WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface water layer

  1. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  2. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  3. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  4. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  5. Solute leaching in a sandy soil with a water-repellent surface layer: a simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Vries, de P.

    1996-01-01

    Many sandy soils in the Netherlands have a water-repellent surface layer covering a wettable soil with a shallow groundwater table. Fingers form in the water-repellent surface layer and rapidly transport water and solutes to the wettable soil in which the streamlines diverge. Although several field

  6. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, V. B.; van Zwol, P. J.

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer (similar to 1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations

  7. Bubbles & Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer & Topographic Interactions in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    key factors we identify as crucial to an understanding of near surface turbulence and mixing in a wind driven sea : wave breaking frequency, bubble ... Bubbles & Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer & Topographic Interactions in Coastal Waters David Farmer Institute of Ocean Sciences 9860 West...near surface of the ocean, including the role of bubbles in mediating and serving as tracers of such processes; (ii) To elucidate the fluid dynamical

  8. Rain Drops and Oil Slicks: Impact of Water Droplets on a Surface Oil Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David; Morra, David; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum spills in aquatic environments form oil slicks on the water surface. These slicks, the thickness of which ranges from microns to several millimeters, negatively impact the natural environment and economic resources. While dispersion of these slicks as small droplets by breaking waves has long been investigated, the dispersive power of another environmental flow, rainfall, has not been considered. The impact of a water drop on a floating layer of immiscible fluid introduces a challenging flow physics problem. Our experimental observations examine processes occurring when falling water droplets impact on floating layers of sweet petroleum crude oil of various thicknesses and dispersant concentrations. The latter alter the surface tension by orders of magnitude. Impact events recorded at high-speed, using UV light to cause oil fluorescence, show the expected formation of modified multiphase Worthington jets, air cavities, as well as breakup of the slicks into clouds of oil droplets and oil-coated bubbles. The latter rise back to the surface and pop. Results include droplet size and spatial distributions as a function of rainfall momentum, oil properties, and processes involved. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  9. Cavity formation and surface modeling of laser milling process under a thin-flowing water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwarodomnukun, Viboon

    2016-11-01

    Laser milling process normally involves a number of laser scans over a workpiece to selectively remove the material and then to form cavities with shape and dimensions required. However, this process adversely causes a heat accumulation in work material, which can in turn damage the laser-milled area and vicinity in terms of recast deposition and change of material properties. Laser milling process performing in a thin-flowing water layer is a promising method that can overcome such damage. With the use of this technique, water can flush away the cut debris and at the same time cool the workpiece during the ablation. To understand the potential of this technique for milling application, the effects of process parameters on cavity dimensions and surface roughness were experimentally examined in this study. Titanium sheet was used as a workpiece to be milled by a nanosecond pulse laser under different water flow velocities. A smooth and uniform cut feature can be obtained when the metal was ablated under the high laser pulse frequency and high water flow velocity. Furthermore, a surface model based on the energy balance was developed in this study to predict the cavity profile and surface roughness. By comparing to the experiments, the predicted profiles had a good agreement with the measured ones.

  10. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  11. Surface charging of thick porous water ice layers relevant for ion sputtering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Vorburger, A.; Pommerol, A.; Wurz, P.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; Brouet, Y.; Tulej, M.; Thomas, N.

    2016-07-01

    We use a laboratory facility to study the sputtering properties of centimeter-thick porous water ice subjected to the bombardment of ions and electrons to better understand the formation of exospheres of the icy moons of Jupiter. Our ice samples are as similar as possible to the expected moon surfaces but surface charging of the samples during ion irradiation may distort the experimental results. We therefore monitor the time scales for charging and discharging of the samples when subjected to a beam of ions. These experiments allow us to derive an electric conductivity of deep porous ice layers. The results imply that electron irradiation and sputtering play a non-negligible role for certain plasma conditions at the icy moons of Jupiter. The observed ion sputtering yields from our ice samples are similar to previous experiments where compact ice films were sputtered off a micro-balance.

  12. Stress-strain curves of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface measured with surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Bos, M.; Stuart, M.C.; Vliet, T. van

    2002-01-01

    Interfacial shear properties of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface were determined using a Couette-type surface shear rheometer. Such experiments are often used to determine a steady-state ratio between stress and rate of strain, which is then denoted as "surface shear viscosity". Ho

  13. Soil and surface layer type affect non-rainfall water inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Nurit; Berliner, Pedro; Jiang, Anxia

    2017-04-01

    Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs), which include fog deposition, dew formation, and direct water vapor adsorption by the soil, play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. Environmental conditions, namely radiation, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, largely affect the water cycle driven by NRWIs. The substrate type (soil type and the existence/absence of a crust layer) may as well play a major role. Our objective was to quantify the effects of soil type (loess vs. sand) and surface layer (bare vs. crusted) on the gain and posterior evaporation of NRWIs in the Negev Highlands throughout the dry summer season. Four undisturbed soil samples (20 cm diameter and 50 cm depth) were excavated and simultaneously introduced into a PVC tube. Two samples were obtained in the Negev's Boker plain (loess soil) and two in the Nizzana sand dunes in the Western Negev. On one sample from each site the crust was removed while on the remaining one the natural crust was left in place. The samples were brought to the research site at the Jacob Bluestein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel (31˚08' N, 34˚53' E, 400 meter above the sea level) where they were exposed to the same environmental conditions. The four samples in their PVC tubes were placed on top of scales and the samples mass was continuously monitored. Soil temperatures were monitored at depths of 1, 2, 3, 5 and10 cm in each microlysimeter (ML) using Copper-Constantan thermocouples. The results of particle size distribution indicated that the crust of the loess soil is probably a physical crust, i.e., a crust that forms due to raindroplets impact; while the crust on the sand soil is biological. On most days, the loess soils adsorbed more water than their corresponding sand soil samples. For both soils, the samples for which the crust was removed adsorbed more water than the samples for which it was intact. The difference in daily water adsorption amount between crusted

  14. Determining water sources in the boundary layer from tall tower profiles of water vapor and surface water isotope ratios after a snowstorm in Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Noone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The D/H isotope ratio is used to attribute boundary layer humidity changes to the set of contributing fluxes for a case following a snowstorm in which a snow pack of about 10 cm vanished. Profiles of H2O and CO2 mixing ratio, D/H isotope ratio, and several thermodynamic properties were measured from the surface to 300 m every 15 min during four winter days near Boulder, Colorado. Coeval analysis of the D/H ratios and CO2 concentrations find these two variables to be complementary with the former being sensitive to daytime surface fluxes and the latter particularly indicative of nocturnal surface sources. Together they capture evidence for strong vertical mixing during the day, weaker mixing by turbulent bursts and low level jets within the nocturnal stable boundary layer during the night, and frost formation in the morning. The profiles are generally not well described with a gradient mixing line analysis because D/H ratios of the end members (i.e., surface fluxes and the free troposphere evolve throughout the day which leads to large uncertainties in the estimate of the D/H ratio of surface water flux. A mass balance model is constructed for the snow pack, and constrained with observations to provide an optimal estimate of the partitioning of the surface water flux into contributions from sublimation, evaporation of melt water in the snow and evaporation from ponds. Results show that while vapor measurements are important in constraining surface fluxes, measurements of the source reservoirs (soil water, snow pack and standing liquid offer stronger constraint on the surface water balance. Measurements of surface water are therefore essential in developing observational programs that seek to use isotopic data for flux attribution.

  15. CATION-EXCHANGE MEMBRANES WITH POLYANILINE SURFACE LAYER FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Dilshatovich Fazullin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion-exchange membranes are widely used in modern technologies, particularly in the field of water treatment and make it possible to considerably reduce expenses for wastewater treatment and ensure high degree of purification. Currently, perfluorinated sulfated proton-conducting membranes are often used, such as NAFION and its Russian analogue, MF-4SK based on co-polymerization product of a perfluorinated vinyl ether with tetrafluoroethylene. However, with development of the industry, materials with improved properties and lower cost are required. The aim is to obtain ion-exchange membranes for water treatment from metal ions and to study physico-chemical properties of obtained membranes. In this study, cation exchange composite membranes with modified polyaniline surface layer on nylon and PTFE substrate have been obtained. Changes in the structure of membranes were recorded using a microscope. Throughput capacity of the membranes was determined by passing a certain volume of distilled water through the membrane. The experiment intended to determine electivity of membranes was performed by passing a certain volume of metal salt solutions of a known concentration, after which the filtrate was collected. Concentrations of the studied metal ions in the original solution and in the filtrate were determined by the method of atomic adsorptive spectrometry with electro thermal atomization "Quantum Z.ETA". Prepared highly selective ion exchange membranes. Properties of modified membranes, such as selective permeability and ion-exchange capacity have been determined. The membranes feature high selectivity for heavy metal ions. Moisture-retaining power and swelling ability of the membranes have been studied. Selectivity of the membrane to heavy metal ions is between 70 and 99%. Ion-exchange capacity of the obtained nylon polyaniline membrane is not inferior to some commercially available cation-exchange membranes. Use of the modified membranes in the

  16. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  17. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  18. Static Electrode DC Resistivity Measurement at Surface Water for Pond Subsurface Layer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumintadireja, P.; Irawan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Resistivity methods in marine applications show slightly different processing techniques from land based resistivity surveys. Special DC resistivity instruments need to overcome difficulties in arranging the electrode with straight array lines and position. Some geoelectrical instrument manufacturers developed equipment which is able to measure resistivity values and positions in real time. In this paper we demonstrate an application of ordinary geoelectrical instruments for resistivity acquisition in water environment. This study is motivated by the inability to apply conventional DC resistivity instruments in water environment. Land resistivity survey array is arranged on the surface of water using static electrode mode. The method has been tested in various environments, such as ponds/lakes with quiet until rough waves and also measurements at coastal environments. Measurement at the ponds/lakes water environment resulted in data that are almost identic to the measurements obtained using standard land DC resistivity method. On the other hand the measurement in coastal environment does not work properly, possibly due to the lack of power source.

  19. Crystallinity of the double layer of cadmium arachidate films at the water surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveiller, F.; Jacquemain, D.; Lahav, M.

    1991-01-01

    A crystalline counterionic layer at the interface between an electrolyte solution and a charged layer of insoluble amphiphilic molecules was observed with grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Uncompressed arachidic films spread over 10(-3) molar cadmium chloride solution (pH 8.8) spon....... The reflections from the Cd2+ layer were indexed according to a 2 X 3 supercell of the arachidate lattice with three Cd2+ ions per cadmium unit cell....

  20. XPS study on water corrosion of fluorzirconate glasses and their protection by a layer of surface modified tin dioxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, P. [Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: peter@iq.unesp.br; Rizzato, A.P. [Rhodia Poliamida e Especialidades, Fazenda Sao Francisco, 07 13140-000 Paulinia, SP (Brazil); Pulcinelli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V. [Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    The surface corrosion process associated with the hydrolysis of fluorozirconate glass, ZBLAN (53ZrF{sub 4}, 20BaF{sub 2}, 20NaF, 4LaF{sub 2}, 3AlF{sub 3}), and the corrosion protection efficiency of a nanocrystalline transparent SnO{sub 2} layer were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tin oxide film was deposited by the sol-gel dip-coating process in the presence of Tiron as particle surface modifier agent. The chemical bonding structure and composition of the surface region of coated and non-coated ZBLAN were studied before water contact and after different immersion periods (5-30 min). In contrast to the effects occurring for non-coated glass, where the surface undergoes a rapid selective dissolution of the most soluble species inducing the formation of a new surface phase consisting of stable zirconium oxyfluoride, barium fluoride and lanthanum fluoride species, the results for the SnO{sub 2}-coated glass showed that the hydrolytic attack induces a filling of the film nanopores by dissolved glass material and the formation of tin oxyfluoride and zirconium oxyfluoride species. This process results in a modified film, which acts as a hermetic diffusion barrier protecting efficiently the glass surface.

  1. Effects of glacier runoff and wind on surface layer dynamics and Atlantic Water exchange in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard; a model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfjord, A.; Albretsen, J.; Kasajima, Y.; Skogseth, R.; Kohler, J.; Nuth, C.; Skarðhamar, J.; Cottier, F.; Nilsen, F.; Asplin, L.; Gerland, S.; Torsvik, T.

    2017-03-01

    A high resolution numerical ocean circulation model has been used to investigate exchange mechanisms and transport of thermal energy towards the inner part of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard; a location where tidewater glaciers expose large calving fronts to the ocean water and sea ice has been a regular winter feature until recently. Comparison of model simulations against a large set of observational data shows that the model captures the main features of seasonality and geographical distribution of hydrography. The model is able to simulate inflow of Atlantic Water although the timing, strength and depth of inflow events are not always the same in the model as in mooring records. The model shows water entering via the shelf consistently penetrating deep into the fjord, and volume transport toward the interior parts are large even under winter conditions. Heat transports are smaller in winter than in summer due to generally lower winter temperatures. Results indicate that glacial freshwater discharge in the surface layer is not a necessary factor for driving sub-surface exchange; rather, along-fjord winds stand out as important for the circulation and hence water exchange in the inner part of the fjord. The combination of inflow of Atlantic Water from the outer shelf into the central part of the fjord, and further transport of mixed water masses with intermediate heat content toward the inner part, constitutes a significant transfer of thermal energy from the outer shelf and deep into the fjord. The potential for glacier front melting is larger in summer than in winter as heat transports are larger this time of year, while even modest heat transports in the upper part of the water column may influence the sea ice cover in winter.

  2. A One-Layer Satellite Surface Energy Balance for Estimating Evapotranspiration Rates and Crop Water Stress Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily evapotranspiration fluxes over the semi-arid Catania Plain area (Eastern Sicily, Italy were evaluated using remotely sensed data from Landsat Thematic Mapper TM5 images. A one-source parameterization of the surface sensible heat flux exchange using satellite surface temperature has been used. The transfer of sensible and latent heat is described by aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance. Required model inputs are brightness, temperature, fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index, albedo, crop height, roughness lengths, net radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. The aerodynamic resistance (rah is formulated on the basis of the Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory and the surface resistance (rs is evaluated from the energy balance equation. The instantaneous surface flux values were converted into evaporative fraction (EF over the heterogeneous land surface to derive daily evapotranspiration values. Remote sensing-based assessments of crop water stress (CWSI were also made in order to identify local irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration data and crop coefficient values obtained from the approach were compared with: (i data from the semi-empirical approach “Kc reflectance-based”, which integrates satellite data in the visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum with ground-based measurements and (ii surface energy flux measurements collected from a micrometeorological tower located in the experiment area. The expected variability associated with ET flux measurements suggests that the approach-derived surface fluxes were in acceptable agreement with the observations.

  3. A photocatalytic reaction kinetics model based on electrical double layer theory(Ⅰ)--Surface complexation model at TiO2/water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新军; 李芳柏; 何明兴; 王良焱; 徐悦华; 黄琮

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of photocatalysis can be us ually described by Langmiur-H inshelwood adsorption expression. The adsorption can be greatly influenced by the surface properties of photocatalyst. Triple layer model (TLM) was chosen to describe the surface adsorption of TiO2 based on electrical double layer (EDL) theory at the TiO2/water interface. And through the potentiometrictit ration the parameters of TLM were determined by the extrapolation method and Fit eql3.1 software. The results show that surface complexation dominates the surfac e charge and the numerical calculation fits the experiment data satisfactorily.

  4. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  5. Simulated potentiometric surface contours of prepumping conditions in layer 1 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These simulated potentiometric surface contours represent prepumping (or steady-state) conditions for model layer 1 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  6. Simulated potentiometric surface contours of prepumping conditions in layer 16 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These simulated potentiometric surface contours represent prepumping (or steady-state) conditions for model layer 16 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  7. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  8. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  9. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  10. Leidenfrost Vapor Layer Stabilization on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Patankar, Neelesh; Marston, Jeremy; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We have performed experiments to investigate the influence of the wettability of a superheated metallic sphere on the stability of a thin vapor layer during the cooling of a sphere immersed in water. For high enough sphere temperatures, a continuous vapor layer (Leidenfrost regime) is observed on the surface of non-superhydrophobic spheres, but below a critical sphere temperature the layer becomes unstable and explosively switches to nuclear boiling regime. In contrast, when the sphere surface is textured and superhydrophobic, the vapor layer is stable and gradually relaxes to the sphere surface until the complete cooling of the sphere, thus avoiding the nuclear boiling transition altogether. This finding could help in the development of heat exchange devices and of vapor layer based drag reducing technologies.

  11. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mixing height over inner Danish waters carried out from September 1990 to October 1992, are discussed. The statistical analysis of the mixed-layer height (z(i)) over the sea does not exhibit the daily variation that is characteristic of the mixed ...

  12. Conserving heat in a marine microcosm with a surface layer of fresh or brackish water: the ''semi-solar pond''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idso, S.B.; Idso, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of the standard solar pond is described, whereby thin surface layers of fresh or brackish water are used to retain heat captured naturally or supplied by passive solar panels to an underlying marine microcosm which simulates the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Several management options are discussed, combinations of which allow for about a 10/sup 0/C temperature advantage to be accrued as a result of employing the technique.

  13. Near-Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Near -Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh...Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka Luca Centurioni Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive...GOALS Improve the knowledge of the near -surface circulation in the BoB and of the pathways through which the freshwater fluxes occur. OBJECTIVES

  14. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  15. Application of 1H NMR spectroscopy method for determination of characteristics of thin layers of water adsorbed on the surface of dispersed and porous adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turov, V V; Leboda, R

    1999-02-01

    The paper presents 1H NMR spectroscopy as a perspective method of the studies of the characteristics of water boundary layers in the hydrated powders and aqueous dispergated suspensions of the adsorbents. The method involves measurements of temperature dependence proton signals intensity in the adsorbed water at temperatures lower than 273 K. Free energy of water molecules at the adsorbent/water interface is diminished due to the adsorption interactions causing the water dosed to the adsorbent surface freezes at T water can be determined from the intensity of the water signal of 1H NMR during the freezing-thawing process. Due to a disturbing action of the adsorbent surface, water occurs in the quasi-liquid state. As a result, it is observed in the 1H NMR spectra as a relatively narrow signal. The signal of ice is not registered due to great differences in the transverse relaxation times of the adsorbed water and ice. The method of measuring the free surface energy of the adsorbents from the temperature dependence of the signal intensity of non-freezing water is based on the fact that the temperature of water freezing decreases by the quantity which depends on the surface energy and the distance of the adsorbed molecules from the solid surface. The water at the interface freezes when the free energies of the adsorbed water and ice are equal. To illustrate the applicability of the method under consideration the series of adsorption systems in which the absorbents used differed in the surface chemistry and porous structure. In particular, the behaviour of water on the surface of the following adsorbents is discussed: non-porous and porous silica (aerosils, silica gels); chemically and physically modified non-porous and porous silica (silanization, carbonization, biopolymer deposition); and pyrogeneous Al2O3 and aluminasilicas. The effect of preliminary treatment of the adsorbent (thermal, high pressure, wetting with polar and non-polar solvents) on the characteristics

  16. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Marston, Jeremy O; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Surface Plasmonic particles and Surface Passivation layer on ZnO Nanorods Array for Improved Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichong; Yan, Xiaoqin; Kang, Zhuo; Li, Yong; Shen, Yanwei; Sun, Yihui; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional zinc oxide nanorods array exhibit excellent electron mobility and thus hold great potential as photoanode for photoelelctrochemical water splitting. However, the poor absorption of visible light and the prominent surface recombination hider the performance improvement. In this work, Au nanoparticles and aluminium oxide were deposited onto the surface of ZnO nanorods to improve the PEC performance. The localized surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs could expand the absorption spectrum to visible region. Simultaneously, the surface of passivation with Au NPs and Al2O3 largely suppressed the photogenerated electron-hole recombination. As a result, the optimal solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of ZnO/Au/Al2O3 with 5 cycles was 6.7 times that of pristine ZnO, ascribed to the synergistic effect of SPR and surface passivation. This research reveals that the synergistic effect could be used as an important method to design efficient photoanodes for photoelectrochemical devices. PMID:27443692

  19. Measurements of mass and heat transfer at a liquid water surface during condensation or evaporation of a subnanometer thickness layer of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Knox, Kerry J; Reid, Jonathan P; Laurain, Adèle M C; Mitchem, Laura

    2010-09-10

    A novel approach for exploring the molecular dynamics during condensation or evaporation at a liquid water surface is reported at pressures between 2 and 100 kPa. By introducing or removing a heating laser illuminating an optically tweezed aqueous aerosol droplet, the temperature of the droplet can be controlled with sub-mK accuracy and the change in size to reequilibrate with the surroundings monitored with subnanometer accuracy. The time constant for equilibration is shown to provide important insight into the coupling of heat and mass transfer during condensation or evaporation.

  20. [Variations of Inorganic Carbon and its Impact Factors in Surface-Layer Waters in a Groundwater-Fed Reservoir in Karst Area, SW China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-hong; Pu, Jun-bing; Yuan, Dao-xian; Liu, Wen; Xiao, Qiong; Yu, Shi; Zhang Tao; Mo, Xue; Sun, Ping-an; Pan, Mou-cheng

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand the inorganic carbon cycle of the groundwater-fed reservoir in karst area, Dalongdong Reservoir, which is located at Shanglin County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, was investigated from 12th to 20th July, 2014. Concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), delta13C of DIC (delta13C(DIC)), partial CO2 pressure (pCO2) and CO2 flux across water-air interface were studied by observation in situ and high-resolution diel monitoring. Results show that: (1) DIC concentration and water pCO2 increased from upstream area to downstream area [DIC(average)): from 122.88 to 172.02 mg x L(-1), pCO2(average) : from 637.91 x 10(-6) to 1399.97 x 10(-6)], while delta13C(DIC) decreased from upstream area to downstream area [delta13C(DIC(average): from -4.34% per hundred to -6.97% per hundred] in the reservoir. (2) CO2 efflux across water-air interface varied from 7.11 to 335.54 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) with mean of 125.03 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) in Dalongdong reservoir surface-layer waters, which was the source of atmospheric CO2. CO2 effluxes across water-air interface in upstream area [mean 131.73 mg x (m2 x h)(-1)] and downstream area [mean 170.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1)] were higher than that in middle area [mean 116.05 mg x (m2 x h))(-1)] in the reservoir. (3) Water pCO2 and CO2 efflux across water-air interface showed similar characteristics of diel variations, which decreased in daylight and increased in night and showed a negative correlation with chlorophyll a (Chla). Possible reasons of research results are found as follows: (1) DIC concentration, water pCO2 and delta13C(DIC) are influenced by biomass of phytoplankton, turbidity, conductivity, the depth of water and transparency, while CO2 efflux across water-air interface is controlled by both of biomass of phytoplankton and wind speed. (2) Photosynthesis, respiration and vertical motion of phytoplankton possibly affect diel variations of DIC cycle in the groundwater-fed reservoir in karst area.

  1. Surface Properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoodIII, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rulison, Christopher [Augustine Scientific; Borup, Rodney [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2010-01-01

    The wetting properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers (GDLs) were quantified by surface characterization measurements and modeling of material properties. Single-fiber contact-angle and surface energy (both Zisman and Owens-Wendt) data of a wide spectrum of GDL types is presented to delineate the effects of hydrophobic post-processing treatments. Modeling of the basic sessile-drop contact angle demonstrates that this value only gives a fraction of the total picture of interfacial wetting physics. Polar forces are shown to contribute 10-20 less than dispersive forces to the composite wetting of GDLs. Internal water contact angles obtained from Owens-Wendt analysis were measured at 13-19 higher than their single-fiber counterparts. An inverse relationship was found between internal contact angle and both Owens-Wendt surface energy and % polarity of the GDL. The most sophisticated PEMFC mathematical models use either experimentally measured capillary pressures or the standard Young-Laplace capillary-pressure equation. Based on the results of the Owens-Wendt analysis, an advancement to the Young-Laplace equation is proposed for use in these mathematical models, which utilizes only solid surface energies and fractional surface coverage of fluoropolymer. Capillary constants for the spectrum of analyzed GDLs are presented for the same purpose.

  2. Uncertainties in Surface Layer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, W.

    2015-12-01

    A central problem for micrometeorologists has been the relationship of air-surface exchange rates of momentum and heat to quantities that can be predicted with confidence. The flux-gradient profile developed through Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) provides an integration of the dimensionless wind shear expression where is an empirically derived expression for stable and unstable atmospheric conditions. Empirically derived expressions are far from universally accepted (Garratt, 1992, Table A5). Regardless of what form of these relationships might be used, their significance over any short period of time is questionable since all of these relationships between fluxes and gradients apply to averages that might rarely occur. It is well accepted that the assumption of stationarity and homogeneity do not reflect the true chaotic nature of the processes that control the variables considered in these relationships, with the net consequence that the levels of predictability theoretically attainable might never be realized in practice. This matter is of direct relevance to modern prognostic models which construct forecasts by assuming the universal applicability of relationships among averages for the lower atmosphere, which rarely maintains an average state. Under a Cooperative research and Development Agreement between NOAA and Duke Energy Generation, NOAA/ATDD conducted atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research using Duke renewable energy sites as research testbeds. One aspect of this research has been the evaluation of legacy flux-gradient formulations (the ϕ functions, see Monin and Obukhov, 1954) for the exchange of heat and momentum. At the Duke Energy Ocotillo site, NOAA/ATDD installed sonic anemometers reporting wind and temperature fluctuations at 10Hz at eight elevations. From these observations, ϕM and ϕH were derived from a two-year database of mean and turbulent wind and temperature observations. From this extensive measurement database, using a

  3. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  4. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition during Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Jeremy; Murphy, Jim

    2016-10-01

    Structural and compositional variability in the layering sequences comprising Mars' polar layered terrains (PLT's) is likely explained by orbital-forced climatic variations in the sedimentary cycles of water ice and dust from which they formed [1]. The PLT's therefore contain a direct, extensive record of the recent climate history of Mars encoded in their structure and stratigraphy, but deciphering this record requires understanding the depositional history of their dust and water ice constituents. 3D Mars atmosphere modeling enables direct simulation of atmospheric dynamics, aerosol transport and quantification of surface accumulation for a range of past and present orbital configurations. By quantifying the net yearly polar deposition rates of water ice and dust under Mars' current and past orbital configurations characteristic of the last several millions of years, and integrating these into the present with a time-stepping model, the formation history of the north and south PLT's will be investigated, further constraining their age and composition, and, if reproducible, revealing the processes responsible for prominent features and stratigraphy observed within the deposits. Simulating the formation of the deposits by quantifying net deposition rates during past orbital epochs and integrating these into the present, effectively 'rebuilding' the terrains, could aid in understanding deeper stratigraphic trends, correlating between geographically-separated deposits, explaining the presence and shapes of large-scale polar features, and correlating stratigraphy with geological time. Quantification of the magnitude and geographical distribution of surface aerosol accumulation will build on the work of previous GCM-based investigations [3]. Construction and analysis of hypothetical stratigraphic sequences in the PLT's will draw from previous climate-controlled stratigraphy methodologies [2,4], but will utilize GCM-derived net deposition rates to model orbital

  5. Effects of surface water on gas sorption capacities of gravimetric sensing layers analyzed by molecular descriptors of organic adsorbates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Iwao; Mitsui, Kouta; Nakamura, Masayuki; Seyama, Michiko

    2011-02-01

    The gas sorption capacities of sputtered carbonaceous films are evaluated with quartz crystal resonators. These films are sensitive to 20 ppm organic vapors and exhibit structure-dependent responses. Films derived from synthetic polymers are hydrophobic, whereas films derived from biomaterials are amphiphilic or hydrophilic. Polyethylene (PE) film has an extremely high sorption capacity for a wide range of vapors. Transient sorption responses are investigated using a humidified carrier by employing carboxylic acid esters, whose aliphatic groups are systematically changed. Small esters with a higher affinity to water induce negative U-shaped responses from amphiphilic films derived from biomaterials. On the other hand, polymeric films exhibit positive exponential response curves. Even if the concentrations are decreased, the response intensities are enhanced with the incremental expansion of carbon chains of aliphatic groups. Only fluoropolymer film shows the opposite tendency. The modeling of quantitative structure property relationships has indicated that the sorption capacities of the PE film to the carboxylic acid esters are fundamentally governed by electrostatic interactions. The intermolecular attractive forces are basically attributable to interactions between the positively polarized sites in esters and the negatively polarized/charged sites in PE film.

  6. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  7. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  8. Comparative study of the surface layer density of liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, E.; Fernández, E. M.; Duque, D.; Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Tarazona, P.

    2009-11-01

    Capillary wave fluctuations blur the inherent structure of liquid surfaces in computer simulations. The intrinsic sampling method subtracts capillary wave fluctuations and yields the intrinsic surface structure, leading to a generic picture of the liquid surface. The most relevant magnitude of the method is the surface layer density ns that may be consistently determined from different properties: the layering structure of the intrinsic density profiles, the turnover rate for surface layer particles, and the hydrodynamic damping rate of capillary waves. The good agreement among these procedures provides evidence for the physical consistency of the surface layering hypothesis, as an inherent physical property of the liquid surfaces. The dependence of the surface compactness, roughness, and exchange rate with temperature is analyzed for several molecular interaction models.

  9. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  10. Dynamic of the atmospheric boundary layer from the isotopic composition of surface water vapor at the Maïdo Observatory (La Réunion, Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilpart, Etienne; Vimeux, Francoise; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Evan, Stephanie; Brioude, Jerome; Cattani, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Projections of tropical and subtropical precipitation strongly differ from one climate model to another, both in sign and in amplitude. This is the case for example in some parts of the West Indian Ocean. The causes of those uncertainties are numerous and a better understanding of humid processes in the tropical atmosphere is needed. We propose to address this burning question by using water stables isotopes. We have been measuring the isotopic composition of surface water vapor at the atmospheric Observatory of Maïdo located at La Reunion Island (21°S, 55°E, 2200m a.s.l) since November 2014. Our results exhibit a strong diurnal cycle all over the year (except during cyclonic activity), with almost constant isotopic values during the day (around -13.5±0.6‰ for oxygen 18 from November 2014 to November 2015) and variable and very depleted isotopic values during the night (down to -35‰ for oxygen 18 over the same period) associated with low humidity levels. We will show in this presentation that the diurnal isotopic variations are associated to a strong air masses mixing. During the day, the isotopic composition of the vapor is typical of marine boundary layer (BL) moisture transported from the close Ocean and lifted up to the Maïdo station. During the night, the depleted values and the low humidity could trace free troposphere moisture, which is consistent with previous studies suggesting that the Maïdo Observatory is above the BL during the night. We will explore the influence of the daily BL development on our observations, using a set of atmospheric vertical profiles done on site in May 2015 during the BIOMAIDO campaign. At last, we will discuss the most isotopic depleted values recorded in our observations during the night as a possible consequence of regional strong subsidences.

  11. Smear layer--materials surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D

    1992-01-01

    SEM and TEM photomicrographs were presented of the smear layer and several dentin-adhesive interfaces. It was shown that as the wetting and penetration of the dentin adhesive increased, the shear bond strength also increased. Three categories of dentin adhesives were presented. Category one included Scotchbond, Dentin Adhesit and Gluma, with shear bond strength values between 5 and 7 MPa; the second category, dentin adhesives based on Dr. Bowen's research, included Tenure and Mirage Bond, with shear bond strengths between 8 and 14 MPa; the third category included Superbond and Scotchbond 2, with shear bond strength values up to 20 MPa. Failures occurred at the interface or in the resin adhesive for materials in categories one and two; failures occurred through the dentin or composite for materials in category three.

  12. Influence of surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxide on ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Dongwei

    2016-04-01

    In this work, ceramic ultrafiltration membranes deposited with different metal oxides (i.e., TiO2, Fe2O3, MnO2, CuO, and CeO2) of around 10 nm in thickness and similar roughness were tested for O/W emulsion treatment. Distinct membrane fouling tendency was observed, which closely correlated to the properties of the filtration-layer metal oxides (i.e. surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity, surface charge, and adhesion energy for oil droplets). In consistent with the distinct bond strength of the surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity of these common metal oxides are quite different. The differences in hydrophilicity consequently lead to different adhesion of these metal oxides towards oil droplets which consists very well with irreversible membrane fouling tendency. In addition, the surface charge of the metal oxide opposite to that of emulsion can help to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling in ultrafiltration. Highly hydrophilic Fe2O3 with lowest fouling tendency could be a potential filtration-layer material for the fabrication/modification of ceramic membranes for O/W emulsion treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study clearly showing the correlations between surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxides and ceramic membrane fouling tendency by O/W emulsion.

  13. Surface-layer gusts for aircraft operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, G.S.; Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    We use Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to extend the Kristensen et al. (1991) aviation gust estimation technique from the neutral to the diabatic surface layer. Example calculations demonstrate the importance of this correction. Simple stability class methods using only standard aviation surface ...

  14. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  15. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrnström, Mats; Wahlén, Erik

    2010-01-01

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  16. Water on graphene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  17. Multipole surface solitons in layered thermal media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2008-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of multipole solitons localized at a thermally insulating interface between uniform or layered thermal media and a linear dielectric. We find that in the case of uniform media, only surface multipoles with less than three poles can be stable. In contrast, we reveal that periodic alternation of the thermo-optic coefficient in layered thermal media makes possible the stabilization of higher order multipoles.

  18. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins, sca

  19. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  20. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range.

  1. Effect of impurities in the description of surface nanobubbles: Role of nonidealities in the surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study [ S. Das, J. H. Snoeijer and D. Lohse Phys. Rev. E 82 056310 (2010)], we provided quantitative demonstration of the conjecture [ W. A. Ducker Langmuir 25 8907 (2009)] that the presence of impurities at the surface layer (or the air-water interface) of surface nanobubbles can substa

  2. Surface state and normal layer effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.A.; Ledvij, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Liu, S.H. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-08-01

    In addition to the conducting CuO{sub 2} (S) layers, most high-T{sub c} superconductors also contain other conducting (N) layers, which are only superconducting due to the proximity effect. The combination of S and N layers can give rise to complicated electronic densities of states, leading to quasilinear penetration depth and NMR relaxation rate behavior at low temperatures. Surface states can also complicate the analysis of tunneling and, photoemission measurements. Moreover, geometrical considerations and in homogeneously trapped flux axe possible explanations of the paramagnetic Meissner effect and of corner and ring SQUID experiments. Hence, all of the above experiments could be consistent with isotropic s-wave superconductivity within the S layers.

  3. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; Muraleedharan, P. M.; Reddy, G. V.; Araligidad, Nilesh; Shenoy, Shrikant

    2002-10-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay of Bengal, such as occurrence time, characteristics, stability, inter-annual variability and generating mechanisms. Spatially organized temperature inversion occurs in the coastal waters of the western and northeastern Bay during winter (November-February). Although the inversion in the northeastern Bay is sustained until February (with remnants seen even in March), in the western Bay it becomes less organized in January and almost disappears by February. Inversion is confined to the fresh water induced seasonal halocline of the surface layer. Inversions of large temperature difference (of the order of 1.6-2.4°C) and thin layer thickness (10-20 m) are located adjacent to major fresh water inputs from the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Krishna and Godavari rivers. The inversion is stable with a mean stability of 3600×10 -8 m -1. Inter-annual variability of the inversion is significantly high and it is caused by the inter-annual variability of fresh water flux and surface cooling in the northern Bay. Fresh water flux leads the occurrence process in association with surface heat flux and advection. The leading role of fresh water flux is understood from the observation that the two occurrence regions of inversion (the western and northeastern Bay) have proximity to the two low salinity (with values about 28-29‰) zones. In the western Bay, the East India Coastal Current brings less saline and cold water from the head of the Bay to the south-west Bay, where it advects over warm, saline water, promoting temperature inversion in this region in association with the surface heat loss. For inversion occurring in the northeastern Bay (where the surface water gains heat from atmosphere), surface advection of the less saline

  4. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  5. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected.

  6. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    OpenAIRE

    Philip S. Brown; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work...

  7. Layer-by-layer rose petal mimic surface with oleophilicity and underwater oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-chin; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2015-01-20

    Surfaces designed with specific wetting properties are still a key challenge in materials science. We present here a facile preparation of a surface assembled by the layer-by-layer technique, using a colloidal dispersion of ionomer particles and linear polyethylene imine. The colloidal ethylene-co-methacrylic acid (EMAA) particles are on the order of half a micron in size with surface features from 40 to 100 nm in width. The resultant surface has roughness on two length scales, one on the micron scale due to the packing of particles and one on the nanoscale due to these surface features on the EMAA particles. This hierarchical structure results in a hydrophobic surface with good water pinning properties (∼550 μN). We show that there is a balance between maximizing contact angle and water pinning force. Furthermore, this surface is oleophilic with regard to many organic solvents, also demonstrating underwater oleophobicity, and given the difference in wetting between aqueous and organic phases, this material may be a candidate material for oil/water separations.

  8. Surface layer similarity in the nocturnal boundary layer: the application of Hilbert-Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence statistics such as flux-variance relationship is critical information in measuring and modeling carbon, water, energy, and momentum exchanges at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Using a recently proposed mathematical technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, this study highlights its possibility to quantify impacts of non-turbulent flows on turbulence statistics in the stable surface layer. The HHT is suitable for the analysis of non-stationary and intermittent data and thus very useful for better understanding of the interplay of the surface layer similarity with complex nocturnal environment. Our analysis showed that the HHT can successfully sift non-turbulent components and be used as a tool to estimate the relationships between turbulence statistics and atmospheric stability in complex environment such as nocturnal stable boundary layer.

  9. Surface layer similarity in the nocturnal boundary layer: the application of Hilbert-Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence statistics such as flux-variance relationship are critical information in measuring and modeling ecosystem exchanges of carbon, water, energy, and momentum at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Using a recently proposed mathematical technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, this study highlights its possibility to quantify impacts of non-turbulent flows on turbulence statistics in the stable surface layer. The HHT is suitable for the analysis of non-stationary and intermittent data and thus very useful for better understanding the interplay of the surface layer similarity with complex nocturnal environment. Our analysis showed that the HHT can successfully sift non-turbulent components and be used as a tool to estimate the relationships between turbulence statistics and atmospheric stability in complex environments such as nocturnal stable boundary layer.

  10. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  11. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional...... mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have...... not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water.In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical...

  12. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  13. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  14. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  15. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  16. Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Figure 1 were a highly viscous fluid, such as honey , the boundary layer would be thick while if the fluid were water, a low-viscosity fluid, the boundary...drag has become even more important. In response to this need, and with the benefit of modern technology, the drag-reduction field is replete with...manufactured with “riblets,” small ridges on the order of fractions of millimeters, built-into the hull or skin that seek to reduce frictional drag. The

  17. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  18. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  19. Wear measurement by surface layer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatchley, C.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of these projects was to demonstrate the capability for precisely but remotely measuring small increments of wear, erosion or corrosion in utility components using detectors mounted outside the system to monitor the presence of radionuclide surface markers. These gamma ray emitting markers are produced by surface layer activation (SLA) using a high energy particle beam from a Van de Graaff or cyclotron particle accelerator. The work was divided into three major projects: (1) determination of the feasibility of applying SLA based surface monitoring techniques to key power plant systems; (2) a field demonstration of SLA monitoring in steam turbine components subject to severe solid particle erosion; and (3) a field demonstration of SLA wear or corrosion monitoring of components in boiler auxiliaries. In the field tests, surface material removal was successfully measured from both selected systems, demonstrating the feasibility of the technique for long term diagnostic condition monitoring. Three bearing components in a boiler circulation pump were monitored almost continuously for a period of over 5 months until the pump was stopped due to electrical problems unrelated to the wear measurements. Solid particle erosion from two stop valve bypass valves was measured during a series of nine startup cycles. Both test demonstrations confirmed the earlier feasibility estimates and showed how SLA markers can be used to provide valuable diagnostic information to plant operators. 22 refs., 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  1. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Louth Crater: Evolution of a layered water ice mound

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Tornabene, Livio L; Roush, Ted L

    2014-01-01

    We report on observations made of the ~36km diameter crater, Louth, in the north polar region of Mars (at 70{\\deg}N, 103.2{\\deg}E). High-resolution imagery from the instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has been used to map a 15km diameter water ice deposit in the center of the crater. The water ice mound has surface features that include roughened ice textures and layering similar to that found in the North Polar Layered Deposits. Features we interpret as sastrugi and sand dunes show consistent wind patterns within Louth over recent time. CRISM spectra of the ice mound were modeled to derive quantitative estimates of water ice and contaminant abundance, and associated ice grain size information. These morphologic and spectral results are used to propose a stratigraphy for this deposit and adjoining sand dunes. Our results suggest the edge of the water ice mound is currently in retreat.

  3. EFFECT OF ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH ON SURFACE LAYER DESTRUCTION IN INSULATION CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. Gontar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of theoretical and experimental studies of surface layer destruction in electrical insulation under lightning surge pulses are given, their impact on the insulation construction durability shown. Causes of water treeing in the surface layers of polymer insulation are analyzed.

  4. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videler, J J

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins, scales, riblets and roughness may influence the flow velocity gradient, the type of flow and the thickness of the boundary layer around animals, and may seriously affect their drag in a positive or negative way. The long-chain polymers found in mucus decrease the pressure gradient and considerably reduced drag due to friction. The effect is probably due to channelling of the flow particles in the direction of the main flow, resulting in a reduction of turbulence. Compliant surfaces could probably reduce drag by equalising and distributing pressure pulses. However, the existing evidence that drag reduction actually occurs is not convincing. There is no indication that instantaneous heating, reducing the viscosity in the boundary layer, is used by animals as a drag-reducing technique. Small longitudinal ridges on rows of scales on fish can reduce shear stress in the boundary by a maximum of 10% compared with the shear stress of a smooth surface. The mechanism is based on the impedance of cross flow under well-defined conditions. The effect has been visualized with the use of particle image velocimetry techniques. The function of the swords and spears of several fast, pelagic, predatory fish species is still enigmatic. The surface structure of the sword of a swordfish is shown to be both rough and porous. The height of the roughness elements on the tip of the sword is close to the critical value for the induction of a laminar-to-turbulent flow transition at moderate cruising speeds. A flow tank is described that is designed to visualize the effects of surface imperfections on flow in the boundary layer in direct comparison with a smooth flat wall. The flow in a 1 m long, 10 cm

  5. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  6. X-ray lattice strain determination in surface layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Pantleon, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The present article describes several aspects of lattice strain determination in surface layers by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. Several possibilities and the origins of stress in surface layers are illustrated by the following three cases: 200 nm thick Mo layers on glass substrates; 5.5 m.......5 microns thick TiN layers on heat treatable steel and 21 microns thick gamma prime-Fe4N1-x layers on iron....

  7. Near-Surface Boundary Layer Turbulence Along a Horizontally-Moving, Surface-Piercing Vertical Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Washuta, Nathan; Duncan, James H

    2016-01-01

    The complex interaction between turbulence and the free surface in boundary layer shear flow created by a vertical surface-piercing wall is considered. A laboratory-scale device was built that utilizes a surface-piercing stainless steel belt that travels in a loop around two vertical rollers, with one length of the belt between the rollers acting as a horizontally-moving flat wall. The belt is accelerated suddenly from rest until reaching constant speed in order to create a temporally-evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially-evolving boundary layer that would exist along a surface-piercing towed flat plate. Surface profiles are measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence system and sub-surface velocity fields are recorded using a high-speed planar particle image velocimetry system. It is found that the belt initially travels through the water without creating any significant waves, before the free surface bursts with activity close to the belt surface. These free surface ripples travel away...

  8. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  9. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  10. Molecular modeling of the structure and dynamics of the interlayer and surface species of mixed-metal layered hydroxides: Chloride and water in hydrocalumite (Friedel's salt)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALINICHEV,ANDREY G.; KIRKPATRICK,R. JAMES; CYGAN,RANDALL T

    2000-01-17

    The dynamical behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O molecules in the interlayer and on the (001) surface of the Ca-aluminate hydrate hydrocalumite (Friedel's salt) over a range of temperatures from {minus}100 to 300 C is studied using the technique of isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics computer simulations. This phase is currently the best available model compound for other, typically more disordered, mixed-metal layered hydroxides. The computed crystallographic parameters and density are in good agreement with available X-ray diffraction data and the force field developed for these simulations preserves the structure and density to within less than 2% of their measured values. In contrast to the highly ordered arrangement of the interlayer water molecules interpreted from the X-ray data, the simulations reveal significant dynamic disorder in water orientations. At all simulated temperatures, the interlayer water molecules undergo rapid librations (hindered hopping rotations) around an axis essentially perpendicular to the layers. This results in breaking and reformation of hydrogen bonds with the neighboring Cl{sup {minus}} anions and in a time-averaged nearly uniaxial symmetry at Cl{sup {minus}}, in good agreement with recent {sup 35}Cl NMR measurements. Power spectra of translational, vibrational, and vibrational motions of interlayer and surface Cl{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O were calculated as Fourier transforms of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions and compared with the corresponding spectra and dynamics for a bulk aqueous solution. The ordered interlayer space has significant effects on the motions. Strong electrostatic attraction between interlayer water molecules and Ca atoms in the principal layer makes the Ca{hor_ellipsis}OH{sub 2} bond direction the preferred axis for interlayer water librations. The calculated diffusion coefficient of Cl{sup {minus}} as an outer-sphere surface complex is almost three times that of inner-sphere Cl

  11. Behavior of cationic surfactants and short-chain alcohols in mixed surface layers at water-air and polymer-water interfaces with regard to polymer wettability II. Wettability of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-10-15

    The wettability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) mixtures with short-chain alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol, as well as for 1-hexadecylpyridinium bromide (CPyB) with the same alcohols, was studied on the basis of advancing contact-angle measurements by the sessile drop method over a wide range of alcohol and cationic surfactant concentrations where they can be present in solution in monomeric or aggregated form. It should be noted that the contact angles for aqueous solution mixtures of cationic surfactants with propanol on PTFE surfaces were measured earlier and presented in our previous paper. From the obtained contact-angle values the relationships between cos theta and surface tension of the solutions (gamma(LV)) and that between adhesion tension and gamma(LV) were considered. The relationship between the cos theta and the reciprocal of gamma(LV) was also discussed. From these relationships the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting and the correlation between the adsorption of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures at water-air and polymer-water interfaces were deduced. On the basis of the contact angles and components and parameters of the surface tension of surfactants, alcohols, and polymers also the Gibbs and Guggenheim-Adam isotherm of adsorption and the effective concentration of alcohols and surfactants at polymer-water interfaces were calculated. Next, the work of adhesion of solution to polymer surface with regard to the surface monolayer composition was discussed. The analysis of the contact angles with regard to adsorption of surfactants and alcohols at polymer-water and water-air interfaces allowed us to conclude that the PTFE wetting depends only on the contribution of the acid-base interactions to the surface tension of aqueous solutions of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures, and the adhesion work of solution to its

  12. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  13. Subharmonic excitation in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in the presence of adsorbed water layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Sergio [Laboratory of Energy and Nanosciences, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barcons, Victor [Departament de Disseny i Programacio de Sistemes Electronics, UPC - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Av. Bases, 61, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Verdaguer, Albert [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (CIN2) (CSIC-ICN), Esfera UAB, Campus de la UAB, Edifici CM-7, 08193-Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Chiesa, Matteo [Laboratory of Energy and Nanosciences, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    In ambient conditions, nanometric water layers form on hydrophilic surfaces covering them and significantly changing their properties and characteristics. Here we report the excitation of subharmonics in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy induced by intermittent water contacts. Our simulations show that there are several regimes of operation depending on whether there is perturbation of water layers. Single period orbitals, where subharmonics are never induced, follow only when the tip is either in permanent contact with the water layers or in pure noncontact where the water layers are never perturbed. When the water layers are perturbed subharmonic excitation increases with decreasing oscillation amplitude. We derive an analytical expression which establishes whether water perturbations compromise harmonic motion and show that the predictions are in agreement with numerical simulations. Empirical validation of our interpretation is provided by the observation of a range of values for apparent height of water layers when subharmonic excitation is predicted.

  14. Surface-Water Conditions in Georgia, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jaime A.; Landers, Mark N.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center-in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies-collected surface-water streamflow, water-quality, and ecological data during the 2005 Water Year (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). These data were compiled into layers of an interactive ArcReaderTM published map document (pmf). ArcReaderTM is a product of Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI?). Datasets represented on the interactive map are * continuous daily mean streamflow * continuous daily mean water levels * continuous daily total precipitation * continuous daily water quality (water temperature, specific conductance dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity) * noncontinuous peak streamflow * miscellaneous streamflow measurements * lake or reservoir elevation * periodic surface-water quality * periodic ecological data * historical continuous daily mean streamflow discontinued prior to the 2005 water year The map interface provides the ability to identify a station in spatial reference to the political boundaries of the State of Georgia and other features-such as major streams, major roads, and other collection stations. Each station is hyperlinked to a station summary showing seasonal and annual stream characteristics for the current year and for the period of record. For continuous discharge stations, the station summary includes a one page graphical summary page containing five graphs, a station map, and a photograph of the station. The graphs provide a quick overview of the current and period-of-record hydrologic conditions of the station by providing a daily mean discharge graph for the water year, monthly statistics graph for the water year and period of record, an annual mean streamflow graph for the period of record, an annual minimum 7-day average streamflow graph for the period of record, and an annual peak streamflow graph for the period of record. Additionally, data can be accessed through the layer's link

  15. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  16. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  17. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  18. Potentially hazardous substances in surface waters. II. Cholinesterase inhibitors in Dutch surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greve, P.A.; Freudenthal, J.; Wit, S.L.

    1972-01-01

    Several analytical methods were employed to determine the concentrations of cholinesterase inhibitors in several Dutch surface waters. An Auto-Analyzer method was used for screening purposes; thin-layer chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for identification and q

  19. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  20. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  1. Radiolysis of water with aluminum oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Sarah C.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum oxide, Al2O3, nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H2, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. Surface analysis techniques included: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer - Emmett - Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Production of H2 by γ-ray radiolysis was determined for samples with adsorbed water and for Al2O3 - water slurries. For Al2O3 samples with adsorbed water, the radiation chemical yield of H2 was measured as 80±20 molecules/100 eV (1 molecule/100 eV=1.04×10-7 mol/J). The yield of H2 was observed to decrease as the amount of water present in the Al2O3 - water slurries increased. Surface studies indicated that the α-phase Al2O3 samples changed phase following irradiation by He ions, and that the oxyhydroxide layer, present on the pristine sample, is removed by γ-ray and He ion irradiation.

  2. Unstirred Water Layer Effects on Biodegradable Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D’Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the mechanistic aspects of in vitro release from biodegradable microspheres with the objective of understanding the effect of the unstirred water layer on polymer degradation and drug release. In vitro drug release experiments on Leuprolide PLGA microspheres were performed under “static” and “continuous” agitation conditions using the “sample and separate” method. At specified time intervals, polymer degradation, mass loss, and drug release were assessed. While molecular weight and molecular number profiles for “static” and “continuous” samples were indistinct, mass loss occurred at a faster rate in “continuous” samples than under “static” conditions. In vitro results describe a fourfold difference in drug release rates between the “continuous” and “static” samples, ascribed to the acceleration of various processes governing release, including elimination of the boundary layer. The findings were confirmed by the fourfold increase in drug release rate when “static” samples were subjected to “continuous” agitation after 11 days. A schema was proposed to describe the complex in vitro release process from biodegradable polymer-drug dosage forms. These experiments highlight the manner in which the unstirred water layer influences drug release from biodegradable microspheres and stress the importance of selecting appropriate conditions for agitation during an in vitro release study.

  3. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

  4. Structured free-water clusters near lubricating surfaces are essential in water-based lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; de Vries, Joop; Van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Water-based lubrication provides cheap and environmentally friendly lubrication and, although hydrophilic surfaces are preferred in water-based lubrication, often lubricating surfaces do not retain water molecules during shear. We show here that hydrophilic (42° water contact angle) quartz surfaces facilitate water-based lubrication to the same extent as more hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces (61°), while lubrication by hydrophilic Ge crystal surfaces (44°) is best. Thus surface hydrophilicity is not sufficient for water-based lubrication. Surface-thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that all surfaces, regardless of their water-based lubrication, were predominantly electron donating, implying water binding with their hydrogen groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ge crystal surfaces providing optimal lubrication consisted of a mixture of -O and =O functionalities, while Si crystal and quartz surfaces solely possessed -O functionalities. Comparison of infrared absorption bands of the crystals in water indicated fewer bound-water layers on hydrophilic Ge than on hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces, while absorption bands for free water on the Ge crystal surface indicated a much more pronounced presence of structured, free-water clusters near the Ge crystal than near Si crystal surfaces. Accordingly, we conclude that the presence of structured, free-water clusters is essential for water-based lubrication. The prevalence of structured water clusters can be regulated by adjusting the ratio between surface electron-donating and electron-accepting groups and between -O and =O functionalities.

  5. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bircher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankyl

  6. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  7. Adsorbed water on iron surface by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, F.W.; Campos, T.M.B.; Cividanes, L.S., E-mail: flaviano@ita.br; Simonetti, E.A.N.; Thim, G.P.

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a new force field to describe the Fe–H{sub 2}O interaction. • We developed a new force field to describe the flexible water model at low temperature. • We analyze the orientation of water along the iron surface. • We calculate the vibrational spectra of water near the iron surface. • We found a complex relationship between water orientation and the atomic vibrational spectra at different sites of adsorption along the iron surface. - Abstract: The adsorption of H{sub 2}O molecules on metal surfaces is important to understand the early process of water corrosion. This process can be described by computational simulation using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo. However, this simulation demands an efficient description of the surface interactions between the water molecule and the metallic surface. In this study, an effective force field to describe the iron-water surface interactions was developed and it was used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed a very good agreement between the simulated vibrational-DOS spectrum and the experimental vibrational spectrum of the iron–water interface. The water density profile revealed the presence of a water double layer in the metal interface. Furthermore, the horizontal mapping combined with the angular distribution of the molecular plane allowed the analysis of the water structure above the surface, which in turn agrees with the model of the double layer on metal surfaces.

  8. Surface Instability of a Vertically Oscillating Granular Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Lei; MIAO Guo-Qing; WEI Rong-Jue

    2001-01-01

    In the study of the surface instability of a vertically oscillating granular layer, we obtained experimentally thephase diagram for the surface states of the layer in the driving frequency-acceleration plane, and measured thedispersion relation for the surface waves in a granular layer in comparison to that in viscous fluids. Our experiments show that the onset dimensionless acceleration increases with the driving frequency, and the wavelengthof the surface waves increases with the depth of granular layer. These experimental results are in agreement withour theoretical model qualitatively.

  9. Water-rich planets: How habitable is a water layer deeper than on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, L.; Höning, D.; Rivoldini, A.; Heistracher, C.; Zimov, N.; Journaux, B.; Lammer, H.; Van Hoolst, T.; Bredehöft, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Water is necessary for the origin and survival of life as we know it. In the search for life-friendly worlds, water-rich planets therefore are obvious candidates and have attracted increasing attention in recent years. The surface H2O layer on such planets (containing a liquid water ocean and possibly high-pressure ice below a specific depth) could potentially be hundreds of kilometres deep depending on the water content and the evolution of the proto-atmosphere. We study possible constraints for the habitability of deep water layers and introduce a new habitability classification relevant for water-rich planets (from Mars-size to super-Earth-size planets). A new ocean model has been developed that is coupled to a thermal evolution model of the mantle and core. Our interior structure model takes into account depth-dependent thermodynamic properties and the possible formation of high-pressure ice. We find that heat flowing out of the silicate mantle can melt an ice layer from below (in some cases episodically), depending mainly on the thickness of the ocean-ice shell, the mass of the planet, the surface temperature and the interior parameters (e.g. radioactive mantle heat sources). The high pressure at the bottom of deep water-ice layers could also impede volcanism at the water-mantle boundary for both stagnant lid and plate tectonics silicate shells. We conclude that water-rich planets with a deep ocean, a large planet mass, a high average density or a low surface temperature are likely less habitable than planets with an Earth-like ocean.

  10. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  11. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  12. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  13. Seasonal cyclogenesis and the role of near-surface stratified layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.

    The role of the near-surface stratified layer developed due to the spread of low salinity waters under the influence of freshwater influx on the cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal is addressed. The seasonal variation of the Effective Oceanic Layer...

  14. Novel water filtration of saline water in the outermost layer of mangrove roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Seo, Eunseok; Chang, Suk-Kyu; Park, Tae Jung; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-02-01

    The scarcity of fresh water is a global challenge faced at present. Several desalination methods have been suggested to secure fresh water from sea water. However, conventional methods suffer from technical limitations, such as high power consumption, expensive operating costs, and limited system durability. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using halophytes as a novel technology of desalinating high-concentration saline water for long periods. This study investigated the biophysical characteristics of sea water filtration in the roots of the mangrove Rhizophora stylosa from a plant hydrodynamic point of view. R. stylosa can grow even in saline water, and the salt level in its roots is regulated within a certain threshold value through filtration. The root possesses a hierarchical, triple layered pore structure in the epidermis, and most Na+ ions are filtered at the first sublayer of the outermost layer. The high blockage of Na+ ions is attributed to the high surface zeta potential of the first layer. The second layer, which is composed of macroporous structures, also facilitates Na+ ion filtration. This study provides insights into the mechanism underlying water filtration through halophyte roots and serves as a basis for the development of a novel bio-inspired desalination method.

  15. The influence of solder mask and hygroscopic flux residues on water layer formation on PCBA surface and corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    The presence of solder flux residue on the Printed Circuit Board Assembly (PCBA) surface compromises the corrosion reliability of electronics under humid conditions and can lead to degradation of the device’s lifetime. In this work, the effect of solder mask morphology and hygroscopic residues were...

  16. White Layer of Hard Turned Surface by Sharp CBN Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-ping; SONG He-chuan; C.Richard Liu

    2005-01-01

    White layers in hard turned surfaces were identified and measured as a function of turning parameters based on the Taguchi method. It reveals that white layers generate on the machine surface in the absence of tool flank wear, and white layer depth varies with the different combinations of hard turning parameters. Turning speed has the most important impact on white layer depth, feed rate follows, and cutting depth at last. The white layer generation consequently suggests a strong couple relation to the heat generation and thermal process of hard turning operation. White layer disappears under an optimal combination of turning parameters by Taguchi method. It suggests that a superior surface integrity without white layer is feasible under some selected combinations of turning parameters by a sharp CBN cutting tool.

  17. Diffusivity and Mobility of Adsorbed Water Layers at TiO2 Rutile and Anatase Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall J. English

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to study diffusion of water molecules adsorbed to anatase-(101 and rutile-(110 interfaces at room temperature (300 K. The mean squared displacement (MSD of the adsorbed water layers were determined to estimate self-diffusivity therein, and the mobility of these various layers was gauged in terms of the “swopping” of water molecules between them. Diffusivity was substantially higher within the adsorbed monolayer at the anatase-(101 surface, whilst the anatase-(101 surface’s more open access facilitates easier contact of adsorbed water molecules with those beyond the first layer, increasing the level of dynamical inter-layer exchange and mobility of the various layers. It is hypothesised that enhanced ease of access of water to the anatase-(101 surface helps to rationalise experimental observations of its comparatively greater photo-activity.

  18. Diamond nucleation on surface of C60 thin layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国伟; 袁放成; 刘大军; 何金田; 张兵临

    1997-01-01

    Diamond nucleation on the surface of C60 thin layers and intermediate layer of Si substrates are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cross-section SEM images of diamond films show that diamond grains really nucleate on the surface of C60 thin layers. The SEM images of diamond nucleating sites show the nucleating aggregation of diamond on C60 surfaces. The preferential oriented diamond films are observed. The plasma pre-treatment of C60 sublimating layers is a key factor for diamond nucleation.

  19. Aspects of the atmospheric surface layers on Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Landberg, L.

    2002-01-01

    The structures of mean flow and turbulence in the atmospheric surface boundary layer have been extensively studied on Earth, and to a far less extent on Mars, where only the Viking missions and the Pathfinder mission have delivered in-situ data. Largely the behaviour of surface-layer turbulence a...

  20. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  1. Factors Affecting Water Permeability of Aleurone Layer in Soybean Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the immersion condition of soybean seeds on the water permeability in aleurone layer was investigated to clarify the water permeability at the initial stage of water sorption. The amounts of water absorbed in seeds coated with only aleurone layer (embryos uncovered with seed coat) and untreated seeds (embryos covered with seed coat and aleurone layer; intact seeds) were compared under several conditions of temperature, pH, ion species, and salt concentration. The relative weight...

  2. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  3. Surface modification of inorganic layer compound with organic compound and preparation of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Hideyuki; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Sumikazu; Karasu, Masa; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi; Chiba, Koji

    1997-11-01

    Water treated Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was prepared by the reaction of LDH oxide and water. By the reaction of the water treated Zn/Al LDH or amorphous metal hydroxide and organic oxychloride, surface modified inorganic layer compounds were prepared. Their layer structures were similar to those of the orginal LDHs except the reaction product of amorphous metal hydroxide and benzoyl chloride. Interlayer spacings of the reaction products were 0.77 to 2.67 nm depending on the size and number of function groups of organic compounds.

  4. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  5. Quantification of the surface brackish water layer and frontal zones in southern Chilean fjords between Boca del Guafo (43°30‧S) and Estero Elefantes (46°30‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Carolina; Sobarzo, Marcus

    2011-03-01

    The southern Chilean region between the Boca del Guafo passage and Estero Elefantes contains one of the estuarine zones with the greatest freshwater influence on the planet. At the surface, plumes of freshwater from the fjord heads to their mouths, emptying into the Moraleda-Costa-Elefantes channel system and then the coastal ocean. The influence of this freshwater on the region's estuarine dynamics, coastal ecology, and biogeochemical processes has only recently begun to be elucidated. Using hydrographic data from the CIMAR-Fiordos cruises (1998-2001), this study quantifies the equivalent height of freshwater, emphasizing the role it plays in the potential energy anomaly and front locations, as well as its relationship with river discharges. Using a criterion of equivalent height of freshwater >15% (density Elefantes), with horizontal extensions on the order of 100 km. The limits of this layer tended to coincide with frontal zones having potential energy anomaly gradients >0.005 J/m 4. The frontal zones were located in the extreme southeast of Jacaf Channel, at the head of Ventisquero Sound, in the central part of the Puyuguapi and Moraleda channels, and at the head and mouth of Aysén Fjord. The equivalent height of freshwater and potential energy anomaly showed a good correlation with the accumulated (5-day) river discharges ( r2=0.87), which were greatest toward the fjord heads in spring. The brackish surface water had short residence times (3.5 days) in Aysen Fjord, unlike the deep layer, which other authors report to have a longer residence time (near 1 year).

  6. Streamers sliding on a water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishev, Yuri Semenov; Karalnik, Vladimir; Medvedev, Mikhail; Petryakov, Alexander; Trushkin, Nikolay; Shafikov, Airat

    2017-06-01

    The features of an electrical interaction between surface streamers (thin current filaments) sliding on a liquid and liquid itself are still unknown in many details. This paper presents the experimental results on properties of the surface streamers sliding on water with different conductivity (distilled and tap water). The streamers were initiated with a sharpened thin metallic needle placed above the liquid and stressed with a periodical or pulsed high voltage. Two electrode systems were used and tested. The first of them provides in advance the existence of the longitudinal electric field above the water. The second one imitates the electrode geometry of a pin-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge in which the barrier is a thick layer of liquid. The electrical and optical characteristics of streamers were complemented with data on the spectroscopic measurements. It was revealed that surface streamers on water have no spatial memory. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  7. Influence of chloride ingress on the microstructure and water sorptivity of the surface layer of concrete%氯离子渗透对混凝土表层渗水系数及微观结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 陈晓池; 邢锋; 王卫仑

    2014-01-01

    In this study,the influences of different immersion conditions on the pore structure and surface layer sorptivity were investigated.After cured for 28 d under standard conditions,concrete specimens with different mix proportions were immersed in ultrapure water and 5% NaCl solution,and Autoclam (a surface sorptivity tester)was used to measure the evolution of surface sorptivity of the concrete specimens following time.In par-allel,paste particles taken from the specimens were cured and immersed under the same conditions,and used for pore structure characterization.It was found that immersion in NaCl solution could significantly improve the surface water-absorption resistance of concrete as compared with the ultrapure water immersion.For example, for concrete PC1,at the immersion age of 90 d,the surface water-sorptivity of concrete immersed in NaCl solu-tion was 0.91 of the specimen immersed in ultrapure water,while this factor decreased to 0.76 at the immersion age of 150 d.This influence could be attributed to the fact that the penetration of chloride ions into concrete made the pore structure finer,and reduced the volume fraction of pores under 100 nm.It was found in experi-ments that for PC1,the volume of pores under 100 nm in specimens under NaCl solution immersion was 32.42% lower than that under ultrapure water immersion,and this ratio was 57.24% for PC2.It was proved that chloride ions facilitated the hydration of cement,thus the immersion in NaCl solution helped cement paste in concrete achieving better hydration and denser microstructure.%使用不同配合比的混凝土试件及颗粒标准养护28 d后,浸泡在超纯水和5%的 NaCl 溶液中,采用表面渗透性测试仪(Autoclam)和氮气吸附法定期检测混凝土的表层渗水系数及微观孔结构,研究氯离子对混凝土表层渗水性能及水泥水化浆体微观结构的影响.结果表明,NaCl溶液浸泡会显著提高混凝土表层的抗渗能力,对PC1混凝土,浸泡90 d后,

  8. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-25

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer "ghosts" during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  9. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  10. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wirn J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  11. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Franeker, van J.A.; Cisewski, B.; Leach, H.; Putte, van de A.P.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Bathmann, U.; Wolff, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0–2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  12. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Z X; Zhang, C; Huang, X F; Liu, W B; Yang, Z G

    2015-08-13

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content.

  13. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-03-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised.

  14. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised. PMID:25731716

  15. First-principles study of the structure of water layers on flat and stepped Pb electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaohang; Evers, Ferdinand; Groß, Axel

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of perodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have addressed the geometric structures and electronic properties of water layers on flat and stepped Pb surfaces. In contrast to late d-band metals, on Pb(111) the energy minimum structure does not correspond to an ice-like hexagonal arrangement at a coverage of 2/3, but rather to a distorted structure at a coverage of 1 due to the larger lattice constant of Pb. At stepped Pb surfaces, the water layers are pinned at the step edge and form a complex network consisting of rectangles, pentagons and hexagons. The thermal stability of the water layers has been studied by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD) at a temperature of 140 K. Whereas the water layer on Pb(111) is already unstable at this temperature, the water layers on Pb(100), Pb(311), Pb(511) and Pb(711) exhibit a higher stability because of stronger water-water interactions. The vibrational spectra of the water layers at the stepped surfaces show a characteristic splitting into three modes in the O-H stretch region.

  16. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soil-structure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  17. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soilstructure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  18. Process Conditions of Forming the Surface Layer of Aluminum Powder Product by Layer-by-layer Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents data on state of the art in selective laser sintering of products. Layer-by-layer sintering is shown to be a future-oriented technology, making it possible to synthesize products of metal powder materials. Factors, influencing the quality of a sintered product, are revealed in the paper. It presents outcomes of experiments, focused on the dependence of surface layer thickness of sintered aluminum powder PA-4 on laser processing conditions. Basic factors, influencing the quality of a sintered surface layer include laser power, speeds of scanning and moving the laser beam on the layer of powder. Thickness of the sintered layer varies from 0.74 to 1.55 mm, as the result of changing the laser processing conditions.

  19. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Aaron

    2011-11-01

    A scanning electron microscope can magnify a sample many times greater than a standard microscope, down to nanoscale dimensions. It can also be used to form patterns on the surfaces of certain materials, a technique used to create microchips. We have developed a technique that simplifies and expedites this process using an unmodified scanning electron microscope. Using this technique, we are able to alter the surface chemistry in a controlled pattern on a special class of materials called transition metal dichalcogenides. These materials have many useful applications: industrial lubricants; high strength nanocomposites; advanced solar cells; and next generation electronics. Altering the surface chemistry of these materials at the nanoscale results in unusual quantum behavior, which is useful in nanotechnology.

  20. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    Surface layer temperature inversion in the south eastern Arabian Sea, during winter has been studied using Bathythermograph data collected from 1132 stations. It is found that the inversion in this area is a stable seasonal feature...

  1. Effects of stratification on an ocean surface Ekman layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hieu; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations are used to investigate the effects of stratification on structural and turbulent dynamics of an upper-ocean Ekman layer that is driven by a constant wind stress (friction velocity u*) at low latitude with Coriolis parameter f. The surface layer evolves in the presence of interior stratification whose buoyancy frequency varies among cases, taking three values: N / f = 19 , 60 and 192. At quasi-steady state, a stratified turbulent Ekman layer forms with a surface current veering to the right of the wind direction. The thickness of the Ekman layer decreases with increasing N and is found to scale with u*, f, and N, similar to the neutral atmospheric boundary layer of Zilitinkevich & Esau (2002) that is capped by a stratified layer with buoyancy frequency, N. As N increases, the speed of the Ekman current increases but the Ekman transport is invariant. The surface veering angle also increases with larger N. The shear rate and buoyancy frequency are elevated at the base of the Ekman layer. The peak of down-wind Reynolds stress occurs near the surface and scales with u*2 in all cases while the peak of cross-wind Reynolds stress occurs in the middle of the Ekman layer and decreases with increasing N.

  2. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under...

  3. Accumulation-layer surface plasmons in transparent conductive oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardad, Shima; Alexander Ramos, E; Salandrino, Alessandro

    2017-05-15

    A rigorous analytical study of the eigenmodes supported by a charge accumulation layer within a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) is presented. The new class of surface plasmons termed accumulation-layer surface plasmons (ASPs) is introduced. Near resonance ASPs are tightly bound and display a vast effective index tunability that could be of great practical interest. The suppression of ASPs in the presence of epsilon-near zero regions is discussed.

  4. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  5. Turbulence Structure of the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer and Transition to the Outer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, K. G.

    We present a new model of the structure of turbulence in the unstable atmospheric surface layer, and of the structural transition between this and the outer layer. The archetypal element of wall-bounded shear turbulence is the Theodorsen ejection amplifier (TEA) structure, in which an initial ejection of air from near the ground into an ideal laminar and logarithmic flow induces vortical motion about a hairpin-shaped core, which then creates a second ejection that is similar to, but larger than, the first. A series of TEA structures form a TEA cascade. In real turbulent flows TEA structures occur in distorted forms as TEA-like (TEAL) structures. Distortion terminates many TEAL cascades and only the best-formed TEAL structures initiate new cycles. In an extended log layer the resulting shear turbulence is a complex, self-organizing, dissipative system exhibiting self-similar behaviour under inner scaling. Spectral results show that this structure is insensitive to instability. This is contrary to the fundamental hypothesis of Monin--Obukhov similarity theory. All TEAL cascades terminate at the top of the surface layer where they encounter, and are severely distorted by, powerful eddies of similar size from the outer layer. These eddies are products of the breakdown of the large eddies produced by buoyancy in the outer layer. When the outer layer is much deeper than the surface layer the interacting eddies are from the inertial subrange of the outer Richardson cascade. The scale height of the surface layer, zs, is then found by matching the powers delivered to the creation of emerging TEAL structures to the power passing down the Richardson cascade in the outer layer. It is zs = u* 3ks, where u*s friction velocity, k is the von Káán constant and s is the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy in the outer layer immediately above the surface layer. This height is comparable to the Obukhov length in the fully convective boundary layer. Aircraft and tower

  6. The glass-liquid transition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2008-09-28

    Interactions of thin water films with surfaces of graphite and vitrified room-temperature ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF(6)])] were investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature and annealing time to elucidate the glass-liquid transition of water at the molecular level. Surface diffusion of water occurs at temperatures higher than 120 K, thereby forming three-dimensional clusters (a two-dimensional layer) on the [bmim][PF(6)] (graphite) surface. The hydrophobic effect of the surface decreases with increasing coverage of water; the bulklike properties evolve up to 40 ML, as evidenced by the occurrence of film dewetting at around the conventional glass transition temperature (140 K). Results also showed that aging is necessary for the water monolayer (a 40 ML water film) to dewet the graphite ([bmim][PF(6)]) surface. The occurrence of aging is explainable by the successive evolution of two distinct liquids during the glass-liquid transition: low density liquid is followed by supercooled liquid water. The water monolayer on graphite is characterized by the preferred orientation of unpaired OH groups toward the surface; this structure is arrested during the aging time despite the occurrence of surface diffusion. However, the water monolayer formed on the [bmim][PF(6)] surface agglomerates immediately after the commencement of surface diffusion. The structure of low density liquid tends to be arrested by the attractive interaction with the neighbors.

  7. Kapitza Resistance between Few-Layer Graphene and Water: Liquid Layering Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Dmitry; Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2015-01-01

    The Kapitza resistance (RK) between few-layer graphene (FLG) and water was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The RK was found to depend on the number of the layers in the FLG though, surprisingly, not on the water blockthickness. This distinct size dependence is attributed to the larg...

  8. Modification of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows by Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael P.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of near zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow over several superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) are presented and compared to those for a hydraulically smooth baseline. The surfaces were developed at the University of Michigan as part of an ongoing research thrust to investigate the feasibility of SHSs for skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. The SHSs were previously evaluated in fully-developed turbulent channel flow and have been shown to provide meaningful drag reduction. The TBL experiments were conducted at the USNA in a water tunnel with a test section 2.0 m (L) x 0.2 m (W) x 0.2 m (H). The free-stream speed was set to 1.26 m/s which corresponded to a friction Reynolds number of 1,500. The TBL was tripped at the test section inlet with a 0.8 mm diameter wire. The upper and side walls provided optical access, while the lower wall was either the smooth baseline or a spray coated SHS. The velocity measurements were obtained with a TSI FSA3500 two-component Laser-Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and custom-designed beam displacer operated in coincidence mode. The LDV probe volume diameter was 45 μm (approx. one wall-unit). The measurements were recorded 1.5 m downstream of the trip. When the measured quantities were normalized using the inner variables, the results indicated a significant reduction in the near wall viscous and total stresses with little effect on the flow outside the inner layer.

  9. Erosion resistance of Fe-C-Cr weld surfacing layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fe-C-Cr weld surfacing layers with different compositions and microstructures can be obtained by submerged arc welding with welding wire of the low carbon steel and high alloy bonded flux. With the increase of Cr and C in the layers the microstructures are changed from hypoeutectoid steel, hypereutectoid steel to hypoeutectic iron and hypereutectic iron. When the weld surfacing layers belong to the alloyed cast irons the erosion resistance can be raised with the eutectic increase and the austenite decrease. Good erosion resistance can be obtained when the proportion of the primary carbides is within 10 %. The experimental results lay a foundation to make double-metal percussive plates by surfacing wear resistant layers on the substrates of the low carbon steels.

  10. Digital map of test-hole, registered-water well, and surface-geophysical log sites used to estimate elevation of base of the upper layer of the phase-three Elkhorn-Loup Model, north-central Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2006, a cooperative study was established to compile reliable data describing groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins. The...

  11. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  12. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  13. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Mayser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  14. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) for Water Year 2003 (WY 2003) (October I, 2002 to September 30, 2003) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at...

  15. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  17. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-08-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  18. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  19. Solar Water Splitting and Nitrogen Fixation with Layered Bismuth Oxyhalides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Hao; Zhan, Guangming; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-01-17

    Hydrogen and ammonia are the chemical molecules that are vital to Earth's energy, environmental, and biological processes. Hydrogen with renewable, carbon-free, and high combustion-enthalpy hallmarks lays the foundation of next-generation energy source, while ammonia furnishes the building blocks of fertilizers and proteins to sustain the lives of plants and organisms. Such merits fascinate worldwide scientists in developing viable strategies to produce hydrogen and ammonia. Currently, at the forefronts of hydrogen and ammonia syntheses are solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, because they go beyond the high temperature and pressure requirements of methane stream reforming and Haber-Bosch reaction, respectively, as the commercialized hydrogen and ammonia production routes, and inherit the natural photosynthesis virtues that are green and sustainable and operate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The key to propelling such photochemical reactions lies in searching photocatalysts that enable water splitting into hydrogen and nitrogen fixation to make ammonia efficiently. Although the past 40 years have witnessed significant breakthroughs using the most widely studied TiO2, SrTiO3, (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx), CdS, and g-C3N4 for solar chemical synthesis, two crucial yet still unsolved issues challenge their further progress toward robust solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, including the inefficient steering of electron transportation from the bulk to the surface and the difficulty of activating the N≡N triple bond of N2. This Account details our endeavors that leverage layered bismuth oxyhalides as photocatalysts for efficient solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, with a focus on addressing the above two problems. We first demonstrate that the layered structures of bismuth oxyhalides can stimulate an internal electric field (IEF) that is capable of efficiently separating electrons and holes after their formation and of precisely channeling

  20. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  1. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  2. Laser alloying of the plain carbon steel surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Radziszewska

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As an example of the types of features observed after laser alloying, the addition of Ta to mild carbon steel is described. The system is of interest because such alloying is beneficial in improving surface related properties. The paper describes the microstructure and properties (phase and chemical composition, microhardness of the laser alloyed surface layer. In the investigation the optical microscope, the scanning electron microscope (SEM, chemical (EDS microanalysis composition and microhardness testing methods have been used. Specimens of 0,17 %C plain steel were coated with Ta powder layers. The paints containing organic components were used as the binders during deposition of Ta powder layers on the sample surface. The thickness of Ta deposited layers amounted to 0,16 mm. The specimens were then swept through high power (of nominal power 2,5 kW CW CO2 laser radiation at different speeds.The surface alloyed layers varied in microstructure consisted of fiber like Ta2C + γ eutectics, chemical composition and microhardness. The EDS analyses revealed the enrichment of tantalum in the laser alloyed zone (LAZ. The changes of process parameters had an influence on the hardness of alloyed surface layers: by increasing scanning velocity (from 12 mm/s to 20 mm/s and decreasing laser power (from 1,8 kW to 1,35 kW, the hardness diminished. The wear tests were also carried out which showed that laser alloying of plain carbon steel surface layer led to improvement of their wear resistance.

  3. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  4. On stratification, barotropic tides, and secular changes in surface tidal elevations: Two-layer analytical models

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Alfredo N; Cerovecki, Ivana; Hendershott, Myrl C; Karsten, Richard H; Miller, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    In this study the influence of stratification on surface tidal elevations in a two-layer analytical model is examined. The model assumes linearized, non-rotating, shallow-water dynamics in one dimension with astronomical forcing and allows for arbitrary topography. Both large scale (barotropic) and small scale (baroclinic) components of the surface tidal elevation are shown to be affected by stratification. It is also shown that the topography and basin boundaries affect the sensitivity of the barotropic surface tide to stratification significantly. In a companion paper it is shown that the barotropic tide in two-layer numerical models run in realistic global domains differs from its value in one-layer numerical models by amounts qualitatively consistent with analytic predictions from this paper. The analytical model also roughly predicts the sensitivity to perturbations in stratification in the two-layer domain model. Taken together, this paper and the companion paper therefore provide a framework to underst...

  5. Preparation and characterization of highly water-soluble magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles via surface double-layered self-assembly method of sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Honghong; Qin, Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Feng, Ying [Department of Bridge Engineering, Shanxi Railway Institute, Weinan 714000 (China); Hu, Lihua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhou, Chunhua, E-mail: chm_zhouch@ujn.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-06-15

    A kind of double-layered self-assembly sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS) capped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN) with highly water-solubility was prepared by a wet co-precipitation method with a pH of 4.8. The resulting Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN could be dispersed into water to form stable magnetic fluid without other treatments. The result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN maintained original crystalline structure and exhibited a diameter of about 7.5 nm. The iron oxide phase of nanoparticles determined by Raman spectroscopy is Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN with spherical morphology were uniformly dispersed in water. FT-IR spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) verified the successful preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered self-assembled AOS. The corresponding capacities of monolayer chemical absorption and the second-layer self-assembly absorption were respectively 4.07 and 14.71 wt% of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-MN, which were much lower than those of other surfactants. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) test result showed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN possessed superparamagnetic behavior with the saturation magnetization value of about 44.45 emu/g. The blocking temperature T{sub B} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS is 170 K. - Highlights: • Double-layered self-assembly sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS) capped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles are prepared by a wet co-precipitation method. • Double-layered Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN exhibits highly water-solubility. • The iron oxide phase is determined by Raman spectroscopy. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS possesses super-paramagnetic behavior. • The blocking temperature T{sub B} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS is 170 K.

  6. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO(2) laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm(2), respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  7. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO2 laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm2, respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  8. Role of water in polymer surface modification using organosilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallapalle, Pradeep Kumar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    In general, polymers exhibit excellent bulk properties but may not possess specific surface properties for successful applications in biomaterials and nanotechnology. Surface modification of polymers with the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes - ‘Silanization’ - is an attractive approach to alter surface properties without altering the polymer’s desired bulk properties. However, a pretreatment such as exposure to UV/O or plasma is normally required to generate active surface groups prior to silanization. These pretreatments cause undesirable surface changes such as severe surface roughening and excessive surface damage. Recent studies in silanization suggest that the presence of water or OH groups on the surface is essential to form SAMs. In this study we investigated the importance of surface water layer and OH groups in the formation of SAMs for a variety of polymers. The pre and post-modified polymers were examined using fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning probe microscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that organosilanes can be grafted to a polymer surface as long as a water layer can be physisorbed to the surface or the polymer itself contains OH groups. However the monolayers formed are less organized compared to those formed on silicon wafers due to the amorphous nature of the polymers.

  9. Study of Water Stability of Different Asphalt Mixtures for Ultra-Thin Surfacing Layer%不同类型超薄层沥青混合料的水稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏忠高

    2016-01-01

    采用浸水车辙试验和冻融劈裂试验分别评价了Type-B(美国级配)、改良型SMA-10、OGFC-10这3种级配和SBS改性沥青、普通沥青+8%抗车辙剂和高黏弹沥青3种结合料组成的9种超薄层沥青混合料的水稳定性.试验结果表明:有5种超薄层沥青混合料,即Type-B SBS改性沥青混合料、改良型SMA-10 SBS改性沥青混合料、Type-B高黏弹沥青混合料、改良型SMA-10高黏弹沥青和OGFC-10高黏弹沥青混合料满足现有规范对水稳定性的要求,其中改良型SMA-10高黏弹沥青混合料的综合性能最优,其条件前后的车辙动稳定度不仅分别是其他8种混合料的2.0~4.5倍和2.0 ~4.7倍.推荐该混合料用于重要的城市主干道、高速公路或重交通道路路面的预防性养护或维修.%By performing immersion rutting test and freeze-thaw splitting test,the water stability of nine different asphalt mixtures for ultra-thin surfacing layer was studied.The said nine asphalt mixtures were made respectively by three gradations (namely Type-B with USA gradation,improved SMA-10 and OGFC-10) and with three binders (namely SBS modified asphalt,common asphalt + 8% anti-rutting agent and highly viscoelastic asphalt).The test results show that five types of asphalt mixture for ultra-thin surfacing layer (namely Type-B SBS modified asphalt mixture,improved SMA-10 SBS modified asphalt mixture,Type-B highly viscoelastic asphalt mixture,improved SMA-10 highly viscoelastic asphalt mixture and OGFC-10 highly viscoelastic asphalt mixture) meet China' s prevailing specification for water stability of asphalt mixtures.Among them the improved SMA-10 highly viscoelastic asphalt mixture demonstrated optimal general performance with both rut dynamic stability and the immersion rutting dynamic stability 2.0 ~ 4.5 times and 2.0 ~ 4.7 times that of other eight mixtures and is thus recommended for use in pavement protective maintenance or repair of key urban artery

  10. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  11. Interfacial Water Structure in Langmuir Monolayer and Gibbs Layer Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贞; 郭源

    2012-01-01

    Langmuir monolayer and Gibbs layer exhibit surface-active properties and it can be used as simple model systems to investigate the physicochemical properties of biological membranes. In this report, we presented the OH stretching vibration of H2O in the 4"-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT), nonadecanenitrile (C18CN) Langmuir monolayer and compared them with CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface with polarization SFG-VS. This study demonstrated that the hydrogen bond network is different in the Langmuir monolayer of 5CT, C18CN from CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface which showed two different water structures on the different surface layer. The results provided a deeper insight into understanding the hydrogen bond on the interfaces.

  12. Surface modes in sheared boundary layers over impedance linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambley, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Surface modes, being duct modes localized close to the duct wall, are analysed within a lined cylindrical duct with uniform flow apart from a thin boundary layer. As well as full numerical solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, simplified mathematical models are given where the duct lining and boundary layer are lumped together and modelled using a single boundary condition (a modification of the Myers boundary condition previously proposed by the author), from which a surface mode dispersion relation is derived. For a given frequency, up to six surface modes are shown to exist, rather than the maximum of four for uniform slipping flow. Not only is the different number and behaviour of surface modes important for frequency-domain mode-matching techniques, which depend on having found all relevant modes during matching, but the thin boundary layer is also shown to lead to different convective and absolute stability than for uniform slipping flow. Numerical examples are given comparing the predictions of the surface mode dispersion relation to full solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, and the accuracy with which surface modes are predicted is shown to be significantly increased compared with the uniform slipping flow assumption. The importance of not only the boundary layer thickness but also its profile (tanh or linear) is demonstrated. A Briggs-Bers stability analysis is also performed under the assumption of a mass-spring-damper or Helmholtz resonator impedance model.

  13. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Rao, R.R.; Neetu, S.; Hegde, A.

    amplitude (~0.26°C). Heat budget analysis of the mixed layer reveals that the net surface heat loss is the most dominant process controlling the formation and maintenance of SLTI. However, there are instances of episodic advection of cold, low-saline waters...

  14. Relevance of glycosylation of S-layer proteins for cell surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-06-01

    Elucidating the building principles and intrinsic features modulating certain water-associated processes (e.g., surface roughness in the nanometer scale, surface hydration and accompanied antifouling property, etc.) of surface structures from (micro)organisms is nowadays a highly challenging task in fields like microbiology, biomimetic engineering and (bio)material sciences. Here, we show for the first time the recrystallization of the wild-type S-layer glycoprotein wtSgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and its recombinantly produced non-glycosylated form, rSgsE, on gold sensor surfaces. Whereas the proteinaceous lattice of the S-layer proteins is forming a rigid layer on the sensor surface, the glycan chains are developing an overall soft, highly dissipative film. Interestingly, to the wtSgsE lattice almost twice the amount of water is bound and/or coupled in comparison with the non-glycosylated rSgsE with the preferred region being the extending glycan residues. The present results are discussed in terms of the effect of the glycan residues on the recrystallization, the adjoining hydration layer, and the nanoscale roughness and fluidic behavior. The latter features may turn out to be one of the most general ones among bacterial and archaeal S-layer lattices.

  15. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Qiu, Qiwen; Xing, Feng; Pan, Dong

    2014-05-30

    This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively) were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days.

  16. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days.

  17. Wetting layer of copper on the tantalum (001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Maxime; Poloni, Roberta; Ratter, Kitti; Rodney, David; De Santis, Maurizio; Gilles, Bruno; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial interface formed by copper deposited onto the tantalum (001) surface is studied by surface x-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations. The analysis of the crystal truncation rods reveals the presence of a wetting layer of copper made of two atomic planes pseudomorphic to the tantalum substrate, with the upper most atomic planes significantly deformed. These findings are in total agreement with the results of density-functional-theory calculations. The presence of the wetting layer confirms a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and is thought to explain the extremely fast atomic diffusion of copper during the dewetting process in the solid state at high temperature.

  18. Stress distribution and surface instability of an inclined granular layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng He-Peng; Jiang Yi-Min; Peng Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Static granular materials may avalanche suddenly under continuous quasi-static drives.This phenomenon,which is important in many engineering applications,can be explained by analyzing the stability of the elastic solutions.We show this for a granular layer driven by its inclination angle in gravity,where the elastic problem can be solved generally and analytically.It is found that a loss of stability may occur only at the free surface of the layer.This result is considered to be relevant for understanding surface avalanches and the flows observed experimentally.

  19. Chromized Layers Produced on Steel Surface by Means of CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKA Ewa; BOGDA(N)SKI Bogdan; JEZIORSKI Leopold; JASI(N)SKI J(o)zef; TORBUS Roman

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of chromium on the surface of carbon steel has been investigated using a novel CVD method that combines the low cost of pack cementation method with advantages of vacuum technique. The processes have been performed in chromium chlorides atmosphere at a low pressure range from 1 to 800 hPa, the treatment temperature 800 to 950℃. Studies of the layers thickness, the phase composition, Cr, C and Fe depth profiles in diffusion zone have been conducted. The effect of the vacuum level during the process and the process parameters such as time and temperature on layer diffusion growth on the carbon steel surface has been investigated.

  20. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  1. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  2. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  3. Phosphorus Speciation of Forest-soil Organic Surface Layers using P K-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Prietzel; J Thieme; D Paterson

    2011-12-31

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx}70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx}30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  4. Surface Modification of Electrospun PVDF/PAN Nanofibrous Layers by Low Vacuum Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Yalcinkaya; Baturalp Yalcinkaya; Adam Pazourek; Jana Mullerova; Martin Stuchlik; Jiri Maryska

    2016-01-01

    Nanofibres are very promising for water remediation due to their high porosity and small pore size. Mechanical properties of nanofibres restrict the application of pressure needed water treatments. Various PAN, PVDF, and PVDF/PAN nanofibre layers were produced, and mechanical properties were improved via a lamination process. Low vacuum plasma treatment was applied for the surface modification of nanofibres. Atmospheric air was used to improve hydrophilicity while sulphur hexafluoride gas was...

  5. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers: interior dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrnström, Mats; Villari, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    We study small-amplitude steady water waves with multiple critical layers. Those are rotational two-dimensional gravity-waves propagating over a perfect fluid of finite depth. It is found that arbitrarily many critical layers with cat's-eye vortices are possible, with different structure at different levels within the fluid. The corresponding vorticity depends linearly on the stream function.

  6. Evaluating the performance of land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN v1.0 on water and energy flux estimation with a single- and multi-layer energy budget scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Bastrikov, Vladislav; McGrath, Matthew J.; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; Ottlé, Catherine; Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Valade, Aude; Black, Andrew; Elbers, Jan A.; Moors, Eddy; Foken, Thomas; van Gorsel, Eva; Haverd, Vanessa; Heinesch, Bernard; Tiedemann, Frank; Knohl, Alexander; Launiainen, Samuli; Loustau, Denis; Ogée, Jérôme; Vessala, Timo; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2016-09-01

    Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions, as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between the land surface and the overlying air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget in the ORCHIDEE-CAN v1.0 land surface model (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit coupling procedure. We aim to provide a set of acceptable parameter values for a range of forest types. Top-canopy and sub-canopy flux observations from eight sites were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad-leaved and evergreen needle-leaved forest with a maximum leaf area index (LAI; all-sided) ranging from 3.5 to 7.0. The parametrization approach proposed in this study was based on three selected physical processes - namely the diffusion, advection, and turbulent mixing within the canopy. Short-term sub-canopy observations and long-term surface fluxes were used to calibrate the parameters in the sub-canopy radiation, turbulence, and resistance modules with an automatic tuning process. The multi-layer model was found to capture the dynamics of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature, and energy fluxes. The performance of the new multi-layer model was further compared against the existing single-layer model. Although the multi-layer model simulation results showed few or no improvements to both the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter compared with a single-layer model simulation, the increased model complexity does provide a more detailed description of the canopy micrometeorology of various forest types. The multi-layer model links to potential future environmental and ecological studies such as the assessment of in

  7. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than the worker permissible dose limits to values very higher than the permissible dose limits.

  8. Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2013-05-01

    By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle Θ = 108°) or perfluorosilane (Θ = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces.

  9. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  10. Insights into the effects of patchy ice layers on water balance heterogeneity in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Simon; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands in boreal and sub-arctic settings are characterised by a high degree of seasonality. During winter soils are frozen and snow covers the surface preventing peat moss growth. Conversely, in summer, soils unfreeze and rain and evapotranspiration drive moss productivity. Although advances have been made in understanding growing season water balance and moss dynamics in northern peatlands, there remains a gap in knowledge of inter-seasonal water balance as layers of ice break up during the spring thaw. Understanding the effects of ice layers on spring water balance is important as this coincides with periods of high wildfire risk, such as the devastating Fort McMurrary wildfire of May, 2016. We hypothesise that shallow layers of ice disconnect the growing surface of moss from a falling water table, and prevent water from being supplied from depth. A disconnect between the evaporating surface and deeper water storage will lead to the drying out of the surface layer of moss and a greater risk of severe spring wildfires. We utilise the unsaturated flow model Hydrus 2D to explore water balance in peat layers with an impermeable layer representing ice. Additionally we create models to represent the heterogeneous break up of ice layers observed in Canadian boreal peatlands; these models explore the ability of breaks in an ice layer to connect the evaporating surface to a deeper water table. Results show that peatlands with slower rates of moss growth respond to dry periods by limiting evapotranspiration and thus maintain moist conditions in the sub-surface and a water table above the ice layer. Peatlands which are more productive continue to grow moss and evaporate during dry periods; this results in the near surface mosses drying out and the water table dropping below the level of the ice. Where there are breaks in the ice layer the evaporating surface is able to maintain contact with a falling water table, but connectivity is limited to above the breaks, with

  11. Surface modification of layered zirconium phosphate with PNIPAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhao, Di; Medina, Ilse B Nava; Diaz, Agustin; Wang, Huiliang; Clearfield, Abraham; Mannan, M Sam; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-04-04

    A new method was reported to modify layered zirconium phosphate (ZrP) with thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAM (poly N-isopropylacrylamide). PNIPAM was proved to be covalently grafted onto ZrP. (60)Co γ-rays irradiation produced peroxide groups on the surface which, upon heating, initiated free radical polymerization and subsequent attachment of PNIPAM.

  12. Removal of surface layers from plated materials: upgrading of scrap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapper, G.; Sloterdijk, W.; Verbraak, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper a description is given of a method developed for the purpose of removing surface layers from plated materials. The principle of separation is based on the difference in vapour pressures and stabilities with the formation of metal chlorides. A series of pyrolytic experiments was carried

  13. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  14. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  15. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  16. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices appe

  17. Convective boundary layers driven by nonstationary surface heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, R.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the response of dry convective boundary layers to nonstationary surface heat fluxes is systematically investigated. This is relevant not only during sunset and sunrise but also, for example, when clouds modulate incoming solar radiation. Because the time scale of the associated change

  18. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  19. A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region

  20. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; Prasanna Kumar, S.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Rao, R. R.; Neetu, S.; Hegde, Akshay

    2016-08-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable impacts on climate and postmonsoon tropical cyclones. Lack of systematic measurements from the BoB in the past prevented a thorough investigation of the SLTI spatiotemporal variability, their formation mechanisms, and their contribution to the surface temperature variations. The present study benefits from the recent Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA) buoys located in BoB along 90°E at 4°N, 8°N, 12°N, and 15°N over the 2006-2014 period. Analysis of data from these RAMA buoys indicates that SLTI forms after the summer monsoon and becomes fully developed during winter (December-February). SLTI exhibits a strong geographical dependency, with more frequent (80% times during winter) and intense inversions (amplitude, ΔT ˜ 0.7°C) occurring only in the northern BoB compared to central and southern Bay. SLTI also exhibits large interannual and intraseasonal variations, with intraseasonal amplitude significantly larger (ΔT ˜ 0.44°C) than the interannual amplitude (˜0.26°C). Heat budget analysis of the mixed layer reveals that the net surface heat loss is the most dominant process controlling the formation and maintenance of SLTI. However, there are instances of episodic advection of cold, low-saline waters over warm-saline waters leading to the formation of SLTI as in 2012-2013. Vertical processes contribute significantly to the mixed layer heat budget during winter, by warming the surface layer through entrainment and vertical diffusion.

  1. Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Surface Water Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset showing the locations of surface water intakes. These intake locations are part of the safe drinking water information system...

  2. Layer-by-layer assembly surface modified microbial biomass for enhancing biorecovery of secondary gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Nengwu; Kang, Naixin; Cao, Yanlan; Shi, Chaohong; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Qin, Benqian

    2017-02-01

    Enhancement of the biosorption capacity for gold is highly desirable for the biorecovery of secondary gold resources. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI) was grafted on Shewanella haliotis surface through layer-by-layer assembly approach so as to improve the biosorption capacity of Au(III). Results showed that the relative contribution of amino group to the biosorption of Au(III) was the largest one (about 44%). After successful grafting 1, 2 and 3-layer PEI on the surface of biomass, the biosorption capacity significantly enhanced from 143.8mg/g to 597.1, 559.1, and 536.8mg/g, respectively. Interestingly, the biomass modified with 1-layer PEI exhibited 4.2 times higher biosorption capacity than the untreated control. When 1-layer modified biomass was subjected to optimizing the various conditions by response surface methodology, the theoretical maximum adsorption capacity could reach up to 727.3mg/g. All findings demonstrated that PEI modified S. haliotis was effective for enhancing gold biorecovery.

  3. Anti-Aliased Rendering of Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Qin; Eihachiro Nakamae; Wei Hua; Yasuo Nagai; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Water surface is one of the most important components of landscape scenes. When rendering spacious far from the viewpoint. This is because water surface consists of stochastic water waves which are usually modeled by periodic bump mapping. The incident rays on the water surface are actually scattered by the bumped waves,pattern, we estimate this solid angle of reflected rays and trace these rays. An image-based accelerating method is adopted so that the contribution of each reflected ray can be quickly obtained without elaborate intersection calculation. We also demonstrate anti-aliased shadows of sunlight and skylight on the water surface. Both the rendered images and animations show excellent effects on the water surface of a reservoir.

  4. Preparation of Two-Layer Anion-Exchange Poly(ethersulfone Based Membrane: Effect of Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Zarybnicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the surface modification of a commercial microfiltration poly(ethersulfone membrane by graft polymerization technique. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene-co-4-vinylbenzylchloride surface layer was covalently attached onto the poly(ethersulfone support layer to improve the membrane electrochemical properties. Followed by amination, a two-layer anion-exchange membrane was prepared. The effect of surface layer treatment using the extraction in various solvents on membrane morphological and electrochemical characteristics was studied. The membranes were tested from the point of view of water content, ion-exchange capacity, specific resistance, permselectivity, FT-IR spectroscopy, and SEM analysis. It was found that the two-layer anion-exchange membranes after the extraction using tetrahydrofuran or toluene exhibited smooth and porous surface layer, which resulted in improved ion-exchange capacity, electrical resistance, and permselectivity of the membranes.

  5. Influencing factors on elastic-plastic deformation of multi-layered surfaces under sliding contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li; PAN Xin-xiang; XU Jiu-jun; CHENG Dong

    2004-01-01

    Stress distribution in the gradient multi-layered surface under a sliding contact was investigated using finite element method(FEM). The main structure parameters of layered surface discussed are total layer thickness,layer number and elastic modulus ratio of layer to the substrate. A model of multi-layered surface contact with rough slider was studied. The effect of the surface structure parameters on the elastic-plastic deformation was analyzed.

  6. Ultrathin and Flat Layer Black Phosphorus Fabricated by Reactive Oxygen and Water Rinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksang; Seo, Sung Won; Kim, Tae Gun; Lee, Eun Seong; Lanh, Phung Thi; Yang, Sena; Ryu, Sunmin; Kim, Jeong Won

    2016-09-27

    Ultrathin black phosphorus (BP) is one of the promising two-dimensional (2D) materials for future optoelectronic devices. Its chemical instability in ambient conditions and lack of a bottom-up approach for its synthesis necessitate efficient etching methods that generate BP films of designed thickness with stable and high-quality surfaces. Herein, reporting a photochemical etching method, we demonstrate a controlled layer-by-layer thinning of thick BP films down to a few layers or a single layer and confirm their Raman and photoluminescence characteristics. Ozone molecules generated by O2 photolysis oxidize BP, forming P2O5-like oxides. When the resulting phosphorus oxides are removed by water, the surface of BP with preset thickness is highly flat and self-protective by surface oxygen functional groups. This method provides a fabrication strategy of BP and possibly other 2D semiconductors with band gaps tuned by their thickness.

  7. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN THE RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA DUMITRAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is an increasingly important and why it is important to surfacewater quality, which is given by the analysis of physical - chemical, biological andobserving the investigation of water, biota, environments investigation. Analysis ofthe Prut river in terms of biological and physical elements - chemical. Evaluationof ecological and chemical status of water was done according to order of approvalof the standard classification nr.161/2006 surface water to determine the ecologicalstatus of water bodies

  8. Surface properties of solids and surface acoustic waves: Application to chemical sensors and layer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    A general phenomenological approach is given for the description of mechanical surface properties of solids and their influence on surface acoustic wave propogation. Surface properties under consideration may be changes of the stress distribution in subsurface atomic layers, the presence of adsorbed gas molecules, surface degradation as a result of impacts from an aggressive environment, damage due to mechanical manufacturing or polishing, deposition of thin films or liquid layers, surface corrugations, etc. If the characteristic thickness of the affected layers is much less than the wavelengths of the propagating surface waves, then the effects of all these irregularities can be described by means of non-classical boundary conditions incorporating the integral surface parameters such as surface tension, surface moduli of elasticity and surface mass density. The effect of surface properties on the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves is analysed in comparison with the results of traditional approaches, in particular with Auld's energy perturbation method. One of the important implications of the above-mentioned boudnary conditions is that they are adequate for the description of the effect of rarely distributed adsorbed atoms or molecules. This allows, in particular, to obtain a rigorous theoretical description of chemical sensors using surface acoustic waves and to derive analytical expressions for their sensitivity.

  9. Covalent layer-by-layer grafting (LBLG) functionalized superhydrophobic stainless steel mesh for oil/water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hongjie; Sun, Yongli; Zhang, Luhong; Xu, Lidong; Hao, Li; Yang, Huawei

    2017-06-01

    A superhydrophobic and superoleophilic stainless steel (SS) mesh for oil/water separation has been developed by using a novel, facile and inexpensive covalent layer-by-layer grafting (LBLG) method. Hierarchical micro/nanostructure surface was formed through grafting the (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (SCA), polyethylenimine (PEI) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) onto the mesh in sequence, accompanied with SiO2 nanoparticles subtly and firmly anchored in multilayers. Superhydrophobic characteristic was realized by self-assembly grafting of hydrophobic groups onto the surface. The as-prepared mesh exhibits excellent superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 159°. Moreover, with a low sliding angle of 4°, it shows the ;lotus effect; for self-cleaning. As for application evaluation, the as-prepared mesh can be used for large-scale separation of oil/water mixtures with a relatively high separation efficiency after 30 times reuse (99.88% for n-octane/water mixture) and a high intrusion pressure (3.58 kPa). More importantly, the mesh exhibited excellent stability in the case of vibration situation, long-term storage as well as saline corrosion conditions, and the compatible pH range was determined to be 1-13. In summary, this work provides a brand new method of modifying SS mesh in a covalent LBLG way, and makes it possible to introduce various functionalized groups onto the surface.

  10. Water environment and zooplankton community structures in surface and bottom layer seawater in mari-culture area in Dapeng Cove coastal water%大鹏澳养殖海域表底层水环境及浮游动物群落结构的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓邦平; 杨宇峰

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal changes in water environment culture and zooplankton community between the sea surface layer and the bottom layer in fish fanning area, shellfish farming area and control area in Dapeng Cove were studied during May 2007- Apr. 2008. The results showed that the difference of DO level between the two layers were significant (p <0.01), the annual average concentrations of DO in the sea surface layer were 5.46,7.26 and 8.10 mg/L, respectively. The highest annual average concentrations of TN ,TP, PO4-P, SiO3 -Si, TIN and the lowest value of pH were all recorded in the fish fanning area. 82 species of zooplankton were recorded during the survey period. The similarity of the species composition between the sea surface layer and the bottom layer were 85.37%. Protozoans and nauplii are the most dominant component, accounting for 93.63% ,91.64% ,81.69% in the sea surface layer and 92.04% , 90.33% ,82.83% in the bottom layer of the total zooplankton abundance,respectively. The difference of the densities of zooplankton between the two layers were significant (p <0.05). The densities of zooplankton were higher in the sea surface layer than in the bottom layer. The size-frequency distributions showed that the frequency of micro-zooplankton ( <0.2 mm) was higher in the sea surface layer (0.533) than in the bottom layer (0.367 ) .the frequency of micro-zooplankton ( <0.3 mm) was higher in the mariculture area (0.785) than in the control area (0.540).The small-sized zooplankton was dominant in the mariculture area in Dapeng Cove.%2007年5月~2008年4月对大鹏澳鱼类养殖区、贝类养殖区、自然海区(对照区)进行了每月一次的调查,分析比较了不同站点表底层水环境因子和浮游动物种类组成、数量变动的季节差异.结果表明:3个站点表层溶解氧年均值分别为5.46、7.26和8.10 mg/L,表层高于底层,表底层差异极显著(p<0.01);总氮(TN)、总磷(TP)、活性磷酸盐(PO4-P)、活性硅酸盐(SiO3-Si

  11. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  12. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Anirban

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on the surface through energy budget in a convective atmospheric boundary layer has received little attention. The main objective of the present study is to examine the turbulence-induced surface temperature fluctuations for different surface properties and stratification. Experiments were performed to measure atmospheric turbulence using sonic anemometers, fine wire thermocouples and LIDAR; and surface temperature using an infra-red camera over grass and artificial turf fields. The surface temperature fluctuations were found to be highly correlated to the turbulent coherent structures and follow the processes postulated in the surface renewal theory. The spatio-temporal scales and advection speed of the surface temperature fluctuation were found to match with those of turbulent coherent structures. A parametric direct numerical simulation (DNS) study was then performed by solving the solid-fluid heat transport mechanism numerically for varying solid thermal properties, solid thickness and strength of stratification. Even though there were large differences in the friction Reynolds and Richardson numbers between the experiments and numerical simulations, similar turbulent characteristics were observed. The ejection (sweep) events tend to be aligned with the streamwise direction to form roll vortices with unstable stratification. The solid-fluid interfacial temperature fluctuations increase with the decreases in solid thermal inertia; and with the increase in solid thickness to

  13. The studies of scale surface produced on outer diffusion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Augustyn-Pieniążek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study at attempt was made to examine the scale formed on ferritic-austenitic duplex type steel subjected to previous thermochemical treatment. The treatment consisted in diffusion aluminising in a metallising mixture composed of Fe-Al powder. As an activator, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl added in an amount of 2 wt.% was used. Then, both the base material and samples with the diffusiondeposited surface layers were oxidised at 1000°C in the air. Thus formed scales were identified by light microscopy, SEM and X-ray phase analysis. The aim of the oxidation tests carried out under isothermal conditions was to compare the scale morphology when obtained on untreated substrate material and on the surface layers rich in aluminium.

  14. Flows induced by sorption on fibrous material in a two-layer oil-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplina, T. O.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Stepanova, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The processes of sorption on fibrous materials in the open elliptic cell filled with a two-layer oil-water liquid at rest are investigated experimentally. When the sorption efficiency dependent on the type of material proves to be reasonably high, large-scale flows are formed in the liquid. In this case, the uniformity of distribution of oil is violated and the free surface of the water is partially restored. The trajectories of motion of individual oil droplets on a released water surface are tracked, and the transfer rates are calculated in various phases of the process.

  15. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  16. Manufacturing and characterisation of water repellent surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Botija, Pablo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    design criteria for such surfaces. The problem of adapting this behaviour to artificially roughened surfaces is addressed by providing design criteria for superhydrophobic, water-repellent and self-cleaning surfaces according to the concrete performance desired for them. Different kind of manufacturing...

  17. Surface-plasmons lasing in double-graphene-layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinov, A. A. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Electronics, and System Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    We consider the concept of injection terahertz lasers based on double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures with metal surface-plasmon waveguide and study the conditions of their operation. The laser under consideration exploits the resonant radiative transitions between GLs. This enables the double-GL laser room temperature operation and the possibility of voltage tuning of the emission spectrum. We compare the characteristics of the double-GL lasers with the metal surface-plasmon waveguides with those of such laser with the metal-metal waveguides.

  18. Studies of stability of blade cascade suction surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xue-zhi; YAN Pei-gang; HAN Wan-jin

    2007-01-01

    Compressible boundary layers stability on blade cascade suction surface was discussed by wind tunnel experiment and numerical solution. Three dimensional disturbance wave Parabolized Stability Equations(PSE) of orthogonal Curvilinear Coordinates in compressible flow was deducted. The surface pressure of blade in wind tunnel experiment was measured. The Falkner-Skan equation was solved under the boundary conditions of experiment result, and velocity, pressure and temperature of average flow were obtained. Substituted this result for discretization of the PSE Eigenvalue Problem, the stability problem can be solved.

  19. Diffusion Carbide Layers, Formed on the Surface of Steel in the Vacuum Titanizing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKAEwa; SENATORSKIJan; NAKONIECZNYAleksander; BABULTomasz

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion layers produced on carbon steel surface in vacuum titanizing process were investigated. Studies of layers thickness, their morphology, titanium, carbon and iron concentration depth profiles in the diffusion zone of titanized layers were carried out. The effect of process parameters such as time and temperature on the kinetics of layer growth on steel surface was investigated. Tribocorrosion resistance of titanized layers was determined.

  20. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The MN Department of Agriculture (MDA) is charged with periodically collecting and analyzing water samples from selected locations throughout the state to determine...

  1. Influence of building resolution on surface water inundation outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess water is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of all UK flood risk. This risk is predicted to increase due to future climatic changes resulting in an increasing magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain an understanding of the depth, extent and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although numerical models allow the simulation of surface water inundation in a particular region, the model parameters (e.g. roughness, hydraulic conductivity) and resolution of topographic data have been shown to exert a profound influence on the inundation outputs which often leads to an over- or under-estimation of flood depths and extent without the use of external validation data to calibrate model outputs. Although previous research has demonstrated that model outputs are highly sensitive to Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mesh resolution, with flood inundation over large and complex topographies often requiring mesh resolutions coarser than the structural features (e.g. buildings) present within the study catchment, the specific influence of building resolution on surface flowpaths and connectivity during a surface water flood event has not been investigated. In this study, a LiDAR-derived DEM and OS MasterMap buildings layer of the Loughborough University campus, UK, were rasterized into separate 1m, 5m and 10m resolution layers. These layers were combined to create a series of Digital Surface Models (DSM) with varying, mismatching building and DEM resolutions (e.g. 1m DEM resolution, 10m building resolution, etc.) to understand

  2. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 104 and 106, spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  3. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  4. Quantum Chemical Study of Water Adsorption on the Surfaces of SrTiO3 Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Andrei V; Kuruch, Dmitry D; Evarestov, Robert A

    2015-07-20

    We have studied the adsorption of water molecules on the inner and outer surfaces of nanotubes generated by rolling (001) layers of SrTiO3 cubic crystals. The stability and the atomic and electronic structures of the adsorbed layers are determined by using hybrid density functional theory. The absorption energy and the preferred adsorbate structure are essentially governed by the nature of the surface of the nanotube. Dissociative adsorption prevails on the outer nanotube surfaces. The stability of the adsorbed layers on the inner surfaces is related to the possibility of the formation of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and surface oxygen atoms, and depends on the surface curvature. The presence of water molecules on the inner surface of the nanotubes leads to an increase of the electronic band gap. Externally TiO2 -terminated nanotubes could be used for the photocatalytic decomposition of water by ultraviolet radiation.

  5. Strain relief and disorder in commensurate water layers formed on Pd(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, F; Omer, A; Clay, C M; Cummings, L; Darling, G R; Hodgson, A

    2012-03-28

    Water adsorbs and desorbs intact on Pd(111), forming a hydrogen-bonded wetting layer whose structure we examine by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and He atom scattering (HAS). LEED shows that water forms commensurate (√3 × √3)R30° clusters that aggregate into a partially ordered, approximately (7 × 7) superstructure as the layer completes. HAS indicates that the water layer remains disordered on a local (approximately 10 Å) scale. Based on workfunction measurements and density functional theory simulations we propose that water forms small, flat domains of a commensurate (√3 × √3)R30° water network, separated by disordered domain boundaries containing largely H-down water. This arrangement allows the water layer to adapt its density and relieve the lateral strain associated with adsorbing water in the optimum flat atop adsorption site. We discuss different possibilities for the structure of these domain walls and compare this strain relief mechanism to the highly ordered, large unit cell structures formed on surfaces such as Pt(111).

  6. Tailored surface engineering of pigments by layer-by-layer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähne, Lars; Schneider, Julia; Lewe, Dirk; Petersen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of layer-by-layer encapsulation technology for the improvement of dye pigments used for tattoos or permanent make-up. The formation of core-shell structures is possible by coating pigments with thin films of several different polyelectrolytes using this technology. The physicochemical surface properties, such as charge density and chemical functionality, can be reproducibly varied in a wide range. Tailoring the surface properties independently from the pigment core allows one to control the rheological behaviour of pigment suspensions, to prevent aggregation between different pigments, to reduce the cytotoxicity, and to influence the response of phagocytes in order to have similar or the same uptake and bioclearance for all pigments. These properties determine the durability and colour tone stability of tattoos and permanent make-up.

  7. Critical heat flux maxima resulting from the controlled morphology of nanoporous hydrophilic surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault-Friend, Melanie; Azizian, Reza; Bucci, Matteo; McKrell, Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Rubner, Michael; Cohen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Porous hydrophilic surfaces have been shown to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling heat transfer. In this work, the separate effects of pore size and porous layer thickness on the CHF of saturated water at atmospheric pressure were experimentally investigated using carefully engineered surfaces. It was shown that, for a fixed pore diameter (˜20 nm), there is an optimum layer thickness (˜2 μm), for which the CHF value is maximum, corresponding to ˜115% enhancement over the value for uncoated surfaces. Similarly, a maximum CHF value (˜100% above the uncoated surface CHF) was observed while changing the pore size at a constant layer thickness (˜1 μm). To explain these CHF maxima, we propose a mechanistic model that can capture the effect of pore size and pore thickness on CHF. The good agreement found between the model and experimental data supports the hypothesis that CHF is governed by the competition between capillary wicking, viscous pressure drop and evaporation, as well as conduction heat transfer within the porous layer. The model can be used to guide the development of engineered surfaces with superior boiling performance.

  8. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-08-16

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition.

  9. Study of near-surface layers of Omerelu area using low velocity layer (LVL method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajani, O.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we have good knowledge of the soil type so as to appreciate the enormous resources we are stepping on. It is more compelling for oil explorationists to know more as this will go a long way to determine the success or failure of search for minerals. Seismic methods give a good overview of a wide area though they involve greater logistics and operational requirements than some other geophysical methods. The purpose of present study is to determine the depth of the weathered layer and velocities of near-surface layers over the investigated area. Twelve sample points were picked with a grid system spread over a perimeter of approximately 4km x 4km. The in-house UpSphere computer program was utilised to analyse and display result in a way that makes final interpretation very easy. This program actually removed the burden of plotting the graphs and the contour maps manually. The depth of weathered layer in the study area varies between 12m and 13m. The velocities of the weathered layer and the consolidated layer vary between 500 m/s – 550 m/s and 1790 m/s – 1875 m/s respectively. Also the dip is in the north east – south west direction.

  10. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  11. MODIFICATION OF SURFACE LAYERS FOR SILICATE GLASSES BY ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Brunov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research results of silicate glass surface layers modification by the influence of electron beams with 5-50 keV energies and 20-50 mC/cm2 doses are presented. It is shown that during the glasses exposure to an electron beam with 20-50 keV electron energies, a gradient optical waveguide with increased refractive index on waveguide axis Δn = 0.01-0.04 is formed in the surface layer. Сhemical etching rate is increased in the exposed area by up to two times which is related to glass grid destruction. Depending on irradiation dose thin film or silver nanoparticles with the size less than 20nm are formed on the surface of the silver containing glasses for electron energies less than 10 keV. Silver films drawn on the surface of the glass are dissolved into the glass bulk for electron energies 20-50 keV and 20-50 mC/cm2 dose. Basic mechanisms causing these effects are: chemical bonds breaking of spatial glass grid by high energy electrons, formation of negative volume charge inside the glass and field migration of positive metal ions into the volume charge region. Achieved results can be used in photonics, integral optics and nanoplasmonics device fabrication.

  12. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  13. In-situ surface hardening of cast iron by surface layer metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sebastian F., E-mail: s.fischer@gi.rwth-aachen.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Muschna, Stefan, E-mail: smuschna@yahoo.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas, E-mail: sekretariat@gi.rwth-aachen.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Bünck, Matthias, E-mail: m.buenck@access-techcenter.de [Access e.V., Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-10-06

    Abrasive wear is a serious problem in many cast iron castings used in industry. To minimize failure and repair of these components, different strategies exist to improve their surface microhardness thus enhancing their wear resistance. However, most of these methods lead to very brittle and/or expensive castings. In the current work a new method for surface hardening is presented which utilizes surface layer metallurgy to generate in-situ a boron-enriched white cast iron surface layer with a high microhardness on a gray cast iron casting. To do this, sand molds are coated with a ferroboron suspension and cast with a cast iron melt. After solidification, a 100–900 µm thick layer of boron-enriched ledeburite is formed on the surface of the casting which produces an increase in the average microhardness from 284 HV{sub 0.1}±52 HV{sub 0.1} to 505 HV{sub 0.1}±87 HV{sub 0.1}. Analyses of the samples' core reveal a typical cast iron microstructure which leads to the conclusion that the coating mainly affects the castings' surface. By varying the grain size of the ferroboron powder in the coatings, it is shown that a powder size ≤100 µm is most suitable to create a boron-enriched ledeburite surface layer possessing high hardness values.

  14. Study on tribological properties of multi-layer surface texture on Babbitt alloys surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongya; Zhao, Feifei; Li, Yan; Li, Pengyang; Zeng, Qunfeng; Dong, Guangneng

    2016-12-01

    To improve tribological properties of Babbitt alloys, multi-layer surface texture consisted of the main grooves and secondary micro-dimples are fabricated on the Babbitt substrate through laser pulse ablation. The tribological behaviors of multi-layer surface texture are investigated using a rotating type pin-on-disc tribo-meter under variation sliding speeds, and the film pressure distributions on the textured surfaces are simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for elucidating the possible mechanisms. The results suggest that: (i) the multi-layer surface texture can reduce friction coefficient of Babbitt alloy, which has lowest friction coefficient of 0.03, in case of the groove parameter of 300 μm width and 15% of area density; (ii) the improvement effect may be more sensitive to the groove area density and the siding speed, and the textured surface with lower area density has lower friction coefficient under high sliding speed. Based on the reasons of (i) the secondary micro-dimples on Babbitt alloy possesses a hydrophobicity surface and (ii) the CFD analysis indicates that main grooves enhancing hydrodynamic effect, thus the multi-layer surface texture is regarded as dramatically improve the lubricating properties of the Babbitt alloy.

  15. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  16. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  17. How water meets a hydrophobic surface: Reluctantly and with flucuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynor Torigoe, Adele Nichole

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low density region forms near the surface. This depleted region would have implications in such diverse areas as colloidal self-assembly, and the boundary conditions of fluid flow. However, the literature still remains divided as to whether or not such a depleted region exists. To investigate the existence of this layer, we have employed three surface-sensitive techniques, time-resolved phase-modulated ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance, and X-ray reflectivity. Both ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity provide strong evidence for the low-density layer and illuminate unexpected temporal behavior. Using all three techniques, we found surprising fluctuations at the interface with a non-Gaussian distribution and a single characteristic time on the order of tenths of seconds. This information supports the idea that the boundary fluctuates with something akin to capillary waves. We have also investigated the dependence of the static and dynamic properties of the hydrophobic/water interface on variables such as temperature, contact angle, pH, dissolved gasses, and sample quality, among others, in a hope to discover the root of the controversy in the literature. We found that the depletion layer is highly dependent on temperature, contact angle and sample quality. This dependence might explain some of the discrepancies in the literature as different groups often use hydrophobic surfaces with different properties.

  18. Lightness constancy through transparency: internal consistency in layered surface representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetric lightness matching was employed to measure how the visual system assigns lightness to surface patches seen through partially-transmissive surfaces. Observers adjusted the luminance of a comparison patch seen through transparency, in order to match the lightness of a standard patch seen in plain view. Plots of matched-to-standard luminance were linear, and their slopes were consistent with Metelli's alpha. A control experiment confirmed that these matches were indeed transparency based. Consistent with recent results, however, when observers directly matched the transmittance of transparent surfaces, their matches deviated strongly and systematically from Metelli's alpha. Although the two sets of results appear to be contradictory, formal analysis reveals a deeper mutual consistency in the representation of the two layers. A ratio-of-contrasts model is shown to explain both the success of Metelli's model in predicting lightness through transparency, and its failure to predict perceived transmittance--and hence is seen to play the primary role in perceptual transparency.

  19. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  20. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  1. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Peters, W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere is key to modelling boundary-layer meteorology and cloud formation, as well as carbon cycling and crop yield. In this study we explore these interactions in the exchange of water, heat and CO2 in a cropland-atmosphere system at the diurnal and local scale. To that end, we couple an atmospheric mixed-layer model (MXL) to two land-surface schemes developed from two different perspectives: while one land-surface scheme (A-gs) simulates vegetation from an atmospheric point of view, the other (GECROS) simulates vegetation from a carbon-storage point of view. We calculate surface fluxes of heat, moisture and carbon, as well as the resulting atmospheric state and boundary-layer dynamics, over a maize field in the Netherlands, on a day for which we have a rich set of observations available. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the role of upper-atmosphere conditions like subsidence in comparison to the role of surface forcings like soil moisture. We show that the atmospheric-oriented model (MXL-A-gs) outperforms the carbon storage-oriented model (MXL-GECROS) on this diurnal scale. We find this performance is partly due to the difference of scales at which the models were made to run. Most importantly, this performance strongly depends on the sensitivity of the modelled stomatal conductance to water stress, which is implemented differently in each model. This sensitivity also influences the magnitude of the surface fluxes of CO2, water and heat (surface control) and subsequently impacts the boundary-layer growth and entrainment fluxes (upper atmosphere control), which alter the atmospheric state. These findings suggest that observed CO2 mole fractions in the boundary layer can reflect strong influences of both the surface and upper-atmosphere conditions, and the interpretation of CO2 mole fraction variations depends on the assumed land-surface coupling. We illustrate this with a sensitivity

  2. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  3. Upper layer waters and their northward extension from Prydz Bay in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲书箴; 董兆乾; 胡筱敏; 于非; 陈幸荣

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, CTD observational data obtained during the 15th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE-15) in the Southern Ocean are used to analyse and study water mass distribution in the Prydz Bay and its adjacent seas. The area, depth, and the thermohaline characteristics are identified for the Prydz Bay summer coastal surface water, the Prydz Bay winter water, the Prydz Bay shelf water, and the circumpolar deep water. Based on the above discussion, the northward extention of the Prydz Bay shelf water are found. Then the thermodynamic and the dynamic characteristics are further discussed, dealing with the inversion layer depth of the water temperature, the locations of the minima of the vertical temperature distribution and the temperature vertical gradient in the water column, the baraclinicity, and the effect of Coriolis deflection force.

  4. Durable superhydrophobic surfaces made by intensely connecting a bipolar top layer to the substrate with a middle connecting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jinghui; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2017-08-30

    This study reported a simple fabrication method for a durable superhydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic top layer of the durable superhydrophobic surface was connected intensely to the substrate through a middle connecting layer. Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560) after hydrolysis was used to obtain a hydrophilic middle connecting layer. It could be adhered to the hydrophilic substrate by covalent bonds. Ring-open reaction with octadecylamine let the KH-560 middle layer form a net-like structure. The net-like sturcture would then encompass and station the silica particles that were used to form the coarse micro structures, intensely to increase the durability. The top hydrophobic layer with nano-structures was formed on the KH-560 middle layer. It was obtained by a bipolar nano-silica solution modified by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). This layer was connected to the middle layer intensely by the polar Si hydroxy groups, while the non-polar methyl groups on the surface, accompanied by the micro and nano structures, made the surface rather hydrophobic. The covalently interfacial interactions between the substrate and the middle layer, and between the middle layer and the top layer, strengthened the durability of the superhydrophobic surface. The abrasion test results showed that the superhydrophobic surface could bear 180 abrasion cycles on 1200 CW sandpaper under 2 kPa applied pressure.

  5. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALPFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources,...

  6. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku

    2013-07-01

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO2, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  7. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Gikan H., E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO{sub 2}, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  8. Exit Creek Water Surface Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from a longitudinal profile of water surface surveyed June 23-24, 2013 at Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai...

  9. US Forest Service Surface Drinking Water Importance

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting watershed indexes to help identify areas of interest for protecting surface drinking water quality. The dataset depicted in this...

  10. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  11. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  12. Processing and properties of electrodeposited layered surface coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    clacks and spalls off early on. For thick, non-compliant coatings, much thicker coatings can be formed. Fracture resistance must be considered in relation to both specimen and loading geometries. Since the inherent bending moment causes a maximum tensile stress at the coating surface, the loading......Hard chromium, produced by conventional dir ect curl ent (DC) electrodeposition, cannot be deposited to thicknesses gl enter than about 5 mu m because of the buildup of processing stresses which cause channel cracks in the coating. Much thicker chromium coatings map be produced by depositing...... a layered structure using alternate DC plating and periodic current reversal (PR). Such layering produces a through thickness stepped gradient in residual stresses. Most importantly a bending moment develops in the coating whenever the substrate is compliant. For thin, compliant substrates, the coating...

  13. [Investigation of the surface layer of 3D-matrices for tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernonosova, V S; Kvon, R I; Kiseleva, E V; Stepanova, A O; Laktionov, P P

    2017-01-01

    Electrospinning is a convenient and promising manufacturing method a variety of materials for tissue engineering. 3D matrices fabricated by electrospinning from solutions of polycaprolactone with human serum albumin or gelatin in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol were studied. The microstructure of the 3D matrices and surface of the fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Protein distribution in the surface layer was studied by modification of protein amino groups with N-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenazine and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was shown, that concentration of the proteins in the surface layer of fibers exceeded their concentration in the initial electrospun solution up to 12 times and the surface layer was enriched in the protein inversely to the concentration of the protein in solution. The minor part of the proteins was released from fibers during first 30-60 min after swelling in water. Treatment of matrices with proteinase K hydrolyzed about 1/3 of the surface exposed human serum albumin. Thus, both methods can be used to study the surface content of the materials produced by electrospinning from blends of synthetic and natural polymers, however X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy appears to be more convenient and informative.

  14. Neutralized wettability effect of superhydrophilic Cr-layered surface on pool boiling critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hong Hyun; Jeong, Ui Ju; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Kim, Sung Joong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The former method is deemed challenging due to longer development period and license issue. In this regard, FeCrAl, Cr, and SiC have been received positive attention as ATF coating materials because they are highly resistant to high temperature steam reaction causing massive hydrogen generation. In this study, Cr was selected as a target deposition material on the metal substrate because we found that Cr-layered surface becomes superhydrophilic, favorable to delaying the triggering of the critical heat flux (CHF). Thus in order to investigate the effect of Cr-layered superhydrophilic surfaces (under explored coating conditions) on pool boiling heat transfer, pool boiling experiment was conducted in the saturated deionized water under atmospheric pressure. As a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method, the DC magnetron sputtering technique was introduced to develop Cr-layered nanostructure. As a control variable of DC sputtering, substrate temperature was selected. Surface wettability and nanostructure were analyzed as major surface parameters on the CHF. We believe that highly dense micro/nano structure without nucleation cavities and inner pores neutralized the wettability effect on the CHF. Moreover, superhydrophilic surface with deficient cavity density rather hinders active nucleation. This emphasizes the importance of micro/nano structure surface for enhanced boiling heat transfer.

  15. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  16. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  17. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauner, Ines M; Deblais, Antoine; Beattie, James K; Kellay, Hamid; Bonn, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m(-1)) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m(-1)) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments.

  18. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  19. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water, and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Combe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere is key to model boundary-layer meteorology and cloud formation, as well as carbon cycling and crop yield. In this study we explore these interactions in the exchange of water, heat, and CO2 in a cropland–atmosphere system at the diurnal and local scale. We thereto couple an atmospheric mixed-layer model (MXL to two land-surface schemes, developed from two different perspectives: while one land-surface scheme (A-gs simulates vegetation from an atmospheric point of view, the other (GECROS simulates vegetation from a carbon-storage point of view. We calculate surface fluxes of heat, moisture and carbon, as well as the resulting atmospheric state and boundary-layer dynamics, over a maize field in the Netherlands, for a day on which we have a rich set of observations available. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the role of upper atmosphere conditions like subsidence, in comparison to the role of surface forcings like soil moisture. We show that the atmospheric-oriented model (MXL-A-gs outperforms the carbon storage-oriented model (MXL-GECROS on this diurnal scale. This performance strongly depends on the sensitivity of the modelled stomatal conductance to water stress, which is implemented differently in each model. This sensitivity also influences the magnitude of the surface fluxes of CO2, water and heat (surface control, and subsequently impacts the boundary-layer growth and entrainment fluxes (upper atmosphere control, which alter the atmospheric state. These findings suggest that observed CO2 mole fractions in the boundary layer can reflect strong influences of both the surface and upper atmospheric conditions, and the interpretation of CO2 mole fraction variations depends on the assumed land-surface coupling. We illustrate this with a sensitivity analysis where increased subsidence, typical for periods of drought, can induce a change of 12 ppm in

  20. Tensile strength of oxygen plasma-created surface layer of PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Taiki; Noda, Haruka; Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Jile, Huge; Deguchi, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commonly used silicone elastomer with broad applications. Particularly for bioengineering use, PDMS is treated with oxygen plasma with which its surface is oxidized to allow positive interaction with water and live cells. In exchange for the acquisition of hydrophilicity, the oxidized PDMS becomes mechanically brittle so that resulting formation of cracks affects the system in various ways. However, tensile strength (TS), which is an inherent capacity of a material to withstand tensile loads before breaking and is thus a key parameter limiting the use of the material, remains unclear regarding oxidized PDMS. Here we determine the TS of oxide layers created on the surface of PDMS based on micro-stretch experiments using a custom-made device. We show that the surface layer displays cracks upon tensile loading of small strains of within 10% to have a TS of ~10-100 kPa, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of unmodified PDMS. We further show that the TS sharply decreases with oxidation duration to become highly brittle, while the thickness of the resulting oxide layer finally reaches a plateau even with prolonged plasma treatment. Consequently, we suggest that gradual surface modification of PDMS takes place only within a finite region even with prolonged plasma treatment, as distinct from previously held assumptions. These quantitative data provide critical design information for the oxide layer of plasma-hydrophilized PDMS.

  1. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during convention

  2. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during

  3. Some physical aspects of the surface waters around the little Andaman Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, C.S.; Das, P.K.; Gouveia, A.D.

    Along with the thermal and haline characteristics of the waters during the peak northeast monsoon period (February),observations on stratifications, inversions, mixed layers, nature and depth of thermocline, wind-induced surface drifts, zones...

  4. Anomalous water drop bouncing on a nanotextured surface by the Leidenfrost levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Jin; Song, Young Seok

    2016-05-01

    We report an anomalous liquid drop bouncing phenomenon that is generated by the Leidenfrost levitation due to a vapor layer reducing energy dissipation during the collision. The Leidenfrost levitation of water drops on both a hydrophobic surface and nanotextured Cassie surface is investigated. When the water drop is positioned onto the hydrophobic surface, a superhydrophobic feature is observed by the levitation effect due to the vapor film, which results in a slow evaporation of the drop due to the low thermal conductivity of the vapor layer that inhibits heat transfer between the heated surface and the water drop. In contrast, for the nanotextured surface, the water drop can bounce off after impact on the surface when it overcomes gravitational and adhesion forces. The spontaneous water drop bouncing on the nanotextured surface is powered by the combination effect of the Leidenfrost levitation and the non-wetting Cassie state.

  5. Structure-phase states of the nickel surface layers after electroexplosive carburizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Budovskikh; E.; A.; Bagautdinov; A.; Y.; Ivanov; Yu.; F.; Martusevich; E.; V.; Gromov; V.; E.

    2005-01-01

    The layer by layer study of the structure-phase states of the nickel surface layer carburizing with use the phenomena of the electrical explosion has conducted by the method TEM of the fine foils.……

  6. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  8. Superwetting double-layer polyester materials for effective removal of both insoluble oils and soluble dyes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bucheng; Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Seeger, Stefan; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-07-23

    Inspired by the mussel adhesive protein and the lotus leaf, Ag-based double-layer polyester (DL-PET) textiles were fabricated for effective removal of organic pollutants in water. The DL-PET textiles are composed of a top superamphiphilic layer and a bottom superhydrophobic/superoleophilic layer. First, the PET textiles were modified with a layer of polydopamine (PDA) and deposited with Ag nanoparticles to form the PET@PDA@Ag textiles. The top superamphiphilic layer, formed by immobilizing Ag3PO4 nanoparticles on the PET@PDA@Ag textile, shows excellent visible-light photocatalytic activity. The bottom superhydrophobic/superoleophilic layer, formed by modifying the PET@PDA@Ag textile using dodecyl mercaptan, is mechanically, environmentally, and chemically very stable. The water-insoluble oils with low surface tension can penetrate both layers of the DL-PET textiles, while the water with soluble organic dyes can only selectively wet the top layer owing to their unique wettability. Consequently, the water-soluble organic contaminants in the collected water can be decomposed by the Ag3PO4 nanoparticles of the top layer under visible-light irradiation or even sunlight in room conditions. Thus, the DL-PET textiles can remove various kinds of organic pollutants in water including both insoluble oils and soluble dyes. The DL-PET textiles feature unique wettability, high oil/water separation efficiency, and visible-light photocatalytic activity.

  9. Aqueous oxidation reaction enabled layer-by-layer corrosion of semiconductor nanoplates into single-crystalline 2D nanocrystals with single layer accuracy and ionic surface capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Muwei; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Jiatao

    2016-02-25

    A controllable aqueous oxidation reaction enabled layer-by-layer corrosion has been proposed to prepare high-quality two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor nanocrystals with single layer accuracy and well-retained hexagonal shapes. The appropriate oxidizing agent, such as H2O2, Fe(NO3)3, and HNO3, could not only corrode the layered-crystalline-structured Bi2Te3 nanoplates layer-by-layer to be a single quintuple layer, but also replace the organic barriers to be ionic ligands on the surface synergistically. AFM analysis was used to confirm the layer-by-layer exfoliation from the side to the center. Together with precise XRD, LRTEM and HRTEM characterizations, the controllable oxidation reaction enabled aqueous layer-by-layer corrosion mechanism has been studied.

  10. Surface Modification of Electrospun PVDF/PAN Nanofibrous Layers by Low Vacuum Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Yalcinkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibres are very promising for water remediation due to their high porosity and small pore size. Mechanical properties of nanofibres restrict the application of pressure needed water treatments. Various PAN, PVDF, and PVDF/PAN nanofibre layers were produced, and mechanical properties were improved via a lamination process. Low vacuum plasma treatment was applied for the surface modification of nanofibres. Atmospheric air was used to improve hydrophilicity while sulphur hexafluoride gas was used to improve hydrophobicity of membranes. Hydrophilic membranes showed higher affinity to attach plasma particles compared to hydrophobic membranes.

  11. Monodisperse gold nanoparticles formed on bacterial crystalline surface layers (S-layers) by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieluweit, S. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Pum, D. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Sleytr, U.B. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, W. [Department for Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2005-12-15

    The fabrication of patterned arrays of nanoparticles whose electronic, optical and magnetic properties will find technological applications, such as ultra-high-density memories, is currently one of the most important objectives of inorganic material research. In this study, the in situ electroless nucleation of ordered two-dimensional arrays of gold nanoparticles (5 nm in size) by using bacterial S-layers as molecular templates and their characterization by small spot X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS) is presented. This yielded the elemental composition of the nanoclusters, which consisted of almost entirely elemental gold, and possible side reactions on the cluster and protein surface. The preferential deposition of the gold nanoparticles on the S-layer suggests that topography and functional groups are important for superlattice formation.

  12. Bioinspired, roughness-induced, water and oil super-philic and super-phobic coatings prepared by adaptable layer-by-layer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-01

    Coatings with specific surface wetting properties are of interest for anti-fouling, anti-fogging, anti-icing, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation applications. Many previous bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. Here, a layer-by-layer technique is utilized to create coatings with four combinations of water and oil repellency and affinity. An adapted layer-by-layer approach is tailored to yield specific surface properties, resulting in a durable, functional coating. This technique provides necessary flexibility to improve substrate adhesion combined with desirable surface chemistry. Polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and silane or fluorosurfactant layers are deposited, combining surface roughness and necessary chemistry to result in four different coatings: superhydrophilic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic/superoleophobic. The superoleophobic coatings display hexadecane contact angles >150° with tilt angles 160° with tilt angles <2°. One coating combines both oleophobic and hydrophobic properties, whilst others mix and match oil and water repellency and affinity. Coating durability was examined through the use of micro/macrowear experiments. These coatings display transparency acceptable for some applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, functional coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either durability or functionality is compromised.

  13. Bioinspired, roughness-induced, water and oil super-philic and super-phobic coatings prepared by adaptable layer-by-layer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Coatings with specific surface wetting properties are of interest for anti-fouling, anti-fogging, anti-icing, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation applications. Many previous bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. Here, a layer-by-layer technique is utilized to create coatings with four combinations of water and oil repellency and affinity. An adapted layer-by-layer approach is tailored to yield specific surface properties, resulting in a durable, functional coating. This technique provides necessary flexibility to improve substrate adhesion combined with desirable surface chemistry. Polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and silane or fluorosurfactant layers are deposited, combining surface roughness and necessary chemistry to result in four different coatings: superhydrophilic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic/superoleophobic. The superoleophobic coatings display hexadecane contact angles >150° with tilt angles 160° with tilt angles oleophobic and hydrophobic properties, whilst others mix and match oil and water repellency and affinity. Coating durability was examined through the use of micro/macrowear experiments. These coatings display transparency acceptable for some applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, functional coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either durability or functionality is compromised. PMID:26353971

  14. On the use of surface neutron-gamma gauges to estimate soil water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, T.T.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Reichardt, K. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Timm, L.C

    2002-09-01

    Surface neutron-gamma gauges are handy instruments to measure soil water contents and bulk densities of surface layers. Although available for some decades, their optimal use is still not well established. This study is a contribution to improve their use, mainly in relation to calibration, and of the effect of soil dry bulk density on soil water content measurements.

  15. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  16. Intermittency and energy fluxes in the surface layer of free-surface turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Troiani, Guido; Olivieri, Angelo; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing hot-wire velocity data taken in an open channel flow, an unambiguous definition of surface-layer thickness is here provided in terms of the cross-over scale between backward and forward energy fluxes. It is shown that the turbulence in the surface layer does not conform to the classical description of two-dimensional turbulence, since the direct energy cascade persists at scales smaller than the cross-over scale, comparable with the distance from the free-surface. The multifractal analysis of the one-dimensional surrogate of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in terms of generalized dimensions and singularity spectrum indicates that intermittency is strongly depleted in the surface layer, as shown by the singularity spectrum contracted to a single point. The combination of intermittency indicators and energy fluxes allowed to identify the specific nature of the surface layer as alternative to classical paradigms of three- and two-dimensional turbulence which cannot fully capture the gl...

  17. Studying surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Fallah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of water exchange in a region or area, which emphasizes the principle of conservation of matter in the water cycle, is called balance. Investigating their balance is the basis for managing the rivers’ water management, the results of which refer to the change rate in surface water supply and can efficiently be used in decision making and optimal use of water resources. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS. In so doing, digital topographic maps, soil map of the area, and meteorological data retrieved from the regional stations were used to prepare layers of precipitation, evaporation and infiltration of rainwater into the soil. Discharge-arearegion comparative method was employed to measure the amount of runoff and base flow for each sub-basin in raster form saved per unit area which was subsequently overlapped based on balance equation, and the balance of the region was displayed in a graphical mode. The results indicated that more surface water is wasted in the southeast and central area of the province.

  18. First-order chemistry in the surface-flux layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    1997-01-01

    process, The analytic flux solution showed a clear deviation from the constant flux, characterizing a conserved scalar in the surface-flux layer. It decreases with height and is reduced by an order of magnitude of the surface flux at a height equal to about the typical mean distance a molecule can travel...... before destruction. The predicted mean concentration profile, however, shows only a small deviation from the logarithmic behavior of a conserved scalar. The solution is consistent with assuming a flux-gradient relationship with a turbulent diffusivity corrected by the Damkohler ratio, the ratio...... of a characteristic turbulent time scale and the scalar mean lifetime. We show that if we use only first-order closure and neglect the effect of the Damkohler ratio on the turbulent diffusivity we obtain another analytic solution for the profiles of the flux and the mean concentration which, from an experimental...

  19. A numerical model for chemical reaction on slag layer surface and slag layer behavior in entrained-flow gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns with slag layer accumulation, chemical reaction on slag layer surface, and slag layer flow, heat and mass transfer on the wall of entrained-flow coal gasifier. A slag layer model is developed to simulate slag layer behaviors in the coal gasifier. This 3-D model can predict temperature, slag particle disposition rate, disposition particle composition, and syngas distribution in the gasifier hearth. The model is used to evaluate the effects of O2/coal ratio on slag layer behaviors.

  20. Plasma Nitriding of Austenitic Stainless Steel with Severe Surface Deformation Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; WANG Liang; SUN Jun-cai; HEI Zu-kun

    2004-01-01

    The dc glow discharge plasma nitriding of austenite stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer is used to produce much thicker surface modified layer. This kind of layers has useful properties such as a high surface hardness of about 1500 Hv 0.1 and high resistance to frictional wear. This paper presents the structures and properties of low temperature plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer.

  1. Evolution of vortex-surface fields in transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Yaomin; Xiong, Shiying

    2016-11-01

    We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), a Lagrangian-based structure-identification method, to the DNS database of transitional boundary layers. The VSFs are constructed from the vorticity fields within a sliding window at different times and locations using a recently developed boundary-constraint method. The isosurfaces of VSF, representing vortex surfaces consisting of vortex lines with different wall distances in the laminar stage, show different evolutionary geometries in transition. We observe that the vortex surfaces with significant deformation evolve from wall-parallel planar sheets through hairpin-like structures and packets into a turbulent spot with regeneration of small-scale hairpins. From quantitative analysis, we show that a small number of representative or influential vortex surfaces can contribute significantly to the increase of the drag coefficient in transition, which implies a reduced-order model based on VSF. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472015, 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  2. Conceptual Tenets of the Theory of Hydration of Heterogeneous Surface with Polar Order of Disperse Ground Layers of Sedimentary Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara G. Makeeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article, basing on the established regularity defines the basic tenets of the theory of hydration of heterogeneous surface with polar order of disperse ground layers of sedimentary genesis. It offers classification and formula for the associated water density, valid corrections for the associated water density, calculates the water film thickness in disperse ground, develops the reliable physicochemical model of the disperse ground, determines the range of applicability of the existing laboratory and field methods.

  3. Crystalline Bacterial Surface Layer (S-Layer) Opens Golden Opportunities for Nanobiotechnology in Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Narges; Chand, Nima; Rassa, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the successful recrystallization of bacterial S-layer arrays of the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 at textile surfaces to create a novel method and material. Optimum bacterial growth was obtained at approximately 45 °C, pH 5.0, and 14 h pi. The cells were resuspended in guanidine hydrochloride and the 43 kDa S-protein was dialyzed and purified. The optimum reassembly on the polypropylene fabric surface in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflectance, and uniformity (spectrophotometry) was obtained at 30 °C, pH 5.0 for 30 minutes in the presence of 2 gr/l (liquor ratio; 1:40) of the S-protein. Overall, our data showed that the functional aspects and specialty applications of the fabric would be very attractive for the textile and related sciences, and result in advanced technical textiles.

  4. Groundwater - surface water interactions in the Ayeyarwady river delta, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, K.; Haruyama, S.; Kuzuha, Y.; Kay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is widely used as a water resource in the Ayeyarwady River delta. But, Groundwater has some chemical problem in part of the area. To use safety groundwater for health, it is important to make clear the actual conditions of physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater in this delta. Besides, Ayeyarwady River delta has remarkable wet and dry season. Surface water - groundwater interaction is also different in each season, and it is concerned that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater is affected by the flood and high waves through cyclone or monsoon. So, it is necessary to research a good aquifer distribution for sustainable groundwater resource supply. The purposes of this study are evaluate to seasonal change of groundwater - surface water interactions, and to investigate the more safety aquifer to reduce the healthy risk. Water samples are collected at 49 measurement points of river and groundwater, and are analyzed dissolved major ions and oxygen and hydro-stable isotope compositions. There are some groundwater flow systems and these water qualities are different in each depth. These showed that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater are closely related to climatological, geomorphogical, geological and land use conditions. At the upper Alluvium, groundwater quality changes to lower concentration in wet season, so Ayeyarwady River water is main recharge water at this layer in the wet season. Besides, in the dry season, water quality is high concentration by artificial activities. Shallower groundwater is affected by land surface conditions such as the river water and land use in this layer. At lower Alluvium, Arakan and Pegu mountains are main recharge area of good water quality aquifers. Oxygen18 value showed a little affected by river water infiltration in the wet season, but keep stable good water quality through the both seasons. In the wet season, the same groundwater exists and water quality changes through

  5. Water vapor interactions with polycrystalline titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, A.; Shamir, N.; Volterra, V.; Mintz, M. H.

    1999-02-01

    The initial interactions of water vapor with polycrystalline titanium surfaces were studied at room temperature. Measurements of water vapor surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analysis system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry (DRS), Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The kinetics of accommodation of the water dissociation fragments (H, O and OH) displayed a complex behavior depending not only on the exposure dose but also on the exposure pressure. For a given exposure dose the efficiency of chemisorption increased with increasing exposure pressure. DRS measurements indicated the occurrence of clustered hydroxyl moieties with tilted O-H bonds formed even at very low surface coverage. A model which assumes two parallel routes of chemisorption, by direct collisions (Langmuir type) and by a precursor state is proposed to account for the observed behavior. The oxidation efficiency of water seemed to be much lower than that of oxygen. No Ti 4+ states were detected even at high water exposure values. It is likely that hydroxyl species play an important role in the reduced oxidation efficiency of water.

  6. Surface heterogeneity impacts on boundary layer dynamics via energy balance partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Brunsell

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of land-atmosphere interactions under heterogeneous surface conditions is investigated in order to identify mechanisms responsible for altering surface heat and moisture fluxes. Twelve coupled land surface – large eddy simulation scenarios with four different length scales of surface variability under three different horizontal wind speeds are used in the analysis. The base case uses Landsat ETM imagery over the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC field site for 3 June 2007. Using wavelets, the surface fields are band-pass filtered in order to maintain the spatial mean and variances to length scales of 200 m, 1600 m, and 12.8 km as lower boundary conditions to the model. The simulations exhibit little variation in net radiation. Rather, a change in the partitioning of the surface energy between sensible and latent heat flux is responsible for differences in boundary layer dynamics. The sensible heat flux is dominant for intermediate surface length scales. For smaller and larger scales of surface heterogeneity, which can be viewed as being more homogeneous, the latent heat flux becomes increasingly important. The results reflect a general decrease of the Bowen ratio as the surface conditions transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous. Air temperature is less sensitive to surface heterogeneity than water vapor, which implies that the role of surface heterogeneity in modifying the local temperature gradients in order to maximize convective heat fluxes. More homogeneous surface conditions, on the other hand, tend to maximize latent heat flux. Scalar vertical profiles respond predictably to the partitioning of surface energy. Fourier spectra of the vertical wind speed, air temperature and specific humidity (w, T and q and associated cospectra (w'T', w'q' and T'q', however, are insensitive to the length scale of surface heterogeneity, but the near surface spectra are sensitive to the

  7. Stability of Water Ice Beneath Porous Dust Layers of the Martian South Polar Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. U.; Skorov, Yu. V.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    2000-08-01

    The analysis of the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data show that the surface layers of the Mars south polar layered deposits have very low thermal inertia between 75 and 125 J/(sq m)(s-1/2)(K-1). This is consistent with the assumption that the surface is covered by a porous layer of fine dust. Paige and Keegan determined a slightly higher value based on a thermal model similar to that of Kieffer et al. In this model the heat transfer equation is used to estimate the thickness of the layer that protects the ground ice from seasonal and diurnal temperature variations. The physical properties of the layer are unimportant as long as it has a low thermal inertia and conductivity and keeps the temperature at the ice boundary low enough to prevent sublimation. A thickness between 20 and 4 cm was estimated. This result can be considered to be an upper limit. We assume the surface to be covered by a porous dust layer and consider the gas diffusion through it, from the ground ice and from the atmosphere. Then the depth of the layer is determined by the mass flux balance of subliming and condensing water and not by the temperature condition. The dust particles in the atmosphere are of the order 1 gm. On the surface we can expect larger grains (up to sand size). Therefore assuming an average pore size of 10 gm, a volume porosity of 0.5, a heat capacity of 1300 J/(kg-1)(K-1) leads to a thermal inertia of approx. 80 J/(sq m)(s-1/2)(K-1). With these parameters a dust layer of only 5 mm thickness is found to establish the flux balance at the ice-dust interface during spring season in the southern hemisphere at high latitudes (where Mars Polar Lander arrived). The diurnal temperature variation at the ice-dust surface is shown. The maximum of 205 K well exceeds the sublimation temperature of water ice at 198 K under the atmospheric conditions. The corresponding vapour flux during the last day is shown together with the flux condensing from the atmosphere. The calculations

  8. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The surface of Mars once had abundant water flowing on its surface, but now there is a general perception that this surface is completely dry. Several lines of research have shown that there are sources of potentially large quantities of water at many locations on the surface, including regions considered as candidates for future human missions. Traditionally, system designs for these human missions are constrained to tightly recycle water and oxygen, and current resource utilization strategies involve ascent vehicle oxidizer production only. But the assumption of relatively abundant extant water may change this. Several scenarios were constructed to evaluate water requirements for human Mars expeditions to assess the impact to system design if locally produced water is available. Specifically, we have assessed water resources needed for 1) ascent vehicle oxidizer and fuel production, 2) open-loop water and oxygen life support requirements along with more robust usage scenarios, and 3) crew radiation protection augmentation. In this assessment, production techniques and the associated chemistry to transform Martian water and atmosphere into these useful commodities are identified, but production mass and power requirements are left to future analyses. The figure below illustrates the type of water need assessment performed and that will be discussed. There have been several sources of feedstock material discussed in recent literature that could be used to produce these quantities of water. This paper will focus on Mars surface features that resemble glacier-like forms on Earth. Several lines of evidence indicate that some of these features are in fact buried ice, likely remnants from an earlier ice age on Mars. This paper examines techniques and hardware systems used in the polar regions of Earth to access this buried ice and withdraw water from it. These techniques and systems will be described to illustrate options available. A technique known as a Rodriguez Well

  9. Interaction of ethanol and water with the {1014} surface of calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Gray, R J; Sand, K K;

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model the interaction between ethanol, water, and the {1014} surface of calcite. Our results demonstrate that a single ethanol molecule is able to form two interactions with the mineral surface (both Ca-O and O-H), resulting in a highly ordered......, stable adsorption layer. In contrast, a single water molecule can only form one or other of these interactions and is thus less well bound, resulting in a more unstable adsorption layer. Consequently, when competitive adsorption is considered, ethanol dominates the adsorption layer that forms even when...... the starting configuration consists of a complete monolayer of water at the surface. The computational results are in good agreement with the results from atomic force microscopy experiments where it is observed that a layer of ethanol remains attached to the calcite surface, decreasing its ability to interact...

  10. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  11. Local environmental conditions and the stability of protective layers on steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J.P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Bursik, A.

    1996-12-01

    Local environmental conditions determine whether the protective layers on steel surfaces are stable. With unfavorable local environmental conditions, the protective layers may be subject to damage. Taking the cation conductivity of all plant cycle streams <0.2 {mu}S/cm for granted, an adequate feed-water and - if applicable - boiler water conditioning is required to prevent such damage. Even if the mentioned conditions are met in a bulk, the local environmental conditions may be inadequate. The reasons for this may be the disregarding of interactions among material, design, and chemistry. The paper presents many possible mechanisms of protective layer damage that are directly influenced or exacerbated by plant cycle chemistry. Two items are discussed in more detail: First, the application of all volatile treatment for boiler water conditioning of drum boiler systems operating at low pressures and, second, the chemistry in the transition zone water/steam in the low pressure turbine. The latter is of major interest for the understanding and prevention of corrosion due to high concentration of impurities in the aqueous liquid phases. This is a typical example showing that local environmental conditions may fundamentally differ from the overall bulk chemistry. (au) 19 refs.

  12. Diffraction of Water Waves by A Vertically Floating Cylinder in A Two-Layer Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the diffraction of water waves by a vertically floating cylinder in a two-layer luid of a finite depth is studied. Analytical expressions for the hydrodynamic loads on the vertically floating cylinder are obtained by use of the method of eigenfunction expansions. The hydrodynamic loads on the vertically floating cylinder in a two-layer fluid include not only the surge, heave and pitch exciting forces due to the incident wave of the surface-wave mode, but also those due to the incident wave of the internal-wave mode. This is different from the case of a homogenous fluid. Some given examples show that, for a two-layer fluid system with a small density difference, the hydrodynamic loads for the surface-wave mode do not differ significantly from those due to surface waves in a single-layer fluid, but the hydrodynamic loads for the internal-wave mode are important over a wide range of frequencies. Moreover, also considered are the free surface and interface elevations generated by the diffraction wave due to the incident wave of the surface-wave and internal-wave modes, and transfer of energy between modes.

  13. Electrolysis of water on (oxidized) metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    directly from the electronic structure calculations. We consider electrodes of Pt(111) and Au(111) in detail and then discuss trends for a series of different metals. We show that the difficult step in the water splitting process is the formation of superoxy-type (OOH) species on the surface...... by the splitting of a water molecule on top an adsorbed oxygen atom. One conclusion is that this is only possible on metal surfaces that are (partly) oxidized. We show that the binding energies of the different intermediates are linearly correlated for a number of metals. In a simple analysis, where the linear...... relations are assumed to be obeyed exactly, this leads to a universal relationship between the catalytic rate and the oxygen binding energy. Finally, we conclude that for systems obeying these relations, there is a limit to how good a water splitting catalyst an oxidized metal surface can become. (c) 2005...

  14. Surface free energy and wettability of silyl layers on silicon determined from contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil J

    2005-05-30

    Using the literature data of the advancing and receding contact angles for water, diiodomethane and hexadecane measured on various hydrophobic silyl layers (mostly monolayers) produced on silicon wafers the apparent surface free energies gamma(s)(tot) were calculated by applying new model of the contact angle hysteresis interpretation. It was found that, for the same silyl layer, the calculated gamma(s)(tot) values to some degree depended on the probe liquid used. Therefore, thus calculated the surface free energies should be considered as apparent ones. Moreover, also the values of the dispersion component gamma(s)(d) of these layers depend on the probe liquid used, but to a less degree. This must be due to the strength of the force field originating from the probe liquid and the spacing between the interacting molecules. The relationships between gamma(s)(tot) and gamma(s)(d) are discussed on the basis of the equations derived. It may be postulated that applying proposed model of the contact angle hysteresis and calculating the apparent total surface free energies and the dispersion contributions better insight into wetting properties of the silyled silicon surface can be achieved.

  15. Patterned hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of ultra-smooth nanocrystalline diamond layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, M.; Mohr, M.; Brühne, K.; Fecht, H. J.; Łojkowski, M.; Święszkowski, W.; Łojkowski, W.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we show that ultra nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces have been modified to add them hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. The nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. This allows growing diamond on different substrates which can be even 3D or structured. Silicon and, for optical applications, transparent quartz glass are the preferred substrates for UNCD layers growth. Fluorine termination leads to strong hydrophobic properties as indicated by a high contact angle for water of more than 100°. Hydrogen termination shows lesser hydrophobic behavior. Hydrophilic characteristics has been realised with oxygen termination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements confirm the oxygen and fluorine- termination on the nanocrystalline diamond surface. Further, by micropatterning using photolithography, multi-terminated layers have been created with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas. In addition, we have shown that retermination is achieved, and the properties of the surface have been changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and vice versa. Micro- roughness and stress in the grown film influences slightly the wetting angle as well. The opportunity to realize local differences in hydrophobicity on nanocrystalline diamond layers, in any size or geometry, offers interesting applications for example in microbiological investigations. Multi-terminated arrays show identical surface roughness and at the same time differences in hydrophobicity. These arrays have been visualized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM).

  16. Exploring the bronzing effect at the surface of ink layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Mathieu; Mallet, Maxime; Deboos, Alexis; Chavel, Pierre; Kuang, Deng-Feng; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Besbes, Mondher; Cazier, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the optical phenomenon responsible for the colored shine that sometimes appears at the surface of ink layers in the specular direction, often called bronzing or gloss differential. It seems to come from the wavelength-dependent refractive index of the ink, which induces a wavelength-dependent reflectance of the ink-air interface. Our experiments on cyan and magenta inkjet inks confirm this theory. Complex refractive indices can be obtained from measurements of the spectral reflectance and transmittance of a transparency film coated with the ink. We propose a correction of the classical Clapper-Yule model in order to include the colored gloss in the prediction of the spectral reflectance of an inked paper. We also explored effects of scattering by the micrometric or nanometric roughness of the ink surface. The micrometric roughness, easy to model with a geometrical optics model, can predict the spreading of the colored gloss over a large cone. Electromagnetic models accounting for the effect of the nanometric roughness of the surface also predict the attenuation of short wavelengths observed under collimated illumination.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer over a divergent convergent superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalabadi, Razieh; Hwang, Jinyul; Nadeem, Muhammad; Yoon, Min; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-08-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a divergent and convergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed over the range 800 < Reθ < 1200. The surface patterns were aligned along the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of free-slip and no-slip surfaces. The gas fraction of the divergent and convergent SHS was the same as that for the straight SHS for a given slip area. The divergent and convergent SHS gave 21% more drag reduction than the straight SHS. Although the maximum value of the streamwise slip velocity was larger over the divergent and convergent SHS, the average slip velocity (Uslip/U∞) was larger over the straight SHS. The greater drag reduction was attributed to the manipulation of the secondary flow in the y-z plane and the changes in the turbulence structure. The streamwise vortices generated by the secondary flow over the divergent and convergent SHS were diminished which reduced drag relative to the flow over the straight SHS. The ejection and sweep motions were weak, and the vortical structure was attenuated near the wall over the divergent and convergent SHS. The skin friction contributions were explored using the velocity-vorticity correlation. The vortex stretching contribution dominated the skin friction budget. The reduced skin friction over the divergent and convergent SHS resulted mainly from reduced vortex stretching.

  18. A sub-surface eddy at inertial current layer in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An Arctic Ocean eddy in sub-surface layer is analyzed in this paper by use of temperature, salinity and current profiles data obtained at an ice camp in the Canada Basin during the second Chinese Arctic Expedition in summer of 2003.In the vertical temperature section, the eddy shows itself as an isolated cold water block at depth of 60 m with a minimum temperature of-1.5℃, about 0.5℃ colder than the ambient water.Isopycnals in the eddy form a pattern of convex, which indicates the eddy is anticyclonic.Although maximum velocity near O.4 m s-1 occurs in the current records observed synchronously, the current pattern is far away from a typical eddy.By further analysis, inertial frequency oscillations with amplitudes comparable with the eddy velocity are found in the sub-surface layer currents.After filter the inertial current and mean current, an axisymmetric current pattern of an eddy with maximum velocity radius of 5 km is obtained.The analysis of the T-S characteristics of the eddy core water and its ambient waters supports the conclusion that the eddy was formed on the Chukchi Shelf and migrated northeastward into the northern Canada Basin.

  19. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  20. Surface Modification of Water Purification Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J; Dreyer, Daniel R; Bielawski, Christopher W; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-04-18

    Polymeric membranes are an energy-efficient means of purifying water, but they suffer from fouling during filtration. Modification of the membrane surface is one route to mitigating membrane fouling, as it helps to maintain high levels of water productivity. Here, a series of common techniques for modification of the membrane surface are reviewed, including surface coating, grafting, and various treatment techniques such as chemical treatment, UV irradiation, and plasma treatment. Historical background on membrane development and surface modification is also provided. Finally, polydopamine, an emerging material that can be easily deposited onto a wide variety of substrates, is discussed within the context of membrane modification. A brief summary of the chemistry of polydopamine, particularly as it may pertain to membrane development, is also described. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon; Bush, John W. M.; Hosoi, A. E.; Lauga, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small-amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be nonzero for moderate values of the capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low capillary number. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

  2. Surface Water Protection by Productive Buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christen, Benjamin

    Vegetated riparian buffer zones are a widely recommended best management practice in agriculture for protecting surface and coastal waters from diffuse nutrient pollution. On the background of the EU funded research project NitroEurope (NEU; www.NitroEurope.eu), this study concentrates...... on the mitigation of nitrogen pollution in surface and groundwater, using riparian buffer zones for biomass production. The objectives are to map suitable areas for buffer implementation across the six NEU study landscapes, model tentative N-loss mitigation, calculate biomass production potential and economic...... designed for local conditions could be a way of protecting water quality attractive to many stakeholders....

  3. Study of interface formation on the cleavage surfaces of A3{B}6 layered semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiy, P. V.; Nenchuk, T. M.; Stakhira, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The adsorption activity of In4Se3, In4Se3(Ag), InSe, GaSe and TlGaSe2 semiconductor crystal interlayer cleavage surfaces relatively to N2, O2, CO gases and water vapour has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. It has been determined that atomically clean layered crystal surfaces do not adsorb N2 and water vapour but reveal a low activity with respect to O2. The kinetics of CO adsorption on surfaces obtained by cleavage in an UHV have been investigated. Indium and gallium selenides adsorb CO with the tendency increasing in the sequence GaSe→TlGaSe2→ InSe→In4Se3 crystals; In4Se3 is essentially more active than the others. The adsorption model with dissociations of the CO molecule and carbon adsorption resulting from the layered structure and peculiarities in the electron-energy spectra of the crystals and their surfaces is discussed with the In4Se3 crystal serving as example.

  4. Comparison of surface fluxes and boundary-layer measurements at Arctic terrestrial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Albee, Robert; Makshtas, Alexander; Kustov, Vasily; Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy

    2014-05-01

    Observational evidence suggests that atmospheric energy fluxes are a major contributor to the decrease of the Arctic pack ice, seasonal land snow cover and the warming of the surrounding land areas and permafrost layers. To better understand the atmosphere-surface exchange mechanisms, improve models, and to diagnose climate variability in the Arctic, accurate measurements are required of all components of the net surface energy budget and the carbon dioxide cycle over representative areas and over multiple years. This study analyzes and discusses variability of surface fluxes and basic meteorological parameters based on measurements made at several long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in USA (Barrow), Canada (Eureka), and Russia (Tiksi). Tower-based eddy covariance and solar radiation measurements provide a long-term near continuous temporal record of hourly average mass and energy fluxes respectively. The turbulent fluxes of the momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are supported by additional atmospheric and surface/snow/permafrost measurements (mean wind speed, air temperature and humidity, upwelling and downwelling short-wave and long-wave atmospheric and surface radiation, snow depth, surface albedo, soil heat flux, active layer temperature profiles etc.) In this study we compare annual cycles of surface fluxes including solar radiation and other ancillary data to describe four seasons in the Arctic including spring onset of melt and fall onset of snow accumulation. Particular interest is a transition through freezing point, i.e. during transition from winter to spring and from summer to fall, when the carbon dioxide and/or water vapor turbulent fluxes change their direction. According to our data, in a summer period observed temporal variability of the carbon dioxide flux was generally in anti-phase with water vapor flux (downward CO2 flux and upward H2O flux). On average the turbulent flux of carbon

  5. A macromolecular model for the endothelial surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, James; Danova-Okpetu, Darina; Grest, Gary

    2006-03-01

    The endothelial surface layer (ESL) is a micron-scale macromolecular lining of the luminal side of blood vessels composed of proteoglycans, glycoproteins, polysaccharides and associated plasma proteins all in dynamic equilibrium. It has numerous physiological roles including the regulation of blood flow and microvascular permeability, and active participation in mechanotransduction and stress regulation, coagulation, cell adhesion, and inflammatory response. The dynamic structure and the mechanical properties of the ESL are crucial for many of its physiological properties. We present a topological model for the ESL composed of three basic macromolecular elements: branched proteoglycans, linear polysaccharide chains, and small plasma proteins. The model was studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and compared with scaling theories for associating tethered polymers. We discuss the observed dynamical and mechanical properties of the ESL captured by this model, and the possible physical insight it provides into the physiological behavior of the ESL.

  6. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  7. Cone model for two surface foundations on layered soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the cone model is applied to the vibration analysis of two foundations on a layered soil half space. In the analysis, the total stress field in the subsoil is divided into the free-field and the scattering field. Seed's simplified method is adopted for the free-field analysis,while the cone model is proposed for analyzing the dynamic scattering stress wave field.The shear stress field and the compressive stress field in the layered stratum with two scattering sources are calculated by shear cone and compressive cone, respectively. Furthermore, the stress fields in the subsoil with two foundations are divided into six zones, and the P wave and S wave are analyzed in each zone. Numerical results are provided to illustrate features of the added stress field for two surface foundations under vertical and horizontal sinusoidal force excitation. The proposed cone model may be useful in handling some of the complex problems associated with multi-scattering sources.

  8. Measurement of atmospheric surface layer turbulence using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Brandon; Smith, Lorli; Schlagenhauf, Cornelia; Bailey, Sean

    2016-11-01

    We describe measurements of the turbulence within the atmospheric surface layer using highly instrumented and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Results from the CLOUDMAP measurement campaign in Stillwater Oklahoma are presented including turbulence statistics measured during the transition from stably stratified to convective conditions. The measurements were made using pre-fabricated fixed-wing remote-control aircraft adapted to fly autonomously and carry multi-hole pressure probes, pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Two aircraft were flown simultaneously, with one flying a flight path intended to profile the boundary layer up to 100 m and the other flying at a constant fixed altitude of 50 m. The evolution of various turbulent statistics was determined from these flights, including Reynolds stresses, correlations, spectra and structure functions. These results were compared to those measured by a sonic anemometer located on a 7.5 m tower. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant #CBET-1351411 and by National Science Foundation award #1539070, Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUDMAP).

  9. Surface topology and electronic structure of layered strontium ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, Robert; Klinke, Melanie; Waelsch, Michael; Mietke, Sebastian; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Peng, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In complex materials the interplay of properties like crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetism results in very interesting physical phenomena. The Ruddlesden-Popper series of layered Strontium Ruthenates Sr{sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} describes one class of these materials. The double and triple layer systems behave like a Fermi liquid up to the transition temperature of 15 K and 24 K, respectively. In both compounds the local density of states (LDOS) shows a peak within the dip-like feature around the Fermi energy E{sub F}. Using low-temperature (LT) STM and STS we studied the temperature dependence of the LDOS in the range from 4.7 to 35 K. By increasing the temperature the peak within the dip in the LDOS at E{sub F} is only affected by thermal broadening. The surface unit cell of the Strontium Ruthenates exhibits a c(2 x 2) super structure, which is stable from 4.7 K up to room temperature as shown by our atomically resolved LT STM images and room temperature LEED experiments.

  10. Engineering a Highly Hydrophilic PVDF Membrane via Binding TiO₂Nanoparticles and a PVA Layer onto a Membrane Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Aiwen; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; He, Chunju

    2015-04-29

    A highly hydrophilic PVDF membrane was fabricated through chemically binding TiO2 nanoparticles and a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer onto a membrane surface simultaneously. The chemical composition of the modified membrane surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the binding performance of TiO2 nanoparticles and the PVA layer was investigated by a rinsing test. The results indicated that the TiO2 nanoparticles were uniformly and strongly tailored onto the membrane surface, while the PVA layer was firmly attached onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles and the membrane by adsorption-cross-linking. The possible mechanisms during the modification process and filtration performance, i.e., water permeability and bovine serum albumin (BSA) rejection, were investigated as well. Furthermore, antifouling property was discussed through multicycles of BSA solution filtration tests, where the flux recovery ratio was significantly increased from 20.0% for pristine PVDF membrane to 80.5% for PVDF/TiO2/PVA-modified membrane. This remarkable promotion is mainly ascribed to the improvement of surface hydrophilicity, where the water contact angle of the membrane surface was decreased from 84° for pristine membrane to 24° for PVDF/TiO2/PVA membrane. This study presents a novel and varied strategy for immobilization of nanoparticles and PVA layer on substrate surface, which could be easily adapted for a variety of materials for surface modification.

  11. Ultra Water Repellent Polypropylene Surfaces with Tunable Water Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tang; Cai, Chao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2017-03-22

    Polypropylene (PP), including isotactic PP (i-PP) and atactic PP (a-PP) with distinct tacticity, is one of the most widely used general plastics. Herein, ultra water repellent PP coatings with tunable adhesion to water were prepared via a simple casting method. The pure i-PP coating shows a hierarchical morphology with micro/nanobinary structures, exhibiting a water contact angle (CA) larger than 150° and a sliding angle less than 5° (for 5 μL water droplet). In contrast, the pure a-PP coating has a less rough morphology with a water contact angle of about 130°, and the water droplets stick on the coating at any tilted angles. For the composite i-PP/a-PP coatings, however, ultra water repellency with CA > 150° but water adhesion tailorable from slippery to sticky can be realized, depending on the contents of a-PP and i-PP. The different wetting behaviors are due to the various microstructures of the composite coatings resulting from the distinct crystallization ability of a-PP and i-PP. Furthermore, the existence of a-PP in the composite coatings enhances the mechanical properties compared to the i-PP coating. The proposed method is feasible to modify various substrates and potential applications in no-loss liquid transportation, slippery surfaces, and patterned superhydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for detecting of arsenic in aqueous solution using polypyrrole-chitosan-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles composite layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Naseri, Mahmoud; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The detection and measurement of low concentrations of arsenic (V) are the subjects of intense research interest in chemistry and environmental activity. In this research, a polypyrrole-chitosan/cobalt ferrite nanoparticles composite layer was prepared using an electrodeposition method on a gold-coated glass slide. The composite layer was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersed spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a high surface stylus profilometer. The composite layer was used to detect the arsenic in water, and the sensor limitation was about 0.001 ppm. The composite layer was tested using atomic-force microscopy before and after the detection of arsenic. As a result, the roughness was disoriented, as the arsenic was bound on the surface of the composite layer.

  13. Growing season boundary layer climate and surface exchanges in a subarctic lichen woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.

    1994-01-01

    Between June and August 1990, observations were made at two surface micrometeorological towers near Schefferville Quebec (54 deg 52 min N, 66 deg 40.5 min W), one in a fen and one in the subarctic lichen woodland, and at four surface climatological stations. Data from these surface stations were supplemented by regular radiosonde launches. Supporting measurements of radiative components and soil temperatures allowed heat and moisture balances to be obtained at two sites. The overall surface meteorological experiment design and results of micrometeorological observations made on a 30-m tower in the lichen woodland are presented here. Seasonal variation in the heat and water vapor transport characteristics illustrate the marked effect of the late summer climatological shift in air mass type. During the first half of the summer, average valley sidewalls only 100 m high are sufficient to channel winds along the valley in the entire convective boundary layer. Channeling effects at the surface, known for some time at the long-term climate station in Schefferville, are observed both at ridge top and in the valley, possibly the response of the flow to the NW-SE orientation of valleys in the region. Diurnal surface temperature amplitude at ridge top (approximately equal to 10 C) was found to be half that observed in the valley. Relatively large differences in precipitation among these stations and the climatological station at Schefferville airport were observed and attributed to the local topography. Eddy correlation observations of the heat, moisture and momentum transports were obtained from a 30-m tower above a sparse (approximately equal to 616 stems/ha) black spruce lichen woodland. Properties of the turbulent surface boundary layer agree well with previous wind tunnel studies over idealized rough surfaces. Daytime Bowen ratios of 2.5-3 are larger than those reported in previous studies. Surface layer flux data quality was assessed by looking at the surface layer heat

  14. Growing season boundary layer climate and surface exchanges in a subarctic lichen woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.

    1994-01-01

    Between June and August 1990, observations were made at two surface micrometeorological towers near Schefferville Quebec (54 deg 52 min N, 66 deg 40.5 min W), one in a fen and one in the subarctic lichen woodland, and at four surface climatological stations. Data from these surface stations were supplemented by regular radiosonde launches. Supporting measurements of radiative components and soil temperatures allowed heat and moisture balances to be obtained at two sites. The overall surface meteorological experiment design and results of micrometeorological observations made on a 30-m tower in the lichen woodland are presented here. Seasonal variation in the heat and water vapor transport characteristics illustrate the marked effect of the late summer climatological shift in air mass type. During the first half of the summer, average valley sidewalls only 100 m high are sufficient to channel winds along the valley in the entire convective boundary layer. Channeling effects at the surface, known for some time at the long-term climate station in Schefferville, are observed both at ridge top and in the valley, possibly the response of the flow to the NW-SE orientation of valleys in the region. Diurnal surface temperature amplitude at ridge top (approximately equal to 10 C) was found to be half that observed in the valley. Relatively large differences in precipitation among these stations and the climatological station at Schefferville airport were observed and attributed to the local topography. Eddy correlation observations of the heat, moisture and momentum transports were obtained from a 30-m tower above a sparse (approximately equal to 616 stems/ha) black spruce lichen woodland. Properties of the turbulent surface boundary layer agree well with previous wind tunnel studies over idealized rough surfaces. Daytime Bowen ratios of 2.5-3 are larger than those reported in previous studies. Surface layer flux data quality was assessed by looking at the surface layer heat

  15. Structure and dynamics of ordered water in a thick nanofilm on ionic surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xiu-Ping; Zhou Bo; Li Lan-Ting; Wang Chun-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of water in a thick film on an ionic surface are studied by molecular dynamic simulations.We find that there is a dense monolayer of water molecules in the vicinity of the surface.Water molecules within this layer not only show an upright hydrogen-down orientation,but also an upright hydrogen-up orientation.Thus,water molecules in this layer can form hydrogen bonds with water molecules in the next layer.Therefore,the two-dimensional hydrogen bond network of the first layer is disrupted,mainly due to the O atoms in this layer,which are affected by the next layer and are unstable.Moreover,these water molecules exhibit delayed dynamic behavior with relatively long residence time compared with those bulk-like molecules in the other layers.Our study should be helpful to further understand the influence of water film thickness on the interfacial water at the solid-liquid interface.

  16. Biochar impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic...

  17. A Numerical Study on Water Waves Generated by A Submerged Moving Body in A Two-Layer Fluid System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Zhen; NG Chiu-On; ZHANG Dao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    This is a numerical study on the time development of surface waves generated by a submerged body moving steadily in a two-layer fluid system, in which a layer of water is underlain by a layer of viscous mud. The fully nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations are solved on FLUENT with the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) multiphase scheme in order to simulate the free surface waves as well as the water-mud interface waves as functions of time. The numerical model is validated by mimick-ing a reported experiment in a one-layer system before it is applied to a two-layer system, it is found that the presence of bottom mud in a water layer can lead to large viscous damping of the surface waves. For the investigation of the problem systematically, the effects of the Froude number and the mud layer thickness, density and viscosity relative to those of water are evaluated and discussed in detail.

  18. Surface Roughness and Dislocation Distribution in Compositionally Graded Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layer with Inserted Strained Si Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Sik

    2005-03-01

    We report the experimental investigation of surface roughness and dislocation distribution of 1 μm-thick, compositionally graded, relaxed SiGe buffer layer with a final Ge surface content of 30%. Tensile-strained Si layers are inserted at various locations in the graded buffer during SiGe epitaxial growths. Slight reduction in surface roughness from about 10.3 nm to about 7.8 nm by inserting two 20 nm thick tensile-strained Si layers followed by SiGe growths. It turns out that majority of the residual surface roughness is developed during the SiGe growths on top of the topmost strain Si layer. The surface immediately after the growth of tensile strained Si is very flat with about 1.1 nm RMS roughness and without crosshatch morphology. Cross-sectional TEM shows clear signs of increased interaction between dislocation half-loops at the top surface of the strained Si layers. Our observation shows that although thin Si layers under tensile-strain are effective in reducing cross-hatch, they could in the meantime impede dislocation propagation leading to higher threading dislocation density. Considerations for an optimized scheme exploiting the flattening function of tensile-strained layers will be discussed.

  19. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  20. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  1. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Kostik; Biljana Bauer; Zoran Kavrakovski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  2. Thermodynamic properties of water solvating biomolecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, Matthias

    Changes in the potential energy and entropy of water molecules hydrating biomolecular interfaces play a significant role for biomolecular solubility and association. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods allow calculations of free energy differences between two states from simulations. However, these methods are computationally demanding and do not provide insights into individual thermodynamic contributions, i.e. changes in the solvent energy or entropy. Here, we employ methods to spatially resolve distributions of hydration water thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of biomolecular surfaces. This allows direct insights into thermodynamic signatures of the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solvent accessible sites of proteins and small molecules and comparisons to ideal model surfaces. We correlate dynamic properties of hydration water molecules, i.e. translational and rotational mobility, to their thermodynamics. The latter can be used as a guide to extract thermodynamic information from experimental measurements of site-resolved water dynamics. Further, we study energy-entropy compensations of water at different hydration sites of biomolecular surfaces. This work is supported by the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC 1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  3. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Lance, Blake; Ho, Clifford K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0deg, 10deg, and 45deg), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47deg contact angle and non-wetting = 93deg contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of %7E3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45deg tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  4. Density functional theory study of water adsorption at reduced and stoichiometric ceria (111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Schelling, Patrick K

    2006-11-28

    We study the structure and energetics of water molecules adsorbed at ceria (111) surfaces for 0.5 and 1.0 ML coverages using density functional theory. The results of this study provide a theoretical framework for interpreting recent experimental results on the redox properties of water at ceria (111) surfaces. In particular, we have computed the structure and energetics of various absorption geometries at the stoichiometric ceria (111) surface. We find that single hydrogen bonds between the water and the oxide surface are favored in all cases. At stoichiometric surfaces, the water adsorption energy depends rather weakly on coverage. We predict that the observed coverage dependence of the water adsorption energy at stoichiometric surfaces is likely the result of dipole-dipole interactions between adsorbed water molecules. When oxygen vacancies are introduced in various surface layers, water molecules are attracted more strongly to the surface. We find that it is very slightly energetically favorable for adsorbed water to oxidized the reduced (111) surface with the evolution of H(2). In the event that water does not oxidize the surface, we predict that the effective attractive water-vacancy interaction will result in a significant enhancement of the vacancy concentration at the surface in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, we present our results in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies of vacancy clustering at the (111) ceria surface.

  5. Effect of treatment time on characterization and properties of nanocrystalline surface layer in copper induced by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farzad Kargar; M Laleh; T Shahrabi; A Sabour Rouhaghdam

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystalline surface layers were synthesized on pure copper by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) at various treatment times. The microstructural features of the surface layers produced by SMAT were systematically characterized by optical microscopy (OM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and surface roughness measurements were also carried out. It is found that the thickness of the deformed layer increased from 50 to 500 m with increasing treatment time from 10 to 300 min, while the average grain size of the top surface layer decreased from 20 to 7 nm. Hardness of the all SMATed samples decreased with depth. Furthermore, the hardness of the top surface layer of the SMATed samples was at least two times higher than that of the un-treated counterpart. Surface roughness results showed different trend with treatment time. Amounts of PV and a values first sharply increased and then decreased.

  6. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  7. Study on microstructure and properties of Mg-alloy surface alloying layer fabricated by EPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AZ91D surface alloying was investigated through evaporative pattern casting (EPC technology. Aluminum powder (0.074 to 0.104 mm was used as the alloying element in the experiment. An alloying coating with excellent properties was fabricated, which mainly consisted of adhesive, co-solvent, suspending agent and other ingredients according to desired proportion. Mg-alloy melt was poured under certain temperature and the degree of negative pressure. The microstructure of the surface layer was examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. It has been found that a large volume fraction of network new phases were formed on the Mg-alloy surface, the thickness of the alloying surface layer increased with the alloying coating increasing from 0.3 mm to 0.5 mm, and the microstructure became compact. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the new phases. It showed that the new phases mainly consist of β-Mg17Al12, in addition to a small quantity of inter-metallic compounds and oxides. A micro-hardness test and a corrosion experiment to simulate the effect of sea water were performed. The result indicated that the highest micro-hardness of the surface reaches three times that of the matrix. The corrosion rate of alloying samples declines to about a fifth of that of the as-cast AZ91D specimen.

  8. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE DETACHMENT OF DIFFERENTLY STRUCTURED DUST LAYERS FROM SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eberhard; Schmidt

    2005-01-01

    A technique is presented for creating surface-adhering dust layers under defined conditions, and characterizing and stressing the layers created. The procedure described is shown to be suitable for the quantitative evaluation of the effects of different parameters such as particle size, porosity and surface roughness etc. on the stability of particle layers.

  9. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  10. Characterization of Floating Surface Layers of Lipids and Lipopolymers by Surface-Sensitive Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    Nanotechnology and molecular (bio-)engineering are making ever deepening inroads into everybodys daily life. Physicochemical and biotechnological achievements in the design of physiologically active supramolecular assemblies have brought about the quest for their submolecular-level characterization. We employ surface-sensitive scattering techniques for the investigation of planar lipid membranes - floating monolayers on aqueous surfaces - to correlate structural, functional and dynamic aspects of biomembrane models. This chapter surveys recent work on the submolecular structure of floating phospholipid monolayers - where the advent of third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources has driven the development of realistic, submolecular-scale quasi-chemical models - as well as of more complex systems: cation binding to anionic lipid surfaces; conformational changes of lipopolymers undergoing phase transitions; the conformational organization of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositides, as examples of physiologically important lipids; and the adsorption of peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY) or solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) onto phospholipid surface layers.

  11. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gervasio DF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments.

  12. Water desalination using nanoporous single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Smirnov, Sergei N; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Unocic, Raymond R; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon M

    2015-05-01

    By creating nanoscale pores in a layer of graphene, it could be used as an effective separation membrane due to its chemical and mechanical stability, its flexibility and, most importantly, its one-atom thickness. Theoretical studies have indicated that the performance of such membranes should be superior to state-of-the-art polymer-based filtration membranes, and experimental studies have recently begun to explore their potential. Here, we show that single-layer porous graphene can be used as a desalination membrane. Nanometre-sized pores are created in a graphene monolayer using an oxygen plasma etching process, which allows the size of the pores to be tuned. The resulting membranes exhibit a salt rejection rate of nearly 100% and rapid water transport. In particular, water fluxes of up to 10(6) g m(-2) s(-1) at 40 °C were measured using pressure difference as a driving force, while water fluxes measured using osmotic pressure as a driving force did not exceed 70 g m(-2) s(-1) atm(-1).

  13. Water desalination using nanoporous single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon M.

    2015-05-01

    By creating nanoscale pores in a layer of graphene, it could be used as an effective separation membrane due to its chemical and mechanical stability, its flexibility and, most importantly, its one-atom thickness. Theoretical studies have indicated that the performance of such membranes should be superior to state-of-the-art polymer-based filtration membranes, and experimental studies have recently begun to explore their potential. Here, we show that single-layer porous graphene can be used as a desalination membrane. Nanometre-sized pores are created in a graphene monolayer using an oxygen plasma etching process, which allows the size of the pores to be tuned. The resulting membranes exhibit a salt rejection rate of nearly 100% and rapid water transport. In particular, water fluxes of up to 106 g m-2 s-1 at 40 °C were measured using pressure difference as a driving force, while water fluxes measured using osmotic pressure as a driving force did not exceed 70 g m-2 s-1 atm-1.

  14. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  15. Ordering layers of [bmim][PF6] ionic liquid on graphite surfaces: molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maolin, Sha; Fuchun, Zhang; Guozhong, Wu; Haiping, Fang; Chunlei, Wang; Shimou, Chen; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-04-01

    Microscopic structures of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) [bmim][PF6] on hydrophobic graphite surfaces have been studied in detail by molecular dynamics simulation. It is clearly shown that both the mass and electron densities of the surface adsorbed ionic liquid are oscillatory, and the first peak adjacent to the graphite surface is considerably higher than others, corresponding to a solidlike IL bottom layer of 6 angstroms thick. Three IL layers are indicated between the graphite surface and the inner bulk IL liquid. The individually simulated properties of single-, double-, and triple-IL layers on the graphite surface are very similar to those of the layers between the graphite surface and the bulk liquid, indicating an insignificant effect of vapor-IL interface on the ordered IL layers. The simulation also indicates that the imidazolium ring and butyl tail of the cation (bmim+) of the IL bottom layer lie flat on the graphite surface.

  16. Dry Deposition, Surface Production and Dynamics of Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1984-01-01

    A model of downward aerosol panicle flux characterized by dry deposition velocity, Vd, due to Slinn and Slinn (1980) is generalized to the case of nonzero surface concentration (absorbing surface with a surface source). A more general expression for the flux at some reference height is developed...... which includes Vd and an effective surface source strength, Si, which is a function of the true surface source strength, Si, and the particle transport properties below the reference height. The general expression for the surface flux is incorporated into a dynamic mixed layer model of the type...... developed by Davidson et al. (1983). This three layer model (diffusion sublayer, turbulent surface layer and mixed layer) is applied to an open ocean marine regime where boundary layer advection is ignored. The aerosol concentration in the boundary layer is considered to consist of sea salt particles...

  17. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface.

  18. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  19. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  20. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  1. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Reddy, G.V.; Araligidad, N.

    distribution of the layer thickness, layer gradient, starting depth and their inter-annual variability, ii) static stability of the layer and iii) generating mechanism/s. It is seen that organized inversions in the bay occur during winter (from November...

  2. Experimental Study of Turbulent Boundary Layers on Groove/Smooth Flat Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei MA; Qiao TIAN; Hui WU

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the turbulent boundary layers on both groove and smooth flat surfaces. The flow structures were shown in a water tunnel using the hydrogen-bubble flow visualization technique. The measurement results indicate that: (1) the grooves can effectively reduce accumulation of low-speed fluids, decrease the number of the low-speed streaks and depress oscillation of the streaks in the sublayer; (2) the grooves can restrain forming of the horseshoe vortices in the buffer region; (3) the grooves bate oscillation and kinking of the quasi-streamwise vortices and restrain production of the hairpin vortices and the ring vortices, reducing both frequency and intensity of the turbulence bursting; (4) the grooves directly affect the flow structures in the sublayer of the boundary layer and then modulate the flow field up to the buffer region and the logarithmic region by restraining development and interaction of the vortices.

  3. Solvation dynamics in water confined within layered manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Klein, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    The confined environment presented by layered transition metal oxides is conducive to a variety of chemical reactions. Despite intense interest in these materials, little is known regarding the microscopic details relevant to their catalytic activity. We characterize aspects of the dynamics governing a redox reaction in the interlayer environment between manganese dioxide sheets. The nonequilibrium solvation dynamics surrounding charge transfer between an ion and the surface are highly non-linear and exhibit long-time relaxation that is governed by collective dynamics. These dynamics are rationalized in terms of structural rearrangements, allowing connections to be made to more complex reactions in these materials.

  4. Equations of atrazine transfer from agricultural land to surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, C.

    1995-08-01

    As atrazine, the most widely used herbicide in agriculture, makes problems for water supply, the Cemagref study its transfer from lands to surface water. On a small basin of central Brittany, soil and water contents of atrazine have been monitored from 1991 to 1994. Data show that atrazine content of the top layer of soil decreases slowly after spreading. Degradation works more than leaching for this decrease. There is always atrazine in the water of the stream at the outlet of the basin. The concentration of atrazine in water increase sharply in every flood and then decrease slowly. The maximum level of concentration in each flood is very well correlated with the ratio of maximum discharge to the base flow. It means that quick superficial flow of water is the most contaminated water. It brings most of the total flow of atrazine which can be measured in the stream. However, this flow represent only a very small part of the spread atrazine on the basin: less than 1%.

  5. Simulation of Discharge Production in a Water Vapour Layer on an Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohammad; Evans, Benjamin; Asimakoulas, Leonidas; Stalder, Kenneth; Field, Thomas; Graham, Bill; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Electrical discharges in water are receiving increasing attention because of chemical, environmental and biomedical applications.The work to be presented focuses on plasmas created directly in high conductivity water, saline solution. Here the plasma is produced at low voltage ( 200V) and is clearly associated with an initial vapour layer on the electrode surface that isolates the electrode from the liquid. In a previous paper a finite element multi-physics program, incorporating all relevant electrical and thermal properties of the solution was shown to reproduce the experimentally observed pre-plasma vapour layer behaviour. The results of a simulation of the plasma production in vapour layers of the same size and shape as predicted in will be presented, At present inert gas fills the ``vapour layer''. However this produces spatial distributions of the electron parameters that are consistent with the electric fields predicted in the original simulations. The water plasma simulation recently developed by Murakami is currently being included. It is anticipated that results of the coupled codes, showing the temporal and 2-D spatial development of the vapour and plasma, will be presented.

  6. Surface Electroelastic Love Waves in Layered System with a Piezoelectric Substrate and Two Isotropic Layers of Any Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danoyan Z.N.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existence and behaviour of electroelastic Love waves in three-layered system of a piezoelectric substrate of classes 6, 4, 6mm, 4mm and attached to her two isotropic layers (conductor-dielectric, conductor-conductor of any thickness is investigated, depending on the physicomechanical characteristics of layered system and relative thicknesses of layers. The characteristic equation of a required surface wave is investigated in case of a basic soft layer. The research is based on properties of the electromechanical factor of surface wave given in the work [1-5]. Existence of a Love wave of a gap type caused by extremely piezoelectric effect in particular is shown. The structure and behavior of modes of Love waves are investigated. The qualitative diagrams of “dispersive” curves of modes of Love waves are given . The relation between electroelastic Love waves, pure-elastic Love waves, and Bleustein-Gulyaev waves is discussed.

  7. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality

  8. Thin Water and Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Mineral-water and ice interactions play important roles in atmospheric cloud formation. They also affect soil biogeochemistry as well as outer-space processes. In this study, thin water and ice films formed on minerals of varied bulk and surface structure, shape, size and surface roughness were probed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and by Dynamic Vapor Adsorption (DVA). Measurements on several types of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, orthosilicates, tectosilicates as well as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Icelandic volcanic ash constrained our understanding of the molecular-level nature of mineral surface-water and ice interactions. DVA experiments showed that particle size is the key feature controlling water loadings at 25 ° C. Under this condition, nano-sized particles stabilized the equivalence of no more than ˜6 monolayers of water at the near saturation of water vapor while sub-micron sized particles stabilized several thousand layers. This result can be explained by the greater ability of larger sized particles at driving water condensation reactions. Cryogenic FTIR measurements at -10 and -50 ° C revealed that most minerals acquired the thin ice films with similar hydrogen bonding environments as those formed at room temperature.[1,2] These thin ice films have weaker hydrogen bond environments than hexagonal ice (νOH ≈ 3130 cm-1), a result seen by FTIR through predominant O-H stretching modes at νOH ≈ 3408-3425 cm-1. The water bending region (˜1630 cm-1) also reveals that most thin ice films are rather supercooled forms of water. Only the materials with greatest levels of heterogeneity, namely ATD and volcanic ash, stabilized solid forms of water reminiscent to hexagonal ice. This work thus constrains further our understanding of how interfacial ice is stabilized at mineral surfaces, and opens possibilities for future studies focused on atmospheric gas uptake on mineral- water and ice admixtures. [1] Song, X. and Boily, J

  9. Rate of evolution of the specific surface area of surface snow layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Dominé, Florent

    2003-02-15

    The snowpack can impact atmospheric chemistry by exchanging adsorbed or dissolved gases with the atmosphere. Modeling this impact requires the knowledge of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow and its variations with time. We have therefore measured the evolution of the SSA of eight recent surface snow layers in the Arctic and the French Alps, using CH4 adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The SSA of fresh snow layers was found to decrease with time, from initial values in the range 613-1540 cm2/g to values as low as 257 cm2/g after 6 days. This is explained by snow metamorphism, which causes modifications in crystal shapes, here essentially crystal rounding and the disappearance of microstructures. A parametrization of the rate of SSA decrease is proposed. We fit the SSA decrease to an exponential law and find that the time constant alpha(exp) (day(-1)) depends on temperature according to alpha(exp) = 76.6 exp (-1708/7), with Tin kelvin. Our parametrization predicts that the SSA of a snow layer evolving at -40 degrees C will decrease by a factor of 2 after 14 days, while a similar decrease at -1 degrees C will only require 5 days. Wind was found to increase the rate of SSA decrease, but insufficient data did not allow a parametrization of this effect.

  10. Remote sensing of Arctic boundary layer clouds above snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    In the Arctic remote sensing of clouds using reflected solar radiation is mostly related to high uncertainties as the contrast between the bright sea ice and snow surface and the clouds is low. Additionally, uncertainties result from variation of the snow grain size which changes the absorption of solar radiation similarly to the size of cloud particles. This is a major issue for understanding the response of Arctic clouds to climate warming as the quantification of cloud properties in this remote region mostly relies on satellite observations. We used spectral radiation measurements of the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer) to improve common used cloud remote sensing algorithms in case of snow surfaces. The measurements were collected during the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) above the Canadian Beaufort where both sea ice covered and ice free ocean areas were present during the observation period. Based on the spectral absorption characteristics of snow and clouds (assuming to be dominated by the liquid fraction) a combination of wavelengths was found which allows to separate the impact of clouds and snow surface on the reflected radiation measured above the clouds. While snow grain size dominates the absorption at a wavelength of 1.0 μm, information on cloud optical thickness and cloud particle effective radius can be extracted at wavelengths of 1.7 μm and 2.1 μm, respectively. Based on radiative transfer simulations lookup tables for the retrieval algorithm were calculated and used to estimate the theoretical uncertainties of the retrieval. It was found that using ratios instead of absolute radiances reduces the uncertainties significantly. The new algorithm was applied to a specific case observed during the VERDI campaign where a stratocumulus clouds was located above an ice edge. It could be shown that the method works also over water

  11. Study for Reduction of Outgassing Property of Adsorbed Water Gas for Improved Surface Finished Titanium Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masatoshi; Kurisu, Hiroki; Uchida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Setsuo; Ishizawa, Katsunobu; Nomura, Takeru; Eda, Takahiro; Murashige, Nobuyuki

    This paper addresses the development of the surface finishing for a titanium material and the study for the reduction of outgassing property of adsorbed water (H2O) molecules. Developed surface finishing is composed of the buffing for the reduction of the surface roughness and improved chemical polishing for the thick surface oxide layer compared with the chemical polishing so far. The surface roughness of the surface finished titanium material is reduced 35% and the thickness of the surface oxide layer increases by 30%. The total amount of thermal desorbed H2O gas for the new surface finished titanium is reduced 30%. It is considered that the origin for the decrease of the amount of desorption H2O gas is the reduction of the adsorption sites due to the decrease of the surface roughness and the reduction of adsorption energy of H2O gas due to the strong surface oxidation for a titanium material.

  12. Outgassing of icy bodies in the solar system - I. The sublimation of hexagonal water ice through dust layers

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, Bastian; Blum, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge about the physical processes determining the activity of comets were mainly influenced by several extremely successful space missions, the predictions of theoretical models and the results of laboratory experiments. However, novel computer models should not be treated in isolation but should be based on experimental results. Therefore, a new experimental setup was constructed to investigate the temperature dependent sublimation properties of hexagonal water ice and the gas diffusion through a dry dust layer covering the ice surface. We show that this experimental setup is capable to reproduce known gas production rates of pure hexagonal water ice. The reduction of the gas production rate due to an additional dust layer on top of the ice surface was measured and compared with the results of another experimental setup in which the gas diffusion through dust layers at room temperature was investigated. We found that the relative permeability of the dust layer is inversely proportional to its thickn...

  13. Methods of improvement in hardness of composite surface layer on cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    J. Szajnar; P. Wróbel; T. Wróbel

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy and next its remelting with use of welding technology TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding te...

  14. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  15. Microstructure of Ni / WC Surface Composite Layer on Gray Iron Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guirong; SONG Wenming; MA Ying; LU Jinjun; HAO Yuan; LI Yuandong; WANG Haitang

    2011-01-01

    The surface infiltrated composite (Ni/WC) layers on gray iron substrate were fabricated through a vacuum infiltration casting technique (VICT) using Ni-based composite powder with different WC particles content as raw materials.The microstructures of surface infiltrated composite layer,the interface structures between surface composite layer and the substrate,the changes of macro-hardness with the increasing of WC content and the micro-hardness distribution are investigated.The infiltrated composite layer includes a surface composite layer and a transition layer,and the thickness of the transition layer decreases with the increasing content of WC.The thickness of transition layer with 20%WC content in the surface infiltrated composite layer was 170 μrn which was the thickest for all transition layers with different WC content.The surface composite layer was mainly composed of WC,W2C,FeB and NiB,along with Ni-Cr-Fe,Ni (Cr) solid solution,Ni (Si) solid solution and Ni (Fe) solid solution.The transition layer was composed of Ni (Cr) solid solution,Ni (Fe) solid solution,Ni (Si) solid solution,Fe (Ni) solid solution and eutectic.The surface macrohardness and micro-hardness of the infiltrated layer had been evaluated.The macro-hardness of the surface composite layer decreases with the WC content increasing,and the average macro-hardness is HRC60.The distribution of micro-hardness presents gradient change.The average micro-hardness of the infiltrated layer is about HV 1000.

  16. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  18. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  19. Convergent surface water distributions in U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.K. Steele; J.B. Heffernan; N. Bettez; J. Cavender-Bares; P.M. Groffman; J.M. Grove; S. Hall; S.E. Hobbie; K. Larson; J.L. Morse; C. Neill; K.C. Nelson; J. O' Neil-Dunne; L. Ogden; D.E. Pataki; C. Polsky; R. Roy Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Earth's surface is rapidly urbanizing, resulting in dramatic changes in the abundance, distribution and character of surface water features in urban landscapes. However, the scope and consequences of surface water redistribution at broad spatial scales are not well understood. We hypothesized that urbanization would lead to convergent surface water abundance and...

  20. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  1. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  2. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-10-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, -PO4H2, -COOH and -OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants.

  3. Water mass dynamics shape Ross Sea protist communities in mesopelagic and bathypelagic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccarato, Luca; Pallavicini, Alberto; Cerino, Federica; Fonda Umani, Serena; Celussi, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea environments host the largest pool of microbes and represent the last largely unexplored and poorly known ecosystems on Earth. The Ross Sea is characterized by unique oceanographic dynamics and harbors several water masses deeply involved in cooling and ventilation of deep oceans. In this study the V9 region of the 18S rDNA was targeted and sequenced with the Ion Torrent high-throughput sequencing technology to unveil differences in protist communities (>2 μm) correlated with biogeochemical properties of the water masses. The analyzed samples were significantly different in terms of environmental parameters and community composition outlining significant structuring effects of temperature and salinity. Overall, Alveolata (especially Dinophyta), Stramenopiles and Excavata groups dominated mesopelagic and bathypelagic layers, and protist communities were shaped according to the biogeochemistry of the water masses (advection effect and mixing events). Newly-formed High Salinity Shelf Water (HSSW) was characterized by high relative abundance of phototrophic organisms that bloom at the surface during the austral summer. Oxygen-depleted Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) showed higher abundance of Excavata, common bacterivores in deep water masses. At the shelf-break, Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), formed by the entrainment of shelf waters in CDW, maintained the eukaryotic genetic signature typical of both parental water masses.

  4. Improved adhesion of superhydrophobic layer on metal surfaces via one step spraying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael I. El Dessouky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic metal substrates have been fabricated by a simple spraying method. The processes of decreasing surface free energy and increasing surface roughness have been accomplished in one step via the addition of functionalized silica (silica nano particles with octyltriethoxysilane to adhesive polymer. The method is simple, cost-effective and can be applied on the large industrial scale. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for surface morphology analysis, showing the roughness produced by surface treatment. The wettability of the micro-nano silica film varied from hydrophilicity (water contact angle 88° to superhydrophobicity (water contact angle 156.9°, while sliding contact angles dramatically decreased (<5° by adding Functionalized silica and/or adhesive polymer. Roughness increased with silica increment which improves the wettability. The coatings were electrochemically characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and Tafel polarization curves; it was found that both systems had good performance against corrosion in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Furthermore, the stability of the coated layer on copper substrate was investigated.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of water on a hydrophilic silica surface at high air pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, H.A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    of air in water at different pressures. Using the calibrated force field, we conduct MD simulations to study the interface between a hydrophilic silica substrate and water surrounded by air at different pressures. We find that the static water contact angle is independent of the air pressure imposed......Wepresent a force field forMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations ofwater and air in contactwith an amorphous silica surface. We calibrate the interactions of each species present in the systemusing dedicated criteria such as the contact angle of a water droplet on a silica surface, and the solubility...... on the system. Our simulations reveal the presence of a nanometer thick layer of gas at the water–silica interface. We believe that this gas layer could promote nucleation and stabilization of surface nanobubbles at amorphous silica surfaces. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Everglades restoration. A century of water management for flood control and water storage in the Everglades resulted in the creation of the Water Conservation Areas (WCAs). Construction of the major canals began in the 1910s and the systems of levees that enclose the basins and structures that move water between basins were largely completed by the 1950s. The abandoned wetlands that remained outside of the Water Conservation areas tended to dry out and subside by 10 feet or more, which created abrupt transitions in land-surface elevations and water levels across the levees. The increases in topographic and hydraulic gradients near the margins of the WCAs, along with rapid pumping of water between basins to achieve management objectives, have together altered the patterns of recharge and discharge in the Everglades. The most evident change is the increase in the magnitude of recharge (on the upgradient side) and discharge (on the downgradient side) of levees separating WCA-2A from other basins or areas outside. Recharge and discharge in the vast interior of WCA-2A also likely have increased, but fluxes in the interior wetlands are more subtle and more difficult to quantify compared with areas close to the levees. Surface-water and ground-water interactions differ in fundamental ways between wetlands near WCA-2A's boundaries and wetlands in the basin's interior. The levees that form the WCA's boundaries have introduced step functions in the topographic and hydraulic gradients that are important as a force to drive water flow across the wetland ground surface. The resulting recharge and discharge fluxes tend to be unidirectional (connecting points of recharge on the upgradient side of the levee with points of discharge on the downgradient side), and fluxes are also relatively steady in magnitude compared with fluxes in the interior. Recharge flow paths are also relatively deep in their extent near levees, with fluxes passing entirely through the 1-m peat layer and inte

  7. Local scaling characteristics of Antarctic surface layer turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, several studies have validated Nieuwstadt's local scaling hypothesis by utilizing turbulence observations from the mid-latitude, nocturnal stable boundary layers. In this work, we probe into the local scaling characteristics of polar, long-lived stable boundary layers by analyzing turbulence data from the South Pole region of the Antarctic Plateau.

  8. A land surface scheme for atmospheric and hydrologic models: SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Warrach, K.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    A soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme is presented here which solves the coupled system of the Surface Energy and Water Balance (SEWAB) equations considering partly vegetated surfaces. It is based on the one-layer concept for vegetation. In the soil the diffusion equations for heat and moisture are solved on a multi-layer grid. SEWAB has been developed to serve as a land-surface scheme for atmospheric circulation models. Being forced with atmospheric data from either simulations or measurements it calculates surface and subsurface runoff that can serve as input to hydrologic models. The model has been validated with field data from the FIFE experiment and has participated in the PILPS project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes. From these experiments we feel that SEWAB reasonably well partitions the radiation and precipitation into sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as into runoff and soil moisture Storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Landoberflaechenschema wird vorgestellt, das den Transport von Waerme und Wasser zwischen dem Erdboden, der Vegetation und der Atmosphaere unter Beruecksichtigung von teilweise bewachsenem Boden beschreibt. Im Erdboden werden die Diffusionsgleichungen fuer Waerme und Feuchte auf einem Gitter mit mehreren Schichten geloest. Das Schema SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance) beschreibt die Landoberflaechenprozesse in atmosphaerischen Modellen und berechnet den Oberflaechenabfluss und den Basisabfluss, die als Eingabedaten fuer hydrologische Modelle genutzt werden koennen. Das Modell wurde mit Daten des FIFE-Experiments kalibriert und hat an Vergleichsexperimenten fuer Landoberflaechen-Schemata im Rahmen des PILPS-Projektes teilgenommen. Dabei hat sich gezeigt, dass die Aufteilung der einfallenden Strahlung und des Niederschlages in den sensiblen und latenten Waermefluss und auch in Abfluss und Speicherung der Bodenfeuchte in SEWAB den beobachteten Daten recht gut entspricht. (orig.)

  9. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  10. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  11. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating

  12. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sungyon; Hosoi, A E; Lauga, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be non-zero for moderate values of Capillar...

  13. A bio-enabled maximally mild layer-by-layer Kapton surface modification approach for the fabrication of all-inkjet-printed flexible electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yunnan; Hester, Jimmy G. D.; Su, Wenjing; Chow, Justin H.; Sitaraman, Suresh K.; Tentzeris, Manos M.

    2016-12-01

    A bio-enabled, environmentally-friendly, and maximally mild layer-by-layer approach has been developed to surface modify inherently hydrophobic Kapton HN substrates to allow for great printability of both water- and organic solvent-based inks thus facilitating the full-inkjet-printing of flexible electronic devices. Different from the traditional Kapton surface modification approaches which are structure-compromising and use harsh conditions to target, and oxidize and/or remove part of, the surface polyimide of Kapton, the present Kapton surface modification approach targeted the surface electric charges borne by its additive particles, and was not only the first to utilize environmentally-friendly clinical biomolecules to build up a thin film of protamine-heparin complex on Kapton, but also the first to be conducted under minimally destructive and maximally mild conditions. Besides, for electrically charged ink particles, the present surface modification method can enhance the uniformity of the inkjet-printed films by reducing the “coffee ring effect”. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, reduced graphene oxide-based gas sensors, which were flexible, ultra-lightweight, and miniature-sized, were fully-inkjet-printed on surface modified Kapton HN films and tested for their sensitivity to dimethyl methylphosphonate (a nerve agent simulant). Such fabricated sensors survived a Scotch-tape peel test and were found insensitive to repeated bending to a small 0.5 cm radius.

  14. Layered Perovskite Nanofibers via Electrospinning for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Nils C; Soldat, Julia; Marschall, Roland

    2015-05-06

    The (111)-layered perovskite materials Ba5 Ta4 O15 , Ba5 Ta2 Nb2 O15 and Ba5 Nb4 O15 are prepared with nanofiber morphology via electrospinning for the first time. The nanofibers are built up from small single crystals, with up to several micrometers length even after calcination. The formation mechanism is investigated in detail, revealing an intermediate formation of amorphous barium carbonate strengthening the nanofiber morphology for high temperature treatment. All nanofiber compounds are able to generate hydrogen without any co-catalyst in photocatalytic reformation of methanol. After photodeposition of Rh-Cr2 O3 co-catalysts, the nanofibers show better activity in overall water splitting compared to sol-gel-derived powders.

  15. Investigation of the Surface Properties of Titanium Biomaterial with Oxide Layer of Rutile Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Nan; Chen Yuanru; Xiao Jing; Xue Zhennan; Liu Xianghuai

    1994-01-01

    Structural characteristics of titanium oxide layer on titanium matrix were investigated by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy(AES) and X-ray diffraction, It has been identified that the titanium oxide layers have rutile structure. The mechanical properties of its surface were ineasured by microhardness test, pin-on-disc wear experiment and scratch adhesion test. The blood-compatibility of the titanium oxide layers of different thickness was studied by blood clotting time measurement. It is shown that as the thickness of the titanium oxide layers increases, the surface mechanical properties and bloodcompatibility of these layers are obviously improved.

  16. Surface tension-driven convection patterns in two liquid layers

    CERN Document Server

    Juel, A; McCormick, W D; Swift, J B; Swinney, H L; Juel, Anne; Burgess, John M.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1999-01-01

    Two superposed liquid layers display a variety of convective phenomena that are inaccessible in the traditional system where the upper layer is a gas. We consider several pairs of immiscible liquids. Once the liquids have been selected, the applied temperature difference and the depths of the layers are the only independent control parameters. Using a perfluorinated hydrocarbon and silicone oil system, we have made the first experimental observation of convection with the top plate hotter than the lower plate. Since the system is stably stratified, this convective flow is solely due to thermocapillary forces. We also have found oscillatory convection at onset in an acetonitrile and n-hexane system heated from below.

  17. Positively charged and bipolar layered poly(ether imide) nanofiltration membranes for water softening applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassara, S.; Abdelkafi, A.; Quémener, D.; Amar, R. Ben; Deratani, A.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(ether imide) (PEI) ultrafiltration membranes were chemically modified with branched poly(ethyleneimine) to obtain nanofiltration (NF) membrane Cat PEI with a positive charge in the pH range below 9. An oppositely charged polyelectrolyte layer was deposited on the resulting membrane surface by using sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSSNa) and sodium polyvinyl sulfonate (PVSNa) to prepare a bipolar layered membrane NF Cat PEI_PSS and Cat PEI_PVS having a negatively charged surface and positively charged pores. Cat PEI exhibited good performance to remove multivalent cations (more than 90% of Ca2+) from single salt solutions except in presence of sulfate ions. Adding an anionic polyelectrolyte layer onto the positively charged surface resulted in a significant enhancement of rejection performance even in presence of sulfate anions. Application of the prepared membranes in water softening of natural complex mixtures was successful for the different studied membranes and a large decrease of hardness was obtained. Moreover, Cat PEI_PSS showed a good selectivity for nitrate removal. Fouling experiments were carried out with bovine serum albumin, as model protein foulant. Cat PEI_PSS showed much better fouling resistance than Cat PEI with a quantitative flux recovery ratio.

  18. Enhanced surface patterning of chalcogenide glass via imprinting process using a buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byeong Kyou; Choi, Duk-Yong; Chung, Woon Jin; Choi, Yong Gyu

    2017-09-01

    In an effort to enhance transcriptability of quasi-three-dimensional patterns present in silicon stamp onto the surface of 'bulk' chalcogenide glass, a buffer layer was introduced during the replication process via imprinting. Dissimilar patterns with diverse depths along the surface normal direction were imprinted with or without the buffer layer, and the resulting patterns on the glass surface were compared with regard to the transcription quality in both the lateral and vertical directions. After assessing the processing conditions appropriate for imprinting bulk As2S3 glass especially in terms of temperature and duration, candidate materials suitable for the buffer layer were screened: Commercially available polydimethylsiloxane was then chosen, and impact of this buffer layer was elucidated. The imprinted patterns turned out to become more uniform over large surface areas when the buffer layer was inserted. This finding confirmed that the use of buffer layer conspicuously enhanced the transcriptability of imprinting process for bulk chalcogenide glass.

  19. Structural Changes of Surface Layers of Steel Plates in the Process of Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, V. A.; Balaganskii, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes developing in surface layers of plates from steel 20 in the process of explosive welding are studied with the help of light metallography and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mathematical simulation is used to compute the depth of the action of severe plastic deformation due to explosive welding of steel plates on the structure of their surface layers.

  20. Metallurgical investigations of dry sliding surface layer in phosphorous iron/steel friction pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Surface layer behaviors of composition concentration and micro-hardness were inves-tigated on phosphorous cast irons after dry sliding. The experimental results indicate that thehardness and chemical composition unevenly distribute in the surface layer. The sliding conditionand microstructure of the pin specimen have greatly effects on the distributions.

  1. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence...

  2. Analysis of Laser Surface Hardened Layers of Automobile Engine Cylinder Liner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-bo; YU Gang; GUO Jian; SHANG Quan-yi; ZHANG Zhen-guo; GU Yi-jie

    2007-01-01

    Gray cast iron that is used for automobile engine cylinder liners was laser surface hardened using Nd∶YAG quasi-continuous and CO2 continuous wave laser, respectively. The macromorphology and microstructure of the laser surface hardened layers were investigated using an optical microscope. Geometric dimensions including depth and width and microhardness distribution of the hardened layers were also examined in order to evaluate the quality of the hardened layers.

  3. DEPTH MEASUREMENT OF DISRUPTED LAYER ON SILICON WAFER SURFACE USING AUGER SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodukha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for depth measurement of a disrupted layer on silicon wafer surface which is based on application of Auger spectroscopy with the precision sputtering of surface silicon layers and registration of the Auger electron yield intensity. In order to measure the disrupted layer with the help of Auger spectroscopy it is necessary to determine dependence of the released Auger electron amount on sputtering time (profile and then the dependence is analyzed. Silicon amount in the disrupted layer is less than in the volume. While going deeper the disruptive layer is decreasing that corresponds to an increase of atom density in a single layer. The essence of the method lies in the fact the disruptive layer is removed by ion beam sputtering and detection of interface region is carried out with the help of registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from the sputtered surface up to the moment when it reaches the value which is equal to the Auger electron yield intensity for single-crystal silicon. While removing surface silicon layers the registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from silicon surface makes it possible to control efficiently a presence of the disrupted layer on the silicon wafer surface. In this case depth control locality is about 1.0 nm due to some peculiarities of Auger spectroscopy method. The Auger electron yield intensity is determined automatically while using Auger spectrometer and while removing the disrupted layer the intensity is gradually increasing. Depth of the disrupted layer is determined by measuring height of the step which has been formed as a result of removal of the disrupted layer from the silicon wafer surface. Auger spectroscopy methods ensures an efficient depth control surface disruptions at the manufacturing stages of silicon wafers and integrated circuits. The depth measurement range of disruptions constitutes 0.001–1.000 um.

  4. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.S., E-mail: jsfang@nfu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Sun, S.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi-Nan University, Nan-Tou 54561, Taiwan (China); Chen, G.S.; Chin, T.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO{sub 4}. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  5. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J. S.; Sun, S. L.; Cheng, Y. L.; Chen, G. S.; Chin, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO4. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  6. Water adsorption induced in-plane domain switching on BaTiO{sub 3} surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Su, Y. J., E-mail: yjsu@ustb.edu.cn [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, B. C. [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Multiscale Materials Modelling group, Department of Materials and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-07

    In this study, the influences of the adsorption of water molecules on the changes in the atomic and electric structures of BaTiO{sub 3} surface were investigated using ab initio calculation. Water molecules are molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface, which makes electrons transfer from water molecules to the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The redistribution of electrons in the BaTiO{sub 3} surface layers weakens the Ba-O interactions and strengthens the Ti-O interactions, so that the Ti atom shifts in TiO{sub 2} plane, i.e., an in-plane domain switching. The adsorption of water molecules on BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces also results in a reduction in the surface rumpling.

  7. Dynamics of altered surface layer formation on dissolving silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Damien; Bernard, Sylvain; Rémusat, Laurent; Wild, Bastien; Guyot, François; Micha, Jean Sébastien; Rieutord, François; Magnin, Valérie; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    The extrapolation of mineral dissolution kinetics experiments to geological timescales has frequently been challenged by the observation that mineral dissolution rates decrease with time. In the present study, we report a detailed investigation of the early stages of wollastonite dissolution kinetics, linking time-resolved measurements of wollastonite dissolution rate as a function of crystallographic orientation to the evolution of physicochemical properties (i.e., diffusivity, density, and thickness) of amorphous silica-rich layers (ASSLs) that developed on each surface. Batch dissolution experiments conducted at room temperature and at far-from-equilibrium conditions revealed that the initial (i.e., ASSL-free) dissolution rate of wollastonite (R(hkl)) based on Ca release observe the following trend: R(010) ≈R(100) >R(101) >R(001) . A gradual decrease of the dissolution rate of some faces by up to one order of magnitude resulted in a modification of this trend after two days: R(010) ≫R(100) ⩾R(101) ≈R(001) . In parallel, the diffusivity of ASSLs developed on each face was estimated based on the measurement of the concentration profile of a conservative tracer (methylene blue) across the ASSL using nanoSIMS. The apparent diffusion coefficients of methylene blue as a function of the crystallographic orientation (Dapp(hkl)) observe the following trend: Dapp(010) ⩾Dapp(100) >Dapp(101) ≫Dapp(001) , and decreases as a function of time for the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces. Finally, the density of ASSL was estimated based on the modeling of X-ray reflectivity patterns acquired as a function of time. The density of ASSLs developed on the (0 1 0) faces remains low and constant, whereas it increases for the ASSLs developed on the (0 0 1) faces. On the whole, our results suggest that the impact of the formation of ASSLs on the wollastonite dissolution rate is anisotropic: while some crystal faces are weakly affected by the formation of non-passivating ASSLs (e

  8. Laser-induced capillary effect in thin layers of water-alcohol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Natalia A; Tatosov, Aleksey V; Bezuglyi, Boris A

    2015-06-01

    The effect of droplet formation in thin layers of water-alcohol mixtures upon laser heating was studied. The droplet growth in the laser beam is governed by the surface tension gradient, which induces solutocapillary flows from the periphery to the center of the heated area. This gradient arises due to the local increase in surface tension caused by the evaporation of alcohol from the heated area of the layer. The experimental results have shown that the increase in the initial concentration of water in the mixture gives rise to the increase in droplet size. However, the increase in the power of laser irradiation leads to a decrease in the droplet growth rate. A simplified one-dimensional model of droplet growth is developed. The model involves the dependence of surface tension on both the temperature and concentration of components in the mixture, as well as the evaporation and condensation of alcohol. The experimental results are compared with those obtained using numerical simulations. A reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical results was shown.

  9. Surface chemistry of the atomic layer deposition of metals and group III oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David Nathan

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technique offering precise control of film thickness and the ability to coat high-aspect-ratio features such as trenches and nanopowders. Unlike other film growth techniques, ALD does not require harsh processing conditions and is not limited by line-of-sight deposition. Emerging applications for ALD materials include semiconductor devices, gas sensors, and water-diffusion barriers. The chemistry behind ALD involves understanding how the precursors interact with surfaces to deposit the desired material. All ALD precursors need to be stable on the substrate to ensure self-limiting behavior yet reactive enough to be easily removed with the second reagent. Recent precursor development has provided many volatile organometallic compounds for most of the periodic table. As the number of precursors increases, proper precursor choice becomes crucial. This is because the film properties, growth rates, and growth temperature vary widely between the precursors. Many of the above traits can be predicted with knowledge of the precursor reaction mechanisms. This thesis aims to link surface reaction mechanisms to observed growth and nucleation trends in metal and oxide ALD systems. The first portion of this thesis explores the mechanisms of two ALD oxide systems. First, I examine the mechanism of ALD alumina with ozone. Ozone is used as an oxidant in the semiconductor industry because the deposited Al 2O3 films possess better insulating properties and ozone is easier to purge from a vacuum system. FT-IR analysis reveals a complicated array of surface intermediates such as formate, carbonate, and methoxy groups that form during Al2O3 growth with ozone. Next, a new method to deposit thin films of Ga2O3 is introduced. Gallium oxide is a transparent conducting oxide that needs expensive solid precursors to be deposited by ALD. I show that trimethylgallium is a good high-temperature ALD precursor that deposits films of Ga2O 3 with

  10. Wettability and water uptake of holm oak leaf surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Plant trichomes play important protective functions and may have a major influence on leaf surface wettability. With the aim of gaining insight into trichome structure, composition and function in relation to water-plant surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of Quercus ilex L. (holm oak) as model. By measuring the leaf water potential 24 h after the deposition of water drops on to abaxial and adaxial surfaces, evidence for water penetration through the upper l...

  11. Layer-by-Layer Method for the Synthesis and Growth of Surface Mounted Metal-Organic Frameworks (SURMOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shekhah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A layer-by-layer method has been developed for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs and their deposition on functionalized organic surfaces. The approach is based on the sequential immersion of functionalized organic surfaces into solutions of the building blocks of the MOF, i.e., the organic ligand and the inorganic unit. The synthesis and growth of different types of MOFs on substrates with different functionalization, like COOH, OH and pyridine terminated surfaces, were studied and characterized with different surface characterization techniques. A controlled and highly oriented growth of very homogenous films was obtained using this method. The layer-by-layer method offered also the possibility to study the kinetics of film formation in more detail using surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, this method demonstrates the potential to synthesize new classes of MOFs not accessible by conventional methods. Finally, the controlled growth of MOF thin films is important for many applications like chemical sensors, membranes and related electrodes.

  12. Groundwater–surface water interactions in wetlands for integrated water resources management (preface)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Winter, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater–surface water interactions constitute an important link between wetlands and the surrounding catchment. Wetlands may develop in topographic lows where groundwater exfiltrates. This water has its functions for ecological processes within the wetland, while surface water outflow from

  13. Precise Nanoscale Surface Modification and Coating of Macroscale Objects: Open-Environment in Loco Atomic Layer Deposition on an Automobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Moataz Bellah M; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2015-09-09

    The fundamental chemical reaction conditions that define atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be achieved in an open environment on a macroscale surface too large and complex for typical laboratory reactor-based ALD. We describe the concept of in loco ALD using conventional modulated reactant flow through a surface-mounted "ALD delivery head" to form a precise nanoscale Al2O3 film on the window of a parked automobile. Analysis confirms that the processes eliminated ambient water contamination and met other conditions that define ALD growth. Using this tool, we demonstrate open-ambient patterned deposition, metal corrosion protection, and polymer surface modification.

  14. Quantitative assessment to the structural basis of water repellency in natural and technical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, P; Fürstner, R; Barthlott, W; Neinhuis, C

    2003-04-01

    Many plant surfaces are water-repellent because of a complex 3-dimensional microstructure of the epidermal cells (papillae) and a superimposed layer of hydrophobic wax crystals. Due to its surface tension, water does not spread on such surfaces but forms spherical droplets that lie only on the tips of the microstructures. Studying six species with heavily microstructured surfaces by a new type of confocal light microscopy, the number, height, and average distance of papillae per unit area were measured. These measurements were combined with those of an atomic force microscope which was used to measure the exposed area of the fine-structure on individual papillae. According to calculations based upon these measurements, roughening results in a reduction of the contact area of more than 95% compared with the projected area of a water droplet. By applying water/methanol solutions of decreasing surface tension to a selection of 33 water-repellent species showing different types of surface structures, the critical value at which wetting occurs was determined. The results impressively demonstrated the importance of roughening on different length scales for water-repellency, since extremely papillose surfaces, having an additional wax layer, are able to resist up to 70% methanol. Surfaces that lack papillae or similar structures on the same length scale are much more easily wetted.

  15. Effect of Adsorbed Alcohol Layers on the Behavior of Water Molecules Confined in a Graphene Nanoslit: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qingwei; Zhu, Yudan; Ruan, Yang; Zhang, Yumeng; Zhu, Wei; Lu, Xiaohua; Lu, Linghong

    2017-09-11

    With the rapid development of a two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, the confined liquid binary mixture has attracted increasing attention, which has significant potential in membrane separation. Alcohol/water is one of the most common systems in liquid-liquid separation. As one of the most focused systems, recent studies have found that ethanol molecules were preferentially adsorbed on the inner surface of the pore wall and formed an adsorbed ethanol layer under 2D nanoconfinement. To evaluate the effect of the alcohol adsorption layer on the mobility of water molecules, molecular simulations were performed to investigate four types of alcohol/water binary mixtures confined under a 20 Å graphene slit. Residence times of the water molecules covering the alcohol layer were in the order of methanol/water molecules and the surrounding water molecules could induce a small degree of damage to the H-bond network of the water molecules covering the alcohol layer, resulting in the long residence time of the water molecules.

  16. General survey and conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Publikatie die bestaat uit twee delen: 1. General survey of the relation between water quantity and water quality; 2. Conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

  17. Improvement of the water selectivity of ULTEM poly(ether imide) pervaporation films by an allylamine-plasma-polymerized layer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaba, Meriyam; Raklaoui, Nabil; Guimon, Marie Françoise; Mas, André

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The wettability and surface energy of extruded ULTEM poly(ether imide) films strongly increased (the water contact angle varied from 75 to 38° and the surface energy varied from 45.3 to 59.5 mJ m-2, respectively) with the deposition of an allylamine-plasma-polymerized layer and were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy according to the experimental parameters. Pervaporation tests for dehydrating ...

  18. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  19. Theoretical Analysis of Interference Nanolithography of Surface Plasmon Polaritons without a Match Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-quan; LIANG Hui-Min; SHI Sha; DU Jing-Lei

    2009-01-01

    Interference nanolithography techniques based on long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPP) are hardly ever achieved by experiments at present.One key reason is that suitable liquid materials are difficult to find as the match layer connects the metal film and the resist.We redesign a Kretschmann-Raether structure for interference lithography.A polymer layer is coated under the metal film,and an air layer is placed between the polymer layer and the resist layer.This design not only avoids the above-mentioned question of the match layer,but also can form a soft contact between the polymer layer and the resist layer and can protect the exposure pattern.Simulation results confirm that a device with an appropriately thick polymer layer can form high intensity and contrast interference fringes with a critical dimension of about λ/7 in the resist.In addition,the fabrication of the device is very easy.

  20. Evaluation of Mercaptobenzothiazole Anticorrosive Layer on Cu Surface by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-05-01

    Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) anticorrosive layer on copper surface prepared in MBT solutions was analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The results showed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed on Cu2O layer in the MBT solution at temperatures higher than 50 °C. Additionally, it was confirmed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed in the MBT solution at room temperature by adding about 20 wt % acetone to the solution. From polishing experiments of MBT anticorrosive layer and benzotriazole (BTA) layer, it was revealed that MBT anticorrosive layer was physically stronger than BTA layer. It is considered that dishing amount in Cu chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) can be reduced by using MBT. However, MBT anticorrosive layer was not formed in the MBT solution including Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggesting that slurry should be composed without H2O2 in order to use MBT for Cu CMP.

  1. Effect of Surface Layer on Electromechanical Stability of Tweezers and Cantilevers Fabricated from Conductive Cylindrical Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keivani, Maryam; Koochi, Ali; Sedighi, Hamid M.; Abadyan, Mohamadreza; Farrokhabadi, Amin; Shahedin, Abed Moheb

    2016-12-01

    Herein, the impact of surface layer on the stability of nanoscale tweezers and cantilevers fabricated from nanowires with cylindrical cross section is studied. A modified continuum based on the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is applied for incorporating the presence of surface layer. Considering the cylindrical geometry of the nanowire, the presence of the Coulomb attraction and dispersion forces are incorporated in the derived formulations. Three different approaches, i.e. numerical differential quadrature method (DQM), an approximated homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and developing lumped parameter model (LPM) have been employed to solve the governing equations. The impact of surface layer on the instability of the system is demonstrated.

  2. Rough SERS substrate based on gold coated porous silicon layer prepared on the silicon backside surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, H.; Haji, L.; Moadhen, A.

    2017-04-01

    We report in this paper a novel method to elaborate rough Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate. A single layer of porous silicon was formed on the silicon backside surface. Morphological characteristics of the porous silicon layer before and after gold deposition were influenced by the rough character (gold size). The reflectance measurements showed a dependence of the gold nano-grains size on the surface nature, through the Localized Surface Plasmon (LSP) band properties. SERS signal of Rhodamine 6G used as a model analyte, adsorbed on the rough porous silicon layer revealed a marked enhancement of its vibrational modes intensities.

  3. Recovery from acidification in European surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data for 56 long-term monitoring sites in eight European countries are used to assess freshwater responses to reductions in acid deposition at a large spatial scale. In a consistent analysis of trends from 1980 onwards, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56 showed significant (p ≤0.05 decreasing trends in pollution-derived sulphate. Only two sites showed a significant increase. Nitrate, on the other hand, had a much weaker and more varied pattern, with no significant trend at 35 of 56 sites, decreases at some sites in Scandinavia and Central Europe, and increases at some sites in Italy and the UK. The general reduction in surface water acid anion concentrations has led to increases in acid neutralising capacity (significant at 27 of 56 sites but has also been offset in part by decreases in base cations, particularly calcium (significant at 26 of 56 sites, indicating that much of the improvement in runoff quality to date has been the result of decreasing ionic strength. Increases in acid neutralising capacity have been accompanied by increases in pH and decreases in aluminium, although fewer trends were significant (pH 19 of 56, aluminium 13 of 53. Increases in pH appear to have been limited in some areas by rising concentrations of organic acids. Within a general trend towards recovery, some inter-regional variation is evident, with recovery strongest in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, moderate in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, and apparently weakest in Germany. Keywords: acidification, recovery, European trends, sulphate, nitrate, acid neutralising capacity

  4. Layer-by-layer fabrication of supramolecular dyes on TiO2 surfaces for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Maguire, Shawn; Lye, Diane; Weck, Marcus; Lee, Stephanie

    We present a modular layer-by-layer approach based on metal coordination chemistry to assemble supramolecular dyes exhibiting increased absorption in the visible range on electrode surfaces. Specifically, palladiated bis-pincer complexes (Pd-BPCs) were employed as linkers between pyridyl-terminated organic molecules via dative bonding. By alternately immersing mesoporous TiO2-coated glass substrates in solutions containing dissolved zinc porphyin (ZnP) and Pd-BPCs, supramolecular dyes were assembled layer-by-layer on the TiO2 surfaces. UV-visible absorption spectra of these assembled structures revealed a linear increase in the Soret and Q bands of ZnP after each immersion of the substrate in the ZnP solution. Coordination of the ZnP layers with Pd-BPC resulted in a slight red shift (organic molecules in specific layers of the supramolecular assemblies. By assembling unique organic dyes that absorb different wavelengths of light, we expect to expand light absorption across the visible region of the solar spectrum for solar cell applications.

  5. Adsorption layer properties of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at interfaces between water and different alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucic, N; Kovalchuk, N M; Aksenenko, E V; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2013-11-15

    We measured the interfacial tensions of aqueous solutions against different oil phases using drop profile analysis tensiometry (PAT-1, Sinterface Technologies, Germany) for decyl- and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TAB and C12TAB) in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH7). The following alkanes were used as oil phases: hexane, heptane, octane, nonane, decane, dodecane and tetradecane. The obtained equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms were fitted by the Frumkin Ionic Compressibility model (FIC). The surfactants adsorb at the water/oil interface in competition with the oil molecules. At high surfactant surface coverage this competitive adsorption is manifested in two ways. First, for short chain surfactants, the oil molecules are embedded into the adsorption layer. Second, for long chain surfactants, the short alkane chains of the oil molecules are squeezed out from the adsorption layer due to strong mutual interaction between surfactants' chains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on Recast-layer in EDM using Aluminium Powder Mixed Distilled Water Dielectric Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Syed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the effect of aluminium powder when mixed in the distilled water dielectric fluid. The work and tool electrode materials used are W300 diesteel and electrolytic copper respectively. Pulse peak current, pulse on-time and concentration of aluminium powder are taken as the process parameters. The output response considered is white layer thickness (WLT. The experiments are planned using face centered central composite design procedure. Empirical model is developed for WLT using response surface methodology (RSM to study the effect ofprocess parameters. Optical microscopy results show that low thickness of white-layer 17.14 μm is obtained at high concentration of powder of 4 g/l and low peak current of 6 A.

  7. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer on perforated surfaces with vector injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Klimov, A. A.; Ianovskii, L. S.; Kondratev, V. I.

    1980-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on perforated plates with uniform vector injection at various angles to gas flow. It was shown that with strong injection at angles oriented in the flow direction the intensity of turbulent pulsation is decreased, while injection at angles in the opposite direction increase the intensity. A relationship was established between the critical parameters of the boundary layer injection angles; it was concluded that the asymptotic theory of Kutateladze and Leontiev can be used for determining the coefficient of friction of vector injection.

  9. Rational Design of Hyperbranched Nanowire Systems for Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Boban, Mathew; He, Yang; Kazyak, Eric; Lee, Duck Hyun; Wang, Chongmin; Tuteja, Anish; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-01-24

    A method for tunable control of geometry in hyperbranched ZnO nanowire (NW) systems is reported, which enables the rational design and fabrication of superomniphobic surfaces. Branched NWs with tunable density and orientation were grown via a sequential hydrothermal process, in which atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used for NW seeding, disruption of epitaxy, and selective blocking of NW nucleation. This approach allows for the rational design and optimization of three-level hierarchical structures, in which the geometric parameters of each level of hierarchy can be individually controlled. We demonstrate the coupled relationships between geometry and contact angle for a variety of liquids, which is supported by mathematical models of structural superomniphobicity. The highest performing superomniphobic surface was designed with three levels of hierarchy and achieved the following advancing/receding contact angles, water: 172°/170°, hexadecane: 166°/156°, octane: 162°/145°, and heptane: 160°/130°. Low surface tension liquids were shown to bounce off the surface from a height of 7 cm without breaking through and wetting. This approach demonstrates the power of ALD as an enabling technique for hierarchical materials by design, spanning the macro, micro, and nano length scales.

  10. Emissivity Measurements of Foam-Covered Water Surface at L-Band for Low Water Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Bo Wei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a foam-covered sea surface, it is difficult to retrieve sea surface salinity (SSS with L-band brightness temperature (1.4 GHz because of the effect of a foam layer with wind speeds stronger than 7 m/s, especially at low sea surface temperature (SST. With foam-controlled experiments, emissivities of a foam-covered water surface at low SST (−1.4 °C to 1.7 °C are measured for varying SSS, foam thickness, incidence angle, and polarization. Furthermore, a theoretical model of emissivity is introduced by combining wave approach theory with the effective medium approximation method. Good agreement is obtained upon comparing theoretical emissivities with those of experiments. The results indicate that foam parameters have a strong influence on increasing emissivity of a foam-covered water surface. Increments of experimental emissivities caused by foam thickness of 1 cm increase from about 0.014 to 0.131 for horizontal polarization and 0.022 to 0.150 for vertical polarization with SSS increase and SST decrease. Contributions of the interface between the foam layer and water surface to the foam layer emissivity increments are discussed for frequencies between 1 and 37 GHz.

  11. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarıışık Merih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanoparticle–based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL process on cotton fabrics properties.

  12. Effects of the 2003 European heatwave on the Central Mediterranean Sea surface layer: a numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olita

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of anomalous weather conditions on the sea surface layer over the Central Mediterranean were studied with an eddy resolving regional ocean model by performing a 5-year long simulation from 2000 to 2004. The focus was on surface heat fluxes, temperature and dynamics. The analysis of the time series of the selected variables permitted us to identify and quantify the anomalies of the analysed parameters. In order to separate the part of variability not related to the annual cycle and to locate the anomalies in the time-frequency domain, we performed a wavelet analysis of anomalies time series. We found the strongest anomalous event was the overheating affecting the sea surface in the summer of 2003. This anomaly was strictly related to a strong increase of air temperature, a decrease of both wind stress and upward heat fluxes in all their components. The simulated monthly averages of the sea surface temperature were in a good agreement with the remotely-sensed data, although the ocean regional model tended to underestimate the extreme events. We also found, on the basis of the long-wave period of the observed anomaly, this event was not limited to the few summer months, but it was probably part of a longer signal, which also includes negative perturbations of the involved variables. The atmospheric parameters responsible for the overheating of the sea surface also influenced the regional surface and sub-surface dynamics, especially in the Atlantic Ionian Stream and the African Modified Atlantic Water current, in which flows seem to be deeply modified in that period.

  13. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF FREE-SURFACE FLOWS WITH BOTTOM AND SURFACE-LAYER PRESSURE TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; JIN Sheng; LIU Gang

    2009-01-01

    A new non-hydrostatic numerical model with the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on structured grids was constructed and discussed. The algorithm is based upon a staggered finite difference Crank-Nicholson scheme on a Cartesian grid. The eddy viscosity coefficient was calculated by the efficient k-ε turbulence model. A new surface-layer non-hydrostatic treatment and a local cell bottom treatment were introduced so that the three-dimensional model is fully non-hydrostatic and is free of any hydrostatic assumption. The developed model is second-order accuracy in both time and space when semi-implicit coefficient is set to 0.5. The validity of the present solution algorithm was demonstrated from its application to the three-dimension channel flow and the wave propagation over a submerged bar problems.

  14. Electrical Double Layer and Charge Regulation for a Homotattic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmud; House

    1997-03-15

    The spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential near a charge-regulated homotattic surface containing zones with altering ionization ability is studied in the framework of the Debye approximation. In contrast to the constant-charge case traditionally discussed in the literature, charge regulation causes inhomogeneity of the surface charge distribution within each zone at the surface. Possible methods of solution of the charge regulation problem are outlined, and the results of a model calculation are reported.

  15. Unlocking annual firn layer water equivalents from ground-penetrating radar data on an Alpine glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sold

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial representation of accumulation measurements is a major limitation for current glacier mass balance monitoring approaches. Here, we present a method for estimating annual accumulation rates on a temperate Alpine glacier based on the interpretation of internal reflection horizons (IRHs in helicopter-borne ground-penetrating radar (GPR data. For each individual GPR measurement, the signal travel time is combined with a simple model for firn densification and refreezing of meltwater. The model is calibrated at locations where GPR repeat measurements are available in two subsequent years and the densification can be tracked over time. Two 10.5 m long firn cores provide a reference for the density and chronology of firn layers. Thereby, IRHs correspond to density maxima, but not exclusively to former summer glacier surfaces. Along GPR profile sections from across the accumulation area we obtain the water equivalent (w.e. of several annual firn layers. Because deeper IRHs could be tracked over shorter distances, the total length of analysed profile sections varies from 7.3 km for the uppermost accumulation layer (2011 to 0.1 km for the deepest (i.e. oldest layer (2006. According to model results, refreezing accounts for 10% of the density increase over time and depth, and for 2% of the water equivalent. The strongest limitation to our method is the dependence on layer chronology assumptions. We show that GPR can be used not only to complement existing mass balance monitoring programmes on temperate glaciers but also to retrospectively extend newly initiated time series.

  16. A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstam, I.; Melendez, R.

    1979-01-01

    A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface has been developed. It contains the vertical heat exchange processes due to radiation, conduction, and atmospheric turbulence. Parametrization of the boundary layer is based on similarity functions developed by Hoffert and Sud (1976), which involve a dimensionless variable, dependent on boundary-layer height and a localized Monin-Obukhov length. The model also contains the atmospheric surface layer and the snowpack itself, where snowmelt and snow evaporation are calculated. The results indicate a strong dependence of surface temperatures, especially at night, on the bursts of turbulence which result from the frictional damping of surface-layer winds during periods of high stability, as described by Businger (1973). The model also shows the cooling and drying effect of the snow on the atmosphere, which may be the mechanism for air mass transformation in sub-Arctic regions.

  17. Surface structure of thin pseudomorphous GeSi layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. F.; Pchelyakov, O. P.

    2015-11-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to study the evolution of thin GexSi1-x film surface superstructures s in the course of molecular beam epitaxy. The (2 × N) superstructure of the epitaxial film surface at periodicity N from 14 to 8, the latter being characteristic of pure germanium at the Si(1 0 0) surface. The epitaxial film thickness that is required for the formation of the (2 × 8) superstructure depends on the deposition temperature and germanium content in the solid solution. The germanium segregation on the growing film surface is shown to be responsible for the observed superstructural changes.

  18. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  19. 谈盾构穿越富水砂层地表沉降和喷涌原因及对策%On reasons for surface settlement and gushing of shields through rich-water sand layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温亚东

    2016-01-01

    Combining with the hydro-geological circumstance of No. 1 subway in Zhengzhou,the paper evaluates the stability of engineering foun-dation,analyzes the surface settlement and gushing for the shield jacking construction,and points out effective controlling measures,so as to en-sure the smooth operation of the shield jacking.%结合郑州地铁1号线的水文地质情况,评价了工程地基的稳定性,分析了盾构掘进施工中引起地表沉降和喷涌的原因,并提出了有效的控制措施,确保了盾构掘进施工的顺利进行。

  20. Thermal Stability of Surface Layer Microstructures of Commercially Pure Titanium Treated by High Energy Shot Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-juan; CHEN Chun-huan; REN Rui-ming

    2004-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium was treated by high energy shot peening, and annealed at a series of temperatures. The surface layers are characterized by means of scan electronic microscope, X-Ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscope and micro-hardness testing machine. The results showed that microhardness of surface layers decreases with anneal temperature, the tendency of microhardness is similar to unannealed one, in other words, the more close to the surface, the more rapidly the hardness decreases, after reaches the depth of 50 μm, the decrease becomes steadily. But the sub-surface microhardness decreased suddenly over 500 ℃, From 550 ℃ to 650 ℃, the microhardness of surface layers almost unchanged.Observing by TEM and SEM, the grain sizes of pure titanium surface layers have increased below 500 ℃; Deformation twins begin disappearing obviously at 550 ℃; The nano-scaled grains within about 10 micrometers from surface existed even at 550℃.Surface nanocrystallization is well known as one of important methods to improve surface properties. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline microstructures was related to their preparation and application. The commercial pure Ti thermal stability of nanocrystalline and deformed microstructures induced by high-energy-shot-peening (HESP) technique was investigated. The nanostructured surface and deformed sub-surface layers of specimens were prepared through HESP treatment. The thermal stability was characterized through XRD analyses of surface layers, SEM and TEM microstructure observation and microhardness measurement of specimens annealed in different temperature in the air after HESP treatments. The results showed that after HESP treatment, the microhardness of surface layers increased with treatment time, especially in the rang of about 40 micrometers from the surface, the microhardness increase was obvious. The surface microhardness decreased gradually with annealing temperature, but the sub-surface

  1. A transducing bacteriophage for Caulobacter crescentus uses the paracrystalline surface layer protein as a receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Edwards; Smit, J

    1991-01-01

    The bacteriophage phi Cr30, a transducing phage for Caulobacter crescentus strains, required the paracrystalline surface (S) layer for infectivity. Wild-type strains were phage resistant when rsaA, the gene for the 130K S-layer protein, was interrupted with an antibiotic resistance cassette. Strains that had lost the S layer by mutation were phage resistant, as were mutants that produce an S layer but which do not attach the structure to the cell surface. Phage sensitivity was restored to 130...

  2. Electrical conductivity of reconstructed Si(111) surface with sodium-doped C60 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, D. A.; Ryzhkova, M. V.; Borisenko, E. A.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical conductance of sodium-doped C60 ultra-thin layers (1-6 monolayers) grown on the Na-adsorbed Si(111)√3 × √3-Au surface has been studied in situ by four-point probe technique, combined with low-energy electron diffraction observations. Evidence of conductance channel formation through the C60 ultrathin layer is demonstrated as a result of Na dosing of 3 and 6 monolayers thick C60 layers. The observed changes in surface conductivity can be attributed to the formation of fulleride-like NaC60 and Na2C60 compound layers.

  3. Inverse method for the determination of elastic properties of coating layers by the surface ultrasonic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jun; YANG Zhen; XU Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    As the coated materials are widely applied in engineering, estimation of the elastic properties of coating layers is of great practical importance. This paper presents an inversion algorithm for determining the elastic properties of coating layers from the given velocity dispersion of surface ultrasonic waves. Based on the dispersive equation of surface waves in layered half space,an objective function dependent on coating material parameters is introduced. The density and wave velocities, which make the object function minimum, are taken as the inversion results. Inverse analyses of two parameters (longitudinal and transverse velocities) and three parameters (the density, longitudinal and transverse velocities) of the coating layer were made.

  4. Characterization and Properties of Nanostructured Surface Layer in a Low Carbon Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer was synthesized on a Iow carbon steel by using surface mechanical attrition (SMA)technique. The refined microstructure of the surface layer was characterized by means of different techniques,and the hardness variation along the depth was examined. Experimental results show that the microstructure isinhomogeneous along the depth. In the region from top surface to about 40μm deep, the grain size increases fromabout 10 nm to 100 nm. In the adjacent region of about 40~80μm depth, the grain size increases from about 100nm to 1000 nm. The grain refinement can be associated with the activity of dislocations. After the SMA treatment,the hardness of the surface layer is enhanced significantly compared with that of the original sample, which canprimarily be attributed to the grain refinement.

  5. Studies on the sea surface microlayer. II. The layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengbin; Liu, Liansheng; Liu, Chunying; Cai, Weijun

    2003-08-01

    Seawater samples of the sea surface microlayer were obtained from the ocean, coastal waters, and laboratory imitation experiments adopting glass plate, rotating drum, screen, and funnel samplers. The result was that surface microlayer samples of thickness 50 microm could be taken, not by the popular screen and funnel techniques, but by glass plate or rotating drum techniques. The layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties in the surface microlayer was found at 50 microm below the sea-air interface. These physical and chemical properties included tens of physical and chemical parameters, such as concentrations of organic matter, nutrients, and dissolved trace metals, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand chlorophyll-a, surface tensions, and pH. Therefore, it was suggested that the layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties in surface seawater should serve as a basis for defining the sea surface microlayer should, and be regarded as the practical operational thickness of the sea surface microlayer. The apparent sampling thickness of the sea surface microlayer from surface seawater should be 50+/-10 microm.

  6. Electrical double layer interactions in bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.T.; Bos, van den R.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory was originally developed to describe interactions between non-biological lyophobic colloids such as polystyrene particles, but is also used to describe bacterial adhesion to surfaces. Despite the differences between the surface of bacteria and

  7. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  8. A modified soil water based Richards equation for layered soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinka, F.; Ahrens, B.

    2010-09-01

    Most Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models like TERRA-ML (implemented e.g. in the CCLM model (www.clm-community.eu)) use the soil moisture based Richards equation to simulate vertical water fluxes in soils, assuming a homogeneous soil type. Recently, high-resolution soil type datasets (e.g. BüK 1000, only for Germany (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, www.bgr.bund.de) or Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD, version 1.1, FAO/IIASA/ISRIC/ISSCAS/JRC, March 2009)) have been developed. Deficiencies in the numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation may occur if inhomogeneous soil type data is implemented, because there are possibly discontinuities in soil moisture due to various soil type characteristics. One way to fix this problem is to use the potential based Richards equation, but this may lead to problems in conservation of mass. This presentation will suggest a possible numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation for inhomogeneous soils. The basic idea is to subtract the equilibrium state of it from soil moisture fluxes. This should reduce discontinuities because each soil layer aspires the equilibrium state and therefore differences might be of the same order. First sensitivity studies have been done for the Main river basin, Germany.

  9. Investigation of thermal processes during test operation of ingot mould with composite surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of grey cast iron EN-GJL-200 ingot mould, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of corundum Al2O3 and quartz sand SiO2. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel and cast iron castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. The results of studies show, that is positive influence of composite surface layer with ceramic particles on increase in life of cast iron ingot moulds.

  10. Grooved organogel surfaces towards anisotropic sliding of water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Liu, Hongliang; Meng, Jingxin; Yang, Gao; Liu, Xueli; Wang, Shutao; Jiang, Lei

    2014-05-21

    Periodic micro-grooved organogel surfaces can easily realize the anisotropic sliding of water droplets attributing to the formed slippery water/oil/solid interface. Different from the existing anisotropic surfaces, this novel surface provides a versatile candidate for the anisotropic sliding of water droplets and might present a promising way for the easy manipulation of liquid droplets for water collection, liquid-directional transportation, and microfluidics.

  11. Shallow Water Measurements Using a Single Green Laser Corrected by Building a Near Water Surface Penetration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhu Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the size and cost of an integrated infrared (IR and green airborne LiDAR bathymetry (ALB system, and improve the accuracy of the green ALB system, this study proposes a method to accurately determine water surface and water bottom heights using a single green laser corrected by the near water surface penetration (NWSP model. The factors that influence the NWSP of green laser are likewise analyzed. In addition, an NWSP modeling method is proposed to determine the relationship between NWSP and the suspended sediment concentration (SSC of the surface layer, scanning angle of a laser beam and sensor height. The water surface and water bottom height models are deduced by considering NWSP and using only green laser based on the measurement principle of the IR laser and green laser, as well as employing the relationship between NWSP and the time delay of the surface return of the green laser. Lastly, these methods and models are applied to a practical ALB measurement. Standard deviations of 3.0, 5.3, and 1.3 cm are obtained by the NWSP, water-surface height, and water-bottom height models, respectively. Several beneficial conclusions and recommendations are drawn through the experiments and discussions.

  12. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  13. Spectroscopic measurements of the surface waters for evaluating the fresh-water transport to marine environments in the Southern Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, Violetta; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub; Makuch, Przemysław; Pakszyc, Paulina; Strzałkowska, Agata; Piskozub, Jacek; Petelski, Tomasz; Zieliński, Tymon; Gutowska, Dorota

    2014-05-01

    To asses concentration and spatial distribution of surface-active molecules (surfactants) the spectrophotometric and spectrofluorometric measurements of water samples taken from a surface film and a depth 0.5 m were carried out during three cruises of r/v Oceania in Springs' 2010-2011 and Autumn' 2012. Measurements were conducted along the transects from the river outlets to the open waters of the Southern Baltic Sea. Surfactants consist of polar molecules of marine dissolved organic matter and are chemically not entirely classified. However, fractions of dissolved organic matter having chromophores or fluorophores (CDOM or FDOM) are recognized through their specific absorption and fluorescence spectra. The sea surface is a layer of transition between the atmosphere and the sea, where there is a variety of biological, physical and chemical processes which contribute to the accumulation and exchange of surfactants, the chemical species concentrated in the surface layer (surface active agents). The main source of marine surfactants are remains of phytoplankton and its degradation products, created by bacterial activity, and as a result of condensation of molecules of low molecular weight to form of surface-active macromolecules. The presence of surfactants in the surface layers can significantly affect the access of solar energy into the sea as well as the air-sea interaction processes. The main objective of the research was to investigate the luminescent properties of surfactants, sampled in different regions of the Southern Baltic, and to find the differences between a surface film and a subsurface layer (of 50 cm). The next aim was to combine the differences in optical properties with the different dynamics for various river outlets. The results of spectrophotometric studies show the differences in the intensity of spectral bands, particularly between coastal (estuaries) and the open sea zones. Also, analysis of the spectra shows differences between areas of the

  14. Surface-Engineered Fire Protective Coatings for Fabrics through Sol-Gel and Layer-by-Layer Methods: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Malucelli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabric flammability is a surface-confined phenomenon: in fact, the fabric surface represents the most critical region, through which the mass and heat transfers, responsible for fueling the flame, are controlled and exchanged with the surroundings. More specifically, the heat the fabric surface is exposed to is transferred to the bulk, from which volatile products of thermal degradation diffuse toward the surface and the gas phase, hence feeding the flame. As a consequence, the chemical and physical characteristics of the fabric surface considerably affect the ignition and combustion processes, as the surface influences the flux of combustible volatile products toward the gas phase. In this context, it is possible to significantly modify (and improve the fire performance of textile materials by “simply” tailoring their surface: currently, one of the most effective approaches exploits the deposition of tailored coatings able to slow down the heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring during the fire stages. This paper reviews the current state of the art related to the design of inorganic, hybrid, or organic flame-retardant coatings suitable for the fire protection of different fabric substrates (particularly referring to cotton, polyester, and their blends. More specifically, the use of sol-gel and layer-by-layer (LbL methods is thoroughly discussed; then, some recent examples of flame retardant coatings are presented, showing their potential advances and their current limitations.

  15. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    index. In the boundary layer, atmospheric temperature fluctuations are primarily responsible for the variations in refractive index at ultraviolet...parameterization of the atmospheric emissivity, in the early 1980s a parallel study of the SEB was conducted by the US Army Waterways Experiment Station...period of rotation of the atmosphere can be defined as TI = 2π/fc. At most mid- latitude locations this period is approximately 17 h. This quantity is

  16. Layered double hydroxide functionalized textile for effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhong; Li, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The removal of oil and organic pollutants from water is highly desired due to frequent oil spill accidents, as well as the increase of industrial oily wastewater. Here, superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile has been successfully prepared for the application of effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption. This textile was fabricated by functionalizing the commercial textile with layered double hydroxide (LDH) microcrystals and low surface energy molecules. The LDH microcrystals were immobilized on the microfibers of the textile through an in situ growth method, and they formed a nestlike microstructure. The combination of the hierarchical structure and the low surface energy molecules made the textile superhydrophobic and superoleophilic. Further experiments demonstrated that the as-prepared textile not only can be applied as effective membrane materials for the separation of oil and water mixtures with high separation efficiency (>97%), but also can be used as a bag for the selective oil adsorption from water. Thus, such superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile is a very promising material for the application of oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment.

  17. Properties Evaluation of Thin Microhardened Surface Layer of Tool Steel after Wire EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboslav Straka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results of experimental research on the thin microhardened surface layer of a machined surface that occurs in materials using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM with brass wire electrode. The direct influence of microhardened surface layer on resulting machined surface quality of tool steel EN X210Cr12 (W.-Nr. 1.2080 was examined. The aim of the experiment was to contribute to the knowledge of mutual interactions between main WEDM technological parameters, the influence of these parameters on the total affected depth, and on the variation of microhardness of sub-surface layers of machined surface. Based on the microhardness experimental measurements, mathematical models were established by the Least Square Method (LSM in order to simulate and predict final quality of machined surface after WEDM. Recommendations are given for setting the main technological parameters of the discharge process concerning minimization of total microhardened surface layer depth and microhardened surface layer homogeneity along the whole cross-section profile of the machined surface.

  18. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, ul. M. Skłodowskiej–Curie 55, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Żenkiewicz, Marian [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We modified polylactide surface layer with chemical, plasma or laser methods. • We tested selected properties and surface structure of modified samples. • We stated that the plasma treatment appears to be the most beneficial. - Abstract: The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm{sup 2} was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  19. In Situ Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Compound Layer during Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment of Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNCai-yun; XIEJi-jia; WUXiao-lei; HONGYou-shi; LIUGang; LUJian; LUKe

    2004-01-01

    The surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) technique was developed to synthesize a nanocrystalline (NC) layer on the surface of metallic materials for upgrading their overall properties and performance. In this paper, by means of SMAT to a pure zirconium plate at the room temperature, repetitive multidirectional peening of steel shots (composition (wt%): 1C, 1.5Cr, base Fe) severely deformed the surface layer. A NC surface layer consisting of the intermetallic compound FeCr was fabricated on the surface of the zirconium. The microstructure characterization of the surface layer was performed by using X-ray diffraction analysis, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations. The NC surface layer was about 25μm thick and consisted of the intermetallic compound FeCr with an average grain size of 25+10 nm. The deformation-induced fast diffusion of Fe and Cr from the steel shots into Zr occurred during SMAT, leading to the formation of intermetallic compound. In addition, the NC surface layer exhibited an ultrahigh nanohardness of 10.2 GPa.

  20. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3......) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe...

  1. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  2. THE EFFECT OF MOISTURE CONTENT OF THE WOOD ON LAYER PERFORMANCE OF WATER BORNE VARNISHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sönmez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The test panels obtained from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Eastern beech (Fagus orientalis L. were initially adjusted to have 8%, 10%, and 12% moisture content in this study. One-component semi-matte and two-component water borne varnishes were applied on the surfaces in order to investigate the effect of the type and the moisture content of the wood on the hardness and the gloss values as well as the adhesion strength of the varnishes. The hardness of the test samples was evaluated based on the standard ANS/ISO1522, the gloss based on TS.4318 EN ISO 2813, and the adhesive strength based on ASTM D-4541. The results indicated that variations in the moisture content of the wood material adversely affected the layer performance of water-borne varnishes and that the best performance was obtained for the wood with moisture contents of 8% and 10%.

  3. Separate Layer Production and Water Injection Technology Developed in Daqing Oil Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu He

    2004-01-01

    @@ Effects of separate layer production and water injection With the improvement of geological research and development degree, the requirements to water injection are also higher than ever before. The development of water injection technology in Daqing oilfield experienced the following four stages: (1) Commingled water injection, (2)concentric water injection, (3) eccentric water injection, and (4) integrated water injection.Through the above improvements, the development technology improved quickly.

  4. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Reuben J; Benck, Jesse D; Young, James L; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis because MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light-limited current density) after 60 h of operation. This represents a 500-fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  5. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Reuben J.; Benck, Jesse D.; Young, James L.; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis since MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light limited current density) after 60 hours of operation. This represents a five-hundred fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  6. Autowaves in near-surface layer of magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, V.V. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: fmf@stavsu.ru; Iljuch, P.M. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Kandaurova, N.V. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, E.A. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)

    2005-03-15

    Autowaves processes in a magnetic fluids in an electric and magnetic fields has been investigated. Different type of autowaves in near-surface region of electrochemical cell has been found. Equation of autowave process has been described.

  7. Petroleum pollutant degradation by surface water microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Malisa P; Jovancićević, Branimir S; Ilić, Mila; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2006-09-01

    It is well known that the composition of petroleum or some of its processing products changes in the environment mostly under the influence of microorganisms. A series of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum conditions for an efficient biodegradation of petroleum pollutant, or bioremediation of different segments of the environment. The aim of these investigations was to show to what extent the hydrocarbons of a petroleum pollutant are degraded by microbial cultures which were isolated as dominant microorganisms from a surface water of a wastewater canal of an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant. Biodegradation experiments were conducted on one paraffinic, and one naphthenic type of petroleum during a three month period under aerobic conditions, varying the following parameters: Inorganic (Kp) or an organic medium (Bh) with or without exposition to light. Microorganisms were analyzed in a surface water sample from a canal (Pancevo, Serbia), into which wastewater from an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant is released. The consortia of microorganisms were isolated from the water sample (most abundant species: Phormidium foveolarum--filamentous Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae and Achanthes minutissima, diatoms, algae). The simulation experiments of biodegradation were conducted with the biomass suspension and crude oils Sirakovo (Sir, paraffinic type) and Velebit (Ve, naphthenic type). After a three month period, organic substance was extracted by means of chloroform. In the extracts, the content of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids was determined (the group composition). n-Alkanes and isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes, pristane and phytane, in the aliphatic fractions, were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Total isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes and polycyclic alkanes of sterane and triterpane types were analyzed by GC-MS. Paraffinic type petroleums have a significant loss of saturated hydrocarbons. For naphthenic

  8. Corrosion protection of fluorzirconate glasses coated by a layer of surface modified tin oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, P. [Instituto de Quimica /UNESP, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, P.O. Box 355, CEP 14801-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: peter@iq.unesp.br; Rizzato, A.P. [Instituto de Quimica /UNESP, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, P.O. Box 355, CEP 14801-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Alvarez, F. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Landers, R. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pulcinelli, S.H. [Instituto de Quimica /UNESP, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, P.O. Box 355, CEP 14801-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Santilli, C.V. [Instituto de Quimica /UNESP, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, P.O. Box 355, CEP 14801-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2006-04-28

    The protection efficiency against water corrosion of fluorozirconate glass, ZBLAN, dip-coated by nanocrystalline tin oxide film containing the organic molecule Tiron (registered) was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The chemical bonding structure of the surface region and morphology were studied before and after two water exposure periods of 5 and 30 min. The results of the analysis for the as-grown sample revealed a SnO{sub 1.6} phase containing carbon and sulfur, related to Tiron (registered) , and traces of elements related to ZBLAN (Zr, F, Ba). This fact and the clear evidence of the presence of tin oxifluoride specie (SnO {sub x}F {sub y}) indicates a diffusion of the glass components into the porous coating. After water exposure, the increase of the oxygen concentration accompanied by a strong increase of Zr, F, Ba and Na content is interpreted as filling of the nanopores of the film by glass compounds. The formation of a compact protective layer is supported by the morphological changes observed by AFM.

  9. Design and installation of a hot water layer system at the Tehran research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmohammadi Sayedeh Leila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hot water layer system (HWLS is a novel system for reducing radioactivity under research reactor containment. This system is particularly useful in pool-type research reactors or other light water reactors with an open pool surface. The main purpose of a HWLS is to provide more protection for operators and reactor personnel against undesired doses due to the radio- activity of the primary loop. This radioactivity originates mainly from the induced radioactivity contained within the cooling water or probable minute leaks of fuel elements. More importantly, the bothersome radioactivity is progressively proportional to reactor power and, thus, the HWLS is a partial solution for mitigating such problems when power upgrading is planned. Following a series of tests and checks for different parameters, a HWLS has been built and put into operation at the Tehran research reactor in 2009. It underwent a series of comprehensive tests for a period of 6 months. Within this time-frame, it was realized that the HWLS could provide a better protection for reactor personnel against prevailing radiation under containment. The system is especially suitable in cases of abnormality, e. g. the spread of fission products due to fuel failure, because it prevents the mixing of pollutants developed deep in the pool with the upper layer and thus mitigates widespread leakage of radioactivity.

  10. Distinguishing dynamical features of water inside protein hydration layer: Distribution reveals what is hidden behind the average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saumyak; Mondal, Sayantan; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-07-01

    Since the pioneering works of Pethig, Grant, and Wüthrich on a protein hydration layer, many studies have been devoted to find out if there are any "general and universal" characteristic features that can distinguish water molecules inside the protein hydration layer from bulk. Given that the surface itself varies from protein to protein, and that each surface facing the water is heterogeneous, search for universal features has been elusive. Here, we perform an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in order to propose and demonstrate that such defining characteristics can emerge if we look not at average properties but the distribution of relaxation times. We present results of calculations of distributions of residence times and rotational relaxation times for four different protein-water systems and compare them with the same quantities in the bulk. The distributions in the hydration layer are unusually broad and log-normal in nature due to the simultaneous presence of peptide backbones that form weak hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic amino acid side chains that form no hydrogen bond, and charged polar groups that form a strong hydrogen bond with the surrounding water molecules. The broad distribution is responsible for the non-exponential dielectric response and also agrees with large specific heat of the hydration water. Our calculations reveal that while the average time constant is just about 2-3 times larger than that of bulk water, it provides a poor representation of the real behaviour. In particular, the average leads to the erroneous conclusion that water in the hydration layer is bulk-like. However, the observed and calculated lower value of static dielectric constant of hydration layer remained difficult to reconcile with the broad distribution observed in dynamical properties. We offer a plausible explanation of these unique properties.

  11. Characteristics of surface layer proteins from two new and native strains of Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak Qamsari, Elahe; Kasra Kermanshahi, Rouha; Erfan, Mohammad; Ghadam, Parinaz; Sardari, Soroush; Eslami, Neda

    2017-02-01

    In this work, some important characteristics of surface layer (S-layer) proteins extracted from two new and native Lactobacillus strains, L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7, were investigated. The presence of S-layer on the external surface of L.brevis KM3 was displayed by thin sectioning and negative staining. SDS-PAGE analysis were shown same dominant protein bands approximately around 48kDa for both S-layer proteins. Moreover, the S-layer reappeared when LiCl treated cells were allowed to grow again. Protein secondary structure and thermal behavior were evaluated by using circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. Both S-layer proteins had high content of β-sheet and low amount of α-helix. The thermograms of lyophilized S-layer proteins of L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7 showed one transition peak at 67.9°C and 59.14°C, respectively. To determine monodispersity of extracted S-layer proteins, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used. The results indicated that the main population of S-layer molecules in two tested lactobacillus strains were composed of monomer with an expected diameter close to 10nm. Furthermore, Zeta potential measurements were showed positive potential for both S-layer proteins, as expected. Our results could be used as the basis for biotechnological applications of these two new S-layer proteins.

  12. Oscillating line source in a shear flow with a free surface: critical layer-like contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    The linearized water-wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged line source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface is investigated analytically at finite, constant depth in the presence of a shear flow varying linearly with depth. The surface velocity is taken to be zero relative to the oscillating source, so that Doppler effects are absent. The radiated wave out from the source is calculated based on Euler's equation of motion with the appropriate boundary and radiation conditions, and differs substantially from the solution obtained by assuming potential flow. To wit, an additional wave is found in the downstream direction in addition to the previously known dispersive wave solutions; this wave is non-dispersive and we show how it is the surface manifestation of a critical layer-like flow generated by the combination of shear and mass flux at the source, passively advected with the flow. As seen from a system moving at the fluid velocity at the source's depth, streamlines form closed curves ...

  13. Enzymatic activity in the surface microlayer and subsurface water in the harbour channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliński, Piotr; Mudryk, Zbigniew J.; Antonowicz, Józef

    2017-09-01

    Hydrolytic activity of eight extracellular enzymes was determined spectrofluorimetric method in the surface microlayer and subsurface water in the harbour channel in Ustka. The ranking order of the potential enzyme activity rates in the studied water layers was as follows: lipase > phosphatase > aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase > xylanase > cellulase > chitinase. The level of activity of all studied hydrolases was higher in the surface microlayer than subsurface water. No clear gradients in the level of enzymatic activity were determined along the horizontal profile of the studied channel. Activity of extracellular enzymes was strongly influenced by the season.

  14. Atmospheric Water Harvesting: Role of Surface Wettability and Edge Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Yong

    2017-06-23

    Atmospheric water is emerging as an important potable water source. The present work experimentally and theoretically investigates water condensation and collection on flat surfaces with contrasting contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) to elucidate their roles on water mass collection efficiency. The experimental results indicate that a hydrophilic surface promotes nucleation and individual droplets growth, and a surface with a low CAH tends to let a smaller droplet to slide down, but the overall water mass collection efficiency is independent of both surface contact angle and CAH. The experimental results agree well with our theoretical calculations. During water condensation, a balance has to be struck between single droplet growth and droplet density on a surface so as to maintain a constant water droplet surface coverage ratio, which renders the role of both surface wettability and hysteresis insignificant to the ultimate water mass collection. Moreover, water droplets on the edges of a surface grow much faster than those on the non-edge areas and thus dominate the contribution to the water mass collection by the entire surface, directly pointing out the very important role of edge effect on water condensation and collection.

  15. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    OpenAIRE

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two “homologous” tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-la...

  16. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm.

  17. Erosion of thin carbon layer on metal surface by hydrogen ion bombardment at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hirotaka, Morita, Kenji, Horino, Yuji, Itoh, Noriaki

    1985-10-01

    In this letter, we report experimental results on the erosion of thin carbon layers segregated on nickel surfaces caused by hydrogen ion bombardements at elevated temperatures. The erosion yield of the segregated carbon layers at temperatures of around 900 K was found to depend on their thickness and for the layers with a thicknes less than 20 A the yield near the 900 K was found to be nearly the same as the physical sputtering yield. (orig./RK).

  18. Influence of magnetic field on microstructure and properties of Ni60 plasma surfacing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhengjun; Sun Jinggang; Liu Duo; Wang Jibing; Zhang Guiqing

    2005-01-01

    In order to control the shape and distribution of hardening phase in plasma surfacing deposit, a longitudinal DC magnetic field was applied during plasma surfacing of nickel-based alloy Ni60. Hardness, wearing resistance, microstructure and phase constituent of the plasma surfacing layer were investigated. It was revealed that the hardness and wearing resistance of the Ni60 plasma surfacing layer could gotten significantly enhanced through introducing magnetic field. The mechanical properties of the surfacing deposit were optimal when magnetic field current is 1 A. The metallurgical analysis showed that the microstructure of the Ni60 plasma surfacing layer was mainly composed of γ solid solution and some hardening phase particles such as Cr7 C3 with an application of the magnetic field.

  19. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  20. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  1. Dissimilarity between temperature-humidity in the atmospheric surface layer and implications for estimates of evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelli, D. M.; Dias, N. L.; Chamecki, M.

    2012-12-01

    In several methods used in water resources to estimate evaporation from land and water surfaces, a fundamental assumption is that temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) fluctuations behave similarly in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). In the Energy-Budget Bowen Ratio method it is assumed that both eddy diffusivities are equal, while in the variance method it is often assumed that all the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) functions for the two scalars are equal. However, it is well-known that the T-q similarity does not always hold and that the dissimilarity found in practice can significantly impact the estimates of evaporation. Given the frequent dissimilarity between temperature and humidity, two important problems arise. The first one is related to the choice of the function used to characterize scalar similarity, given that not all commonly used functions are equally capable of identifying scalar dissimilarity. The second problem is associated with the identification of the physical mechanisms behind scalar dissimilarity in each particular case: local advection, nonstationarity, surface heterogeneity, active/passive roles of the scalars, entrainment fluxes at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer are typically cited as possible causes, but seldom a convincing argument is presented. In this work we combine experimental data and numerical simulations to study similarity between T and q in the ASL. Data measured over a lake in Brazil suggests a strong relationship between scalar similarity and the balance between local production and dissipation of scalar variance, which is in practice related to the strength of the surface forcing. Scalar variance and covariance budgets are used to derive a set of dimensionless Scalar Flux numbers that are capable of diagnosing the balance between gradient production and molecular dissipation of scalar variance and covariance. Experimental data shows that these Scalar Flux numbers are good predictors of scalar (dis

  2. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kostik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, while in ground water samples from wells boreholes and mineral waters with the technique of ion chromatography. The research shows that lithium concentration in potable water ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 μg/L; in surface water from 0.5 to 15.0 μg/L; ground water from wells boreholes from 16.0 to 49.1 μg/L and mineral water from 125.2 to 484.9 μg/L. Obtained values are in accordance with the relevant international values for the lithium content in water.

  3. Surface band-gap narrowing in quantized electron accumulation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D; McConville, C F; Zúñiga-Pérez, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Hopkinson, M; Rienks, E D L; Jensen, M Fuglsang; Hofmann, Ph

    2010-06-25

    An energy gap between the valence and the conduction band is the defining property of a semiconductor, and the gap size plays a crucial role in the design of semiconductor devices. We show that the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas near to the surface of a semiconductor can significantly alter the size of its band gap through many-body effects caused by its high electron density, resulting in a surface band gap that is much smaller than that in the bulk. Apart from reconciling a number of disparate previous experimental findings, the results suggest an entirely new route to spatially inhomogeneous band-gap engineering.

  4. Formation of Nanoscale Intermetallic Phases in Ni Surface Layer at High Intensity Implantation of Al Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.A.Bozhko; S.V.Fortuna; I.A.Kurzina; I.B.Stepanov; E.V.Kozlov; Yu.P. Sharkeev

    2004-01-01

    The results of experimental study of nanoscale intermetallic formation in surface layer of a metal target at ion implantation are presented. To increase the thickness of the ion implanted surface layer the high intensive ion implantation is used. Compared with the ordinary ion implantation, the high intensive ion implantation allows a much thicker modified surface layer. Pure polycrystalline nickel was chosen as a target. Nickel samples were irradiated with Al ions on the vacuum-arc ion beam and plasma flow source "Raduga-5". It was shown that at the high intensity ion implantation the fine dispersed particles of Ni3Al, NiAl intermetallic compounds and solid solution Al in Ni are formed in the nickel surface layer of 200 nm and thicker. The formation of phases takes place in complete correspondence with the Ni-Al phase diagram.

  5. Determination of elastic properties of surface layers and coatings by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžek, M.; Sedlák, P.; Seiner, H.; Landa, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with determination of in-plane elastic constants of thin layers deposited on substrates. Modified resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is used to measure resonant spectra before and after layer deposition . These two spectra are compared and changes in the position of the resonant peaks are associated with layer properties. It is shown that for thin layers either the elastic moduli or the surface mass density can be determined, providing the complementary information (the surface mass density for the determination of the moduli, the elastic moduli for the determination of the surface mass density) is known. As an experimental demonstration of this approach, the elastic moduli of diamond-like-carbon film deposited on a silicon substrate and the surface mass density of a thin spray paint on a silicon substrate are determined.

  6. FORMING A PARTING LAYER OF COATING ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOULD DURING DIE-CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pivovarchik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the study of the possibility of accumulation of the lubricating layer coating on the surface of the separation process of foundry equipment with high pressure die casting aluminum alloys.

  7. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II: Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  8. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renk, Timothy J.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  9. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  10. On inferring isoprene emission surface flux from atmospheric boundary layer concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Dries, van den K.; Pino, D.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the dependence of the inferred isoprene surface emission flux from atmospheric concentration on the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer (CBL). A series of systematic numerical experiments carried out using the mixed-layer technique enabled us to study the sensitivity of i

  11. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and t...

  12. Surface Phenomena During Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Etching of SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasvoda, Ryan J; van de Steeg, Alex W; Bhowmick, Ranadeep; Hudson, Eric A; Agarwal, Sumit

    2017-09-13

    Surface phenomena during atomic layer etching (ALE) of SiO2 were studied during sequential half-cycles of plasma-assisted fluorocarbon (CFx) film deposition and Ar plasma activation of the CFx film using in situ surface infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Infrared spectra of the surface after the CFx deposition half-cycle from a C4F8/Ar plasma show that an atomically thin mixing layer is formed between the deposited CFx layer and the underlying SiO2 film. Etching during the Ar plasma cycle is activated by Ar(+) bombardment of the CFx layer, which results in the simultaneous removal of surface CFx and the underlying SiO2 film. The interfacial mixing layer in ALE is atomically thin due to the low ion energy during CFx deposition, which combined with an ultrathin CFx layer ensures an etch rate of a few monolayers per cycle. In situ ellipsometry shows that for a ∼4 Å thick CFx film, ∼3-4 Å of SiO2 was etched per cycle. However, during the Ar plasma half-cycle, etching proceeds beyond complete removal of the surface CFx layer as F-containing radicals are slowly released into the plasma from the reactor walls. Buildup of CFx on reactor walls leads to a gradual increase in the etch per cycle.

  13. Research on synthetic aperture radar imaging technology of one-dimensional layered rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wei-Jie; Tong Chuang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A quick and exact imaging method for one-dimensional layered rough surfaces is proposed in this paper to study the scattering characteristics of a layered medium that exists widely in nature.The boundary integral equations of layered rough surfaces are solved by using the propagation-inside-layer expansion combined with the forward and backward spectral acceleration method (PILE+FB-SA),and the back scattering data are obtained.Then,a conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging procedure called back projection method is used to generate a two-dimensional (2D) image of the layered rough surfaces.Combined with the relative dielectric permittivity of realistic soil,the random rough surfaces with Gauss spectrum are used to simulate the layered medium with rough interfaces.Since the back scattering data are computed by using the fast numerical method,this method can be used to study layered rough surfaces with any parameter,which has a great application value in the detection and remote sensing areas.

  14. Site-specific immobilization of protein layers on gold surfaces via orthogonal sortases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T

    2015-04-01

    We report a site-specific, sortase-mediated ligation to immobilize proteins layer-by-layer on a gold surface. Recombinant fluorescent proteins with a Sortase A recognition tag at the C-terminus were immobilized on peptide-modified gold surfaces. We used two sortases with different substrate specificities (Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase A and Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A) to immobilize layers of GFP and mCherry site-specifically on the gold surface. Surfaces were characterized using fluorescence and atomic force microscopy after immobilizing each layer of protein. Fluorescent micrographs showed that both protein immobilization on the modified gold surface and protein oligomerization are sortase-dependent. AFM images showed that either homogenous protein monolayers or layers of protein oligomers can be generated using appropriately tagged substrate proteins. Using Sortase A variants with orthogonal peptide substrate specificities, site-specific immobilization of appropriately tagged GFP onto a layer of immobilized mCherry was achieved without disruption of the underlying protein layer.

  15. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    OpenAIRE

    D. Myszka; M. Kłębczyk; Zych, A.; L. Kwiatkowski

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  16. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  17. Layer-by-layer self assembly of a water-soluble phthalocyanine on gold. Application to the electrochemical determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodlur, Lokesh S

    2013-06-01

    A self-assembled molecular film of a water-soluble cobalt tetrasulfophthalocyanine was deposited on a gold substrate premodified with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). The process of layer-by-layer assembly on the gold substrate was characterized using UV-Vis, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical methods. Results demonstrate the formation of a completely covered phthalocyanine film on the gold surface. UV-Vis spectra indicated the formation of monolayer film of the phthalocyanine on the surface. The functionalized surface is uniformly covered and becomes hydrophilic after modification. The modified gold surface exhibits a reversible redox behavior and acts as an electronic conductor for the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer. A linear increase in the catalytic current is observed for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide in the concentration range from 1 to 20 μM, with a detection limit of 0.4 μM. Hydrogen peroxide spiked pond water sample showed a recovery of 94% indicating the method is selective and can be applied for various applications. The present method is a simple, cost effective and sensitive electrochemical method for the detection and quantification of hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Boron Diffused Thermoluminescent Surface Layer in LiF TLDs for Skin Dose Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Majborn, Benny

    1980-01-01

    A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry.......A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry....

  19. Understanding surface interactions in aqueous miscible organic solvent treated layered double hydroxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Erastova, Valentina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; O'Hare, Dermot; Greenwell, H. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials are of interest for use in a wealth of technological applications, many of which require a high surface area for optimal properties and performance. Recently, an industrially scalable method to create high surface area layered double hydroxide (LDH) materials, which may be readily dispersed in non-polar solvents, has been developed. This method involves treatment of LDHs with aqueous miscible organic (AMO) solvents. Here, molecular modeling is exploited to elucidate the AMO ...

  20. Nanostructured Hardening of Hard Alloys Surface Layers Through Electron Irradiation in Heavy Inert Gas Plasma Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mokhovikov, A. A.; Baohai, Yu; Hua, Xu Yun

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents research and experimental findings which prove that metal ceramic composite surface layer contains micro constituents’ hierarchies in the form of secondary nano sized inclusions inside ceramic phases. These inclusions have typical dimensions from several tens to several hundreds of nano meters. It has been shown that multi level structure-phase condition, developed in a nano sized area, effects physical and tribological properties of a metal ceramic composite surface layer.

  1. The near-neutral atmospheric surface layer: turbulence and non-stationarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M; McKeon, B J; Holmes, H

    2007-03-15

    The neutrally stable atmospheric surface layer is used as a physical model of a very high Reynolds number, canonical turbulent boundary layer. Challenges and limitations with this model are addressed in detail, including the inherent thermal stratification, surface roughness and non-stationarity of the atmosphere. Concurrent hot-wire and sonic anemometry data acquired in Utah's western desert provide insight to Reynolds number trends in the axial velocity statistics and spectra.

  2. Highly stable surface functionalization of microgas chromatography columns using layer-by-layer self-assembly of silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shakeel, Hamza; Lovette, John; Rice, Gary W; Heflin, James R; Agah, Masoud

    2013-09-03

    A controllable and high-yield surface functionalization of silicon microchannels using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of SiO2 nanoparticles (SNPs) is presented. The application of SNPs (45 nm average diameter) coating as a stationary phase for chromatographic separation is also demonstrated with surface functionalization using chloroalkylsilanes. This method facilitates a simple, low-cost, and parallel processing scheme that also provides homogeneous and stable nanoparticle-based stationary phases with ease of control over the coating thickness. The SNP-functionalized microfabricated columns with either single capillary channels (1 m long, 150 μm wide, 240 μm deep) or very narrow multicapillary channels (25 cm long, 30 μm wide, 240 μm deep, 16 parallel channels) successfully separated a multicomponent gas mixture with a wide range of boiling points with high reproducibility.

  3. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  4. Enabling organosilicon chemistries on inert polymer surfaces with a vapor-deposited silica layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Ashurst, W R

    2009-10-06

    Given the large surface area-to-volume ratios commonly encountered in microfluidics applications, the ability to engineer the chemical properties of surfaces encountered in these applications is critically important. However, as various polymers are rapidly replacing glass and silicon as the chosen materials for microfluidics devices, the ability to easily modify the surface chemistry has been diminished by the relatively inert nature of some commonly employed polymer surfaces, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This paper describes the low-temperature, vapor-phase deposition of robust silica layers to PMMA, polystyrene, and PDMS surfaces, which enables the functionalization of these surfaces by standard organosilane chemistries. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the silica layers that form on these surfaces. Aqueous immersion experiments indicate that the silica layer has excellent stability in aqueous environments, which is a prerequisite for microfluidics applications, but for PMMA surfaces, low adhesion of the silica layer to the underlying substrate is problematic. For PDMS substrates, the presence of the silica layer helps to slow the process of hydrophobic recovery, which is an additional advantage.

  5. Instrumentation in Support of Research on Bio-optical Thin Layers in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    INSTRUMENTATION IN SUPPORT OF RESEARCH ON BIO -OPTICAL THIN LAYERS IN COASTAL WATERS Dian J. Gifford Graduate School of Oceanography University of...SUBTITLE Instrumentation in Support of Research on Bio -optical Thin Layers in Coastal Waters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Because the layers scatter both sound and light, they are important in a number of other disciplinary areas in ocean including bio -optics and acoustics

  6. The influence of moisture content on the water vapour resistance of surface coated spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, E.T.; Ulriksen, L.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2005-01-01

    , but now with one layer of paint (60 g/m^2) on one surface of the wood specimens. The results show that the RH level significantly influences the water vapour resistance of the paint. For wet cup tests a water vapour resistance of the paint of 6.5•10^8 Pa•m^2•s/kg in average is found. In contrast...

  7. How to repel hot water from a superhydrophobic surface?

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhejun

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces, with water contact angles greater than 150° and slide angles less than 10°, have attracted a great deal of attention due to their self-cleaning ability and excellent water-repellency. It is commonly accepted that a superhydrophobic surface loses its superhydrophobicity in contact with water hotter than 50 °C. Such a phenomenon was recently demonstrated by Liu et al. [J. Mater. Chem., 2009, 19, 5602], using both natural lotus leaf and artificial leaf-like surfaces. However, our work has shown that superhydrophobic surfaces maintained their superhydrophobicity, even in water at 80 °C, provided that the leaf temperature is greater than that of the water droplet. In this paper, we report on the wettability of water droplets on superhydrophobic thin films, as a function of both their temperatures. The results have shown that both the water contact and slide angles on the surfaces will remain unchanged when the temperature of the water droplet is greater than that of the surface. The water contact angle, or the slide angle, will decrease or increase, however, with droplet temperatures increasingly greater than that of the surfaces. We propose that, in such cases, the loss of superhydrophobicity of the surfaces is caused by evaporation of the hot water molecules and their condensation on the cooler surface. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  8. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vibrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rigid, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  9. Investigation on electromagnetic scattering from rough soil surface of layered medium using the small perturbation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xin-Cheng; Guo Li-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from a rough surface of layered medium is investigated, and the formulae of the scattering coefficients for different polarizations are derived using the small perturbation method. A rough surface with exponential correlation function is presented for describing a rough soil surface of layered medium, the formula of its scattering coefficient is derived by considering the spectrum of the rough surface with exponential correlation function; the curves of the bistatic scattering coefficient of HH polarization with variation of the scattering angle are obtained by numerical calculation. The influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the roughness surface parameters and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is discussed. Numerical results show that the influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the rms and the correlation length of the rough surface, and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is very complex.

  10. Formation of nanocrystalline layers by surface severe plastic deformation and pulsed plasma electrolytic carburizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2010-07-01

    Surfaces of various kinds of metallic materials spheres were treated by nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation and then pulsed nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic carburizing to study nanocrystalline substrate effect on formation and nano-hardness of hard nanocrystalline layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation were characterized by means of high resolution scanning electron microscope. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 15 to 90 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all metallic materials, which are low carbon steel and commercially pure titanium. The effect of substrate nanocrystallization on growth kinetics and hardness of formed nanocrystalline carbide layer was studied with the means of figure analysis and nanohardness tests. Figure analysis show the length to diameter ratio and distribution curve of nanocrystals and it has been found that the achieved properties of hard layer (growth rate, nano-hardness, nanostructure...) are related to these factors. It was also clarified that these techniques and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials. Results indicate that the resultant hardened carburized layers exhibited excellent hardness profile. Investigation of the layer characteristics showed strong dependence followed from the treatment experimental parameters as well as the shape of nanocrystals.

  11. Structure and reactivity of water at biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, E A

    1998-02-01

    Molecular self association in liquids is a physical process that can dominate cohesion (interfacial tension) and miscibility. In water, self association is a powerful organizational force leading to a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network (water structure). Localized perturbations in the chemical potential of water as by, for example, contact with a solid surface, induces compensating changes in water structure that can be sensed tens of nanometers from the point of origin using the surface force apparatus (SFA) and ancillary techniques. These instruments reveal attractive or repulsive forces between opposing surfaces immersed in water, over and above that anticipated by continuum theory (DLVO), that are attributed to a variable density (partial molar volume) of a more-or-less ordered water structure, depending on the water wettability (surface energy) of the water-contacting surfaces. Water structure at surfaces is thus found to be a manifestation of hydrophobicity and, while mechanistic/theoretical interpretation of experimental results remain the subject of some debate in the literature, convergence of experimental observations permit, for the first time, quantitative definition of the relative terms 'hydrophobic' and 'hydrophilic'. In particular, long-range attractive forces are detected only between surfaces exhibiting a water contact angle theta > 65 degrees (herein defined as hydrophobic surfaces with pure water adhesion tension tau O = gamma O cos theta 30 dyn/cm). These findings suggest at least two distinct kinds of water structure and reactivity: a relatively less-dense water region against hydrophobic surfaces with an open hydrogen-bonded network and a relatively more-dense water region against hydrophilic surfaces with a collapsed hydrogen-bonded network. Importantly, membrane and SFA studies reveal a discrimination between biologically-important ions that preferentially solubilizes divalent ions in more-dense water regions relative to less

  12. Distribution of {sup 129}I in terrestrial surface water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuegao [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Meng [College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Yi, Peng, E-mail: pengyi1915@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Yu, Zhongbo [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Li [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-15

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. {sup 129}I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of {sup 129}I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of {sup 129}I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on {sup 129}I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  13. Origin of interfacial nanoscopic gaseous domains and formation of dense gas layer at hydrophobic solid-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Birkett, Greg R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2013-12-10

    Interfacial gas enrichment (IGE) covering the entire area of hydrophobic solid-water interface has recently been detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hypothesized to be responsible for the unexpected stability and anomalous contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles and the significant change from DLVO to non-DLVO forces. In this paper, we provide further proof of the existence of IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) by molecular dynamic simulation. Nitrogen gas adsorption at the water-graphite interface is investigated using molecular dynamic simulation at 300 K and 1 atm normal pressure. The results show that a DGL with a density equivalent to a gas at pressure of 500 atm is formed and equilibrated with a normal pressure of 1 atm. By varying the number of gas molecules in the system, we observe several types of dense gas domains: aggregates, cylindrical caps, and DGLs. Spherical cap gas domains form during the simulation but are unstable and always revert to another type of gas domain. Furthermore, the calculated surface potential of the DGL-water interface, -17.5 mV, is significantly closer to 0 than the surface potential, -65 mV, of normal gas bubble-water interface. This result supports our previously stated hypothesis that the change in surface potential causes the switch from repulsion to attraction for an AFM tip when the graphite surface is covered by an IGE layer. The change in surface potential comes from the structure change of water molecules at the DGL-water interface as compared with the normal gas-water interface. In addition, the contact angle of the cylindrical cap high density nitrogen gas domains is 141°. This contact angle is far greater than 85° observed for water on graphite at ambient conditions and much closer to the 150° contact angle observed for nanobubbles in experiments.

  14. Small Flux Buoy for Characterizing Marine Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    wind direction or speed. They are also frequently found in fetch-limited offshore coastal flow. Young developing waves are dominated by the growth...approximately 9 kg. Cables from the sensors are routed to the mast by an umbilical arrangement. The length of the cables is long enough to prevent...from the umbilical cable using a separate small float and a weight. Depths were selected within the first 50 cm of the water column for the purpose of

  15. Surface heterogeneity impacts on boundary layer dynamics via energy balance partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Brunsell

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of land-atmosphere interactions under heterogeneous surface conditions is investigated in order to identify mechanisms responsible for altering surface heat and moisture fluxes. Twelve coupled land surface – large eddy simulation scenarios with four different length scales of surface variability under three different horizontal wind speeds are used in the analysis. The base case uses Landsat ETM imagery over the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC field site for 3 June 2007. Using wavelets, the surface fields are band-pass filtered in order to maintain the spatial mean and variances to length scales of 200 m, 1600 m, and 12.8 km as lower boundary conditions to the model (approximately 0.25, 1.2 and 9.5 times boundary layer height. The simulations exhibit little variation in net radiation. Rather, there is a pronounced change in the partitioning of the surface energy between sensible and latent heat flux. The sensible heat flux is dominant for intermediate surface length scales. For smaller and larger scales of surface heterogeneity, which can be viewed as being more homogeneous, the latent heat flux becomes increasingly important. The simulations showed approximately 50 Wm−2 difference in the spatially averaged latent heat flux. The results reflect a general decrease of the Bowen ratio as the surface conditions transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous. Air temperature is less sensitive to variations in surface heterogeneity than water vapor, which implies that the role of surface heterogeneity may be to maximize convective heat fluxes through modifying and maintaining local temperature gradients. More homogeneous surface conditions (i.e. smaller length scales, on the other hand, tend to maximize latent heat flux. The intermediate scale (1600 m this does not hold, and is a more complicated interaction of scales. Scalar vertical profiles respond predictably to the partitioning of surface energy. Fourier

  16. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mews, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.mews@helmholtz-berlin.de; Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekuléstraße 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo [Evonik Industries AG, Creavis Technologies and Innovation, Paul-Baumann-Straße 1, D-45772 Marl (Germany)

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  17. Properties of laser alloyed surface layers on magnesium base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galun, R.; Weisheit, A.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik)

    1998-01-01

    The investigations have shown that laser surface alloying is a promising process to improve the wear and corrosion properties of magnesium base alloys without affecting the initial bulk properties like the low density. With an alloying element combination of aluminium and nickel the wear rate in the scratch test was reduced by 90% compared to untreated pure magnesium. Additionally the corrosion resistance was improved by laser alloying with this element combination. Because of distortion or crack formation in the case of large area treatments, the laser alloying should be limited to the treatment of smaller areas. In the near future this process could be an interesting alternative to surface coating or to a partially reinforcement with ceramic fibres or particles. (orig.)

  18. Dynamics of surface tension driven mixing of an alcohol droplet with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, Raj; Pant, Anurag; Puthenveettil, Baburaj

    2016-11-01

    We study the flow induced by the surface tension driven spreading of an ethanol droplet of radius rd on the surface of a 5mm water layer, visualizing the flow using aluminium flakes on the surface of the water layer with backlighting and high speed imaging. The concentration of tracer aluminium particles was found to have no effect on the scaling law for spreading.The drop,when brought in contact with the water surface causes a local depression in surface tension ,resulting in a thin circular region to expand radially outwards.We observe that the dimensionless radius of the expanding front (r* =r/rd) scales with the dimensionless time (t* = μ rd/ Δγ) , as r* t*1/4,where μ is the viscosity of water and Δγ is the surface tension difference between water and the ethanol droplet.A scaling analysis taking the viscous and the marangoni forces into account explains the observed scaling law.Our observations differ from that in the case of continuous alcohol supply where the observed scaling law is r* t*1/2. The expanding front radius reaches a maximum value and then decreases with time.

  19. Design of Matched Absorbing Layers for Surface Plasmon-Polaritons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de la Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a procedure for designing metal-metal boundaries for the strong attenuation of surface plasmon-polaritons without the introduction of reflections or scattering effects. Solutions associated with different sets of matching materials are found. To illustrate the results and the consequences of adopting different solutions, we present calculations based on an integral equation formulation for the scattering problem and the use of a nonlocal impedance boundary condition.

  20. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w