WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface water values

  1. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friday, G. P.

    2005-07-18

    One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It

  2. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  3. Microplastics in Arctic polar waters: the first reported values of particles in surface and sub-surface samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Amy L.; Tirelli, Valentina; O'Connor, Ian; Officer, Rick

    2015-10-01

    Plastic, as a form of marine litter, is found in varying quantities and sizes around the globe from surface waters to deep-sea sediments. Identifying patterns of microplastic distribution will benefit an understanding of the scale of their potential effect on the environment and organisms. As sea ice extent is reducing in the Arctic, heightened shipping and fishing activity may increase marine pollution in the area. Microplastics may enter the region following ocean transport and local input, although baseline contamination measurements are still required. Here we present the first study of microplastics in Arctic waters, south and southwest of Svalbard, Norway. Microplastics were found in surface (top 16 cm) and sub-surface (6 m depth) samples using two independent techniques. Origins and pathways bringing microplastic to the Arctic remain unclear. Particle composition (95% fibres) suggests they may either result from the breakdown of larger items (transported over large distances by prevailing currents, or derived from local vessel activity), or input in sewage and wastewater from coastal areas. Concurrent observations of high zooplankton abundance suggest a high probability for marine biota to encounter microplastics and a potential for trophic interactions. Further research is required to understand the effects of microplastic-biota interaction within this productive environment.

  4. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  5. Values of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, N.; Dicke, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Water is essential for human life. However, due to its scarcity, the management of water is a topic of great concern. Inadequate management may lead to famines, food insecurity, ecological destruction, and resource-based conflicts, and eventually to human suffering and the loss of millions of human

  6. Values of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, N.; Dicke, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Water is essential for human life. However, due to its scarcity, the management of water is a topic of great concern. Inadequate management may lead to famines, food insecurity, ecological destruction, and resource-based conflicts, and eventually to human suffering and the loss of millions of human

  7. The Economic Value of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Arrojo Agudo

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The economic term of water is seen from the perspective of an ecological economy, an Aristotelian sense that integrates social values, environmental considerations and financial issues. Water should thus be conceptualized as an “ecosocial” good and not merely as a simple factor of production. Therefore, the focus of water management should not limit itself to managing a scarce resource. Rather the focus should be to articulate an institutional framework that would allow for the use of management tools based on the financial value of water (pricing policies, fiscal incentives, economic penalties for inefficiency... fixed to a somewhat interventionist market, or which answers to administration mechanisms, with constraints setting the conditions of sustainablity that the sound management of water requires in each territory. This approach brings to the table a profoundly territorial andcontextualized view of water management within the paradigm of Sustainable Development. Having said this does not imply disregarding the classical economic science tools of cost/benefit analysis, though. Quite the contrary: today, economic science can provide highly useful, multiple concepts and traditional techniques to the creation of a new model of the economic management of water. At bottom, the challenge is to take advantage of the previous conceptual and methodological body of work, refining the work in some cases,contextualizing it in others, and above all, complementing the previous work with other value-based perspectives to develop a multi-criteria decision-making model for the management and financial assessment of water policies.

  8. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  9. Guidance proposal for using available DegT50 values for estimation of degradation rates of plant protection products in Dutch surface water and sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Tiktak, A.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The degradation rate of plant protection products and their transformation products in surface water and sediment may influence their concentrations in Dutch surface water. Therefore the estimation of these rates may be an important part of the assessment of the exposure of aquatic organisms. We

  10. Water on graphene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  11. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  12. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  13. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional...... mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have...... not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water.In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical...

  14. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  15. The Added Value of Water Footprint Assessment for National Water Policy: A Case Study for Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A Water Footprint Assessment is carried out for Morocco, mapping the water footprint of different activities at river basin and monthly scale, distinguishing between surface- and groundwater. The paper aims to demonstrate the added value of detailed analysis of the human water footprint within a country and thorough assessment of the virtual water flows leaving and entering a country for formulating national water policy. Green, blue and grey water footprint estimates and virtual water flows ...

  16. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  17. Values Connecting Societies and Water Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. van Ast (Jacko); J.J. Bouma (Jan Jaap); M. Bal (Mansee)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction__ Water systems such as rivers and lakes have many important values for ecosystems and human societies. Both economical, social-ecological, cultural and political values are met by the water systems, connecting different activities in human society and ecosystem

  18. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  19. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  20. Assimilation of GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage into a Land Surface Model: Evaluation 1 and Potential Value for Drought Monitoring in Western and Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bailing; Rodell, Matthew; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Koster, Randal D.; van Dam, Tonie M.

    2012-01-01

    A land surface model s ability to simulate states (e.g., soil moisture) and fluxes (e.g., runoff) is limited by uncertainties in meteorological forcing and parameter inputs as well as inadequacies in model physics. In this study, anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission were assimilated into the NASA Catchment land surface model in western and central Europe for a 7-year period, using a previously developed ensemble Kalman smoother. GRACE data assimilation led to improved runoff correlations with gauge data in 17 out of 18 hydrological basins, even in basins smaller than the effective resolution of GRACE. Improvements in root zone soil moisture were less conclusive, partly due to the shortness of the in situ data record. In addition to improving temporal correlations, GRACE data assimilation also reduced increasing trends in simulated monthly TWS and runoff associated with increasing rates of precipitation. GRACE assimilated root zone soil moisture and TWS fields exhibited significant changes in their dryness rankings relative to those without data assimilation, suggesting that GRACE data assimilation could have a substantial impact on drought monitoring. Signals of drought in GRACE TWS correlated well with MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data in most areas. Although they detected the same droughts during warm seasons, drought signatures in GRACE derived TWS exhibited greater persistence than those in NDVI throughout all seasons, in part due to limitations associated with the seasonality of vegetation.

  1. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  2. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  3. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  4. The Added Value of Water Footprint Assessment for National Water Policy: A Case Study for Morocco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schyns, Joep F.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2014-01-01

    A Water Footprint Assessment is carried out for Morocco, mapping the water footprint of different activities at river basin and monthly scale, distinguishing between surface- and groundwater. The paper aims to demonstrate the added value of detailed analysis of the human water footprint within a cou

  5. Modeling Source Water Threshold Exceedances with Extreme Value Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, B.; Samson, C.; Summers, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Variability in surface water quality, influenced by seasonal and long-term climate changes, can impact drinking water quality and treatment. In particular, temperature and precipitation can impact surface water quality directly or through their influence on streamflow and dilution capacity. Furthermore, they also impact land surface factors, such as soil moisture and vegetation, which can in turn affect surface water quality, in particular, levels of organic matter in surface waters which are of concern. All of these will be exacerbated by anthropogenic climate change. While some source water quality parameters, particularly Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and bromide concentrations, are not directly regulated for drinking water, these parameters are precursors to the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), which are regulated in drinking water distribution systems. These DBPs form when a disinfectant, added to the water to protect public health against microbial pathogens, most commonly chlorine, reacts with dissolved organic matter (DOM), measured as TOC or dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and inorganic precursor materials, such as bromide. Therefore, understanding and modeling the extremes of TOC and Bromide concentrations is of critical interest for drinking water utilities. In this study we develop nonstationary extreme value analysis models for threshold exceedances of source water quality parameters, specifically TOC and bromide concentrations. In this, the threshold exceedances are modeled as Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) whose parameters vary as a function of climate and land surface variables - thus, enabling to capture the temporal nonstationarity. We apply these to model threshold exceedance of source water TOC and bromide concentrations at two locations with different climate and find very good performance.

  6. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  7. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  8. Water vapor interactions with polycrystalline titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, A.; Shamir, N.; Volterra, V.; Mintz, M. H.

    1999-02-01

    The initial interactions of water vapor with polycrystalline titanium surfaces were studied at room temperature. Measurements of water vapor surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analysis system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry (DRS), Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The kinetics of accommodation of the water dissociation fragments (H, O and OH) displayed a complex behavior depending not only on the exposure dose but also on the exposure pressure. For a given exposure dose the efficiency of chemisorption increased with increasing exposure pressure. DRS measurements indicated the occurrence of clustered hydroxyl moieties with tilted O-H bonds formed even at very low surface coverage. A model which assumes two parallel routes of chemisorption, by direct collisions (Langmuir type) and by a precursor state is proposed to account for the observed behavior. The oxidation efficiency of water seemed to be much lower than that of oxygen. No Ti 4+ states were detected even at high water exposure values. It is likely that hydroxyl species play an important role in the reduced oxidation efficiency of water.

  9. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  10. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  11. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kostik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, while in ground water samples from wells boreholes and mineral waters with the technique of ion chromatography. The research shows that lithium concentration in potable water ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 μg/L; in surface water from 0.5 to 15.0 μg/L; ground water from wells boreholes from 16.0 to 49.1 μg/L and mineral water from 125.2 to 484.9 μg/L. Obtained values are in accordance with the relevant international values for the lithium content in water.

  12. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  13. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  14. Value of information for water quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Shortle, James; Horan, Richard D.; Abler, David

    2005-06-01

    There is now much interest in comprehensive watershed-based approaches to water quality protection. While there is much to be said in favor of such an approach, it is also clear that implementation requires information that is often lacking. Given that information acquisition is costly, decisions are required about the types and amounts of information that should be sought. We examine the expected value of different types of information for price and quantity instruments for agricultural nitrogen pollution control in the Susquehanna River Basin. We also compare the ex ante economic efficiency of price and quantity instruments. The analysis explicitly accounts for public sector uncertainty about the benefits and costs of pollution reductions, with economic efficiency measured as the expected benefits less the expected costs of pollution reductions. We find optimized price controls to outperform optimized quantity controls under a range of possible information structures. For both instruments, information collection improves policy performance, with information about the benefits of pollution reductions having the greatest impact. The performance of the quantity instrument is more sensitive to information than is the price instrument. In consequence, the value of information to reduce benefit and cost uncertainty is greater for the quantity control.

  15. Distribution of {sup 129}I in terrestrial surface water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuegao [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Meng [College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Yi, Peng, E-mail: pengyi1915@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Yu, Zhongbo [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Li [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-15

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. {sup 129}I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of {sup 129}I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of {sup 129}I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on {sup 129}I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) for Water Year 2003 (WY 2003) (October I, 2002 to September 30, 2003) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at...

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  19. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  20. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  1. The added value of water footprint assessment for national water policy: a case study for Morocco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joep F Schyns

    Full Text Available A Water Footprint Assessment is carried out for Morocco, mapping the water footprint of different activities at river basin and monthly scale, distinguishing between surface- and groundwater. The paper aims to demonstrate the added value of detailed analysis of the human water footprint within a country and thorough assessment of the virtual water flows leaving and entering a country for formulating national water policy. Green, blue and grey water footprint estimates and virtual water flows are mainly derived from a previous grid-based (5 × 5 arc minute global study for the period 1996-2005. These estimates are placed in the context of monthly natural runoff and waste assimilation capacity per river basin derived from Moroccan data sources. The study finds that: (i evaporation from storage reservoirs is the second largest form of blue water consumption in Morocco, after irrigated crop production; (ii Morocco's water and land resources are mainly used to produce relatively low-value (in US$/m3 and US$/ha crops such as cereals, olives and almonds; (iii most of the virtual water export from Morocco relates to the export of products with a relatively low economic water productivity (in US$/m3; (iv blue water scarcity on a monthly scale is severe in all river basins and pressure on groundwater resources by abstractions and nitrate pollution is considerable in most basins; (v the estimated potential water savings by partial relocation of crops to basins where they consume less water and by reducing water footprints of crops down to benchmark levels are significant compared to demand reducing and supply increasing measures considered in Morocco's national water strategy.

  2. The added value of water footprint assessment for national water policy: a case study for Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyns, Joep F; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2014-01-01

    A Water Footprint Assessment is carried out for Morocco, mapping the water footprint of different activities at river basin and monthly scale, distinguishing between surface- and groundwater. The paper aims to demonstrate the added value of detailed analysis of the human water footprint within a country and thorough assessment of the virtual water flows leaving and entering a country for formulating national water policy. Green, blue and grey water footprint estimates and virtual water flows are mainly derived from a previous grid-based (5 × 5 arc minute) global study for the period 1996-2005. These estimates are placed in the context of monthly natural runoff and waste assimilation capacity per river basin derived from Moroccan data sources. The study finds that: (i) evaporation from storage reservoirs is the second largest form of blue water consumption in Morocco, after irrigated crop production; (ii) Morocco's water and land resources are mainly used to produce relatively low-value (in US$/m3 and US$/ha) crops such as cereals, olives and almonds; (iii) most of the virtual water export from Morocco relates to the export of products with a relatively low economic water productivity (in US$/m3); (iv) blue water scarcity on a monthly scale is severe in all river basins and pressure on groundwater resources by abstractions and nitrate pollution is considerable in most basins; (v) the estimated potential water savings by partial relocation of crops to basins where they consume less water and by reducing water footprints of crops down to benchmark levels are significant compared to demand reducing and supply increasing measures considered in Morocco's national water strategy.

  3. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  4. NUTRITIVE VALUE OF WATER HYACINTH (Eichhornia crassipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Emran HOSSAIN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to find out the chemical composition and nutritive value of Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes available in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Eichhornia crassipes samples were collected from three different remote places of the study area. Chemical analyses of the samples were carried out in triplicate for dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, crude fiber (CF, nitrogen free extracts (NFE, ether extracts (EE and total ash (TA in the animal nutrition and poultry research and training centre (PRTC laboratory, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Metabolizable energy (ME was estimated mathematically for all samples by using standard formula. Results indicated that, there were no significant variations (P>0.05 in the DM, CP, CF, NFE, EE and TA contents of the samples collected from different places. DM content varied from 8.7 to 9.3 g/100g, CP content varied from 10.1 to 11.2 g/100g, CF content varied from 26.1 to 27.4 g/100g, EE content varied from 1.1 to 1.8 g/100g, NFE content varied from 47.2 to 50.2 g/100g and TA content varied from 12.3 to 12.4 g/100g. Similarly, metabolizable energy (ME content also varied from 1999.7 to 2054.1 Kcal/kg DM. It could therefore be inferred that, the nutrient contents of Eichhornia crassipes does not vary due to variation in geographical location. Nutritionally, Eichhornia crassipes seems sound enough to be utilized as feed for livestock especially during scarcity period.

  5. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 835 - Surface Contamination Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to radioactive contamination deposited on, but not incorporated into the interior or matrix of, the... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surface Contamination Values D Appendix D to Part 835...—Surface Contamination Values The data presented in appendix D are to be used in identifying the need for...

  6. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  7. Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Surface Water Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset showing the locations of surface water intakes. These intake locations are part of the safe drinking water information system...

  8. Anti-Aliased Rendering of Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Qin; Eihachiro Nakamae; Wei Hua; Yasuo Nagai; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Water surface is one of the most important components of landscape scenes. When rendering spacious far from the viewpoint. This is because water surface consists of stochastic water waves which are usually modeled by periodic bump mapping. The incident rays on the water surface are actually scattered by the bumped waves,pattern, we estimate this solid angle of reflected rays and trace these rays. An image-based accelerating method is adopted so that the contribution of each reflected ray can be quickly obtained without elaborate intersection calculation. We also demonstrate anti-aliased shadows of sunlight and skylight on the water surface. Both the rendered images and animations show excellent effects on the water surface of a reservoir.

  9. Second Inflection Point of the Surface Tension of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalova, Jana; Mares, Radim

    2012-06-01

    The theme of a second inflection point of the temperature dependence of the surface tension of water remains a subject of controversy. Using data above 273 K, it is difficult to get a proof of existence of the second inflection point, because of experimental uncertainties. Data for the surface tension of supercooled water and results of a molecular dynamics study were included into the exploration of existence of an inflection point. A new term was included into the IAPWS equation to describe the surface tension in the supercooled water region. The new equation describes the surface tension values of ordinary water between 228 K and 647 K and leads to the inflection point value at a temperature of about 1.5 °C.

  10. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN THE RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA DUMITRAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is an increasingly important and why it is important to surfacewater quality, which is given by the analysis of physical - chemical, biological andobserving the investigation of water, biota, environments investigation. Analysis ofthe Prut river in terms of biological and physical elements - chemical. Evaluationof ecological and chemical status of water was done according to order of approvalof the standard classification nr.161/2006 surface water to determine the ecologicalstatus of water bodies

  11. Presence of water in residential environments - value for money?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauko, T.J.; Goetgeluk, R.W.; Straub, A.; Priemus, H.

    2003-01-01

    The role of water in the locational bundle of residential value and choice determinants is multiple. Relevant attributes pertain to water quality, proximity and length of water frontage, view, size of water body, coastal development costs, and costs caused by flooding. They also pertain to different

  12. Presence of water in residential environments - value for money?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauko, T.J.; Goetgeluk, R.W.; Straub, A.; Priemus, H.

    2003-01-01

    The role of water in the locational bundle of residential value and choice determinants is multiple. Relevant attributes pertain to water quality, proximity and length of water frontage, view, size of water body, coastal development costs, and costs caused by flooding. They also pertain to different

  13. Water hyacinth a potential source for value addition: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok; Madhavan, Aravind; Alphonsa, Jose Anju; Vivek, Narisetty; Gnansounou, Edgard; Castro, Eulogio; Faraco, Vincenza

    2017-04-01

    Water hyacinth a fresh water aquatic plant is considered as a noxious weed in many parts of the world since it grows very fast and depletes nutrients and oxygen from water bodies adversely affecting the growth of both plants and animals. Hence conversion of this problematic weed to value added chemicals and fuels helps in the self-sustainability especially for developing countries. The present review discusses the various value added products and fuels which can be produced from water hyacinth, the recent research and developmental activities on the bioconversion of water hyacinth for the production of fuels and value added products as well as its possibilities and challenges in commercialization.

  14. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yongjun; WEI Bingbo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the surface properties of water in a temperature range from 228 to 293 K by using the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and four-site TIP4P potentials. The calculated surface tension increases with the decrease of temperature, and moreover the slopes of the surface tension-temperature curves show a weak rise below 273 K, whereas no obvious anomalies appear near 228 K, which accords with the previous experiments. Compared with the measured values, the SPC/E potential shows a good agreement, and the TIP4P potential scription of the surface structure of supercooled water for the SPC/E. When simulating the orientational distributions of water molecules near the surface, the SPC/E potential produces higher ordering and larger surface potentials than the TIP4P potential.

  15. Manufacturing and characterisation of water repellent surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Botija, Pablo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    design criteria for such surfaces. The problem of adapting this behaviour to artificially roughened surfaces is addressed by providing design criteria for superhydrophobic, water-repellent and self-cleaning surfaces according to the concrete performance desired for them. Different kind of manufacturing...

  16. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The MN Department of Agriculture (MDA) is charged with periodically collecting and analyzing water samples from selected locations throughout the state to determine...

  17. The Economic Value of Changes in Water Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Kejser

    Water quality is from both a European and Danish perspective challenged by private use of the resource. The public good characteristics of the resource require that regulation should internalize the non-market values of water quality, in order to reach an optimal level from a welfare economic...... perspective. Valuation using stated preference techniques to value changes in ecosystem services has been widely used to estimate values of water quality. However, heterogeneity in values exists across different groups in the population. The objective of this PhD-thesis is to explore two different kinds...... of preference heterogeneity, when valuing changes in water quality. The PhD thesis consists of four papers all related to heterogeneity in the public preferences for water quality improvements. Papers referred to as 1, 2 and 3 are based on a discrete choice experiment (DCE) on water quality improvements...

  18. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ambrus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institutional levels. This article assesses whether there is substantive fragmentation in water law at the international, the European, the sub-regional (Danube River Basin, and the Dutch domestic level. To this end, first a working definition of the concept of ‘public water values’ will be formulated. Subsequently, this article will draw conclusions regarding the degree of substantive fragmentation in water law across the institutional levels mentioned, based on an in-depth analysis of relevant sources of water law. The article will not present an exhaustive overview of public water values, but elaborates on a number of core values in water law.

  19. Decision support system for economic value of irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gafy, Inas; El-Ganzori, Akram

    2012-06-01

    The mismatch between the supply and demand, inequitable distribution and the over irrigation of water consuming crops are the main constraints that are faced in the implementation of the integrated water resources management in Egypt. With water scarcity, the problem under consideration is that the current cropping pattern is not economically efficient in the utilization of the available water resource. Moreover, in consequence of the importance of the agricultural sector to the national economies, it is necessary to be aware of the economic performance of water use in the crops production. The scope of this study is to develop economic value of irrigation water maps of Egypt. The objective of the study is carried out by acquiring a Decision Support System for economic value of irrigation water of Egypt. This Decision Support System is applied for developing economic value maps for the irrigation water that is used for cultivating 45 crops under cereal, fiber, legumes, and vegetables, herbalist, and forages categories at each governorate of Egypt in year 2008 and 2009. The crops that achieve the highest and lowest economic value of irrigation water at each governorate of Egypt were identified. The reasons of the variations in the economic value of irrigation water at the governorates of Egypt were determined. The developed Decision Support System could be used yearly as a tool for demonstrating a picture about the economic value of irrigation water for the decision makers in the areas of water resources and agriculture. The developed economic value of irrigation water maps can be used in proposing a cropping pattern that maximizes the economic value of irrigation water in each governorate of Egypt.

  20. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    Mompelat, S.; Thomas, Olivier; Le Bot, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The occurrence of 20 human pharmaceutical compounds and metabolites from 10 representative therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface water). Of the 20 human pharmaceutical compounds selected, 16 were quantified in both the surface water and drinking water, with 22% of the values above the limit o...

  1. Measurements of water surface snow lines in classical protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Blevins, Sandra M; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R; Carr, John S; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1-100 AU using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model comprising of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of $\\sim 3-11$ AU, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abu...

  2. Surface water waves due to an oscillatory wavemaker in the presence of surface tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Mandal

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial value problem of generation of surface water waves by a harmonically oscillating plane vertical wavemaker in an infinite incompressible fluid under the action of gravity and surface tension is investigated. In the asymptotic evaluation of the free surface depression for large time and distance, the contribution to the integral by stationary phase method gives rise to transient component of the free surface depression while the contribution from the poles give rise to steady state component. It is observed that the presence of surface tension sometimes changes the qualitative nature of the transient component of free surface depression.

  3. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  4. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  5. Stormwater Priority Pollutants Versus Surface Water Quality Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Ledin, Anna; Baun, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Stormwater in urban areas comprises of a substantial part of the urban water cycle, dominating the flow in many small urban streams, and the pollution levels are sizeable. No stormwater quality criteria were found here and no European or national emission limit values exist. Stormwater pollutants...... however are present in levels exceeding most of the regulated surface water quality criteria and environmental quality standards. Therefore catchment characterisation is needed to chose suitable treatment prior to discharge into receiving surface waters, as the mixing may be insufficient in small streams....

  6. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALPFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources,...

  7. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku

    2013-07-01

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO2, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  8. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Gikan H., E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO{sub 2}, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  9. Exit Creek Water Surface Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from a longitudinal profile of water surface surveyed June 23-24, 2013 at Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai...

  10. US Forest Service Surface Drinking Water Importance

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting watershed indexes to help identify areas of interest for protecting surface drinking water quality. The dataset depicted in this...

  11. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  12. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  13. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauner, Ines M; Deblais, Antoine; Beattie, James K; Kellay, Hamid; Bonn, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m(-1)) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m(-1)) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments.

  14. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  15. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during convention

  16. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during

  17. Dropwise condensation rate of water breath figures on polymer surfaces having similar surface free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface roughness, wettability, water contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and wetting hysteresis (WH) of polymeric substrates to the water drop condensation rate. We used five polyolefin coatings whose surface free energies were in a close range of 30-37 mJ/m2 but having different surface roughness and CAH. The formation of water breath figures was monitored at a temperature just below the dew point. The initial number of the condensed droplets per unit area (N0) and droplet surface coverage were determined during the early stage of drop condensation where the droplet coalescence was negligible. It was found that the mean drop diameter of condensed droplets on these polymer surfaces grow according to a power law with exponent 1/3 of time, similar to the previous reports given in the literature. It was determined that surface roughness and corresponding CAH and WH properties of polymers have important effects on the number of nucleation sites and growth rate of the condensed water droplets. N0 values and the surface coverage increased with the increase in surface roughness, CAH and WH of the polymer surfaces. The total condensed water drop volume also increased with the increase in surface roughness in accordance with the increase of the number of nucleated droplets.

  18. Valuing water gains in the Eastern Cape's Working for Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2002-01-01

    Jan 1, 2002 ... reason it is crucial that the pricing of this water be an accurate reflection of its relative scarcity. This paper .... This sensitivity would entail estimating .... of groundwater occurrence in the upper formations has yet been reported ...

  19. Precious Droplets: The Value of Water. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kristi Rennebohm

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  20. The Value of Forest Conservation for Water Quality Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Kreye

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Forests protect water quality by reducing soil erosion, sedimentation, and pollution; yet there is little information about the economic value of conserving forests for water quality protection in much of the United States. To assess this value, we conducted a meta-analysis of willingness-to-pay (WTP for protecting unimpaired waters, and econometrically determined several significant drivers of WTP: type of conservation instrument (tool, aquatic resource type, geographic context, spatial scale, time, and household income. Using a benefit transfer to two highly forested sites, we illustrate the importance of these factors on WTP for water quality protection programs, forest conservation and policy design.

  1. Temperature limit values for touching cold surfaces with the fingertip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Q.; Holme, I.; Hartog, E.A. den; Havenith, G.; Jay, O.; Malchaires, J.; Piette, A.; Rintama, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was performed in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the short-term accidental touching of the fingertip with cold

  2. Temperature limit values for touching cold surfaces with the fingertip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Q.; Holme, I.; Hartog, E.A. den; Havenith, G.; Jay, O.; Malchaires, J.; Piette, A.; Rintama, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was performed in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the short-term accidental touching of the fingertip with cold surfa

  3. Water-clay surface interaction: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, O., E-mail: sobolev38@gmail.com [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France); Favre Buivin, F. [HES-SO Fribourg, Bd de Perolles 80-CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kemner, E.; Russina, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Beuneu, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin and Ikerbasque, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Charlet, L. [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: Interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces was studied by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} was used to reduce hydration of interlayer cations. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} (NC{sub 4}H{sub 12}), was used to saturate the interlayer space of nontronite NAu-1 in order to reduce hydration of interlayer cations that could hinder the effects related to the clay-water interactions. The water content was low in order to reduce hydrogen bonding between water molecules. It was found that water molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of nontronite. The diffusion activation energy value E{sub a} = 29 {+-} 3 kJ/mol was obtained for water molecules hydrating the clay surface. These results confirm the assumption that surfaces of smectite clays with tetrahedral substitutions are hydrophilic.

  4. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  5. Recommended values of clean metal surface work functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derry, Gregory N., E-mail: gderry@loyola.edu; Kern, Megan E.; Worth, Eli H. [Department of Physics, Loyola University Maryland, 4501 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Maryland 21210 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A critical review of the experimental literature for measurements of the work functions of clean metal surfaces of single-crystals is presented. The tables presented include all results found for low-index crystal faces except cases that were known to be contaminated surfaces. These results are used to construct a recommended value of the work function for each surface examined, along with an uncertainty estimate for that value. The uncertainties are based in part on the error distribution for all measured work functions in the literature, which is included here. The metals included in this review are silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iridium (Ir), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W)

  6. Radiolysis of water with aluminum oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Sarah C.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum oxide, Al2O3, nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H2, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. Surface analysis techniques included: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer - Emmett - Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Production of H2 by γ-ray radiolysis was determined for samples with adsorbed water and for Al2O3 - water slurries. For Al2O3 samples with adsorbed water, the radiation chemical yield of H2 was measured as 80±20 molecules/100 eV (1 molecule/100 eV=1.04×10-7 mol/J). The yield of H2 was observed to decrease as the amount of water present in the Al2O3 - water slurries increased. Surface studies indicated that the α-phase Al2O3 samples changed phase following irradiation by He ions, and that the oxyhydroxide layer, present on the pristine sample, is removed by γ-ray and He ion irradiation.

  7. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Ambrus; Herman Kasper Gilissen; Jasper J.H. van Kempen

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institutional levels. This article assesses whether there is substantive fragmentation in water law at the international, the European, the sub-regional (Danube River Basin), and the Dutch domestic level. ...

  8. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  9. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The surface of Mars once had abundant water flowing on its surface, but now there is a general perception that this surface is completely dry. Several lines of research have shown that there are sources of potentially large quantities of water at many locations on the surface, including regions considered as candidates for future human missions. Traditionally, system designs for these human missions are constrained to tightly recycle water and oxygen, and current resource utilization strategies involve ascent vehicle oxidizer production only. But the assumption of relatively abundant extant water may change this. Several scenarios were constructed to evaluate water requirements for human Mars expeditions to assess the impact to system design if locally produced water is available. Specifically, we have assessed water resources needed for 1) ascent vehicle oxidizer and fuel production, 2) open-loop water and oxygen life support requirements along with more robust usage scenarios, and 3) crew radiation protection augmentation. In this assessment, production techniques and the associated chemistry to transform Martian water and atmosphere into these useful commodities are identified, but production mass and power requirements are left to future analyses. The figure below illustrates the type of water need assessment performed and that will be discussed. There have been several sources of feedstock material discussed in recent literature that could be used to produce these quantities of water. This paper will focus on Mars surface features that resemble glacier-like forms on Earth. Several lines of evidence indicate that some of these features are in fact buried ice, likely remnants from an earlier ice age on Mars. This paper examines techniques and hardware systems used in the polar regions of Earth to access this buried ice and withdraw water from it. These techniques and systems will be described to illustrate options available. A technique known as a Rodriguez Well

  10. Electrolysis of water on (oxidized) metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    directly from the electronic structure calculations. We consider electrodes of Pt(111) and Au(111) in detail and then discuss trends for a series of different metals. We show that the difficult step in the water splitting process is the formation of superoxy-type (OOH) species on the surface...... by the splitting of a water molecule on top an adsorbed oxygen atom. One conclusion is that this is only possible on metal surfaces that are (partly) oxidized. We show that the binding energies of the different intermediates are linearly correlated for a number of metals. In a simple analysis, where the linear...... relations are assumed to be obeyed exactly, this leads to a universal relationship between the catalytic rate and the oxygen binding energy. Finally, we conclude that for systems obeying these relations, there is a limit to how good a water splitting catalyst an oxidized metal surface can become. (c) 2005...

  11. Surface Tension of Ab Initio Liquid Water at the Water-Air Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the simulation cell size dependence of the surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which show that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is required for the small system used in the AIMD simulation. The AIMD simulations reveal that the double-{\\xi} basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress, while the triple and quadruple-{\\xi} basis sets give similar results. We further demonstrate that the van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension, while van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in the value for the surface tension that is too high. T...

  12. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University; Mark, David [University at Buffalo (SUNY); Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  13. Public Values in Water Law : A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, Monika; Gilissen, Herman Kasper; van Kempen, Jasper JH

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institut

  14. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, M.; Gilissen, Herman Kasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314838732; van Kempen, Jasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314011900

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institut

  15. Public Values in Water Law : A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, Monika; Gilissen, Herman Kasper; van Kempen, Jasper JH

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various

  16. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, M.; Gilissen, Herman Kasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314838732; van Kempen, Jasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314011900

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various

  17. Spring and surface water quality of the Cyprus ophiolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of surface, spring and borehole waters associated with the ophiolite rocks of Cyprus shows five broad water types (1 Mg-HCO3, (2 Na-SO4-Cl-HCO3, (3 Na-Ca-Cl-SO4-OH-CO3, (4 Na-Cl-SO4 and (5 Ca-SO4. The waters represent a progression in chemical reactivity from surface waters that evolve within a groundwater setting due to hydrolysis of the basic/ultrabasic rock as modified by CO2-weathering. An increase in salinity is also observed which is due to mixing with a saline end-member (modified sea-water and dissolution of gypsum/anhydrite. In some cases, the waters have pH values greater than 11. Such high values are associated with low temperature serpentinisation reactions. The system is a net sink for CO2. This feature is related not only to the hydrolysis of the primary minerals in the rock, but also to CaCO3 or Ca-Mg-CO3 solubility controls. Under hyperalkaline conditions, virtually all the carbon dioxide is lost from the water due to the sufficiently high calcium levels and carbonate buffering is then insignificant. Calcium sulphate solubility controls may also be operative when calcium and sulphate concentrations are particularly high. Keywords: Cyprus, Troodos, ophiolite, serpentinisation, spring, stream, water quality, bromide, iodine, boron, trace elements, hyperalkaline.

  18. Surface Modification of Water Purification Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J; Dreyer, Daniel R; Bielawski, Christopher W; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-04-18

    Polymeric membranes are an energy-efficient means of purifying water, but they suffer from fouling during filtration. Modification of the membrane surface is one route to mitigating membrane fouling, as it helps to maintain high levels of water productivity. Here, a series of common techniques for modification of the membrane surface are reviewed, including surface coating, grafting, and various treatment techniques such as chemical treatment, UV irradiation, and plasma treatment. Historical background on membrane development and surface modification is also provided. Finally, polydopamine, an emerging material that can be easily deposited onto a wide variety of substrates, is discussed within the context of membrane modification. A brief summary of the chemistry of polydopamine, particularly as it may pertain to membrane development, is also described. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Surface Water Protection by Productive Buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christen, Benjamin

    Vegetated riparian buffer zones are a widely recommended best management practice in agriculture for protecting surface and coastal waters from diffuse nutrient pollution. On the background of the EU funded research project NitroEurope (NEU; www.NitroEurope.eu), this study concentrates...... on the mitigation of nitrogen pollution in surface and groundwater, using riparian buffer zones for biomass production. The objectives are to map suitable areas for buffer implementation across the six NEU study landscapes, model tentative N-loss mitigation, calculate biomass production potential and economic...... designed for local conditions could be a way of protecting water quality attractive to many stakeholders....

  20. Surface-Water Conditions in Georgia, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jaime A.; Landers, Mark N.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center-in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies-collected surface-water streamflow, water-quality, and ecological data during the 2005 Water Year (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). These data were compiled into layers of an interactive ArcReaderTM published map document (pmf). ArcReaderTM is a product of Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI?). Datasets represented on the interactive map are * continuous daily mean streamflow * continuous daily mean water levels * continuous daily total precipitation * continuous daily water quality (water temperature, specific conductance dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity) * noncontinuous peak streamflow * miscellaneous streamflow measurements * lake or reservoir elevation * periodic surface-water quality * periodic ecological data * historical continuous daily mean streamflow discontinued prior to the 2005 water year The map interface provides the ability to identify a station in spatial reference to the political boundaries of the State of Georgia and other features-such as major streams, major roads, and other collection stations. Each station is hyperlinked to a station summary showing seasonal and annual stream characteristics for the current year and for the period of record. For continuous discharge stations, the station summary includes a one page graphical summary page containing five graphs, a station map, and a photograph of the station. The graphs provide a quick overview of the current and period-of-record hydrologic conditions of the station by providing a daily mean discharge graph for the water year, monthly statistics graph for the water year and period of record, an annual mean streamflow graph for the period of record, an annual minimum 7-day average streamflow graph for the period of record, and an annual peak streamflow graph for the period of record. Additionally, data can be accessed through the layer's link

  1. Ultra Water Repellent Polypropylene Surfaces with Tunable Water Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tang; Cai, Chao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2017-03-22

    Polypropylene (PP), including isotactic PP (i-PP) and atactic PP (a-PP) with distinct tacticity, is one of the most widely used general plastics. Herein, ultra water repellent PP coatings with tunable adhesion to water were prepared via a simple casting method. The pure i-PP coating shows a hierarchical morphology with micro/nanobinary structures, exhibiting a water contact angle (CA) larger than 150° and a sliding angle less than 5° (for 5 μL water droplet). In contrast, the pure a-PP coating has a less rough morphology with a water contact angle of about 130°, and the water droplets stick on the coating at any tilted angles. For the composite i-PP/a-PP coatings, however, ultra water repellency with CA > 150° but water adhesion tailorable from slippery to sticky can be realized, depending on the contents of a-PP and i-PP. The different wetting behaviors are due to the various microstructures of the composite coatings resulting from the distinct crystallization ability of a-PP and i-PP. Furthermore, the existence of a-PP in the composite coatings enhances the mechanical properties compared to the i-PP coating. The proposed method is feasible to modify various substrates and potential applications in no-loss liquid transportation, slippery surfaces, and patterned superhydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  2. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  3. Valuing flexibilities in the design of urban water management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinghan; Cardin, Michel-Alexandre; Babovic, Vladan; Santhanakrishnan, Deepak; Schmitter, Petra; Meshgi, Ali

    2013-12-15

    Climate change and rapid urbanization requires decision-makers to develop a long-term forward assessment on sustainable urban water management projects. This is further complicated by the difficulties of assessing sustainable designs and various design scenarios from an economic standpoint. A conventional valuation approach for urban water management projects, like Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) analysis, fails to incorporate uncertainties, such as amount of rainfall, unit cost of water, and other uncertainties associated with future changes in technological domains. Such approach also fails to include the value of flexibility, which enables managers to adapt and reconfigure systems over time as uncertainty unfolds. This work describes an integrated framework to value investments in urban water management systems under uncertainty. It also extends the conventional DCF analysis through explicit considerations of flexibility in systems design and management. The approach incorporates flexibility as intelligent decision-making mechanisms that enable systems to avoid future downside risks and increase opportunities for upside gains over a range of possible futures. A water catchment area in Singapore was chosen to assess the value of a flexible extension of standard drainage canals and a flexible deployment of a novel water catchment technology based on green roofs and porous pavements. Results show that integrating uncertainty and flexibility explicitly into the decision-making process can reduce initial capital expenditure, improve value for investment, and enable decision-makers to learn more about system requirements during the lifetime of the project.

  4. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Kostik; Biljana Bauer; Zoran Kavrakovski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  5. Thermodynamic properties of water solvating biomolecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, Matthias

    Changes in the potential energy and entropy of water molecules hydrating biomolecular interfaces play a significant role for biomolecular solubility and association. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods allow calculations of free energy differences between two states from simulations. However, these methods are computationally demanding and do not provide insights into individual thermodynamic contributions, i.e. changes in the solvent energy or entropy. Here, we employ methods to spatially resolve distributions of hydration water thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of biomolecular surfaces. This allows direct insights into thermodynamic signatures of the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solvent accessible sites of proteins and small molecules and comparisons to ideal model surfaces. We correlate dynamic properties of hydration water molecules, i.e. translational and rotational mobility, to their thermodynamics. The latter can be used as a guide to extract thermodynamic information from experimental measurements of site-resolved water dynamics. Further, we study energy-entropy compensations of water at different hydration sites of biomolecular surfaces. This work is supported by the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC 1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  6. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Lance, Blake; Ho, Clifford K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0deg, 10deg, and 45deg), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47deg contact angle and non-wetting = 93deg contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of %7E3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45deg tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  7. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  8. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  9. Strategic Value of Water to the National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    per energy unit11 Gasoline 5 gallons of water to produce 1 gallon Nuclear 720 gallons per MW Subcritical Pulverized Coal 520...to 990 gallons per MW Supercritical Pulverized Coal 450 to 840 gallons per MW Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle 310 to 450 gallons per MW...or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. STRATEGIC VALUE OF WATER TO THE NATIONAL GUARD BY

  10. Streamers sliding on a water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishev, Yuri Semenov; Karalnik, Vladimir; Medvedev, Mikhail; Petryakov, Alexander; Trushkin, Nikolay; Shafikov, Airat

    2017-06-01

    The features of an electrical interaction between surface streamers (thin current filaments) sliding on a liquid and liquid itself are still unknown in many details. This paper presents the experimental results on properties of the surface streamers sliding on water with different conductivity (distilled and tap water). The streamers were initiated with a sharpened thin metallic needle placed above the liquid and stressed with a periodical or pulsed high voltage. Two electrode systems were used and tested. The first of them provides in advance the existence of the longitudinal electric field above the water. The second one imitates the electrode geometry of a pin-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge in which the barrier is a thick layer of liquid. The electrical and optical characteristics of streamers were complemented with data on the spectroscopic measurements. It was revealed that surface streamers on water have no spatial memory. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  11. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  12. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality

  13. 2D Gridded Surface Data Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Q [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Xie, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2015-08-30

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Best Estimate (ARMBE) 2-dimensional (2D) gridded surface data (ARMBE2DGRID) value-added product. Spatial variability is critically important to many scientific studies, especially those that involve processes of great spatial variations at high temporal frequency (e.g., precipitation, clouds, radiation, etc.). High-density ARM sites deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) allow us to observe the spatial patterns of variables of scientific interests. The upcoming megasite at SGP with its enhanced spatial density will facilitate the studies at even finer scales. Currently, however, data are reported only at individual site locations at different time resolutions for different datastreams. It is difficult for users to locate all the data they need and requires extra effort to synchronize the data. To address these problems, the ARMBE2DGRID value-added product merges key surface measurements at the ARM SGP sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate the data application.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  15. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  16. Convergent surface water distributions in U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.K. Steele; J.B. Heffernan; N. Bettez; J. Cavender-Bares; P.M. Groffman; J.M. Grove; S. Hall; S.E. Hobbie; K. Larson; J.L. Morse; C. Neill; K.C. Nelson; J. O' Neil-Dunne; L. Ogden; D.E. Pataki; C. Polsky; R. Roy Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Earth's surface is rapidly urbanizing, resulting in dramatic changes in the abundance, distribution and character of surface water features in urban landscapes. However, the scope and consequences of surface water redistribution at broad spatial scales are not well understood. We hypothesized that urbanization would lead to convergent surface water abundance and...

  17. From superhydrophobicity and water repellency to superhydrophilicity: smart polymer-functionalized surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Emmanuel; Mateescu, Anca; Barberoglou, Marios; Vamvakaki, Maria; Fotakis, Costas; Anastasiadis, Spiros H

    2010-06-21

    pH-responsive surfaces, reversibly switching between superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity/water repellency, are developed by "grafting from" a pH-sensitive polymer onto a hierarchically micro/nano-structured substrate. We quantify the water repellency by investigating the restitution coefficient of water droplets bouncing off the surfaces. The water repellent state requires appropriate hydrophobicity of the functionalizing polymer as well as very low values of contact angle hysteresis.

  18. Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban WaterConservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents a project undertaken for theCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council (the Council) to create a newmethod of accounting for the diverse environmental benefits of raw watersavings. The environmental benefits (EB) model was designed to providewater utilities with a practical tool that they can use to assign amonetary value to the benefits that may accrue from implementing any ofthe Council-recommended Best Management Practices. The model treats onlyenvironmental services associated directly with water, and is intended tocover miscellaneous impacts that are not currently accounted for in anyother cost-benefit analysis.

  19. Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Q. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Xie, S. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Best Estimate (ARMBE) station-based surface data (ARMBESTNS) value-added product. It is a twin data product of the ARMBE 2-Dimensional gridded (ARMBE2DGRID) data set. Unlike the ARMBE2DGRID data set, ARMBESTNS data are reported at the original site locations and show the original information (except for the interpolation over time). Therefore, the users have the flexibility to process the data with the approach more suitable for their applications. This document provides information about the input data, quality control (QC) method, and output format of this data set. As much of the information is identical to that of the ARMBE2DGRID data, this document will emphasize more on the different aspects of these two data sets.

  20. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  1. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  2. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  3. Groundwater - surface water interactions in the Ayeyarwady river delta, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, K.; Haruyama, S.; Kuzuha, Y.; Kay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is widely used as a water resource in the Ayeyarwady River delta. But, Groundwater has some chemical problem in part of the area. To use safety groundwater for health, it is important to make clear the actual conditions of physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater in this delta. Besides, Ayeyarwady River delta has remarkable wet and dry season. Surface water - groundwater interaction is also different in each season, and it is concerned that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater is affected by the flood and high waves through cyclone or monsoon. So, it is necessary to research a good aquifer distribution for sustainable groundwater resource supply. The purposes of this study are evaluate to seasonal change of groundwater - surface water interactions, and to investigate the more safety aquifer to reduce the healthy risk. Water samples are collected at 49 measurement points of river and groundwater, and are analyzed dissolved major ions and oxygen and hydro-stable isotope compositions. There are some groundwater flow systems and these water qualities are different in each depth. These showed that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater are closely related to climatological, geomorphogical, geological and land use conditions. At the upper Alluvium, groundwater quality changes to lower concentration in wet season, so Ayeyarwady River water is main recharge water at this layer in the wet season. Besides, in the dry season, water quality is high concentration by artificial activities. Shallower groundwater is affected by land surface conditions such as the river water and land use in this layer. At lower Alluvium, Arakan and Pegu mountains are main recharge area of good water quality aquifers. Oxygen18 value showed a little affected by river water infiltration in the wet season, but keep stable good water quality through the both seasons. In the wet season, the same groundwater exists and water quality changes through

  4. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  5. Relations between information, time, and value of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Galindo, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    This research uses with stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) as a tool to reveal economic information about managed water resources. An application to the operation of an example hydropower reservoir is presented. SDP explicitly balances the marginal value of water for immediate use and its expected opportunity cost of not having more water available for future use. The result of an SDP analysis is a steady state policy, which gives the optimal decision as a function of the state. A commonly applied form gives the optimal release as a function of the month, current reservoir level and current inflow to the reservoir. The steady state policy can be complemented with a real-time management strategy, that can depend on more real-time information. An information-theoretical perspective is given on how this information influences the value of water, and how to deal with that influence in hydropower reservoir optimization. This results in some conjectures about how the information gain from real-time operation could affect the optimal long term policy. Another issue is the sharing of increased benefits that result from this information gain in a multi-objective setting. It is argued that this should be accounted for in negotiations about an operation policy.

  6. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence...

  7. Wettability and water uptake of holm oak leaf surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Plant trichomes play important protective functions and may have a major influence on leaf surface wettability. With the aim of gaining insight into trichome structure, composition and function in relation to water-plant surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of Quercus ilex L. (holm oak) as model. By measuring the leaf water potential 24 h after the deposition of water drops on to abaxial and adaxial surfaces, evidence for water penetration through the upper l...

  8. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  9. Groundwater–surface water interactions in wetlands for integrated water resources management (preface)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Winter, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater–surface water interactions constitute an important link between wetlands and the surrounding catchment. Wetlands may develop in topographic lows where groundwater exfiltrates. This water has its functions for ecological processes within the wetland, while surface water outflow from

  10. General survey and conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Publikatie die bestaat uit twee delen: 1. General survey of the relation between water quantity and water quality; 2. Conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

  11. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  12. Recovery from acidification in European surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data for 56 long-term monitoring sites in eight European countries are used to assess freshwater responses to reductions in acid deposition at a large spatial scale. In a consistent analysis of trends from 1980 onwards, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56 showed significant (p ≤0.05 decreasing trends in pollution-derived sulphate. Only two sites showed a significant increase. Nitrate, on the other hand, had a much weaker and more varied pattern, with no significant trend at 35 of 56 sites, decreases at some sites in Scandinavia and Central Europe, and increases at some sites in Italy and the UK. The general reduction in surface water acid anion concentrations has led to increases in acid neutralising capacity (significant at 27 of 56 sites but has also been offset in part by decreases in base cations, particularly calcium (significant at 26 of 56 sites, indicating that much of the improvement in runoff quality to date has been the result of decreasing ionic strength. Increases in acid neutralising capacity have been accompanied by increases in pH and decreases in aluminium, although fewer trends were significant (pH 19 of 56, aluminium 13 of 53. Increases in pH appear to have been limited in some areas by rising concentrations of organic acids. Within a general trend towards recovery, some inter-regional variation is evident, with recovery strongest in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, moderate in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, and apparently weakest in Germany. Keywords: acidification, recovery, European trends, sulphate, nitrate, acid neutralising capacity

  13. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompelat, S; Thomas, O; Le Bot, B

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of 20 human pharmaceutical compounds and metabolites from 10 representative therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface water). Of the 20 human pharmaceutical compounds selected, 16 were quantified in both the surface water and drinking water, with 22% of the values above the limit of quantification for surface water and 14% for drinking water). Psychostimulants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, iodinated contrast media and anxiolytic drugs were the main therapeutic classes of human pharmaceutical compounds detected in the surface water and drinking water. The results for surface water were close to results from previous studies in spite of differences in prescription rates of human pharmaceutical compounds in different countries. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other human pharmaceutical compounds seemed to be removed more efficiently (average elimination rate of over 50%) by adsorption onto activated carbon and oxidation/disinfection with ozone or chlorine (not taking account of the disinfection by-products). These results add to the increasing evidence of the occurrence of human pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water that may represent a threat to human beings exposed to a cocktail of human pharmaceutical compounds and related metabolites and by-products in drinking water.

  14. The water energy nexus, an ISO50001 water case study and the need for a water value system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan P. Walsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The world’s current utilisation of water, allied to the forecasted increase in our dependence on it, has led to the realisation that water as a resource needs to be managed. The scarcity and cost of water worldwide, along with water management practices within Europe, are highlighted in this paper. The heavy dependence of energy generation on water and the similar dependence of water treatment and distribution on energy, collectively termed the water–energy nexus, is detailed. A summary of the recently launched ISO14046 Water Footprint Standard along with other benchmarking measures is outlined and a case history of managing water using the Energy Management Standard ISO50001 is discussed in detail. From this, the requirement for a methodology for improvement of water management has been identified, involving a value system for water streams, which, once optimised will improve water management including efficiency and total utilisation.

  15. Structured free-water clusters near lubricating surfaces are essential in water-based lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; de Vries, Joop; Van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Water-based lubrication provides cheap and environmentally friendly lubrication and, although hydrophilic surfaces are preferred in water-based lubrication, often lubricating surfaces do not retain water molecules during shear. We show here that hydrophilic (42° water contact angle) quartz surfaces facilitate water-based lubrication to the same extent as more hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces (61°), while lubrication by hydrophilic Ge crystal surfaces (44°) is best. Thus surface hydrophilicity is not sufficient for water-based lubrication. Surface-thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that all surfaces, regardless of their water-based lubrication, were predominantly electron donating, implying water binding with their hydrogen groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ge crystal surfaces providing optimal lubrication consisted of a mixture of -O and =O functionalities, while Si crystal and quartz surfaces solely possessed -O functionalities. Comparison of infrared absorption bands of the crystals in water indicated fewer bound-water layers on hydrophilic Ge than on hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces, while absorption bands for free water on the Ge crystal surface indicated a much more pronounced presence of structured, free-water clusters near the Ge crystal than near Si crystal surfaces. Accordingly, we conclude that the presence of structured, free-water clusters is essential for water-based lubrication. The prevalence of structured water clusters can be regulated by adjusting the ratio between surface electron-donating and electron-accepting groups and between -O and =O functionalities.

  16. Potentially hazardous substances in surface waters. II. Cholinesterase inhibitors in Dutch surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greve, P.A.; Freudenthal, J.; Wit, S.L.

    1972-01-01

    Several analytical methods were employed to determine the concentrations of cholinesterase inhibitors in several Dutch surface waters. An Auto-Analyzer method was used for screening purposes; thin-layer chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for identification and q

  17. Estimating cultural benefits from surface water status improvements in freshwater wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebeling, Peter; Abrantes, Nelson; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Freshwater wetlands provide crucial ecosystem services, though are subject to anthropogenic/natural stressors that provoke negative impacts on these ecosystems, services and values. The European Union Water Framework Directive aims to achieve good status of surface waters by 2015, through implementation of Catchment Management Plans. Implementation of Catchment Management Plans is costly, though associated benefits from improvements in surface water status are less well known. This paper establishes a functional relationship between surface water status and cultural ecosystem service values of freshwater systems. Hence, we develop a bio-economic valuation approach in which we relate ecological status and chemical status of surface waters (based on local physio-chemical and benthic macro-invertebrates survey data) to willingness-to-pay (using benefit-function transfer). Results for the Pateira de Fermentelos freshwater wetland (Portugal) show that the current status of surface waters is good from a chemical though only moderate from an ecological perspective. The current cultural ecosystem service value of the wetland is estimated at 1.54 m€/yr- increasing to 2.02 m€/yr in case good status of surface waters is obtained. Taking into account ecosystem services and values in decision making is essential to avoid costs from externalities and capture benefits from spill-overs--leading to more equitable, effective and efficient water resources management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality Evaluation and Its Application to Surface Water Ecosystem Based on Maximum Flux Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘年磊; 毛国柱; 赵林

    2010-01-01

    Based on the maximum flux principle(MFP),a water quality evaluation model for surface water ecosystem is presented by using self-organization map(SOM) neural network simulation algorithm from the aspect of systematic structural evolution.This evaluation model is applied to the case of surface water ecosystem in Xindu District of Chengdu City in China.The values reflecting the water quality of five cross-sections of the system at different developing stages are obtained,with stable values of 1.438,2.952,1.86...

  19. Grooved organogel surfaces towards anisotropic sliding of water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Liu, Hongliang; Meng, Jingxin; Yang, Gao; Liu, Xueli; Wang, Shutao; Jiang, Lei

    2014-05-21

    Periodic micro-grooved organogel surfaces can easily realize the anisotropic sliding of water droplets attributing to the formed slippery water/oil/solid interface. Different from the existing anisotropic surfaces, this novel surface provides a versatile candidate for the anisotropic sliding of water droplets and might present a promising way for the easy manipulation of liquid droplets for water collection, liquid-directional transportation, and microfluidics.

  20. Petroleum pollutant degradation by surface water microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Malisa P; Jovancićević, Branimir S; Ilić, Mila; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2006-09-01

    It is well known that the composition of petroleum or some of its processing products changes in the environment mostly under the influence of microorganisms. A series of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum conditions for an efficient biodegradation of petroleum pollutant, or bioremediation of different segments of the environment. The aim of these investigations was to show to what extent the hydrocarbons of a petroleum pollutant are degraded by microbial cultures which were isolated as dominant microorganisms from a surface water of a wastewater canal of an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant. Biodegradation experiments were conducted on one paraffinic, and one naphthenic type of petroleum during a three month period under aerobic conditions, varying the following parameters: Inorganic (Kp) or an organic medium (Bh) with or without exposition to light. Microorganisms were analyzed in a surface water sample from a canal (Pancevo, Serbia), into which wastewater from an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant is released. The consortia of microorganisms were isolated from the water sample (most abundant species: Phormidium foveolarum--filamentous Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae and Achanthes minutissima, diatoms, algae). The simulation experiments of biodegradation were conducted with the biomass suspension and crude oils Sirakovo (Sir, paraffinic type) and Velebit (Ve, naphthenic type). After a three month period, organic substance was extracted by means of chloroform. In the extracts, the content of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids was determined (the group composition). n-Alkanes and isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes, pristane and phytane, in the aliphatic fractions, were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Total isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes and polycyclic alkanes of sterane and triterpane types were analyzed by GC-MS. Paraffinic type petroleums have a significant loss of saturated hydrocarbons. For naphthenic

  1. The Influence of Environmental Constraints on the Water Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Guisández

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of more severe hydrological environmental constraints, usually as seasonal minimum flows (ϕ and maximum ramping rates (ρ, on hydropower operation is a growing trend. This paper presents a study on the influence of ϕ and ρ on the water values (WV of a real hydropower plant that participates in the Spanish day-ahead electricity market. For this purpose, a master-slave algorithm, based on stochastic dynamic programming (SDP and deterministic mixed integer linear programming (DMILP, is used on a real hydropower plant. The master module, based on SDP, has a yearly planning period with weekly time steps and considers three state variables: stored water volume in the reservoir at the beginning of each week; weekly water inflow; and average weekly energy price. The slave module, based on DMILP, has a weekly planning period with hourly time steps and considers many features of the hydropower plant operation, such as: start-up costs, evaporation, wear and tear costs, etc. The results indicate that WV of a hydropower plant are very sensitive to the presence of these constraints; ϕ especially during the wettest season and ρ during the driest one. As the severity of ϕ and ρ increase, WV increase and decrease, respectively.

  2. Lonely drinking fountains and comforting coolers: paradoxes of water value and ironies of water use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Martha

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses ethnographically on Americans and technologies of drinking water, as tokens of and vehicles for health, agency, and surprising kinds of community. Journalists and water scholars have argued that bottled water is a material concomitant of privatization and alienation in U.S. society. But, engaging Latour, this research shows that water technologies and the groups they assemble, are plural. Attention to everyday entwining of workplace lives with drinking fountains, single-serve bottles, and spring water coolers shows us several different quests, some individualized, some alienated, but some seeking health via public, collective care, acknowledgment of stakeholding, and community organizing. Focused on water practices on a college campus, in the roaring 1990s and increasingly sober 2000s in the context of earlier U.S. water histories of inclusion and exclusion, I draw on ethnographic research from the two years that led up to the recession and the presidential election of 2008. I argue for understanding of water value through attention to water use, focusing both on the social construction of water and the use of water for social construction.

  3. Atmospheric Water Harvesting: Role of Surface Wettability and Edge Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Yong

    2017-06-23

    Atmospheric water is emerging as an important potable water source. The present work experimentally and theoretically investigates water condensation and collection on flat surfaces with contrasting contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) to elucidate their roles on water mass collection efficiency. The experimental results indicate that a hydrophilic surface promotes nucleation and individual droplets growth, and a surface with a low CAH tends to let a smaller droplet to slide down, but the overall water mass collection efficiency is independent of both surface contact angle and CAH. The experimental results agree well with our theoretical calculations. During water condensation, a balance has to be struck between single droplet growth and droplet density on a surface so as to maintain a constant water droplet surface coverage ratio, which renders the role of both surface wettability and hysteresis insignificant to the ultimate water mass collection. Moreover, water droplets on the edges of a surface grow much faster than those on the non-edge areas and thus dominate the contribution to the water mass collection by the entire surface, directly pointing out the very important role of edge effect on water condensation and collection.

  4. Adsorbed water on iron surface by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, F.W.; Campos, T.M.B.; Cividanes, L.S., E-mail: flaviano@ita.br; Simonetti, E.A.N.; Thim, G.P.

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a new force field to describe the Fe–H{sub 2}O interaction. • We developed a new force field to describe the flexible water model at low temperature. • We analyze the orientation of water along the iron surface. • We calculate the vibrational spectra of water near the iron surface. • We found a complex relationship between water orientation and the atomic vibrational spectra at different sites of adsorption along the iron surface. - Abstract: The adsorption of H{sub 2}O molecules on metal surfaces is important to understand the early process of water corrosion. This process can be described by computational simulation using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo. However, this simulation demands an efficient description of the surface interactions between the water molecule and the metallic surface. In this study, an effective force field to describe the iron-water surface interactions was developed and it was used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed a very good agreement between the simulated vibrational-DOS spectrum and the experimental vibrational spectrum of the iron–water interface. The water density profile revealed the presence of a water double layer in the metal interface. Furthermore, the horizontal mapping combined with the angular distribution of the molecular plane allowed the analysis of the water structure above the surface, which in turn agrees with the model of the double layer on metal surfaces.

  5. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  6. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  7. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  8. Predicting temperature timit values for cold touchable surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den

    2005-01-01

    During some occupational activities, workers have to handle objects or tools in cold environments. In other circumstances, contact between the hand and the cold surface might be accidental (e.g., when a worker touches a cold surface, a cooler, etc). In both cases, contact between the hands and the c

  9. How to repel hot water from a superhydrophobic surface?

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhejun

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces, with water contact angles greater than 150° and slide angles less than 10°, have attracted a great deal of attention due to their self-cleaning ability and excellent water-repellency. It is commonly accepted that a superhydrophobic surface loses its superhydrophobicity in contact with water hotter than 50 °C. Such a phenomenon was recently demonstrated by Liu et al. [J. Mater. Chem., 2009, 19, 5602], using both natural lotus leaf and artificial leaf-like surfaces. However, our work has shown that superhydrophobic surfaces maintained their superhydrophobicity, even in water at 80 °C, provided that the leaf temperature is greater than that of the water droplet. In this paper, we report on the wettability of water droplets on superhydrophobic thin films, as a function of both their temperatures. The results have shown that both the water contact and slide angles on the surfaces will remain unchanged when the temperature of the water droplet is greater than that of the surface. The water contact angle, or the slide angle, will decrease or increase, however, with droplet temperatures increasingly greater than that of the surfaces. We propose that, in such cases, the loss of superhydrophobicity of the surfaces is caused by evaporation of the hot water molecules and their condensation on the cooler surface. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  10. Structure and reactivity of water at biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, E A

    1998-02-01

    Molecular self association in liquids is a physical process that can dominate cohesion (interfacial tension) and miscibility. In water, self association is a powerful organizational force leading to a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network (water structure). Localized perturbations in the chemical potential of water as by, for example, contact with a solid surface, induces compensating changes in water structure that can be sensed tens of nanometers from the point of origin using the surface force apparatus (SFA) and ancillary techniques. These instruments reveal attractive or repulsive forces between opposing surfaces immersed in water, over and above that anticipated by continuum theory (DLVO), that are attributed to a variable density (partial molar volume) of a more-or-less ordered water structure, depending on the water wettability (surface energy) of the water-contacting surfaces. Water structure at surfaces is thus found to be a manifestation of hydrophobicity and, while mechanistic/theoretical interpretation of experimental results remain the subject of some debate in the literature, convergence of experimental observations permit, for the first time, quantitative definition of the relative terms 'hydrophobic' and 'hydrophilic'. In particular, long-range attractive forces are detected only between surfaces exhibiting a water contact angle theta > 65 degrees (herein defined as hydrophobic surfaces with pure water adhesion tension tau O = gamma O cos theta 30 dyn/cm). These findings suggest at least two distinct kinds of water structure and reactivity: a relatively less-dense water region against hydrophobic surfaces with an open hydrogen-bonded network and a relatively more-dense water region against hydrophilic surfaces with a collapsed hydrogen-bonded network. Importantly, membrane and SFA studies reveal a discrimination between biologically-important ions that preferentially solubilizes divalent ions in more-dense water regions relative to less

  11. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  12. A Novel Energy efficient Surface water Wireless Sensor Network Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining the energy of sensors in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is important in critical applications. It has been a challenge to design wireless sensor networks to enable applications for oceanographicdata collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance applications. WSN consists of sensor nodes which sense the physical parameters such as temperature, humidity, pressure and light etc and send them to a fusion center namely Base Station (BS from where one can get the value of physical parameters at any time. Requirement of monitoring the environment might be anywhere, like middle of the sea or under the earth where man cannot go often to recharge the batterieswhich supplies the sensing device, transceiver and memory unit in the sensor node. So the usage of the battery power must be judicious in WSN. Earlier attempts have been made to prolong the network lifetime, but still it is a challenging task. In this paper we propose a Novel Energy efficient Surface water Wireless Sensor Network Algorithm (NES-WSN to optimize the energy consumption by WSN. The present work concentrates on energy saving of sensor nodes when they are deployed in the surface of the sea water. Whenever the sea surface temperature increases there will be a power loss which is reduced by clustering the nodes and by transferring data through multihop routing. Experimental results show that due to increase in temperature there is a definite power loss and it can be minimized by using NES-WSN algorithm definitely.

  13. Mechanical Values Transformer on the Surface Acoustic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Piddubnyi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of parameters of the membrane type mechanical values transformer into the frequency electric signal is rewired. The article deals with the issues of deformational and heat sensitivity. Results of research are shown.

  14. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w

  15. Biofilm development on metal surfaces in tropical marine waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Bhosle, N.B.

    environments. However, little is known about biofilm bacteria developed on metal surfaces, especially immersed in tropical marine waters. Similarly, not much is known about the nature of organic matter deposited on the surfaces over the period of immersion...

  16. The glass-liquid transition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2008-09-28

    Interactions of thin water films with surfaces of graphite and vitrified room-temperature ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF(6)])] were investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature and annealing time to elucidate the glass-liquid transition of water at the molecular level. Surface diffusion of water occurs at temperatures higher than 120 K, thereby forming three-dimensional clusters (a two-dimensional layer) on the [bmim][PF(6)] (graphite) surface. The hydrophobic effect of the surface decreases with increasing coverage of water; the bulklike properties evolve up to 40 ML, as evidenced by the occurrence of film dewetting at around the conventional glass transition temperature (140 K). Results also showed that aging is necessary for the water monolayer (a 40 ML water film) to dewet the graphite ([bmim][PF(6)]) surface. The occurrence of aging is explainable by the successive evolution of two distinct liquids during the glass-liquid transition: low density liquid is followed by supercooled liquid water. The water monolayer on graphite is characterized by the preferred orientation of unpaired OH groups toward the surface; this structure is arrested during the aging time despite the occurrence of surface diffusion. However, the water monolayer formed on the [bmim][PF(6)] surface agglomerates immediately after the commencement of surface diffusion. The structure of low density liquid tends to be arrested by the attractive interaction with the neighbors.

  17. A Mean Value Theorem for Closed Geodesics on Congruence Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lukianov, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    We define a weighted multiplicity function for closed geodesics of given length on a finite area Riemann surface. These weighted multiplicities appear naturally in the Selberg trace formula, and in particular their mean square plays an important role in the study of statistics of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian on the surface. In the case of the modular domain, E. Bogomolny, F. Leyvraz and C. Schmit gave a formula for the mean square, which was rigorously proved by M. Peter. In this paper we...

  18. Conjunctive Surface Water and Groundwater Management under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change can result in significant impacts on regional and global surface water and groundwater resources. Using groundwater as a complimentary source of water has provided an effective means to satisfy the ever-increasing water demands and deal with surface water shortages problems due to robust capability of groundwater in responding to climate change. Conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater is crucial for integrated water resources management. It is helpful to reduce vulnerabilities of water supply systems and mitigate the water supply stress in responding to climate change. Some critical challenges and perspectives are discussed to help decision/policy makers develop more effective management and adaptation strategies for conjunctive water resources use in facing climate change under complex uncertainties.

  19. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  20. Region 9 Surface Water Intakes (SDWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  1. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN SURFACE WATER HARVESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-11-25

    Nov 25, 2014 ... There is seasonal water scarcity in Marigat Division and the water demand has been ... with improved storage and rainwater harvesting methods. Such water can be ..... in the planning process and decision making and this ... The organizations support the community ... systems for domestic uses in urban.

  2. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon; Bush, John W. M.; Hosoi, A. E.; Lauga, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small-amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be nonzero for moderate values of the capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low capillary number. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

  3. Adsorption mechanism of water molecule on goethite (010) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fangyuan; Zhou, Long; Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin

    2016-12-01

    Goethite widely exists among ocean sediments; it plays an important role in fixing heavy metals and adsorbing organic contaminants. So the understanding of the adsorbing process of water molecule on its surface will be very helpful to further reveal such environmental friendly processes. The configuration, electronic properties and interaction energy of water molecules adsorbed on pnma goethite (010) surface were investigated in detail by using density functional theory on 6-31G (d,p) basis set and projector- augment wave (PAW) method. The mechanism of the interaction between goethite surface and H2O was proposed. Despite the differences in total energy, there are four possible types of water molecule adsorption configurations on goethite (010) surface (Aa, Ab, Ba, Bb), forming coordination bond with surface Fe atom. Results of theoretical modeling indicate that the dissociation process of adsorbed water is an endothermic reaction with high activation energy. The dissociation of adsorbed water molecule is a proton transportation process between water's O atoms and surface. PDOS results indicate that the bonding between H2O and (010) surface is due to the overlapping of water's 2p orbitals and Fe's 3d orbitals. These results clarify the mechanism on how adsorbed water is dissociated on the surface of goethite and potentially provide useful information of the surface chemistry of goethite.

  4. The Wealth of Water: The Value of an Essential Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathburn, Melanie K.; Baum, Karina J.

    2011-01-01

    Many students take water availability for granted and yet, by 2025, two-thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This case study is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource and is used to highlight how the exploitation of water can have far-reaching social, political, and economic…

  5. The Wealth of Water: The Value of an Essential Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathburn, Melanie K.; Baum, Karina J.

    2011-01-01

    Many students take water availability for granted and yet, by 2025, two-thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This case study is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource and is used to highlight how the exploitation of water can have far-reaching social, political, and economic…

  6. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream......, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short......, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using...

  7. Nitrogen surface water retention in the Baltic Sea drainage basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stålnacke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we estimate the surface water retention of nitrogen (N in all the 117 drainage basins to the Baltic Sea with the use of a statistical model (MESAW for source apportionment of riverine loads of pollutants. Our results show that the MESAW model was able to estimate the N load at the river mouth of 88 Baltic Sea rivers, for which we had observed data, with a sufficient degree of precision and accuracy. The estimated retention parameters were also statistically significant. Our results show that around 380 000 t of N are annually retained in surface waters draining to the Baltic Sea. The total annual riverine load from the 117 basins to the Baltic Sea was estimated to 570 000 t of N, giving a total surface water N retention of around 40%. In terms of absolute retention values, three major river basins account for 50% of the total retention in the 117 basins; i.e. around 104 000 t of N is retained in Neva, 55 000 t in Vistula and 32 000 t in Oder. The largest retention was found in river basins with a high percentage of lakes as indicated by a strong relationship between N retention (% and share of lake area in the river drainage areas. For example in Göta älv, we estimated a total N retention of 72%, whereof 67% of the retention occurred in the lakes of that drainage area (Lake Vänern primarily. The obtained results will hopefully enable the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM to refine the nutrient load targets in the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP, as well as to better identify cost-efficient measures to reduce nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea.

  8. Characteristics of meter-scale surface electrical discharge propagating along water surface at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Petr; Sugiyama, Yuki; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Akiyama, Hidenori; Lukes, Petr; Akiyama, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports physical characteristics of water surface discharges. Discharges were produced by metal needle-to-water surface geometry, with the needle electrode driven by 47 kV (FWHM) positive voltage pulses of 2 µs duration. Propagation of discharges along the water surface was confined between glass plates with 2 mm separation. This allowed generation of highly reproducible 634 mm-long plasma filaments. Experiments were performed using different atmospheres: air, N2, and O2, each at atmospheric pressure. Time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements revealed that early spectra of discharges in air and nitrogen atmospheres were dominated by N2 2nd positive system. N2 radiation disappeared after approx. 150 ns, replaced by emissions from atomic hydrogen. Spectra of discharges in O2 atmosphere were dominated by emissions from atomic oxygen. Time- and spatially-resolved emission spectra were used to determine temperatures in plasma. Atomic hydrogen emissions showed excitation temperature of discharges in air to be about 2  ×  104 K. Electron number densities determined by Stark broadening of the hydrogen H β line reached a maximum value of ~1018 cm-3 just after plasma initiation. Electron number densities and temperatures depended only slightly on distance from needle electrode, indicating formation of high conductivity leader channels. Direct observation of discharges by high speed camera showed that the average leader head propagation speed was 412 km · s-1, which is substantially higher value than that observed in experiments with shorter streamers driven by lower voltages.

  9. Simulation of water cluster assembly on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Zhang, R Q; Lee, S T; Elstner, M; Frauenheim, Th; Wan, L J

    2005-07-28

    The assembly of small water clusters (H2O)n, n = 1-6, on a graphite surface is studied using a density functional tight-binding method complemented with an empirical van der Waals force correction, with confirmation using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. It is shown that the optimized geometry of the water hexamer may change its original structure to an isoenergy one when interacting with a graphite surface in some specific orientation, while the smaller water cluster will maintain its cyclic or linear configurations (for the water dimer). The binding energy of water clusters interacting with graphite is dependent on the number of water molecules that form hydrogen bonds, but is independent of the water cluster size. These physically adsorbed water clusters show little change in their IR peak position and leave an almost perfect graphite surface.

  10. Surface Curvature-Induced Directional Movement of Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a surface curvature-induced directional movement phenomenon, based on molecular dynamics simulations, that a nanoscale water droplet at the outer surface of a graphene cone always spontaneously moves toward the larger end of the cone, and at the inner surface toward the smaller end. The analysis on the van der Waals interaction potential between a single water molecule and a curved graphene surface reveals that the curvature with its gradient does generate the driving force resulting in the above directional motion. Furthermore, we found that the direction of the above movement is independent of the wettability, namely is regardless of either hydrophobic or hydrophilic of the surface. However, the latter surface is in general leading to higher motion speed than the former. The above results provide a basis for a better understanding of many reported observations, and helping design of curved surfaces with desired directional surface water transportation.

  11. Quality-control results for ground-water and surface-water data, Sacramento River Basin, California, National Water-Quality Assessment, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Cathy; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluating the extent that bias and variability affect the interpretation of ground- and surface-water data is necessary to meet the objectives of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Quality-control samples used to evaluate the bias and variability include annual equipment blanks, field blanks, field matrix spikes, surrogates, and replicates. This report contains quality-control results for the constituents critical to the ground- and surface-water components of the Sacramento River Basin study unit of the NAWQA Program. A critical constituent is one that was detected frequently (more than 50 percent of the time in blank samples), was detected at amounts exceeding water-quality standards or goals, or was important for the interpretation of water-quality data. Quality-control samples were collected along with ground- and surface-water samples during the high intensity phase (cycle 1) of the Sacramento River Basin NAWQA beginning early in 1996 and ending in 1998. Ground-water field blanks indicated contamination of varying levels of significance when compared with concentrations detected in environmental ground-water samples for ammonia, dissolved organic carbon, aluminum, and copper. Concentrations of aluminum in surface-water field blanks were significant when compared with environmental samples. Field blank samples collected for pesticide and volatile organic compound analyses revealed no contamination in either ground- or surface-water samples that would effect the interpretation of environmental data, with the possible exception of the volatile organic compound trichloromethane (chloroform) in ground water. Replicate samples for ground water and surface water indicate that variability resulting from sample collection, processing, and analysis was generally low. Some of the larger maximum relative percentage differences calculated for replicate samples occurred between samples having lowest absolute concentration differences and(or) values near

  12. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  13. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  14. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  15. LIMIT BEHAVIOUR OF SOLUTIONS TO EQUIVALUED SURFACE BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR PARABOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fengquan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the limit behaviour of solutions to equivalued surface boundary value problem for parabolic equations when the equivalued surface boundary shrinks to a point and the space dimension of the domain is two or more.

  16. On the totally ramified value number of the Gauss map of minimal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakami, Yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we define the totally ramified value number (TRVN) of the Gauss map of a complete minimal surface, and prove that there exist algebraic minimal surfaces that have the TRVN equal to $2.5$.

  17. LIMIT BEHAVIOUR OF SOLUTIONS TO EQUIVALUED SURFACE BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR PARABOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiFengquan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss the limit behaviour of solutions to equivalued surface boundayr value problem for parabolic equatiopns when the equivalued surface boundary shriks to a point and the space dimension of the domain is two or more.

  18. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-29

    term goals were to 1. exploit measurements of breaking wave noise and photographic images of whitecaps to infer bubble cloud populations at the sea ...surface reverberation in wind-driven seas , an additional objective has been to study the role of sub-surface bubbles on the attenuation and scattering of...acoustic signals, including determining methods for quantifying bubble populations with video footage of the sea surface and developing models of

  19. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of surface water quality of Pratapgarh district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogeochemical study of surface water in Pratapgarh district has been carried out to assess the major ion chemistry and water quality for drinking and domestic purposes. For this purpose, twenty-five surface water samples were collected from river, ponds and canals and analysed for pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids (TDS), turbidity, hardness, major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+), major anions (HCO3 -, F-, Cl-, NO3 -, SO4 2-) and dissolved silica concentration. The analytical results show mildly acidic to alkaline nature of surface water resources of Pratapgarh district. HCO3 - and Cl- are the dominant anions, while cation chemistry is dominated by Na+ and Ca2+. The statistical analysis and data plotted on the Piper diagram reveals that the surface water chemistry is mainly controlled by rock weathering with secondary contributions from agriculture and anthropogenic sources. Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3 -, Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- and Na+-HCO3 --Cl- are the dominant hydrogeochemical facies in the surface water of the area. For quality assessment, values of analysed parameters were compared with Indian and WHO water quality standards, which shows that the concentrations of TDS, F-, NO3 -, Na+, Mg2+ and total hardness are exceeding the desirable limits in some water samples. Water Quality Index (WQI) is one of the most effective tools to communicate information on the quality of any water body. The computed WQI values of Pratapgarh district surface water range from 28 to 198 with an average value of 82, and more than half of the study area is under excellent to good category.

  20. Water-Mediated Interactions between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R

    2016-09-01

    All surfaces in water experience at short separations hydration repulsion or hydrophobic attraction, depending on the surface polarity. These interactions dominate the more long-ranged electrostatic and van der Waals interactions and are ubiquitous in biological and colloidal systems. Despite their importance in all scenarios where the surface separation is in the nanometer range, the origin of these hydration interactions is still unclear. Using atomistic solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the interaction free energies of charge-neutral model surfaces with different elastic and water-binding properties. The surface polarity is shown to be the most important parameter that not only determines the hydration properties and thereby the water contact angle of a single surface but also the surface-surface interaction and whether two surfaces attract or repel. Elastic properties of the surfaces are less important. On the basis of surface contact angles and surface-surface binding affinities, we construct a universal interaction diagram featuring three different interaction regimes-hydration repulsion, cavitation-induced attraction-and for intermediate surface polarities-dry adhesion. On the basis of scaling arguments and perturbation theory, we establish simple combination rules that predict the interaction behavior for combinations of dissimilar surfaces.

  1. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Yongjun

    2006-01-01

    .Layering structures at free liquid surfaces:The Fisher-Widom line and the capillary waves.J Chem Phys,2002,117:3941-3950[16]Schwartz D K,Scholssman E K,Kellogg G J,et al.Thermal diffuse X-ray-scattering studies of the water-vapor interface.Phys Rev A,1990,41:5687-5690[17]Nijmeijer N J P,Bakker A F,Bruin C,et al.A molecular dynamics simulation of the Lennard-Jones liquid-vapor interface.J Chem Phys,1988,89:3789-3792[18]Vargaftik N B,Volkov B N,Voljak L D.International tables of the surface tension of water.J Phys Chem Ref Data,1983,12:817-820[19]Pellicer J,Garcia-Morales V,Guanter L,et al.On the experimental values of the water surface tension used in some textbook.Am J Phys,2002,79:705-709[20]Leyendekkers J V,Hunter R J.Thermodynamic properties of water in the subcooled region.J Chem Phys,1982,82:1447-1453[21]Schiffrin D J.Real standard entropy of ions in water.Trans Faraday Soc,1970,66:2464-2468

  2. Benefits of Safer Drinking Water: The Value of Nitrate Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Crutchfield, Stephen R.; Cooper, Joseph C.; Hellerstein, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates in drinking water, which may come from nitrogen fertilizers applied to crops, are a potential health risk. This report evaluates the potential benefits of reducing human exposure to nitrates in the drinking water supply. In a survey, respondents were asked a series of questions about their willingness to pay for a hypothetical water filter, which would reduce their risk of nitrate exposure. If nitrates in the respondent's drinking water were to exceed the EPA minimum safety standard,...

  3. An interdisciplinary approach to valuing water from brush control

    OpenAIRE

    Lemberg, B.; Mjelde, J.; Conner, J; Griffin, R.; Rosenthal, W; Stuth, J

    2002-01-01

    Metadata only record This paper develops an integrated model to assess the viability of increasing water yields in the Frio River basin of Texas through brush control. The presented method accounts for the effect of brush control on forage productivity and water supply by incorporating ecological, hydrologic, and economic models. The simulation of water yields suggests that brush control would increase water yields on 35% of the land area, but the costs usually would exceed the financial b...

  4. Surface water quality assessment by environmetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioglu, Hülya; Boyacioglu, Hayal

    2007-08-01

    This environmetric study deals with the interpretation of river water monitoring data from the basin of the Buyuk Menderes River and its tributaries in Turkey. Eleven variables were measured to estimate water quality at 17 sampling sites. Factor analysis was applied to explain the correlations between the observations in terms of underlying factors. Results revealed that, water quality was strongly affected from agricultural uses. Cluster analysis was used to classify stations with similar properties and results distinguished three groups of stations. Water quality at downstream of the river was quite different from the other part. It is recommended to involve the environmetric data treatment as a substantial procedure in assessment of water quality data.

  5. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility... Water Act, as amended. (b) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility shall not cause...

  6. Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water: A case study ... in Mvudi River used as a source of domestic water for people who live around it. ... of Water Affairs and Forestry of South Africa (DWAF) and the World Health ...

  7. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sungyon; Hosoi, A E; Lauga, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be non-zero for moderate values of Capillar...

  8. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  9. Pre-coagulation for microfiltration of an upland surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkarainen, A T; Judd, S J; Jokela, J; Gillberg, L

    2004-01-01

    The effect of different coagulants on cake formation and hydraulic resistance in membrane filtration of strongly coloured (SUVA> or =4.8) upland surface water has been studied at bench-scale under constant pressure conditions. Coagulants used were aluminium sulphate, polyaluminium chloride, ferric chloride and ferric sulphate. Optimisation of coagulation parameters was carried by conventional jar testing. The R'c (specific cake resistance in m(-2)) values were determined for all coagulants over a range of coagulant doses and slow mixing flocculation periods. Experiments indicated slight differences in cake formation trends between ferric- and aluminium-based coagulants and chloride and sulphate counterions, but that the range of measured R'c values was small (0.9 and 2.6 x 10(18) m(-2)) over the range of doses studied. Greater than 99% UV(254) removal was achieved with every coagulant, whereas dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal ranged from 78% to 88%. Optimisation of the pre-coagulation-membrane filtration process suggests ferric chloride to be slightly superior for the feedwater matrix studied on the basis of DOC removal, whereas ferric sulphate gave slightly lower filter cake specific resistance values.

  10. Water footprint assessment along the wheat-bread value chain towards the sustainable use of freshwater in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlotsane, Pascalina; Owusu-Sekyere, Enoch; Jordaan, Henry

    2017-04-01

    A significant amount of water is used in food production. The current increase in demand for food and impact of climate change place much pressure on the available water resources. South Africa is soon approaching complete utilisation of its available surface water, with irrigated agriculture accountable for about 63% of the country's available water use. This poses a threat to food security. Wheat is the largest winter cereal crop produced in South Africa, approximately 80% of this wheat is used to produce Bread. Bread consumption in South Africa is estimated at 2.8 billion loaves per annum. About 62 loaves of bread are consumed per person per annum with noticeable differences in preferences. Therefore, it is important to account for the amount of water used along the wheat-bread production chain. In this paper, we examined water footprint along the wheat-bread value chain. The water footprint concept provides an appropriate framework for analysis to find the link between the consumption of agricultural goods and the use of water resources. The paper employed the Global Water Footprint Standard approach to calculating the volumetric green, blue and grey water footprint along the wheat-bread value chain. Our findings reveal that wheat production at the farm level accounts for 99.95 percent of the total water footprint of the bread, while processing and wholesale levels only account for 0.56 per cent. Our findings highlight the importance of effective and efficient water use at the farm level for wheat production. Specifically, the total water footprint of wheat bread is 937.42m3.ton-1. The green water component was found to be 190.59m3.ton-1 and that of blue water was 745.28 m3.ton-1. Grey water footprint accounted for only 1.55 m3.ton-1. The results indicate that the amount of water used at farm level is the largest contributor to the total water footprint of bread. Given the blue water scarcity situation in South Africa, it is very critical for wheat producers to

  11. Surface properties of a single perfluoroalkyl group on water surfaces studied by surface potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoaka, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Shioya, Nobutaka; Morita, Kohei; Sonoyama, Masashi; Amii, Hideki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A discriminative study of a single perfluoroalkyl (Rf) group from a bulk material is recently recognized to be necessary toward the total understanding of Rf compounds based on a primary chemical structure. The single molecule and the bulk matter have an interrelationship via an intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) aggregation property of an Rf group, which is theorized by the stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory. Since an Rf group has dipole moments along many C-F bonds, a single Rf group would possess a hydrophilic-like character on the surface. To reveal the hydration character of a single Rf group, in the present study, surface potential (ΔV) measurements are performed for Langmuir monolayers of Rf-containing compounds. From a comparative study with a monolayer of a normal hydrocarbon compound, the hydration/dehydration dynamics of a lying Rf group on water has first been monitored by ΔV measurements, through which a single Rf group has been revealed to have a unique "dipole-interactive" character, which enables the Rf group interacted with the water 'surface.' In addition, the SDA theory proves to be useful to predict the 2D aggregation property across the phase transition temperature of 19°C by use of the ΔV measurements.

  12. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  13. Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IESWTR balances the need for treatment with potential increases in disinfection by -products. The materials found on this page are intended to assist public water systems and state in the implementation of the IESWTR.

  14. SurfaceWater Source Protection Areas (SPAs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Source Protection Area (SPA) boundaries have been located on RF 24000 & RF 25000 scale USGS topographic maps by Water Supply Division (DEC) and VT Dept of Health...

  15. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental pollution derived from domestic and industrial activities. Due to the inadequacy of controlled waste management strategies and waste treatment plants ... Oxygen Demand (COD), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Dissolved ... appropriate waste water purifying plants. ..... University of Turku, Finland. 2.

  16. Bioinspired aquatic microrobot capable of walking on water surface like a water strider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbin; Zhao, Jie; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Mingwen; Pan, Qinmin

    2011-07-01

    Walking on the water surface is a dream of humans, but it is exactly the way of life for some aquatic insects. In this study, a bionic aquatic microrobot capable of walking on the water surface like a water strider was reported. The novel water strider-like robot consisted of ten superhydrophobic supporting legs, two miniature dc motors, and two actuating legs. The microrobot could not only stand effortlessly but also walk and turn freely on the water surface, exhibiting an interesting motion characteristic. A numerical model describing the interface between the partially submerged leg and the air-water surface was established to fully understand the mechanism for the large supporting force of the leg. It was revealed that the radius and water contact angle of the legs significantly affect the supporting force. Because of its high speed, agility, low cost, and easy fabrication, this microrobot might have a potential application in water quality surveillance, water pollution monitoring, and so on.

  17. Unique water-water coordination tailored by a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; MacNaughton, J.;

    2013-01-01

    At low coverage of water on Cu(110), substrate-mediated electrostatics lead to zigzagging chains along [001] as observed with STM [T. Yamada, S. Tamamori, H. Okuyama, and T. Aruga, “Anisotropic water chain growth on Cu(110) observed with scanning tunneling microscopy” Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 036105...... (2006)]. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy we find an anomalous low-energy resonance at ~533.1 eV which, based on density functional theory spectrum simulations, we assign to an unexpected configuration of water units whose uncoordinated O-H bonds directly face those of their neighbors...

  18. Water and people: challenges at the interface of symbolic and utilitarian values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; Roger N. Clark; George H. Stankey

    2008-01-01

    The demand for water is rapidly increasing, but the uses to which that water is put and the values society places on water are changing dramatically. Water is the source of life, the sustenance for living, the resource needed for manufacturing, mining, agriculture; the element required to grow our lawns, to water our landscaping, to shower us with refreshment; it is...

  19. Survival of Phytophthora infestans in Surface Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lyndon D; Johnson, Dennis A

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT Coverless petri dishes with water suspensions of sporangia and zoospores of Phytophthora infestans were embedded in sandy soil in eastern Washington in July and October 2001 and July 2002 to quantify longevity of spores in water under natural conditions. Effects of solar radiation intensity, presence of soil in petri dishes (15 g per dish), and a 2-h chill period on survival of isolates of clonal lineages US-8 and US-11 were investigated. Spores in water suspensions survived 0 to 16 days under nonshaded conditions and 2 to 20 days under shaded conditions. Mean spore survival significantly increased from 1.7 to 5.8 days when soil was added to the water. Maximum survival time of spores in water without soil exposed to direct sunlight was 2 to 3 days in July and 6 to 8 days in October. Mean duration of survival did not differ significantly between chilled and nonchilled sporangia, but significantly fewer chilled spores survived for extended periods than that of nonchilled spores. Spores of US-11 and US-8 isolates did not differ in mean duration of survival, but significantly greater numbers of sporangia of US-8 survived than did sporangia of US-11 in one of three trials.

  20. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  1. Surface complexation at calcium mineral-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liuming

    1994-01-01

    Surface reactions occurring at solid-water interfaces in calcium mineral-ligands systems have been studied. Both hydrous apatite and fluorite surfaces show clear amphoteric properties. An ion exchange process between lattice ions of F- on fluorite and OH- ions in bulk solution is discovered. The surface adsorption of Alizarin Red S and sodium oleate are determined. Surface chemical reaction models are established based on acidbase potentiometric titrations, solubility, adsorption and zeta-pot...

  2. Tractor beam on the water surface

    CERN Document Server

    Punzmann, Horst; Xia, Hua; Falkovich, Gregory; Shats, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Can one send a wave to bring an object from a distance? The general idea is inspired by the recent success in moving micro particles using light and the development of a tractor beam concept. For fluid surfaces, however, the only known paradigm is the Stokes drift model, where linear planar waves push particles in the direction of the wave propagation. Here we show how to fetch a macroscopic floater from a large distance by sending a surface wave towards it. We develop a new method of remote manipulation of floaters by forming inward and outward surface jets, stationary vortices, and other complex surface flows using nonlinear waves generated by a vertically oscillating plunger. The flows can be engineered by changing the geometry and the power of a wave maker, and the flow dissipation. The new method is robust and works both for long gravity and for short capillary waves. We use a novel method of visualising 3D particle trajectories on the surface. This letter introduces a new conceptual framework for unders...

  3. Contribution of environmental media to cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis prevalence in Tehran: a focus on surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Mahdi; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Yunesian, Masud; Nasseri, Simin; Nabizadeh Nodehi, Ramin; Tashauoei, Hamidreza; Jalilzadeh, Esfandiar; Zarinnejad, Roya

    2016-10-01

    The occurrences of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in surface sources of drinking water in Tehran were monitored, using US EPA method 1623.1. The prevalence ratios (PR) of positive samples among other media (animal's stools, vegetables, and human's stools) were also estimated from literature data. The density of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in water samples were 0.129 ± 0.069 cysts/L and 0.005 ± 0.002 oocysts/L, respectively. Estimated PR in vegetables, animal stools, surface waters, and human stools were 6.65, 20.42, 21.05, and 4.28 % for Cryptosporidium and 6.46, 17.13, 73.68, and 15.65 % for Giardia, respectively. These reveal the importance of surface waters' and animal stools' roles in the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in Tehran's population. Giardia's prevalence in untreated surface waters in Tehran was found 3.5 times as much as Cryptosporidium while this found 2.3 times on a global scale. Moreover, the prevalence of giardiasis to cryptosporidiosis infections in Tehran's human population was 3.65. These values could be a clue to attribute the infections to the occurrence of parasites in surface waters. Significant (p < 0.05) associations were observed between rainfalls and presence of Giardia (r = 0.62) and Cryptosporidium (r = 0.60) in surface waters. In autumn, rainfalls can increase the parasites occurrences in surface waters. Significant (p < 0.05) difference on the density of parasites was found between some seasons using Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison tests. A significant correlation (r = 0.86) between Giardia and Cryptosporidium densities also confirms the common sources of pollution in surface waters. Findings suggest that untreated surface waters in Tehran may be a potential route of human exposure to protozoan parasites.

  4. Experimental Observation of Dark Solitons on Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    vertical walls are made of transparent sections of glass supported by the metal frame. The water level of the free surface is measured with seven resistive...Experimental observation of dark solitons on water surface A. Chabchoub1,∗, O. Kimmoun2, H. Branger3, N. Hoffmann1, D. Proment4, M. Onorato4,5, and N...observation of dark solitons on the water surface. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation

  5. Effect-based trigger values for in vitro bioassays: Reading across from existing water quality guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2015-09-15

    Cell-based bioassays are becoming increasingly popular in water quality assessment. The new generations of reporter-gene assays are very sensitive and effects are often detected in very clean water types such as drinking water and recycled water. For monitoring applications it is therefore imperative to derive trigger values that differentiate between acceptable and unacceptable effect levels. In this proof-of-concept paper, we propose a statistical method to read directly across from chemical guideline values to trigger values without the need to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolations. The derivation is based on matching effect concentrations with existing chemical guideline values and filtering out appropriate chemicals that are responsive in the given bioassays at concentrations in the range of the guideline values. To account for the mixture effects of many chemicals acting together in a complex water sample, we propose bioanalytical equivalents that integrate the effects of groups of chemicals with the same mode of action that act in a concentration-additive manner. Statistical distribution methods are proposed to derive a specific effect-based trigger bioanalytical equivalent concentration (EBT-BEQ) for each bioassay of environmental interest that targets receptor-mediated toxicity. Even bioassays that are indicative of the same mode of action have slightly different numeric trigger values due to differences in their inherent sensitivity. The algorithm was applied to 18 cell-based bioassays and 11 provisional effect-based trigger bioanalytical equivalents were derived as an illustrative example using the 349 chemical guideline values protective for human health of the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. We illustrate the applicability using the example of a diverse set of water samples including recycled water. Most recycled water samples were compliant with the proposed triggers while wastewater effluent would not have been compliant with a few

  6. Quantitative assessment to the structural basis of water repellency in natural and technical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, P; Fürstner, R; Barthlott, W; Neinhuis, C

    2003-04-01

    Many plant surfaces are water-repellent because of a complex 3-dimensional microstructure of the epidermal cells (papillae) and a superimposed layer of hydrophobic wax crystals. Due to its surface tension, water does not spread on such surfaces but forms spherical droplets that lie only on the tips of the microstructures. Studying six species with heavily microstructured surfaces by a new type of confocal light microscopy, the number, height, and average distance of papillae per unit area were measured. These measurements were combined with those of an atomic force microscope which was used to measure the exposed area of the fine-structure on individual papillae. According to calculations based upon these measurements, roughening results in a reduction of the contact area of more than 95% compared with the projected area of a water droplet. By applying water/methanol solutions of decreasing surface tension to a selection of 33 water-repellent species showing different types of surface structures, the critical value at which wetting occurs was determined. The results impressively demonstrated the importance of roughening on different length scales for water-repellency, since extremely papillose surfaces, having an additional wax layer, are able to resist up to 70% methanol. Surfaces that lack papillae or similar structures on the same length scale are much more easily wetted.

  7. Valuing water resources in Switzerland using a hedonic price model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Diana; Siber, Rosi; Brouwer, Roy; Logar, Ivana; Sanadgol, Dorsa

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, linear and spatial hedonic price models are applied to the housing market in Switzerland, covering all 26 cantons in the country over the period 2005-2010. Besides structural house, neighborhood and socioeconomic characteristics, we include a wide variety of new environmental characteristics related to water to examine their role in explaining variation in sales prices. These include water abundance, different types of water bodies, the recreational function of water, and water disamenity. Significant spatial autocorrelation is found in the estimated models, as well as nonlinear effects for distances to the nearest lake and large river. Significant effects are furthermore found for water abundance and the distance to large rivers, but not to small rivers. Although in both linear and spatial models water related variables explain less than 1% of the price variation, the distance to the nearest bathing site has a larger marginal contribution than many neighborhood-related distance variables. The housing market shows to differentiate between different water related resources in terms of relative contribution to house prices, which could help the housing development industry make more geographically targeted planning activities.

  8. Urban surface water pollution problems arising from misconnections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revitt, D Michael; Ellis, J Bryan

    2016-05-01

    The impacts of misconnections on the organic and nutrient loadings to surface waters are assessed using specific household appliance data for two urban sub-catchments located in the London metropolitan region and the city of Swansea. Potential loadings of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), soluble reactive phosphorus (PO4-P) and ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N) due to misconnections are calculated for three different scenarios based on the measured daily flows from specific appliances and either measured daily pollutant concentrations or average pollutant concentrations for relevant greywater and black water sources obtained from an extensive review of the literature. Downstream receiving water concentrations, together with the associated uncertainties, are predicted from derived misconnection discharge concentrations and compared to existing freshwater standards for comparable river types. Consideration of dilution ratios indicates that these would need to be of the order of 50-100:1 to maintain high water quality with respect to BOD and NH4-N following typical misconnection discharges but only poor quality for PO4-P is likely to be achievable. The main pollutant loading contributions to misconnections arise from toilets (NH4-N and BOD), kitchen sinks (BOD and PO4-P) washing machines (PO4-P and BOD) and, to a lesser extent, dishwashers (PO4-P). By completely eliminating toilet misconnections and ensuring misconnections from all other appliances do not exceed 2%, the potential pollution problems due to BOD and NH4-N discharges would be alleviated but this would not be the case for PO4-P. In the event of a treatment option being preferred to solve the misconnection problem, it is shown that for an area the size of metropolitan Greater London, a sewage treatment plant with a Population Equivalent value approaching 900,000 would be required to efficiently remove BOD and NH4-N to safely dischargeable levels but such a plant is unlikely to have the capacity to deal

  9. Drainage-water travel times as a key factor for surface water contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Groenendijk, P.; Eertwegh, van den, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the unsaturated zone as an inextricable part of the hydrologic cycle has long been recognized. The root zone and the unsaturated sub-surface domain are chemically and biologically the most active zones. The interrelationships between soil, subsoil and surface waters make it unrealistic to treat the saturated and unsaturated zones and the discharge to surface waters separately. Point models describe vertical water flow in the saturated zone and possibly lateral flow by defini...

  10. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2012 water year (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), data were collected at 81 stations—73 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 6 alternate Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 78 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  11. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.; Schneider, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2013 water year (October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2013), data were collected at 79 stations—73 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 4 alternate Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 76 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN AN ARSENIC CONTAMINATED VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud C. Saikia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of ground water has occurred in various parts of the world, becoming a menace in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra basin (West Bengal and Assam in India and Bangladesh. Recently arsenic has been detected in Cachar and Karimganj districts of barak valley, Assam, bordering Bangladesh. In this area coli form contamination comprises the major constraint towards utilization of its otherwise ample surface water resources. The local water management exploited ground water sources using a centralized piped water delivery scheme without taking into account the geologically arsenic-prone nature of the sediments and aquifers in this area. Thus surface water was the suggestive alternative for drinking water in this area. The present study investigated surface water quality and availability in a village of Karimganj district, Assam, India contaminated with arsenic for identifying the potential problems of surface water quality maintenance so that with effective management safe drinking water could be provided. The study revealed that the area was rich in freshwater ecosystems which had all physico-chemical variables such as water temperature, pH, DO, total alkalinity, free CO2, heavy metals like lead, chromium and cadmium within WHO standards. In contrast, coli form bacteria count was found far beyond permissible limit in all the sources. Around 60% people of the village preferred ground water for drinking and only 6% were aware of arsenic related problems. The problem of bacterial contamination could be controlled by implementing some ameliorative measures so that people can safely use surface water. Inhabitants of the two districts should be given proper education regarding arsenic contamination and associated health risk. Effluents should be treated to acceptable levels and standards before discharging them into natural streams.

  13. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  14. Evaluation of acute copper toxicity to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in soft surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Genderen, Eric J; Ryan, Adam C; Tomasso, Joseph R; Klaine, Stephen J

    2005-02-01

    The hardness-based regulatory approach for Cu prescribes an extrapolation of the toxicity-versus-hardness relationship to low hardness (hardness surface waters. Seasonal water sampling was conducted at 24 sites throughout South Carolina, USA, to determine the site-specific influences of soft surface-water conditions on acute Cu toxicity. Concurrent toxicity tests in laboratory water, matched for hardness and alkalinity (modified method), also were conducted to allow calculation of water-effect ratios (WERs). In addition, tests were conducted at recommended hardness levels (recommended method) for comparison of WER methodology in soft water. Surface-water conditions (average+/-standard deviation, n = 53) were hardness of 16+/-8 mg/L as CaCO3, alkalinity of 18+/-11 mg/L as CaCO3, and dissolved organic carbon of 6+/-4 mg/L. Dissolved Cu 48-h median lethal concentration (LC50) values varied nearly 45-fold across the dataset and greater than four-fold at individual sites. Spatial (p hardness-based equation for Cu at 50 mg/L or less as CaCO3 would adequately protect fathead minnow populations in soft surface waters. The WER results presented here demonstrate the inconsistency between hardness-based criteria and the methodology for deriving site-specific water-quality criteria in low-hardness waters.

  15. 77 FR 43822 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Valuing Improved Water Quality in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... AGENCY Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Valuing Improved Water Quality in the... request (ICR), ``Valuing Improved Water Quality in the Chesapeake Bay Using Stated Preference Methods (New... Act (CWA) directs EPA to coordinate Federal and State efforts to improve water quality in the...

  16. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2015-12-18

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2014 water year (October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014), data were collected at 74 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Assessment Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 71 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  17. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2010 water year (October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2010), data were collected at 75 stations-72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, and 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  18. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2009 water year (October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009), data were collected at 75 stations-69 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, and 3 stations sampled in cooperation with the Elk River Watershed Improvement Association. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and seven-day low flow is presented.

  19. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2011 water year (October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011), data were collected at 75 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, and 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  20. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.; Heimann, David C.

    2016-11-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During water year 2015 (October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015), data were collected at 74 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Assessment Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 71 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak streamflows, monthly mean streamflows, and 7-day low flows is presented.

  1. Role of water in polymer surface modification using organosilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallapalle, Pradeep Kumar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    In general, polymers exhibit excellent bulk properties but may not possess specific surface properties for successful applications in biomaterials and nanotechnology. Surface modification of polymers with the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes - ‘Silanization’ - is an attractive approach to alter surface properties without altering the polymer’s desired bulk properties. However, a pretreatment such as exposure to UV/O or plasma is normally required to generate active surface groups prior to silanization. These pretreatments cause undesirable surface changes such as severe surface roughening and excessive surface damage. Recent studies in silanization suggest that the presence of water or OH groups on the surface is essential to form SAMs. In this study we investigated the importance of surface water layer and OH groups in the formation of SAMs for a variety of polymers. The pre and post-modified polymers were examined using fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning probe microscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that organosilanes can be grafted to a polymer surface as long as a water layer can be physisorbed to the surface or the polymer itself contains OH groups. However the monolayers formed are less organized compared to those formed on silicon wafers due to the amorphous nature of the polymers.

  2. The perceptions of research values and priorities in water resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Research has played an important role in water resource management and a consensus on research objectives would increase the efficiency of these practices. ... related to the lack of enforcement or to human resource constraints.

  3. The perceptions of research values and priorities in water resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... Centre for Environmental Management, Internal Box 67, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, ... stakeholders involved in water resource management in south- ... environmental practices (in this case, research) are likely.

  4. SWFSC FED Mid Water Trawl Juvenile Rockfish Survey, Surface Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC FED Mid Water Trawl Juvenile Rockfish Survey: Station Information and Surface Data. Surveys have been conducted along the central California coast in May/June...

  5. Treatability of South African surface waters by enhanced coagulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-05

    Jun 5, 2013 ... The majority of South African inland surface water sources are compromised due to a ... minimising residual coagulant, minimising sludge production .... included as being indicative of the worst effects of indirect reuse.

  6. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    compare the results with experiment. This work will be used to help interpret field data of bistatic scattering from sea ice cover and calibrate...approximate analytical and numerical acoustic models used to compute bistatic scattering. The clouds of bubbles entrained at the sea surface by breaking...ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified

  7. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  8. Influence of Surface and Bulk Water Ice on the Reactivity of a Water-forming Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Thanja; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    On the surface of icy dust grains in the dense regions of the interstellar medium, a rich chemistry can take place. Due to the low temperature, reactions that proceed via a barrier can only take place through tunneling. The reaction {{H}}+{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}2\\longrightarrow {{{H}}}2{{O}}+{OH} is such a case with a gas-phase barrier of ∼26.5 kJ mol‑1. Still, the reaction is known to be involved in water formation on interstellar grains. Here, we investigate the influence of a water ice surface and of bulk ice on the reaction rate constant. Rate constants are calculated using instanton theory down to 74 K. The ice is taken into account via multiscale modeling, describing the reactants and the direct surrounding at the quantum mechanical level with density functional theory (DFT), while the rest of the ice is modeled on the molecular mechanical level with a force field. We find that H2O2 binding energies cannot be captured by a single value, but rather they depend on the number of hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. In highly amorphous surroundings, the binding site can block the routes of attack and impede the reaction. Furthermore, the activation energies do not correlate with the binding energies of the same sites. The unimolecular rate constants related to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism increase as the activation energy decreases. Thus, we provide a lower limit for the rate constant and argue that rate constants can have values up to two order of magnitude larger than this limit.

  9. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.;

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  10. Super water repellent surface 'strictly' mimicking the surface structure of lotus leaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Tae Gon; Kim, Ho Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Moon, Myoung Woon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    To achieve the hierarchy of roughness as observed in lotus leaves, most artificial water-repellent surfaces have nano-asperities on top of micropillars. However, observation of real lotus leaves through SEM reveals that nonoscale roughness covers the entire surface including the base as well as bumps. Thus we fabricate surfaces having the same hierarchical roughness structure as the lotus leaf by forming nanopillars on both micropillars and base. We compare the measures of water-repellency (static contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and transition pressure between the Cassie and Wenzel states) of the lotus-like surface with those of surfaces having single micro- and nano- roughness. The results show that nanoscale roughness covering entire surface area leads to superior water-repellency to other surface roughness structures. We also give a theoretical consideration of this observation.

  11. Near-surface viscosity effects on capillary rise of water in nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Barisik, Murat; Kim, BoHung

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for predicting nanoscale capillary imbibitions using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) theory. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effects of surface forces on the viscosity of liquid water. This provides an update to the modified LW equation that considered only a nanoscale slip length. An initial water nanodroplet study was performed to properly elucidate the wetting behavior of copper and gold surfaces. Intermolecular interaction strengths between water and corresponding solid surfaces were determined by matching the contact angle values obtained by experimental measurements. The migration of liquid water into copper and gold capillaries was measured by MD simulations and was found to differ from the modified LW equation. We found that the liquid layering in the vicinity of the solid surface induces a higher density and viscosity, leading to a slower MD uptake of fluid into the capillaries than was theoretically predicted. The near-surface viscosity for the nanoscale-confined water was defined and calculated for the thin film of water that was sheared between the two solid surfaces, as the ratio of water shear stress to the applied shear rate. Considering the effects of both the interface viscosity and slip length of the fluid, we successfully predicted the MD-measured fluid rise in the nanotubes.

  12. Wettability modification of human tooth surface by water and UV and electron-beam radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@gmail.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Coyoacan, México, D.F. (Mexico); Elefterie, Florina, E-mail: elefterie_florina@yahoo.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Beyens, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.beyens@ed.univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Maschke, Ulrich, E-mail: Ulrich.Maschke@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Brès, Etienne F., E-mail: etienne.bres@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-01

    The wettability of the human tooth enamel and dentin was analyzed by measuring the contact angles of a drop of distilled water deposited on the surface. The samples were cut along the transverse and longitudinal directions, and their surfaces were subjected to metallographic mirror-finish polishing. Some samples were also acid etched until their microstructure became exposed. Wettability measurements of the samples were done in dry and wet conditions and after ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) irradiations. The results indicate that water by itself was able to increase the hydrophobicity of these materials. The UV irradiation momentarily reduced the contact angle values, but they recovered after a short time. EB irradiation raised the contact angle and maintained it for a long time. Both enamel and dentin surfaces showed a wide range of contact angles, from approximately 10° (hydrophilic) to 90° (hydrophobic), although the contact angle showed more variability on enamel than on dentin surfaces. Whether the sample's surface had been polished or etched did not influence the contact angle value in wet conditions. - Highlights: • Human tooth surface wettability changes in dry/wet and UV/EB radiation conditions. • More variability in contact angle is observed on enamel than on dentin surfaces. • Water by itself increases the hydrophobicity of the human tooth surface. • UV irradiation reduces momentarily the human tooth surface hydrophobicity. • EB irradiation increases and maintains the hydrophobicity for a long time.

  13. Simulation of the Regional Ground-Water-Flow System and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interaction in the Rock River Basin, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    , the model routes tributary base flow through the river network to the Rock River. The parameter-estimation code PEST was linked to the GFLOW model to select the combination of parameter values best able to match more than 8,000 water-level measurements and base-flow estimates at 9 streamgages. Results from the calibrated GFLOW model show simulated (1) ground-water-flow directions, (2) ground-water/surface-water interactions, as depicted in a map of gaining and losing river and lake sections, (3) ground-water contributing areas for selected tributary rivers, and (4) areas of relatively local ground water captured by rivers. Ground-water flow patterns are controlled primarily by river geometries, with most river sections gaining water from the ground-water-flow system; losing sections are most common on the downgradient shore of lakes and reservoirs or near major pumping centers. Ground-water contributing areas to tributary rivers generally coincide with surface watersheds; however the locations of ground-water divides are controlled by the water table, whereas surface-water divides are controlled by surface topography. Finally, areas of relatively local ground water captured by rivers generally extend upgradient from rivers but are modified by the regional flow pattern, such that these areas tend to shift toward regional ground-water divides for relatively small rivers. It is important to recognize the limitations of this regional-scale model. Heterogeneities in subsurface properties and in recharge rates are considered only at a very broad scale (miles to tens of miles). No account is taken of vertical variations in properties or pumping rates, and no provision is made to account for stacked ground-water-flow systems that have different flow patterns at different depths. Small-scale flow systems (hundreds to thousands of feet) associated with minor water bodies are not considered; as a result, the model is not currently designed for simulating site-specifi

  14. Simulation method for determining biodegradation in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeberl, P.; Guhl, W. [Henkel KGaA, Duesseldorf (Germany). Hauptabteilung Oekologie; Scholz, N. [OXENO GmbH, Marl (Germany); Taeger, K. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    OECD guidelines and EU directives on the biological testing of chemicals contain no methods able to simulate biodegradation in surface waters. The surface water simulation method presented in this paper is suitable for closing this gap. The species in the autochthonous biocoenosis used in the method form part of the food web in natural surface waters. The microbial degradation activity measured by the half-life is comparable with that in surface waters. The degrees of degradation measured in this surface water simulation method can be applied to natural surface waters. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die OECD- und EU-Richtlinien zur biologischen Pruefung von Chemikalien enthalten kein Verfahren, mit dem der biologische Abbau in Fliessgewaessern simuliert werden kann. Das in dieser Arbeit vorgestellte Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell ist geeignet, diese Luecke zu schliessen. Die Arten der autochthonen Biocoenose des Modells sind Glieder im Nahrungsnetz natuerlicher Fliessgewaesser. Die an der Halbwertszeit gemessene mikrobielle Abbauaktivitaet ist mit derjenigen in Fliessgewaessern vergleichbar. Die im Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell gemessenen Abbaugrade sind auf natuerliche Fliessgewaesser uebertragbar. (orig.)

  15. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  16. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T.; van Staalduinen, M.A.; van der Sluijs, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expe

  17. Value of Landsat in urban water resources planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Ragan, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The reported investigation had the objective to evaluate the utility of satellite multispectral remote sensing in urban water resources planning. The results are presented of a study which was conducted to determine the economic impact of Landsat data. The use of Landsat data to estimate hydrologic model parameters employed in urban water resources planning is discussed. A decision regarding an employment of the Landsat data has to consider the tradeoff between data accuracy and cost. Bayesian decision theory is used in this connection. It is concluded that computer-aided interpretation of Landsat data is a highly cost-effective method of estimating the percentage of impervious area.

  18. Value of Landsat in urban water resources planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Ragan, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The reported investigation had the objective to evaluate the utility of satellite multispectral remote sensing in urban water resources planning. The results are presented of a study which was conducted to determine the economic impact of Landsat data. The use of Landsat data to estimate hydrologic model parameters employed in urban water resources planning is discussed. A decision regarding an employment of the Landsat data has to consider the tradeoff between data accuracy and cost. Bayesian decision theory is used in this connection. It is concluded that computer-aided interpretation of Landsat data is a highly cost-effective method of estimating the percentage of impervious area.

  19. Seasonal Spatial Patterns of Surface Water Temperature, Surface Heat Fluxes and Meteorological Forcing Over Lake Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani Rahaghi, A.; Lemmin, U.; Bouffard, D.; Riffler, M.; Wunderle, S.; Barry, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many lakes, surface heat flux (SHF) is the most important component controlling the lake's energy content. Accurate methods for the determination of SHF are valuable for water management, and for use in hydrological and meteorological models. Large lakes, not surprisingly, are subject to spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions, and hence SHF. Here, we report on an investigation for estimating the SHF of a large European lake, Lake Geneva. We evaluated several bulk formulas to estimate Lake Geneva's SHF based on different data sources. A total of 64 different surface heat flux models were realized using existing representations for different heat flux components. Data sources to run the models included meteorological data (from an operational numerical weather prediction model, COSMO-2) and lake surface water temperature (LSWT, from satellite imagery). Models were calibrated at two points in the lake for which regular depth profiles of temperature are available, and which enabled computation of the total heat content variation. The latter, computed for 03.2008-12.2012, was the metric used to rank the different models. The best calibrated model was then selected to calculate the spatial distribution of SHF. Analysis of the model results shows that evaporative and convective heat fluxes are the dominant terms controlling the spatial pattern of SHF. The former is significant in all seasons while the latter plays a role only in fall and winter. Meteorological observations illustrate that wind-sheltering, and to some extent relative humidity variability, are the main reasons for the observed large-scale spatial variability. In addition, both modeling and satellite observations indicate that, on average, the eastern part of the lake is warmer than the western part, with a greater temperature contrast in spring and summer than in fall and winter whereas the SHF spatial splitting is stronger in fall and winter. This is mainly due to negative heat flux

  20. ACHIEVING THRESHOLD BARRIER OF 1 nm ROUGHNESS VALUE OF SILICON SURFACE BY DIAMOND TURNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    1 nm roughness value of silicon surface by diamond turning is obtained firstly and three novel techniques are proposed. The surface integrity is studied in detail by using atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and stylus surface instrument. The diamond tool sharpness hasa considerable influence on the machined surface, therefore a novel technique-brightness modulation for measuring accurately the edge of the cutter is proposed. Mirror surfaces are assessed by another novel technique-a measure of their reflectivity. A third technique, single grit diamond machining is carried out. It supplies a experimental evidence for verifying the obtained high quality turned surfaces.

  1. Persistent organic pollutants in China's surface water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J

    2017-02-15

    Following recent rapid industrialization, China is now one of the largest producers and consumers of organic chemicals in the world. This is compounded by variable regulatory oversight with respect to storage, use and waste management of these chemicals and their byproducts. This review synthesizes the data on the distribution of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in waters in China. Surface water heavily polluted with POPs is distributed in the Yangtze River Estuary, Pearl River Delta, Minjiang River Estuary, Jiulongjiang Estuary, Daya Bay, Taihu Lake, and the waterways of Zhejiang Province, where concentrations of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) frequently exceed both international and Chinese guideline values. These areas are mainly distributed along the southeast coast of China, within or downstream of major manufacturing districts, intensive agricultural basins, and other industrial centers. A comparison of the levels of OCPs in the aquatic environment of China with other indicative regions worldwide shows comparable levels of pollution (overall range from below detection limit (BDL) to 5104.8ng/L and regional means from 2.9-929.6ng/L). PAHs and PCBs pollution appear to be particularly serious in China (PAHs overall ranging from BDL to 474,000ng/L with regional means from 15.1-72,400ng/L; PCBs from BDL to 3161ng/L with regional means ranging from 0.2-985.2ng/L). There is as yet limited evidence of serious perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) pollution. We discuss major sources and processes responsible for high POP occurrence using a range of measures (including diagnostic ratios of different compounds), regulatory oversight and policy gaps in the control of POPs in China, and potential long-term health and ecological effects. We argue that water quality guidelines, pollution control measures and cleanup strategies for POPs in China should be

  2. Surface area, porosity and water adsorption properties of fine volcanic ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Villiéras, Frédéric; Pelletier, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    Our understanding on how ash particles in volcanic plumes react with coexisting gases and aerosols is still rudimentary, despite the importance of these reactions in influencing the chemistry and dynamics of a plume. In this study, six samples of fine ash (500 Å. All the specimens had similar pore size distributions, with a small peak centered around 50 Å. These findings suggest that fine ash particles have relatively undifferentiated surface textures, irrespective of the chemical composition and eruption type. Adsorption isotherms for water vapour revealed that the capacity of the ash samples for water adsorption is systematically larger than predicted from the nitrogen adsorption as values. Enhanced reactivity of the ash surface towards water may result from (i) hydration of bulk ash constituents; (ii) hydration of surface compounds; and/or (iii) hydroxylation of the surface of the ash. The later mechanism may lead to irreversible retention of water. Based on these experiments, we predict that volcanic ash is covered by a complete monolayer of water under ambient atmospheric conditions. In addition, capillary condensation within ash pores should allow for deposition of condensed water on to ash particles before water reaches saturation in the plume. The total mass of water vapour retained by 1 g of fine ash at 0.95 relative water vapour pressure is calculated to be ~10-2 g. Some volcanic implications of this study are discussed.

  3. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of heavy metal river Ingulets surface water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Trokhymenko, Ganna G.; Tsyhanyuk, Nina V.

    2017-01-01

    The low efficiency of implemented targeted programs to reduce the anthropogenic impact on hydroecosystem and overcoming its negative consequences demand a search for the optimal evidence reasonable decisions to improve the quality of Ingul river water basin for different economic sectors of water resources and the required number and suitable quality. Methodical bases of such research must be based on a detailed and comprehensive study of the hydrochemical regime and surface water quality. Th...

  5. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Surface Water near Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Pincus, Philip A; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-12-06

    Despite much effort to probe the properties of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution, the effects of DMSO on water, especially near plasma membrane surfaces, still remain elusive. By performing molecular dynamics simulations at varying DMSO concentrations (XDMSO), we study how DMSO affects structural and dynamical properties of water in the vicinity of phospholipid bilayers. As proposed by a number of experiments, our simulations confirm that DMSO induces dehydration from bilayer surfaces and disrupts the H-bond structure of water. However, DMSO-enhanced water diffusivity at solvent-bilayer interfaces, an intriguing discovery reported by a spin-label measurement, is not confirmed in our simulations. To resolve this discrepancy, we examine the location of the spin label (Tempo) relative to the solvent-bilayer interface. In accord with the evidence in the literature, our simulations, which explicitly model Tempo-phosphatidylcholine, find that the Tempo moiety is equilibrated at ∼8-10 Å below the bilayer surface. Furthermore, the DMSO-enhanced surface-water diffusion is confirmed only when water diffusion is analyzed around the Tempo moiety that is immersed below the bilayer surface, which implies that the experimentally detected signal of water using Tempo stems from the interior of bilayers, not from the interface. Our analysis finds that the increase of water diffusion below the bilayer surface is coupled to the increase of area per lipid with an increasing XDMSO(≲10mol%). Underscoring the hydrophobic nature of the Tempo moiety, our study calls for careful re-evaluation of the use of Tempo in measurements on lipid bilayer surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid surface-water volume estimations in beaver ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, Daniel J.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Johnston, Carol A.; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Beaver ponds are surface-water features that are transient through space and time. Such qualities complicate the inclusion of beaver ponds in local and regional water balances, and in hydrological models, as reliable estimates of surface-water storage are difficult to acquire without time- and labour-intensive topographic surveys. A simpler approach to overcome this challenge is needed, given the abundance of the beaver ponds in North America, Eurasia, and southern South America. We investigated whether simple morphometric characteristics derived from readily available aerial imagery or quickly measured field attributes of beaver ponds can be used to approximate surface-water storage among the range of environmental settings in which beaver ponds are found. Studied were a total of 40 beaver ponds from four different sites in North and South America. The simplified volume-area-depth (V-A-h) approach, originally developed for prairie potholes, was tested. With only two measurements of pond depth and corresponding surface area, this method estimated surface-water storage in beaver ponds within 5 % on average. Beaver pond morphometry was characterized by a median basin coefficient of 0.91, and dam length and pond surface area were strongly correlated with beaver pond storage capacity, regardless of geographic setting. These attributes provide a means for coarsely estimating surface-water storage capacity in beaver ponds. Overall, this research demonstrates that reliable estimates of surface-water storage in beaver ponds only requires simple measurements derived from aerial imagery and/or brief visits to the field. Future research efforts should be directed at incorporating these simple methods into both broader beaver-related tools and catchment-scale hydrological models.

  7. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  8. AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO VALUING WATER FROM BRUSH CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical methodology utilizing models from three disciplines is developed to assess the viability of brush control for wate yield in the Frio River Basin, TX. Ecological, hydrologic, and economic models are used to portray changes in forage production and water supply result...

  9. Nonzero Ideal Gas Contribution to the Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Marcello; Fábián, Balázs; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2017-06-15

    Surface tension, the tendency of fluid interfaces to behave elastically and minimize their surface, is routinely calculated as the difference between the lateral and normal components of the pressure or, invoking isotropy in momentum space, of the virial tensor. Here we show that the anisotropy of the kinetic energy tensor close to a liquid-vapor interface can be responsible for a large part of its surface tension (about 15% for water, independent from temperature).

  10. Metropolitan Spokane Region Water Resources Study. Appendix A. Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    the river as surface supply. This second area lies mostly north of the Spokane River extending up the val- ley known as Rathdrum Prairie and includes...4 10. 2-29 I .~ -A- IvA -4 -4 IS I rp4r 1-4 - 4NCs 4~ 10. 2- 3o * r~tar gg~wr 4 . fAPPENDIX I en00 -4 - r., 0 CM- WMC q ~~0 0r0 4. .44 . VFog 4102A3

  11. Determination of threshold value of soil water content for field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, S.

    2009-04-01

    Both the potential water consumption of plants and their ability to withdraw soil water are necessary in order to estimate actual evapotranspiration and to predict irrigation timing and amount. In relating to root water uptake the threshold value at which plants reducing evapotranspiration is an important parameter. Since transpiration is linearly correlated to dry matter production, under the condition that the AET/PET-Quotient is smaller than 1.0 (de Wit 1958, Tanner & Sinclair 1983), the dry matter production begins to decline too. Plants respond to drought with biochemical, physiological and morphological modifications in order to avoid damages, for instance by increasing the root water uptake. The objective of the study is to determine threshold values of soil water content and pressure head respectively for different field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements and to derive so called reduction functions. Both parameter, potenzial water demand in several growth stages and threshold value of soil water content or pressure head can be determined with weighable field lysimeter. The threshold value is reached, when the evapotranspiration under natural rainfall condition (AET) drop clearly (0.8 PET) below the value under well watered condition (PET). Basis for the presented results is the lysimeter plant Buttelstedt of the Thuringian State Institute of Agriculture. It consist of two lysimeter cellars, each with two weighable monolithic lysimeters. The lysimeter are 2.5 m deep with a surface area of 2 m2 to allow a non-restrictive root growth and to arrange a representative number of plants. The weighing accuracy amounts to 0.05 mm. The percolating water is collected by ceramic suction cups with suction up to 0.3 MPa at a depth of 2.3 m. The soil water content is measured by using neutron probe. One of the two lysimeter cellars represents the will irrigated, the other one the non irrigated and/or reduced irrigated part of field. The soil is a Haplic

  12. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  13. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  14. Water pollution abatement programme. The Czech Republic. Project 4.2. Assessing critical loads of acidity to surface waters in The Czech Republic. Critical loads of acidity to surface waters, Northern Moravia and Silesia, The Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, L.; Raclavsky, K.; Henriksen, A.; Raclavska, H.; Matysek, D.

    1994-12-31

    The governments of Norway and Czech and Slovak Federal Republic have signed a bilateral environmental protection agreement. This report describes Project 4.2 of the agreement: Assessing critical loads of acidity to surface waters in The Czech Republic. Critical load of acidity to surface waters and exceedance of critical load were estimated by using standard methods modified for the sampling area. Water samples were mainly taken from small forest streams, which were the only available surface waters with negligible pollution from local sources. High critical loads were calculated, averaging 20 times higher than the corresponding value for southern Norway. The deposition of acidifying components in the region was high, but did not exceed the critical load and so there is a reserve for additional acid deposition. Scattered water analyses from several other parts of The Czech Republic indicate both low critical loads and exceedance of critical load in various regions (e.g. Bohemia). 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Surface Water Resources Response to Climate Changes in Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The response of surface water resources on climate changes was studied.[Method] By dint of monthly average temperature and precipitation in 45 meteorological stations in Jilin Province from 1960 to 2000,monthly runoff in 56 hydrological stations in Songhuajiang and Liaohe region,the surface runoff change and the response of surface water resources to climate change in 41 years were expounded.[Result] The runoff of Songliao region was limited during 1960s and 1970s.It began to increase slowly in ...

  16. Contaminants in surface water and sediments around the Tynagh Mine, Galway, Ireland.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, A.; Phillips, D.H.; Bowen, J; Sen Gupta, B.

    2015-01-01

    A former silver mine in Tynagh, Co. Galway, Ireland is one of the most contaminated mine sites in Europe with maximum concentrations of Zn, As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cd far exceeding guideline values for water and sediment. The aims of this research were to 1) further assess the contamination, particularly metals, in surface water and sediment around the site, and 2) determine if the contamination has increased 10 years after the Environmental Protection Agency Ireland (EPAI) identified off-sit...

  17. The Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Alsdorf, Douglas; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Morrow, Rosemary; Mognard, Nelly; Vaze, Parag; Lafon, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A new space mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is being developed jointly by a collaborative effort of the international oceanographic and hydrological communities for making high-resolution measurement of the water elevation of both the ocean and land surface water to answer the questions about the oceanic submesoscale processes and the storage and discharge of land surface water. The key instrument payload would be a Ka-band radar interferometer capable of making high-resolution wide-swath altimetry measurement. This paper describes the proposed science objectives and requirements as well as the measurement approach of SWOT, which is baselined to be launched in 2019. SWOT would demonstrate this new approach to advancing both oceanography and land hydrology and set a standard for future altimetry missions.

  18. The influence of lithology on surface water sources | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of surface water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed “rainout effect”, which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the leeward side of the Oregon Coastal Range. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Results indicate a significant difference in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation was the most distinct during the summer when low flows reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall and winter) showed a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. This indicates that baseflow within streams drained by sandstone versus basalt is being supplied from two distinctly separate water sources. In addition, Marys River flow at the outle

  19. Tropospheric aerosols remote sensing over the water surface of Penang Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S. A.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, H. S.; Wong, C. J.; Salleh, N. Mohd.

    2006-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols play an important role in climate change. Aerosols are typically studied over deep clear water, due to the relatively constant reflectance of water and the ability to easily separate surface and atmospheric contributions on the satellite signal. A methodology based on multi-spectral approach was employed to map tropospheric aerosols concentrations over the water areas surrounding Penang Island. The aim of this study was to estimate the pollutants concentrations using remote sensing techniques. In this study, we attempted to derive AOT (Aerosol Optical Thickness) values from the sky transmittance measurements in the visible spectrum. The transmittance values were measured at the sea surface using a handheld spectroradiometer. The correspond PM10 readings were taken simultaneously during the transmittance measurements acquisition of the imageries using a Dust Trak meter. The PCI Geomatica version 9.1 digital image processing software was used in all image-processing analyses. The results produced a linear relationship between PM10 and AOT values over the water surface of Penang Island. Finally, The PM10 concentration map over the water surface of Penang Island was generated using Kriging interpolation technique. This study has indicated the potential use of a handheld spectroradiometer for air quality study.

  20. On the influence of the intermolecular potential on the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafong, E.; Geske, J.; Drossel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To describe the intermolecular interaction between water and silica atoms, two types of interaction potential models are used: the standard BródkA and Zerda (BZ) model and the Gulmen and Thompson (GT) model. We perform an in-depth analysis of the influence of the choice of the potential on the arrangement of the water molecules in partially filled pores and on top of silica slabs. We find that at moderate pore filling ratios, the GT silica surface is completely wetted by water molecules, which agrees well with experimental findings, while the commonly used BZ surface is less hydrophilic and is only partially wetted. We interpret our simulation results using an analytical calculation of the phase diagram of water in partially filled pores. Moreover, an evaluation of the contact angle of the water droplet on top of the silica slab reveals that the interaction becomes more hydrophilic with increasing slab thickness and saturates around 2.5-3 nm, in agreement with the experimentally found value. Our analysis also shows that the hydroaffinity of the surface is mainly determined by the electrostatic interaction, but the van der Waals interaction nevertheless is strong enough that it can turn a hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic surface.

  1. Trends in water monomer adsorption and dissociation on flat insulating surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Liang; Carrasco, Javier; Klimeš, Jiří; Michaelides, Angelos

    2011-07-21

    The interaction of water with solid surfaces is key to a wide variety of industrial and natural processes. However, the basic principles that dictate how stable and in which state (intact or dissociated) water will be on a given surface are not fully understood. Towards this end, we have used density functional theory to examine water monomer adsorption on the (001) surfaces of a broad range of alkaline earth oxides, alkaline earth sulfides, alkali fluorides, and alkali chlorides. Some interesting general conclusions are arrived at: (i) on all the surfaces considered only a few specific adsorption structures are favoured; (ii) water becomes more stable upon descending the oxide and fluoride series but does not vary much upon going down the chloride and sulfide series; (iii) water is stabilised both by an increase in the lattice constant, which facilitates hydrogen bonding to the substrate, and by the flexibility of the substrate. These are also factors that favour water dissociation. We hope that this study is of some value in better understanding the surface science of water in general, and in assisting in the interpretation and design of future experiments.

  2. Surface tension isotherms of the dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhambulatov, R. S.; Dadashev, R. Kh.; Elimkhanov, D. Z.; Dadashev, I. N.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the concentration dependence of surface tension of aqueous solutions of the 1,4-dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems were given. The studies were performed by the hanging-drop method on a DSA100 tensiometer. The maximum error of surface tension was 1%. The theoretical models for calculating the surface tension of the ternary systems of organic solutions were analyzed.

  3. Supplementary report on surface-water and ground-water surveys, Nueces River Basin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, W.L.; Ellsworth, C.E.

    1950-01-01

    A report on the ground-water and surface-water surveys of the Nueces River Basin was included in a report by the Bureau of Reclamation, entitled "Comprehensive plan for water-resources development of the Nueces River Basin project planning report number 5-14.04-3, February 1946".

  4. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  6. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  7. Foulant characteristics comparison in recycling cooling water system makeup by municipal reclaimed water and surface water in power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    and DNA microarrays technologies.4,5,6,7,8 Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water,2,9-16 at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle...... computations of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems.3,16,17,18 For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence...

  9. How to monitor and adjust in real time the total water consumption and water use efficiency: Earned value method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhong; Dong, Zengchuan; Wu, Huixiu; Yang, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation indexes of total water consumption and water use efficiency have the characteristics of post feedback. In this paper we introduce the basic concept and specific theory of Earned value method (EVM) from project management, and reconstruct parameters in the method to adapt to water resources monitoring. The case of Dandong was studied, by analyzing the industry and irrigation water utilization. Although the total water consumption of two aspects reaches standards, the industrial added value and water use efficiency of irrigation are not up to standard. The results show that PV can be used as a baseline for real-time monitoring and adjustment, and the advantage of the EVM is that it can be an organic unity of water consumption and efficiency, so we can analyze comprehensively water utilization process.

  10. A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region

  11. The significant surface-water connectivity of "geographically isolated wetlands"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Mushet, David M.; Alexander, Laurie C.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Richter, Stephen; Walls, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the current literature, coupled with our collective research expertise, on surface-water connectivity of wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” (sensu Tiner Wetlands 23:494–516, 2003a) to critically assess the scientific foundation of grouping wetlands based on the singular condition of being surrounded by uplands. The most recent research on wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” shows the difficulties in grouping an ecological resource that does not reliably indicate lack of surface water connectivity in order to meet legal, regulatory, or scientific needs. Additionally, the practice of identifying “geographically isolated wetlands” based on distance from a stream can result in gross overestimates of the number of wetlands lacking ecologically important surface-water connections. Our findings do not support use of the overly simplistic label of “geographically isolated wetlands”. Wetlands surrounded by uplands vary in function and surface-water connections based on wetland landscape setting, context, climate, and geographic region and should be evaluated as such. We found that the “geographically isolated” grouping does not reflect our understanding of the hydrologic variability of these wetlands and hence does not benefit conservation of the Nation’s diverse wetland resources. Therefore, we strongly discourage use of categorizations that provide overly simplistic views of surface-water connectivity of wetlands fully embedded in upland landscapes.

  12. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  13. Operational Surface Water Detection and Monitoring Using Radarsat 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bolanos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional on-site methods for mapping and monitoring surface water extent are prohibitively expensive at a national scale within Canada. Despite successful cost-sharing programs between the provinces and the federal government, an extensive number of water features within the country remain unmonitored. Particularly difficult to monitor are the potholes in the Canadian Prairie region, most of which are ephemeral in nature and represent a discontinuous flow that influences water pathways, runoff response, flooding and local weather. Radarsat-2 and the Radarsat Constellation Mission (RCM offer unique capabilities to map the extent of water bodies at a national scale, including unmonitored sites, and leverage the current infrastructure of the Meteorological Service of Canada to monitor water information in remote regions. An analysis of the technical requirements of the Radarsat-2 beam mode, polarization and resolution is presented. A threshold-based procedure to map locations of non-vegetated water bodies after the ice break-up is used and complemented with a texture-based indicator to capture the most homogeneous water areas and automatically delineate their extents. Some strategies to cope with the radiometric artifacts of noise inherent to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images are also discussed. Our results show that Radarsat-2 Fine mode can capture 88% of the total water area in a fully automated way. This will greatly improve current operational procedures for surface water monitoring information and impact a number of applications including weather forecasting, hydrological modeling, and drought/flood predictions.

  14. Surface-water quality assessment of the Clover Creek basin, Pierce County, Washington, 1991-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Increasing urbanization in the 67-square-mile Clover Creek Basin has generated interest in the effects of land-use changes on local water quality. To investigate these effects, water-quality and streamflow data were collected from 19 surface-water sites in the basin over a 16-month period from January 1991 through April 1992. These data were used to understand the effects of surficial geology, land-use practices, and wastewater disposal practices on surface-water quality within the basin. The basin was divided into four drainage subbasins with dissimilar hydrogeologic, land-use, and water-quality characteristics. In the Upper Clover Creek subbasin, the high permeability of surficial geologic materials promotes infiltration of precipitation to ground water and thus attenuates the response of streams to rainfall. Significant interaction occurs between surface and ground water in this subbasin, and nitrate concentrations and specific conductance values, similar to those found historically in local ground water, indicate that sources such as subsurface waste-disposal systems and fertilizers are affecting surface- water quality in this area. In the Spanaway subbasin, the presence of Spanaway and Tule Lakes affects water quality, primarily because of the reduced velocity and long residence time of water in the lakes. Reduced water velocity and long residence times (1) cause settling of suspended materials, thereby reducing concentrations of suspended sediment and constituents that are bound to the sediment; (2) promote biological activity, which tends to trap nutrients in the lakes; and (3) allow dispersion to attenuate peaks in discharge and water-quality constituent concentrations. In the North Fork subbasin, the low permeability of surficial geologic materials and areas of intensive land development inhibit infiltration of precipitation and thus promote surface runoff to streams. Surface pathways provide little attenuation of storm runoff and result in rapid increases

  15. Assessing of landscape potential for water management regarding its surface water (using the example of the micro-region Minčol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunáková Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water is one of the decisive factors of landscape’s natural potential. Water affects landscape’s predisposition for agricultural production, water supply available to the wide population and industry (the most important is the yield of water resources. Ponds, lakes and other water areas are zones of recreation and relaxation. Near sources mineral water, several world-famous spas were build. Waterways are also used to generate electricity. Geothermal underground water represents a very significant landscape potential. Determining hydrological potential of the area is important for the regional development. This paper assesses the landscape potential for water management regarding its surface waters in the micro-region Minčol. The micro-region was divided by a square grid, and for each square, we determined the appropriateness of this potential based on score points. The determining evaluation criteria were static reserves of surface water, waterway ranking and annual average discharge. First, we determined the significance (value of individual criteria (classification characteristics, and then we calculated the values of individual classifiers, which were then multiplied by the value of the individual classifier intervals. The summary of points in each square belongs to a particular degree of suitability for water management based on surface waters. The potential was divided into five degrees (intervals: very unfavourable potential, unfavourable potential, moderately favourable potential, favourable potential and very favourable potential.

  16. Studying surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Fallah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of water exchange in a region or area, which emphasizes the principle of conservation of matter in the water cycle, is called balance. Investigating their balance is the basis for managing the rivers’ water management, the results of which refer to the change rate in surface water supply and can efficiently be used in decision making and optimal use of water resources. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS. In so doing, digital topographic maps, soil map of the area, and meteorological data retrieved from the regional stations were used to prepare layers of precipitation, evaporation and infiltration of rainwater into the soil. Discharge-arearegion comparative method was employed to measure the amount of runoff and base flow for each sub-basin in raster form saved per unit area which was subsequently overlapped based on balance equation, and the balance of the region was displayed in a graphical mode. The results indicated that more surface water is wasted in the southeast and central area of the province.

  17. Water-Saving and High-Yielding Irrigation for Lowland Rice by Controlling Limiting Values of Soil Water Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether an irrigation system could be established to save water and increase grain yield to enhance water productivity by proper water management at the field level in irrigated lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.). Using two field-grown rice cultivars, two irrigation systems; conventional irrigation and water-saving irrigation, were conducted.In the water-saving irrigation system, limiting values of soil water potential related to specific growth stages were proposed as irrigation indices. Compared with conventional irrigation where drainage was in mid-season and flooded at other times,the water-saving irrigation increased grain yield by 7.4% to 11.3%, reduced irrigation water by 24.5% to 29.2%, and increased water productivity (grain yield per cubic meter of irrigation water) by 43.1% to 50.3%. The water-saving irrigation significantly increased harvest index, improved milling and appearance qualities, elevated zeatin +zeatin riboside concentrations in root bleedings and enhanced activities of sucrose synthase, adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme in grains. Our results indicate that water-saving irrigation by controlling limiting values of soil water potential related to specific growth stages can enhance physiological activities of roots and grains,reduce water input, and increase grain yield.

  18. Marginal value of natural water in agriculture: a study in the suburbs of Mekelle City, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gezahegn, T.W.; Xueqin Zhu, Xueqin

    2015-01-01

    In areas where markets for natural water are lacking, information on its marginal value can be an important tool for proper pricing to achieve efficient allocation of the resource. This article investigates the marginal value of natural water (rainwater used as a proxy) in agricultural crop producti

  19. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  20. Influence of building resolution on surface water inundation outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess water is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of all UK flood risk. This risk is predicted to increase due to future climatic changes resulting in an increasing magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain an understanding of the depth, extent and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although numerical models allow the simulation of surface water inundation in a particular region, the model parameters (e.g. roughness, hydraulic conductivity) and resolution of topographic data have been shown to exert a profound influence on the inundation outputs which often leads to an over- or under-estimation of flood depths and extent without the use of external validation data to calibrate model outputs. Although previous research has demonstrated that model outputs are highly sensitive to Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mesh resolution, with flood inundation over large and complex topographies often requiring mesh resolutions coarser than the structural features (e.g. buildings) present within the study catchment, the specific influence of building resolution on surface flowpaths and connectivity during a surface water flood event has not been investigated. In this study, a LiDAR-derived DEM and OS MasterMap buildings layer of the Loughborough University campus, UK, were rasterized into separate 1m, 5m and 10m resolution layers. These layers were combined to create a series of Digital Surface Models (DSM) with varying, mismatching building and DEM resolutions (e.g. 1m DEM resolution, 10m building resolution, etc.) to understand

  1. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, F.; Albrechtsen, H.; Binning, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using data of a tracer experiment in a riparian zone. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a new biodegradable and strongly sorbed pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the method of Morris was employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results showed that the presence of an aquitard and its characteristics (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depth are the crucial factors affecting the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. Global sensitivity analysis results were compared with rank correlation statistics between pesticide concentrations and geological parameters derived from a comprehensive database of Danish drinking water wells. Aquitard thickness and well depth are the most critical parameters in both the model and observed data.

  2. Study on the Value of Forest to Conserve Soil and Water in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Forest has a strongfunction in storing water, conserving soil and protecting farmland. In the study, based on fleld management and survey, these effects of forest in Beijing were determined and quantified. According to the principles and methodology of environment economics, the values of forest to conserve soil and water were accounted. The result shows that the total value of forest to conserve soil and water in Beijing is as much as 1129.58×10~8 yuan, in which the value of water storage is 1107.92×10...

  3. Return of naturally sourced Pb to Atlantic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgestock, Luke; van de Flierdt, Tina; Rehkämper, Mark; Paul, Maxence; Middag, Rob; Milne, Angela; Lohan, Maeve C.; Baker, Alex R.; Chance, Rosie; Khondoker, Roulin; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Achterberg, Eric P.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions completely overwhelmed natural marine lead (Pb) sources during the past century, predominantly due to leaded petrol usage. Here, based on Pb isotope measurements, we reassess the importance of natural and anthropogenic Pb sources to the tropical North Atlantic following the nearly complete global cessation of leaded petrol use. Significant proportions of up to 30-50% of natural Pb, derived from mineral dust, are observed in Atlantic surface waters, reflecting the success of the global effort to reduce anthropogenic Pb emissions. The observation of mineral dust derived Pb in surface waters is governed by the elevated atmospheric mineral dust concentration of the North African dust plume and the dominance of dry deposition for the atmospheric aerosol flux to surface waters. Given these specific regional conditions, emissions from anthropogenic activities will remain the dominant global marine Pb source, even in the absence of leaded petrol combustion.

  4. Macroelements in the surface microlayer of water of urban ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonowicz Józef Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyses were conducted concerning the accumulation of four metals representing the group of macroelements, i.e. sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium in two ponds located in the city of Słupsk. Water samples for chemical analyses were collected from the surface microlayer using a Garrett net. At the same time subsurface water samples were collected. Concentrations of metals were determined using a mass spectrometer. Generally, amounts of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium were similar in surface microlayer and subsurface water. Only in the case of potassium and calcium was low enrichment observed in the surface microlayer in one pond, while the greatest extent for magnesium enrichment was observed in the spring period.

  5. Occurrence of illicit drugs in surface waters in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiyang; Du, Peng; Xu, Zeqiong; Gao, Tingting; Li, Xiqing

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as a group of emerging contaminants. In this work, occurrence of common illicit drugs and their metabolites in Chinese surface waters was examined by collecting samples from 49 lakes and 4 major rivers across the country. Among the drugs examined, methamphetamine and ketamine were detected with highest frequencies and concentration levels, consistent with the fact that these are primary drugs of abuse in China. Detection frequencies and concentrations of other drugs were much lower than in European lakes and rivers reported in the literature. In most Chinese surface waters methamphetamine and ketamine were detected at concentrations of several ng L(-1) or less, but in some southern lakes and rivers, these two drugs were detected at much higher concentrations (up to several tens ng L(-1)). Greater occurrence of methamphetamine and ketamine in southern surface waters was attributed to greater abuse and more clandestine production of the two drugs in southern China.

  6. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海涛; 程营; 王敬时; 刘晓峻

    2015-01-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection.

  7. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment.

  8. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment

  9. Dynamics of surface tension driven mixing of an alcohol droplet with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, Raj; Pant, Anurag; Puthenveettil, Baburaj

    2016-11-01

    We study the flow induced by the surface tension driven spreading of an ethanol droplet of radius rd on the surface of a 5mm water layer, visualizing the flow using aluminium flakes on the surface of the water layer with backlighting and high speed imaging. The concentration of tracer aluminium particles was found to have no effect on the scaling law for spreading.The drop,when brought in contact with the water surface causes a local depression in surface tension ,resulting in a thin circular region to expand radially outwards.We observe that the dimensionless radius of the expanding front (r* =r/rd) scales with the dimensionless time (t* = μ rd/ Δγ) , as r* t*1/4,where μ is the viscosity of water and Δγ is the surface tension difference between water and the ethanol droplet.A scaling analysis taking the viscous and the marangoni forces into account explains the observed scaling law.Our observations differ from that in the case of continuous alcohol supply where the observed scaling law is r* t*1/2. The expanding front radius reaches a maximum value and then decreases with time.

  10. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface.

  11. Chemical characteristics of fulvic acids from Arctic surface waters: Microbial contributions and photochemical transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Rose M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Miller, Penney; Jaros, Chris L.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) originating from the extensive Arctic tundra is an important source of organic material to the Arctic Ocean. Chemical characteristics of whole water dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the fulvic acid fraction of DOM were studied from nine surface waters in the Arctic region of Alaska to gain insight into the extent of microbial and photochemical transformation of this DOM. All the fulvic acids had a strong terrestrial/higher plant signature, with uniformly depleted δ13C values of -28‰, and low fluorescence indices around 1.3. Several of the measured chemical characteristics of the Arctic fulvic acids were related to water residence time, a measure of environmental exposure to sunlight and microbial activity. For example, fulvic acids from Arctic streams had higher aromatic contents, higher specific absorbance values, lower nitrogen content, lower amino acid-like fluorescence and were more depleted in δ15N relative to fulvic acids isolated from lake and coastal surface waters. The differences in the nitrogen signature between the lake and coastal fulvic acids compared to the stream fulvic acids indicated that microbial contributions to the fulvic acid pool increased with increasing water residence time. The photo-lability of the fulvic acids was positively correlated with water residence time, suggesting that the fulvic acids isolated from source waters with larger water residence times (i.e., lakes and coastal waters) have experienced greater photochemical degradation than the stream fulvic acids. In addition, many of the initial differences in fulvic acid chemical characteristics across the gradient of water residence times were consistent with changes observed in fulvic acid photolysis experiments. Taken together, results from this study suggest that photochemical processes predominantly control the chemical character of fulvic acids in Arctic surface waters. Our findings show that hydrologic transport in addition to

  12. Modeling of Microwave Reflection from the Surface of Water Basins with Spills of Water-Cut Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotikov, V. D.; Pelushenko, S. A.; Rakut', I. V.; Savelyev, V. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    We consider specific features of reflection of microwaves from the surface of a water basin for the two-layer model of oil spills, which are determined by a water-cut-oil film. Within the spill model, the dielectric properties of water were allowed for in accordance with the Debye theory, and the dielectric properties of the water-cut oil, in accordance with the theory developed for binary systems. The data about variations in the values of reflection coefficients depending on the frequency, viewing angle, thickness of the oil film, and moisture content in the film are obtained. The dependences of reflection coefficients on the film thickness are determined for various values of volume content of the water fraction in oil. Complex values of the dielectric permittivity of oil-water emulsions with preset volume moisture content are found. Describing the obtained dependences of the complex dielectric permittivity of the emulsion on the volume moisture content requires application of asymmetrical formulas for the mixture of polar and nonpolar fluids.

  13. Application of water quality indices and analysis of the surface water quality monitoring network in semiarid North-Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Lesly; Kretschmer, Nicole; Oyarzún, Jorge; Meza, Francisco; Núñez, Jorge; Maturana, Hugo; Soto, Guido; Oyarzo, Paula; Garrido, Marcela; Suckel, Felipe; Amezaga, Jaime; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Surface water quality has increasing importance worldwide and is particularly relevant in the semiarid North-Central Chile, where agriculture and mining activities are imposing heavy pressure on limited water resources. The current study presents the application of a water quality index in four watersheds of the 29°-33°S realm for the period 1999-2008, based on the Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment approach and the Chilean regulation for irrigation water quality. In addition, two modifications to the index are tested and a comprehensive characterization of the existing monitoring network is performed through cluster analysis. The basins studied show fairly good water quality in the overall, specially the Limarí basin. On the other hand, the lower index values were obtained for the headwaters of Elqui, associated with the El Indio mining district. The first modification of the indicator (i.e., to consider parameters differentially according to their effect on human health or the environment) did not produce major differences with respect to the original index, given the generally good water quality. The second modification (i.e., to consider as threshold values the more restrictive figures derived from a set of regulations) yielded important differences in the indicator values. Finally, an adequate characterization of the monitoring network was obtained. The results presented spatial coherence and the information can be used as a basis for the optimization of the monitoring network if required.

  14. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  15. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales...

  16. Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Óluva Karin; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Smith, Christian

    2014-01-01

    in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more......Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface...

  17. Some Aspects of Surface Water Treatment Technology in Tirana Drinking Water Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    , Tania Floqi; , Aleksandër Trajçe; , Daut Vezi

    2009-01-01

    Tirana’s Bovilla treatment plant was the Şrst of its kind for Albania, which treats surface water. The input water comes from the Bovilla artiŞcial lake, around which, the presence of villages induces pollution in the surface water and therefore affects the efŞciency of treatment plant and consequently the quality of drinking water. The treatment plant is a simple conventional system and includes pre-oxidation, coagulation, şocculation & sedimentation, fast Şltration, post-oxidation. ...

  18. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar SULTAN; Kim DOWLING

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations(Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic(As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4),oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 μS/cm). The concen- trations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration ofNa(98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments.The As soil level is naturally high(linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 μg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values(>15 μg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings.Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters(lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface water chemistry

  19. Fluctuations of water near extended hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Amish J.; Chandler, David

    2009-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the SPC-E model of liquid water to derive probability distributions for water density fluctuations in probe volumes of different shapes and sizes, both in the bulk as well as near hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. To obtain our results, we introduce a biased sampling of coarse-grained densities, which in turn biases the actual solvent density. The technique is easily combined with molecular dynamics integration algorithms. Our principal result is t...

  20. Monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available the surface. The chelated Pluronic-DMDDO ligand can be used for affinity purification of histidine tagged proteins. A regeneration formulation based on anionic SDS detergent desorbed pluronic modified polymeric membranes and the possibility of re... ingredients, household products and industrial chemicals. Surface waters are the main sink of said EDCs. Accurate EDC detection is usually via time consuming and costly ex situ LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. An important class of biosensors include those...

  1. Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2013-05-01

    By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle Θ = 108°) or perfluorosilane (Θ = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces.

  2. The pH Value of Fungicide, Insecticide and Mineral Fertilizer Mixtures Depending on Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušanka Inđić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the effect of water quality on the pH value of fungicides, insecticides, mineral fertilizers and their mixtures. The fungicides propineb (Antracol WP-70 and mancozeb (Dithane M-70, insecticides pirimiphos-methyl (Actellic-50 and imidacloprid(Confidor 200-SL, several fertilizers (Ferticare I, Ferticare II, Ferticare III and Wuxal Super and their mixtures were analyzed for pH value under laboratory conditions using a potentiometric pH meter. Measurements were made directly after preparation or mixing with tap and well water and 24 hours later. Tap water exhibited a neutral reaction. A slightly alkaline reaction of well water was mostlikely due to high ammonium content. The suspensions of Antracol WP-70 exhibited slightly alkaline reactions with both water types during 24 hours. The spray liquids of Dithane M-70 mixed with tap or well water had neutral reaction after preparation and slightly alkaline reaction after 24 hours. The emulsions of Actellic-50 showed neutral reaction with both water types, followed by a pH increase in tap water after 24 hours. The solutions of Confidor200-SL had a slightly alkaline reaction after mixing and the pH value increased with both water types after 24 hours. It is therefore recommended to apply these insecticides directly after preparation. Mineral fertilizers considerably reduced pH values of the fungicide and insecticide components in double and triple mixtures, especially Ferticare nutrients which had a moderately acid reaction. Wuxal Super had a neutral reaction with both water types.The mixtures with well water increased pH values, which indicates that water pH does affect the pH value of the mixture. Both individual fertilizers and all mixtures (double and triple with Ferticare had pH values between 2.4 and 6, which allows their active liquids to be stored for 12 to 24 hours. The suspensions (Antracol WP-70, double and triple mixtures, emulsions (Actellic-50 and Actellic-50+Wuxal Super

  3. Nanofiltration in Transforming Surface Water into Healthy Water: Comparison with Reverse Osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Naidu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural surface water, especially available through rivers, is the main source of healthy water for the living beings throughout the world from ancient days as it consists of all essential minerals. With the advent of industrialization, gradually even the most prominent rivers have been polluted in all parts of the world. Although there are lots of technologies, nanofiltration (NF has been chosen to transform river water into healthy water due to its unique advantages of retaining optimum TDS (with essential minerals required for human body, consuming of lower energy, and no usage of any chemicals. The prominent parameters of surface water and macro/microminerals of treated water have been analyzed. It is shown that NF is better in producing healthy water with high flux by consuming low energy.

  4. Modeling the interaction Between Ethylene Diamine and Water Films on the Surface of a Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Walther, Jens H.; Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    It has been observed that a carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip coated with ethylene diamine (EDA) penetrates the liquid water-air interface more easily than an uncoated nanotube tip. The EDA coating remains intact through repeated cycles of dipping and removal. In order to understand the physical basis for this observation, we use ab initio quantum chemistry calculations to study the EDA-CNT-water interaction and to parameterize a force field describing this system. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out for EDA-water mixtures and an EDA-coated carbon nanotube immmed in water. These simulations are similar to our earlier MD study that characterized the CNT-water interface. The attractive CNT-EDA and CNT-water interactions arise primarily from van der Waals forces, and the EDA-EDA, EDA-water and water-water interactions are mainly due to hydrogen bond formation. The binding energ of single EDA molecule to the nanotube is nearly three times larger than the corresponding value found for water (4.3 versus 1.5 kcal mol, respectively). The EDA molecules readily stick to and diffuse along the CNT surface. As a resulf mixing of the EDA and water films does not occur on the timescale of the MD simulations. The EDA film reduces the hydrophobicity of the nanotube surface and acts like a prototypical surfactant in stabilizing the suspension of carbon nanotubes in water. For this presentation, we use the MD simulations to determine how the presence of the carbon nanotube surface perturbs the properties of EDA-water mixtures.

  5. Characterizing the concentration of Cryptosporidium in Australian surface waters for setting health-based targets for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, S; Roser, D; Deere, D

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed that the next revision of the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines will include 'health-based targets', where the required level of potable water treatment quantitatively relates to the magnitude of source water pathogen concentrations. To quantify likely Cryptosporidium concentrations in southern Australian surface source waters, the databases for 25 metropolitan water supplies with good historical records, representing a range of catchment sizes, land use and climatic regions were mined. The distributions and uncertainty intervals for Cryptosporidium concentrations were characterized for each site. Then, treatment targets were quantified applying the framework recommended in the World Health Organization Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality 2011. Based on total oocyst concentrations, and not factoring in genotype or physiological state information as it relates to infectivity for humans, the best estimates of the required level of treatment, expressed as log10 reduction values, ranged among the study sites from 1.4 to 6.1 log10. Challenges associated with relying on historical monitoring data for defining drinking water treatment requirements were identified. In addition, the importance of quantitative microbial risk assessment input assumptions on the quantified treatment targets was investigated, highlighting the need for selection of locally appropriate values.

  6. A full value-chain Water Footprint Assessment to help informed decision in corporate sustainability strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoping; Chico Zamanilo, Daniel; Bai, Xue; Ren, Xiajing; Chen, Rong; Qin, Jun

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the water footprint (WF) of five production facilities along Muyuan Foodstuff Co. Ltd's (Muyuan) value chain, and assessed the sustainability and impact of their water footprints at the river catchment level. Muyuan, a large-scale, integrated pig breeder and producer in China, is keen to fulfil its corporate social responsibilities and committed to ensuring food quality and security, promoting environmental protection, and participating in catchment water resources management. Formulating corporate water related sustainability strategies, however, has been challenging. This study carried out a comprehensive Water Footprint Assessment (WFA) for Muyuan's full value chain to assist in formulating such strategies and setting up action plans with water footprint reduction targets. The study showed that that the water footprint of the supply chain, resulting from crops and crop products used in Muyuan's feed production facility is a major contributor to Muyuan's facilities' water footprint. From the perspective of the direct WF at the facilities, addressing the impact on water quality from effluents (i.e. the grey water footprint) at hog farms is a critical component of any water sustainability strategy. From the blue WF perspective, there are opportunities to reduce blue water consumption at hog farms through improved technology and implementation of best practices. The water footprint sustainability assessment in this study indicated that Muyuan operates in a catchment which is already under water stress and is a hotspot in terms of both blue water scarcity and water pollution level. The study helped identify potential water-related risks and opportunities for improving Muyuan's water use efficiency as well as ways Muyuan could contribute to sustainable water resources management in the catchment within which it operates. This is an innovative application of WFA in the livestock sector and supports the development of Muyuan's corporate water

  7. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  8. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  9. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  10. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  11. Spatially Complete Global Spectral Surface Albedos: Value-Added Datasets Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an important parameter in describing the radiative properties of the earth s surface as it represents the amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected from the surface. The amount and type of vegetation of the surface dramatically alters the amount of radiation that is reflected; for example, croplands that contain leafy vegetation will reflect radiation very differently than blacktop associated with urban areas. In addition, since vegetation goes through a growth, or phenological, cycle, the amount of radiation that is reflected changes over the course of a year. As a result, albedo is both temporally and spatially dependant upon global location as there is a distribution of vegetated surface types and growing conditions. Land surface albedo is critical for a wide variety of earth system research projects including but not restricted to remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol and cloud properties from space, ground-based analysis of aerosol optical properties from surface-based sun/sky radiometers, biophysically-based land surface modeling of the exchange of energy, water, momentum, and carbon for various land use categories, and surface energy balance studies. These projects require proper representation of the surface albedo s spatial, spectral, and temporal variations, however, these representations are often lacking in datasets prior to the latest generation of land surface albedo products.

  12. A Two-Step Double Filter Method to Extract Open Water Surfaces from Landsat ETM+ Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haijing; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, lakes and temporal ponds play a significant role in agriculture and livelihood of local communities as well as in ecology. Monitoring the changes of these open water bodies allows to draw conclusions on water use as well as climatic impacts and can assist in the formulation of a sustainable resource management strategy. The simultaneous monitoring of larger numbers of water bodies with respect to their stage and area is feasible with the aid of remote sensing. Here the monitoring of lake surface areas is discussed. Landsat TM and ETM+ images provide a medium resolution of 30m, and offer an easily available data source to monitor the long term changes of water surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. In the past great effort was put into developing simple indices to extract water surfaces from satellite images. However, there is a common problem in achieving accurate results with these indices: How to select a threshold value for water pixels without introducing excessive subjective judgment. The threshold value would also have to vary with location, land features and seasons, allowing for inherent uncertainty. A new method was developed using Landsat ETM+ imaginary (30 meter resolution) to extract open water surfaces. This method uses the Normalized Difference of Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the basis for an objective way of selecting threshold values of Modified Normalized Difference of Water Index (MNDWI) and Stress Degree Days (SDD), which were used as a combined filter to extract open water surfaces. We choose two study areas to verify the method. One study area is in Northeast China, where bigger lakes, smaller muddy ponds and wetlands are interspersed with agricultural land and salt crusts. The other one is Kafue Flats in Zambia, where seasonal floods of the Zambezi River create seasonal wetlands in addition to the more permanent water ponds and river channels. For both sites digital globe images of 0.5 meter resolution are available

  13. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  14. An evaluation of free water surface wetlands as tertiary sewage water treatment of micro-pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitholtz, Magnus; Näslund, Maria; Stråe, Daniel; Borg, Hans; Grabic, Roman; Fick, Jerker

    2012-04-01

    Increased attention is currently directed towards potential negative effects of pharmaceuticals and other micro-pollutants discharged into the aquatic environment via municipal sewage water. A number of additional treatment technologies, such as ozonation, have therefore been suggested as promising tools for improving the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals in existing Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs). Constructed wetlands are also capable of removing a variety of micro-pollutants, including some pharmaceuticals, and could hence be a resource efficient complement to more advanced treatment technologies. The purpose of the present study was therefore to increase the knowledge base concerning the potential use of constructed wetlands as a treatment step to reduce emissions of organic micro-pollutants from municipal sewage effluents. Under cold winter conditions, incoming and outgoing waters from four Swedish free water surface wetlands, operated as final treatment steps of sewage effluent from municipal STPs, were sampled and analyzed for levels of a set of 92 pharmaceuticals and 22 inorganic components as well as assessed using subchronic ecotoxicity tests with a macro-alga and a crustacean. Sixty-five pharmaceuticals were detected in the range from 1 ng L(-1) to 7.6 μg L(-1) in incoming and outgoing waters from the four investigated wetlands. Although the sampling design used in the present study lacks the robustness of volume proportional to 24h composite samples, the average estimated removal rates ranged from 42% to 52%, which correlates to previous published values. The effects observed in the ecotoxicity tests with the macro-alga (EC(50)s in the range of 7.5-46%) and the crustacean (LOECs in the range of 11.25-90%) could not be assigned to either pharmaceutical residues or metals, but in general showed that these treatment facilities release water with a relatively low toxic potential, comparable to water that has been treated with advanced tertiary

  15. Natural attenuation of organic contaminants at the interface between groundwater and surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Staps, S.; Rijnaarts, H. [TNO-MEP Environment, Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Roelofsen, F.; Valstar, J. [TNO-NITG, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Smits, J. [WL/Delf Hydraulics (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    There are strong indications that the interface between groundwater and surface water plays an important role in the natural degradation of organic contaminants (NA-interface). This is especially the case for mobile contaminants that are relatively persistent in an anaerobic (subsurface) environment, and are mineralised relatively easy under more oxidized environmental conditions (e.g. benzene, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride, the light aliphatic fraction of mineral oil, etc.). These compounds are often also present as degradation products of natural or stimulated in situ biodegradation processes. Previous investigations have indicated indirectly that NA-interface processes contribute to a reduction of contaminant flux into surface water systems. Until now, no straightforward assessment and quantification of NA-interface has been performed. Moreover, limit values for allowable influx of contamination from a site into a surface water system do not exist. This prevents a possible beneficial use of NA-interface processes as a part of a cost-effective and integrated soil and water quality management. This project aims to gain more understanding of the occurrence of NA-interface processes, to quantify their contribution to emission reduction towards the surface water system and, in case of substantial contribution, to promote application of NA-interface as a part of a cost-effective integrated environmental management of contaminated sites and surrounding water bodies. The project's starting point is that the surface water is regarded as an object of risk and not as a reactor. Thus, effective degradation in the interface does not move environmental problems to surface water systems, but eliminates contaminants by natural occurring processes, thus protecting the aquatic ecosystem. (orig.)

  16. IMPROVING CYANOBACTERIA AND CYANOTOXIN MONITORING IN SURFACE WATERS FOR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria in fresh water can cause serious threats to drinking water supplies. Managing cyanobacterial blooms particularly at small drinking water treatment plants is challenging. Because large amount of cyanobacteria may cause clogging in the treatment process and various cyanotoxins are hard to remove, while they may cause severe health problems. There is lack of instructions of what cyanobacteria/toxin amount should trigger what kind of actions for drinking water management except for Microcystins. This demands a Cyanobacteria Management Tool (CMT to help regulators/operators to improve cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin monitoring in surface waters for drinking water supply. This project proposes a CMT tool, including selecting proper indicators for quick cyanobacteria monitoring and verifying quick analysis methods for cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin. This tool is suggested for raw water management regarding cyanobacteria monitoring in lakes, especially in boreal forest climate. In addition, it applies to regions that apply international WHO standards for water management. In Swedish context, drinking water producers which use raw water from lakes that experience cyanobacterial blooms, need to create a monitoring routine for cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin and to monitor beyond such as Anatoxins, Cylindrospermopsins and Saxitoxins. Using the proposed CMT tool will increase water safety at surface water treatment plants substantially by introducing three alerting points for actions. CMT design for each local condition should integrate adaptive monitoring program.

  17. The Conservation Nexus: Valuing Interdependent Water and Energy Savings in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, M.; Bartos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Energy and water resources are intrinsically linked, yet they are managed separately--even in the water-scarce American southwest. This study develops a spatially-explicit model of water-energy interdependencies in Arizona, and assesses the potential for co-beneficial conservation programs. Arizona consumes 2.8% of its water demand for thermoelectric power and 8% of its electricity demand for water infrastructure--roughly twice the national average. The interdependent benefits of investments in 7 conservation strategies are assessed. Deployment of irrigation retrofits and new reclaimed water facilities dominate potential water savings, while residential and commercial HVAC improvements dominate energy savings. Water conservation policies have the potential to reduce statewide electricity demand by 1.0-2.9%, satisfying 5-14% of mandated energy-efficiency goals. Likewise, adoption of energy-efficiency measures and renewable generation portfolios can reduce non-agricultural water demand by 2.0-2.6%. These co-benefits of conservation investments are typically not included in conservation plans or benefit-cost analyses. Residential water conservation measures produce significant water and energy savings, but are generally not cost-effective at current water prices. An evaluation of the true cost of water in Arizona would allow future water and energy savings to be compared objectively, and would help policymakers allocate scarce resources to the highest-value conservation measures. Water Transfers between Water Cycle Components in Arizona in 2008 Cumulative embedded energy in water cycle components in Arizona in 2008

  18. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relative roles of volume and surface nucleation in the freezing of water droplets. Nucleation experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled liquid water aerosols with radii between about 1 and 3 μ m. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rate between 234.8 and 236.2 K are derived with help of a microphysical model from aerosol compositions and size distributions based on infrared extinction measurements in the aerosol flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process and has implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  19. Statistical robustness of machine-learning estimates for characterizing a groundwater-surface water system, Southland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M. J.; Daughney, C.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a successful surface-groundwater management strategy depends on the quality of data provided for analysis. This study evaluates the statistical robustness when using a modified self-organizing map (MSOM) technique to estimate missing values for three hypersurface models: synoptic groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry, time-series of groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry, and mixed-survey (combination of groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry and lithologies) hydrostratigraphic unit data. These models of increasing complexity are developed and validated based on observations from the Southland region of New Zealand. In each case, the estimation method is sufficiently robust to cope with groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry vagaries due to sample size and extreme data insufficiency, even when >80% of the data are missing. The estimation of surface water hydrochemistry time series values enabled the evaluation of seasonal variation, and the imputation of lithologies facilitated the evaluation of hydrostratigraphic controls on groundwater-surface water interaction. The robust statistical results for groundwater-surface water models of increasing data complexity provide justification to apply the MSOM technique in other regions of New Zealand and abroad.

  20. Thin Water and Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Mineral-water and ice interactions play important roles in atmospheric cloud formation. They also affect soil biogeochemistry as well as outer-space processes. In this study, thin water and ice films formed on minerals of varied bulk and surface structure, shape, size and surface roughness were probed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and by Dynamic Vapor Adsorption (DVA). Measurements on several types of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, orthosilicates, tectosilicates as well as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Icelandic volcanic ash constrained our understanding of the molecular-level nature of mineral surface-water and ice interactions. DVA experiments showed that particle size is the key feature controlling water loadings at 25 ° C. Under this condition, nano-sized particles stabilized the equivalence of no more than ˜6 monolayers of water at the near saturation of water vapor while sub-micron sized particles stabilized several thousand layers. This result can be explained by the greater ability of larger sized particles at driving water condensation reactions. Cryogenic FTIR measurements at -10 and -50 ° C revealed that most minerals acquired the thin ice films with similar hydrogen bonding environments as those formed at room temperature.[1,2] These thin ice films have weaker hydrogen bond environments than hexagonal ice (νOH ≈ 3130 cm-1), a result seen by FTIR through predominant O-H stretching modes at νOH ≈ 3408-3425 cm-1. The water bending region (˜1630 cm-1) also reveals that most thin ice films are rather supercooled forms of water. Only the materials with greatest levels of heterogeneity, namely ATD and volcanic ash, stabilized solid forms of water reminiscent to hexagonal ice. This work thus constrains further our understanding of how interfacial ice is stabilized at mineral surfaces, and opens possibilities for future studies focused on atmospheric gas uptake on mineral- water and ice admixtures. [1] Song, X. and Boily, J

  1. Climatological evaluation of some fluxes of the surface energy and soil water balances over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Choisnel

    Full Text Available This paper presents some statistical evaluations of the surface energy and soil water balance fluxes, for a prairie-type canopy, using the Earth model with a double-reservoir system for the management of the soil water reserve and the regulation of actual evapotranspiration. The mean values of these fluxes are estimated from energy and water balance simulations done on a 30-year climatic reference period (1951–1980. From values of these fluxes calculated for each meteorological synoptic station, mappings of net radiation, actual evapotranspiration, drainage and conduction fluxes have been made over French territory. Lastly, a few conclusions pertaining to the spatial variability of fluxes and to the partition of rainfall between run-off and drainage on the one hand and replenishment of the soil water reserve on the other hand are drawn from these preliminary results.

  2. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  3. Surface water and groundwater interaction on a hill island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rasmus Rumph; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Christensen, Steen

    – the hill islands – is relatively unknown. This study aims at providing new information about the rainfall-runoff processes in hill island landscapes where surface water and groundwater interaction is expected to have a dominant role and hill-slope processes not. Through stream flow measurements, field...

  4. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results

  5. Observation of water condensate on hydrophobic micro textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Wook; Do, Sang Cheol; Ko, Jong Soo; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2013-07-01

    We visually observed that a dropwise condensation occurred initially and later changed into a filmwise condensation on hydrophobic textured surface at atmosphere pressure condition. It was observed that the condensate nucleated on the pillar side walls of the micro structure and the bottom wall adhered to the walls and would not be lifted to form a spherical water droplet using environmental scanning electron microscope.

  6. Zearalenone occurrence in surface waters in central Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic secondary metabolite produced by certain fungi that commonly infest important cereal crops, such as corn and wheat. The ability of ZEN to move from contaminated crops to surface waters has been demonstrated previously. This article reports the development of a meth...

  7. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teklu, B.M.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Deneer, J.W.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small

  8. Riparian shrub buffers reduce surface water pollutant loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. A. Geyer; C. Barden; K. Mankin; D. Devlin

    2003-01-01

    Surface water resources in Kansas often contain concentrations of pesticides, nutrients, and sediments that are of concern to local citizens. The United States Geological Survey reported in 1999 that 97 percent of streams and 82 percent of lakes in Kansas would not fully support all uses as designated by state statutes (U.S. Geological Survey 1999). Bacteria and...

  9. Modelling the effects of surface water flood pulses on groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Flood pulses in wetlands steer ecosystem development directly through surface water processes and indirectly through the effects of the flood pulse on groundwater. Direct effects on ecosystems are exerted by e.g. inundation and deposition of sediments containing nutrients. Indirect effects include t

  10. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results sh

  11. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teklu, B.M.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Deneer, J.W.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small

  12. An Experimental Study of Planing Surfaces Operating in Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    D C APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; (7 DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED 22 1918 PT CLAIME Ar-Th -L’A THI S DOUETI 7E QUALITLY . AVAIILABIJaTECP FURNSR DTO DTIC...Aerodynamic tares were determined by towing the model just above the water surface at various trims and speeds. Only the drag was greatly affected by air

  13. CONTROLLING STORM WATER RUNOFF WITH TRADABLE CREDITS FOR IMPERVIOUS SURFACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm water flow off impervious surface in a watershed can lead to stream degradation, habitat alteration, low base flows and toxic leading. We show that a properly designed tradable runoff credit (TRC) system creates economic incentives for landowners to employ best management p...

  14. Hydrogeologic controls of surface-water chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N.E.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between surface-water discharge, water chemistry, and watershed geology were investigated to evaluate factors affecting the sensitivity of drainage waters in the Adirondack region of New York to acidification by atmospheric deposition. Instantaneous discharge per unit area was derived from relationships between flow and staff-gage readings at 10 drainage basins throughout the region. The average chemical composition of the waters was assessed from monthly samples collected from July 1982 through July 1984. The ratio of flow at the 50-percent exceedence level to the flow at the 95-percent exceedence level of flow duration was negatively correlated with mean values of alkalinity or acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), sum of basic cations (SBC), and dissolved silica, for basins containing predominantly aluminosilicate minerals and little or no carbonate-bearing minerals. Low ratios are indicative of systems in which flow is predominately derived from surface- and ground-water storage, whereas high ratios are characteristic of watersheds with variable flow that is largely derived from surface runoff. In an evaluation of two representative surface-water sites, concentrations of ANC, SBC, and dissolved silica, derived primarily from soil mineral weathering reactions. decreased with increasing flow. Furthermore, the ANC was highest at low flow when the percentage of streamflow derived from ground water was maximum. As flow increased, the ANC decreased because the contribution of dilute surface runoff and lateral flow through the shallow acidic soil horizons to total flow increased. Basins having relatively high ground-water contributions to total flow, in general, have large deposits of thick till or stratified drift. A major factor controlling the sensitivity of these streams and lakes to acidification is the relative contribution of ground water to total discharge. ?? 1987 Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  15. Quality of surface-water supplies in the Triangle area of North Carolina, water year 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgino, M.J.; Rasmussen, R.B.; Pfeifle, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Surface-water supplies are important sources of drinking water for residents in the Triangle area of North Carolina, which is located within the upper Cape Fear and Neuse River Basins. Since 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey and a consortium of governments have tracked water-quality conditions and trends in several of the area's water-supply lakes and streams. This report summarizes data collected through this cooperative effort, known as the Triangle Area Water Supply Monitoring Project, during October 2007 through September 2008. Major findings for this period include:

  16. Arsenic, Fluoride and Vanadium in surface water (Chasicó Lake, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria laura ePuntoriero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chasicó Lake is the main water body in the southwest of the Chaco-Pampean plain. It shows some differences from the typical Pampean shallow lakes, such as high salinity and high arsenic and fluoride levels. The aim of this paper is to analyze the trace elements [arsenic (As, fluoride (F- and vanadium (V] present in Chasicó Lake. Surface and groundwater were sampled in dry and wet periods, during 2010 and 2011. Fluoride was determined with a selective electrode. As and V were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES. Significant correlation in surface water was only found for As and F- (r=0.978, p<0.01. The As, F- and V concentration values were higher and more widely dispersed in surface water than in groundwater, as a consequence of evaporation. The fact that these elements do not correlate in surface water may also indicates that groundwater would not be the main source of origin of As, F- and V in surface water. The origin of these trace elements is from volcanic glass from Pampean loess. As, F- and V concentration were higher than in national and international guideline levels for the protection of aquatic biota. Hence, this issue is relevant since the silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis is the most important commercial species in Chasicó Lake. This fish is both consumed locally and exported to other South-American countries through commercial and sport fishing.

  17. Load-bearing ability of the mosquito tarsus on water surfaces arising from its flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X. Q.; Liu, J. L.; Zhang, W. J.; Qu, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes possess a remarkable ability to stand effortlessly and walk freely on water surfaces because their six legs provide a large force to support the body weight. This study is focused on the role of the tarsus (the distal segment of the mosquito leg) because it was observed that normally only the tarsi make contact with water. The maximum value of the supporting force of the tarsus (6 mm long) in contact with water is estimated as 492 ± 5 μN, nearly 20 times the body weight of the mosquito, whereas the value for the whole leg (11 mm) is about 23 times the body weight. We demonstrate that the huge force provided by the tarsus originates from its flexibility, which ensures that the leg does not easily pierce the water. Adjustment of the initial stepping angle of the tarsus assists the mosquito to control the supporting force. These findings help to illustrate how mosquitoes stand or walk on water with only their tarsi in nearly horizontal contact with the water surface. Besides enhancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying "walking on water" by semi-aquatic insects, these investigations could provide inspiration for the biomimetic design of miniature robotics.

  18. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    As of January 1, 1988, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 368 continuous streamflow, 12 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 38 gage height, 15 crest-stage partia 1-record, 4 periodic discharge through range, 32 floodhydrocjraph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record 45 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 83 periodic biological, 19 lake surveys, 160 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 33 periodic pesticide, 20 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor elements, 125 periodic chemical-quality, 74 periodic physica1-organic, 24 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 21 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemicalquality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations.

  19. Surface water pH variations and trends in China from 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yinhuan; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Xia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    With economic development and the increase of energy consumption, surface water acidification has been a potential environmental concern in China. Here, we analyzed variations and trends in surface water pH of 73 sites from ten river basins in China from 2004 to 2014 with nonparametric Seasonal Kendall test method. Our analysis showed that the variations of surface water pH in China ranged from 6.5 to 9.0 in the past decade (2004-2014), which satisfied the water quality criteria in pH for protection of aquatic ecosystems in China (6.0-9.0) and USA (6.5-9.0). However, significant decreasing trends in surface water pH were found in 31 monitoring sites, which were mainly located in Haihe River, Taihu Lake and Yangtze River, while the pH value showed significant increasing trends in 22 sites, which mainly were located in Songhua River and Pearl River. Our results suggested the increased potential acidification of susceptible water bodies in China. Besides the control policy of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, the emissions of nitrous oxides (NOx) should also be reduced to protect the aquatic systems in China.

  20. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer; C.T.McLean

    2001-06-02

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  1. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  2. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1999 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    2000-04-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 22 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory with one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle and nine partial-record storm water stations.

  3. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  4. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  5. Development of aquatic biomonitoring models for surface waters used for drinking water supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penders, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Given the need for continued quality control of surface waters used for the production of drinking water by state-of-the-art bioassays and biological early warning systems, the objective of the present thesis was to validate and improve some of the bioassays and biological early warning systems used

  6. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  7. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  8. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  9. Water level observations from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for improving estimates of surface water-groundwater interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Vammen Jacobsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . However, traditional river gauging stations are normally spaced too far apart to capture spatial patterns in the water surface, while spaceborne observations have limited spatial and temporal resolution. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) can retrieve river water level measurements, providing: i) high...

  10. A Simulation Stud on Effect of Surface Film—Forming Material on Water Evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANGSHUNYAO; YINBIN; 等

    2001-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of surface film-forming material(SFFM),a mixture of 16-18-octadecanols by emulsification,on water evaporation,Air-dired soil with distilled water was incubated firstly for 7days to reestablish soil biological activity and then for another 7 days atfer treated with SFFM at rates of 0,1,2,4,6,8 and 8 g m-2,respectively,Everyday during the 7-day incubation after addition of SFFM,water losses due to evaporation were measured by an electronic balance.The rate of water evaporation with the addition of SFFM was reduced significantly compared with the control treatment and the effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation reduced with time.According to the equation expressions of the effect of SFFM on water evaporation ,the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation was introduced and calculated to analyze quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation and the addition rate of SFFM.The calculaed half-life increased with the addition rate of SFFM and the confidence of the calculated values of the half-life was high,suggesting that the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation could be described quantitaively and may be helpful for ameliorating application method of SFFM and screening surface-film forming materials in order to improve nitrogen fetilizer use efficiency in floodey rice fields.

  11. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahkaramipour, Nima; Tran, Thien N.; Ramanan, Sankara; Lin, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol), polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted. PMID:28273869

  12. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Shahkaramipour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol, polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted.

  13. Flow boiling of water on nanocoated surfaces in a microchannel

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effects of surface wettability on flow boiling of water at atmospheric pressure. The test channel is a single rectangular channel 0.5 mm high, 5 mm wide and 180 mm long. The mass flux was set at 100 kg/m2 s and the base heat flux varied from 30 to 80 kW/m2. Water enters the test channel under subcooled conditions. The samples are silicone oxide (SiOx), titanium (Ti), diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiOC) surfaces with static contact angles of 26{\\deg}, 49{\\deg}, 63{\\deg} and 103{\\deg}, respectively. The results show significant impacts of surface wettability on heat transfer coefficient.

  14. Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Óluva K; Corfitzen, Charlotte B; Smith, Christian; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface water. To investigate the ability of the ATP assay in detecting different contamination types, the contaminant was diluted with non-chlorinated drinking water. Wastewater, diluted at 10(4) in drinking water, was detected with the ATP assay, as well as 10(2) to 10(3) times diluted surface water. To improve the performance of the ATP assay in detecting microbial ingress in drinking water, different approaches were investigated, i.e. quantifying microbial ATP or applying reagents of different sensitivities to reduce measurement variations; however, none of these approaches contributed significantly in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more sensitive than the ATP measurements, though with much longer response times. Continuous sampling combined with ATP measurements displays definite monitoring potential for microbial drinking water quality, since microbial ingress in drinking water can be detected in real-time with ATP measurements. The ability of the ATP assay to detect microbial ingress is influenced by both the ATP load from the contaminant itself and the ATP concentration in the specific drinking water. Consequently, a low ATP concentration of the specific drinking water facilitates a better detection of a potential contamination of the water supply with the ATP assay.

  15. Surface waters of Illinois River basin in Arkansas and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, L.L.

    1959-01-01

    flow during the 19-year base period, an impoundment at that site would have required a usable storage of 185,000 acre-ft to satisfy this demand during the drought years 1954-1956. The surface waters of the Illinois River basin are excellent quality being suitable for municipal, agriculture and most industrial uses. The average concentration of the dissolved mineral content is about 105 ppm (parts per million) and the hardness about 85 ppm. The water is slightly alkaline, having a range of pH values from 7.2 to 8.0. This report gives the estimated average discharge at gaging stations and approximations of average discharge at the State line for 3 sub-basins during the 19-year period October 1937 to September 1956, used as a base period in this report. Duration-of-flow data for various percentages of the time are shown for the period of observed record at the gaging stations; similar data are estimated for the selected base period. Storage requirements to sustain flow during the recent drought years are given for 3 stations. The streamflow records in the basin are presented on a monthly and annual basis through September 1957; provisional records for 3 stations are included through July 1958 for correlation purposes. Results of discharge measurements are given for miscellaneous sites where low-flow observations have been made. (available as photostat copy only)

  16. Drainage-water travel times as a key factor for surface water contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, P.; Eertwegh, van den G.A.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the unsaturated zone as an inextricable part of the hydrologic cycle has long been recognized. The root zone and the unsaturated sub-surface domain are chemically and biologically the most active zones. The interrelationships between soil, subsoil and surface waters make it unreali

  17. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  18. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barks, R. [ed.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  19. Diminished Mercury Emission From Water Surfaces by Duckweed (Lemna minor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, J. L.; Peters, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae (generally referred to as duckweeds) are a widely distributed type of floating vegetation in freshwater systems. Under suitable conditions, duckweeds form a dense vegetative mat on the water surface, which reduces light penetration into the water column and decreases the amount of exposed water surface. These two factors would be expected to reduce mercury emission by limiting a) direct photoreduction of Hg(II), b) indirect reduction via coupled DOC photooxidation-Hg(II) reduction, and c) gas diffusion across the water-air interface. Conversely, previous studies have demonstrated transpiration of Hg(0) by plants, so it is therefore possible that the floating vegetative mat would enhance emission via transpiration of mercury vapor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether duckweed limits mercury flux to the atmosphere by shading and the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion, or whether it enhances emission from aquatic systems via transpiration of Hg(0). Deionized water was amended with mercury to achieve a final concentration of approximately 35 ng/L and allowed to equilibrate prior to the experiment. Experiments were conducted in rectangular polystyrene flux chambers with measured UV-B transmittance greater than 60% (spectral cutoff approximately 290 nm). Light was able to penetrate the flux chamber from the sides as well as the top throughout the experiment, limiting the effect of shading by duckweed on the water surface. Flux chambers contained 8L of water with varying percent duckweed cover, and perforated plastic sheeting was used as an abiotic control. Exposures were conducted outside on days with little to no cloud cover. Real time mercury flux was measured using atomic absorption (Mercury Instruments UT-3000). Total solar and ultraviolet radiation, as well as a suite of meteorological parameters, were also measured. Results indicate that duckweed diminishes mercury emission from the water surface

  20. How water meets a hydrophobic surface: Reluctantly and with flucuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynor Torigoe, Adele Nichole

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low density region forms near the surface. This depleted region would have implications in such diverse areas as colloidal self-assembly, and the boundary conditions of fluid flow. However, the literature still remains divided as to whether or not such a depleted region exists. To investigate the existence of this layer, we have employed three surface-sensitive techniques, time-resolved phase-modulated ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance, and X-ray reflectivity. Both ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity provide strong evidence for the low-density layer and illuminate unexpected temporal behavior. Using all three techniques, we found surprising fluctuations at the interface with a non-Gaussian distribution and a single characteristic time on the order of tenths of seconds. This information supports the idea that the boundary fluctuates with something akin to capillary waves. We have also investigated the dependence of the static and dynamic properties of the hydrophobic/water interface on variables such as temperature, contact angle, pH, dissolved gasses, and sample quality, among others, in a hope to discover the root of the controversy in the literature. We found that the depletion layer is highly dependent on temperature, contact angle and sample quality. This dependence might explain some of the discrepancies in the literature as different groups often use hydrophobic surfaces with different properties.

  1. Treatability of South African surface waters by activated carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This suggests that GAC usage rate is not only a function of the initial UV absorbance but also ... and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) data suggested that for some waters UV254 ..... analysis was done with the UV254 absorbance value, as this.

  2. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  3. Hydrochemistry of surface water and groundwater from a fractured carbonate aquifer in the Helwan area, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fathy A Abdalla; Traugott Scheytt

    2012-02-01

    Groundwater is an important water resource in the Helwan area, not only for drinking and agricultural purposes, but also because several famous mineral springs have their origin in the fractured carbonate aquifer of the region. The area is heavily populated with a high density of industrial activities which may pose a risk for groundwater and surface water resources. The groundwater and surface water quality was investigated as a basis for more future investigations. The results revealed highly variable water hydrochemistry. High values of chloride, sulphate, hardness and significant mineralization were detected under the industrial and high-density urban areas. High nitrate contents in the groundwater recorded in the southern part of the study area are probably due to irrigation and sewage infiltrations from the sewage treatment station. The presence of shale and marl intercalation within the fissured and cavernous limestone aquifer promotes the exchange reactions and dissolution processes. The groundwater type is sodium, sulphate, chloride reflecting more mineralized than surface water. The results also showed that water in the study area (except the Nile water) is unsuitable for drinking purposes, but it can be used for irrigation and industrial purposes with some restrictions.

  4. Preliminary investigation of radon concentration in surface water and drinking water in Shenzhen City, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Wang, Nanping; Li, Shijun

    2015-11-01

    A radon survey in surface water and drinking water was conducted using a portable degassing system associated with an ionisation chamber AlphaGUARD (PQ2000) for understanding levels of dissolved radon ((222)Rn) concentration in different types of water sources and risk assessment of radon in drinking water in Shenzhen City (SC) with a population of 10 628 900 in 2013, Guangdong Province of China. The measurements show that arithmetic means ± standard deviations of radon ((222)Rn) concentration are 52.05 ± 6.64, 0.29 ± 0.26, 0.15 ± 0.23 and 0.37 ± 0.42 kBq m(-3) in spring water, surface water, large and small public water supplies, respectively. Only radon concentrations of two water samples collected in mountainous areas are more than 11.10 kBq m(-3), exceeding the limit of radon concentration in drinking water stipulated by the national standard of China (GB5749-2006). The annual effective doses due to radon in drinking water were also calculated. The investigation suggests that there are no risks caused by radon in the drinking water in SC.

  5. An examination of the potential added value of water safety plans to the United States national drinking water legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rachel; Amjad, Urooj; Luh, Jeanne; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    National and sub-national governments develop and enforce regulations to ensure the delivery of safe drinking water in the United States (US) and countries worldwide. However, periodic contamination events, waterborne endemic illness and outbreaks of waterborne disease still occur, illustrating that delivery of safe drinking water is not guaranteed. In this study, we examined the potential added value of a preventive risk management approach, specifically, water safety plans (WSPs), in the US in order to improve drinking water quality. We undertook a comparative analysis between US drinking water regulations and WSP steps to analyze the similarities and differences between them, and identify how WSPs might complement drinking water regulations in the US. Findings show that US drinking water regulations and WSP steps were aligned in the areas of describing the water supply system and defining monitoring and controls. However, gaps exist between US drinking water regulations and WSPs in the areas of team procedures and training, internal risk assessment and prioritization, and management procedures and plans. The study contributes to understanding both required and voluntary drinking water management practices in the US and how implementing water safety plans could benefit water systems to improve drinking water quality and human health.

  6. Evaluating the generation efficiency of hydrogen peroxide in water by pulsed discharge over water surface and underwater bubbling pulsed discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiaojing; Yao, Dan; Lu, Na; Jiang, Nan; Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed electric discharge over water surface/in water has been used to generate reactive species for decomposing the organic compounds in water, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the strong reactive species which can be decomposed into another stronger oxidative species, hydroxyl radical. The production efficacy of H2O2 by a gas phase pulsed discharge over water surface and an underwater bubbling pulsed discharge was evaluated through diagnosis of H2O2 by a chemical probe method. The experimental results show that the yield and the production rate of H2O2 increased with the input energy regardless of the electric discharge patterns, and the underwater bubbling pulsed discharge was more advantageous for H2O2 production considering both the yield and the production rate of H2O2. Results also indicate that the electric discharge patterns also influenced the water solution properties including the conductivity, the pH value and the water temperature.

  7. The Economic Value of Water in Recreation: Evidence from the California Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Frank A.; Roach, Brian A.; Henderson, Jim E.

    1996-04-01

    A significant barrier to economically efficient management of most reservoir systems is lack of reliable information about how recreational values change with reservoir levels. This paper presents evidence on marginal values of water for recreation at Corps of Engineer reservoirs in the Sacramento, California, District. Data on visitors were collected by origin and destination before and during the early part of the 1985-1991 California drought. Because lake levels varied widely during the sample period, water's effect on visits was isolated from price and other effects. An estimated regional travel cost model containing water level as a visit predictor provided information to compute marginal values of water in recreation. For the range of the lake levels seen, annual recreational values per acre-foot (1234 m3) of water vary from 6 at Pine Flat Reservoir to more than 600 at Success Lake. These findings are limited to use values of visitors who travel to the reservoirs and do not reflect passive use values to people who value the reservoirs but never visit them. Analysts could apply similar methods to other river basins in which a public agency controls the management of multiple water uses.

  8. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12 μm{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  9. Transitions for fipronil quant in surface water, Summary of Current Fipronil Water Data and Water Data for WWTPs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Comparison of fipronil sources in North Carolina surface water and identification of a novel fipronil transformation product in recycled wastewater. This dataset is...

  10. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  11. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multi year ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie river-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multi-year ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to sub-surface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface (0- were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to sub-surface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ~6% and ~8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particles concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of melt water on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering nonuniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM photobleaching.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SOIL FERTILISATION WITH ORGANIC MANURE ABOUT SURFACE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA POPA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the hydrographic basin of Mures river, aboard an altitude gradient, were taken samples from surface waters for research the nutrients concentrations. The reference point was represented by a dairy caw farm where the agricultural fields of this is applied the organic fertilization with manure. The water samples were prelevated in spring and autumn and the prelevate dates are the same with spread manure dates. At the second data prelevaion (in autumn it observed an increase of N-NH4, N-NO3 and P in surface water in comparison with the concentrations founded at first data prelevation (in spring. The explication is the manifestation to the cumulated and at distance effects of introduction in water to some organic products, very probably washed from neighborhoods of agricultural field. Were calculated values of Student test for seasonal comparisons and were founded significant differences between nutrients concentration values at first and second prelevations. These bigger concentrations values of N in water are consequence of wrong manure management.

  13. Water entry without surface seal: Extended cavity formation

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2014-03-01

    We report results from an experimental study of cavity formation during the impact of superhydrophobic spheres onto water. Using a simple splash-guard mechanism, we block the spray emerging during initial contact from closing thus eliminating the phenomenon known as \\'surface seal\\', which typically occurs at Froude numbers Fr= V0 2/(gR0) = O(100). As such, we are able to observe the evolution of a smooth cavity in a more extended parameter space than has been achieved in previous studies. Furthermore, by systematically varying the tank size and sphere diameter, we examine the influence of increasing wall effects on these guarded impact cavities and note the formation of surface undulations with wavelength λ =O(10)cm and acoustic waves λa=O(D0) along the cavity interface, which produce multiple pinch-off points. Acoustic waves are initiated by pressure perturbations, which themselves are generated by the primary cavity pinch-off. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques we study the bulk fluid flow for the most constrained geometry and show the larger undulations ( λ =O (10cm)) have a fixed nature with respect to the lab frame. We show that previously deduced scalings for the normalized (primary) pinch-off location (ratio of pinch-off depth to sphere depth at pinch-off time), Hp/H = 1/2, and pinch-off time, τ α (R0/g) 1/2, do not hold for these extended cavities in the presence of strong wall effects (sphere-to-tank diameter ratio), ε = D 0/Dtank 1/16. Instead, we find multiple distinct regimes for values of Hp/H as the observed undulations are induced above the first pinch-off point as the impact speed increases. We also report observations of \\'kinked\\' pinch-off points and the suppression of downward facing jets in the presence of wall effects. Surprisingly, upward facing jets emanating from first cavity pinch-off points evolve into a \\'flat\\' structure at high impact speeds, both in the presence and absence of wall effects.

  14. Evaporative Control on Soil Water Isotope Ratios: Implications for Atmosphere-Land Surface Water Fluxes and Interpretation of Terrestrial Proxy Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; O'Neill, M.

    2014-12-01

    The moisture balance of the continental boundary layer plays an important role in regulating the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and atmosphere. Near-surface moisture balance is controlled by a number of factors including precipitation, infiltration and evapotranspiration. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in water can be exploited to better understand the mechanisms controlling atmosphere-land surface water fluxes. Understanding the processes that set sub-surface water isotope ratios can prove useful for refining paleoclimate interpretations of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based proxies. We present in situ tower-based measurements of stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δ18O) in vapor, precipitation and soil from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, a semi-arid tall-tower site in Erie, Colorado, from July 2012 to September 2014. Near surface profiles from 0 to 10 m were measured approximately every ninety minutes. Soil profiles from 0 to 30 cm, the region of maximum variability, were sampled on a weekly basis and cryogenically extracted for stable water isotope measurement. Evaporation-proof bulk rain collectors provided precipitation samples at this site. Results show disequilibrium exists between surface vapor and soil water isotopes, with the top 10 cm of soil water approaching equilibrium with the surface vapor right after a rain event because of high infiltration and saturation at the surface. At this semi-arid site with little vegetation, evaporative exchange is the main driver for soil water fluxes as the soil dries, corroborated by soil Dexcess profiles showing progressive enrichment through evaporation. In addition, when nighttime surface temperatures are cooler than deep soil, as is the case in many arid and semi-arid environments, upward vapor diffusion from the soil leads to dew formation at the surface which then contributes to surface vapor values. We use these observations to constrain a Craig-Gordon evaporation

  15. Droplet impinging behavior on surfaces: Part II - Water on aluminium and cast iron surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangavi, S.; Balaji, S.; Mithran, N.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Droplet cooling of metal surfaces is an important area of research in industrial applications such as material quenching, nozzle spraying, etc. Fluids (water) act as an excellent agent in heat transfer to remove excess heat in various processes by convection and conduction. Such cooling process varies the material properties. The bubbles formed during droplet impinging on the surface act as heat sink and causes variation of height and spreading radius of the droplet with increase in temperature. In the present work, an experimental study of the droplet impinging behavior on Aluminium and Cast iron surfaces is reported. The water droplets are made to fall on the surface of the specimens from a specific height, which also influences the spreading radius. The effect of temperature on droplet height and droplet spreading radius is detailed.

  16. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  17. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  18. Analysis of water microdroplet condensation on silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takuya; Fujimoto, Kenya; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Mogi, Katsuo; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Takagi, Shu; Univ. of Tokyo Team; Tokyo Inst. of Tech. Team

    2016-11-01

    We observed the condensation process of water microdroplets on flat silicon (100) surfaces by means of the sequential visualization of the droplets using an environmental scanning electron microscope. As previously reported for nanostructured surfaces, the condensation process of water microdroplets on the flat silicon surfaces also exhibits two modes: the constant base (CB) area mode and the constant contact angle (CCA) mode. In the CB mode, the contact angle increases with time while the base diameter is constant. Subsequently, in the CCA mode, the base diameter increases with time while the contact angle remains constant. The dropwise condensation model regulated by subcooling temperature does not reproduce the experimental results. Because the subcooling temperature is not constant in the case of a slow condensation rate, this model is not applicable to the condensation of the long time scale ( several tens of minutes). The contact angle of water microdroplets ( several μm) tended to be smaller than the macro contact angle. Two hypotheses are proposed as the cause of small contact angles: electrowetting and the coalescence of sub- μm water droplets.

  19. Characterization of Drain Surface Water: Environmental Profile, Degradation Level and Geo-statistic Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Waseem Mumtaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The physico-chemical characterization of the surface water. Samples was carried out collected from nine sampling points of drain passing by the territory of Hafizabad city, Punjab, Pakistan. The water of drain is used by farmers for irrigation purposes in nearby agricultural fields. Twenty water quality parameters were evaluated in three turns and the results obtained were compared with the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS municipal and industrial effluents prescribed limits. The highly significant difference (p0.05 was noted for temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, hardness, calcium, sodium, chemical oxygen demand and chloride among water samples from different sampling points. Furthermore, the experimental results of different water quality parameters studied at nine sampling points of the drain were used and interpolated in ArcGIS 9.3 environment system using kriging techniques to obtain calculated values for the remaining locations of the Drain.

  20. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  1. Water contact angles and hysteresis of polyamide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of a series of aliphatic polyamides (PAs) has been examined. PAs with varying amide content and polyethylene (PE) were molded against glass to produce surfaces with similar roughness. After cleaning, chemical composition of the surfaces was verified with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Advancing and receding contact angles were measured from small sessile water drops. Contact angles decreased with amide content while hysteresis increased. Hysteresis arose primarily from molecular interactions between the contact liquid and the solid substrates, rather than moisture absorption, variations in crystallinity, surface deformation, roughness, reorientation of amide groups, or surface contamination. Free energies of hysteresis were calculated from contact angles. For PE, which is composed entirely of nonpolar methylene groups, free energies were equivalent to the strength of dispersive van der Waals bonds. For PAs, free energies corresponded to fractional contributions from the dispersive methylene groups and polar amide groups.

  2. Nonlinear Acoustics at the Air-Water Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pree, Seth; Naranjo, Brian; Putterman, Seth

    2016-11-01

    According to linear acoustics, airborne sound incident on a water surface transmits only a tenth of a percent of its energy. This difficulty of transmitting energy across the water surface limits the feasibility of standoff ultrasound imaging. We propose to overcome this long standing problem by developing new methods of coupling into the medium at standoff. In particular, we believe that the acoustic nonlinearity of both the air and the medium may yield a range of effects in the vicinity of the surface permitting an efficient transmission of ultrasound from the air into the medium. The recent commercial availability of parametric speakers that deliver modulated 100kHz ultrasound at 135dB to nonlinearly generate music at 95dB provides an interesting platform with which to revisit the transmission of sound across acoustic impedance mismatches. We show results of experimental studies of the behavior of the air-water free surface when subjected to large amplitude acoustic pressures from the air. This work was supported by the ARO STIR program.

  3. THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES AND CHARACTERIZATIONS OF CHITOSAN NANO-PARTICLES CORROSION INHIBITION ON THE SURFACE OF MILD STEELIN PEAT WATER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Erna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic properties and characterizations of corrosion inhibition of chitosan nano-particles on the surface of mild steel in peat water media had been studied using weight loss method at temperatures of 30 - 50 oC. Steel surfaces were characterized by FT-IR spectra and SEM-EDS morphology photos. The research found that the value of DGo approaching -40 kJmol-1. The negative value of Gibbs free energy shows that the adsorption of inhibitor molecules on the surface of mild steel was achemisorption and it occurred spontaneously. Meanwhile, the values of DHo is also negative confirming that the adsoprtion of inhibitor molecules is an exothermic process. The value of DSo obtained is positive, it indicates hat the inhibitor molecules were adsorbed spontaneously on the mild steel surface. The analysis on mild steel surfaces hows that the nano-particle chitosan was adsorbed on the steel surface to form the complex compounds.

  4. Surface viscoelastic properties of spread ferroelectric liquid crystal monolayer on air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Bhullar, Gurpreet Kaur; Raina, K. K.

    2013-06-01

    Ferroelectric Liquid crystal having Smectic C* phase at room temperature was capable of forming Langmuir monolayer due to presence of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups in it. Surface viscoelasticity properties of FLC monolayer spread on water surface had been determined by dynamic oscillation method and discussed as a function of surface pressure. Dynamic viscoelastic properties such as G (Elastic modulus), G' (storage (elastic) modulus), G' (Loss (viscous) modulus) and phase change with sinusoidal oscillation had been measured at phase changing surface pressure values. As monolayer was becoming condensed, increasing trend was observed in G' values while G' was decreasing. At higher frequencies, viscous modulus G' had negative values. This relaxation phenomenon was probably caused by conformational rearrangements that acted to fluidize monolayer. Phase change tan θ was positive, response in surface pressure was ahead of the de-formation in area and the monolayer had positive dilatational viscosity. Phase change tan θ was negative, response in surface pressure was hysteretic to the deformation in area, and negative dilatational viscosity had been observed. Studies of monolayer in barrier oscillating mode provided us the surface pressure which was most suitable for Langmuir Blodgett monolayer deposition.

  5. Assessment of Ecosystem Water Conservation Value In The Beijing Four Seasons Flower Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiao-Na

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of field investigation and multi-source data analysis, Beijing Four Seasons Flower Valley declared in 2008 towards valley economy water conservation function and value was estimated by means of rainfall storage capacity as well as ecological economy. The results showed that: Landscape structure of FSFV was forest land-cultivated land-grassland. FSFV had the highest water conservation function in Beijing valleys, with the capacity of 1101.13 m3/hm2. Annual total amount of water conservation was 31.20×106 m3, accounting for 10.07% of Beijing valleys, and the total value of water conservation was 3.61×108 Yuan. High water conservation capacity areas were mainly located in the eastern mountainous region with broadleaf forest centralized distribution. Low water conservation function areas were mainly occurred in the regions effected by human activities. Forest ecosystem had the highest capacity of water conservation of 1116 m3/hm2, while construction ecosystem had the lowest. Higher degree of human activities, lower capacity of water conservation. Shrub forest and broadleaf forest had the largest contribution on valley water conservation, with contribution rate of 36.35% and 35.62%. Ranking of water conservation capacity, broadleaf forest had the highest value of 1135 m3/hm2, followed by coniferous forest, shrub forest and mixed forest.

  6. Sensors and OBIA synergy for operational monitoring of surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Eric; Thenard, Lucas

    2010-05-01

    This contribution will focus on combining Object Based Image Analysis (i.e. OBIA with e-Cognition 8) and recent sensors (i.e. Spot 5 XS, Pan and ALOS Prism, Avnir2, Palsar) to address the technical feasibility for an operational monitoring of surface water. Three cases of river meandering (India), flood mapping (Nepal) and dam's seasonal water level monitoring (Morocco) using recent sensors will present various application of surface water monitoring. The operational aspect will be demonstrated either by sensor properties (i.e. spatial resolution and bandwidth), data acquisition properties (i.e. multi sensor, return period and near real-time acquisition) but also with OBIA algorithms (i.e. fusion of multi sensors / multi resolution data and batch processes). In the first case of river meandering (India) we will address multi sensor and multi date satellite acquisition to monitor the river bed mobility within a floodplain using an ALOS dataset. It will demonstrate the possibility of an operational monitoring system that helps the geomorphologist in the analysis of fluvial dynamic and sediment budget for high energy rivers. In the second case of flood mapping (Nepal) we will address near real time Palsar data acquisition at high spatial resolution to monitor and to map a flood extension. This ALOS sensor takes benefit both from SAR and L band properties (i.e. atmospheric transparency, day/night acquisition, low sensibility to surface wind). It's a real achievement compared to optical imagery or even other high resolution SAR properties (i.e. acquisition swath, bandwidth and data price). These advantages meet the operational needs set by crisis management of hydrological disasters but also for the implementation of flood risk management plans. The last case of dam surface water monitoring (Morocco) will address an important issue of water resource management in countries affected by water scarcity. In such countries water users have to cope with over exploitation

  7. Three-dimensional topographies of water surface dimples formed by superhydrophobic water strider legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.; Zheng, Y. L.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Tian, Y.

    2016-10-01

    A water strider has a remarkable capability to stand and walk freely on water. Supporting forces of a water strider and a bionic robot have been calculated from the side view of pressed depth of legs to reconstruct the water surface dimples. However, in situ measurements of the multiple leg forces and significantly small leg/water contact dimples have not been realized yet. In this study, a shadow method was proposed to reconstruct the in situ three-dimensional topographies of leg/water contact dimples and their corresponding supporting forces. Results indicated that the supporting forces were affected by the depth, width, and length of the dimple, and that the maximum dimple depth was not proportional to the supporting forces. The shadow method also has advantages in disclosing tiny supporting force of legs in their subtle actions. These results are helpful for understanding the locomotion principles of water-walking insects and the design of biomimetic aquatic devices.

  8. An economic framework for valuing information in water scarce irrigation districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaune, Alexander; Werner, Micha; Karimi, Poolad; de Fraiture, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Data and information plays a crucial role in quantifying the abundance of the available water resource and the demand placed on it in water scarce regions, and is central to decision making. This is particularly so for water allocation decisions in large irrigation districts. However, in most irrigation schemes data collection is normally limited due to the economic investments required. As a result, water allocation decisions are normally taken based on incomplete or uncertain data on the current or forecast situation, leading to less optimal decisions being taken in system planning and operation. Wrong water allocation decisions can lead to economic loss in agricultural production, implying low performance of the system and possible impact on the users' livelihoods. The objective of this research is to assess available frameworks in valuing information and to adapt these to support water allocation decisions in irrigation districts. Water allocation decisions made in the planning of irrigation districts as well as in their operation will be evaluated through a decision framework that considers a discrete set of options, each generating different agricultural production loss scenarios relative to uncertain water scarcity conditions. Additional information obtained from improved data can support better decision making and thus constitutes added value. This added value can be interpreted as the marginal benefit of the improved data. The marginal benefit of information will be determined following an economic framework based on the Relative Economic Value theory that is applied in making decisions in a Bayesian setting. Through this framework it is expected to provide economic values of information in support of water allocation decisions in vulnerable irrigation districts. This is an essential step to provide insight on the value of information in water allocation decisions in planning and operation, and ultimately to reduce agricultural production loss.

  9. Presence and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in surface water and drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Trace amounts of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters in the nano- to microgram per liter range, and in drinking water in the nanogram/L range. The environmental risks of pharmaceuticals in surface waters have been evaluated and generally found to be low if the wastewater is treated...... before release to the environment. The human health risks of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in drinking water have however not been evaluated in any great depth. Preliminary screening level assessments suggest risk to be low – but the public and decision-makers are concerned and would like the matter...... investigated more thoroughly, especially with regards to mixture effects, chronic long-term effects and sensitive sub-populations. The World Health Organization is currently evaluating the need for credible health based guidance associated with low concentrations of pharmaceuticals in drinking water....

  10. Presence and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in surface water and drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Trace amounts of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters in the nano- to microgram per liter range, and in drinking water in the nanogram/L range. The environmental risks of pharmaceuticals in surface waters have been evaluated and generally found to be low if the wastewater is treated...... before release to the environment. The human health risks of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in drinking water have however not been evaluated in any great depth. Preliminary screening level assessments suggest risk to be low – but the public and decision-makers are concerned and would like the matter...... investigated more thoroughly, especially with regards to mixture effects, chronic long-term effects and sensitive sub-populations. The World Health Organization is currently evaluating the need for credible health based guidance associated with low concentrations of pharmaceuticals in drinking water....

  11. A "First Principles" Potential Energy Surface for Liquid Water from VRT Spectroscopy of Water Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Leforestier, C; Saykally, R J

    2004-05-25

    We present results of gas phase cluster and liquid water simulations from the recently determined VRT(ASP-W)III water dimer potential energy surface. VRT(ASP-W)III is shown to not only be a model of high ''spectroscopic'' accuracy for the water dimer, but also makes accurate predictions of vibrational ground-state properties for clusters up through the hexamer. Results of ambient liquid water simulations from VRT(ASP-W)III are compared to those from ab initio Molecular Dynamics, other potentials of ''spectroscopic'' accuracy, and to experiment. The results herein represent the first time that a ''spectroscopic'' potential surface is able to correctly model condensed phase properties of water.

  12. Isotopic values of plants in relation to water availability in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Gideon; Danin, Avinoam

    2010-04-01

    Plant C and N isotope values often correlate with rainfall on global and regional scales. This study examines the relationship between plant isotopic values and rainfall in the Eastern Mediterranean region. The results indicate significant correlations between both C and N isotope values and rainfall in C(3) plant communities. This significant relationship is maintained when plant communities are divided by plant life forms. Furthermore, a seasonal increase in C isotope values is observed during the dry season while N isotope values remain stable across the wet and dry seasons. Finally, the isotopic pattern in plants originating from desert environments differs from those from Mediterranean environments because some desert plants obtain most of their water from secondary sources, namely water channeled by local topographic features rather than direct rainfall. From these results it can be concluded that water availability is the primary factor controlling C and N isotope variability in plant communities in the Eastern Mediterranean.

  13. Load-bearing ability of the mosquito tarsus on water surfaces arising from its flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Q. Kong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes possess a remarkable ability to stand effortlessly and walk freely on water surfaces because their six legs provide a large force to support the body weight. This study is focused on the role of the tarsus (the distal segment of the mosquito leg because it was observed that normally only the tarsi make contact with water. The maximum value of the supporting force of the tarsus (6 mm long in contact with water is estimated as 492 ± 5 μN, nearly 20 times the body weight of the mosquito, whereas the value for the whole leg (11 mm is about 23 times the body weight. We demonstrate that the huge force provided by the tarsus originates from its flexibility, which ensures that the leg does not easily pierce the water. Adjustment of the initial stepping angle of the tarsus assists the mosquito to control the supporting force. These findings help to illustrate how mosquitoes stand or walk on water with only their tarsi in nearly horizontal contact with the water surface. Besides enhancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying “walking on water” by semi-aquatic insects, these investigations could provide inspiration for the biomimetic design of miniature robotics.

  14. Equations of atrazine transfer from agricultural land to surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, C.

    1995-08-01

    As atrazine, the most widely used herbicide in agriculture, makes problems for water supply, the Cemagref study its transfer from lands to surface water. On a small basin of central Brittany, soil and water contents of atrazine have been monitored from 1991 to 1994. Data show that atrazine content of the top layer of soil decreases slowly after spreading. Degradation works more than leaching for this decrease. There is always atrazine in the water of the stream at the outlet of the basin. The concentration of atrazine in water increase sharply in every flood and then decrease slowly. The maximum level of concentration in each flood is very well correlated with the ratio of maximum discharge to the base flow. It means that quick superficial flow of water is the most contaminated water. It brings most of the total flow of atrazine which can be measured in the stream. However, this flow represent only a very small part of the spread atrazine on the basin: less than 1%.

  15. Biological methods used to assess surface water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczerbiñska Natalia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the guidelines of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60 (WFD, both ecological and chemical statuses determine the assessment of surface waters. The profile of ecological status is based on the analysis of various biological components, and physicochemical and hydromorphological indicators complement this assessment. The aim of this article is to present the biological methods used in the assessment of water status with a special focus on bioassay, as well as to provide a review of methods of monitoring water status. Biological test methods include both biomonitoring and bioanalytics. Water biomonitoring is used to assess and forecast the status of water. These studies aim to collect data on water pollution and forecast its impact. Biomonitoring uses organisms which are characterized by particular vulnerability to contaminants. Bioindicator organisms are algae, fungi, bacteria, larval invertebrates, cyanobacteria, macroinvertebrates, and fish. Bioanalytics is based on the receptors of contaminants that can be biologically active substances. In bioanalytics, biosensors such as viruses, bacteria, antibodies, enzymes, and biotests are used to assess degrees of pollution.

  16. The impact of land use on microbial surface water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Christiane; Rechenburg, Andrea; Rind, Esther; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Our knowledge relating to water contamination from point and diffuse sources has increased in recent years and there have been many studies undertaken focusing on effluent from sewage plants or combined sewer overflows. However, there is still only a limited amount of microbial data on non-point sources leading to diffuse pollution of surface waters. In this study, the concentrations of several indicator micro-organisms and pathogens in the upper reaches of a river system were examined over a period of 16 months. In addition to bacteria, diffuse pollution caused by Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. was analysed. A single land use type predestined to cause high concentrations of all microbial parameters could not be identified. The influence of different land use types varies between microbial species. The microbial concentration in river water cannot be explained by stable non-point effluent concentrations from different land use types. There is variation in the ranking of the potential of different land use types resulting in surface water contamination with regard to minimum, median and maximum effects. These differences between median and maximum impact indicate that small-scale events like spreading manure substantially influence the general contamination potential of a land use type and may cause increasing micro-organism concentrations in the river water by mobilisation during the next rainfall event. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  18. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  19. Residential surface soil guidance values applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention POP pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Aaron A; Li, Zijian

    2015-09-01

    Surface soil contamination is a worldwide problem. Many regulatory jurisdictions attempt to control human exposures with regulatory guidance values (RGVs) that specify a soil's maximum allowable concentration. Pesticides are important soil contaminants because of their intentional toxicity and widespread surface soil application. Worldwide, at least 174 regulatory jurisdictions from 54 United Nations member states have published more than 19,400 pesticide RGVs for at least 739 chemically unique pesticides. This manuscript examines the variability of the guidance values that are applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention persistent organic pollutants (POP) pesticides (Aldrin, Chlordane, DDT, Dieldrin, Endrin, Heptachlor, Mirex, and Toxaphene) for which at least 1667 RGVs have been promulgated. Results indicate that the spans of the RGVs applied to each of these pesticides vary from 6.1 orders of magnitude for Toxaphene to 10.0 orders of magnitude for Mirex. The distribution of values across these value spans resembles the distribution of lognormal random variables, but also contain non-random value clusters. Approximately 40% of all the POP RGVs fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) RGV cancer risk model. Another 22% of the values fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the USEPA's non-cancer risk model, but the cancer risk calculations yield the binding (lowest) value for all POP pesticides except Endrin. The results presented emphasize the continued need to rationalize the RGVs applied worldwide to important soil contaminants.

  20. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Some pesticide transformation products have been observed to occur in higher concentrations and more frequently than the parent active pesticide in surface water and groundwater. These products are often more mobile and sometimes more stable than the parent pesticide. If they also represent the major product into which the parent substance is transformed, these transformation products may dominate observed pesticide occurrences in surface water and groundwater. Their potential contribution to the overall risk to the aquatic environment caused by the use of the parent pesticide should therefore not be neglected in chemical risk and water quality assessments. The same is true for transformation products of other compound classes that might reach the soil environment, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals. However, the fate and input pathways of transformation products of soil-applied chemicals into surface water are not yet well understood, which largely prevents their appropriate inclusion into chemical risk and water quality assessments. Here, we studied whether prioritization methods based on available environmental fate data from pesticide registration dossiers in combination with basic fate models could help identify transformation products which can be found in relevant concentrations in surface and groundwater and which should therefore be included into monitoring programs. A three-box steady state model containing air, soil, and surface water compartments was used to predict relative inputs of pesticide transformation products into surface waters based on their physico-chemical and environmental fate properties. The model predictions were compared to monitoring data from a small Swiss river located in an intensely agricultural catchment (90 km2) which was flow-proportionally sampled from May to October 2008 and screened for 74 pesticides as well as 50 corresponding transformation products. Sampling mainly occurred during high discharge, but additional samples

  1. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

    2014-01-01

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

  2. Diminishing of the mutual influencing in the transformers of mechanical values on surface acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Piddubnyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false RU X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Examined the problems usage differential amplifier as an active part of the secondary transformer mechanical values in the electrical signal to the surface acoustic wave. Description and results of his researches is resulted.

  3. Theoretical investigation of water formation on Rh and Pt Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Steffen; Natoli, Vincent; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2000-06-01

    Catalytic water formation from adsorbed H and O adatoms is a fundamental reaction step in a variety of technologically important reactions involving organic molecules. In particular, the water-formation rate determines the selectivity of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas. In this report we present a theoretical investigation of the potential-energy diagram for water formation from adsorbed O and H species on Rh(111) and Pt(111) surfaces. The study is based on accurate first-principles calculations applying density-functional theory. Our results are compared to the potential-energy diagram for this reaction inferred from experimental data by Hickman and Schmidt [AIChE. J. 39, 1164 (1993)]. The calculations essentially reproduce the scheme of Hickman and Schmidt for water formation on Rh(111) with the important difference that the OH molecule is significantly more stable than assumed by Hickman and Schmidt. On Pt(111) surfaces, however, the calculations predict a barrier to OH formation very similar to that found on Rh(111). In particular, the calculated barrier to OH formation of about 20 kcal/mol seems to contradict the small 2.5 kcal/mol barrier assumed in the Hickman-Schmidt scheme and the observed large rate of water formation on Pt. A possible explanation for the apparent discrepancy between the large calculated barrier for OH formation on Pt and the experimentally observed rapid formation of water even at low temperatures is that the active sites for water formation on Pt are at "defect" sites and not on the ideally flat terraces. A similar conclusion has been reached by Verheij and co-workers [Surf. Sci. 371, 100 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 174, 449 (1990); Surf. Sci. 272, 276 (1991)], who did detailed experimental work on water formation on Pt surfaces. Analyzing our results, we develop an explicit picture of the interaction processes governing the formation of OH groups. This picture rationalizes the calculated weak dependence of OH

  4. Impacts of climate change on surface water quality in relation to drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpla, I; Jung, A-V; Baures, E; Clement, M; Thomas, O

    2009-11-01

    Besides climate change impacts on water availability and hydrological risks, the consequences on water quality is just beginning to be studied. This review aims at proposing a synthesis of the most recent existing interdisciplinary literature on the topic. After a short presentation about the role of the main factors (warming and consequences of extreme events) explaining climate change effects on water quality, the focus will be on two main points. First, the impacts on water quality of resources (rivers and lakes) modifying parameters values (physico-chemical parameters, micropollutants and biological parameters) are considered. Then, the expected impacts on drinking water production and quality of supplied water are discussed. The main conclusion which can be drawn is that a degradation trend of drinking water quality in the context of climate change leads to an increase of at risk situations related to potential health impact.

  5. The Effects of a Water Conservation Instructional Unit on the Values Held by Sixth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Andrew; Tomera, Audrey

    1977-01-01

    Sixth grade students were divided into two groups. Students in one group received instruction on water conservation using expository and discovery activities. The students in the control group received none. Results gave evidence that students' values could be changed by this mode of water conservation instruction. (MA)

  6. A review of the modelling of water values in different use sectors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    irrigated agriculture as an important use sector in terms of water volumes, ... wide range of topics is to provide information to policy decision-makers on the economics of water management in South .... ET values estimated by the RV method for eucalyptus vary .... cised rights will not be supported for transfer, it appears that.

  7. Time to re-evaluate the guideline value for manganese in drinking water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Karin; Vahter, Marie

    2007-11-01

    We reviewed the scientific background for the current health-based World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value for manganese in drinking water. The initial starting point was the background document for the development of the WHO's guideline value for manganese in drinking water as well as other regulations and recommendations on manganese intake levels. Data referred to in these documents were traced back to the original research papers. In addition, we searched for scientific reports on manganese exposure and health effects. The current health-based guideline value for manganese in drinking water is based partly on debatable assumptions, where information from previous reports has been used without revisiting original scientific articles. Presently, preparation of common infant formulas with water containing manganese concentrations equivalent to the WHO guideline value will result in exceeding the maximum manganese concentration for infant formula. However, there are uncertainties about how this maximum value was derived. Concurrently, there is increasing evidence of negative neurologic effects in children from excessive manganese exposure. The increasing number of studies reporting associations between neurologic symptoms and manganese exposure in infants and children, in combination with the questionable scientific background data used in setting the manganese guideline value for drinking water, certainly warrant a re-evaluation of the guideline value. Further research is needed to understand the causal relationship between manganese exposure and children's health, and to enable an improved risk assessment.

  8. Surface Analysis of Metal Materials After Water Jet Abrasive Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Polák

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we deal with a progressive production technology using the water jet cutting technology with the addition of abrasives for material removal. This technology is widely used in cutting various shapes, but also for the technology of machining such as turning, milling, drilling and cutting of threads. The aim of this article was to analyse the surface of selected types of metallic materials after abrasive machining, i.e. by assessing the impact of selected machining parameters on the surface roughness of metallic materials.

  9. Surface Passivation of GaN Nanowires for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Varadhan, Purushothaman

    2017-02-08

    Hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical water-splitting is a key source of clean and sustainable energy. The use of one-dimensional nanostructures as photoelectrodes is desirable for photoelectrochemical water-splitting applications due to the ultralarge surface areas, lateral carrier extraction schemes, and superior light-harvesting capabilities. However, the unavoidable surface states of nanostructured materials create additional charge carrier trapping centers and energy barriers at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, which severely reduce the solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. In this work, we address the issue of surface states in GaN nanowire photoelectrodes by employing a simple and low-cost surface treatment method, which utilizes an organic thiol compound (i.e., 1,2-ethanedithiol). The surface-treated photocathode showed an enhanced photocurrent density of −31 mA/cm at −0.2 V versus RHE with an incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 18.3%, whereas untreated nanowires yielded only 8.1% efficiency. Furthermore, the surface passivation provides enhanced photoelectrochemical stability as surface-treated nanowires retained ∼80% of their initial photocurrent value and produced 8000 μmol of gas molecules over 55 h at acidic conditions (pH ∼ 0), whereas the untreated nanowires demonstrated only <4 h of photoelectrochemical stability. These findings shed new light on the importance of surface passivation of nanostructured photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical applications.

  10. Surface Passivation of GaN Nanowires for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Purushothaman; Fu, Hui-Chun; Priante, Davide; Retamal, Jose Ramon Duran; Zhao, Chao; Ebaid, Mohamed; Ng, Tien Khee; Ajia, Idirs; Mitra, Somak; Roqan, Iman S; Ooi, Boon S; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-03-08

    Hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical water-splitting is a key source of clean and sustainable energy. The use of one-dimensional nanostructures as photoelectrodes is desirable for photoelectrochemical water-splitting applications due to the ultralarge surface areas, lateral carrier extraction schemes, and superior light-harvesting capabilities. However, the unavoidable surface states of nanostructured materials create additional charge carrier trapping centers and energy barriers at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, which severely reduce the solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. In this work, we address the issue of surface states in GaN nanowire photoelectrodes by employing a simple and low-cost surface treatment method, which utilizes an organic thiol compound (i.e., 1,2-ethanedithiol). The surface-treated photocathode showed an enhanced photocurrent density of -31 mA/cm(2) at -0.2 V versus RHE with an incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 18.3%, whereas untreated nanowires yielded only 8.1% efficiency. Furthermore, the surface passivation provides enhanced photoelectrochemical stability as surface-treated nanowires retained ∼80% of their initial photocurrent value and produced 8000 μmol of gas molecules over 55 h at acidic conditions (pH ∼ 0), whereas the untreated nanowires demonstrated only surface passivation of nanostructured photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical applications.

  11. Shallow Alluvial Aquifer Ground Water System and Surface Water/Ground Water Interaction, Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, K. P.; Ge, S.; Crifasi, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Water chemistry in Boulder Creek, Colorado, shows significant variation as the Creek flows through the City of Boulder [Barber et al., 2006]. This variation is partially due to ground water inputs, which are not quantitatively understood. The purpose of this study is (1) to understand ground water movement in a shallow alluvial aquifer system and (2) to assess surface water/ground water interaction. The study area, encompassing an area of 1 mi2, is located at the Sawhill and Walden Ponds area in Boulder. This area was reclaimed by the City of Boulder and Boulder County after gravel mining operations ceased in the 1970's. Consequently, ground water has filled in the numerous gravel pits allowing riparian vegetation regrowth and replanting. An integrated approach is used to examine the shallow ground water and surface water of the study area through field measurements, water table mapping, graphical data analysis, and numerical modeling. Collected field data suggest that lateral heterogeneity exists throughout the unconsolidated sediment. Alluvial hydraulic conductivities range from 1 to 24 ft/day and flow rates range from 0.01 to 2 ft/day. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ground water movement parallels surface topography and does not noticeably vary with season. Recharge via infiltrating precipitation is dependent on evapotranspiration (ET) demands and is influenced by preferential flow paths. During the growing season when ET demand exceeds precipitation rates, there is little recharge; however recharge occurs during cooler months when ET demand is insignificant. Preliminary data suggest that the Boulder Creek is gaining ground water as it traverses the study area. Stream flow influences the water table for distances up to 400 feet. The influence of stream flow is reflected in the zones relatively low total dissolved solids concentration. A modeling study is being conducted to synthesize aquifer test data, ground water levels, and stream flow data. The

  12. Evaluation of water quality and hydrogeochemistry of surface and groundwater, Tiruvallur District, Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, S.; Hari Babu, S.; Eswar Rao, P.; Selvakumar, S.; Thivya, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Jeyabal, G.

    2017-09-01

    Water quality of Tiruvallur Taluk of Tiruvallur district, Tamil Nadu, India has been analysed to assess its suitability in relation to domestic and agricultural uses. Thirty water samples, including 8 surface water (S), 22 groundwater samples [15 shallow ground waters (SW) and 7 deep ground waters (DW)], were collected to assess the various physico-chemical parameters such as Temperature, pH, Electrical conductivity (EC), Total dissolved solids (TDS), cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K), anions (CO3, HCO3, Cl, SO4, NO3, PO4) and trace elements (Fe, Mn, Zn). Various irrigation water quality diagrams and parameters such as United states salinity laboratory (USSL), Wilcox, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), sodium percentage (Na %), Residual sodium carbonate (RSC), Residual Sodium Bicarbonate (RSBC) and Kelley's ratio revealed that most of the water samples are suitable for irrigation. Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) values suggest that the water is slightly corrosive and non-scale forming in nature. Gibbs plot suggests that the study area is dominated by evaporation and rock-water dominance process. Piper plot indicates the chemical composition of water, chiefly controlled by dissolution and mixing of irrigation return flow.

  13. Evaluation of water quality and hydrogeochemistry of surface and groundwater, Tiruvallur District, Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, S.; Hari Babu, S.; Eswar Rao, P.; Selvakumar, S.; Thivya, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Jeyabal, G.

    2016-07-01

    Water quality of Tiruvallur Taluk of Tiruvallur district, Tamil Nadu, India has been analysed to assess its suitability in relation to domestic and agricultural uses. Thirty water samples, including 8 surface water (S), 22 groundwater samples [15 shallow ground waters (SW) and 7 deep ground waters (DW)], were collected to assess the various physico-chemical parameters such as Temperature, pH, Electrical conductivity (EC), Total dissolved solids (TDS), cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K), anions (CO3, HCO3, Cl, SO4, NO3, PO4) and trace elements (Fe, Mn, Zn). Various irrigation water quality diagrams and parameters such as United states salinity laboratory (USSL), Wilcox, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), sodium percentage (Na %), Residual sodium carbonate (RSC), Residual Sodium Bicarbonate (RSBC) and Kelley's ratio revealed that most of the water samples are suitable for irrigation. Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) values suggest that the water is slightly corrosive and non-scale forming in nature. Gibbs plot suggests that the study area is dominated by evaporation and rock-water dominance process. Piper plot indicates the chemical composition of water, chiefly controlled by dissolution and mixing of irrigation return flow.

  14. The δ15N of nitrate in the Southern Ocean: Consumption of nitrate in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Altabet, M. A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Francois, R.; Fischer, G.

    1999-12-01

    We report nitrogen isotope data for nitrate from transects of hydrocast and surface samples collected in the eastern Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean, focusing here on the data from the upper water column to study the effect of nitrate consumption by phytoplankton. The δ15N of nitrate increases by 1-2‰ from deep water into the Antarctic summertime surface layer, due to kinetic isotopic fractionation during nitrate uptake. Estimation of the nitrate uptake isotope effect from Antarctic depth profiles yields values in the range of 5-6‰ in east Indian sector and 4-5‰ in the east Pacific sector. Surface transect data from the Pacific sector also yield values of 4-5‰. The major uncertainty in the profile-based estimation of the isotope effect involves the δ15N of nitrate from the temperature minimum layer below the summertime Antarctic surface layer, which deviates significantly from the predictions of simple models of isotope fractionation. For the Subantarctic surface, it is possible to distinguish between nitrate supplied laterally from the surface Antarctic and nitrate supplied vertically from the Subantarctic thermocline because of the distinctive relationships between the δ15N and concentration of nitrate in these two potential sources. Our Subantarctic samples, collected during the summer and fall, indicate that nitrate is supplied to the Subantarctic surface largely by northward transport of Antarctic surface water. Isotopic data from the Pacific sector of the Subantarctic suggest an isotope effect of 4.5‰, indistinguishable from the Antarctic estimates in this sector.

  15. Estimating economic value of agricultural water under changing conditions and the effects of spatial aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Harou, Julien J; Howitt, Richard E

    2010-11-01

    Given the high proportion of water used for agriculture in certain regions, the economic value of agricultural water can be an important tool for water management and policy development. This value is quantified using economic demand curves for irrigation water. Such demand functions show the incremental contribution of water to agricultural production. Water demand curves are estimated using econometric or optimisation techniques. Calibrated agricultural optimisation models allow the derivation of demand curves using smaller datasets than econometric models. This paper introduces these subject areas then explores the effect of spatial aggregation (upscaling) on the valuation of water for irrigated agriculture. A case study from the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo Basin in North Mexico investigates differences in valuation at farm and regional aggregated levels under four scenarios: technological change, warm-dry climate change, changes in agricultural commodity prices, and water costs for agriculture. The scenarios consider changes due to external shocks or new policies. Positive mathematical programming (PMP), a calibrated optimisation method, is the deductive valuation method used. An exponential cost function is compared to the quadratic cost functions typically used in PMP. Results indicate that the economic value of water at the farm level and the regionally aggregated level are similar, but that the variability and distributional effects of each scenario are affected by aggregation. Moderately aggregated agricultural production models are effective at capturing average-farm adaptation to policy changes and external shocks. Farm-level models best reveal the distribution of scenario impacts.

  16. 76 FR 70444 - Environmental Economics Advisory Committee Augmented for the Consideration of the Value of Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... AGENCY Environmental Economics Advisory Committee Augmented for the Consideration of the Value of Water... teleconference of the augmented SAB Environmental Economics Advisory Committee to provide early advice on the... that the Environmental Economics Advisory Committee Augmented for the Consideration of the Value...

  17. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  18. Surface water hydrology and the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Yang, K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Ryan, J.; Hubbard, A.; Tedesco, M.; Behar, A.

    2016-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet now exceeds 260 Gt/year, raising global sea level by >0.7 mm annually. Approximately two-thirds of this total mass loss is now driven by negative ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), attributed mainly to production and runoff of meltwater from the ice sheet surface. This new dominance of runoff as a driver of GrIS total mass loss will likely persist owing to anticipated further increases in surface melting, reduced meltwater storage in firn, and the waning importance of dynamical mass losses (ice calving) as the ice sheets retreat from their marine-terminating margins. It also creates the need and opportunity for integrative research pairing traditional surface water hydrology approaches with glaciology. As one example, we present a way to measure supraglacial "runoff" (i.e. specific discharge) at the supraglacial catchment scale ( 101-102 km2), using in situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge and high-resolution satellite/drone mapping of upstream catchment area. This approach, which is standard in terrestrial hydrology but novel for ice sheet science, enables independent verification and improvement of modeled SMB runoff estimates used to project sea level rise. Furthermore, because current SMB models do not consider the role of fluvial watershed processes operating on the ice surface, inclusion of even a simple surface routing model materially improves simulations of runoff delivered to moulins, the critical pathways for meltwater entry into the ice sheet. Incorporating principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology and into glaciological models will thus aid estimates of Greenland meltwater runoff to the global ocean as well as connections to subglacial hydrology and ice sheet dynamics.

  19. Assessing surface water availability considering human water use and projected climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Batool; AghaKouchak, Amir; Mousavi-Baygi, Mohammd; Moftakhari, Hamed; Anjileli, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Climate variability along with anthropogenic activities alter the hydrological cycle and local water availability. The overarching goal of this presentation is to demonstrate the compounding interactions between human water use/withdrawals and climate change and variability. We focus on Karkheh River basin and Urmia basin, in western Iran, that have high level of human activity and water use, and suffer from low water productivity. The future of these basins and their growth relies on sustainable water resources and hence, requires a holistic, basin-wide management to cope with water scarcity challenges. In this study, we investigate changes in the hydrology of the basin including human-induced alterations of the system, during the past three decades. Then, we investigate the individual and combined effects of climate variability and human water withdrawals on surface water storage in the 21st century. We use bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from ensemble mean of eleven General Circulation Models (GCMs) under two climate change scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. The results show that, hydrology of the studied basins are significantly dominated by human activities over the baseline period (1976 - 2005). Results show that the increased anthropogenic water demand resulting from substantial socio-economic growth in the past three decades have put significant stress on water resources. We evaluate a number of future water demand scenarios and their interactions with future climate projections. Our results show that by the end of the 21st century, the compounding effects of increased irrigation water demand and precipitation variability may lead to severe local water scarcity in these basins. Our study highlights the necessity for understanding and considering the compounding effects of human water use and future climate projections. Such studies would be useful for improving water management and developing adaption plans in water scarce regions.

  20. The Silica-Water Interface: How the Silanols Determine the Surface Acidity and Modulate the Water Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizi, Marialore; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-03-13

    Silica is the most abundant metal oxide and the main component of the Earth's crust. Its behavior in contact with water plays a critical role in a variety of geochemical and environmental processes. Despite its key role, the details of the aqueous silica interface at the microscopic molecular level are still elusive. Here we provide such a detailed understanding of the molecular behavior of the silica-water interface, using density functional theory based molecular dynamics (DFTMD) simulations, where a consistent treatment of the electronic structure of solvent and surface is provided. We have calculated the acidity of the silanol groups at the interface directly from the DFTMD simulations, without any fitting of parameters to the experimental data. We find two types of silanol groups at the surface of quartz: out-of-plane silanols with a strong acidic character (pKa = 5.6), which consequently results in the formation of strong and short hydrogen bonds with water molecules at the interface, and in-plane silanols with a pKa of 8.5, forming weak hydrogen bonds with the interfacial water molecules. Our estimate of the quartz point of zero charge (1.0) is found in good agreement with the experimental value of 1.9. We have also shown how the silanols orientation and their hydrogen bond properties are responsible for an amphoteric behavior of the surface. A detailed analysis has identified two species of adsorbed water molecules at the solid-liquid interface, which using the language of vibrational spectroscopy can be identified as "liquid-like" and "ice-like" water or, in other words, water molecules forming respectively weak and strong H-bonds with the oxide surface. These two populations of water are in turn responsible for two distinct peaks in the infrared spectrum of interfacial water and thus provide a molecular explanation of the experimental sum frequency generation spectrum recorded in the literature. In the specific case of quartz, we show that the liquid

  1. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R(2), RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  2. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R2, RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  3. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature

  4. Utilizing an Automated Home-Built Surface Plasmon Resonance Apparatus to Investigate How Water Interacts with a Hydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynor, Adele

    2011-03-01

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low- density region forms near the surface. We have employed an automated home-built Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) apparatus to investigate this boundary.

  5. Speciation of mercury in surface and deep-sea waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Logar, Martina; Fajon, Vesna; Zvonarić, Tomislav; Pirrone, Nicola

    A summary of data recently obtained for mercury analysis and speciation (reactive Hg, total Hg and monomethylmercury (MMHg)) in filtered and non-filtered seawater samples, dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) and dimethylmercury (DMHg) in open and coastal waters of the Mediterranean Sea is presented. The majority of the results were obtained during an oceanographic cruise aboard the research vessel Urania from 14 July to 9 August, 2000, as part of the MED-OCEANOR Project funded by the National Research Council of Italy. The results are compared with those obtained in contaminated coastal environments of the Adriatic (The Gulf of Trieste and Kaštela Bay) and non-contaminated coastal waters of the eastern Adriatic coast obtained in 1998. Total mercury concentrations in surface ocean waters are relatively low with an average of 0.81 pM (0.49-1.91 pM). Reactive Hg represents a substantial part with an average of 57% of total Hg (15-97%). Most mercury in open ocean waters was present in the dissolved form (32-95%, av. 70%), which is mainly due to the low abundance of particulate matter, a phenomenon well known for the Mediterranean open ocean waters. On average the percentage of Hg as MMHg was about 20%, of which about 66% was present in the dissolved form. The percentage of DGM in the surface ocean waters represents about 9% of total Hg (2.5-24.5%) and may originate from photochemical, biologically mediated mechanisms or diffusion from deeper layer either due to biological and/or to tectonic activity which is typical of the Mediterranean region. The presence of DMHg was confirmed only in waters below 20 m (up to 12 fM), while in surface waters DMHg was below the limit of detection (<0.1 fM). Surface concentrations of Hg in the eastern and western parts are comparable, except for DGM which shows significantly higher concentrations in the eastern part (mean value: 0.22 pM) as compared to the western Mediterranean (mean value: 0.09 pM). The distribution of Hg species with

  6. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, R W [Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)], E-mail: blake@zoology.ubc.ca

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ({approx}0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid prohibitive

  7. Towards Physarum robots: computing and manipulating on water surface

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium of Physarym polycephalum is an ideal biological substrate for implementing concurrent and parallel computation, including combinatorial geometry and optimization on graphs. We report results of scoping experiments on Physarum computing in conditions of minimal friction, on the water surface. We show that plasmodium of Physarum is capable for computing a basic spanning trees and manipulating of light-weight objects. We speculate that our results pave the pathways towards design and implementation of amorphous biological robots.

  8. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklu, Berhan M; Adriaanse, Paulien I; Ter Horst, Mechteld M S; Deneer, John W; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small stream and for two types of small ponds. Seven selected pesticides were selected since they were estimated to bear the highest risk to humans on the basis of volume of use, application rate and acute and chronic human toxicity, assuming exposure as a result of the consumption of surface water. Potential ecotoxicological risks were not considered as a selection criterion at this stage. Estimates of exposure concentrations in surface water were established using modelling software also applied in the EU registration procedure (PRZM and TOXSWA). Input variables included physico-chemical properties, and data such as crop calendars, irrigation schedules, meteorological information and detailed application data which were specifically tailored to the Ethiopian situation. The results indicate that for all the pesticides investigated the acute human risk resulting from the consumption of surface water is low to negligible, whereas agricultural use of chlorothalonil, deltamethrin, endosulfan and malathion in some crops may result in medium to high risk to aquatic species. The predicted environmental concentration estimates are based on procedures similar to procedures used at the EU level and in the USA. Addition of aquatic macrophytes as an ecotoxicological endpoint may constitute a welcome future addition to the risk assessment procedure. Implementation of the methods used for risk characterization constitutes a good step forward in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia.

  9. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa C Van Dijk

    Full Text Available Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001 between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051. However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l(-1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l(-1 (MTR seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified.

  10. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  11. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  12. Efficiency of silver nanoparticles against bacterial contaminants isolated from surface and ground water in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Dosoky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal efficiency of silver nanoparticles (AgNP was evaluated against bacteria isolated from surface and ground water samples in Egypt. The AgNP were synthesized by typical one-step synthesis protocol, and were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The bactericidal efficiency of AgNP was evaluated by its application in three concentrations i.e., 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 ppm to water sample, and allowed to interact with bacteria for different duration e.g., 5 min 15 min, 30 min, 1 h and 2 h. Then, the bactericidal efficiency of AgNPs was determined by comparing the counted bacteria before and after the treatments. Higher mean values of total bacterial count (TBC, total coliform count (TCC, and total streptococcal count (TFS were detected in surface water than in ground water. Also, the results showed that TBC, TCC and TFS exceeded permissible limits. Application of AgNP at different concentration, the number of bacteria in TBC was significantly reduced in all AgNP-exposed samples as compared to the control group (p<0.05. The highest concentration of AgNP exhibited highest bactericidal efficiency in TBC, where, after two hours, 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 mg/L AgNP was found to be sufficient to inhibit 91.85, 89.14 and 74.92%, and 92.33, 85.23 and 53.17% in TBC of surface and ground water, respectively. Moreover, the inhibition efficiency of the highest concentration (0.1 ppm against TCC reached to 98.10 and 99.88% in surface water and 95.54 and 99.20% in ground water after 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Similar results were found against TFS count. The AgNPs were found to be effective against bacteria of water origin.

  13. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feretti, Donatella; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gustavino, Bianca; Zerbini, Llaria; Zani, Claudia; Monarca, Silvano; Rizzoni, Marco

    2012-02-17

    Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L) and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L). These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia). No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  14. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  15. Water Protects Graphitic Surface from Airborne Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiting; Kozbial, Andrew; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh Jagadeesh; Salim, Muhammad; Amemiya, Shigeru; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-26

    The intrinsic wettability of graphitic materials, such as graphene and graphite, can be readily obscured by airborne hydrocarbon within 5-20 min of ambient air exposure. We report a convenient method to effectively preserve a freshly prepared graphitic surface simply through a water treatment technique. This approach significantly inhibits the hydrocarbon adsorption rate by a factor of ca. 20×, thus maintaining the intrinsic wetting behavior for many hours upon air exposure. Follow-up characterization shows that a nanometer-thick ice-like water forms on the graphitic surface, which remains stabilized at room temperature for at least 2-3 h and thus significantly decreases the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbon on the graphitic surface. This method has potential implications in minimizing hydrocarbon contamination during manufacturing, characterization, processing, and storage of graphene/graphite-based devices. As an example, we show that a water-treated graphite electrode maintains a high level of electrochemical activity in air for up to 1 day.

  16. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  17. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  18. A quantitative risk assessment for metals in surface water following the application of biosolids to grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel; Peyton, Dara; Healy, Mark G; Fenton, Owen; Cummins, Enda

    2016-10-01

    During episodic rainfall events, land application of treated municipal sludge ('biosolids') may give rise to surface runoff of metals, which may be potentially harmful to human health if not fully treated in a water treatment plant (WTP). This study used surface runoff water quality data generated from a field-scale study in which three types of biosolids (anaerobically digested (AD), lime stabilised (LS), and thermally dried (TD)) were spread on micro-plots of land and subjected to three rainfall events at time intervals of 24, 48 and 360h following application. Making the assumption that this water directly entered abstraction waters for a WTP without any grassed buffer zone being present, accounting for stream dilution, and modelling various performance scenarios within the WTP, the aim of this research was to conduct a human health risk assessment of metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr), which may still be present in drinking water after the WTP. Different dose-response relationships were characterised for the different metals with reference to the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) and the Hazard Quotient (HQ). The results for the LADD show that child exposure concentrations were highest for Cu when the measured surface runoff concentrations from the LS biosolids treatment were used as input into the model. The results for the HQ showed that of all the scenarios considered, Cu had the highest HQ for children. However, values were below the threshold value of risk (HQ<0.01 - no existing risk). Under the conditions monitored, metal concentrations in the biosolids applied to grassland were not considered to result in a risk to human health in surface water systems.

  19. Temporal aspects of surface water quality variation using robust statistical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adamu; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Juahir, Hafizan

    2012-01-01

    Robust statistical tools were applied on the water quality datasets with the aim of determining the most significance parameters and their contribution towards temporal water quality variation. Surface water samples were collected from four different sampling points during dry and wet seasons and analyzed for their physicochemical constituents. Discriminant analysis (DA) provided better results with great discriminatory ability by using five parameters with (P < 0.05) for dry season affording more than 96% correct assignation and used five and six parameters for forward and backward stepwise in wet season data with P-value (P < 0.05) affording 68.20% and 82%, respectively. Partial correlation results revealed that there are strong (r(p) = 0.829) and moderate (r(p) = 0.614) relationships between five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and chemical oxygen demand (COD), total solids (TS) and dissolved solids (DS) controlling for the linear effect of nitrogen in the form of ammonia (NH(3)) and conductivity for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Multiple linear regression identified the contribution of each variable with significant values r = 0.988, R(2) = 0.976 and r = 0.970, R(2) = 0.942 (P < 0.05) for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Repeated measure t-test confirmed that the surface water quality varies significantly between the seasons with significant value P < 0.05.

  20. Temporal Aspects of Surface Water Quality Variation Using Robust Statistical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust statistical tools were applied on the water quality datasets with the aim of determining the most significance parameters and their contribution towards temporal water quality variation. Surface water samples were collected from four different sampling points during dry and wet seasons and analyzed for their physicochemical constituents. Discriminant analysis (DA provided better results with great discriminatory ability by using five parameters with (P<0.05 for dry season affording more than 96% correct assignation and used five and six parameters for forward and backward stepwise in wet season data with P-value (P<0.05 affording 68.20% and 82%, respectively. Partial correlation results revealed that there are strong (rp=0.829 and moderate (rp=0.614 relationships between five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 and chemical oxygen demand (COD, total solids (TS and dissolved solids (DS controlling for the linear effect of nitrogen in the form of ammonia (NH3 and conductivity for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Multiple linear regression identified the contribution of each variable with significant values r = 0.988, R2 = 0.976 and r = 0.970, R2 = 0.942 (P<0.05 for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Repeated measure t-test confirmed that the surface water quality varies significantly between the seasons with significant value P<0.05.

  1. Water heating solar system using collector with polycarbonate absorber surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luiz Guilherme Meira de; Sodre, Dilton; Cavalcanti, Eduardo Jose Cidade; Souza, Luiz Guilherme Vieira Meira de; Mendes, Jose Ubiragi de Lima [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)], e-mails: lguilherme@dem.ufrn.br, diltonsodre@ifba.edu.br, ubiragi@ct.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    It is presented s solar collector to be used in a heating water for bath system, whose main characteristics are low cost and easy fabrication and assembly processes. The collector absorber surface consists of a polycarbonate plate with an area of 1.5 m{sup 2}. The water inlet and outlet are made of PVC 50mm, and were coupled to a 6mm thick polycarbonate plate using fiberglass resin. A 200 liters thermal reservoir will be used. This reservoir is also alternative. The absorber heating system works under thermo-siphon regimen. Thermal parameters will be evaluated to prove the feasibility of the studied solar heating system to obtain bath water for a four people family. (author)

  2. Evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; He, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the dynamic evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces with micropillars. Our experimental data showed that receding contact angles of the water droplet increased with the decreasing of the scale of the micropillars during evaporation, even though the solid area fractions of the microstructured substrates remained constant. We also experimentally found that the critical contact diameters of the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states are affected not only by the geometrical parameters of the microstructures, but also by the initial volume of the water droplet. The measured critical pressure is consistent with the theoretical model, which validated the pressure-induced impalement mechanism for the wetting state transition.

  3. Dynamic corona characteristics of water droplets on charged conductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zezhong; Chen, Shuiming; He, Jinliang

    2017-03-01

    The formation of the Taylor cone of a water droplet on the surface of the conductor in a line-ground electrode system is captured using a high-speed camera, while the corona current is synchronously measured using a current measurement system. Repeated Taylor cone deformation is observed, yielding regular groupings of corona current pulses. The underlying mechanism of this deformation is studied and the correlation between corona discharge characteristics and cone deformation is investigated. Depending on the applied voltage and rate of water supply, the Taylor cone may be stable or unstable and has a significant influence on the characteristics of the corona currents. If the rate of water supply is large enough, the Taylor cone tends to be unstable and generates corona-current pulses of numerous induced current pulses with low amplitudes. In consequence, this difference suggests that large rainfall results in simultaneously lower radio interference and higher corona loss.

  4. Modeling the impact of soil and water conservation on surface and ground water based on the SCS and Visual MODFLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Gao, Jian-en; Zhang, Shao-long; Zhang, Meng-jie; Li, Xing-hua

    2013-01-01

    Soil and water conservation measures can impact hydrological cycle, but quantitative analysis of this impact is still difficult in a watershed scale. To assess the effect quantitatively, a three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) with a surface runoff model-the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) were calibrated and applied based on the artificial rainfall experiments. Then, three soil and water conservation scenarios were simulated on the sand-box model to assess the effect of bare slope changing to grass land and straw mulching on water volume, hydraulic head, runoff process of groundwater and surface water. Under the 120 mm rainfall, 60 mm/h rainfall intensity, 5 m(2) area, 3° slope conditions, the comparative results indicated that the trend was decrease in surface runoff and increase in subsurface runoff coincided with the land-use converted from bare slope to grass land and straw mulching. The simulated mean surface runoff modulus was 3.64×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h in the bare slope scenario, while the observed values were 1.54×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h and 0.12×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h in the lawn and straw mulching scenarios respectively. Compared to the bare slope, the benefits of surface water reduction were 57.8% and 92.4% correspondingly. At the end of simulation period (T = 396 min), the simulated mean groundwater runoff modulus was 2.82×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h in the bare slope scenario, while the observed volumes were 3.46×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h and 4.91×10(-2) m(3)/m(2)/h in the lawn and straw mulching scenarios respectively. So the benefits of groundwater increase were 22.7% and 60.4% correspondingly. It was concluded that the soil and water conservation played an important role in weakening the surface runoff and strengthening the underground runoff. Meanwhile the quantitative analysis using a modeling approach could provide a thought for the study in a watershed scale to help decision-makers manage water resources.

  5. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    As of January 1, 1987, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 376 continuous streamflow, 76 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 34 gage height, 16 crest-stage partial-record, 8 periodic discharge through range, 33 floodhydrograph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record, 46 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 84 periodic biological, 17 lake surveys, 162 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 42 periodic pesticide, 19 automatic sampler, 141 periodic minor elements, 130 periodic chemical-quality, 78 periodic physical-organic, 22 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 22 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemical-quality or sediment'stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surfacewater stations.

  6. VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS FOR LIVESTOCK FEED PRODUCTION USING SALINE IRRIGATION DRAINAGE WATER IN TURKMENISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley JOHNSON

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation return flows increase the salt concentrations of receiving water bodies and cause water logging which affect agricultural productivity in Turkmenistan. Flooding irrigation drainage water using on natural pastures has also had adverse effects on the long-term productivity of desert ranges. This study examines the economics of halophytes as feed for sheep using saline irrigation water from drainage collector systems on a representative farm. Cost-benefit and rate of return analyses show that the project is economically feasible for reused water with 1400 mg/l mineralization levels or less. At higher mineral concentrations in water, or in more saline soils, bioremediation through halophyte fodder production can be profitably implemented if new market incentives exist. Value chain analysis is applied to evaluate alternative incentive systems for sheep operations based on saline water irrigated halophyte fodder production.

  7. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied...... properties. It was found that rapid exposition of pharmaceutical materials by water mist resulted in the improvement of powder technical properties. The evident changes in flowability of coarser lactose were obviously due to smoothing of particle surface and decreasing in the level of fines with very slight...... increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures...

  8. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures......The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied...... properties. It was found that rapid exposition of pharmaceutical materials by water mist resulted in the improvement of powder technical properties. The evident changes in flowability of coarser lactose were obviously due to smoothing of particle surface and decreasing in the level of fines with very slight...

  9. Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data Time Series for Flood Detection and Surface Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioresita, Filsa; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of environmental changes surface waters are undergoing changes in time and space. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface waters resources becomes essential to support sustainable policies and development activities. Especially because surface waters, are not only a vital sweet water resource, but can also pose hazards to human settlements and infrastructures through flooding. Floods are a highly frequent disaster in the world and can caused huge material losses. Detecting and mapping their spatial distribution is fundamental to ascertain damages and for relief efforts. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an effective way to monitor surface waters bodies over large areas since it provides excellent temporal coverage and, all-weather day-and-night imaging capabilities. However, emergent vegetation, trees, wind or flow turbulence can increase radar back-scatter returns and pose problems for the delineation of inundated areas. In such areas, passive remote sensing data can be used to identify vegetated areas and support the interpretation of SAR data. The availability of new Earth Observation products, for example Sentinel-1 (active) and Sentinel-2 (passive) imageries, with both high spatial and temporal resolution, have the potential to facilitate flood detection and monitoring of surface waters changes which are very dynamic in space and time. In this context, the research consists of two parts. In the first part, the objective is to propose generic and reproducible methodologies for the analysis of Sentinel-1 time series data for floods detection and surface waters mapping. The processing chain comprises a series of pre-processing steps and the statistical modeling of the pixel value distribution to produce probabilistic maps for the presence of surface waters. Images pre-processing for all Sentinel-1 images comprise the reduction SAR effect like orbit errors, speckle noise, and geometric effects. A modified

  10. Transient flow between aquifers and surface water: analytically derived field-scale hydraulic heads and fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. de Rooij

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of catchment-scale and basin-scale models of the hydrological cycle makes it desirable to have a simple, yet physically realistic model for lateral subsurface water flow. As a first building block towards such a model, analytical solutions are presented for horizontal groundwater flow to surface waters held at prescribed water levels for aquifers with parallel and radial flow. The solutions are valid for a wide array of initial and boundary conditions and additions or withdrawals of water, and can handle discharge into as well as lateral infiltration from the surface water. Expressions for the average hydraulic head, the flux to or from the surface water, and the aquifer-scale hydraulic conductivity are developed to provide output at the scale of the modelled system rather than just point-scale values. The upscaled conductivity is time-variant. It does not depend on the magnitude of the flux but is determined by medium properties as well as the external forcings that drive the flow. For the systems studied, with lateral travel distances not exceeding 10 m, the circular aquifers respond very differently from the infinite-strip aquifers. The modelled fluxes are sensitive to the magnitude of the storage coefficient. For phreatic aquifers a value of 0.2 is argued to be representative, but considerable variations are likely. The effect of varying distributions over the day of recharge damps out rapidly; a soil water model that can provide accurate daily totals is preferable over a less accurate model hat correctly estimates the timing of recharge peaks.

  11. Maximizing the economic value of irrigation water and achieving self sufficiency of main crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hosni

    2014-12-01

    Giving information on the economic value of water enable decision makers to take informed choices on water allocation to face the growing demands for all uses and drawing its sustainable future in agricultural and water policies. The current paper aims to assist decision makers in developing new cropping patterns considering the supply and demand aspects based on the efficient utilization of the water resources. It has proposed a cropping pattern which can increase the economic value of irrigation water from 0.88 LE/CM to 0.92 LE/CM. It can also decrease the gap between the national production and the imports, and increase self sufficiency of the main agricultural crops.

  12. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in s

  13. Application of composite protective coatings on the surface of sausages with different water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tyburcy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emulsion coatings on the surface of sausages counteract weight loss during storage. Therefore they could be applied instead of synthetic foils, which are used for vacuum packaging. The aim of this study was the assessment of the properties of two emulsion coatings (with different carrageenan content applied on the surface of two Polish sausages with various water content (kabanosy and frankfurterki. Material and methods. Sausages were coated with emulsions containing gelatine, kappa-carrageenan, beeswax, lard, glycerol and water. Coated and uncoated sausages were stored for 7, 14 or 21 days at the temperature of 4-6°C. After each storage period weight losses and hardness of peeled sausages, as well as colour values (L*, a*, b* and water activity of removed coatings were determined. Results. Coated sausages incurred smaller weight loss and after similar storage periods they were characterized by lower hardness in comparison with uncoated sausages. Reducing the carrageenan content decreased the consumption of emulsion for coating. However, it did not have any impact on the barrier properties of coating. Water activity of coatings decreased during storage. Their colour values also changed. Conclusions. Irrespective of water content in the sausages, emulsion coatings effectively inhibited their weight loss during storage. The coating with lower content of carrageenan could be recommended. Instability of coatings colour during storage implies the need of adding a colorant to the composition of emulsion.  

  14. Multiple sources of boron in urban surface waters and groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenmueller, Elizabeth A., E-mail: eahasenm@wustl.edu; Criss, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies attribute abnormal boron (B) levels in streams and groundwaters to wastewater and fertilizer inputs. This study shows that municipal drinking water used for lawn irrigation contributes substantial non-point loads of B and other chemicals (S-species, Li, and Cu) to surface waters and shallow groundwaters in the St. Louis, Missouri, area. Background levels and potential B sources were characterized by analysis of lawn and street runoff, streams, rivers, springs, local rainfall, wastewater influent and effluent, and fertilizers. Urban surface waters and groundwaters are highly enriched in B (to 250 μg/L) compared to background levels found in rain and pristine, carbonate-hosted streams and springs (< 25 μg/L), but have similar concentrations (150 to 259 μg/L) compared to municipal drinking waters derived from the Missouri River. Other data including B/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}−S and B/Li ratios confirm major contributions from this source. Moreover, sequential samples of runoff collected during storms show that B concentrations decrease with increased discharge, proving that elevated B levels are not primarily derived from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) during flooding. Instead, non-point source B exhibits complex behavior depending on land use. In urban settings B is rapidly mobilized from lawns during “first flush” events, likely representing surficial salt residues from drinking water used to irrigate lawns, and is also associated with the baseflow fraction, likely derived from the shallow groundwater reservoir that over time accumulates B from drinking water that percolates into the subsurface. The opposite occurs in small rural watersheds, where B is leached from soils by recent rainfall and covaries with the event water fraction. Highlights: ► Boron sources and loads differ between urban and rural watersheds. ► Wastewaters are not the major boron source in small St. Louis, MO watersheds. ► Municipal drinking water used for lawn

  15. Characterizing the Interaction between Groundwater and Surface Water in the Boise River for Water Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, J.; Tan, K.; Portugais, B.

    2014-12-01

    Management of water resources has increasingly become aware of the importance of considering groundwater and surface water as an interconnected, single resource. Surface water is commonly hydraulically connected to groundwater, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. Such a conjunctive approach has often been left out of water-management considerations because of a lack of understanding of the processes occurring. The goal of this research is to increase the better understanding of the interaction between the surface water and groundwater using the study case of the Treasure Valley Aquifer and the Boise River in Idaho, framed on water sustainability. Water-budgets for the Treasure Valley for the calendar years 1996 and 2000 suggest that the Boise River lost to the shallow aquifer almost 20 Hm3 and 95 Hm3, respectively, along the Lucky Peak to Capitol Bridge reach. Groundwater discharge occurred into the Boise River, along the Capitol Bridge to Parma reach, at about 645 Hm3 and 653 Hm3for the calendar years 1996 and 2000, respectively (USBR). These figures highlight the importance of better understanding of the water flow because of disparity, which would impact groundwater management practices. There is a need of better understanding of the groundwater-surface water interface for predicting responses to natural and human-induced stresses. A groundwater flow model was developed to compute the rates and directions of groundwater movement through aquifer and confining units in the subsurface. The model also provides a representation of the interaction that occurs between the Boise River and the shallow aquifer in the Treasure Valley. Work in progress on the general flow pattern allows assessing of the connectivity between shallow aquifer and river for helping understanding the impacts of groundwater extraction. Quantifying the interaction between the two freshwater sources would be beneficial in proper water management decisions in order to optimize

  16. Research on Haze Value of Wafer Surface%晶片表面Haze值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟才; 宋晶; 杨洪星; 赵权

    2011-01-01

    The Haze value of wafer surface is introduced from the definitions and theories based on the principle of SSIS. The Haze is explained as optical signals which can indirectly reflect the state of the wafer surface. The different materials and different surface were scanned by SSIS, and the effect of surface roughness and reflection coefficient on the Haze value and its distribution were studied. The results show that the Haze value of the same material increases with the increase of surface roughness, and the Haze value shows significant differences between different materials with similar roughness. Through the Analysis of the characteristics of scans, the relationship between Haze value distribution and the consistency of wafer surface state was studied. A new process feedback method for chemical mechanical polishing and wet cleaning process using Haze value was proposed.%介绍了晶片表面Haze值的定义和理论依据,通过对SSIS系统的原理分析,揭示了H aze是一种间接反映晶片表面状态的光学信号.通过对不同表面状态抛光片的光学扫描,研究了晶片表面粗糙度与Haze值的关系;通过对Si抛光片和砷化镓抛光片的扫描对比,研究了晶片本体反射系数对Haze值的影响.研究结果表明,同种材料的Haze值随着表面粗糙度的增大而增大,而不同的材料即使拥有相似的表面粗糙度,Haze值也会因本体反射系数的不同而呈现很大差异.通过对Haze扫描图的特征分析,研究了Haze值分布与晶片表面均匀性的关系,成功地利用Haze值分布将表面性状化,为化学机械抛光和湿法清洗工艺提供了一个新的反馈手段.

  17. In-situ surface wettability parameters of submerged in brackish water surfaces derived from captive bubble contact angle studies as indicators of surface condition level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, S. J.; Mazurek, A. Z.; Szczepanska, A.

    2013-06-01

    The characterization of wetting properties (by contact angles) of several undersea artificial (glass plates,) and natural (stones, sand layers, soft-bottom structures, aquatic macrophytes, sediments, and seafloor communities) solid substrata in the Baltic Sea brackish water (Gulf of Gdansk). The studies were performed under laboratory and field conditions using a novel captive bubble air-pipette computer microscope system. A set of the surface wettability parameters: the apparent surface free energy γSV, adhesive layer film pressure Π, work of adhesion WA, and work of spreading WS were determined to quantify the wetting properties of model substrata using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approach. The useful technique to measure in situ the contact angle giving reproducible and accurate values of CA turned out to be a captive bubble method, for fully hydrated interfacial layers of highly hydrophilic and porous nature met at seabed (Rodrigues-Valverde et al., 2002). CA measurements revealed mostly hydrophilic nature of the studied solid material (CA oil film covering lead to surface hydrophobization (CA↑, γSV ↓,WA↓, WS more negative). The adhesion of biofouling was correlated both with CAH and the dispersive interaction term γSVd of the total γSV. Monitoring of the artificial substrata of the hydrophilic nature with a CA technique can be used to observe the development of the organisms community i.e., microfouling, and to carry out a comprehensive study of surfaces of the submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton lucens in particular). Since aquatic macrophytes can act as bio-indicators of water chemistry their surface wettability may reflect plant surface erosion and organic matter accumulation state being of particular value in biological assessment of ecosystems status.

  18. Arctic Marine Water Isotope Characteristics: In-situ, Continuous Surface and Water Column Isoscapes (δ18O and δ2H) and Linkages into the Marine Food Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, J. M.; Klein, E. S.; Collins, E.; Iken, K.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Norcross, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic is under going rapid and profound sea ice, temperature, food web, ocean current, precipitation and synoptic weather changes. Delineating these changes requires a suite of tools, especially those that have the ability to depict the interactive nature of the marine system. Understanding the marine water isotope cycle is paramount to recognizing the unique isotopic properties of this region and to characterize possibly the reorganization of the Arctic. The Arctic marine water isotope system has been primarily examined with shore-based stations and or episodic station sampling; without continuous surface water sampling in combination with station-specific water column and organismic measurements. New technologies that allow in situ and continuous water isotope measurements (vapor and liquid) and the integration of inorganic and organic water isotope geochemistry provide a means to reveal in more detail the fundamental traits of the Arctic marine water isotope system. In July and August of 2016, we are measuring seawater surface (8 m depth) isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in-situ and continuously (Picarro CWS system) along a research transect (60oN to 77oN) from the Gulf of Alaska to the Arctic Ocean Basin. These continuous surface water isotope measurements are being combined with periodic water column isotope profiling and corresponding organic δ18O and δ2H measurements of pelagic and benthic organisms (microbes to fish) to depths of up to 2600m. We measured surface seawater δ18O that from -1‰ to -6‰; while seawater profiles followed vertical separation in the water column; possibly reflecting divergent currents of the Arctic. Station based δ18O and δ2H values of surface water did not vary by more than 1‰ δ18O over the course of our 24-36 hour sampling periods. The δ18O and δ2H values of marine organism throughout the water column and by trophic level will be analyzed and a seawater-food web model will be developed in addition to surface and water

  19. First Derivative UV Spectra of Surface Water as a Monitor of Chlorination in Drinking Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zitko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries require the presence of free chlorine at about 0.1 mg/l in their drinking water supplies. For various reasons, such as cast-iron pipes or long residence times in the distribution system, free chlorine may decrease below detection limits. In such cases it is important to know whether or not the water was chlorinated or if nonchlorinated water entered the system by accident. Changes in UV spectra of natural organic matter in lakewater were used to assess qualitatively the degree of chlorination in the treatment to produce drinking water. The changes were more obvious in the first derivative spectra. In lakewater, the derivative spectra have a maximum at about 280 nm. This maximum shifts to longer wavelengths by up to 10 nm, decreases, and eventually disappears with an increasing dose of chlorine. The water treatment system was monitored by this technique for over 1 year and changes in the UV spectra of water samples were compared with experimental samples treated with known amounts of chlorine. The changes of the UV spectra with the concentration of added chlorine are presented. On several occasions, water, which received very little or no chlorination, may have entered the drinking water system. The results show that first derivative spectra are potentially a tool to determine, in the absence of residual chlorine, whether or not surface water was chlorinated during the treatment to produce potable water.

  20. Calculation methods to assess the value of upstream water flows and storage as a function of downstream benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2002-01-01

    With the increasing scarcity of water resources, the issue of water valuation becomes one of the major keys for an efficient utilisation and allocation of water. The renewable and cyclic nature of water implies that analysing the value of water should be integrated with the whole water system rather

  1. Agricultural insecticides threaten surface waters at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Compared with nutrient levels and habitat degradation, the importance of agricultural pesticides in surface water may have been underestimated due to a lack of comprehensive quantitative analysis. Increasing pesticide contamination results in decreasing regional aquatic biodiversity, i.e., macroinvertebrate family richness is reduced by ∼30% at pesticide concentrations equaling the legally accepted regulatory threshold levels (RTLs). This study provides a comprehensive metaanalysis of 838 peer-reviewed studies (>2,500 sites in 73 countries) that evaluates, for the first time to our knowledge on a global scale, the exposure of surface waters to particularly toxic agricultural insecticides. We tested whether measured insecticide concentrations (MICs; i.e., quantified insecticide concentrations) exceed their RTLs and how risks depend on insecticide development over time and stringency of environmental regulation. Our analysis reveals that MICs occur rarely (i.e., an estimated 97.4% of analyses conducted found no MICs) and there is a complete lack of scientific monitoring data for ∼90% of global cropland. Most importantly, of the 11,300 MICs, 52.4% (5,915 cases; 68.5% of the sites) exceeded the RTL for either surface water (RTLSW) or sediments. Thus, the biological integrity of global water resources is at a substantial risk. RTLSW exceedances depend on the catchment size, sampling regime, and sampling date; are significantly higher for newer-generation insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids); and are high even in countries with stringent environmental regulations. These results suggest the need for worldwide improvements to current pesticide regulations and agricultural pesticide application practices and for intensified research efforts on the presence and effects of pesticides under real-world conditions. PMID:25870271

  2. The Value of Risk Pooling for Mitigating Water Utility Financial Risks Arising From Water Scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, R.; Characklis, G. W.; Hughes, J.; Eskaf, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water utilities across the United States face growing supply risks as demand growth and extreme weather events make water scarcity more common. As it has become more difficult and expensive to build new supply capacity to accommodate these events, many utility managers respond by either imposing conservation measures, which reduces revenues, or acquiring additional water from other sources, which increases costs. These actions lead to changing financial trends that are difficult to predict and that utilities are currently ill-equipped to manage. As a result, adaptation strategies and tools are being developed to reduce utility vulnerabilities, ensuring both financial stability and continued access to low cost financing, a critical consideration for a capital intensive industry. Previous work in this area has involved the development of utility specific financial hedging tools. However, the time and informational requirements associated with developing these individualized strategies may be a limiting factor for widespread implementation. The objective of this research is to develop more generalized hedging instruments that can be applied simultaneously to multiple utilities across the United States, thereby increasing the potential for widespread implementation. This work first analyzes the financial risks of water scarcity for a large set of water utilities across the country and then proposes a financial hedging solution to mitigate these risks through hydrologic index-based financial insurance. Results provide insights into the most effective indices, the potential for risk pooling to reduce insurance costs, and the performance of these contracts in managing utility financial risk arising from drought.

  3. Metals in bulk deposition and surface waters at two upland locations in northern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, A J; Tipping, E

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of aluminium and minor metals (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba, Pb) were measured in precipitation and surface water at two upland locations (Upper Duddon Valley, UDV; Great Dun Fell, GDF) in northern England for 1 year commencing April 1998. At both locations, the loads in bulk precipitation were at the lower ends of ranges reported for other rural and remote sites, for the period 1985-1995. The deposited metals were mostly in the dissolved form, and their concentrations tended to be greatest when rainfall volumes were low. The concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb in deposition were correlated (r2 > or = 0.40) with concentrations of non-marine sulphate. Three streams, ranging in mean pH from 5.07 to 7.07, and with mean concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) waters at each location, and temporal variations in individual waters, can be explained qualitatively in terms of sorption to solid-phase soil organic matter and mineral surfaces, complexation and transport by DOC, and chemical weathering. The UDV catchments are sinks for Pb and sources of Al, Mn, Sr, Cd and Ba. The GDF catchments are sources of Al, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sr, Cd and Ba. Other metals measured at the two locations are approximately in balance. Comparison of metal:silicon ratios in the surface waters with values for silicate rocks indicates enrichment of Ni and Cu, and substantial enrichment of Zn, Cd and Pb. These enrichments, together with high metal deposition in the past, make it likely that concentrations of the metals in the surface waters are governed by release from catchment pools of atmospherically-deposited metal. The catchments appear to be responding on a time scale of decades, possibly centuries, to changes in metal deposition. For the more acid waters at UDV, the calculated free-ion concentrations of Al are similar to published LC50 values for acute toxicity towards fish. The free-ion concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd in all the surface waters are one-to-four orders of

  4. Assessing the Total Economic Value of Improving Water Quality to Inform Water Resources Management: Evidence and Challenges from Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, S.; Fukushi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Population growth, high rates of economic development and rapid urbanization in the developing countries of Southeast Asia (SEA) have resulted in degradation and depletion of natural resources, including water resources and related ecosystem services. Many urban rivers in the region are highly polluted with domestic, industrial and agricultural wastes. Policymakers are often aware of the direct value of water resources for domestic and industrial consumption, but they often underestimate the indirect value of these functions, since they are not exchanged in the market and do not appear in national income accounts. Underestimation of pollution and over-exploitation of water resources result in a loss of these benefits and have adverse impacts on nearby residents, threatening the long-term sustainable development of natural resources in the region. Behind these constraints lies a lack of knowledge (ignorance) from governments that a clean water environment could bring significant economic benefits. This study has been initiated to tackle this issue and to foster a more rational approach for sustainable urban development in Metro Manila in the Philippines. We applied a Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) based on Computer-Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI) technique. Results show that users are willing to pay up to PHP 102.42 (2.18) monthly to improve quality of urban waterbodies whereas nonusers are willing to pay up to PHP 366.53 (7.80) as one-time payment towards water quality improvement. The estimated monetary value of water quality improvements would be a useful variable in cost-benefit analyses of various water quality-related policies, in both public and private sectors in Metro Manila. This survey design could serve as a useful template for similar water quality studies in other SEA countries.

  5. Removal of selenium species from waters using various surface-modified natural particles and waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Nevzat O.; Tozum, Seda [Department of Environmental Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    Waste red mud and natural pumice/volcanic slag particles were surface modified and their selenium adsorption from waters was investigated. Acid activation/heat treatment of original red mud (ORM) particles significantly increased their micropore and external surface area and cumulative volume of pores. Iron oxide coating of pumice/slags and acid activation of ORM decreased their pH{sub pzc} values and increased surface acidity. Selenite/selenate adsorption on iron oxide surfaces and acid activated red mud (AARM) was very fast with approximately first-order adsorption kinetics. Iron oxide coating of pumice/slag and acid activation of ORM particles significantly enhanced their selenite and selenate uptakes. Maximum Se adsorption capacities as high as 6.3 (mg Se/g adsorbent) were obtained by AARM. The extent of selenate uptakes by the surface modified particles was generally lower than those of selenite. Due to competition among Se species and other background water matrix for iron oxide adsorption sites, reduced selenite/selenate uptakes were found in natural water compared to single solute tests. Higher Se uptakes by iron oxide surfaces were found at pH 7.5 compared to pH 8.9, due to increased electrostatic repulsion among iron oxides and Se species at higher pH. The most effective adsorbents among the tested 17 different particles for Se uptake were AARM and iron oxide coated pumice. Se concentrations less than drinking water standards (5-10 {mu}g/L) can be achieved by these particles. These low-cost, natural, or recyclable waste particles appear to be promising adsorbents for Se removal after their surface modification. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Liquid Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saykally, Richard

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a new experiment for probing molecular details of liquid-vapor interfaces of volatile substances and their solutions under equilibrium conditions. Electronic and geometric structures of interfacial molecules are probed by EXAFS and NEXAFS methods in the soft X-ray region, using the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA. Liquids are introduced into a high vacuum environment through the use of liquid microjets, which have been characterized independently by Raman spectroscopy. Detection of ions and electrons produced by the Auger avalanche probe the bulk and surface regions of the microjet, respectively, as a result of their different escape depths. Our first efforts involved a comparative study of the interfaces of water and methanol, wherein we detailed the first observation of surface relaxation for a liquid. Analysis of EXAFS data yielded a 6distance at the water interface, whereas a 5was found for methanol. NEXAFS measurements, interpreted in terms of density functional theory simulations, indicate a large population of interfacial water molecules having two free OH bonds ("acceptor only molecules"). This complements the "single donor" species identified in sum frequency generation experiments. These results are supported by recent theoretical calculations. For methanol and other simple alcohols, the data indicate that free alkyl groups extend into the vapor part of the interface. Preliminary results for aqueous solutions, as well as for other pure liquids, have been obtained and are presently under analysis. REFERENCES 1. K.R. Wilson, R.D. Schaller, B.S. Rude, T. Catalano, D.T. Co, J.D. Bozek, and R.J. Saykally, "Surface relaxation in liquid water and methanol studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy," J. Chem. Phys 117,7738(2002). 2. K.R. Wilson, M. Cavalleri, B.S. Rude, R.D. Schaller, A. Nilsson, L.G.M. Pettersson, N. Goldman, T. Catalano, J.D. Bozek, and R.J. Saykally, "Characterization of hydrogen bond acceptor molecules at the water surface

  7. Automated Subpixel Surface Water Mapping from Heterogeneous Urban Environments Using Landsat 8 OLI Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xie

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water bodies are a fundamental element of urban ecosystems, and water mapping is critical for urban and landscape planning and management. Remote sensing has increasingly been used for water mapping in rural areas; however, when applied to urban areas, this spatially- explicit approach is a challenging task due to the fact that the water bodies are often of a small size and spectral confusion is common between water and the complex features in the urban environment. Water indexes are the most common method of water extraction at the pixel level. More recently, spectral mixture analysis (SMA has been widely employed in analyzing the urban environment at the subpixel level. The objective of this study is to develop an automatic subpixel water mapping method (ASWM which can achieve a high accuracy in urban areas. Specifically, we first apply a water index for the automatic extraction of mixed land-water pixels, and the pure water pixels that are generated in this process are exported as the final result. Secondly, the SMA technique is applied to the mixed land-water pixels for water abundance estimation. As for obtaining the most representative endmembers, we propose an adaptive iterative endmember selection method based on the spatial similarity of adjacent ground surfaces. One classical water index method (the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI, a pixel-level target detection method (constrained energy minimization (CEM, and two widely used SMA methods (fully constrained least squares (FCLS and multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA were chosen for the water mapping comparison in the experiments. The results indicate that the proposed ASWM was able to detect water pixels more efficiency than other unsupervised water extraction methods, and the water fractions estimated by the proposed ASWM method correspond closely to the reference fractions with the slopes of 0.97, 1.02, 1.04, and 0.98 and the R-squared values of 0

  8. The interplay of snow, surface water, and groundwater reservoirs for integrated water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S.; Huntington, J.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in climate, growth in population and economy have increased the reliance on groundwater to augment supplies of surface water across the world, and especially the Western United States. Martis Valley, a high altitude, snow dominated watershed in the Sierra Nevada, California has both surface (river/reservoir) and groundwater resources that are utilized to meet demands within the valley. The recent drought and changing precipitation type (less snow, more rain) has stressed the regional surface water supply and has increased the reliance on groundwater pumping. The objective of this paper is to quantify how changes in climate and depletion of snow storage result in decreased groundwater recharge and increased groundwater use, and to assess if increased surface water storage can mitigate impacts to groundwater under historic and future climate conditions. These objectives require knowledge on the spatiotemporal distribution of groundwater recharge, discharge, and surface and groundwater interactions. We use a high resolution, physically-based integrated surface and groundwater model, GSFLOW, to identify key mechanisms that explain recent hydrologic changes in the region. The model was calibrated using a multi-criteria approach to various historical observed hydrologic fluxes (streamflow and groundwater pumping) and states (lake stage, groundwater head, snow cover area). Observations show that while groundwater use in the basin has increased significantly since the 1980's, it still remains a relatively minor component of annual consumptive water use. Model simulations suggest that changes from snow to rain will lead to increases in Hortonian and Dunnian runoff, and decreases in groundwater recharge and discharge to streams, which could have a greater impact on groundwater resources than increased pumping. These findings highlight the necessity of an integrated approach for evaluating natural and anthropogenic impacts on surface and groundwater resources.

  9. A review of heterogeneous photocatalysis for water and surface disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John Anthony; Dunlop, Patrick Stuart Morris; Hamilton, Jeremy William John; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Polo-López, Inmaculada; Sharma, Preetam Kumar; Vennard, Ashlene Sarah Margaret

    2015-03-30

    Photo-excitation of certain semiconductors can lead to the production of reactive oxygen species that can inactivate microorganisms. The mechanisms involved are reviewed, along with two important applications. The first is the use of photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water. It is estimated that 750 million people do not have accessed to an improved source for drinking and many more rely on sources that are not safe. If one can utilize photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water and provide an inexpensive, simple method of water disinfection, then it could help reduce the risk of waterborne disease. The second application is the use of photocatalytic coatings to combat healthcare associated infections. Two challenges are considered, i.e., the use of photocatalytic coatings to give "self-disinfecting" surfaces to reduce the risk of transmission of infection via environmental surfaces, and the use of photocatalytic coatings for the decontamination and disinfection of medical devices. In the final section, the development of novel photocatalytic materials for use in disinfection applications is reviewed, taking account of materials, developed for other photocatalytic applications, but which may be transferable for disinfection purposes.

  10. Surface Towed CSEM Systems for Shallow Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, J.; Constable, S.; Kannberg, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a low-power, surface towed electric dipole-dipole system suitable for mapping seafloor geology in shallow water and deployable from small boats. The transmitter is capable of up to 50 amps output using 12 VDC from a 110/240 VAC power supply, and can generate an arbitrary GPS stabilized ternary waveform. Transmitter antennas are typically 50 to 100 m long. Receivers are built around the standard Scripps seafloor electrode, amplifier, and logging systems but housed in floating PVC cases and equipped with GPS timing and positioning, pitch/roll/heading sensors, and accelerometers. Receiver dipoles are 1.5 m long rigid booms held 1 m below the surface. As with the Scripps deep-towed Vulcan system, rigid antennas are used to avoid noise associated with flexible antennas moving across Earth's magnetic field. The tow cable is a simple floating rope up to 1000 m long. Water depth and conductivity are sampled continuously in order to provide constraints for apparent resistivity calculations and inversion, and moored seafloor recorders can be used to extend transmitter/receiver offsets. The entire system can be air freighted and transported in one utility vehicle. We will present results from a study to map permafrost in shallow water off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

  11. WATER ICE AT THE SURFACE OF THE HD 100546 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, M. [Department of Physics, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011 (Japan); Kudo, T.; Terada, H.; Takato, N. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Takatsuki, S.; Nakamoto, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inoue, A. K. [College of General Education, Osaka Sangyo University, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Fukagawa, M.; Tamura, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We made near-infrared multicolor imaging observations of a disk around Herbig Be star HD 100546 using Gemini/NICI. K (2.2 μm), H{sub 2}O ice (3.06 μm), and L′ (3.8 μm) disk images were obtained and we found a 3.1 μm absorption feature in the scattered light spectrum, likely due to water ice grains at the disk surface. We compared the observed depth of the ice absorption feature with the disk model based on Oka et al., including the water ice photodesorption effect by stellar UV photons. The observed absorption depth can be explained by both the disk models with and without the photodesorption effect within the measurement accuracy, but the model with photodesorption effects is slightly more favored, implying that the UV photons play an important role in the survival/destruction of ice grains at the Herbig Ae/Be disk surface. Further improvement to the accuracy of the observations of the water ice absorption depth is needed to constrain the disk models.

  12. Global Occurrence and Emission of Rotaviruses to Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M. Kiulia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses (RV are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children globally. Waterborne transmission of RV and the presence of RV in water sources are of major public health importance. In this paper, we present the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for RV (GloWPa-Rota model to estimate the global distribution of RV emissions to surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first model to do so. We review the literature to estimate three RV specific variables for the model: incidence, excretion rate and removal during wastewater treatment. We estimate total global RV emissions to be 2 × 1018 viral particles/grid/year, of which 87% is produced by the urban population. Hotspot regions with high RV emissions are urban areas in densely populated parts of the world, such as Bangladesh and Nigeria, while low emissions are found in rural areas in North Russia and the Australian desert. Even for industrialized regions with high population density and without tertiary treatment, such as the UK, substantial emissions are estimated. Modeling exercises like the one presented in this paper provide unique opportunities to further study these emissions to surface water, their sources and scenarios for improved management.

  13. A Review of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis for Water and Surface Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Anthony Byrne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Photo-excitation of certain semiconductors can lead to the production of reactive oxygen species that can inactivate microorganisms. The mechanisms involved are reviewed, along with two important applications. The first is the use of photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water. It is estimated that 750 million people do not have accessed to an improved source for drinking and many more rely on sources that are not safe. If one can utilize photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water and provide an inexpensive, simple method of water disinfection, then it could help reduce the risk of waterborne disease. The second application is the use of photocatalytic coatings to combat healthcare associated infections. Two challenges are considered, i.e., the use of photocatalytic coatings to give “self-disinfecting” surfaces to reduce the risk of transmission of infection via environmental surfaces, and the use of photocatalytic coatings for the decontamination and disinfection of medical devices. In the final section, the development of novel photocatalytic materials for use in disinfection applications is reviewed, taking account of materials, developed for other photocatalytic applications, but which may be transferable for disinfection purposes.

  14. Diagnostic value of 3 D CT surface reconstruction in spinal fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dietrich, K. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Steinecke, R. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Kloeppel, R. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Schulz, H.G. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic value of three-dimensional (3 D) CT surface reconstruction in spinal fractures in comparison with axial and reformatted images. A total of 50 patients with different CT-proven spinal fractures were analysed retrospectively. Based on axial scans and reformatted images, the spinal fractures were classified according to several classifications as Magerl for the thoraco-lumbar and lower cervical spine by one radiologist. Another radiologist performed 3 D CT surface reconstructions with the aim of characterizing the different types of spinal fractures. A third radiologist classified the 3 D CT surface reconstruction according to the Magerl classification. The results of the blinded reading process were compared. It was checked to see in which type and subgroup 3 D surface reconstructions were helpful. Readers one and two obtained the same results in the classification. The 3 D surface reconstruction did not yield any additional diagnostic information concerning type A and B injuries. Indeed, the full extent of the fracture could be easier recognized with axial and reformatted images in all cases. In 10 cases of C injuries, the dislocation of parts of vertebrae could be better recognized with the help of 3 D reconstructions. A 3 D CT surface reconstruction is only useful in rotational and shear vertebral injuries (Magerl type C injury). (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Trigger values for investigation of hormonal activity in drinking water and its sources using CALUX bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Walter; de Jongh, Cindy M; van der Linden, Sander C; Mennes, Wim; Puijker, Leo M; van Leeuwen, Cornelis J; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-05-01

    To screen for hormonal activity in water samples, highly sensitive in vitro CALUX bioassays are available which allow detection of estrogenic (ERα), androgenic (AR), progestagenic (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) activities. This paper presents trigger values for the ERα, AR, PR, and GR CALUX bioassays for agonistic hormonal activities in (drinking) water, which define a level above which human health risk cannot be waived a priori and additional examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted. The trigger values are based on 1) acceptable or tolerable daily intake (ADI/TDI) values of specific compounds, 2) pharmacokinetic factors defining their bioavailability, 3) estimations of the bioavailability of unknown compounds with equivalent hormonal activity, 4) relative endocrine potencies, and 5) physiological, and drinking water allocation factors. As a result, trigger values of 3.8ng 17β-estradiol (E2)-equivalents (eq)/L, 11ng dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-eq/L, 21ng dexamethasone (DEX)-eq/L, and 333ng Org2058-eq/L were derived. Benchmark Quotient (BQ) values were derived by dividing hormonal activity in water samples by the derived trigger using the highest concentrations detected in a recent, limited screening of Dutch water samples, and were in the order of (value) AR (0.41)>ERα (0.13)>GR (0.06)>PR (0.04). The application of trigger values derived in the present study can help to judge measured agonistic hormonal activities in water samples using the CALUX bioassays and help to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity followed by a subsequent safety evaluation may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority with respect to health concerns in the human population. For instance, at one specific drinking water production site ERα and AR (but no GR and PR) activities were detected in drinking water, however, these levels are at least a factor 83 smaller than the respective trigger values, and

  16. Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water

    CERN Document Server

    Rousseaux, Germain; Mathis, Christian; Coullet, Pierre; Philbin, Thomas G; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered, in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity [R. Schuetzhold and W. G. Unruh W G, Phys. Rev. D 66 (2002) 044019]. A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/long wavelength case kh>>1 where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

  17. Engineering Extreme Hydrophobic and Super Slippery Water Shedding Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Glen

    2017-04-01

    The intrinsic water repellency of a material is fundamentally determined by its surface chemistry, but alone this does not determine the ability of a surface to shed water. Physical factors such as the surface texture/topography, rigidity/flexibility, granularity/porosity combined with the intrinsic wetting properties of the liquid with the surface and whether it is infused by a lubricating liquid are equally important. In this talk I will outline fundamental, but simple, ideas on the topographic enhancement of surface chemistry to create superhydrophobicity, the adhesion of particles to liquid-air interfaces to create liquid marbles, elastocapillarity to create droplet wrapping, and lubricant impregnated surfaces to create completely mobile droplets [1-3]. I will discuss how these ideas have their origins in natural systems and surfaces, such as Lotus leaves, galling aphids and the Nepenthes pitcher plant. I will show how we have applied these concepts to study the wetting of granular systems, such as sand, to understand extreme soil water repellency. I will argue that relaxing the assumption that a solid substrate is fixed in shape and arrangement, can lead to the formation of liquid marbles, whereby a droplet self-coats in a hydrophobic powder/grains. I will show that the concepts of wetting and porosity blur as liquids penetrate into a porous or granular substrate. I will also discuss how lubricant impregnated super slippery surfaces can be used to study a pure constant contact angle mode of droplet evaporation [4]. Finally, I will show dewetting of a surface is not simply a video reversal of wetting [5], and I will give an example of the use of perfect hydrophobicity using the Leidenfrost effect to create a new type of low friction mechanical and hear engine [6]. References: [1] Shirtcliffe, N. J., et al., An introduction to superhydrophobicity. Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 161, pp.124-138 (2010). [2] McHale, G. & Newton, M. I. Liquid

  18. High prevalence of enteric viruses in untreated individual drinking water sources and surface water in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Andrej; Torkar, Karmen Godič; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Poljšak-Prijatelj, Mateja

    2011-09-01

    Waterborne infections have been shown to be important in outbreaks of gastroenteritis throughout the world. Although improved sanitary conditions are being progressively applied, fecal contaminations remain an emerging problem also in developed countries. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of fecal contaminated water sources in Slovenia, including surface waters and groundwater sources throughout the country. In total, 152 water samples were investigated, of which 72 samples represents groundwater from individual wells, 17 samples from public collection supplies and 63 samples from surface stream waters. Two liters of untreated water samples were collected and concentrated by the adsorption/elution technique with positively charged filters followed by an additional ultracentrifugation step. Group A rotaviruses, noroviruses (genogroups I and II) and astroviruses were detected with real-time RT-PCR method in 69 (45.4%) out of 152 samples collected, of which 31/89 (34.8%) drinking water and 38/63 (60.3%) surface water samples were positive for at least one virus tested. In 30.3% of drinking water samples group A rotaviruses were detected (27/89), followed by noroviruses GI (2.2%; 2/89) and astroviruses (2.2%; 2/89). In drinking groundwater samples group A rotaviruses were detected in 27 out of 72 tested samples (37.5%), genogroup I noroviruses in two (2.8%), and human astroviruses in one (1.4%) samples. In surface water samples norovirus genogroup GII was the most frequently detected (41.3%; 26/63), followed by norovirus GI (33.3%; 21/63), human astrovirus (27.0%; 17/63) and group A rotavirus (17.5%; 11/63). Our study demonstrates relatively high percentage of groundwater contamination in Slovenia and, suggests that raw groundwater used as individual drinking water supply may constitute a possible source of enteric virus infections. In the future, testing for enteric viruses should be applied for drinking water sources in waterborne outbreaks.

  19. Radiological impact of surface water and sediment near uranium mining sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, K; Stojanovska, Z; Badulin, V; Kunovska, B; Yovcheva, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the radiological impact of surface water and sediment around uranium mining sites 20 years after their closing. The areas under observations are 31 former classical underground uranium mining and exploratory sites in Bulgaria, named as objects. The extraction and processing of uranium ores in the Republic of Bulgaria were ended in 1992. To assess the radiological impact of radionuclides field expeditions were performed to sample water and bottom sediment. The migration of uranium through surface water was examined as one of the major pathways for contamination spread. The range of uranium concentration in water flowing from the mining sites was from 0.012 to 6.8 mgU l(-1) with a geometric mean of 0.192 mgU l(-1). The uranium concentrations in water downstream the mining sites were approximately 3 times higher than the background value (upstream). The concentrations of Unat, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (232)Th in the sediment of downstream river were higher than those upstream by 3.4, 2.6, 2, and 1.7 times, respectively. The distribution coefficient of uranium reflects its high mobility in most of the sites. In order to evaluate the impact on people as well as site prioritization for more detailed assessment and water management, screening dose assessments were done.

  20. The Function and Value of Water Conservation of Forest Ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve of Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Gongbo Nature Reserve, located in Nyingchi of Tibet, is by far the largest construction project of forest reserves that China approves and invests in. This article adopts the shadow project method, and estimates the water conservation function of forest ecosystem of Gongbo Nature Reserve based on the Specifications for Assessment of Forest Ecosystem Services in China promulgated by State Forestry Administration of China. The results show that the total value of water conservation of forest ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve is 8.485 billion yuan, while the function of water conservation is a small fraction of ecological service function, indicating that there is great ecological value in service function of forest ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve, that is, Gongbo Nature Reserve has vital ecological value.

  1. Surface-water hydrology and runoff simulations for three basins in Pierce County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Creek Basin model and the Clear-Clarks Basin model-by incorporating the generalizations of the conceptual model into the construction of two HSPF numerical models. Initially, the process-related parameters for runoff from glacial-till hillslopes were calibrated with numerical models for three catchment sites and one headwater basin where streamflows were continuously measured and little or no influence from ground water, channel storage, or channel losses affected runoff. At one of the catchments soil moisture was monitored and compared with simulated soil moisture. The values for these parameters were used in the basin models. Basin models were calibrated to the first year of observed streamflow data by adjusting other parameters in the numerical model that simulated channel losses, simulated channel storage in a few of the reaches in the headwaters and in the floodplain of the main stem of Clover Creek, and simulated volume and outflow of the ground-water reservoir representing the regional ground-water aquifers. The models were run for a second year without any adjustments, and simulated results were compared with observed results as a measure of validation of the models. The investigation showed the importance of defining the ground-water flow boundaries and demonstrated a simple method of simulating the influence of the regional ground-water aquifer on streamflows. In the Clover Creek Basin model, ground-water flow boundaries were used to define subbasins containing mostly glacial outwash soils and not containing any surface drainage channels. In the Clear-Clarks Basin model, ground-water flow boundaries outlined a recharge area outside the surface-water boundaries of the basin that was incorporated into the model in order to provide sufficient water to balance simulated ground-water outflows to the creeks. A simulated ground-water reservoir used to represent regional ground-water flow processes successfully provided the proper water balance of inflows and outfl

  2. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  3. Heavy metal contamination, sources, and pollution assessment of surface water in the Tianshan Mountains of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoyong, Zhang; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Fengqing, Jiang

    2015-02-01

    In order to gain insight into heavy metal contamination occurring in the surface water of the Tianshan Mountains in northwest China, we collected surface water samples from there, tested heavy metals Pb, Ni, Cd, Co, Hg, As, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Cr, and then we analyzed the data using typical analysis, multivariate statistical, and pollution index methods. Results showed that (1) the order of the average values of the ten kinds of heavy metals in all the water samples was as follows: Zn > Mn > Cu > Co > Ni > Pb > Cr > As > Hg > Cd. The maximum variation coefficients of Zn and Pb were 138.96 and 145.86 %, respectively, indicating that these heavy metal concentrations varied largely between different sampling locations. (2) Research showed the average concentrations of Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Zn, and Cr were all within the national surface water standard of class IV and those of As, Cu, Mn, and Cr were all within the range of the Drinking Water Guidelines from the WHO, indicating the surface water of the Tianshan Mountains is clean. (3) Multivariate statistical analysis showed that Cu, Cd, Mn, Hg, Zn, and Pb have close correlations, and they mainly came from artificial sources; while Ni, As, Co, Cu, and Cr mainly came from natural sources. The results of correlation analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis are consistent. (4) Pollution evaluation showed the values of comprehensive pollution index (WQI) of ten kinds of heavy metals in three sections were all lower than 2, suggesting the low levels of pollution, while the over-limit ratios of Pb and Zn in water samples of the middle Urumqi-Akesu section, As in the western Zhaosu-Tekesi section, and Pb, Hg, and Zn in the eastern Balikun-Yiwu section were all above 10 %. This research shows that recent economic development of the Tianshan Mountains has negatively influenced the heavy metal concentrations in the surface water, although the concentrations of the ten kinds of tested

  4. Kd Values for Agricultural and Surface Soils for Use in Hanford Site Farm, Residential, and River Shoreline Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-08-01

    This report provides best estimate Kd values and a minimum and maximum range of Kd values to be used for agricultural soils and Columbia River bank sediments that exist today or would exist in the future when portions of the Hanford Site are released for farming, residential, and recreational use after the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) completes clean up of defense waste on the site. The Kd values should be used to determine the fate and transport rates of contaminants and their availability for plant and animal uptake in selected non-groundwater scenarios included in Hanford Site environmental impact statements, risk assessments and specific facility performance assessments. This report describes scenarios such as a small farm where drilling of a well inadvertently goes through buried waste and brings waste to the surface, allowing the tailings to become available for direct human exposure or incorporation into garden crops and farm animals used for food by the farm family. The Kd values recommended in this report can also be used to calculate sediment-water partitioning factors used to predict plant and animal uptake from interaction with the contaminated soil.

  5. Water on titanium dioxide surface: a revisiting by reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangliang; Gubbins, Keith E; Li, Licheng; Lu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-16

    The behavior of surface water, especially the adsorption and dissociation characteristics, is a key to understanding and promoting photocatalytic and biomedical applications of titanium dioxide materials. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the ReaxFF force field, we study the interactions between water and five different TiO2 surfaces that are of interest to both experiments and theoretical calculations. The results show that TiO2 surfaces demonstrate different reactivities for water dissociation [rutile (011) > TiO2-B (100) > anatase (001) > rutile (110)], and there is no water dissociation observed on the TiO2-B (001) surface. The simulations also reveal that the water dissociation and the TiO2 surface chemistry change, and the new surface Ti-OH and O-H functional groups affect the orientation of other near-surface water molecules. On the reactive surface, such as the rutile (110) surface, water dissociated and formed new Ti-OH and O-H bonds on the surface. Those functional groups enhanced the hydrogen bond networking with the near-surface water molecules and their configurations. On the nonreactive TiO2-B (001) surface where no molecular or dissociative water adsorption is observed, near-surface water can also form hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of TiO2, but their distance to the surface is longer than that on the rutile (011) surface.

  6. The Kinect as a low cost high resolution small scale LiDAR for water surface and shallow subsurface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Russo, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect, a video game input device designed for the Xbox system, can be used by earth scientists as a low cost high resolution LiDAR sensor. The device can see through at least 1 m of clear still water, or image the surface of opaque water. When observing through water the measurement is distorted by the refraction at the air/water interface. We present initial results of a calibration for sub-aqueous measurements, and describe a method for measuring sub-aqueous features and water height. When waves exist on the surface the signal is further convoluted and both the waves and subsurface are captured in the signal. We discuss signal deconvolution and techniques for capturing the relative and/or absolute values of surface waves and subsurface features.

  7. Valuing environmental water pulses into the Incomati estuary: Key to achieving equitable and sustainable utilisation of transboundary waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengo, D. José; Kachapila, Albert; Zaag, Pieter van der; Mul, Marloes; Nkomo, Sakhiwe

    Upstream developments in the Incomati river basin, shared by South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique, have altered downstream flows significantly. The frequency of small floods into the estuary has been reduced dramatically. This change in the flow regime has impacted on the state of the environment downstream, and the Incomati estuary in particular. The estuary requires fresh water pulses that naturally occur, and the resulting seasonal flooding of the plains. Resource-poor rural households depend on the goods and services that the estuary and flood plains provide such as wood, charcoal, building materials, fish and shrimp, wetland farming, and tourism. Alteration of the flow regime into the estuary has a negative impact on the state of the environment and hence on the goods and services the estuary yields; a phenomenon the people living near the estuary are keenly aware of. The article estimates the value of the goods and services that the estuary currently provides, that is under the conditions of a changed flow regime. A linear relationship is then assumed between fresh water pulses into the estuary and the goods and services it provides, so that the order of magnitude of the economic value of fresh water pulses into the estuary may be approximated. Various development scenarios in the Incomati basin are then considered, that have different upstream and downstream impacts on water availability, and the basin-wide benefits and costs are compared. The paper concludes that the principle of sharing the benefits derived from the water resources, rather than the water itself, as proposed by authors such as [Sadoff, C.W., Grey, D., 2002. Beyond the river: the benefits of cooperation on international rivers. Water Policy 4, 389-403], may be a feasible approach only if the less tangible benefits and functions, especially those of the environment, are assigned an appropriate value and corresponding priority.

  8. OPTIMUM, CRITICAL AND THRESHOLD VALUES FOR WATER OXYGENATION FOR MULLETS (MUGILIDAE) AND FLATFISHES (PLEURONECTIDAE) IN ONTOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    P. Shekk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the optimum, critical, and threshold values of water oxygenation for embryos, larvae and fingerlings of mullets and flatfishes under different temperature conditions. Methodology. Oxygen consumption was studied in chronic experiments with «interrupted flow» method with automatic fixation of dissolved oxygen in water with the aid of an oxygen sensor and automatic, continuous recording of the obtained results. «Critical» (Pcrit.), and the «threshold» (Pthr.) oxygen ten...

  9. Surface water - groundwater interactions at different spatial and temporal scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebök, Éva

    in lowland catchments, mainly exploring and assessing Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) which by detecting variability in temperatures at the Sediment-Water Interface (SWI) can indirectly map variability in groundwater discharge at several spatial and temporal scales. On the small-scale (...As there is a growing demand for the protection and optimal management of both the surface water and groundwater resources, the understanding of their exchange processes is of great importance. This PhD study aimed at describing the natural spatial and temporal variability of these interactions...... detected large spatial variability in SWI temperatures with scattered high-discharge sites in a stream and also in a lake where discharge fluxes were estimated by vertical temperature profiles and seepage meter measurements. On the kilometre scale DTS indicated less spatial variability in streambed...

  10. Embedded water-based surface heating part 2: experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    : hybrid 3D numerical model. Journal of Building Physics 33: 357-391). The thermal response of the system is tested in both long (16 h) and short (30 min) cycle experiments where the water flow alters between on and off. Temperature distribution, within the floor construction, and the heat exchange process...... are studied throughout the test cycles. The model underestimates the steady-state heat exchange from the pipe loop by 16% when boundary conditions and thermal properties according to the reference case are applied. Temperatures at the floor surface are assessed with good precision while temperatures......The transient operation of an embedded water-based floor heating system has been studied by means of a numerical simulation tool. Prior to this study, Caccavelli and Richard (Caccavelli D, Richard P (1994) Etude portant sur le dimensionnement d'un plancher chauffant a eau chaude en CIC. Rapport n...

  11. Towards Physarum Robots: Computing and Manipulating on Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew Adamatzky; Jeff Jones

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is an ideal biological substrate for implementing concurrent and parallel com-putation, including combinatorial geometry and optimization on graphs. The scoping experiments on Physarum computing in conditions of minimal friction, on the water surface were performed. The laboratory and computer experimental results show that plasmodium of Physarum is capable of computing a basic spanning tree and manipulating of light-weight objects. We speculate that our results pave the pathways towards the design and implementation of amorphous biological robots.

  12. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila.

  13. Investigation of natural biofilms formed during the production of drinking water from surface water embankment filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtiazi, Farahnaz; Schwartz, Thomas; Marten, Silke Mareike; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter; Obst, Ursula

    2004-03-01

    Populations of bacteria in biofilms from different sites of a drinking water production system were analysed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses revealed changing DNA band patterns, suggesting a population shift during bank filtration and processing at the waterworks. In addition, common DNA bands that were attributed to ubiquitous bacteria were found. Biofilms even developed directly after UV disinfection (1-2m distance). Their DNA band patterns only partly agreed with those of the biofilms from the downstream distribution system. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in biofilms were analysed using PCR and Southern blot hybridisation (SBH). Surface water appeared to have a direct influence on the composition of biofilms in the drinking water distribution system. In spite of preceding filtration and UV disinfection, opportunistic pathogens such as atypical mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were found in biofilms of drinking water, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected sporadically. Enterococci were not found in any biofilm. Bacterial cell counts in the biofilms from surface water to drinking water dropped significantly, and esterase and alanine-aminopeptidase activity decreased. beta-glucosidase activity was not found in the biofilms. Contrary to the results for planktonic bacteria, inhibitory effects were not observed in biofilms. This suggested an increased tolerance of biofilm bacteria against toxic compounds.

  14. PAHs behavior in surface water and groundwater of the Yellow River estuary: Evidence from isotopes and hydrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Fadong; Liu, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Large-scale irrigation projects have impacted the regional surface-groundwater interactions in the North China Plain (NCP). Given this concern, the aim of this study is to evaluate levels of PAH pollution, identify the sources of the PAHs, analyze the influence of surface-groundwater interactions on PAH distribution, and propose urgent management strategies for PAHs in China's agricultural areas. PAH concentrations, hydrochemical indicators and stable isotopic compositions (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) were determined for surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) samples. PAHs concentrations in surface water and groundwater varied from 11.84 to 393.12 ng/L and 8.51-402.84 ng/L, respectively, indicating mild pollution. The seasonal variations showed the following trend: PAHs in surface water at the low-water phase > PAHs in groundwater at the low-water phase > PAHs in surface water at the high-water phase > PAHs in groundwater at the high-water phase. Hydrochemical and δ(18)O value of most groundwater samples distributed between the Yellow River and seawater. The mean value of mixture ratio of the Yellow River water recharge to the groundwater was 65%, few anomalous sites can reach to 90%. Surface-groundwater interactions influence the spatial distribution of PAHs in the study area. In light of the ongoing serious pollution, management practices for source control, improved control technologies, and the construction of a monitoring network to warn of increased risk are urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city, Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T.; Kuroda, K.; Do Thuan, A.; Tran Thi Viet, N.; Takizawa, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hanoi is the capital of Viet Nam and the second largest city in this country (population: 6.45 million in 2009). Hanoi city has developed along the Red River and has many lakes, ponds and canals. However, recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced number of natural water areas such as ponds and lakes by reclamation not only in the central area but the suburban area. Canals also have been reclaimed or cut into pieces. Contrary, number of artificial water areas such as fish cultivation pond has rapidly increased. On the other hand, various kind of waste water flows into these natural and artificial water areas and induces pollution and eutrophication. These waste waters also have possibility of pollution of groundwater that is one of major water resources in this city. In addition, groundwater in this area has high concentrations of Arsenic, Fe and NH4. Thus, groundwater use may causes re-circulation of Arsenic. However, studies on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater and on the role of surface water areas for solute transport with water cycle are a few. Therefore, we focused on these points and took water samples of river, pond and groundwater from four communities in suburban areas: two communities are located near the Red River and other two are far from the River. Also, columnar sediment samples of these ponds were taken and pore water was abstracted. Major dissolved ions, metals and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen of water samples were analyzed. As for water cycle, from the correlation between δ18O and δD, the Red River water (after GNIR) were distributed along the LMWL (δD=8.2δ18O+14.1, calculated from precipitation (after GNIP)). On the other hand, although the pond waters in rainy season were distributed along the LMWL, that in dry season were distributed along the local evaporation line (LEL, slope=5.6). The LEL crossed with the LMWL at around the point of weighted mean values of precipitation in rainy season and of

  16. Assessment of surface water quality of inland valleys for cropping in SW Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboyeji, O. S.; Ogunkoya, O. O.

    2017-05-01

    Inland valley agro-ecosystems which are a category of wetlands have potential for sustainable crop production relative to uplands. A major challenge to their utilisation in the study area is their heterogeneity in hydrology, morphology, soil types and agro-economy. The study assessed the surface water quality of three typologies of the agro-ecosystems—amphitheatre-like valley-heads (Am), valley-side (VS), and low depression (LD)—for cropping. Surface water of six sites were sampled during the wet and dry seasons. The physicochemical properties and metal concentrations of the samples were analysed. Descriptive statistics and water quality indices were used to assess the suitability of the waters of the agro-ecosystems for cropping. Results showed that the valleys have neutral to slightly alkaline waters. Values of physicochemical parameters are generally within the acceptable range for cropping. The concentration of major cations varied across the inland valley types, but exhibited similar characteristics within each valley. The dominance of the major cations is in the order of Na > Ca > K > Mg. ANOVA results indicated that there is no significant difference in the concentration of heavy metals across the valleys ( F = 2.044, p = 0.138, α = 0.05). Generally, most of the physicochemical parameters and trace metals have low concentrations and are non-toxic to plants. Values of water quality indices (sodium adsorption ratio, soluble sodium percentage, total dissolved solids and permeability index) indicated that the concentrations of minerals in waters across the valley typologies are generally within permissible limits for cropping.

  17. Observation of the vortex ring interacting with free surface of water

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Sugaya, Shuji; 永田 拓; 菅谷 修士

    2002-01-01

    Vortex structures of the vortex rings ejected parallel or perpendicular to a free surface of water were studied by means of flow visualization experiments. The emphasis is on the process of vortex deformation, induction of the flow on the free surface, evolution of surface vortices and interaction between the surface vortices and vortices in the water. Experiments were conducted under the two surface conditions, i.e. a clean surface and a surface contaminated with surfactant droplets. The ele...

  18. Influence of surface polarity on water dynamics at the water/rutile TiO₂(110) interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Mishra, Ankur; Yoshimune, Seiji; Nakamura, Hisao; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2014-06-18

    We report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the water/clean rutile TiO2 (110) interface using polarizable and non-surface polarity force field models. The effect of surface polarity on the water dynamics near the TiO2(110) surface is addressed, specifically by calculating the water hydrogen bond and reorientational dynamics. The hydrogen bond lifetime of interfacial water molecules is several times longer than that of bulk water due to the strong water-TiO2 interactions. A comparison of the dynamics simulated with the polarizable and non-surface polarity models shows that, while the hydrogen bond lifetime between the interfacial water and TiO2 surface is insensitive to the surface polarity, the reorientational dynamics around this hydrogen bond axis is significantly influenced by the surface polarity; the surface polarity of the TiO2 increases the water-TiO2 interactions, stabilizing the local structure of the interfacial water molecules and restricting their rotational motion. This reorientation occurs predominantly by rotation around the O-H group hydrogen bonded to the TiO2 surface. Furthermore, we correlate the dynamics of the induced charge on the TiO2 surface with the interfacial water dynamics. Our results show that the timescale of correlations of the atom charges induced by the local electric field in bulk water is influenced by the rotational motion, hydrogen bond rearrangement and translational motion, while the induced charge dynamics of the TiO2 surface is governed primarily by the rotational dynamics of the interfacial water molecules. This study demonstrates that the solid surface polarity has a significant impact on the dynamics of water molecules near TiO2 surfaces.

  19. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multiyear ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie River-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multiyear ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to subsurface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to subsurface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ∼6 and ∼8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particle concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of meltwater on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering non-uniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV (ultraviolet domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM (particulate organic matter photobleaching.

  20. Drinking Water Sources with Surface Intakes from LDHH source data, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1999) [drinking_water_surface_intakes_LDHH_1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a point dataset for 87 public drinking water sources with surface intakes. It was derived from a larger statewide general drinking water source dataset...