigate the sediments and obtain information on the subsoil layering. The processing

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  17. Amplification of surface acoustic waves by transverse electric current in piezoelectric semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulyaev, Yuri V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the principal characteristic feature of the surface acoustic waves in piezoelectrics—the presence of an alternating electric field transverse to the surface, which can be of the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal field—may not only give rise to the known transverse...... acoustoelectric effect but also lead to amplification of surface acoustic waves by electron drift perpendicular to the surface. For Love waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor film on a highly conducting substrate, the amplification coefficient is found and the conditions necessary for amplification...

  18. Profiles of optical surface waves formed at the metal - photorefractive crystal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmedzhanov, I M [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-31

    Photorefractive surface waves propagating in a stationary regime along the surface of the metal - photorefractive crystal (SBN-75) interface are considered. The transverse structure of the optical field distribution is calculated in the near- and far-field zones, depending on the angle of incidence of the exciting wave. The calculation results are in good agreement with the published experimental results. It is shown that the photorefractive effect leads to a splitting of the spectrum of a surface plasmon polariton excited at the metal - photorefractive crystal interface. (surface waves)

  19. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

    2004-05-13

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Long-period Surface Wave in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqiong; Yu, Yanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Studies have shown that the western Taiwan coastal plain is influenced by long-period ground motion from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake, and engineering structures with natural vibration long-period are damaged by strong surface wave in the western coastal plain. The thick sediments in the western coastal plain are the main cause of the propagation of strong long-period ground motion. The thick sediments similar to in the western coastal plain also exist in northern China. It is necessary to research the effects of thick sediments to long-period ground motion in northern China. The numerical simulation of ground motion based on theoretical seismology is one of important means to study the ground motion. We will carry out the numerical simulation of long-period ground motion in northern China by using the existing tomographic imaging results of northern China to build underground medium model, and adopting finite fault source model for wave input. In the process of simulation, our previous developed structure-preserving algorithm, symplectic discrete singular convolution differentiator (SDSCD), is used to deal with seismic wave field propagation. Our purpose is to reveal the formation and propagation of long-period surface wave in thick sediments and grasp the amplification effect of long-period ground motion due to the thick sediments. It will lay the foundation on providing the reference for the value of the long-period spectrum during determining the ground motion parameters in seismic design. This work has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41204046, 42574051).

  1. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45° slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly\\vadjust{\

  2. UNSTEADY WAVES DUE TO AN IMPULSIVE OSEENLET BENEATH THE CAPILLARY SURFACE OF A VISCOUS FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dong-qiang; CHEN Xiao-bo

    2008-01-01

    The two-dimensional free-surface waves due to a point force steadily moving beneath the capillary surface of an incompressible viscous fluid of infinite depth were analytically investigated. The unsteady Oseen equations were taken as the governing equations for the viscous flows. The kinematic and dynamic conditions including the combined effects of surface tension and viscosity were linearized for small-amplitude waves on the free-surface. The point force is modeled as an impulsive Oseenlet. The complex dispersion relation for the capillary-gravity waves shows that the wave patterns are characterized by the Weber number and the Reynolds number. The asymptotic expansions for the wave profiles were explicitly derived by means of Lighthill's theorem for the Fourier transform of a function with a finite number of singularities. Furthermore, it is found that the unsteady wave system consists of four families, that is, the steady-state gravity wave, the steady-state capillary wave, the transient gravity wave, and the transient capillary wave. The effect of viscosity on the capillary-gravity was analytically expressed.

  3. Localized excitation of magnetostatic surface spin waves in yttrium iron garnet by shorted coaxial probe detected via spin pumping and rectification effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee Tee, E-mail: a0046479@u.nus.edu; Ong, C. K. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Peng, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-04-21

    We demonstrate the localized excitation and dc electrical detection of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) by a shorted coaxial probe. Thin films of NiFe and Pt are patterned at different regions onto a common bulk YIG substrate. A shorted coaxial probe is used to excite spin precession locally near various patterned regions. The dc voltages across the corresponding regions are recorded. For excitation of the Pt regions, the dc voltage spectra are dominated by the spin pumping of MSSWs from YIG, where various modes can be clearly distinguished. For the NiFe region, it is also found that spin pumping from MSSWs generated in YIG dominated the spectra, indicating that the spin pumped currents are dissipated into charge currents via the inverse Spin Hall effect (ISHE) in NiFe. For all regions, dc signals from YIG MSSWs are observed to be much stronger than the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) uniform mode, likely due to the nature of the microwave excitation. The results indicate the potential of this probe for microwave imaging via dc detection of spin dynamics in continuous and patterned films.

  4. Surface Modification on Acoustic Wave Biosensors for Enhanced Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Gallant

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (Bcl-2 found in urine is under investigation as a biomarker for non-invasive early detection of ovarian cancer. In this study, surface chemistry and biofunctionalization approaches were evaluated for their effectiveness in presenting antibodies for Bcl-2 capture while minimizing non-specific protein adsorption. The optimal combination of sequentially adsorbing protein A/G, anti-Bcl-2 IgG and Pluronic F127 onto a hydrophobic surface provided the greatest signal-to-noise ratio and enabled the reliable detection of Bcl-2 concentrations below that previously identified for early stage ovarian cancer as characterized by a modified ELISA method. Finally, the optimal surface modification was applied to a prototype acoustic device and the frequency shift for a range of Bcl-2 concentration was quantified to demonstrate the effectiveness in surface acoustic wave (SAW-based detection applications. The surface functionalization approaches demonstrated here to specifically and sensitively detect Bcl-2 in a working ultrasonic MEMS biosensor prototype can easily be modified to detect additional biomarkers and enhance other acoustic biosensors.

  5. Observation of Zenneck-Like Waves over a Metasurface Designed for Launching HF Radar Surface Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Jangal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 20th century a controversy has been continuously revived about the existence of the Zenneck Wave. This wave is a theoretical solution of Maxwell’s equations and might be propagated along the interface between the air and a dielectric medium. The expected weak attenuation at large distance explains the constant interest for this wave. Notably in the High Frequency band such a wave had been thought as a key point to reduce the high attenuation observed in High Frequency Surface Wave Radar. Despite many works on that topic and various experiments attempted during one century, there is still an alternation of statements between its existence and its nonexistence. We report here an experiment done during the optimisation of the transmitting antennas for Surface Wave Radars. Using an infrared method, we visualize a wave having the structure described by Zenneck above a metasurface located on a dielectric slab.

  6. An experimental study of wave coupling in gravity surface wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Weak turbulence is a theoretical framework aimed at describing wave turbulence (in the weakly nonlinear limit) i.e. a statistical state involving a large number of nonlinearly coupled waves. For gravity waves at the surface of water, it provides a phenomenology that may describe the formation of the spectrum of the ocean surface. Analytical predictions of the spectra are made based on the fact that energy transfer occurs through 4-wave coupling. By using an advanced stereoscopic imaging technique, we measure in time the deformation of the water surface. We obtain a state of wave turbulence by using two small wedge wavemakers in a 13-m diameter wavetank. We then use high order correlator (bi- and tri-coherence) in order to get evidence of the active wave coupling present in our system as used successfully for gravity-capillary wave turbulence. At odds with the weak turbulence theory we observe 3-wave interaction involving 2 quasi linear wave and a bound wave whose frequency lies on the first harmonics of the linear dispersion relation. We do not observe 4-wave coupling within the accuracy of our measurement. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 647018-WATU).

  7. Surface waves in a vertically excited circular cylindrical container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yong-Jun; E Xue-Quan; Zhang Jie; Meng Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear free surface amplitude equation, which has been derived from the inviscid fluid by solving the potential equation of water waves with a singular perturbation theory in a vertically oscillating rigid circular cylinder,is investigated successively in the fourth-order Runge-Kutta approach with an equivalent time-step. Computational results include the evolution of the amplitude with time, the characteristics of phase plane determined by the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude, the single-mode selection rules of the surface waves in different forced frequencies,contours of free surface displacement and corresponding three-dimensional evolution of surface waves, etc. In addition,the comparison of the surface wave modes is made between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements,and the results are reasonable although there are some differences in the forced frequency.

  8. Spatial characteristics of ocean surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Thomson, Jim; Rogers, W. Erick; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Lehner, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    The spatial variability of open ocean wave fields on scales of O (10km) is assessed from four different data sources: TerraSAR-X SAR imagery, four drifting SWIFT buoys, a moored waverider buoy, and WAVEWATCH III Ⓡ model runs. Two examples from the open north-east Pacific, comprising of a pure wind sea and a mixed sea with swell, are given. Wave parameters attained from observations have a natural variability, which decreases with increasing record length or acquisition area. The retrieval of dominant wave scales from point observations and model output are inherently different to dominant scales retrieved from spatial observations. This can lead to significant differences in the dominant steepness associated with a given wave field. These uncertainties have to be taken into account when models are assessed against observations or when new wave retrieval algorithms from spatial or temporal data are tested. However, there is evidence of abrupt changes in wave field characteristics that are larger than the expected methodological uncertainties.

  9. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Haudin, Florence; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In propagating wave systems, three or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical non-linear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave-trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (Laser Doppler Vibrometry) and a spatio-temporal one (Diffusive Light Photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wavenumber. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly non-linear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave-trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-w...

  10. Ray-map migration of transmitted surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-08-25

    Near-surface normal faults can sometimes separate two distinct zones of velocity heterogeneity, where the medium on one side of the fault has a faster velocity than on the other side. Therefore, the slope of surface-wave arrivals in a common-shot gather should abruptly change near the surface projection of the fault. We present ray-map imaging method that migrates transmitted surface waves to the fault plane, and therefore it roughly estimates the orientation, depth, and location of the near-surface fault. The main benefits of this method are that it is computationally inexpensive and robust in the presence of noise.

  11. Surface Wave Amplitude Anomalies in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, C.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    We determine maps of local surface wave amplitude factors across the Western United States for Rayleigh and Love waves at discrete periods between 25 and 125s. Measurements of raw amplitude anomalies are made from data recorded at 1161 USArray stations for minor arc arrivals of earthquakes with Mw>5.5 occurring between 2006 and 2010. We take the difference between high-quality amplitude anomaly measurements for events recorded on station pairs less than 2 degrees apart. The mean of these differences for each station pair is taken as the datum. Surface wave amplitudes are controlled by four separate mechanisms: focusing due to elastic structure, attenuation due to anelastic structure, source effects, and receiver effects. By taking the mean of the differences of amplitude anomalies for neighboring stations, we reduce the effects of focusing, attenuation, and the seismic source, thus isolating amplitude anomalies due to near-receiver amplitude effects. We determine local amplitude factors for each USArray station by standard linear inversion of the differential data set. The individual station amplitude factors explain the majority of the variance of the data. For example, derived station amplitude factors for 50s Rayleigh waves explain 92% of the variance of the data. We explore correlations between derived station amplitude factors and local amplitude factors predicted by crust and upper mantle models. Maps of local amplitude factors show spatial correlation with topography and geologic structures in the Western United States, particularly for maps derived from Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies. A NW-SE trending high in amplitude factors in Eastern California is evident in the 50s map, corresponding to the location of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. High amplitude factors are observed in Colorado and New Mexico in the 50s-125s maps in the location of the highest peaks of the Rocky Mountains. High amplitude factors are also seen in Southern Idaho and Eastern Wyoming in

  12. A modulating effect of Tropical Instability Wave (TIW)-induced surface wind feedback in a hybrid coupled model of the tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are two air-sea coupling phenomena that are prominent in the tropical Pacific, occurring at vastly different space-time scales. It has been challenging to adequately represent both of these processes within a large-scale coupled climate model, which has led to a poor understanding of the interactions between TIW-induced feedback and ENSO. In this study, a novel modeling system was developed that allows representation of TIW-scale air-sea coupling and its interaction with ENSO. Satellite data were first used to derive an empirical model for TIW-induced sea surface wind stress perturbations (τTIW). The model was then embedded in a basin-wide hybrid-coupled model (HCM) of the tropical Pacific. Because τTIW were internally determined from TIW-scale sea surface temperatures (SSTTIW) simulated in the ocean model, the wind-SST coupling at TIW scales was interactively represented within the large-scale coupled model. Because the τTIW-SSTTIW coupling part of the model can be turned on or off in the HCM simulations, the related TIW wind feedback effects can be isolated and examined in a straightforward way. Then, the TIW-scale wind feedback effects on the large-scale mean ocean state and interannual variability in the tropical Pacific were investigated based on this embedded system. The interactively represented TIW-scale wind forcing exerted an asymmetric influence on SSTs in the HCM, characterized by a mean-state cooling and by a positive feedback on interannual variability, acting to enhance ENSO amplitude. Roughly speaking, the feedback tends to increase interannual SST variability by approximately 9%. Additionally, there is a tendency for TIW wind to have an effect on the phase transition during ENSO evolution, with slightly shortened interannual oscillation periods. Additional sensitivity experiments were performed to elucidate the details of TIW wind effects on SST evolution during ENSO

  13. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Puiu; Ana-Maria Gurban; Lucian Rotariu; Simona Brajnicov; Cristian Viespe; Camelia Bala

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  14. Surface Effects and Challenges for Application of Piezoelectric Langasite Substrates in Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Caused by High Temperature Annealing under High Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Seifert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Substrate materials that are high-temperature stable are essential for sensor devices which are applied at high temperatures. Although langasite is suggested as such a material, severe O and Ga diffusion into an O-affine deposited film was observed during annealing at high temperatures under vacuum conditions, leading to a damage of the metallization as well as a change of the properties of the substrate and finally to a failure of the device. Therefore, annealing of bare LGS (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 substrates at 800 ∘ C under high vacuum conditions is performed to analyze whether this pretreatment improves the suitability and stability of this material for high temperature applications in vacuum. To reveal the influence of the pretreatment on the subsequently deposited metallization, RuAl thin films are used as they are known to oxidize on LGS at high temperatures. A local study of the pretreated and metallized substrates using transmission electron microscopy reveals strong modification of the substrate surface. Micro cracks are visible. The composition of the substrate is strongly altered at those regions. Severe challenges for the application of LGS substrates under high-temperature vacuum conditions arise from these substrate damages, revealing that the pretreatment does not improve the applicability.

  15. On the joint distribution of surface slopes for the fourth order nonlinear random sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张书文; 孙孚; 管长龙

    1999-01-01

    Based upon the nonlinear model of Longuet-Higgins the joint distribution of wave surface slopes is theoretically investigated. It is shown that in the fourth order approximation, the distribution is given by truncated Gram-Charlier series. The types of wave-wave coupling interactions are related to the order of approximation to nonlinearity of sea surface, which eventually defines the truncated term of the Gram-Charlier series. For each order approximation, the coefficients in the series are modified comparatively to the corresponding ones for the previous order approximation. If the nonlinear effect of the kurtosis is considered, the wave surface must be as accurate at least as to the third order approximation, and with regard to skewness, the wave surface must be as accurate at least as to the fourth order approximation.

  16. Numerical simulation of floating bodies in extreme free surface waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Hu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use the in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD flow code AMAZON-SC as a numerical wave tank (NWT to study wave loading on a wave energy converter (WEC device in heave motion. This is a surface-capturing method for two fluid flows that treats the free surface as contact surface in the density field that is captured automatically without special provision. A time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme are employed in both fluid regions (air/water. The Cartesian cut cell method can provide a boundary-fitted mesh for a complex geometry with no requirement to re-mesh globally or even locally for moving geometry, requiring only changes to cut cell data at the body contour. Extreme wave boundary conditions are prescribed in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments prior to calculations of extreme waves acting on a floating Bobber-type device. The validation work also includes the wave force on a fixed cylinder compared with theoretical and experimental data under regular waves. Results include free surface elevations, vertical displacement of the float, induced vertical velocity and heave force for a typical Bobber geometry with a hemispherical base under extreme wave conditions.

  17. Numerical simulation of floating bodies in extreme free surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. Z.; Causon, D. M.; Mingham, C. G.; Qian, L.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we use the in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow code AMAZON-SC as a numerical wave tank (NWT) to study wave loading on a wave energy converter (WEC) device in heave motion. This is a surface-capturing method for two fluid flows that treats the free surface as contact surface in the density field that is captured automatically without special provision. A time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme are employed in both fluid regions (air/water). The Cartesian cut cell method can provide a boundary-fitted mesh for a complex geometry with no requirement to re-mesh globally or even locally for moving geometry, requiring only changes to cut cell data at the body contour. Extreme wave boundary conditions are prescribed in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments prior to calculations of extreme waves acting on a floating Bobber-type device. The validation work also includes the wave force on a fixed cylinder compared with theoretical and experimental data under regular waves. Results include free surface elevations, vertical displacement of the float, induced vertical velocity and heave force for a typical Bobber geometry with a hemispherical base under extreme wave conditions.

  18. Interpretation of nonlinearity in wind generated ocean surface waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    This study attempts to resolve a mix-up between a physical process and its mathematical interpretation in the context of wind waves on ocean surface. Wind generated wave systems, are conventionally interpreted as a result of interaction of a number...

  19. Palladium nanoparticle-based surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Devika; Hines, Jacqueline; Udeoyo, Uduak; Borguet, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (5-20 nm) are used as the sensing layer on surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices for detecting H2. The interaction with hydrogen modifies the conductivity of the Pd nanoparticle film, producing measurable changes in acoustic wave propagation, which allows for the detection of this explosive gas. The nanoparticle-based SAW sensor responds rapidly and reversibly at room temperature.

  20. Stokesian swimming of a sphere by radial helical surface wave

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a sphere by means of radial helical surface waves is studied on the basis of the Stokes equations. Explicit expressions are derived for the matrices characterizing the mean translational and rotational swimming velocities and the mean rate of dissipation to second order in the wave amplitude.

  1. Scattering of mid-IR-range surface electromagnetic waves by optically smooth metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonch-Bruevich, A.M.; Libenson, M.N.; Makin, V.S.; Pudkov, S.D.; Trubaev, V.V.

    1985-09-01

    The paper reports the experimental observation of the intense scattering of surface electromagnetic waves with a wavelength of 10.6 microns excited on an optically smooth metal surface with a residual roughness having a mean square height of less than 25 A. A method for determining the attenuation of surface electromagnetic waves is proposed, and a test of the method is reported which involves the measurement of the relative intensity of the local scattering of the waves along their path. 9 references.

  2. Effects on humans elicited by inhaling the fragrance of essential oils: sensory test, multi-channel thermometric study and forehead surface potential wave measurement on basil and peppermint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tomoko; Sugawara, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The effects on humans inhaling the fragrance of essential oils were examined in terms of a sensory test, a multi-channel skin thermometer study and a portable forehead surface electroencephalographic (IBVA-EEG) measurement. The essential oils examined in this study were those of basil and peppermint, because our previous sensory test had indicated an opposite effect of these essential oils when mental work was undertaken; the inhalation of basil produced a more favorable impression after work than before work, whereas peppermint produced an unfavorable impression under these circumstances. For subjects administered basil or peppermint before and after mental work using an inhalator, a series of multi-channel skin thermometer studies and IBVA-EEG measurements were conducted. Using such paired odorants, our results showed that when compared between before and after mental work assigned to subjects: (1) the inhalation of basil, in which a favorable impression was predominant on the whole in terms of the sensory evaluation spectrum, was shown to be associated upward tendency in finger-tip skin temperature; (2) whereas these situations were opposite in the case of peppermint, in which the reversed (unfavorable) feature in sensory profiling was accompanied by a decrease in the magnitude of beta waves and a decrease in the finger-tip skin temperature both based on Welch's method, even at p < 0.01, implying a decreasing propensity of the aroused state and of the arousal response. The elucidation of such sensory and physiological endpoints of paired odorants would be of primary importance for human chemoreception science, because these are only rarely recorded during the same experiments, and this paradigm is highly informative about non-verbal responses to odorants.

  3. Surface-Wave Tomography of Yucca Flat, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toney, L. D.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Preston, L. A.; Hoots, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, Sandia National Laboratories conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. The Yucca Flat basin hosted over 900 nuclear tests between 1951 and 1992. Data from this survey will help characterize seismic propagation effects of the area, informing models for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiments. The survey source was a 13,000-kg weight-drop at 91 locations along a 19-km N-S transect and 56 locations along an 11-km E-W transect. Over 350 three-component 2-Hz geophones were variably spaced at 10, 20, and 100 m along each line. We employed roll-along survey geometry to ensure 10-m receiver spacing within 2 km of the source. Phase velocity surface-wave analysis via the refraction-microtremor (ReMi) method was previously performed on this data in order to obtain an S-wave velocity model of the subsurface. However, the results of this approach were significantly impacted in areas where ray paths were proximate to underground nuclear tests, resulting in a spatially incomplete model. We have processed the same data utilizing group velocities and the multiple filter technique (MFT), with the hope that the propagation of wave groups is less impacted by the disrupted media surrounding former tests. We created a set of 30 Gaussian band-pass filters with scaled relative passbands and central frequencies ranging from 1 to 50 Hz. We picked fundamental Rayleigh wave arrivals from the filtered data; these picks were then inverted for 2D S-wave velocity along the transects. The new S-wave velocity model will be integrated with previous P-wave tomographic results to yield a more complete model of the subsurface structure of Yucca Flat. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. The gravitational-wave memory effect

    OpenAIRE

    Favata, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear memory effect is a slowly-growing, non-oscillatory contribution to the gravitational-wave amplitude. It originates from gravitational waves that are sourced by the previously emitted waves. In an ideal gravitational-wave interferometer a gravitational-wave with memory causes a permanent displacement of the test masses that persists after the wave has passed. Surprisingly, the nonlinear memory affects the signal amplitude starting at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order. Despite ...

  5. Noise generation in the solid Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, from non-linear interacting surface gravity waves in finite depth

    CERN Document Server

    Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic observations, even in very deep water, and atmospheric pressure or seismic records, from anywhere on Earth, contain noise with dominant periods between 3 and 10 seconds, that can be related to surface gravity waves in the oceans. This noise is consistent with a dominant source explained by a nonlinear wave-wave interaction mechanism, and takes the form of surface gravity waves, acoustic or seismic waves. Previous theoretical works on seismic noise focused on surface (Rayleigh) waves, and did not consider finite depth effects on the generating wave kinematics. These finite depth effects are introduced here, which requires the consideration of the direct wave-induced pressure at the ocean bottom, a contribution previously overlooked in the context of seismic noise. That contribution can lead to a considerable reduction of the seismic noise source, which is particularly relevant for noise periods larger than 10 s. The theory is applied to acoustic waves in the atmosphere, extending previous theories that...

  6. Wave Generated by the NACA4412 Hydrofoil near Free Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghassemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of wave due to moving hydrofoil in steady streams close to a free surface is presented. The potential-based boundary element method is employed to the NACA4412 hydrofoil with linearized dynamic and kinematic boundary conditions on the free surface. The perturbation velocity potential is calculated using the Green formulation and Kutta condition. The numerical results of waves generated by the hydrofoil are presented and discussed at various Froude numbers and immersion depths.

  7. Anomalous Surface Wave Launching by Handedness Phase Control

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2015-10-09

    Anomalous launch of a surface wave with different handedness phase control is achieved in a terahertz metasurface based on phase discontinuities. The polarity of the phase profile of the surface waves is found to be strongly correlated to the polarization handedness, promising polarization-controllable wavefront shaping, polarization sensing, and environmental refractive-index sensing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  9. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Holister Dis speciael Dean of Graduate Studiesj ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller B.S. Electrical...James Henry Miller 1987 The author hereby prants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis in whole or in part. Signature of...ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the

  10. Modulation of cavity-polaritons by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Hey, R.;

    2006-01-01

    We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations.......We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations....

  11. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    OpenAIRE

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with anWe demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfl...

  12. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  13. Wave turbulence in a two-layer fluid: coupling between free surface and interface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Issenmann, Bruno; Falcon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study gravity-capillary wave turbulence on the interface between two immiscible fluids of close density with free upper surface. We locally measure the wave height at the interface between both fluids by means of a highly sensitive laser Doppler vibrometer. We show that the inertial range of the capillary wave turbulence regime is significantly extended when the upper fluid depth is increased: The crossover frequency between the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes is found to decrease whereas the dissipative cut-off frequency of the spectrum is found to increase. We explain most of these observations by the progressive decoupling between waves propagating at the interface and the ones at the free surface, using the full dispersion relation of gravity-capillary waves in a two-layer fluid of finite depths.s.

  14. Beam interactions with surface waves and higher-order modes in oversized backward wave oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Kazuo; Kojima, Akihiko; Kawabe, Fumiaki; Yambe, Kiyoyuki [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Amin, Ruhul [Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur (Bangladesh)

    2014-10-15

    Beam interactions with surface waves and higher-order modes in an oversized backward wave oscillator (BWO) are studied. In addition to the well-known Cherenkov interaction, the slow cyclotron interaction occurs due to transverse perturbations of the electron beam. The Cherenkov interaction dominates the slow cyclotron interaction. Growth rates of both the interactions for the higher order modes are small compared with those for the surface-wave modes in an oversized BWO. The coaxial slow-wave structure exhibits a reduced number of higher-order modes, which consequently reduces the mode competition problem and improves beam interactions with higher order modes. For higher values of beam currents, the slow cyclotron wave grows at a faster rate than the Cherenkov waves.

  15. Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the wave hub experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M J; Sheehan, E V; Bearhop, S; Broderick, A C; Conley, D C; Cotterell, S P; Crow, E; Grecian, W J; Halsband, C; Hodgson, D J; Hosegood, P; Inger, R; Miller, P I; Sims, D W; Thompson, R C; Vanstaen, K; Votier, S C; Attrill, M J; Godley, B J

    2012-01-28

    Marine renewable energy installations harnessing energy from wind, wave and tidal resources are likely to become a large part of the future energy mix worldwide. The potential to gather energy from waves has recently seen increasing interest, with pilot developments in several nations. Although technology to harness wave energy lags behind that of wind and tidal generation, it has the potential to contribute significantly to energy production. As wave energy technology matures and becomes more widespread, it is likely to result in further transformation of our coastal seas. Such changes are accompanied by uncertainty regarding their impacts on biodiversity. To date, impacts have not been assessed, as wave energy converters have yet to be fully developed. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build a framework of understanding regarding the potential impacts of these technologies, underpinned by methodologies that are transferable and scalable across sites to facilitate formal meta-analysis. We first review the potential positive and negative effects of wave energy generation, and then, with specific reference to our work at the Wave Hub (a wave energy test site in southwest England, UK), we set out the methodological approaches needed to assess possible effects of wave energy on biodiversity. We highlight the need for national and international research clusters to accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent understanding of potential effects-both positive and negative.

  16. Energy budget of surface waves in the global ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Yong; YANG Yongzeng; QIAO Fangli; LU Jing; YIN Xunqiang

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical energy input from atmosphere and losses from wave-breaking dissipation of sea surface waves are estimated by a direct scheme. This scheme is based on the integration in the wavenumber space of the wind input and breaking dissipation source functions of the MASNUM wave model.The global amount of wind energy input, averaged in 2005, is about 57 TW, and the wave-breaking dissipation summed in deep-water is about 33 TW, over a half of the wind energy input. The residual may be dissipated by beach processes. Global distributions of the energy input and breaking dissipation concentrate in the westerlies of the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. The Surface Wave Scattering-Microwave Scanner (SWS-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Chamtouri, Maha; Merchiers, Olivier; Tortel, Hervé; Litman, Amélie; Bailly, Jean-Sébastien; Lacroix, Bernard; Francoeur, Mathieu; Vaillon, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    The Surface Wave Scattering-Microwave Scanner (SWS-MS) is a device that allows the measurement of the electromagnetic fields scattered by objects totally or partially submerged in surface waves. No probe is used to illuminate the sample, nor to guide or scatter the local evanescent waves. Surface waves are generated by total internal reflection and the amplitude and phase of the fields scattered by the samples are measured directly, both in the far-field and the near-field regions. The device's principles and their practical implementation are described in details. The surface wave generator is assessed by measuring the spatial distribution of the electric field above the surface. Drift correction and the calibration method for far-field measurements are explained. Comparison of both far-field and near-field measurements against simulation data shows that the device provides accurate results. This work suggests that the SWS-MS can be used for producing experimental reference data, for supporting a better understanding of surface wave scattering, for assisting in the design of near-field optical or infrared systems thanks to the scale invariance rule in electrodynamics, and for performing nondestructive control of defects in materials.

  18. Effect of Rigid Boundary on Propagation of Torsional Surface Waves in Porous Elastic Layer%多孔弹性层的刚性边界对扭转表面波传播的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S·古普塔; A·卡托帕德亚; D·K·玛里; 吴承平

    2011-01-01

    根据介质的力学性能,正如Cowin及Nunziato一样,导出多孔弹性层覆盖在多孔弹性半空间上时,研究其刚性边界对扭转表面波传播的影响.导出了速度方程并对其结果进行了讨论.发现介质中可能存在两类扭转表面波阵面,而Dey等(Tamkang Journal of Science and Engineering,2003,6(4):241-249.)给出的没有刚性边界面时,存在3类扭转表面波阵面.研究还揭示,多孔弹性层中Love波也可能随同扭转表面波一起存在.值得注意的是,刚性边界面多孔弹性层中Love波的相速度,不同于自由边界面多孔弹性层中的相速度.实际观察到扭转波的色散性,以及速度随着振荡频率的增大而减小.%The effect of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface waves in a porous elastic layer over a porous elastic half space was presented using the mechanics of the medium as derived by Cowin and Nunziato. The velocity equation was derived and the results were discussed. It is observed that there may be two torsional surface wave fronts in the medium whereas there exists three wave fronts of torsional surface waves in the absence of rigid boundary plane given by Dey et al( Tamkang Journal of Science and Engineering, 2003, 6(4 ): 241-249. ). The results also reveals that in the porous layer, the Love wave is also available along with the torsional surface waves. It is remarkable that phase speed of Love wave in a porous layer with rigid surface is different from that in a porous layer with a free surface. The torsional waves are observed to be dispersive in nature, and the velocity decreases as the frequency of oscillation increases.

  19. Mountain Waves in High Resolution Forecast Models: Automated Diagnostics of Wave Severity and Impact on Surface Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An automated method producing a diagnostic of the severity of lee waves and their impacts on surface winds as represented in output from a high resolution linear numerical model (3D velocities over mountains (3DVOM covering several areas of the U.K. is discussed. Lee waves involving turbulent rotor activity or downslope windstorms represent a hazard to aviation and ground transport, and summary information of this kind is highly valuable as an efficient ‘heads-up’ for forecasters, for automated products or to feed into impact models. Automated diagnosis of lee wave surface effects presents a particular challenge due to the complexity of turbulent zones in the lee of irregular terrain. The method proposed quantifies modelled wind perturbations relative to those that would occur in the absence of lee waves for a given background wind, and diagnoses using it are found to be quite consistent between cases and for different ranges of U.K. hills. A recent upgrade of the operational U.K. limited area model, the U.K. Variable Resolution Model (UKV used for general forecasting at the Met Office means that it now resolves lee waves, and its performance is here demonstrated using comparisons with aircraft- and surface-based observations and the linear model. In the future, automated diagnostics may be adapted to use its output to routinely produce contiguous mesoscale maps of lee wave activity and surface impacts over the whole U.K.

  20. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  1. Decay of viscous surface waves without surface tension

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Consider a viscous fluid of finite depth below the air. In the absence of the surface tension effect at the air-fluid interface, the long time behavior of a free surface with small amplitude has been an intriguing question since the work of Beale \\cite{beale_1}. In this monograph, we develop a new mathematical framework to resolve this question. If the free interface is horizontally infinite, we establish that it decays to a flat surface at an algebraic rate. On the other hand, if the free interface is periodic, we establish that it decays at an almost exponential rate, i.e. at an arbitrarily fast algebraic rate determined by the smallness of the data. Our framework contains several novel techniques, which include: (1) a local well-posed theory of the Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of a moving boundary; (2) a two-tier energy method that couples the boundedness of high-order energy to the decay of low-order energy, the latter of which is necessary to balance out the growth of the highest derivatives o...

  2. Steep waves in free-surface flow past narrow topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Stephen L.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Mattner, Trent W.; Denier, James P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we compute steep forced solitary wave solutions for the problem of free-surface flow over a localised topographic disturbance in an otherwise flat horizontal channel bottom. A single forced solitary wave and a double-crested forced solitary wave solution are shown to exist, both of which approach the Stokes limiting configuration of an included angle of 12 0° and a stagnation point at the wave crests. The solution space for the topographically forced problem is compared to that found in Wade et al. ["On the free-surface flow of very steep forced solitary waves," J. Fluid Mech. 739, 1-21 (2014)], who considered forcing due to a localised distribution of pressure applied to the free surface. The main feature that differentiates the two types of forcing is an additional solution that exists in the pressure-forced problem, a steep wave with a cusp at a single wave crest. Our numerical results suggest that this cusped-wave solution does not exist in the topographically forced problem.

  3. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; J Parashar

    2003-09-01

    A surface plasma wave (SPW) over bismuth–vacuum interface has a signature of mass anisotropy of free electrons. For SPW propagation along the trigonal axis there is no birefringence. The frequency cutoff of SPW cutoff=$_{p}/\\sqrt{2(_{L}+)}$ lies in the far infrared region and can be accessed using free electron laser. The damping rate of waves at low temperatures is low. The surface plasma wave may be excited by an electron beam of current ∼ 100 mA propagating parallel to the interface in its close proximity.

  4. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  5. A study of body-to-surface wave conversion associated with deep earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding converted surface waves is helpful because they could improve the accuracy of earthquake location if the exacted scattered point is known as well as serve to image shallow structures with dispersion features. Previous studies have reported a few observations of body-to-surface-wave conversion associated with deep earthquakes. For example, Wagner and Langston used coda intensity analysis and f-k analysis to confirm a P-to-Rg wave and performed forward modeling with T-matrix method demonstrating that a 1km relief was responsible for the observed body-to-surface wave scattering. Moreover, Furumura et al. observed unusual Rayleigh waves converted from S wave observed at Australia with deep earthquakes occurred along Kermadec-Tonga trench and a 2D Pseudospetral method is adopted to illustrate that the Rayleigh waves could be explained by ridge structures. Both T-matrix and pseudospetral algorithms are based on numerical methods. However, we lack a theory to study the mechanism of those surface waves quantitatively. For instance, the relationship between the topography with the dominate frequency of converted surface waves could be resolved thoroughly with a theoretical approach. From this perspective, we carried out a theoretical method to calculate the converted Rayleigh wave with surface topography. During the calculation, a homogeneous half space medium is assumed and the path of the converted phase is divided into two segments. Firstly, we will introduce our theoretical method in detail and a comparison of our results and SEM results will be presented to verify our methods. Secondly, the topography effect and the transfer efficiency of P and S wave will be examined quantitatively with different source mechanisms. Then, we will report an observation of unusual large amplitude surface waves transferred from body waves at local stations. Our preliminary result shows that those anomalous waves are identified as Rayleigh wave and are probably generated by

  6. Manipulating the Magnetization of a Nanomagnet with Surface Acoustic Waves: Spin-Rotation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2016-03-01

    We show that the magnetic moment of a nanoparticle embedded in the surface of a solid can be switched by surface acoustic waves in the GHz frequency range via a universal mechanism that does not depend on the structure of the particle and the structure of the substrate. It is based upon the generation of the effective ac magnetic field in the coordinate frame of the nanoparticle by the shear deformation of the surface due to surface acoustic waves. The magnetization reversal occurs via a consecutive absorption of surface phonons of the controlled variable frequency. We derive analytical equations governing this process and solve them numerically for the practical range of parameters.

  7. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation.

  8. Surface-wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Source processes commonly posed to explain instances of remote dynamic triggering of tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor by surface waves include frictional failure and various modes of fluid activation. The relative potential for Love- and Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses to trigger tectonic tremor through failure on critically stressed thrust and vertical strike-slip faults under the Coulomb-Griffith failure criteria as a function of incidence angle is anticorrelated over the 15- to 30-km-depth range that hosts tectonic tremor. Love-wave potential is high for strike-parallel incidence on low-angle reverse faults and null for strike-normal incidence; the opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. Love-wave potential is high for both strike-parallel and strike-normal incidence on vertical, strike-slip faults and minimal for ~45?? incidence angles. The opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. This pattern is consistent with documented instances of tremor triggered by Love waves incident on the Cascadia mega-thrust and the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California resulting from shear failure on weak faults (apparent friction, ????? 0.2). However, documented instances of tremor triggered by surface waves with strike-parallel incidence along the Nankai megathrust beneath Shikoku, Japan, is associated primarily with Rayleigh waves. This is consistent with the tremor bursts resulting from mixed-mode failure (crack opening and shear failure) facilitated by near-lithostatic ambient pore pressure, low differential stress, with a moderate friction coefficient (?? ~ 0.6) on the Nankai subduction interface. Rayleigh-wave dilatational stress is relatively weak at tectonic tremor source depths and seems unlikely to contribute significantly to the triggering process, except perhaps for an indirect role on the SAF in sustaining tremor into the Rayleigh-wave coda that was initially triggered by Love waves.

  9. Experimental study of breaking and energy dissipation in surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Le Gal, Patrice; Le Bars, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the evolution of monochromatic waves produced by a parabolic wave maker. Because of the parabolic shape of the wave front, the waves exhibit spatial focusing and their amplitude dramatically increases over distances of a few wavelengths. Unlike linear waves, the amplitude of the free surface deformation cannot exceed a certain threshold and when this happens the waves break. In order to give a criterion for the appearance of breaking, we calculate the steepness defined as ɛ = H/ λ (where H is the wave height and λ their wavelength) for waves of frequencies in the range 4-10 Hz. We found that wave breaking develops when ɛ attains approximately a value of 0.10. We also evaluate the lost of energy carried by the waves during their breaking by a detailed and accurate measurement of their amplitude using an optical Fourier transform profilometry. G. Ruiz Chavarria acknowledges DGAPA-UNAM by support under Project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  10. Regional Body-Wave Corrections and Surface-Wave Tomography Models to Improve Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Rodgers, A J; Meyeda, K M; Sicherman, A

    2003-07-18

    Our identification research for the past several years has focused on the problem of correctly discriminating small-magnitude explosions from a background of earthquakes, mining tremors, and other events. Small magnitudes lead to an emphasis on regional waveforms. The goal is to reduce the variance within the population of each type of event, while increasing the separation between the explosions and the other event types. We address this problem for both broad categories of seismic waves, body waves, and surface waves. First, we map out the effects of propagation and source size in advance so that they can be accounted for and removed from observed events. This can dramatically reduce the population variance. Second, we try to optimize the measurement process to improve the separation between population types. For body waves we focus on the identification power of the short-period regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg, and coda that can often be detected down to very small magnitudes. It is now well established that particular ratios of these phases, such as 6- to 8-Hz Pn/Lg, can effectively discriminate between closely located explosions and earthquakes. To extend this discrimination power over broad areas, we developed a revised Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC2) procedure (Walter and Taylor, 2002). This joint source and path model fits the observed spectra and removes magnitude and distance trends from the data. It allows for the possibility of variable apparent stress scaling in earthquakes, an unresolved issue that is the subject of investigation under separate funding. The MDACZ procedure makes use of the extremely stable coda estimates of Mw for source magnitude and can also use independent Q tomography to help reduce trade-offs in fitting spectra. We can then apply the kriging operation to the MDAC2 residuals to provide full 2-D path corrections by phase and frequency band. These corrections allow the exploration of all possible ratios and

  11. Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri Boroujeni, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum plasma in the presence of the external magnetic field and collisional effects is investigated by using quantum magnetohydrodynamics model. A general analytical expression for the dispersion relation of surface waves is obtained by considering the boundary conditions. It is shown that, in some special cases, the obtained dispersion relation reduces to the results reported in previous works. It is also indicated that the quantum, external magnetic field and collisional effects can facilitate the propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded plasma. In addition, it is found that the growth rate of the surface wave instability is enhanced by increasing the collision frequency and plasmonic parameter.

  12. What are the frequencies of standing magnetopause surface waves?

    CERN Document Server

    Archer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We estimate, for the first time, the distribution of standing magnetopause surface wave (also called Kruskal-Schwartzschild mode) frequencies using realistic models of the magnetosphere and magnetosheath utilising an entire solar cycle's worth of solar wind data. Under non-storm times or northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the most likely fundamental frequency is calculated to be 0.64$\\pm$0.06 mHz, consistent with that previously inferred from observed oscillation periods of the boundary. However, the distributions exhibit significant spread (of order $\\pm$0.3 mHz), much larger than suggested by proponents of discrete, stable "magic" frequencies of magnetospheric oscillation. The frequency is found to be most dependent on the solar wind speed, southward component of the IMF and the Dst index, with the latter two being due to the erosion of the magnetosphere by reconnection and the former an effect of the expression for the surface wave phase speed. Finally, the occurrence of Kruskal-Schwartzschild ...

  13. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuchao; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhao, Yanhui; Huang, Po-Hsun; McCoy, J Phillip; Levine, Stewart J; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-03-07

    The development of microfluidic chip-based cytometers has become an important area due to their advantages of compact size and low cost. Herein, we demonstrate a sheathless microfluidic cytometer which integrates a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microdevice capable of 3D particle/cell focusing with a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. Using SSAW, our microfluidic cytometer was able to continuously focus microparticles/cells at the pressure node inside a microchannel. Flow cytometry was successfully demonstrated using this system with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 10% at a throughput of ~1000 events s(-1) when calibration beads were used. We also demonstrated that fluorescently labeled human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) could be effectively focused and detected with our SSAW-based system. This SSAW-based microfluidic cytometer did not require any sheath flows or complex structures, and it allowed for simple operation over a wide range of sample flow rates. Moreover, with the gentle, bio-compatible nature of low-power surface acoustic waves, this technique is expected to be able to preserve the integrity of cells and other bioparticles.

  14. Mechanical back-action of a spin-wave resonance in a magnetoelastic thin film on a surface acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowtham, P. G.; Labanowski, D.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-07-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) traveling on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal can, through the magnetoelastic interaction, excite traveling spin-wave resonance in a magnetic film deposited on the substrate. This spin-wave resonance in the magnetic film creates a time-ynamic surface stress of magnetoelastic origin that acts back on the surface of the piezoelectric and modifies the SAW propagation. Unlike previous analyses that treat the excitation as a magnon-phonon polariton, here the magnetoelastic film is treated as a perturbation modifying boundary conditions on the SAW. We use acoustical perturbation theory to find closed-form expressions for the back-action surface stress and strain fields and the resultant SAW velocity shifts and attenuation. We demonstrate that the shear stres fields associated with this spin-wave back-action also generate effective surface currents on the piezoelectric both in phase and out of phase with the driving SAW potential. Characterization of these surface currents and their applications in determination of the magnetoelastic coupling are discussed. The perturbative calculation is carried out explicitly to first order (a regime corresponding to many experimental situations of current interest) and we provide a sketch of the implications of the theory at higher order.

  15. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  16. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  17. Excitation of surface plasma waves over corrugated slow-wave structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; Jetendra Parashar

    2005-08-01

    A microwave propagating along vacuum–dielectric–plasma interface excites surface plasma wave (SPW). A periodic slow-wave structure placed over dielectric slows down the SPW. The phase velocity of slow SPW is sensitive to height, periodicity, number of periods, thickness and the separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure. These slow SPW can couple the microwave energy to the plasma and can sustain the discharge. The efficiency of the power coupling is few per cent and is sensitive to separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure.

  18. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  19. A surface wave elastography technique for measuring tissue viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    A surface wave elastography method is proposed to study the viscoelastic properties of skin by measuring the surface wave speed and attenuation on the skin. Experiments were carried out on porcine skin tissues. The surface wave speed is measured by the change of phase with distance. The wave attenuation is measured by the decay of wave amplitude with distance. The change of viscoelastic properties with temperature was studied at room and body temperatures. The wave speed was 1.83m/s at 22°C but reduced to 1.52m/s at 33°C. The viscoelastic ratio was almost constant from 22°C to 33°C. Fresh and decayed tissues were studied. The wave speed of the decayed tissue increased from 1.83m/s of fresh state to 2.73m/s. The viscoelastic ratio was 0.412/mm at the decayed state compared to 0.215/mm at the fresh state. More tissue samples are needed to study these viscoelastic parameters according to specific applications.

  20. Temperature Compensation of Surface Acoustic Waves on Berlinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, David Michael Marshall

    The surface acoustic wave properties of Berlinite (a-AlPO4) have been investigated theoretically and experimentally, for a variety of crystallographic orientations, to evaluate its possible use as a substrate material for temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices. A computer program has been developed to calculate the surface wave properties of a material from its elastic, piezoelectric, dielectric and lattice constants and their temperature derivatives. The program calculates the temperature coefficient of delay, the velocity of the surface wave, the direction of power flow and a measure of the electro-mechanical coupling. These calculations have been performed for a large number of orientations using a modified form of the data given by Chang and Barsch for Berlinite and predict several new temperature compensated directions. Experimental measurements have been made of the frequency-temperature response of a surface acoustic wave oscillator on an 80° X axis boule cut which show it to be temperature compensated in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. This orientation shows a cubic frequency-temperature dependence instead of the expected parabolic response. Measurements of the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient k gave a value lower than predicted. Similar measurements on a Y cut plate gave a value which is approximately twice that of ST cut quartz, but again lower than predicted. The surface wave velocity on both these cuts was measured to be slightly higher than predicted by the computer program. Experimental measurements of the lattice parameters a and c are also presented for a range of temperatures from 25°C to just above the alpha-beta transition at 584°C. These results are compared with the values obtained by Chang and Barsch. The results of this work indicate that Berlinite should become a useful substrate material for the construction of temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices.

  1. Imaging of lateral heterogeneity by using reflected surface waves. Hansha hyomenha wo mochiita suihei hoko no chika kozo fukinshitsusei no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Y. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Kobayashi, Y. (Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1991-06-01

    Surface wave holography was applied to the reflected surface waves obtained on the Uji ground, Kyoto University. Clear reflected surface waves were confirmed in the records of waves and it was found possible to detect the surface waves generated by an artificial hypocenter. The reflected waves consisted of two groups having different frequency zones, which were the reflected waves from two different reflectors. It is clear from this result that in the case of the reflected wave groups due to the multiple scatterers, the surface wave holography enables to determine the corresponding locations of respective scatterers. The combination of the back projection method using the reflected wave envelopes and the other method such as incident angles to the array is most effective as the analyzing method. The surface wave holography can be used sufficiently to detect the lateral heterogeneity. 17 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Characters of surface deformation and surface wave in thermal capillary convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Li; KANG; Qi; HU; Wenrei

    2006-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, free surface phenomena is one of the most important physical processes. In the present research work, the surface deformation and surface wave caused by temperature difference of sidewalls in a rectangular cavity have been investigated. The horizontal cross-section of the container is 52 mm×42 mm, and there is a silicon oil layer of height 3.5 mm in the experimental cavity. Temperature difference between the two side walls of the cavity is increased gradually, and the flow on the liquid layer will develop from stable convection to un-stable convection. An optical diagnostic system consisting of a modified Michelson interferometer and image processor has been developed for study of the surface deformation and surface wave of thermal capillary convection. The Fourier transformation method is used to interferometer fringe analysis. The quantitative results of surface deformation and surface wave have been calculated from a serial of the interference fringe patterns. The characters of surface deformation and surface wave have been obtained. They are related with temperature gradient and surface tension. Surface deformation is fluctuant with time, which shows the character of surface wave. The cycle period of the wave is 4.8 s, and the amplitudes are from 0 to 0.55 μm. The phase of the wave near the cool side of the cavity is opposite and correlative to that near the hot side. The present experiment proves that the surface wave of thermal capillary convection exists on liquid free surface, and it is wrapped in surface deformation.

  3. Short wave breaking effects on low frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.; Roelvink, J.A.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; McCall, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of short wave breaking on low frequency waves is investigated using two breaker formulations implemented in a time-dependent numerical model (XBeach): (1) an advective-deterministic approach (ADA) and (2) the probabilistic breaker formulation of Roelvink (1993). Previous research has show

  4. Generation of 1D interference patterns of Bloch surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomina, E. A.; Bezus, E. A.; Doskolovich, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns of Bloch surface waves with a period that is significantly less than the wavelength of incident radiation are formed using dielectric diffraction gratings located on the surface of photonic crystal. The simulation based on electromagnetic diffraction theory is used to demonstrate the possibility of high-quality interference patterns due to resonant enhancement of higher evanescent diffraction orders related to the excitation of the Bloch surface waves. The contrast of the interference patterns is close to unity, and the period is less than the period of the diffraction structure by an order of magnitude.

  5. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  6. Reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2002-03-01

    In the present investigation, it is shown that there exists five basic waves in a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The problem of reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid half-space is studied. The energy ratios for various reflected waves are obtained for aluminium- epoxy composite as a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The variations of the energy ratios with the angle of incidence are shown graphically. The microstretch effect is shown on various reflected waves.

  7. The Dynamics of Flat Surface Internal Geophysical Waves with Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compelli, Alan; Ivanov, Rossen I.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional water wave system is examined consisting of two discrete incompressible fluid domains separated by a free common interface. In a geophysical context this is a model of an internal wave, formed at a pycnocline or thermocline in the ocean. The system is considered as being bounded at the bottom and top by a flatbed and wave-free surface respectively. A current profile with depth-dependent currents in each domain is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is determined and expressed in terms of canonical wave-related variables. Limiting behaviour is examined and compared to that of other known models. The linearised equations as well as long-wave approximations are presented.

  8. The Dynamics of Flat Surface Internal Geophysical Waves with Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Compelli, Alan

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional water wave system is examined consisting of two discrete incompressible fluid domains separated by a free common interface. In a geophysical context this is a model of an internal wave, formed at a pycnocline or thermocline in the ocean. The system is considered as being bounded at the bottom and top by a flatbed and wave-free surface respectively. A current profile with depth-dependent currents in each domain is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is determined and expressed in terms of canonical wave-related variables. Limiting behaviour is examined and compared to that of other known models. The linearised equations as well as long-wave approximations are presented.

  9. Propagation of elastic waves in a plate with rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shuwu; ZHANG Hailan

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of Lamb wave propagating in a solid plate with rough surfacesare studied on the basis of small perturbation approximation. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequencyequation expressed with SA matrix is presented. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation fora rough surface plate is different from that for a smooth surface plate, resulting in a smallperturbation Ak on Lamb wave vector k. The imaginary part of Ak gives the attenuationcaused by wave scattering. An experiment is designed to test our theoretical predications.By using wedge-shape pipes, different Lamb wave modes are excited. The signals at differentpositions are received and analyzed to get the dispersion curves and attenuations of differentmodes. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predications.

  10. On the cascade mechanism of short surface wave modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charnotskii

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of short surface ripples by long surface or internal waves by a cascade mechanism is considered. At the first stage, the orbital velocity of the long wave (LW adiabatically modulates an intermediate length nonlinear gravity wave (GW, which generates a bound (parasitic capillary wave (CW near its crest in a wide spatial frequency band. Due to strong dependence of the CW amplitude on that of the GW, the resulting ripple modulation by LW can be strong. Adiabatic modulation at the first stage is calculated for an arbitrarily strong LW current. The CWs are calculated based on the Lonquet-Higgins theory, in the framework of a steady periodic solution, which proves to be sufficient for the cases considered. Theoretical results are compared with data from laboratory experiments. A discussion of related sea clutter data is given in the conclusion.

  11. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

    2014-01-01

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

  12. Elastic waves at periodically-structured surfaces and interfaces of solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Every

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple treatment of elastic wave scattering at periodically structured surfaces and interfaces of solids, and the existence and nature of surface acoustic waves (SAW and interfacial (IW waves at such structures. Our treatment is embodied in phenomenological models in which the periodicity resides in the boundary conditions. These yield zone folding and band gaps at the boundary of, and within the Brillouin zone. Above the transverse bulk wave threshold, there occur leaky or pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW, which are attenuated via radiation into the bulk wave continuum. These have a pronounced effect on the transmission and reflection of bulk waves. We provide examples of pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW for which the coupling to the bulk wave continuum vanishes at isloated points in the dispersion relation. These supersonic guided waves correspond to embedded discrete eigenvalues within a radiation continuum. We stress the generality of the phenomena that are exhibited at widely different scales of length and frequency, and their relevance to situations as diverse as the guiding of seismic waves in mine stopes, the metrology of periodic metal interconnect structures in the semiconductor industry, and elastic wave scattering by an array of coplanar cracks in a solid.

  13. Elastic waves at periodically-structured surfaces and interfaces of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Every, A. G., E-mail: arthur.every@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, PO Wits 2050 (South Africa); Maznev, A. A., E-mail: alexei.maznev@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a simple treatment of elastic wave scattering at periodically structured surfaces and interfaces of solids, and the existence and nature of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and interfacial (IW) waves at such structures. Our treatment is embodied in phenomenological models in which the periodicity resides in the boundary conditions. These yield zone folding and band gaps at the boundary of, and within the Brillouin zone. Above the transverse bulk wave threshold, there occur leaky or pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW, which are attenuated via radiation into the bulk wave continuum. These have a pronounced effect on the transmission and reflection of bulk waves. We provide examples of pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW for which the coupling to the bulk wave continuum vanishes at isloated points in the dispersion relation. These supersonic guided waves correspond to embedded discrete eigenvalues within a radiation continuum. We stress the generality of the phenomena that are exhibited at widely different scales of length and frequency, and their relevance to situations as diverse as the guiding of seismic waves in mine stopes, the metrology of periodic metal interconnect structures in the semiconductor industry, and elastic wave scattering by an array of coplanar cracks in a solid.

  14. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  15. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  16. Gravitational waves from surface inhomogeneities of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Sushan; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Sarkar, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Surface asymmetries of accreting neutron stars are investigated for their mass quadrupole moment content. Though the amplitude of the gravitational waves from such asymmetries seems to be beyond the limit of detectability of the present generation of detectors, it appears that rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic fields residing in high-mass x-ray binaries would be worth considering for a targeted search for continuous gravitational waves with the next generation of instruments.

  17. Effects on Humans Elicited by Inhaling the Fragrance of Essential Oils: Sensory Test, Multi-Channel Thermometric Study and Forehead Surface Potential Wave Measurement on Basil and Peppermint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SATOH, Tomoko; SUGAWARA, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The effects on humans inhaling the fragrance of essential oils were examined in terms of a sensory test, a multi-channel skin thermometer study and a portable forehead surface electroencephalographic (IBVA-EEG) measurement...

  18. Localized Electromagnetic Waves: Interactions with Surfaces and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicholas R.

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves with nanostructures is an important area of research for signal processing devices, magnetic data storage, biosensors and a variety of other applications. In this work, we present analytic and numerical calculations for oscillating electric and magnetic fields coupling with excitations in magnetic materials as well as metallic and dielectric materials, near their resonance frequencies. One of the problems with the miniaturization of signal processing components is that there is a cutoff frequency associated with the transverse electric (TE) mode in waveguides. However, it is usually the TE mode which is used to achieve nonreciprocity for devices such as isolators. As a first step to circumvent this problem we looked at the absorption of electromagnetic waves in an antiferromagnet and a ferrite when the incident wave is at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction. We calculated reflectivity and attenuated total reflectivity and found absorption and nonreciprocity, asymmetric behavior for waves traveling in opposite directions, for a broad range of propagation angles. Subsequently we also performed calculations for a transverse magnetic mode in a waveguide. The wave was allowed to propagate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction of the ferrite in the waveguide. We again found nonreciprocity for a wide range of angles. Our results show that this system could be used as an on-chip isolator with isolation values over 75 dB/cm in the 50 GHz range. We explored another signal processing device operating in the GHz range: a nonlinear phase shifter. Using Fe as the magnetic material allows the phase shifter to operate over a wide frequency and power range. We found a differential phase shift of greater than 50° over 3 cm for this device. The theoretical results compared well with experimental measurements. Finally, we study surface plasmon polaritons propagating along a metallic

  19. Lateral Flooding Associated to Wave Flood Generation on River Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Núñez, C.; Parrot, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    This research provides a wave flood simulation using a high resolution LiDAR Digital Terrain Model. The simulation is based on the generation of waves of different amplitudes that modify the river level in such a way that water invades the adjacent areas. The proposed algorithm firstly reconstitutes the original river surface of the studied river section and then defines the percentage of water loss when the wave floods move downstream. This procedure was applied to a gently slope area in the lower basin of Coatzacoalcos river, Veracruz (Mexico) defining the successive areas where lateral flooding occurs on its downstream movement.

  20. Analysis of surface plasmon waves in metaldielectric- metal structures and the criterion for negative refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2009-01-19

    Surface plasmon waves in metal-dielectric-metal structures have been theoretically examined. Because of the existence of evanescent waves that can have comparable or smaller decay rates than the propagating waves, the sign of dispersion does not necessarily indicate the sign of effective refractive index for these structures. By using the direction of energy decay to distinguish the sign of index, we have obtained different results and insights from previous reports. We also propose an approach to increase the bandwidth and decrease the loss of negative index surface Plasmon propagation in the MDM structure, by simply changing the properties of its dielectric layer.

  1. Multimode filter composed of single-mode surface acoustic wave/bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yulin; Bao, Jingfu; Tang, Gongbin; Wang, Yiling; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of realizing multimode filters composed of multiple single-mode resonators by using radio frequency surface and bulk acoustic wave (SAW/BAW) technologies. First, the filter operation and design principle are given. It is shown that excellent filter characteristics are achievable by combining multiple single-mode resonators with identical capacitance ratios provided that their resonance frequencies and clamped capacitances are set properly. Next, the effect of balun performance is investigated. It is shown that the total filter performance is significantly degraded by balun imperfections such as the common-mode rejection. Then, two circuits are proposed to improve the common-mode rejection, and their effectiveness is demonstrated.

  2. An atmosphere-wave regional coupled model: improving predictions of wave heights and surface winds in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Koch, Wolfgang; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Ho-Hagemann, Ha T. M.; Stanev, Emil V.

    2017-04-01

    The coupling of models is a commonly used approach when addressing the complex interactions between different components of earth systems. We demonstrate that this approach can result in a reduction of errors in wave forecasting, especially in dynamically complicated coastal ocean areas, such as the southern part of the North Sea - the German Bight. Here, we study the effects of coupling of an atmospheric model (COSMO) and a wind wave model (WAM), which is enabled by implementing wave-induced drag in the atmospheric model. The numerical simulations use a regional North Sea coupled wave-atmosphere model as well as a nested-grid high-resolution German Bight wave model. Using one atmospheric and two wind wave models simultaneously allows for study of the individual and combined effects of two-way coupling and grid resolution. This approach proved to be particularly important under severe storm conditions as the German Bight is a very shallow and dynamically complex coastal area exposed to storm floods. The two-way coupling leads to a reduction of both surface wind speeds and simulated wave heights. In this study, the sensitivity of atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and atmospheric pressure, to the wave-induced drag, in particular under storm conditions, and the impact of two-way coupling on the wave model performance, is quantified. Comparisons between data from in situ and satellite altimeter observations indicate that two-way coupling improves the simulation of wind and wave parameters of the model and justify its implementation for both operational and climate simulations.

  3. Excitation of surface waves on the interfaces of general bi-isotropic media

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Seulong

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the characteristics of surface waves excited at the interface between a metal and a general bi-isotropic medium, which includes isotropic chiral media and Tellegen media as special cases. We derive an analytical dispersion relation for surface waves, using which we calculate the effective index and the propagation length numerically. We also calculate the absorptance, the cross-polarized reflectance and the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic fields for plane waves incident on a bilayer system consisting of a metal layer and a bi-isotropic layer in the Kretschmann configuration, using the invariant imbedding method. The results obtained using the invariant imbedding method agree with those obtained from the dispersion relation perfectly. In the case of chiral media, the effective index is an increasing function of the chirality index, whereas in Tellegen media, it is a decreasing function of the Tellegen parameter. The propagation length for surface waves in both cases increase ...

  4. Surface waves propagation on a turbulent flow forced electromagnetically

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow. The flow is generated in a layer of liquid metal by an electromagnetic forcing. This forcing creates a quasi two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. The turbulent flow contains much more energy than the surface waves. In order to focus on the surface wave, the deformations induced by the turbulent flow are removed. This is done by performing a coherent phase averaging. For wavelengths smaller than the forcing lengthscale, we observe a significant increase of the wavelength of the propagating wave that has not been reported before. We suggest that it can be explained by the random deflection of the wave induced by the velocity gradient of the turbulent flow. Under this assumption, the wavelength shift is an estimate of the fluctuations of deflection angle. The local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is measured. Finally we qu...

  5. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect.

  6. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  7. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  8. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  9. Surface Waves Properties in Cosserat Continuum: Construction of Solution and Analysis Using Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesh, M.; Holschneider, M.; Shardakov, I.

    2005-12-01

    The problem of the surface elastic wave propagation in the half-space within the framework of the Cosserat continuum has been considered. Medium deformation in this model is described not only by the displacement vector, but also by kinematically independent rotation vector. This model can be used for the description of the media with microstructure, for example concrete, sand, sandy-gravel mixture etc. At the same time the applications of these models almost do not exist in praxis, since there are no reliable data about the material properties in nonsymmetrical elasticity theory and in fact there are no experiments which can demonstrate the effects of couple-stress behavior in solid under deformation. The main result of presented work consist in fact, that within the framework of the Cosserat continuum in half-space besides elliptical Rayleigh wave can be in existence the surface shear wave with only transversal component. Geometrically such wave is equal to Love wave, but in classical elasticity theory existence of the Love wave as surface elastic wave is defined by presence of a layer on a half-space, and while a layer thickness vanishing the Love wave proceeds to a plane wave. Thus, in Cosserat medium the new wave mode is found out, and there is no analogue of it in classical elasticity theory. As a second result of presented work the method of the displacement seismogram inversion has been proposed. This method is based on continues wavelet transform and allows to restore the wave number, phase and group velocities. These results can be effectively used in possible experiments which are aimed at the detection of couple-stress effects in medium and further at the identification of material constants of nonsymmetrical elasticity theory. This work was supported by Russian Foundation of Fundamental Research under project 03-01-00561 and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the priority program SPP 1114, Mathematical methods for time

  10. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  11. Wave breaking on turbulent energy budget in the ocean surface mixed layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qun; GUAN Changlong; SONG Jinbao

    2008-01-01

    As an important physical process at the air-sea interface.wave movement and breaking have a significant effect on the ocean surface mixed layer (OSML).When breaking waves occur at the ocean surface,turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is input downwards,and a sublayer is formed near the surface and turbulence vertical mixing is intensively enhanced.A one-dimensional ocean model including the Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 turbulence closure equations was employed in our research on variations in turbulent energy budget wimin OSML.The influence of wave breaking could be introduced into the model by modifying an existing surface boundary condition of the TKE equation and specifying its input.The vertical diffusion and dissipation of TKE were effectively enhanced in the sublayer when wave breaking was considered.Turbulent energy dissipated in the sublayer was about 92.0% of the total depth-integrated dissipated TKE,which is twice higher than that of non-wave breaking.The shear production of TKE decreased bv 3.5% because the mean flow fields tended to be uniform due to wave-enhanced turbulent mixing.As a result.a new local equilibrium between diffusion and dissipation of TKE was reached in the wave-enhanced layer.Below the sublayer,the local equilibrium between shear production and dissipation of TKE agreed with the conclusion drawn from the classical law-of-the-wall (Craig and Banner,1994).

  12. A Microring Temperature Sensor Based on the Surface Plasmon Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of microring sensor suitable for temperature measurement based on the surface plasmon wave is put forward in this paper. The sensor uses surface plasmon multilayer waveguiding structure in the vertical direction and U-shaped microring structure in the horizontal direction and utilizes SOI as the thermal material. The transfer function derivation of the structure of surface plasmon microring sensor is according to the transfer matrix method. While the change of refractive index of Si is caused by the change of ambient temperature, the effective refractive index of the multilayer waveguiding structure is changed, resulting in the drifting of the sensor output spectrum. This paper focuses on the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure and the impact on the output spectrum caused by refractive index changes in temperature parts. According to the calculation and simulation, the transmission performance of the structure is stable and the sensitivity is good. The resonance wavelength shift can reach 0.007 μm when the temperature is increased by 100 k and FSR can reach about 60 nm. This structure achieves a high sensitivity in the temperature sense taking into account a wide range of filter frequency selections, providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of microoptics.

  13. Surface Electroelastic Love Waves in Layered System with a Piezoelectric Substrate and Two Isotropic Layers of Any Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danoyan Z.N.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existence and behaviour of electroelastic Love waves in three-layered system of a piezoelectric substrate of classes 6, 4, 6mm, 4mm and attached to her two isotropic layers (conductor-dielectric, conductor-conductor of any thickness is investigated, depending on the physicomechanical characteristics of layered system and relative thicknesses of layers. The characteristic equation of a required surface wave is investigated in case of a basic soft layer. The research is based on properties of the electromechanical factor of surface wave given in the work [1-5]. Existence of a Love wave of a gap type caused by extremely piezoelectric effect in particular is shown. The structure and behavior of modes of Love waves are investigated. The qualitative diagrams of “dispersive” curves of modes of Love waves are given . The relation between electroelastic Love waves, pure-elastic Love waves, and Bleustein-Gulyaev waves is discussed.

  14. Sensitivity of surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Zubko, Konrad

    2001-08-01

    The SAW devices are widely used as filters, delay lines, resonators and gas sensors. It is possible to use it as mechanical force. The paper describes sensitivity of acceleration sensor based on SAW using the Rayleigh wave propagation. Since characteristic of acceleration SAW sensors are largely determined by piezoelectric materials, it is very important to select substrate with required characteristics. Researches and numerical modeling based on simply sensor model include piezoelectric beam with unilateral free end. An aggregated mass is connected to the one. The dimension and aggregated mass are various. In this case a buckling stress and sensitivity are changed. Sensitivity in main and perpendicular axis are compare for three sensor based on SiO2, LiNbO3, Li2B4O7. Influences of phase velocity, electro-mechanical coupling constant and density on sensitivity are investigated. Some mechanical parameters of the substrates in dynamic work mode are researched using sensor model and Rayleigh model of vibrations without vibration damping. The model is useful because it simply determines dependencies between sensor parameters and substrate parameters. Differences between measured and evaluated quantities are less than 5 percent. Researches based on sensor modes, which fulfilled mechanical specifications similarly to aircraft navigation.

  15. Characteristics of surface waves in anisotropic left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yong-Yuan; Shi Hong-Yan; Zhang Yong-Qiang; Hou Chun-Feng; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2007-01-01

    We report the coexistence of TE and TM surface modes in certain same frequency domain at the interface between one isotropic regular medium and another biaxially anistotropic left-handed medium. The conditions for the existence of TE and TM polarized surface waves in biaxially anisotropic left-handed materials are identified, respectively.The Poynting vector and the energy density associated with surface modes are calculated. Depending on the system parameters, either TE or TM surface modes can have the time averaged Poynting vector directed to or opposite to the mode phase velocity. It is seen that the characteristics of surface waves in biaxially anisotropic left-handed media are significantly different from that in isotropic left-handed media.

  16. Super-virtual Interferometric Separation and Enhancement of Back-scattered Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect near-surface reflectors with steep dips. A robust surface-wave migration requires the prior separation of the back-scattered surface-wave events from the data. This separation is often difficult to implement because the back-scattered surface waves are masked by the incident surface waves. We mitigate this problem by using a super-virtual interferometric method to enhance and separate the back-scattered surface waves. The key idea is to calculate the virtual back-scattered surface waves by stacking the resulting virtual correlated and convolved traces associated with the incident and back-scattered waves. Stacking the virtual back-scattered surface waves improves their signal-to-noise ratio and separates the back-scattered surface-waves from the incident field. Both synthetic and field data results validate the robustness of this method.

  17. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  18. Investigation of surface magnetostatic wave propagation in ferrite superconductor structure

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, A A; Melkov, A A; Bobyl', A V; Suris, R A; Gal'perin, Y M; Iokhansen, T K

    2001-01-01

    Electrodynamic model describing dispersion properties of surface magnetostatic wave in ferrite/superconductor structure was suggested. On the basis of the model a new method of ascertaining superhigh frequency surface resistance R sub s of superconducting films in magnetic fields was developed. The calculated values agree with the results obtained by the Tauber method, making up R sub s =0.20-1.96 m Ohm. A regulated incursion of wave phase amounting to about 1.5 pi with the change in penetration depth 2.0-0.8 mu m for YBCO film was attained for YIG/YBCO structures

  19. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dietler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  20. Photonic crystal biosensor based on optical surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopsky, Valery N; Karakouz, Tanya; Alieva, Elena V; Vicario, Chiara; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Dietler, Giovanni

    2013-02-19

    A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  1. FREQUENCY LOCK—IN PHENOMENON OF FLAPPING MOTION WITH SURFACE WATER WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HsuChintsau; KuangJun; SunJianhong

    2002-01-01

    To study the effect of a progressive surface wave on the flapping motion of a vertical turbulent plane jet in shallow water,the laser visualizations and measurements were carried out in a water tank.The images of visualization by laser-induced fluorescence(LIF)technique show that the jet flapping motion occurs in the wave environ-ment.Using the wave height gauge and laser Doppler velocimetry(LDV) ,experimental results show that the jet flapping motions indeed lock-in to the wave oscillations if the wave frequency is close to but lower than the nature frequency of jet flapping motion.The phenomenon does not occur when the wave frequency is above the nature frequency of jet flapping motion.

  2. Unidirectional propagation of magnetostatic surface spin waves at a magnetic film surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Kin L.; Bao, Mingqiang, E-mail: mingqiangbao@gmail.com, E-mail: caross@mit.edu; Lin, Yen-Ting; Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bi, Lei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wen, Qiye; Zhang, Huaiwu [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Chatelon, Jean Pierre [Univerisité de Saint-Etienne, Université de Lyon, LT2C, 25 rue du Docteur Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Ross, C. A., E-mail: mingqiangbao@gmail.com, E-mail: caross@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    An analytical expression for the amplitudes of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) propagating in opposite directions at a magnetic film surface is presented. This shows that for a given magnetic field H, it is forbidden for an independent MSSW to propagate along the direction of −H{sup →}×n{sup →}, where n{sup →} is the surface normal. This unidirectional propagation property is confirmed by experiments with both permalloy and yttrium iron garnet films of different film thicknesses, and has implications in the design of spin-wave devices such as isolators and spin-wave diodes.

  3. Simulation of Surface Wave with Large Eddy Simulation in σ-Coordinate System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model in the σ-coordinate system is developed to study the problem of waves. Turbulence effects are modeled by a subgrid-scale (SGS) model with the concept of large eddy simulation (LES). The σ-coordinate transformation is introduced to map the irregular physical domain of the wavy free surface and uneven bottom onto the regular computational domain of the shape of rectangular prism. The operator splitting method, which splits the solution procedure into the advection, diffusion, and propagation steps, is used to solve the modified Navier-Stokes Equation.The model is used to simulate the propagation of solitary wave and wave passing over a submerged breakwater. Numerical results are compared with available analytical solutions and experimental data in terms of velocity profiles, free surface displacement, and energy conservation. Good agreement is obtained. The method is proved to be of high accuracy and efficiency in simulating surface wave propagation and wave-structure interaction. It is suitable for the large and irregular physical domain, and requiring the non-uniform grid system. The present work provides a foundation for further studies of random waves, wave-structure interaction, wave-discharge interaction,etc.

  4. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  5. Effects of the surface alb edo on short-wave infrared detection of atmospheric CO2%地表反照率对短波红外探测大气CO2的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁; 张淳民; 王鼎益; 张兴赢; 王舒鹏; 栗彦芬; 刘冬冬; 荣飘

    2015-01-01

    The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, for which short-wave infrared remote sensing detection is carried out by using satellite sensors to measure the Earth’s atmosphere scattering solar radiation, and makes use of the inversion algorithm to achieve measurements. Most of the solar radiation enter the satellite sensors after surface reflection, so the surface albedo which reflects the surface features is one of the important parameters which affect the accuracy of the detection. Aiming at the great demands of high precision carbon dioxide for greenhouse gas, this study first investigate the effects of the Earth’s surface albedo on the observed spectra. Simulation results show that the increase in the surface albedo will enhance the observed spectral intensity, especially larger in the O2-A band than in the 1.6 µm band. In other words, the surface albedo has a greater impact on O2-A ban. In the actual satellite inversio, the surface types of actual observation pointare uncertain, which will result in the error of surface albedo. Effect of surface albedo on the inverted XCO2 is analyzed when the surface albedo is changed by changing the type of surfac. Two observation cases are analyzed in detail. One is on April 23, 2009 for the desert surface, and another on May 21, 2013 for the grass surfac. Results show that when the O2-A band surface albedo approximates to the real surface albedo valu, the relative error of the inverted XCO2 is the smaller. If the relative changes of the O2-A band surface albedo exceed 0.25 in the grass surfac or 0.35 in the desert surface, the relative error of the inverted XCO2 will be greater than 1%, not satisfying the design requirement of the inversion system. In contrast, the changesin 1.6 µm band surface albedo have negligible effect on the inverted XCO2. This study shows the importance of surface albedo in the process of satellite remote sensin, and provides an important theoretical basis and guidance for improving the accuracy of

  6. Experimental evidence of wave chaos from a double slit experiment with water surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunfei; Shen, Yifeng; Yang, Jiong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian; Li, Baowen

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we report experimental evidence of wave chaos using the double slit water surface wave experiment. We demonstrate that classical dynamics of a domain manifests itself in the interference patterns after the diffraction behind the double slit. For a domain whose classical dynamics is integrable clear interference fringes can be observed behind the double slits; for a domain whose classical dynamics is chaotic, however, interference fringes can totally disappear. Our experimental results clearly demonstrate that the centuries-old double slit experiment can render an excellent tool to observe the manifestations of wave chaos.

  7. Attenuation of Rayleigh Surface Waves in a Porous Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEBBOUB Salima; BOUMA(I)ZA Youcef; BOUDOUR Amar; TAHRAOUI Tarek

    2012-01-01

    Using acoustic microscopy at higher frequency,we show the velocity evolutions of surface acoustic waves,in particular Rayleigh waves that depend on porosity for a mesoporous silicon layer.The velocities are obtained from different V(z) curves,which are determined experimentally at a frequency of 600MHz.The analysis of V(z) data yields attenuation that is directly dependent on porosity.On the other hand,αN attenuation has been modeled and allows us to investigate its influence on the velocity VR of the propagation for Rayleigh waves.%Using acoustic microscopy at higher frequency, we show the velocity evolutions of surface acoustic waves, in particular Rayleigh waves that depend on porosity for a mesoporous silicon layer. The velocities are obtained from different V(z) curves, which are determined experimentally at a frequency of 600 MHz. The analysis of V(z) data yields attenuation that is directly dependent on porosity. On the other hand, αN attenuation has been modeled and allows us to investigate its influence on the velocity VR of the propagation for Rayleigh waves.

  8. Two-Dimensional Wave Motion on the Charged Surface of a Viscous Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang; YIN Xie-Yuan; YIN Xie-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    The wave motion on the charged surface of a viscous Newtonian liquid is solved as an initial-value problem. Both the leaky dielectric and perfect dielectric cases are considered. The amplitude of wave is assumed to be small. The electric field induced by surface charge is shown to have a generally destabilizing effect on surface wave. The neutral stability curve is drawn in the (G, N,e) plane (G: the gravitational bond number; Ne: the electrical Bond number). The Ohnesorge number, Taylor-Melcher number and permittivity ratio have little influence on the neutral stability curve. It is testified that the classical normal mode method cannot predict wave behaviour at small times.

  9. Polarization controlled directional excitation of Bloch surface waves (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are electromagnetic surface waves which can be excited at the interface between periodic dielectric multilayer and a surrounding medium. In comparison with surface plasmon polaritons these surface states perform high quality factor due to low loss characteristics of dielectric materials and can be exited both by TE and TM polarized light. A platform consisting of periodic stacks of alternative SiO2 and Si3N4 layers is designed and fabricated to work at the wavelength of 1.55 µm. The platform has an application in sensing and in integrated optics domain. A standard way of BSW excitation is coupling via Kretschmann configuration, but in this work we investigate a grating coupling of BSWs. Grating parameters are analytically and numerically optimized by RCWA and FDTD methods in order to obtain the best coupling conditions. The light is launched orthogonally to the surface of the photonic crystal and the grating. Due to a special grating configuration we demonstrate directionality of the BSW propagation depending on polarization of the incident light. The structure was experimentally realized on the surface of the photonic crystal by FIB milling. Experimental results are in a good agreement with a theory. The investigated configuration can be successfully used as a BSW launcher in on-chip all-optical integrated systems and work as a surface wave switch or modulator.

  10. Surface waves on currents with arbitrary vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K.; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2017-04-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past for the case of waves propagating along the same axis as the background current, and we herein extend and apply it to problems with an arbitrary angle between the wave propagation and current directions. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving a broad range of wave vectors, such as ship waves and Cauchy-Poisson initial value problems. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between concave down and concave up profiles when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. We also discuss the nature of additional solutions to the dispersion relation when using the piecewise-linear model. These are vorticity waves, drifting vortical structures which are artifacts of the piecewise model. They are absent for a smooth profile and are spurious in the present context.

  11. Observations of surface waves interacting with ice using stereo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alexander J.; Bechle, Adam J.; Wu, Chin H.

    2014-06-01

    A powerful Automated Trinocular Stereo Imaging System (ATSIS) is used to remotely measure waves interacting with three distinct ice types: brash, frazil, and pancake. ATSIS is improved with a phase-only correlation matching algorithm and parallel computation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution 3-D profiles of the water/ice surface, from which the wavelength, frequency, and energy flux are calculated. Alongshore spatial frequency distributions show that pancake and frazil ices differentially attenuate at a greater rate for higher-frequency waves, causing a decrease in mean frequency. In contrast, wave propagation through brash ice causes a rapid increase in the dominant wave frequency, which may be caused by nonlinear energy transfer to higher frequencies due to collisions between the brash ice particles. Consistent to the results in frequency, the wavelengths in pancake and frazil ices increase but decrease in brash ice. The total wave energy fluxes decrease exponentially in both pancake and frazil ice, whereas the overall energy flux remain constant in the brash ice due to thin layer thickness. The spatial energy flux distributions also reveal that wave reflection occurs at the boundary of each ice layer, with reflection coefficient decaying exponentially away from the ice interface. Reflection is the strongest at the pancake/ice-free and frazil/brash interfaces and the weakest at the brash/ice-free interface. These high resolution observations measured by ATSIS demonstrate the spatially variable nature of waves propagating through ice.

  12. Electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma near the critical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Electromagnetic waves in a plasma in a magnetic field give rise to enhanced refraction, produce a change in polarization, and cause electromagnetic energy to flow from one wave mode to another when propagating near the critical surface (CS), the one where the electron Langmuir frequency is equal to the wave frequency. A simple unified model of all phenomena taking place near the CS is proposed. These phenomena are due to electromagnetic waves linearly interacting with electron Langmuir oscillations which are localized at the CS in a cold plasma. This interaction manifests itself most strikingly in electron Langmuir oscillation energy escaping directly into a vacuum in the form of electromagnetic radiation. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  14. On-surface radiation condition for multiple scattering of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The formulation of the on-surface radiation condition (OSRC) is extended to handle wave scattering problems in the presence of multiple obstacles. The new multiple-OSRC simultaneously accounts for the outgoing behavior of the wave fields, as well as, the multiple wave reflections between the obstacles. Like boundary integral equations (BIE), this method leads to a reduction in dimensionality (from volume to surface) of the discretization region. However, as opposed to BIE, the proposed technique leads to boundary integrals with smooth kernels. In addition, under appropriate conditions, this approach leads to approximate explicit (up to numerical integration) formulas for the solution, avoiding the need to invert any operator or matrix. As a result, the computational effort is significantly reduced. This approach may serve as a fast method to explore parameter-spaces or as an inexpensive pre-conditioner for Krylov iterative solutions of BIE.

  15. Individually Identifiable Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors, Tags and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Tucker, Dana Y. G. (Inventor); Hines, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A surface-launched acoustic wave sensor tag system for remotely sensing and/or providing identification information using sets of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor tag devices is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include coding and other diversity techniques to produce groups of sensors that interact minimally, reducing or alleviating code collision problems typical of prior art coded SAW sensors and tags, and specific device embodiments of said coded SAW sensor tags and systems. These sensor/tag devices operate in a system which consists of one or more uniquely identifiable sensor/tag devices and a wireless interrogator. The sensor device incorporates an antenna for receiving incident RF energy and re-radiating the tag identification information and the sensor measured parameter(s). Since there is no power source in or connected to the sensor, it is a passive sensor. The device is wirelessly interrogated by the interrogator.

  16. SAW devices based on novel surface wave excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Joel; Dai, Lian

    2015-03-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices have applications in radio frequency and microwave filtering as well as highly sensitive sensors. Current SAW design employs the use of an array of electrode pairs, referred to as Inter-Digitated Transducers (IDTs) for creating and receiving surface waves on piezoelectric substrates. The pitch of the electrode pairs along with the properties of the substrate determine the operating frequency. The number of electrode pairs determine the bandwidth of the emitted waves. We will present a novel configuration that eliminates the need for the IDTs and replaces with with a single circular electrode located inside a larger ground ring. This configuration induces drumhead modes. We will show that the resonant frequencies follow the zeros of Bessel functions of the first kind. Applications in RF filtering and mass sensing will be presented.

  17. Surface waves in the magnetized, collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Ishihara, O. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The properties of the low frequency surface waves in inhomogeneous, magnetized collisional complex dusty plasma are investigated in this work. The inhomogeneity is modelled by the two distinct regions of the dusty medium with different dust densities. The external magnetic field is assumed to be oriented along the interface dividing the two medium. It is shown that the collisional momentum exchange that is responsible for the relative drift between the plasma particles affects the propagation of the surface waves in the complex plasma via the Hall drift of the magnetic fluctuations. The propagation properties of the sausage and kink waves depend not only on the grain charge and size distribution but also on the ambient plasma thermal conditions.

  18. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of Goos-Hanchen shift by exciting Bloch surface wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuhang; Zheng, Zheng; Kong, Weijing; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Ya; Bian, Yusheng; Liu, Jiansheng

    2012-04-09

    Goos-Hanchen effect is experimentally studied when the Bloch surface wave is excited in the forbidden band of a one-dimensional photonic band-gap structure. By tuning the refractive index of the cladding covering the truncated photonic crystal structure, either a guided or a surface mode can be excited. In the latter case, strong enhancement of the Goos-Hanchen shift induced by the Bloch-surface-wave results in sub-millimeter shifts of the reflected beam position. Such giant Goos-Hanchen shift, ~750 times of the wavelength, could enable many intriguing applications that had been less than feasible to implement before.

  19. Hybrid surface waves in semi-infinite metal-dielectric lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Miret, Juan J; Jaksic, Zoran; Vukovic, Slobodan; Belic, Milivoj R

    2012-01-01

    We investigate surface waves at the boundary between a semi-infinite layered metal-dielectric nanostructure cut normally to the layers and a semi-infinite dielectric. Spatial dispersion properties of such a nanostructure can be dramatically affected by coupling of surface plasmons polaritons at different metal-dielectric interfaces. As a consequence, the effective medium approach is not applicable in general. It is demonstrated that Dyakonov-like surface waves with hybrid polarization can propagate in an angular range substantially enlarged compared to conventional birefringent materials. Our numerical simulations for an Ag-GaAs stack in contact with glass show a low to moderate influence of losses.

  20. Tuning Acoustic Wave Properties by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    Vibrations generated by high aspects ratio electrodes are studied by the finite element method. It is found that the modes are combined of a surface wave and vibration in the electrodes. For increasing aspect ratio most of the mechanical energy is confined to the electrodes which act as mechanical...

  1. Dispersive surface waves along partially saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical results for the velocity and attenuation of surface wave modes in fully permeable liquid/partially saturated porous solid plane interfaces are reported in a broadband of frequencies (100 Hz–1 MHz). A modified Biot theory of poromechanics is implemented which takes into account the interact

  2. Quantitative photography of intermittency in surface wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W.; Budakian, R.; Putterman, S.J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    At high amplitudes of excitation surface waves on water distribute their energy according to a Kolmogorov type of turbulent power spectrum. We have used diffusing light photography to measure the power spectrum and to quantify the presence of large structures in the turbulent state.

  3. On the dependence of sea surface roughness on wind waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, H.K.; Højstrup, J.; Vested, H.J.;

    1998-01-01

    The influence of wind waves on the momentum transfer (wind stress) between the atmosphere and sea surface was studied using new measured data from the RASEX experiment and other datasets compiled by Donelan et al. Results of the data analysis indicate that errors in wind friction velocity u...

  4. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF 2D FREE SURFACE WAVES WITH FIXED BOTTOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-wen Zhang; Xiao-ming Zheng

    2002-01-01

    The motion of surface waves under the effect of bottom is a very interesting and challenging phenomenon in the nature. we use boundary integral method to compute and analyze this problem. In the linear analysis, the linearized equations have bounded error increase under some compatible conditions. This contributes to the cancellation of instable Kelvin-Helmholtz terms. Under the effect of bottom, the existence of equations is hard to determine, but given some limitations it proves true. These limitations are that the swing of interfaces should be small enough, and the distance between surface and bottom should be large enough. In order to maintain the stability of computation, some compatible relationship must be satisfied like that of [5]. In the numerical examples, the simulation of standing waves and breaking waves are calculated. And in the case of shallow bottom, we found that the behavior of waves are rather singular.

  5. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  6. Investigation into mass loading sensitivity of sezawa wave mode-based surface acoustic wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Islam, Md Shabiul; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Parthiban, R; Ramakrishnan, N

    2013-02-06

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher) than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  7. Second-harmonic plasma response in diffusion-controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoev, L.

    2008-05-01

    The formation of nonlinear plasma response at the second harmonic frequency in diffusion controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges is studied theoretically. The study is aimed at estimating theoretically the ratio of the squared amplitudes of the wave field of fundamental frequency and of the resulting - from the nonlinear effects - electric field at the second harmonic frequency. The model presented is intended for further use in discharge diagnostics.

  8. Experimental observations of nonlinear effects of the Lamb waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Mingxi; D.C. Price; D.A.Scott

    2004-01-01

    The experimental observations of nonlinear effects of the primary Lamb waves have been reported. Firstly, the brief descriptions have been made for the nonlinear acoustic measurement system developed by Ritec. The detailed considerations for the acoustic experiment system established for observing of the nonlinear effects of the primary Lamb waves have been carried out. Especially, the analysis focuses on the time-domain responses of second harmonics of the primary Lame waves by employing a straightforward model. Based on the existence conditions of strong nonlinearity of the primary Lamb waves, the wedge transducers are designed to generate and detect the primary and secondary waves on the surface of an aluminum sheet. For the different distances between the transmitting and receiving wedge transducers,the amplitudes of the primary waves and the second harmonics on the sheet surface have been measured within a specified frequency range. In the immediate vicinity of the driving frequency,where the primary and the double frequency Lamb waves have the same phase velocities, the quantitative relations of second-harmonic amplitudes with the propagation distance have been analyzed. It is experimentally verified that the second harmonics of the primary Lamb waves do have a cumulative growth effect along with the propagation distance.

  9. Site characterization studies along coastal Andhra Pradesh—India using multichannel analysis of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupti, S.; Srinivas, K. N. S. S. S.; Pavan Kishore, P.; Seshunarayana, T.

    2012-04-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique was employed for site characterization studies at the identified lineament locations along coastal regions of Andhra Pradesh covering ~ 600 km to measure the shear wave velocity. The shear (S)-wave velocity of near surface materials (such as soil, rocks and pavement) and its effect on seismic wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering and environmental studies. Geologically, the study area comprises of Precambrian basement over which younger rocks commencing with Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary and Quaternary have given rise to varying sequences in different parts. The study has been conducted along the lineaments and these were selected based on the analysis of IRS-1D LISS-IV satellite images and the field geological investigation. The average shear wave velocity, stiffness and the liquefaction potential were evaluated by using the obtained shear wave velocities. Soils are classified into four categories as soft soils, stiff soils, dense soils/soft rock and hard rock based on the obtained shear wave velocities. The factor of safety (FS) against liquefaction is determined and it is found that the sites with low shear wave velocity have FS canal alignments, and cross-drainage structures.

  10. EFFECT OF SHOCK WAVES ON RILL FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keli ZHANG; Lifang LUO; Shuangcai LI

    2004-01-01

    Hydraulic mechanism of rill formation was studied theoretically and experimentally.It was assumed that the impact of varied boundary on overland flow results in fluctuating of water surface,and shock waves that may contribute to the formation of rills.Both theoretical derivation and laboratory experiments were used to compare the hydraulic characteristics of flows with and without shock waves.Results showed that shock waves can lead to an increase in flowdepth,flow velocity,and turbulence intensity.Consequently,flow shear stress or stream energy increase dramatically and rill headcuts may occur where shock waves converge.

  11. An asymptotic approximation to the free-surface elevation around a cylinder in long waves

    CERN Document Server

    Morris-Thomas, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Strong nonlinear effects are known to contribute to the wave run-up caused when a progressive wave impinges on a vertical surface piercing cylinder. The magnitude of the wave run-up is largely dependent on the coupling of the cylinder slenderness, $ka$, and wave steepness, $kA$, parameters. This present work proposes an analytical solution to the free-surface elevation around a circular cylinder in plane progressive waves. It is assumed throughout that the horizontal extent of the cylinder is much smaller than the incident wavelength and of the same order of magnitude as the incident wave amplitude. A perturbation expansion of the velocity potential and free-surface boundary condition is invoked and solved to third-order in terms of $ka$ and $kA$. The validity of this approach is investigated through a comparison with canonical second-order diffraction theory and existing experimental results. We find that for small $ka$, the long wavelength theory is valid up to $kA \\approx 0.16-0.2$ on the up wave side of t...

  12. Spin density wave order, topological order, and Fermi surface reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, Subir; Chatterjee, Shubhayu; Schattner, Yoni

    2016-01-01

    In the conventional theory of density wave ordering in metals, the onset of spin density wave (SDW) order co-incides with the reconstruction of the Fermi surfaces into small 'pockets'. We present models which display this transition, while also displaying an alternative route between these phases via an intermediate phase with topological order, no broken symmetry, and pocket Fermi surfaces. The models involve coupling emergent gauge fields to a fractionalized SDW order, but retain the canonical electron operator in the underlying Hamiltonian. We establish an intimate connection between the suppression of certain defects in the SDW order, and the presence of Fermi surface sizes distinct from the Luttinger value in Fermi liquids. We discuss the relevance of such models to the physics of the hole-doped cuprates near optimal doping.

  13. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海涛; 程营; 王敬时; 刘晓峻

    2015-01-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection.

  14. Precessional magnetization switching by a surface acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenard, L.; Camara, I. S.; Majrab, S.; Bernard, M.; Rovillain, P.; Lemaître, A.; Gourdon, C.; Duquesne, J.-Y.

    2016-04-01

    Precessional switching allows subnanosecond and deterministic reversal of magnetic data bits. It relies on triggering a large-angle, highly nonlinear precession of magnetic moments around a bias field. Here we demonstrate that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating on a magnetostrictive semiconducting material produces an efficient torque that induces precessional switching. This is evidenced by Kerr microscopy and acoustic behavior analysis in a (Ga,Mn)(As,P) thin film. Using SAWs should therefore allow remote and wave control of individual magnetic bits at potentially GHz frequencies.

  15. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  16. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Yeon Oh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0% and aerial stems (50.1%. While, monoterpenes (74.6% are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3% and lauraldehyde (3.5% were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition.

  17. Damping of an ion acoustic surface wave due to surface currents

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J

    1999-01-01

    The well-known linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave has been obtained by including the linear surface current density J sub z parallel to the interface and by neglecting the linear surface current density J sub x perpendicular to the interface. The neglect of J sub x is questionable although it leads to the popular boundary condition that the tangential electric field is continuous. In this work, linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave is worked out by including both components of the linear current density J . When that is done, the ion acoustic wave turns out to be heavily damped. If the electron mass is taken to be zero (electrons are Bolzmann-distributed), the perpendicular component of the surface current density vanishes, and we have the well-known ion acoustic surface wave eigenmode. We conclude that an ion acoustic surface wave propagates as an eigenmode only when its phase velocity is much smaller than the electron thermal velocity.

  18. Observations and Modelling of Winds and Waves During the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    l’Environnement Terrestre et Planitalre (CRPE), France; Dr. Will M. Drennan, National Water Research Institute, CCIW; Dr. Lynn "Nick" K. Shay, RSMAS; Dr...250 m), and the orbital velocities of the low-frequency surface wave components. A summary of the results from SWADE are described in Shay (1993). 18

  19. A surface acoustic wave ICP sensor with good temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Hu, Hong; Ye, Aipeng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-07-20

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is very important for assessing and monitoring hydrocephalus, head trauma and hypertension patients, which could lead to elevated ICP or even devastating neurological damage. The mortality rate due to these diseases could be reduced through ICP monitoring, because precautions can be taken against the brain damage. This paper presents a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor to realize ICP monitoring, which is capable of wireless and passive transmission with antenna attached. In order to improve the temperature stability of the sensor, two methods were adopted. First, the ST cut quartz was chosen as the sensor substrate due to its good temperature stability. Then, a differential temperature compensation method was proposed to reduce the effects of temperature. Two resonators were designed based on coupling of mode (COM) theory and the prototype was fabricated and verified using a system established for testing pressure and temperature. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a linearity of 2.63% and hysteresis of 1.77%. The temperature stability of the sensor has been greatly improved by using the differential compensation method, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Experimental verification of directional liquid surface wave emission at band edge frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzyu@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Nie, Xiaofei

    2013-12-15

    Directional liquid surface wave emission at band edge frequencies is an interesting physical phenomenon and has already been studied in theoretical research. There has been no experimental validation of it to date, however. This paper has as its subject the experimental investigation of the emission effect when a point source is placed inside a finite square array of rigid cylinders standing vertically in liquid. Both the wave patterns and spatial intensities are obtained by experiment and compared with simulated results calculated by using the finite element method. We can see from this comparison that the two results correspond closely both at lower and upper band edge frequency. Obvious directional wave emission along a desired direction is observed in the source structures, confirming previous theoretical predictions. In the future, this method could serve as a directional liquid wave source in applications used in hydraulic and ocean engineering for the concentration of wave energy.

  1. Observation of depth-induced properties in wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We report the observation of changes in the wave turbulence properties of gravity-capillary surface waves due to a finite depth effect. When the fluid depth is decreased, a hump is observed on the wave spectrum in the capillary regime at a scale that depends on the depth. The possible origin of this hump is discussed. In the gravity regime, the wave spectrum still shows a power law but with an exponent that strongly depends on the depth. A change in the scaling of the gravity spectrum with the mean injected power is also reported. Finally, the probability density function of the wave amplitude rescaled by its rms value is found to be independent of the fluid depth and to be well described by a Tayfun distribution.

  2. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  3. Coriolis effect on water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Melinand

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of water waves under the influence of the gravity and the Coriolis force. It is quite common in the physical literature that the rotating shallow water equations are used to study such water waves. We prove a local wellposedness theorem for the water waves equations with vorticity and Coriolis force, taking into account the dependence on various physical parameters and we justify rigorously the shallow water model. We also consider a possible non constant pr...

  4. Viscosity effects in wind wave generation

    CERN Document Server

    Paquier, Anna; Rabaud, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of the liquid viscosity on the problem of the generation of waves by a turbulent wind at the surface of a liquid, extending the results of Paquier, Moisy and Rabaud [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 27}, 122103 (2015)] over nearly three decades of viscosity. The surface deformations are measured with micrometer accuracy using the Free-Surface Synthetic Schlieren method. We recover the two regimes of surface deformations previously identified: the wrinkles regime at small wind velocity, resulting from the viscous imprint on the liquid surface of the turbulent fluctuations in the boundary layer, and the regular wave regime at large wind velocity. Below the wave threshold, we find that the characteristic amplitude of the wrinkles scales as $\

  5. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  6. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqian Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor.

  7. Waves on the surface of the Orion molecular cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berné, Olivier; Marcelino, Núria; Cernicharo, José

    2010-08-19

    Massive stars influence their parental molecular cloud, and it has long been suspected that the development of hydrodynamical instabilities can compress or fragment the cloud. Identifying such instabilities has proved difficult. It has been suggested that elongated structures (such as the 'pillars of creation') and other shapes arise because of instabilities, but alternative explanations are available. One key signature of an instability is a wave-like structure in the gas, which has hitherto not been seen. Here we report the presence of 'waves' at the surface of the Orion molecular cloud near where massive stars are forming. The waves seem to be a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that arises during the expansion of the nebula as gas heated and ionized by massive stars is blown over pre-existing molecular gas.

  8. Biological decontamination of surfaces using guided ionization waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrige, Julien; Zaepffel, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have received an increasing attention these last ten years in various domains, including biomedical applications and decontamination. Among these technologies, guided ionization waves (also called ``plasma bullets'') are very promising because of their ability to produce a highly non-equilibrium plasma. Reactive species can be generated in the open air over a long distance during the propagation of the wave (typically: several cm), while the background gas remains at ambient temperature. A non-thermal plasma system has been developed and tested for the biological decontamination of surfaces. It consists of a dielectric barrier discharge in a helium flow driven by high voltage pulses. The propagation of the ionization wave and the spatial distribution of the species have been characterized by high speed imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. The influence of the discharge parameters on the plasma properties is investigated. Results of decontamination on several bacteria are shown, and the decontamination efficiency is compared with the plasma properties.

  9. Surface wave dynamics in orbital shaken cylindrical containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclari, M.; Dreyer, M.; Tissot, S.; Obreschkow, D.; Wurm, F. M.; Farhat, M.

    2014-05-01

    Be it to aerate a glass of wine before tasting, to accelerate a chemical reaction, or to cultivate cells in suspension, the "swirling" (or orbital shaking) of a container ensures good mixing and gas exchange in an efficient and simple way. Despite being used in a large range of applications this intuitive motion is far from being understood and presents a richness of patterns and behaviors which has not yet been reported. The present research charts the evolution of the waves with the operating parameters identifying a large variety of patterns, ranging from single and multiple crested waves to breaking waves. Free surface and velocity fields measurements are compared to a potential sloshing model, highlighting the existence of various flow regimes. Our research assesses the importance of the modal response of the shaken liquids, laying the foundations for a rigorous mixing optimization of the orbital agitation in its applications.

  10. Surface wave dynamics in orbital shaken cylindrical containers

    CERN Document Server

    Reclari, Martino; Tissot, Stéphanie; Obreschkow, Danail; Wurm, Florian Maria; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Be it to aerate a glass of wine before tasting, to accelerate a chemical reaction or to cultivate cells in suspension, the "swirling" (or orbital shaking) of a container ensures good mixing and gas exchange in an efficient and simple way. Despite being used in a large range of applications this intuitive motion is far from being understood and presents a richness of patterns and behaviors which has not yet been reported. The present research charts the evolution of the waves with the operating parameters identifying a large variety of patterns, ranging from single and multiple crested waves to breaking waves. Free surface and velocity fields measurements are compared to a potential sloshing model, highlighting the existence of various flow regimes. Our research assesses the importance of the modal response of the shaken liquids, laying the foundations for a rigorous mixing optimization of the orbital agitation in its applications. Copyright (2014) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded ...

  11. Identification of Swell in Nearshore Surface Wave Energy Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Work

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach for routine identification of swell and sea in nominally fully developed, omnidirectional, surface water wave energy spectra measured in arbitrary water depth is developed, applied, and discussed. The methodology is an extension of earlier work with deepwater spectra and involves identifying the frequency at which wave steepness is maximized and relating this to the swell separation frequency. The TMA parameterized spectrum is employed to establish a relationship between the two frequencies so that the methodology can be used when wind data are unavailable. The methodology is developed for finite water depth and tested using a dataset that includes both acoustic Doppler current profiler and wave buoy data, recorded simultaneously at the same location. For cases where the sea and swell are clearly, visually distinguishable in the omnidirectional spectra, the new method accurately distinguishes between the two, but it can also be used to identify sea and swell in unimodal spectra.

  12. Experimental demonstration of hyperbolic wave vector surfaces in silver nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, Joerg [ZIK, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Kanungo, Jyotirmayee [Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Arrays of metal nanowires represent uniaxial metamaterials, whose principal effective permittivities perpendicular and parallel to the wire axis have opposite sign in the infrared and visible spectral range. This property leads to a hyperbolic equi-frequency surface for the extraordinary rays in wave vector space allowing the propagation of waves with unusually large wave vectors. Here we present an experimental mapping of the hyperbolic equi-frequency surfaces of TM (p-)polarised light propagating within a silver nanowire array. To this purpose we performed angular resolved transmission measurements on a 1.7 micron high alumina film containing the silver nanowire array. From the order of the observed Fabry-Perot resonances the wave vector component k{sub z} is determined, while the lateral wave vector component k{sub x}, is obtained from the angle of incidence. The resulting markings in k{sub x}-k{sub z} wave vector diagram then result in a hyperbolic equi-frequency surface for the TM polarisation. Fitting the relationship between spectral position of the Fabry-Perot peaks and angle of incidence by a simple linear equation, we furthermore determined the values of the principal permittivities for TE and TM polarisation in a wide spectral range. All experimental results agree well with simulations based on the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory.

  13. Wave Effect on the Ocean Circulations Through Mass Transport and Wave-Induced Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Fan; WU Kejian

    2014-01-01

    The wave Coriolis-Stokes-Force-modified ocean momentum equations are reviewed in this paper and the wave Stokes transport is pointed out to be part of the ocean circulations. Using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40-year reanalysis data (ERA-40 data) and the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) version 2.2.4 data, the magnitude of this transport is compared with that of wind-driven Sverdrup transport and a 5-to-10-precent contribution by the wave Stokes transport is found. Both transports are stronger in boreal winter than in summers. The wave effect can be either contribution or cancellation in different seasons. Examination with Kuroshio transport verifies similar seasonal variations. The clarification of the efficient wave boundary condition helps to understand the role of waves in mass transport. It acts as surface wind stress and can be functional down to the bottom of the ageostrophic layer. The pumping velocities resulting from wave-induced stress are zonally distributed and are significant in relatively high latitudes. Further work will focus on the model performance of the wave-stress-changed-boundary and the role of swells in the eastern part of the oceans.

  14. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  15. Retrieving capillary-gravity wave spectrum from polarimetric microwave radiation of ocean surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new simple two-scale model on the polarimetric microwave emission of ocean surface is derived at first, which can be ex-pressed as an integral of weighting functions (M0 and M2) and ocean surface curvature spectrum coefficients (C0 and C2). This provides a simple way to investigate the effect of curvature spectrum on ocean emission. It is found that ocean waves with wavelengths both comparable to and much greater than the electromagnetic wavelength can contribute to the harmonics of ocean surface microwave emission, depending on the magnitude of the ocean surface spectrum in these length scales. Bright-ness temperature predictions differ significantly due to present diverse spectrum models, and thus a study on wave spectrum obtained inversely from brightness temperature measurements is necessary. From the ocean surface radiation data measured by polarimetric microwave radiometer, we derived an ocean wave spectrum with a wider wave number range, using the proposed two-scale model and constrained linear least-squares method. The derived ocean wave spectrum is useful for comparing with present diverse models.

  16. Surface water waves due to an oscillatory wavemaker in the presence of surface tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Mandal

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial value problem of generation of surface water waves by a harmonically oscillating plane vertical wavemaker in an infinite incompressible fluid under the action of gravity and surface tension is investigated. In the asymptotic evaluation of the free surface depression for large time and distance, the contribution to the integral by stationary phase method gives rise to transient component of the free surface depression while the contribution from the poles give rise to steady state component. It is observed that the presence of surface tension sometimes changes the qualitative nature of the transient component of free surface depression.

  17. Spin wave absorber generated by artificial surface anisotropy for spin wave device network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi; Sekiguchi, Koji; Granovsky, Alexander B.; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-09-01

    Spin waves (SWs) have the potential to reduce the electric energy loss in signal processing networks. The SWs called magnetostatic forward volume waves (MSFVWs) are advantageous for networking due to their isotropic dispersion in the plane of a device. To control the MSFVW flow in a processing network based on yttrium iron garnet, we developed a SW absorber using artificial structures. The mechanical surface polishing method presented in this work can well control extrinsic damping without changing the SW dispersion of the host material. Furthermore, enhancement of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth over 3 Oe was demonstrated.

  18. Nonlinear mixing of laser generated narrowband Rayleigh surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Chaitanya; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    This research presents the nonlinear mixing technique of two co-directionally travelling Rayleigh surface waves generated and detected using laser ultrasonics. The optical generation of Rayleigh waves on the specimen is obtained by shadow mask method. In conventional nonlinear measurements, the inherently small higher harmonics are greatly influenced by the nonlinearities caused by coupling variabilities and surface roughness between the transducer and specimen interface. The proposed technique is completely contactless and it should be possible to eliminate this problem. Moreover, the nonlinear mixing phenomenon yields not only the second harmonics, but also the sum and difference frequency components, which can be used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimen. In this paper, we will be addressing the experimental configurations for this technique. The proposed technique is validated experimentally on Aluminum 7075 alloy specimen.

  19. Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A; Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F

    2007-04-01

    Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media are investigated theoretically, with a focus on propagation in tissue-like media. The model is obtained as a limiting case of the theory developed by Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)] for nonlinear surface waves in arbitrary isotropic elastic media, and it is consistent with the results obtained by Fu and Devenish [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 49, 65-80 (1996)] for incompressible isotropic elastic media. In particular, the quadratic nonlinearity is found to be independent of the third-order elastic constants of the medium, and it is inversely proportional to the shear modulus. The Gol'dberg number characterizing the degree of waveform distortion due to quadratic nonlinearity is proportional to the square root of the shear modulus and inversely proportional to the shear viscosity. Simulations are presented for propagation in tissue-like media.

  20. Surface wave and linear operating mode of a plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogachev, N. N., E-mail: bgniknik@yandex.ru; Bogdankevich, I. L.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The relation between the propagation conditions of a surface electromagnetic wave along a finiteradius plasma cylinder and the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna is investigated. The solution to the dispersion relation for a surface wave propagating along a finite-radius plasma cylinder is analyzed for weakly and strongly collisional plasmas. Computer simulations of an asymmetrical plasma dipole antenna are performed using the KARAT code, wherein the dielectric properties of plasma are described in terms of the Drude model. The plasma parameters corresponding to the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna are determined. It is demonstrated that the characteristics of the plasma antenna in this mode are close to those of an analogous metal antenna.

  1. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V. [LPC2E/CNRS - University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Agapitov, O. V. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  2. Numerical Study of Submerged Vertical Plane Jets Under Progressive Water Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui-chao; WANG Ling-ling

    2005-01-01

    When wastewater is discharged into a coastal area through an outfall system, it will always be subjected to the action of waves. It is important to study and quantify the mixing of the discharge with the ambient water so that accurate environmental impact assessment can be made for such discharge conditions. The present work aims to study the phenomenon of a plane jet discharged into water environment with regular waves. A 3D numerical model based on the full Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the σ-coordinate is developed to study the present problem. Turbulence effects are modeled by a subgrid-scale (SGS) model using the concept of large eddy simulation (LES). The operator splitting method is used to solve the modified NSE. The model has been applied to the simulation of three different cases of submerged plane jets with surface waves: jet with strong waves, jet with weak waves and jet without waves. Numerical results show that the waves enhance the mixing of the jet with the ambient fluid, and cause a periodic deflection of the jet. The size of the re-circulation is about 1.5~2.4 depth of water. The velocity profile of the jet is self-similar in the zone of established flow for both the pure jet and jet in wave circumstances. The spreading characteristic constant α is 0.100 and 0.105 for pure momentum jets with Re numbers 1025 and 2050. The value of α increases from 0.130 to 0.147 for a jet in weak and strong wave circumstances, showing that waves have an obvious effect on the mixing and dilution properties of jets. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data for the cases of pure jets and jets with waves.

  3. Surface Catalytic Mechanism in Square-Wave Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Mirceski, Valentin; Gulaboski, Rubin

    2001-01-01

    A pseudo-first-order catalytic mechanism in which both reactant and product of the redox reaction are strongly immobilized on the electrode surface is theoretically analyzed under conditions of square-wave voltammetry (SWV). A mathematical procedure is developed for diffusionless conditions. The relationships between the properties of the voltammetric response and both the kinetic parameters of the redox reaction and the parameters of the excitement signal are studied. The phenomenon...

  4. Laser ablation method for production of surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Dmitry; Shevchenko, Sergey; Kukaev, Alexander; Safronov, Daniil

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are produced using a photolithography method. In case of inertial sensors it suffers several disadvantages, such as difficulty in matching topologies produced on opposite sides of the wafer, expensive in small series production, not allowing further topology correction. In this case a laser ablation method seems promising. Details of a proposed technique are described in the paper along with results of its experimental test and discussion.

  5. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  6. Study on Propagation Characteristics of Plasma Surface Wave in Medium Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shiqing; YAN Zelin; LI Wenzhong; LIU Jian; LI Jian; XU Lingfei

    2008-01-01

    Axial propagation characteristics of the axisymmetric surface wave along the plasma in the medium tube were studied. The expressions of electromagnetic field inside and outside the medium tube were deduced. Also, the impacts of several factors, such as plasma density, signal frequency, inner radius of medium tube, collision frequency, etc., on plasma surface wave propa-gation were numerically simulated. The results show that, the properties of plasma with higher density and .lower gas pressure are closer to those of metal conductor. Furthermore, larger radius of medium tube and lower signal frequency are better for surface wave propagation. However, the effect of collision frequency is not obvious. The optimized experimental parameters can be chosen as the plasma density of about 1017 m-3 and the medium radius between 11 mm and 19 mm.

  7. Particle-in-cell investigation on the resonant absorption of a plasma surface wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Chao-Hui; Hu Xi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The resonant absorption of a plasma surface wave is supposed to be an important and efficient mechanism of power deposition for a surface wave plasma source.In this paper,by using the particle-in-cell method and Monte Carlo simulation,the resonance absorption mechanism is investigated.Simulation results demonstrate the existence of surface wave resonance and show the high efficiency of heating electrons.The positions of resonant points,the resonance width and the spatio-temporal evolution of the resonant electric field are presented,which accord well with the theoretical results.The paper also discusses the effect of pressure on the resonance electric field and the plasma density.

  8. Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces and Droplet Transportation by Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J. T.; Geraldi, N. R.; Guan, J. H.; McHale, G.; Wells, G. G.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2017-01-01

    On a solid surface, a droplet of liquid will stick due to the capillary adhesion, and this causes low droplet mobility. To reduce contact line pinning, surface chemistry can be coupled to micro- and/or nanostructures to create superhydrophobic surfaces on which a droplet balls up into an almost spherical shape, thus, minimizing the contact area. Recent progress in soft matter has now led to alternative lubricant-impregnated surfaces capable of almost zero contact line pinning and high droplet mobility without causing droplets to ball up and minimize the contact area. Here we report an approach to surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW) actuated droplet transportation enabled using such a surface. These surfaces maintain the contact area required for efficient energy and momentum transfer of the wave energy into the droplet while achieving high droplet mobility and a large footprint, therefore, reducing the threshold power required to induce droplet motion. In our approach, we use a slippery layer of lubricating oil infused into a self-assembled porous hydrophobic layer, which is significantly thinner than the SAW wavelength, and avoid damping of the wave. We find a significant reduction (up to 85%) in the threshold power for droplet transportation compared to that using a conventional surface-treatment method. Moreover, unlike droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces, where interaction with the SAW induces a transition from a Cassie-Baxter state to a Wenzel state, the droplets on our liquid-impregnated surfaces remain in a mobile state after interaction with the SAW.

  9. Elastic friction drive of surface acoustic wave motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi; Itoh, Hidenori; Asai, Katsuhiko

    2003-06-01

    Importance of elastic deformation control to obtain large output force with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor is discussed in this paper. By adding pre-load to slider, stator and slider surfaces are deformed in a few tens nanometer. Appropriate deformation in normal direction against normal vibration displacement amplitude of SAW existed. By moderate deformation, the output force of the SAW motor was enlarged up to about 10 N and no-load speed was 0.7 m/s. To produce this performance, the transducer weight and slider size were only 4.2 g and 4 x 4 mm(2).By traveling wave propagation, surface particles of the SAW device move in elliptical motion. Due to the amplitude of the elliptical motion is 10 or 20 nm order, the contact condition of the slider is very critical. To control the contact condition, namely, the elastic deformation of the slider and stator surface in nanometer order, a lot of projections were fabricated on the slider surface. The projection diameter was 20 micro m. In static condition, the elastic deformation and stress were evaluated with the FEM analysis. From this calculation and the simulation result, it is consider that the wave crest is distorted, hence the elasticity has influence on the friction drive condition. Elastic deformation of the stator surface beneath the projection from the initial position were evaluated. In 4 x 4 mm(2) square area, the sliders had from 1089 to 23,409 projections. Depression was independent to the contact pressure. However, the output force depended on the depression although the projection density were different. From the view point of the output power of the motor, the proper depression was independent to the projection density. Around 25 nm depression, the output force and output power were maximized. This depression value was almost same as the vibration displacement amplitude of the stator transducer.

  10. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Oshiumi, Taro; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Kazushi; Wu, Xiaoyang; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA) combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA) with a surface acoustic wave (SAW). SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs). The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  11. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Ibere; Mohapatra, Sonali [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration. (orig.)

  12. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  13. INTERNAL RESONANT INTERACTIONS OF THREE FREE SURFACE-WAVES IN A CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL BASIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晨明

    2003-01-01

    The basic equations of free capillary-gravity surface-waves in a circular cylindrical basin were derived from Luke' s principle. Taking Galerkin ' s expansion of the velocity potential and the free surface elevation, the second-order perturbation equations were derived by use of expansion of multiple scale. The nonlinear interactions with the second order internal resonance of three free surface-waves were discussed based on the above. The results include:derivation of the couple equations of resonant interactions among three waves and the conservation laws; analysis of the positions of equilibrium points in phase plane; study of the resonant parameters and the non-resonant parameters respectively in all kinds of circumstances; derivation of the stationary solutions of the second-order interaction equations corresponding to different parameters and analysis of the stability property of the solutions; discussion of the effective solutions only in the limited time range. The analysis makes it clear that the energy transformation mode among three waves differs because of the different initial conditions under nontrivial circumstance. The energy may either exchange among three waves periodically or damp or increase in single waves.

  14. Identification and mitigation of T-S waves using localized dynamic surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Tuna, Burak A.; Dell'Orso, Haley

    2016-06-01

    The control of transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow over a flat plate using localized dynamic surface modifications was explored experimentally in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's subsonic wind tunnel. Dynamic surface modification, via a pair of Piezoelectrically Driven Oscillating Surface (PDOS) actuators, was used to excite and control the T-S wave over a flat plate. Creating an upstream, localized small disturbance at the most amplified frequency of fact = 250 Hz led to phase-locking the T-S wave. This enabled observation of the excited T-S wave using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The growth of the T-S wave as it moved downstream was also measured using this technique (25% growth over four wavelengths of the excited wave). Activation of a downstream PDOS actuator (in addition to the upstream PDOS) at the appropriate amplitude and phase shift resulted in attenuation of the peak amplitude of the coherent velocity fluctuations (by up to 68%) and a substantial reduction of the degree of coherence of the T-S wave. Since the PDOS actuators used in this work were localized, the effect of the control strategy was confined to the region directly downstream of the PDOS actuator.

  15. A Note on the Resonant Interaction of a Surface Wave With two Interfacial Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, M.; Lawrence, G. A.; Seymour, B. R.

    2002-12-01

    Recently Hill and Foda (1998) and Jamali (1998) have performed theoretical and experimental studies of the resonant interaction between a surface wave and two oblique interfacial waves. Despite many similarities between the findings of the two studies there is one seemingly major difference. The analysis of Hill and Foda (1998) indicated that there are only narrow bands of frequency, density ratio, and direction angle within which growth is possible. On the other hand Jamali (1998) predicted and observed wave growth over wide ranges of frequency and direction angle, and for all the density ratios that he investigated. We show that second order representation of the dynamic interfacial boundary condition of Hill and Foda (1998) is missing a term proportional to the velocity shear across the interface. When this missing term is included in the analysis the resulting predictions are consistent with the laboratory experiments.

  16. A note on the resonant interaction between a surface wave and two interfacial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Mirmosadegh; Lawrence, Gregory A.; Seymour, Brian

    2003-09-01

    Hill & Foda (1998) and Jamali (1998) have presented theoretical and experimental studies of the resonant interaction between a surface wave and two oblique interfacial waves. Despite many similarities between the findings there is one seemingly major difference. Hill & Foda's (1998) analysis indicated that there are only narrow bands of frequency, density ratio and direction angle within which growth is possible. On the other hand, Jamali (1998) predicted and observed wave growth over wide ranges of frequency and direction angle, and for all the density ratios that he investigated. We show that Hill & Foda's (1998) second-order representation of the dynamic interfacial boundary condition is missing a term proportional to the time derivative of the square of the velocity shear across the interface. When this missing term is included in the analysis, the resulting predictions are consistent with the laboratory experiments.

  17. Incorporating Floating Surface Objects into a Fully Dispersive Surface Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    solutions and a VOF model for a 2D floating box and with laboratory measurements of wave generation by a ver- tically oscillating sphere. A steep...breaking waves or sud - en surface impacts. These simplifications also considerably reduce he computational requirements of the model. The Pressure...recently, erakhti et al. (2015) carried out extensive model validations of HWAVE against laboratory data. The focus of their study was to xamine the

  18. Investigation of surface acoustic waves in laser shock peened metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Yuan; Gang Yan; Zhonghua Shen; Hangwei Xu; Xiaowu Ni; Jian Lu

    2008-01-01

    Laser shock peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing near-surface compressive residual stress. The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are dispersive when the near-surface properties of materials are changed. So the near-surface properties (such as the thickness of hardened layers, elastic properties, residual stresses, etc.) can be analyzed by the phase velocity dispersion. To study the propagation of SAWs in metal samples after peening, a more reasonable experimental method of broadband excitation and reception is introduced. The ultrasonic signals are excited by laser and received by polyvinylindene fluoride (PVDF) transducer. The SAW signals in aluminum alloy materials with different impact times by laser shock peening are detected. Signal spectrum and phase velocity dispersion curves of SAWs are analyzed. Moreover, reasons for dispersion are discussed.

  19. Identification of surface wave higher modes using a methodology based on seismic noise and coda waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Diane; Campillo, Michel; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves is performed to assess the velocity of complex structures such as sedimentary basins. At short periods several modes of the Rayleigh waves are often exited. To perform a reliable inversion of the velocity structure an identification of these modes is thus required. We propose a novel method to identify the modes of surface waves. We use the spectral ratio of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V) measured on seismic coda. We then compare the observed values with the theoretical H/V ratio for velocity models deduced from surface wave dispersion when assuming a particular mode. We first invert the Rayleigh wave measurements retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation with the assumptions that (1) the fundamental mode and (2) the first overtone are excited. Then we use these different velocity models to predict theoretical spectral ratios of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V). These H/V ratios are computed under the hypothesis of equipartition of a diffuse field in a layered medium. Finally we discriminate between fundamental and higher modes by comparing the theoretical H/V ratio with the H/V ratio measured on seismic coda. In an application, we reconstruct Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at seven broad-band stations in the Valley of Mexico. For paths within the soft quaternary sediments basin, the maximum energy is observed at velocities higher than expected for the fundamental mode. We identify that the dominant mode is the first higher mode, which suggests the importance of higher modes as the main vectors of energy in such complex structures.

  20. Finite element analysis of surface acoustic waves in high aspect ratio electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2008-01-01

    down the SAWvelocity because of mechanical energy storage. A finite model is furthermore employed to study the acousto-optical interaction and shows that it is possible to get a bigger change in effective refractive index with these surface acoustic waves compared to using conventional interdigital...

  1. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  2. Accurate source location from P waves scattered by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (> 100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P-coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example. The grid search method is combined with the 3D strain Green's tensor database type method to improve the search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solution. The strain Green's tensor is calculated by the 3D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are then obtained based on the least-square misfit between the 'observed' and predicted P and P-coda waves. A 95% confidence interval of the solution is also provided as a posterior error estimation. We find that the scattered waves are mainly due to topography in comparison with random velocity heterogeneity characterized by the von Kάrmάn-type power spectral density function. When only P wave data is used, the 'best' solution is offset from the real source location mostly in the vertical direction. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces its uncertainty. The solution remains robust with a range of random noises in data, un-modeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors that we tested.

  3. Determination of Surface Stress Distributions in Steel Using Laser-Generated Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi; Yifei; Ni; Chenyin; Shen; Zhonghua; Ni; Xiaowu; Lu; Jian

    2008-05-01

    High frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a pulsed laser and detected by a specially designed poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) transducer to investigate surface stress distribution. Two kinds of stressed surfaces are examined experimentally. One is a steel plate elastically deformed under simple bending forces, where the surface stress varies slowly. The other is a welded steel plate for which the surface stress varies very rapidly within a small area near the welding seam. Applying a new signal processing method developed from correlation technique, the velocity distribution of the SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution, is obtained in these two samples with high resolution.

  4. Estimation of Plasma Density by Surface Plasmons for Surface-Wave Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; LAN Chao-Hui; CHEN Wei; LUO Zhi-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ An estimation method of plasma density based on surface plasmons theory for surface-wave plasmas is proposed. The number of standing-wave is obtained directly from the discharge image, and the propagation constant is calculated with the trim size of the apparatus in this method, then plasma density can be determined with the value of 9.1 × 1017 m-3. Plasma density is measured using a Langmuir probe, the value is 8.1 × 1017 m-3 which is very close to the predicted value of surface plasmons theory. Numerical simulation is used to check the number of standing-wave by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method also. All results are compatible both of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement.

  5. Trapping of surface gravity waves by a vertical flexible porous plate near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Koley, S.; Sahoo, T.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by a vertical submerged flexible porous plate located near a rigid wall in water of finite as well as infinite depths. The physical problem is based on the assumption of small amplitude water wave theory and structural response. The flexible plate is assumed to be thin and is modeled based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation. Using the Green's function technique to the plate equation and associated boundary conditions, an integral equation is derived which relates the normal velocity on the plate to the difference in velocity potentials across the plate involving the porous-effect parameter and structural rigidity. Further, applying Green's second identity to the free-surface Green's function and the scattered velocity potentials on the two sides of the plate, a system of three more integral equations is derived involving the velocity potentials and their normal derivatives across the plate boundary along with the velocity potential on the rigid wall. The system of integral equations is converted into a set of algebraic equations using appropriate Gauss quadrature formula which in turn solved to obtain various quantities of physical interest. Utilizing Green's identity, explicit expressions for the reflection coefficients are derived in terms of the velocity potentials and their normal derivatives across the plate. Energy balance relations are derived and used to check the accuracy of the computational results. As special cases of the submerged plate, wave trapping by the bottom-standing as well as surface-piercing plates is analyzed. Effects of various wave and structural parameters in trapping of surface waves are studied from the computational results by analyzing the reflection coefficients, wave forces exerted on the plate and the rigid wall, flow velocity, plate deflections and surface elevations. It is observed that surface-piercing plate is more effective for trapping of water waves

  6. Surface water waves interaction in a circular vessel with oscillating walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Hsieh, Din-Yu

    1998-11-01

    Surface water waves appeared in a circular elastic vessel (modelled after the Chinese antique "Dragon Wash") are studied experimentally. Interaction of different wave modes are investigated. For small amplitude of wall oscillations, only the axisymmetric capillary wave mode, which is hardly visible to naked eyes, exists. When the amplitude is increased, half-frequency circumferential wave appears. Further increase of amplitude leads to chaotic behavior of surface waves. For large amplitudes, water drops jumping from edge regions are observed. Then, excitation of different modes of low frequency axisymmetric gravity waves may be obtained. Conditions for appearance of these gravity waves are investigated. Optical methods were applied for water surface diagnostics.

  7. Periodicity effects on compound guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-09-01

    Surface waves of different types can be compounded when a homogeneous layer is sandwiched between two half spaces filled with dissimilar periodically non-homogeneous dielectric materials and the intermediate layer is sufficiently thin. We solved the boundary-value problem for compound waves guided by a layer of a homogeneous and isotropic (metal or dielectric) material sandwiched between a structurally chiral material (SCM) and a periodically multi-layered isotropic dielectric material. We found that the periodicity of the SCM is crucial to excite a multiplicity of compound guided waves with strong coupling between the two interfaces.

  8. Reliable Damping of Free Surface Waves in Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Robinson

    2015-01-01

    This paper generalizes existing approaches for free-surface wave damping via momentum sinks for flow simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown in 2D flow simulations that, to obtain reliable wave damping, the coefficients in the damping functions must be adjusted to the wave parameters. A scaling law for selecting these damping coefficients is presented, which enables similarity of the damping in model- and full-scale. The influence of the thickness of the damping layer, the wave steepness, the mesh fineness and the choice of the damping coefficients are examined. An efficient approach for estimating the optimal damping setup is presented. Results of 3D ship resistance computations show that the scaling laws apply to such simulations as well, so the damping coefficients should be adjusted for every simulation to ensure convergence of the solution in both model and full scale. Finally, practical recommendations for the setup of reliable damping in flow simulations with regular and irregular...

  9. Calculation of surface acoustic waves in a multilayered piezoelectric structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2013-01-01

    The propagation properties of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered piezoelectric structure are calculated by using the recursive asymptotic method.The phase velocities and the electromechanical coupling coefficients for the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave in the different ZnO-SiO2-Si structures are calculated and analyzed.The Love mode wave is found to be predominantly generated since the c-axis of the ZnO film is generally perpendicular to the substrate.In order to prove the calculated results,a Love mode SAW device based on the ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered structure is fabricated by micromachining,and its frequency responses are detected.The experimental results are found to be mainly consistent with the calculated ones,except for the slightly larger velocities induced by the residual stresses produced in the fabrication process of the films.The deviation of the experimental results from the calculated ones is reduced by thermal annealing.

  10. The Nonlinear Talbot Effect of Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Song, Jianping; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers are rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLSE). Talbot effect (TE) is an image recurrence phenomenon in the diffraction of light waves. We report the nonlinear TE of rogue waves in a cubic medium. It is different from the linear TE, in that the wave propagates in a NL medium and is an eigenmode of NLSE. Periodic rogue waves impinging on a NL medium exhibit recurrent behavior, but only at the TE length and at the half-TE length with a \\pi-phase shift; the fractional TE is absent. The NL TE is the result of the NL interference of the lobes of rogue wave breathers. This interaction is related to the transverse period and intensity of breathers, in that the bigger the period and the higher the intensity, the shorter the TE length.

  11. The gravitational-wave memory effect

    CERN Document Server

    Favata, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear memory effect is a slowly-growing, non-oscillatory contribution to the gravitational-wave amplitude. It originates from gravitational waves that are sourced by the previously emitted waves. In an ideal gravitational-wave interferometer a gravitational-wave with memory causes a permanent displacement of the test masses that persists after the wave has passed. Surprisingly, the nonlinear memory affects the signal amplitude starting at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order. Despite this fact, the nonlinear memory is not easily extracted from current numerical relativity simulations. After reviewing the linear and nonlinear memory I summarize some recent work, including: (1) computations of the memory contribution to the inspiral waveform amplitude (thus completing the waveform to third post-Newtonian order); (2) the first calculations of the nonlinear memory that include all phases of binary black hole coalescence (inspiral, merger, ringdown); and (3) realistic estimates of the detectability of the ...

  12. Magnetic ocean wave effects in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. R.; Chen, C. H.; Yen, H. Y.; Lin, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    12 magnetic stations routinely monitor changes in the geomagnetic total intensity field are utilized in this study to examine magnetic ocean wave effects in Taiwan. The time-varied magnetic data are transferred into the frequency domain via the Fourier transform to investigate the frequency characteristics associated with ocean waves. Significant enhancements can be found from spectrums in the frequency band of about 0.05-0.3 Hz at stations located very close to the seashore. Frequency characteristics of magnetic data were compared with them of water-level heights monitored derived from nearby meteorological observation buoys operated by Weather Central Bureau. The agreement in the frequency characteristics suggests that the magnetic field is affected by ocean waves directly hitting the seashore in open oceans. In contrast, ocean waves with the double-frequency recorded by the marine metrological buoys reveal the locally dominate wave-wave interaction around bays.

  13. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  14. Surface waves on arbitrary vertically-sheared currents

    CERN Document Server

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of arbitrary depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation, and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past in 2D, and we herein extend and apply it to 3D problems. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving Fourier transformations in the horizontal plane. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile, and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between a concave down profile when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. New insight is given concerning the nature of extra spurious solution...

  15. Bubble size distribution in surface wave breaking entraining process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Lei; YUAN; YeLi

    2007-01-01

    From the similarity theorem,an expression of bubble population is derived as a function of the air entrainment rate,the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) spectrum density and the surface tension.The bubble size spectrum that we obtain has a dependence of a-2.5+nd on the bubble radius,in which nd is positive and dependent on the form of TKE spectrum within the viscous dissipation range.To relate the bubble population with wave parameters,an expression about the air entrainment rate is deduced by introducing two statistical relations to wave breaking.The bubble population vertical distribution is also derived,based on two assumptions from two typical observation results.

  16. Scanning Michelson interferometer for imaging surface acoustic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, J V; Tikka, P T; Salomaa, M M

    2000-05-01

    A scanning homodyne Michelson interferometer is constructed for two-dimensional imaging of high-frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) fields in SAW devices. The interferometer possesses a sensitivity of ~10(-5)nm/ radicalHz , and it is capable of directly measuring SAW's with frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 1 GHz. The fast scheme used for locating the optimum operation point of the interferometer facilitates high measuring speeds, up to 50,000 points/h. The measured field image has a lateral resolution of better than 1 mu;m . The fully optical noninvasive scanning system can be applied to SAW device development and research, providing information on acoustic wave distribution that cannot be obtained by merely electrical measurements.

  17. Beta Distribution of Surface Elevation of Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 徐德伦

    2001-01-01

    A probability density function (PDF) is derived of beta distribution with both λ3 (skewness) and λ4 (kurtosis) as parameters for weakly nonlinear wave surface elevation by use of a method recently proposed by Srokosz. This PDF not only has a simpler form than the well-known Gram-Charlier Series PDF derived by Longuet-Higgins, but also overcomes an obvious shortcoming of the latter that when the series is unsuitably truncated, the resulting PDF is locally negative. To test the derived beta PDF, laboratorial experiments of wind waves are conducted. The experimental data indicate that the theoretical requirements of the parameters in the beta PDF are fulfilled. The experimental results show that the present PDF is in better agreement with the measured data than the beta PDF only including parameter λ3, and also than the Gram-Charlier Series PDF truncated up to the term of H6.

  18. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Timothy L.

    2000-09-14

    The objective of this study was to develop analysis programs for surface-wave group-velocity tomography, and apply these to three test areas. We succeeded by obtaining data covering two square areas that were 30 meters on a side, and a third area that was 16 meters on a side, in addition to a collaborative effort wherein we processed data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory site. At all sites, usable group velocities were obtained for frequencies from 16 to 50 Hz using a sledgehammer source. The resulting tomographic images and velocity anomalies were sufficient to delineate suspected burial trenches (one 4-meters deep) and anomalous velocity structure related to rocks and disturbed soil. The success was not uniform because in portions of one area the inversion for shear-wave structure became unstable. More research is needed to establish a more robust inversion technique.

  19. Cyclodextrin-based surface acoustic wave chemical microsensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.Q.; Shi, J.X.; Springer, K.; Swanson, B.I.

    1996-07-01

    Cyclodextrin thin films were fabricated using either self-assembled monolayer (SAM) or solgel techniques. The resulting host receptor thin films on the substrates of surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators were studied as method of tracking organic toxins in vapor phase. The mass loading of surface-attached host monolayers on SAW resonators gave frequency shifts corresponding to typical monolayer surface coverages for SAM methods and ``multilayer`` coverages for sol-gel techniques. Subsequent exposure of the coated SAW resonators to organic vapors at various concentrations, typically 5,000 parts per millions (ppm) down to 100 parts per billions (ppb) by mole, gave responses indicating middle-ppb-sensitivity ({approximately}50 ppb) for those sensor-host-receptors and organic-toxin pairs with optimum mutual matching of polarity, size, and structural properties.

  20. Joint Geophysical Imaging of the Utah Area Using Seismic Body Waves, Surface Waves and Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Toksoz, M. N.; Burlacu, R.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present a joint geophysical imaging method that makes use of seismic body wave arrival times, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data to determine three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models. An empirical relationship mapping densities to Vp and Vs for earth materials is used to link them together. The joint inversion method takes advantage of strengths of individual data sets and is able to better constrain the velocity models from shallower to greater depths. Combining three different data sets to jointly invert for the velocity structure is equivalent to a multiple-objective optimization problem. Because it is unlikely that the different “objectives” (data types) would be optimized by the same parameter choices, some trade-off between the objectives is needed. The optimum weighting scheme for different data types is based on relative uncertainties of individual observations and their sensitivities to model parameters. We will apply this joint inversion method to determine 3D Vp and Vs models of the Utah area. The seismic body wave arrival times are assembled from waveform data recorded by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) regional network for the past 7 years. The surface wave dispersion measurements are obtained from the ambient noise tomography study by the University of Colorado group using EarthScope/USArray stations. The gravity data for the Utah area is extracted from the North American Gravity Database managed by the University of Texas at El Paso. The preliminary study using the seismic body wave arrival times indicates strong low velocity anomalies in middle crust beneath some known geothermal sites in Utah. The joint inversion is expected to produce a reasonably well-constrained velocity structure of the Utah area, which is helpful for characterizing and exploring existing and potential geothermal reservoirs.

  1. Surface wave characteristics in a micropolar transversely isotropic halfspace underlying an inviscid liquid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R.R.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the propagation of waves in a micropolar transversely isotropic half space with an overlying inviscid fluid layer. Effects of fluid loading and anisotropy on the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, specific loss and relative frequency shift. Finally, a numerical solution was carried out for aluminium epoxy material and the computer simulated results for the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, specific loss and relative frequency shift are presented graphically. A particular case for the propagation of Rayleigh waves in a micropolar transversely isotropic half-space is deduced and dispersion curves are plotted for the same as functions of the wave number. An amplitude of displacements and microrotation together with the path of surface particles are also calculated for the propagation of Rayleigh waves in the latter case

  2. Lung Ultrasound Surface Wave Elastography: A Pilot Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Zhou, Boran; Meixner, Duane; Kinnick, Randall R; Bartholmai, Brian; Greenleaf, James F; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    A lung ultrasound surface wave elastography (LUSWE) technique is developed to measure superficial lung tissue elastic properties. The purpose of this paper was to translate LUSWE into clinical studies for assessing patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and present the pilot data from lung measurements on 10 healthy subjects and 10 patients with ILD. ILD includes multiple lung disorders in which the lung tissue is distorted and stiffened by tissue fibrosis. Chest radiography and computed tomography are the most commonly used techniques for assessing lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot directly measure lung elastic properties. LUSWE provides a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. LUSWE was used to measure regions of both lungs through six intercostal spaces for patients and healthy subjects. The data are presented as wave speed at 100, 150, and 200 Hz at the six intercostal spaces. As an example, the surface wave speeds are, respectively, 1.88 ± 0.11 m/s at 100 Hz, 2.74 ± 0.26 m/s at 150 Hz, and 3.62 ± 0.13 m/s at 200 Hz for a healthy subject in the upper right lung; this is in comparison to measurements from an ILD patient of 3.3 ± 0.37 m/s at 100 Hz, 4.38 ± 0.33 m/s at 150 Hz, and 5.24 ± 0.44 m/s at 200 Hz in the same lung space. Significant differences in wave speed between healthy subjects and ILD patients were found. LUSWE is a safe and noninvasive technique which may be useful for assessing ILD.

  3. Remote laser generation of narrow-band surface waves through optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scalea, F L; Berndt, T P; Spicer, J B; Djordjevic, B B

    1999-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a fiberoptic bundle for flexible, compact, remote, and noncontact laser generation of surface ultrasonic waves in materials. The bundle is able to deliver Nd:YAG pulsed light with a 60% delivery efficiency up to an average energy of 55 mJ/pulse for a pulse duration on the order of 10 ns and a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz without signs of fiber damage. Details of the bundle construction and surface preparation are given, and pulsed light delivery tests performed with single tapered fibers are discussed. The high-power light delivery capabilities of the bundle are demonstrated for the generation of narrow-band surface waves in a Carbon/PEEK composite laminate by a spatial modulation technique that employs a periodic transmission mask. Single laser pulse ultrasonic tonebursts are clearly detectable using a small aperture piezoelectric transducer while ensuring thermoelastic generation conditions. The theory of narrow-band generation of surface acoustic waves is improved by accounting for the strength nonuniformity of the illumination sources. In addition, the effect of the number of illumination sources on the bandwidth of the generated surface wave is assessed experimentally, and excellent agreement is shown with the theoretical results predicted by the improved model.

  4. Influence of standing surface waves on thermocapillary convection stability and crystal growth in weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feonychev, A. I.

    Numerical investigation of thermocapillary flows and crystal growth by the floating zone method had been carried out in the case what free fluid surface oscillates in the form of standing wave by vibration. Two sorts of standing waves were considered. First, it is inertia-capillary standing waves due to vibration motion of fluid column as unit. These waves had been discovered under numerical investigation of problem /1/. Analytical model and the characteristic properties of these waves are described in /2/. Secondly, usual capillary waves generated by vibration of growing crystal were also considered. The effects of these surface waves on fluid flow and heat and mass transfer in process of crystal growth had been investigated over the wide ranges of dimensionless parameters for the Prandtl number is less than 1. The Marangoni number was varied from 140 to 2500, the range of cyclic frequency was between 200 and 76000. Transition from laminar thermocapillary convection to regime of flow with high oscillations (turbulent convection) happens very sharply when dimensionless amplitude (scale for linear dimensions is radius of fluid column) of standing wave reached 0.01112/n, where n is number of standing wave periods are along the length of fluid zone. If configuration of standing wave correlates with thermocapillary flow pattern two specific regimes of flow had been discovered. Flow with small oscillations is located in the range of standing wave amplitude between 0.0028 and 0.00418. In this area, radial macrosegregation of dopant is lowered by the factor of 3-6 depending on the Marangoni number. Next is an area with practically stable flow, in particular is identical to laminar flow without vibration. This area ends very sharply in the boundary of turbulent flow. All the mentioned boundaries are independent of the Marangoni number and frequency of oscillation of standing wave. For oscillatory thermocapillary convection (the Marangoni number is more than 2000

  5. Simulation of the ocean surface mixed layer under the wave breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qun; SONG Jinbao; GUAN Changlong

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional mixed-layer model, including a Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 turbulence closure scheme, was implemented to investigate the dynamical and thermal structures of the ocean surface mixed layer in the northern South China Sea. The turbulent kinetic energy released through wave breaking was incorporated into the model as a source of energy at the ocean surface, and the influence of the breaking waves on the mixed layer was studied. The numerical simulations show that the simulated SST is overestimated in summer without the breaking waves. However, the cooler SST is simulated when the effect of the breaking waves is considered, the corresponding discrepancy with the observed data decreases up to 20% and the MLD calculated averagely deepens 3.8 m. Owing to the wave-enhanced turbulence mixing in the summertime, the stratification at the bottom of the mixed layer was modified and the temperature gradient spread throughout the whole thermocline compared with the concentrated distribution without wave breaking.

  6. FREE-SURFACE WAVES AND FAR WAKES GENERATED BY A FLOATING BODY IN A VISCOUS FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dong-qiang

    2003-01-01

    The free-surface waves and the flow field due to a body moving on the surface of an incompressible viscous fluid of infinite depth were studied analytically. The floating body was modeled as a normal point pressure on the free surface. Based on the Oseen approximation for governing equations and the linearity assumption for boundary conditions, the exact solutions in integral form for the free-surface elevation, the velocities and the pressure were given. By employing Lighthill's two-stage scheme, the asymptotic representations in far field for large Reynolds numbers were derived explicitly. The effect of viscosity on the wave profiles was expressed by an exponential decay factor, which removes the singular behavior predicted by the potential theory.

  7. Homogenization of seismic surface wave profiling in highly heterogeneous improved ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.; Chien, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic surface wave profiling is gaining popularity in engineering practice for determining shear-wave velocity profile since the two-station SASW (Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave) was introduced. Recent developments in the multi-station approach (Multi-station Analysis of Surface Wave, MASW) result in several convenient commercial tools. Unlike other geophysical tomography methods, the surface wave method is essentially a 1-D method assuming horizontally-layered medium. Nevertheless, MASW is increasingly used to map lateral variation of S-wave velocity by multiple surveys overlooking the effect of lateral heterogeneity. MASW typically requires long receiver spread in order to have enough depth coverage. The accuracy and lateral resolution of 2-D S-wave velocity imaging by surface wave is not clear. Many geotechnical applications involves lateral variation in a scale smaller than the geophone spread and wave length. For example, soft ground is often improved to increase strength and stiffness by methods such as jet grouting and stone column which result in heterogeneous ground with improved columns. Experimental methods (Standard Penetration Test, sampling and laboratory testing, etc.) used to assess such ground improvement are subjected to several limitations such as small sampling volume, time-consuming, and cost ineffectiveness. It's difficult to assess the average property of the improved ground and the actual replacement ratio of ground improvement. The use of seismic surface wave method for such a purpose seems to be a good alternative. But what MASW measures in such highly heterogeneous improved ground remains to be investigated. This study evaluated the feasibility of MASW in highly heterogeneous ground with improved columns and investigated the homogenization of shear wave velocity measured by MASW. Field experiments show that MASW testing in such a composite ground behaves similar to testing in horizontally layered medium. It seems to measure some sort

  8. Surface Wave Propagation in a Microstretch Thermoelastic Diffusion Material under an Inviscid Liquid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the propagation of Rayleigh type surface waves in an isotropic microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half space under a layer of inviscid liquid. The secular equation for surface waves in compact form is derived after developing the mathematical model. The dispersion curves giving the phase velocity and attenuation coefficients with wave number are plotted graphically to depict the effect of an imperfect boundary alongwith the relaxation times in a microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half space under a homogeneous inviscid liquid layer for thermally insulated, impermeable boundaries and isothermal, isoconcentrated boundaries, respectively. In addition, normal velocity component is also plotted in the liquid layer. Several cases of interest under different conditions are also deduced and discussed.

  9. The Effect of Heat Waves and Drought on Surface Wind Circulations in the Northeast of the Iberian Peninsula during the Summer of 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, P.A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; González-Rouco, J.F.; Navarro, J.; Montávez, J.P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Dudhia, J.

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the diurnal wind pattern associated with heat waves and drought conditions are investigated climatologically at a regional level (northeast of the Iberian Peninsula). The study, based on high-density observational evidence and fine spatial-scale mesoscale modeling for the 1992–2004 per

  10. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  11. Effective Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapalparvi, Ramesh; Protas, Bartosz

    2010-11-01

    In this investigation we introduce the concept of an "effective free surface" arising as a solution of time--averaged equations in the presence of free boundaries. This work is motivated by applications of optimization theory to problems involving free surfaces, such as droplets impinging on the weld pool surface in welding processes. In such problems the time--dependent governing equations lead to technical difficulties, many of which are alleviated when methods of optimization are applied to a steady problem with effective free surfaces. The corresponding equations are obtained by performing the Reynolds decomposition and averaging of the time--dependent free--boundary equations based on the volume--of--fluid (VoF) formalism. We identify the terms representing the average effect of fluctuating free boundaries which, in analogy with the Reynolds stresses in classical turbulence models, need to be modelled and propose some simple algebraic closures for these terms. We argue that effective free boundaries can be computed using methods of shape optimization and present some results.

  12. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  13. 120-GHz HEMT Oscillator With Surface-Wave-Assisted Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene; Siegel, Peter; Leong, Kevin; Itoh, Tatsuo; Qian, Yongxi; Radisic, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Two monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) have been designed and built to function together as a source of electromagnetic radiation at a frequency of 120 GHz. One of the MMICs is an oscillator and is the highest-power 120-GHz oscillator reported thus far in the literature. The other MMIC is an end-fire antenna that radiates the oscillator signal. Although these MMICs were constructed as separate units and electrically connected with wire bonds, future oscillator/ antenna combinations could readily be fabricated as monolithic integrated units. Such units could be used as relatively high-power solid-state microwave sources in diverse applications that include automotive radar, imaging, scientific instrumentation, communications, and radio astronomy. As such, these units would be attractive alternatives to vacuum-tube oscillators, which are still used to obtain acceptably high power in the frequency range of interest. The oscillator (see figure) includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT), with gate-periphery dimensions of 4 by 37 m, in a common-source configuration. The series feedback element of the oscillator is a grounded coplanar waveguide (CPW) at the source. The HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle) to maximize the output power of the oscillator. Input and output impedance-matching circuit elements are designed to maximize output power and to establish the conditions needed for oscillation. The design of the antenna takes advantage of surface waves, which, heretofore, have been regarded as highly disadvantageous because they can leak power and degrade the performances of antennas that have not been designed to exploit them. Measures taken to suppress surface waves have included complex machining of circuit substrates and addition of separate substrates. These measures are difficult to implement in standard MMIC fabrication processes. In contrast, because the design of the

  14. Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajneesh Kumar; B S Hundal

    2007-06-01

    A study of surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible porous half-space lying under a uniform layer of liquid is presented. The dispersion relation connecting the phase velocity with wave number is derived. The variation of phase velocity and attenuation coefficients with wave number is presented graphically and discussed. As a particular case, the propagation of Rayleigh type surface waves at the free surface of an incompressible porous half-space is also deduced and discussed.

  15. Do tidal or swing waves roughen planetary surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, Gennady G.

    2010-05-01

    Surfaces of the terrestrial planets and their moons are far from being smooth. They are warped by several wavelengths and show a remarkable regularity: their roughness increases with the solar distance. Thus, if for Mercury the surface relief range does not exceed several km, for Mars it is already about 30 km. Earth's range is 20 km, Venus' one 14 km. Recently it was shown that this row of ranges reflects ratios of the tectonic granules radii of terrestrial planets [1, 2]. These radii related to unity of reduced planetary globes (in a geometrical model all planets are represented by even circles [2]) are as follows: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2. It means that in the great planetary circles (equators) there are 32, 12, 8, and 4 tectonic granules (now they all are mapped by remote methods) and their numbers are inversely proportional to the orbital frequencies of the planets: higher frequency - smaller granule, and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger granule. In this planetary law is a firm confirmation of the main conceptual point of the wave planetology: "Orbits make structures" [3]. But how this happens? A basic reason lies in the keplerian elliptical orbits implying periodical changes of planetary bodies accelerations. Periodical slowing down and speeding up produce inertia-gravity waves warping any celestial body. In rotating bodies this wave warping is divided in four directions: two orthogonal and two diagonal. An interference of these directions produces tectonic blocks of three kinds: uplifting, subsiding, and neutral. Sizes and amplitudes of the blocks (granules) depend on the warping wavelengths and increase with the solar distance. Thus, a relief-forming potential and the actual relief range observed on the planets increase in this direction [1, 2, 4]. But the tidal forces diminish in this direction. That is why they cannot be a reason for the relief-forming potential. Having in mind a swinging action of planetary orbits on

  16. Hydrogen Adsorption Studies Using Surface Acoustic Waves on Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.B. Phillips; G. Myneni; B.S. Shivaram

    2005-06-13

    Vanadium nanoparticles, on the order of 20 nm, were deposited on a quartz crystal surface acoustic wave resonator (SAW) using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser deposition system. Due to the high Q and resonant frequency of the SAW, mass changes on the order of 0.1 nanogram can be quantitatively measured. Roughly 60 nanogram of V was deposited on the SAW for these experiments. The SAW was then moved into a hydrogen high pressure cell.At room temperature and 1 atmosphere of hydrogen pressure, 1 wt% H, or H/V {approx} 0.5 (atomic ratio) absorption was measured.

  17. Plasma Limiter Based on Surface Wave Plasma Excited by Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Geng; TAN Jichun; SHEN Benjian

    2008-01-01

    A novel plasma limiter, in which the plasma is excited by surface wave, is presented. The breakdown time of some gases filled in the limiter were calculated as a function of gas pres-sure, ionization degree and density of seed electrons under low pressure (0.01 ~1 Torr) and high pressure (10 ~1000 Torr) cases. The results show that the limiter filled with Xe with a pressure of 0.9 Torr, seed electron density of 1016 m-3, and ionization degree of 10-4, has a breakdown time of approximate 19.6 ns.

  18. Low power sessile droplet actuation via modulated surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Herth, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Low power actuation of sessile droplets is of primary interest for portable or hybrid lab-on-a-chip and harmless manipulation of biofluids. In this paper, we show that the acoustic power required to move or deform droplets via surface acoustic waves can be substantially reduced through the forcing of the drops inertio-capillary modes of vibrations. Indeed, harmonic, superharmonic and subharmonic (parametric) excitation of these modes are observed when the high frequency acoustic signal (19.5 MHz) is modulated around Rayleigh-Lamb inertio-capillary frequencies. This resonant behavior results in larger oscillations and quicker motion of the drops than in the non-modulated case.

  19. Light waves guided by a single curved metallic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, H

    1978-01-15

    Propagation of TE-waves along a single curved metallic surface with radius of curvature much larger than wavelength is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Approximate analytic expressions for the field configuration yield that power concentrates in a small region near the metal. The attenuation constant per unit angle of bend (radian) is given by the real part of the inverse of the refractive index, independent of the radius of curvature and of the mode number. In agreement with theory experiments with 10-microm radiation showed that low loss guiding can be realized.

  20. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established to analyze the frequency, and a peripheral circuit is designed to measure the micro force. The SAW based micro force sensor is tested to show the reasonable design of detection circuit and the stability of frequency and amplitude.

  1. Wave-scattering from a gently curved surface

    CERN Document Server

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We study wave scattering from a gently curved surface. We show that the recursive relations, implied by shift invariance, among the coefficients of the perturbative series for the scattering amplitude allow to perform an infinite resummation of the perturbative series to all orders in the amplitude of the corrugation. The resummed series provides a derivative expansion of the scattering amplitude in powers of derivatives of the height profile, which is expected to become exact in the limit of quasi-specular scattering. We discuss the relation of our results with the so-called small-slope approximation introduced some time ago by Voronovich.

  2. Stern Gerlach spin filter using surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paulo V.; Nitta, Junsaku; Ploog, Klaus H.

    2004-12-01

    We propose the ambipolar carrier transport by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a semiconductor quantum well (QW) for the realization of the Stern-Gerlach (SG) experiment in the solid phase. The well-defined and very low carrier velocity in the moving SAW field leads to a large deflection angle and thus to efficient spin separation, even for the weak field gradients and short (μm-long) interaction lengths that can be produced by micromagnets. The feasibility of a SG spin filter is discussed for different QW materials.

  3. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  4. Surface acoustic wave devices including Langmuir-Blodgett films (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesskii, V. P.

    1991-06-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental research related to the use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is reviewed. The sensitivity of the different cuts of quartz and lithium niobate to inertial loading is investigated, and it is shown that some cuts in lithium niobate are twice as sensitive to mass loading than the commonly used YZ-cut. The large variety of organic compounds suitable for the production of LB films makes it possible to create SAW sensors reacting selectively to certain substances. The existing SAW sensors based on LB films are characterized by high sensitivity and fast response.

  5. Surface acoustic wave vapor sensors based on resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated in the resonator configuration have been used as organic vapor sensors and compared with delay line devices more commonly used. The experimentally determined mass sensitivities of 200, 300, and 400 MHz resonators and 158 MHz delay lines coated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(vinyl tetradecanal) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The response of LB- and spray-coated sensors to various organic vapors were determined, and scaling laws for mass sensitivities, vapor sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed. The 200 MHz resonators provide the lowest noise levels and detection limits of all the devices examined.

  6. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  7. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  8. A proper methodology aimed at surface wave tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Badal

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available When applying a methodology for obtaining the 3D shear-wave velocity structure of a medium from surface wave dispersion data, the problem must be considered with caution since one inverts path-averaged velocities and the use of any inversion method entails some drawbacks such as lack of uniqueness, unwarranted stability and constraints affecting the data. In order to avoid the application of consecutive inversions and to overcome these drawbacks, we propose alternative mapping methods, for example spatial prediction methods, or else the use of an algorithm that, from a mathematical viewpoint, can be understood through the application of the orthogonal projection theorem onto convex sets (POCS. Among the first ones, we try inverse weighted distance interpolation. The POCS algorithm we have used discretises a second order differential equation for the velocity field with boundary conditions. All these imaging techniques aimed at volumetric modelling and the visualisation of data are discussed, and finally we show some results based on ray path velocities obtained previously by inversion of phase and group velocities of Rayleigh waves propagating across the Iberian peninsula.

  9. TE Magnetostatic Surface Waves in Symmetric Dielectric Negative Permittivity Material Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Ass'ad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear magnetostatic surface wave in a slab waveguide structure has been investigated. The design consisted of dielectric film between two thick nonlinear nonmagnetic negative permittivity material (NPM layers. A dispersion relation for TE nonlinear Magnetostatic surface waves (NMSSWs has been derived into the proposed structure and has been numerically investigated. Effective refractive index decreases with thickness and frequency increase have been found. Effective refractive index decrease with optical nonlinearity increase and switching to negative values of effective refractive index at a certain value of optical nonlinearity have been found. This meant that the structure behaved like a left-handed material over certain range. We found that the power flow was changing by changing the operating frequency, the dielectric film thickness, and the optical nonlinearity. Also, the effective refractive index and power flow attained constant values over certain values of dielectric constant values.

  10. Variational space–time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, E.; Ambati, V.R.; Vegt, van der J.J.W.; Bokhove, O.

    2014-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles’ variational principle for water waves together with a finite element

  11. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, E.; Vegt, van der J.J.W.; Ambati, V.R.; Bokhove, O.

    2013-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a space-time finite element discretization that is cont

  12. Rayleigh waves ellipticity and mode mis-identification in multi-channel analysis of surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Strobbia, Claudio

    dispersion curve which is then inverted. Typically, single component vertical and multi channel receivers are used. In most cases the inversion of the dispersion properties is carried out assuming that the experimental dispersion curve corresponds to a single mode, mostly the fundamental Rayleigh mode......-identification known as ‘osculation’ (‘kissing’). In general it is called ‘osculation point’ the point where the energy peak shifts at low frequencies from the fundamental to the first higher mode. This jump occurs, with a continuous smooth transition, around a well-define frequency where the two modes get very close...... the vertical component of ground motion, as the mode osculation is linked to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity polarization, and therefore we conclude that multi-component data, using also horizontal receivers, can help discern the multi-modal nature of surface waves. Finally we introduce a-priori detectors...

  13. Transverse relativistic effects in paraxial wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We consider relativistic deformations of interfering paraxial waves moving in the transverse direction. Owing to superluminal transverse phase velocities, noticeable deformations of the interference patterns arise when the waves move with respect to each other with non-relativistic velocities. Similar distortions also appear on a mutual tilt of the interfering waves, which causes a phase delay analogous to the relativistic time delay. We illustrate these observations by the interference between a vortex wave beam and a plane wave, which exhibits a pronounced deformation of the radial fringes into a fork-like pattern (relativistic Hall effect). Furthermore, we describe an additional relativistic motion of the interference fringes (a counter-rotation in the vortex case), which become noticeable at the same non-relativistic velocities.

  14. Feasibility of Using Dynamically Oscillating Surfaces to Control Tollmien-Schlichting Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Orso, Haley

    This work characterizes and controls Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves by means of Piezoelectrically-Driven Oscillating Surface (PDOS) actuators, using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A parametric study of PDOS actuator design parameters was conducted and a 0.79 mm thick rubber surface with a 12.7 mm diameter circular dimple, a cavity height of 2 mm, and a neck height of 2 mm was selected for implementation in T-S wave control over a flat plate. Two circular PDOS actuators were used to excite and control the most amplified frequency of the T-S wave on a flat plate. The actuators were placed at the mid-span of a flat plate at two streamwise locations of x/L = 0.18 and x/L = 0.28 downstream from the leading edge, where the free-stream velocity was U = 16 m/s. The upstream actuator was used to excite and phase-lock the T-S waves at an excitation frequency of ƒact = 250 Hz (corresponding to the most amplified frequency of the T-S wave, based on linear stability analysis), and the downstream PDOS was used to mitigate the T-S wave by driving it at an anti-phase with the appropriate amplitude. Time- and phase-averaged flow fields were acquired at two downstream interrogation domains. The first window of data, taken in between the two PDOS actuators, explored the effect of the excitation amplitude on the magnitude of the excited T-S waves. At the second window, located downstream of both PDOS actuators, the simultaneous activation of both actuators at an appropriate phase shift and amplitudes resulted in a significant reduction or augmentation of the T-S waves, depending on the phase shift between the two actuators.

  15. Surface Plasmon Waves on noble metals at Optical Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Pratap Maity

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the variation of the propagation constant, the attenuation coefficient, penetration depth inside the metal and the dielectric has been evaluated. The propagation characteristics of Surface Plasmon Waves (SPWs which exists on noble metals like gold (Au, silver (Ag and aluminium (Al due to the formation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs, have been evaluated theoretically and simulated. It has been found that highly conducting metals Au and Ag provide a strong confinement to the SPWs than Al at optical frequencies. The comparative study reveals that metal having higher conductivity can support a more confined SPW, having a lower penetration depth than metals of lower conductivity at terahertz frequencies when its dielectric constant assumes a negative value.

  16. Focusing of Surface Acoustic Wave on a Piezoelectric Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Dong-Hai; WANG Cheng-Hao; WANG Zuo-Qing

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the focusing phenomena of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) field generated by a circular-arc interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric crystal. A rigorous vector field theory of surface excitation on the crystal we developed previously is used to evaluate the convergent SAW field instead of the prevalent scalar angular spectrum used in optics. The theoretical results show that the anisotropy of a medium has great impact on the focusing properties of the acoustic beams, such as focal length and symmetrical distributions near the focus. A dark field method is used in experiment to observe the focusing of the SAW field optically. Although the convergent phenomena of SAW field on the anisotropic media or piezoelectric crystals are very complicated,the experimental data are in agreement with those from the rigorous theory.

  17. Assessment of a geological model by surface wave analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, R.; Capizzi, P.; Avellone, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Siragusa, R.; Luzio, D.

    2017-02-01

    A set of horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements, carried out in the Altavilla Milicia (Sicily) area, is analyzed to test a geological model of the area. Statistical techniques have been used in different stages of the data analysis, to optimize the reliability of the information extracted from geophysical measurements. In particular, cluster analysis algorithms have been implemented to select the time windows of the microseismic signal to be used for calculating the spectral ratio H/V and to identify sets of spectral ratio peaks likely caused by the same underground structures. Using results of reflection seismic lines, typical values of P-wave and S-wave velocity were estimated for each geological formation present in the area. These were used to narrow down the research space of parameters for the HVSR interpretation. MASW profiles have been carried out close to each HVSR measuring point, provided the parameters of the shallower layers for the HVSR models. MASW inversion has been constrained by extrapolating thicknesses from a known stratigraphic sequence. Preliminary 1D seismic models were obtained by adding deeper layers to models that resulted from MASW inversion. These justify the peaks of the HVSR curves due to layers deeper than MASW investigation depth. Furthermore, much deeper layers were included in the HVSR model, as suggested by geological setting and stratigraphic sequence. This choice was made considering that these latter layers do not generate other HVSR peaks and do not significantly affect the misfit. The starting models have been used to limit the starting research space for a more accurate interpretation, made considering the noise as a superposition of Rayleigh and Love waves. Results allowed to recognize four main seismic layers and to associate them to the main stratigraphic successions. The lateral correlation of seismic velocity models, joined with tectonic evidences

  18. Numerical investigation of interactions of multiple spherical shock waves between themselves and with the underlying surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrushchenko, V. A.; Murashkin, I. V.; Shevelev, Yu. D.

    2016-06-01

    Within the investigation of various aspects of asteroid and comet danger and, in particular, the explosion of several fragments of meteoroids in the atmosphere above the Earth surface, the toy problem about four point explosions in the case of their special arrangement above the underlying surface is numerically solved. Complex interactions of primary and secondary shock waves between themselves, with the hard surface, and with tangential discontinuities are examined. The structure of flow inside gas regions disturbed by the explosions—the occurrence of eddy structures in them and the influence of reflected shocks waves on them—are investigated. The tendency of the external wave fronts of each explosion to form a unified front and the tendency of their internal hot domains to merge into a joined configuration (where the second process proceeds a little later than the first one) is revealed. This unified front and joined configuration are qualitatively identical to the external internal structure for the solitary explosion. The specially arranged explosions are chosen because the effects of multiple diffraction, interference, and, the main thing, cumulation of spherical waves are manifested more clearly in this caseTwo variants with different altitude of the explosions above the surface are calculated.

  19. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Small surface wave discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss'ovski, Zh; Kolev, M.; Ivanov, A.; Lishev, St.; Koleva, I.

    2009-09-01

    A small surface wave driven source produces plasma at atmospheric pressure. Microwave power at frequency 2.45 GHz is coupled with the source and a discharge is ignited at power levels below 10 W. The coaxial exciter of the surface waves has a length of 10 mm because its dielectric is a high permittivity discharge tube. The plasma source operates as a plasma jet in the case of plasma columns longer than the tube length. The source maintains stable plasma columns over a wide range of neutral gas flow and applied power in continuous and pulse regimes. An additional advantage of this source is the discharge self-ignition. An electron temperature of Te ~ 1.9 eV and a density of ne ~ 3.9 × 1014 cm-3 are estimated by the probe diagnostics method. The emission spectra in the wavelength range 200-1000 nm under different experimental conditions are analysed and they prove the applicability of the source for analytical spectroscopy. The dependences of column length, reflected power and plasma parameters on the gas flow and the input power are discussed.

  20. A Surface Acoustic Wave Ethanol Sensor with Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Giffney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors are a class of piezoelectric MEMS sensors which can achieve high sensitivity and excellent robustness. A surface acoustic wave ethanol sensor using ZnO nanorods has been developed and tested. Vertically oriented ZnO nanorods were produced on a ZnO/128∘ rotated Y-cut LiNbO3 layered SAW device using a solution growth method with zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetriamine, and polyethyleneimine. The nanorods have average diameter of 45 nm and height of 1 μm. The SAW device has a wavelength of 60 um and a center frequency of 66 MHz at room temperature. In testing at an operating temperature of 270∘C with an ethanol concentration of 2300 ppm, the sensor exhibited a 24 KHz frequency shift. This represents a significant improvement in comparison to an otherwise identical sensor using a ZnO thin film without nanorods, which had a frequency shift of 9 KHz.