WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface water evaporation

  1. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  2. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  3. Evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; He, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the dynamic evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces with micropillars. Our experimental data showed that receding contact angles of the water droplet increased with the decreasing of the scale of the micropillars during evaporation, even though the solid area fractions of the microstructured substrates remained constant. We also experimentally found that the critical contact diameters of the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states are affected not only by the geometrical parameters of the microstructures, but also by the initial volume of the water droplet. The measured critical pressure is consistent with the theoretical model, which validated the pressure-induced impalement mechanism for the wetting state transition.

  4. New insights into saline water evaporation from porous media: Complex interaction between evaporation rates, precipitation, and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri-Kuehni, Salomé M. S.; Vetter, Thomas; Webb, Colin; Shokri, Nima

    2017-06-01

    Understanding salt transport and deposition patterns during evaporation from porous media is important in many engineering and hydrological processes such as soil salinization, ecosystem functioning, and land-atmosphere interaction. As evaporation proceeds, salt concentration increases until it exceeds solubility limits, locally, and crystals precipitate. The interplay between transport processes, crystallization, and evaporation influences where crystallization occurs. During early stages, the precipitated salt creates an evolving porous structure affecting the evaporation kinetics. We conducted a comprehensive series of experiments to investigate how the salt concentration and precipitation influence evaporation dynamics. Our results illustrate the contribution of the evolving salt crust to the evaporative mass losses. High-resolution thermal imaging enabled us to investigate the complex temperature dynamics at the surface of precipitated salt, providing further confirmation of salt crust contribution to the evaporation. We identify different phases of saline water evaporation from porous media with the corresponding dominant mechanisms in each phase and extend the physical understanding of such processes.

  5. Evaporation dynamics of water droplets on inclined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    When a water droplet is gently placed on a flat substrate, particularly which is tilted at an inclined angle, usually there are advancing and receding angles inside the droplet formed by inclination under gravitational force. Evaporation dynamics of an nonspherical inclined droplet at inclinations would deviate from that of a spherical droplet. Here we study on evaporation dynamics rates of inclined droplets by measuring mass changes with time and their lifetimes. We find that the lifetime of an evaporating inclined droplets becomes longer as the gravitational influence becomes stronger. The lifetime depends on the pinning-depinning transitions and the depinning onset times, which are changed by the gravitational influence. This The dependence inclination-induced evaporation behavior would be useful important in understanding evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  6. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Xuemei Chen; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol dr...

  7. Enhancement of Water Evaporation on Solid Surfaces with Nanoscale Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Wang, Chunlei; Lei, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guoquan; Fang, Haiping

    2015-11-06

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the evaporation of nanoscale water on hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterned surfaces is unexpectedly faster than that on any surfaces with uniform wettability. The key to this phenomenon is that, on the patterned surface, the evaporation rate from the hydrophilic region only slightly decreases due to the correspondingly increased water thickness; meanwhile, a considerable number of water molecules evaporate from the hydrophobic region despite the lack of water film. Most of the evaporated water from the hydrophobic region originates from the hydrophilic region by diffusing across the contact lines. Further analysis shows that the evaporation rate from the hydrophobic region is approximately proportional to the total length of the contact lines.

  8. A Simulation Stud on Effect of Surface Film—Forming Material on Water Evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANGSHUNYAO; YINBIN; 等

    2001-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of surface film-forming material(SFFM),a mixture of 16-18-octadecanols by emulsification,on water evaporation,Air-dired soil with distilled water was incubated firstly for 7days to reestablish soil biological activity and then for another 7 days atfer treated with SFFM at rates of 0,1,2,4,6,8 and 8 g m-2,respectively,Everyday during the 7-day incubation after addition of SFFM,water losses due to evaporation were measured by an electronic balance.The rate of water evaporation with the addition of SFFM was reduced significantly compared with the control treatment and the effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation reduced with time.According to the equation expressions of the effect of SFFM on water evaporation ,the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation was introduced and calculated to analyze quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation and the addition rate of SFFM.The calculaed half-life increased with the addition rate of SFFM and the confidence of the calculated values of the half-life was high,suggesting that the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation could be described quantitaively and may be helpful for ameliorating application method of SFFM and screening surface-film forming materials in order to improve nitrogen fetilizer use efficiency in floodey rice fields.

  9. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-11-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol droplet not only evaporates faster, but also inhibits Cassie-to-Wenzel wetting transitions on surfaces with certain geometries. We use an interfacial energy-based description of the system, including the transition energy barrier and triple line energy, to explain the underlying transition mechanism and behaviour observed. Suppression of the wetting transition during evaporation of droplets provides an important metric for evaluating the robustness of omniphobic surfaces requiring such functionality.

  10. Effects of Surface Dipole Lengths on Evaporation of Tiny Water Aggregation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shen; TU Yu-Song; WAN Rong-Zheng; FANG Hai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation,we compared evaporation behavior of a tiny amount of water molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with different dipole lengths,including surface dipole lengths of 1 fold,2 folds,4 folds,6 folds and 8 folds of 0.14 nm and different charges from 0.1e to 0.9e.Surfaces with short dipole lengths (1-fold system) can always maintain hydrophobic character and the evaporation speeds are not influenced,whether the surface charges are enhanced or weakened; but when surface dipole lengths get to 8 folds,surfaces become more hydrophilic as the surface charge increases,and the evaporation speeds increase gradually and monotonically.By tuning dipole lengths from 1-fold to 8-fold systems,we confirmed non-monotonic variation of the evaporation flux (first increases,then decreases)in 4 fold system with charges (0.1e-0.7e),reported in our previous paper [S.Wang,et al.,J.Phys.Chem.B 116 (2012)13863],and also show the process from the enhancement of this unexpected non-monotonic variation to its vanishment with surface dipole lengths increasing.Herein,we demonstrated two key factors to influence the evaporation flux of a tiny amount of water molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces:the exposed surficial area of water aggregation from where the water molecules can evaporate directly and the attraction potential from the substrate hindering the evaporation.In addition,more interestingly,we showed extra steric effect of surface dipoles on further increase of evaporation flux for 2-folds,4-folds,6-folds and 8-folds systems with charges around larger than 0.7e.(The steric effect is first reported by parts of our authors [C.Wang,et al.,Sci.Rep.2 (2012) 358]).This study presents a complete physical picture of the influence of surface dipole lengths on the evaporation behavior of the adsorbed tiny amount of water.

  11. Droplet evaporation of pure water and protein solution on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces of varying heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2009-07-07

    Evaporation of liquids on substrates is important for many applications including lab-on-a-chip, especially when they are in droplets. Unlike on planar substrates, droplet evaporation on micropatterned substrates has been studied only recently and none so far on nanopatterns. Driven by the applicability of nanostructured surfaces to biomaterials and tissue engineering, we report on the evaporative process of sessile droplets of pure water and a protein solution on superhydrophobic surfaces of sharp-tip post structures in a submicrometer pitch (230 nm) and varying heights (100-500 nm). We find that the nanotopographical three-dimensionalities such as structural height and sidewall profile affect the surface superhydrophobicity in such a way that only tall and slender nanostructures provide the surface with great superhydrophobicity (a contact angle more than 170 degrees). The evaporation process was different between the pure water and the protein solution; unlike pure water, a significant contact-line spreading and pinning effect was observed in a droplet of a protein solution with an intermediate transition from a dewetting (Cassie) to a wetting (Wenzel) state. Enabled by well-defined nanostructures, our results highlight that the surface superhydrophobicity and the droplet evaporation are significantly affected by the three-dimensional nanometric topography and the surface fouling such as protein adsorption.

  12. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  13. Cooling clothing utilizing water evaporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Tominaga, Naoto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    We developed cooling clothing that utilizes water evaporation to cool the human body and has a mechanism to control the cooling intensity. Clean water was supplied to the outer surface of the T-shirt of the cooling clothing, and a small fan was used to enhance evaporation on this outer surface...... temperature ranging from 27.4 to 30.7 °C to establish a suitable water supply control method. A water supply control method that prevents water accumulation in the T-shirt and water dribbling was validated; this method is established based on the concept of the water evaporation capacity under the applied...

  14. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbazoglu, F. M.; Fan, B.; Kargar, A.; Vemuri, K.; Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.

  15. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbazoglu, F. M.; Fan, B.; Kargar, A.; Vemuri, K.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.

  16. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  17. Thickness effects of water overlayer on its explosive evaporation at heated metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou Yusheng E-mail: ysd@chem.psu.edu; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Postawa, Zbigniew; Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J

    2001-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of the thickness of a water overlayer on the character of its ejection from a heated Au surface. The simulations are performed for five systems differing in the thickness of the water overlayer which was adsorbed on a metal substrate heated to 1000 K. For each system, an explosive evaporation occurs in the part of the water film adjacent to the metal surface and the upper part of the film is pushed off by the generated force. The average maximum temperature of the water film decreases as the film thickness increases. In contrast, the temperature achieved by the fast cooling due to the explosive evaporation shows an inverse trend. The significance of these model calculations to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is discussed.

  18. Controls on open water evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Granger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the initial results of a field study of boundary layer behaviour and open water evaporation carried out on two small- to medium-sized lakes in Western and Northern Canada. Meteorological and boundary layer measurements were made over the water surfaces and over the upwind land surface, allowing for an examination of the effect of lake-land contrasts of temperature on the wind speed over the open water and on the evaporation rates. Lake evaporation was measured directly using eddy covariance equipment.

    The study showed that, for time periods shorter than daily, the open water evaporation bears no relationship to the net radiation. The wind speed is the most significant factor governing the evaporation rates, followed by the land-water temperature contrast and the land-water vapour pressure contrast. The effect of the stability on the wind field is demonstrated; stability over the water and adjacent land surfaces are, for the most part, out of phase. The derived relationships will be used to develop a model for estimating the hourly evaporation rates from open water.

    Examination of the seasonal trends shows that the open water period can be separated into two distinct evaporative regimes: the warming period in the Spring, when the land temperature is greater than the water temperature, the turbulent fluxes over water are suppressed; and the cooling period, when the water temperature is greater than the air temperature, and the turbulent fluxes over water are enhanced.

  19. Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  20. Evaporation from water surfaces in urban environments, using Prague and Pilsen (Czech Republic as examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knozová Gražyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is an evaluation of the amount of evaporation from water surfaces (VVH, measured using EWM devices in two cities of different sizes, and located approximately 80 km from each other – Prague and Pilsen. The results were analyzed in the context of urban phenomena, which are pronounced especially in Prague, and also in the context of meteorological and morphological conditions in those locations. It was found that higher amounts of evaporation were measured at the meteorological station in Pilsen. The difference between the average sum of VVH per season (1st May to 30th September between 2005 and 2014 for the two locations is 33.3 mm. The difference between daily average values was 0.2 mm. Given the suburban nature of the two locations where measurements were taken, it was not possible to draw any conclusions about the effect of the urban heat island on the rate of evaporation and values of VVH. Factors significantly influencing VVH are surface roughness, which is higher in urban environments than in open landscapes. Based on the results it was concluded that at both a regional and a local scale, the rate of evaporation is more affected by wind speed than thermal conditions. The measured VVH values differ, not just because of the urban dimension of the two cities compared, but especially as a result of different topoclimatic location of the two stations.

  1. Micrometer-sized water droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation on a flat dry surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Alejandro M; Ervin, Jamie S; Putnam, Shawn A; Byrd, Larry W; Gschwender, Lois

    2010-08-17

    A comprehensive numerical and experimental investigation on micrometer-sized water droplet impact dynamics and evaporation on an unheated, flat, dry surface is conducted from the standpoint of spray-cooling technology. The axisymmetric time-dependent governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and species are solved. Surface tension, wall adhesion effect, gravitational body force, contact line dynamics, and evaporation are accounted for in the governing equations. The explicit volume of fluid (VOF) model with dynamic meshing and variable-time stepping in serial and parallel processors is used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain. The numerical model includes temperature- and species-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. The contact line dynamics and the evaporation rate are predicted using Blake's and Schrage's molecular kinetic models, respectively. An extensive grid independence study was conducted. Droplet impingement and evaporation data are acquired with a standard dispensing/imaging system and high-speed photography. The numerical results are compared with measurements reported in the literature for millimeter-size droplets and with current microdroplet experiments in terms of instantaneous droplet shape and temporal spread (R/D(0) or R/R(E)), flatness ratio (H/D(0)), and height (H/H(E)) profiles, as well as temporal volume (inverted A) profile. The Weber numbers (We) for impinging droplets vary from 1.4 to 35.2 at nearly constant Ohnesorge number (Oh) of approximately 0.025-0.029. Both numerical and experimental results show that there is air bubble entrapment due to impingement. Numerical results indicate that Blake's formulation provides better results than the static (SCA) and dynamic contact angle (DCA) approach in terms of temporal evolution of R/D(0) and H/D(0) (especially at the initial stages of spreading) and equilibrium flatness ratio (H(E)/D(0)). Blake's contact line

  2. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  3. 河北省水面蒸发特性分析%Water Surface Evaporation Characteristic Analysis of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴景峰

    2011-01-01

    The 60-year evaporation data from 46 water surface evaporation stations of Hebei province from 1951 to 2010 are used to analyze the conversion coefficient of evaporation between the 20 cm diameter evaporation pan and the E601 type evaporator. The entire province is divided into six sub-regions,and the monthly conversion coefficients for different types of evaporators are investigated for each sub-region. Then the evaporation data from different types of evaporators are converted into the data for the E601 type evaporator based on the conversion coefficients .which is beneficial to evaluate the evaporation from water surface spatially and temporally in Hebei province. The spatial variation of evaporation indicates a tendency of higher evaporation in the north than the south and a larger evaporation in the plains than the mountains. Furthermore, the yearly evaporation decreases with a significant interWater Surface Evaporation Characteristic Analysis of Hebei Provinceannual variation. The maximum e-vaporation appeared in the 1960 s. After 1983,the evaporation was usually less than the average value.%利用河北省46个水面蒸发站1951年(或建站)-2010年60年的蒸发资料,按不同器皿逐月点绘了折算系数分区图,将全省划分为6个分区,分析了20 cm口径蒸发皿与E601型蒸发器水面蒸发折算系数.把不同类型的蒸发器资料均换算成E601型蒸发器资料,从地区分布、时程分配等方面阐述了全省水面蒸发量的特点;蒸发量呈南部大于北部,平原大于山区的地区分布特征;年蒸发量呈下降趋势,年际变化较为明显,20世纪60年代蒸发量最大,减少的变异年份出现在1983年.

  4. A Simulation Study on Effect of SurfaceFilm-Forming{1mmMaterial on Water Evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect ofsurface film-forming material (SFFM), a mixture of1618-octadecanols by emulsification, on water evaporation.Air-dried soil with distilled water was incubated firstly for 7 days toreestablish soil biological activity and then for another 7 days aftertreated with SFFM at rates of 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g m{-2,respectively. Everyday during the 7-day incubation after addition ofSFFM, water losses due to evaporation were measured by an electronicbalance. The rate of water evaporation with the addition of SFFM wasreduced significantly compared with the control treatment and theeffectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation reduced with time. Accordingto the equation expressions of the effect of SFFM on water evaporation,the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation wasintroduced and calculated to analyze quantitative relationship betweenthe effectiveness of SFFM on water evaporation and the addition rate ofSFFM. The calculated half-life increased with the addition rate of SFFMand the confidence of the calculated values of the half-life was high,suggesting that the half-life of effectiveness of SFFM on waterevaporation could be described quantitatively and may be helpful forameliorating application method of SFFM and screening surface-filmforming materials in order to improve nitrogen fertilizer useefficiency in flooded rice fields.

  5. Universal wetting transition of an evaporating water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Bussonnière, Adrien; Bigdeli, Masoud; Chueh, Di-Yen; Liu, Qingxia; Chen, Peilin

    2016-11-01

    An evaporating water droplet on a superhydrophobic surface undergoes a wetting transition from a heterogeneous wetting (Cassie-Baxter) to homogeneous wetting (Wenzel) state. The critical transition is manifested by a sudden decrease of contact angle, when "Fakir" water drop permeates the minute hydrophobic cavities. This breakdown of superhydrophobicity would hinder various applications of self-cleaning, low-frictional, and potentially ice-phobic properties of superhydrophobic materials. In this work, we experimentally investigate such wetting transition using hydrophobic nanostructures. With a theoretical model, we find a universal criterion of the critical contact angle at the transition point. The prediction of critical contact angle, which solely depends on the geometrical parameters of the hydrophobic pillars, agree well with various data for both micro- and nano-structures.

  6. Wetting behaviour during evaporation and condensation of water microdroplets on superhydrophobic patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y C; Bhushan, B

    2008-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications due to their extreme water repellent properties. The superhydrophobic surfaces may be generated by the use of hydrophobic coating, roughness and air pockets between solid and liquid. The geometric effects and dynamic effects, such as surface waves, can destroy the composite solid-air-liquid interface. The relationship between the water droplet size and geometric parameters governs the creation of composite interface and affects transition from solid-liquid interface to composite interface. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of droplets of various sizes. We have studied the effect of droplet size on contact angle by evaporation using droplets with radii ranging from about 300 to 700 microm. Experimental and theoretical studies of the wetting properties of silicon surfaces patterned with pillars of two different diameters and heights with varying pitch values are presented. We propose a criterion where the transition from Cassie and Baxter regime to Wenzel regime occurs when the droop of the droplet sinking between two asperities is larger than the depth of the cavity. The trends are explained based on the experimental data and the proposed transition criteria. An environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is used to form smaller droplets of about 20 microm radius and measure the contact angle on the patterned surfaces. The investigation has shown that ESEM provides a new approach to wetting studies on the microscale.

  7. Modern and long-term evaporation of central Andes surface waters suggests paleo archives underestimate Neogene elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Jeffery, M. Louise; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-12-01

    Central Andean paleoelevations reconstructed from stable isotope and paleofloral data imply a large magnitude (>2 km) Miocene-to-modern surface uplift. However, the isotopic relationships between precipitation, surface waters, and soil waters upon which these reconstructions are based remain poorly constrained for both past, and in many cases, modern conditions. We quantify the relationships between central Andean precipitation and surface waters by measuring the isotopic composition of 249 stream water samples (δ18O and δD) collected between April 2009 and October 2012. The isotopic compositions of stream waters match precipitation along the eastern flank. In contrast, Altiplano surface waters possess a lower δD-δ18O slope (4.59 vs ∼8 for meteoric waters) not observed in precipitation, which signals heavy isotope evaporative enrichment in surface waters. Paleoclimate models indicate that highly evaporative conditions have persisted on the plateau throughout Andean uplift, and that conditions may have been more evaporative when the Andes were lower. Thus, more ancient proxy materials may have a greater evaporative bias than previously recognized and paleoelevation reconstructions from stable isotope based central Andean plateau proxy materials likely overstate Miocene-to-present surface uplift. We propose Altiplano paleoelevations of 1-2 km at 24.5 Ma, 1.5-2.9 km by 11.45 Ma, and modern elevations by ∼6 Ma based on the lightest isotopic compositions observed in Altiplano proxy materials, which are least likely to be influenced by evaporation. These constraints limit total late-Miocene-to-modern uplift to <2.2 km, are more consistent with crustal shortening records, and suggest that plateau uplift may have been more spatially uniform than suggested by previous interpretations of stable isotope proxies.

  8. Estimation of the near surface soil water content during evaporation using air-launched ground-penetrating radar

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the global water cycle and its variation affects the near sur-face soil water content, which is crucial for surface hydrology and climate modelling. Soil evaporation rate is often characterized by two distinct phases, namely, the energy limited phase (stage-I) and the soil hydraulic limited period (stage-II). In this paper, a laboratory experiment was conducted using a sand box filled with fine sand, which was subject to evaporation for a period of twenty three days. The setup was equipped with a weighting system to record automatically the weight of the sand box with a constant time-step. Furthermore, time-lapse air-launched ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements were performed to monitor the evaporation process. The GPR model involves a full-waveform frequency-domain solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The accuracy of the full-waveform GPR forward modelling with respect to three different petrophysical models was investigated. Moreover, full-waveform inversion of the GPR data was used to estimate the quantitative information, such as near surface soil water content. The two stages of evaporation can be clearly observed in the radargram, which indicates qualitatively that enough information is contained in the GPR data. The full-waveform GPR inversion allows for accurate estimation of the near surface soil water content during extended evaporation phases, when a wide frequency range of GPR (0.8-5.0 GHz) is taken into account. In addition, the results indicate that the CRIM model may constitute a relevant alternative in solving the frequency-dependency issue for full waveform GPR modelling.

  9. Surface-induced evaporative cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Min; Yan Bo; Cheng Feng; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The effects of surface-induced evaporative cooling on an atom chip are investigated. The evolutions of temperature, number and phase-space density of the atom cloud are measured when the atom cloud is brought close to the surface. Rapid decrease of the temperature and number of the atoms is found when the atom-surface distance is < 100 μm. A gain of about a factor of five on the phase-space density is obtained. It is found that the efficiency of the surface-induced evaporative cooling depends on the atom-surface distance and the shape of the evaporative trap. When the atoms are moved very close to the surface, severe heating is observed, which dominates when the holding time is > 8 ms. It is important that the surface-induced evaporative cooling offers novel possibilities for the realization of a continuous condensation, where a spatially varying evaporative cooling is required.

  10. Water Drop Evaporation on Mushroom-like Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Temperature Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Rodney Marcelo; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Pirat, Christophe; Ramos, Stella M M

    2016-03-01

    We report on experiments of drop evaporation on heated superhydrophobic surfaces decorated with micrometer-sized mushroom-like pillars. We analyze the influence of two parameters on the evaporation dynamics: the solid-liquid fraction and the substrate temperature, ranging between 30 and 80 °C. In the different configurations investigated, the drop evaporation appears to be controlled by the contact line dynamics (pinned or moving). The experimental results show that (i) in the pinned regime, the depinning angles increase with decreasing contact fraction and the substrate heating promotes the contact line depinning and (ii) in the moving regime, the droplet motion is described by periodic stick-slip events and contact-angle oscillations. These features are highly smoothed at the highest temperatures, with two possible mechanisms suggested to explain such a behavior, a reduction in the elasticity of the triple line and a decrease in the depinning energy barriers. For all surfaces, the observed remarkable stability of the "fakir" state to the temperature is attributed to the re-entrant micropillar curvature that prevents surface imbibition.

  11. Evaporation of water droplets on Pt-surface in presence of external electric field--A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Abhiram; Biswas, Gautam; De, Sudipta

    2015-09-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet on a hot solid substrate is an important problem in fluid mechanics. It is relevant to theoretical issues in heat transfer as well as several practical applications. This study investigates the spreading and evaporation of a nanoscale water droplet on a solid platinum surface. The major objective was to analyze the effect of an external electric field on these phenomena. Varying the intensity and direction of the external electric field, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to understand these phenomena at a molecular level. The results reveal that a horizontal electric field assists in droplet spreading, whereas a vertical electric field enhances the rate of evaporation for a certain range of field intensities. It also shows that the substrate temperature plays an important role in such processes. It is seen that the effect of an external electric field on droplet evaporation becomes significant at an intermediate range of surface temperatures and this effect is not clearly visible for either very high or very low range of surface temperatures.

  12. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  13. Accelerated evaporation of water on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Shi, Guosheng

    2017-03-15

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water on patterned graphene oxide is faster than that on homogeneous graphene oxide. The evaporation rate of water is insensitive to variation in the oxidation degree of the oxidized regions, so long as the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. The evaporation rate drops when the water film spreads onto the unoxidized regions. Further analysis showed that varying the oxidation degree observably changed the interaction between the outmost water molecules and the solid surface, but the total interaction for the outmost water molecules only changed a very limited amount due to the correspondingly regulated water-water interaction when the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. When the oxidation degree is too low and some unoxidized regions are also covered by the water film, the thickness of the water film decreases, which extends the lifetime of the hydrogen bonds for the outmost water molecules and lowers the evaporation rate of the water. The insensitivity of water evaporation to the oxidation degree indicates that we only need to control the scale of the unoxidized and oxidized regions for graphene oxide to regulate the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water.

  14. Evaporative Control on Soil Water Isotope Ratios: Implications for Atmosphere-Land Surface Water Fluxes and Interpretation of Terrestrial Proxy Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; O'Neill, M.

    2014-12-01

    The moisture balance of the continental boundary layer plays an important role in regulating the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and atmosphere. Near-surface moisture balance is controlled by a number of factors including precipitation, infiltration and evapotranspiration. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in water can be exploited to better understand the mechanisms controlling atmosphere-land surface water fluxes. Understanding the processes that set sub-surface water isotope ratios can prove useful for refining paleoclimate interpretations of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based proxies. We present in situ tower-based measurements of stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δ18O) in vapor, precipitation and soil from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, a semi-arid tall-tower site in Erie, Colorado, from July 2012 to September 2014. Near surface profiles from 0 to 10 m were measured approximately every ninety minutes. Soil profiles from 0 to 30 cm, the region of maximum variability, were sampled on a weekly basis and cryogenically extracted for stable water isotope measurement. Evaporation-proof bulk rain collectors provided precipitation samples at this site. Results show disequilibrium exists between surface vapor and soil water isotopes, with the top 10 cm of soil water approaching equilibrium with the surface vapor right after a rain event because of high infiltration and saturation at the surface. At this semi-arid site with little vegetation, evaporative exchange is the main driver for soil water fluxes as the soil dries, corroborated by soil Dexcess profiles showing progressive enrichment through evaporation. In addition, when nighttime surface temperatures are cooler than deep soil, as is the case in many arid and semi-arid environments, upward vapor diffusion from the soil leads to dew formation at the surface which then contributes to surface vapor values. We use these observations to constrain a Craig-Gordon evaporation

  15. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  16. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  17. Interannual variability in the surface energy budget and evaporation over a large southern inland water in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Heping

    2013-05-01

    Understanding how the surface energy budget and evaporation over inland waters respond to climate change and variability remains limited. Here we report 2 year measurements of the surface energy budget using the eddy covariance method over Ross Barnett Reservoir, Mississippi, USA, for 2008 and 2009. Annual mean sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat fluxes in 2008 were 9.5%, and 10.0% greater than in 2009, respectively. Most of the interannual variations in the surface energy fluxes and meteorological variables primarily occurred in the cool seasons from October to March, which was enhanced by frequent large wind events associated with cold front passages. These large wind events greatly promoted H and LE exchange and produced H and LE pulses that increased variations in H and LE between these two cool seasons. In the warm seasons from April to September, H and LE pulses were also present, which largely increased variations in LE and dampened those in H between the two warm seasons. The H and LE pulses contributed to approximately 50% of the annual H and 28% of the annual LE, although they only covered about 16% of the entire year. The interannual variations in H and LE pulses contributed to about 78% of the interannual variations in H and 40% of those in LE. Our results imply that the increased interannual variability in cold front activities as a result of climate change would amplify interannual variations in the evaporation and the surface energy exchange over inland waters in this region.

  18. Water repellency diminishes peatland evaporation after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettridge, Nick; Lukenbach, Max; Hokanson, Kelly; Devito, Kevin; Hopkinson, Chris; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are a critically important global carbon reserve. There is increasing concern that such ecosystems are vulnerable to projected increases in wildfire severity under a changing climate. Severe fires may exceed peatland ecological resilience resulting in the long term degradation of this carbon store. Evaporation provides the primary mechanisms of water loss from such environments and can regulate the ecological stress in the initial years after wildfire. We examine variations in evaporation within burned peatlands after wildfire through small scale chamber and large scale remote sensing measurements. We show that near-surface water repellency limits peatland evaporation in these initial years post fire. Water repellent peat produced by the fire restricts the supply of water to the surface, reducing evaporation and providing a strong negative feedback to disturbance. This previously unidentified feedback operates at the landscape scale. High surface temperatures that result from large reductions in evaporation within water repellent peat are observed across the 60,000 ha burn scar three months after the wildfire. This promotes high water table positions at a landscape scale which limit the rate of peat decomposition and supports the post fire ecohydrological recovery of the peatlands. However, severe burns are shown to exceed this negative feedback response. Deep burns at the peatland margins remove the hydrophobic layer, increasing post fire evaporation and leaving the peatland vulnerable to drying and associated ecological shifts.

  19. Measurements of mass and heat transfer at a liquid water surface during condensation or evaporation of a subnanometer thickness layer of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Knox, Kerry J; Reid, Jonathan P; Laurain, Adèle M C; Mitchem, Laura

    2010-09-10

    A novel approach for exploring the molecular dynamics during condensation or evaporation at a liquid water surface is reported at pressures between 2 and 100 kPa. By introducing or removing a heating laser illuminating an optically tweezed aqueous aerosol droplet, the temperature of the droplet can be controlled with sub-mK accuracy and the change in size to reequilibrate with the surroundings monitored with subnanometer accuracy. The time constant for equilibration is shown to provide important insight into the coupling of heat and mass transfer during condensation or evaporation.

  20. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruey-Hung [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Phuoc, Tran X. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Martello, Donald [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  1. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are repres......This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which...

  2. Evaporation of water and uptake of HCl and HBr through hexanol films at the surface of supercooled sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Samuel V; Park, Seong-Chan; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2006-06-22

    Vacuum evaporation and molecular beam scattering experiments have been used to monitor the loss of water and dissolution of HCl and HBr in deuterated sulfuric acid at 213 K containing 0 to 100 mM hexanol. The addition of 1-hexanol to the acid creates a surface film of hexyl species. This film becomes more compact with decreasing acidity, ranging from approximately 62% to approximately 68% of maximum packing on 68 to 56 wt % D(2)SO(4), respectively. D(2)O evaporation from 68 wt % acid remains unaltered by the hexyl film, where it is most porous, but is impeded by approximately 20% from 56 and 60 wt % acid. H --> D exchange experiments further indicate that the hexyl film on 68 wt % acid enhances conversion of HCl and HBr into DCl and DBr, which is interpreted as an increase in HCl and HBr entry into the bulk acid. For this permeable hexyl film, the hydroxyl groups of surface hexanol molecules may assist uptake by providing extra sites for HCl and HBr hydrogen bonding and dissociation. In contrast, HCl --> DCl exchange in 60 wt % D(2)SO(4) at first rises with hexyl surface coverage but then drops back to the bare acid value as the hexyl species pack more tightly. HCl entry is actually diminished by the hexyl film on 56 wt % acid, where the film is most compact. These experiments reveal a transition from a porous hexanol film on 68 wt % sulfuric acid that enhances HCl and HBr uptake to one on 56 wt % acid that slightly impedes HCl and D(2)O transport.

  3. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  4. Application of a coupled microwave, energy and water transfer model to relate passive microwave emission from bare soils to near-surface water content and evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Simmonds

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the stability of the relation between microwave emission from the soil and the average near-surface water content in the case of relatively smooth, bare soils, and then considers the extent to which microwave radiometry can be used to estimate the effective surface resistance to vapour transfer, which is also related to the near-surface water status. The analysis is based on the use of a model (MICRO-SWEAT which couples a microwave radiative transfer model with a SVAT scheme that describes the exchanges of water vapour, energy and sensible heat at the land surface. Verification of MICRO-SWEAT showed good agreement (about 3K RMSE between predicted L band (1.4 GHz brightness temperature over soils with contrasting texture during a multi-day drydown, and those measured using a truck-mounted radiometer. There was good agreement between the measured and predicted relations between the average water content of the upper 2 cm of the soil profile and the brightness temperature normalised with respect to the radiometric surface temperature. Some of the scatter in this relationship was attributable to diurnal variation in the magnitude of near-surface gradients in temperature and water content, and could be accounted for by using the physically-based simulation model. The influence of soil texture on this relationship was well-simulated using MICRO-SWEAT. The paper concludes by demonstrating how MICRO-SWEAT can be used to establish a relationship between the normalised brightness temperature and the surface resistance for use in the prediction of evaporation using the Penman-Montheith equation.

  5. Sessile droplet evaporation on superheated superhydrophobic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, Robb C; Maynes, Daniel; Webb, Brent W

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video depicts the evaporation of sessile water droplets placed on heated superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces of varying cavity fraction, F_c, and surface temperature, T_s, above the saturation temperature, T_sat. Images were captured at 10,000 FPS and are played back at 30 FPS in this video. Teflon-coated silicon surfaces of F_c = 0, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.95 were used for these experiments. T_s ranging from 110{\\deg}C to 210{\\deg}C were studied. The video clips show how the boiling behavior of sessile droplets is altered with changes in surface microstructure. Quantitative results from heat transfer rate experiments conducted by the authors are briefly discussed near the end of the video.

  6. Modeling of Droplet Evaporation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Heitor C M; Vainstein, Mendeli H; Brito, Carolina

    2015-07-14

    When a drop of water is placed on a rough surface, there are two possible extreme regimes of wetting: the one called Cassie-Baxter (CB) with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet and the one called the Wenzel (W) state characterized by the homogeneous wetting of the surface. A way to investigate the transition between these two states is by means of evaporation experiments, in which the droplet starts in a CB state and, as its volume decreases, penetrates the surface's grooves, reaching a W state. Here we present a theoretical model based on the global interfacial energies for CB and W states that allows us to predict the thermodynamic wetting state of the droplet for a given volume and surface texture. We first analyze the influence of the surface geometric parameters on the droplet's final wetting state with constant volume and show that it depends strongly on the surface texture. We then vary the volume of the droplet, keeping the geometric surface parameters fixed to mimic evaporation and show that the drop experiences a transition from the CB to the W state when its volume reduces, as observed in experiments. To investigate the dependency of the wetting state on the initial state of the droplet, we implement a cellular Potts model in three dimensions. Simulations show very good agreement with theory when the initial state is W, but it disagrees when the droplet is initialized in a CB state, in accordance with previous observations which show that the CB state is metastable in many cases. Both simulations and the theoretical model can be modified to study other types of surfaces.

  7. Study of the Internal Flow and Evaporation Characteristic Inside a Water Droplet on a Vertical Vibrating Hydrophobic Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Seok; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Thermal Marangoni flow has been observed inside droplets on heated surfaces, finally resulting in a coffee stain effect. This study aims to visualize and control the thermal Marangoni flow by employing periodic vertical vibration. The variations in the contact angle and internal volume of the droplet as it evaporates is observed by using a combination of continuous light and a still camera. With regard to the internal velocity, the particle image velocimetry system is applied to visualize the internal thermal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the internal temperature gradient and surface tension on the surface of a droplet, the theoretical model based on the conduction and convection theory of heat transfer is applied. Thus, the internal velocity increases with an increase in plate temperature. The flow directions of the Marangoni and gravitational flows are opposite, and hence, it may be possible to control the coffee stain effect.

  8. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  9. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits.

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms.

  11. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  12. Experimental study of the Marangoni flow in evaporating water droplet placed on vertical vibration and heated hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Seok; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-11-01

    In general, the heated surface generates a Marangoni flow inside a droplet yielding a coffee stain effect in the end. This study aims to visualize and control the Marangoni flow by using periodic vertical vibration. While the droplet is evaporating, the variation of contact angle and internal volume of droplet was observed by using the combination of a continuous light and a DSLR still camera. Regarding the internal velocity, the PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) system was applied to visualize the internal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the temperature gradient inside and surface tension on the droplet, a commercial software Comsol Multiphysics was used. In the result, the internal velocity increases with the increase of the plate temperature and both flow directions of Marangoni and gravitational flow are opposite so that there seems to be a possibility to control the coffee stain effect. In addition, the Marangoni flow was controlled at relatively lower range of frequency 30 ~ 50Hz. Work supported by Korea government Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy KETEP grant No. 20134030200290, Ministry of Education NRF grant No. NRF2013R1A1A2005347.

  13. Evaporative cooling: water for thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rui Camargo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative cooling is an environmentally friendly air conditioning system that operates using induced processes of heat and mass transfer, where water and air are the working fluids. It consists, specifically, in water evaporation, induced by the passage of an air flow, thus decreasing the air temperature. This paper presents three methods that can be used as reference for efficient use of evaporative cooling systems, applying it to several Brazilian cities, characterized by different climates. Initially it presents the basic operation principles of direct and indirect evaporative cooling and defines the effectiveness of the systems. Afterwards, it presents three methods that allows to determinate where the systems are more efficient. It concludes that evaporative cooling systems have a very large potential to propitiate thermal comfort and can still be used as an alternative to conventional systems in regions where the design wet bulb temperature is under 24ºC.

  14. Water Evaporation and Conformational Changes from Partially Solvated Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Prakash Thirumuruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  15. Evaporation of water between two microspheres: how wetting affects drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kun; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    When a small volume of water is confined between microparticles or nanoparticles, its evaporation behavior can be influenced by wettability of particles. This situation frequently appears in coating or printing of colloidal drops in which colloidal particles are uniformly dispersed into a liquid. To explore water evaporation between particles, here we study on evaporation dynamics of water between two microspheres by utilizing high-resolution X-ray microscopy for side views and optical microscopy for bottom views. We find that evaporating water gets pinned on microsphere surfaces, due to a force balance among air, water, and microspheres. Side and bottom views of evaporating water enable us to evaluate water curvature evolution around microspheres before and after pinning. Interestingly curvature evolution is controlled by cooperation of evaporation and wetting dynamics. This study would be useful in identifying and controlling of coating or printing for colloidal drops. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  16. Effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on evaporative deposition patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-05-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation are vital in printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. This Letter presents surface wettability-based localization of evaporation-driven particulate deposition and the effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on the distribution of deposits. Sessile water droplets containing suspended latex particles are evaporated on non-wetting textured surfaces with varying microstructure geometry at ambient conditions. The droplets are visualized throughout the evaporation process to track the temporal evolution of contact radius and apparent contact angle. The resulting particle deposits on the substrates are quantitatively characterized. The experimental results show that superhydrophobic surfaces suppress contact-line deposition during droplet evaporation, thereby providing an effective means of localizing the deposition of suspended particles. A correlation between deposit size and surface morphology, explained in terms of the interface pressure balance at the transition between wetting states, reveals an optimum surface morphology for minimizing the deposit coverage area.

  17. Directional motion of evaporating droplets on gradient surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuhuai; Xu, Li; Li, Zhigang

    2012-11-01

    Droplet evaporation on surfaces has various applications in drying problems such as ink-jet printing, pesticide spraying, chemical or biological detection, and DNA microarray spotting technology. Controlling evaporating droplets via substrate morphology and/or wetting properties allows for efficient deposition of sample molecules in these applications. In this work, evaporation of sessile water droplets on surfaces with wettability gradients was studied. The wettability gradient was generated by fabricating non-uniformly distributed cylindrical micropillars on silicon surfaces. During the evaporation, it was found, along the wettability gradient, that the contact line on one side was strongly pinned, while the contact line on the other side depinned and gradually receded, making the center of mass of the droplet move either in or against the direction the wettability gradient, depending on the configuration of the micropillars. The theoretical criterion predicting the moving direction was derived based on the excess free energy and the energy barrier during the evaporation. The theoretical predications agreed well with the experimental observations. The results provide a parametric design basis to control the contact line dynamics and directional transport of evaporating droplets. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong under General Research Fund (Grant No. 621110).

  18. Wind increases "evaporative demand" but reduces plant water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, determined by stomatal or canopy resistance. Therefore, so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand" or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. An increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is generally believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress, aggravating drought effects. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at the leaf scale. In fact, in a range of field measurements, we found that water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, enabling plants to conserve water during photosynthesis. We estimate that the observed global decrease in terrestrial near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We conclude that trends in wind speed and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have to be considered explicitly for the estimation of drought effects on

  19. Evaporation of particle-laden droplets on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Masoud; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigated the evaporation dynamics of water droplets suspended with minute particles of varying concentrations on a superhydrophobic surface. The contact angle, diameter, and height of the droplets decreased during the evaporation process. For pure water, the droplet went through a wetting transition from a partial wetting (Cassie-Baxter), with a large contact angle (>140°), to completely wetting (Wenzel) state, with a small contact angle. Unlike pure water, the nanofluid droplets maintain high contact angles (>100°) during evaporation. We found that the contact line was pinned, and an increase (10 %) in the weight fraction of nanoparticles led to a remarkable 40 % decrease in the total drying time. The nanofluid droplets left donut-shaped drying patterns. In these final drying structures, a shrinkage of the droplet height and base diameter was observed for nanofluids with lower concentrations. The results show that droplet evaporation rate and deposit pattern depend on the concentration of nanoparticles, implying the crucial influences of water evaporation and particle migration dynamics and time-scales.

  20. Particle deposition on superhydrophobic surfaces by sessile droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy Grace

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation is essential in ink-jet printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. In recent years, sessile droplet evaporation on bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive method for depositing materials on a site-specific, localized region, but is less explored compared to evaporative deposition on hydrophilic surfaces. It is therefore of interest to understand particle deposition during droplet evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces to enable accurate prediction and tunable control of localized deposits on such surfaces. The purpose of the present work is to explore the morphology of particles deposited on superhydrophobic surfaces by the evaporation of sessile water droplets containing suspended latex spheres. Droplet evaporation experiments are performed on non-wetting, textured surfaces with varying geometric parameters. The temporal evolution of the droplet contact radius and contact angle throughout the evaporation process are tracked by visualizing the transient droplet shape and wetting behavior. The droplets are observed to exhibit a combination of the following modes of evaporation: the constant contact radius mode, the constant contact angle mode, and the mixed mode in which the contact angle and the contact radius change simultaneously. After complete dry-out, the remaining particulate deposits are qualitatively and quantitatively characterized to describe their spatial distribution. In the first part of the study, the test surfaces are maintained at different temperatures. Experiments are conducted at ambient conditions and at elevated substrate temperatures of approximately 40°C, 50°C, and 60°C. The results show that droplet evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, driven by either mass diffusion at ambient conditions or by substrate heating, suppresses

  1. Experimental study of evaporation of distilled water and 10% NaCl and СaCl2 aqueous salt solutions droplets under their free falling on a heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental results of evaporation of distilled water and 10% aqueous salt solutions of NaCl and СaCl2 droplets under their free falling on a heated surface. It is proved that it is more expedient to conduct the experimental research in this field according to classical multifactorial experiment. Laser treatment of surfaces is found to increase the evaporation rate and to biases the point of boiling crisis in the region of lower surface temperatures. In this case, in the conditions of boiling crisis the frequency of contact of a droplet with a heated surface will decrease.

  2. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  3. Evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces. Variation of elongation is achieved by depositing droplets on surfaces with varying ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripe widths. Elongated droplets evaporate faster than more spherical droplets. Bo

  4. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  5. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-01-30

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  6. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-05-01

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  7. Evaporative cooling of cold atoms at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Märkle, J; Federsel, P; Jetter, B; Günther, A; Fortágh, J; Proukakis, N P; Judd, T E

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the evaporative cooling of cold rubidium atoms that are brought close to a solid surface. The dynamics of the atom cloud are described by coupling a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate with a quantum Boltzmann description of the thermal cloud (the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin method). We have also performed experiments to allow for a detailed comparison with this model and find that it can capture the key physics of this system provided the full collisional dynamics of the thermal cloud are included. In addition, we suggest how to optimize surface cooling to obtain the purest and largest condensates.

  8. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  9. Models for calculating phreatic water evaporation on bare and Tamarix-vegetated lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shunjun; TIAN Changyan; SONG Yudong; CHEN Xiaobing; LI Yuetan

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water consumption of natural vegetation in arid regions.It is an effective approach to study ecological water demand of natural vegetation by phreatic evaporation.In order to study the ecological water demand of Tarim river basin, based on the observation data of phreatic evaporation on bare lands at the Aksu Water Balance Experimental station from 1989 to 1996, by analyzing the relationship of phreatic evaporation,depth of phreatic surface and evaporation of water,taking the limit rate of phreatic evaporation as the control condition, and based on the objective law that the relation between phreatic evaporation and evaporation of water is nonlinear, we establish models for calculating phreatic evaporation on bare land,which can fully reflect the law of phreatic evaporation in the Tarim river basin. According to the data of depth of phreatic surface and soil moisture when pheratic level decline is caused just by evapotranspiration on Tamarix-vegetated land from 2003 to 2004, we calculate the amount of phreatic evaporation and set up models for calculating phreatic evaporation on Tamarix- vegetated land. Phreatic evaporation on bare land and Tamarix-vegetated land could be transformed each other by a Tamarix vegetation conversion coefficient. The test results show that the calculation accuracy of the models is high and the models are suitable for Tarim river basin.

  10. Soil-water evaporation dynamics determined with measurement of sensible heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-water evaporation is important in both the hydrologic cycle and the surface energy balance. Yet, routine measurements are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in evaporation. Recent improvements for fine-scale measurement of soil thermal propert...

  11. On the Modeling of Droplet Evaporation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Heitor C. M.; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Brito, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    When a drop of water is placed on a rough surface, there are two possible extreme regimes of wetting: the one called Cassie-Baxter (CB) with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet and the one characterized by the homogeneous wetting of the surface, called the Wenzel (W) state. A way to investigate the transition between these two states is by means of evaporation experiments, in which the droplet starts in a CB state and, as its volume decreases, penetrates the surface's grooves, reaching...

  12. Water addition, evaporation and water holding capacity of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Litter moisture content has been related to ammonia, dust and odour emissions as well as bird health and welfare. Improved understanding of the water holding properties of poultry litter as well as water additions to litter and evaporation from litter will contribute to improved litter moisture management during the meat chicken grow-out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how management and environmental conditions over the course of a grow-out affect the volume of water A) applied to litter, B) able to be stored in litter, and C) evaporated from litter on a daily basis. The same unit of measurement has been used to enable direct comparison-litres of water per square metre of poultry shed floor area, L/m(2), assuming a litter depth of 5cm. An equation was developed to estimate the amount of water added to litter from bird excretion and drinking spillage, which are sources of regular water application to the litter. Using this equation showed that water applied to litter from these sources changes over the course of a grow-out, and can be as much as 3.2L/m(2)/day. Over a 56day grow-out, the total quantity of water added to the litter was estimated to be 104L/m(2). Litter porosity, water holding capacity and water evaporation rates from litter were measured experimentally. Litter porosity decreased and water holding capacity increased over the course of a grow-out due to manure addition. Water evaporation rates at 25°C and 50% relative humidity ranged from 0.5 to 10L/m(2)/day. Evaporation rates increased with litter moisture content and air speed. Maintaining dry litter at the peak of a grow-out is likely to be challenging because evaporation rates from dry litter may be insufficient to remove the quantity of water added to the litter on a daily basis.

  13. Infrared thermography of evaporative fluxes and dynamics of salt deposition on heterogeneous porous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani; Dragila, Maria; Weisbrod, Noam

    2011-12-01

    Evaporation of saline solutions from porous media, common in arid areas, involves complex interactions between mass transport, energy exchange and phase transitions. We quantified evaporation of saline solutions from heterogeneous sand columns under constant hydraulic boundary conditions to focus on effects of salt precipitation on evaporation dynamics. Mass loss measurements and infrared thermography were used to quantify evaporation rates. The latter method enables quantification of spatial and temporal variability of salt precipitation to identify its dynamic effects on evaporation. Evaporation from columns filled with texturally-contrasting sand using different salt solutions revealed preferential salt precipitation within the fine textured domains. Salt precipitation reduced evaporation rates from the fine textured regions by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, low evaporation rates from coarse-textured regions (due to low capillary drive) exhibited less salt precipitation and consequently less evaporation rate suppression. Experiments provided insights into two new phenomena: (1) a distinct increase in evaporation rate at the onset of evaporation; and (2) a vapor pumping mechanism related to the presence of a salt crust over semidry media. Both phenomena are related to local vapor pressure gradients established between pore water and the surface salt crust. Comparison of two salts: NaCl and NaI, which tend to precipitate above the matrix surface and within matrix pores, respectively, shows a much stronger influence of NaCl on evaporation rate suppression. This disparity reflects the limited effect of NaI precipitation on matrix resistivity for solution and vapor flows.

  14. Pattern Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis via Droplet Evaporation on Micropillars Arrays at a Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susarrey-Arce, A.; Gomez Marin, A.; Massey, A.; Oknianska, A.; Diaz-Fernandez, Y.; Hernandez Sanchez, Jose Federico; Griffiths, E.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Lohse, D.; Raval, R.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the effect of epoxy surface structuring on the evaporation of water droplets containing Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). During evaporation, droplets with S. epidermidis cells yield to complex wetting patterns such as the zipping-wetting1−3 and the coffee-stain effects. Depen

  15. Rate of evaporation from the free surface of a heated liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örvös, M.; Szabó, V.; Poós, T.

    2016-11-01

    A method and an experimental setup are developed for determining the intensity of evaporation from the free surface of water. During the measurement, the ambient air velocity and the water temperature can be varied. The mass and temperature of water, as well as the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the ambient air are measured as functions of time. The evaporation rates are calculated from the measured and recorded data in the cases of natural and forced convection.

  16. PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON SUPERHYDROPHOBIC SURFACES BY SESSILE DROPLET EVAPORATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dicuangco, Mercy G.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation is essential in ink-jet printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. In recent years, sessile droplet evaporation on bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive method for depositing materials on a site-specific, localized region, but is less explored compared to evaporative deposition on hyd...

  17. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  18. Self-wrapping of an ouzo drop induced by evaporation on a superamphiphobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Versluis, Michel; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2017-03-15

    Evaporation of multi-component drops is crucial to various technologies and has numerous potential applications because of its ubiquity in nature. Superamphiphobic surfaces, which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, can give a low wettability not only for water drops but also for oil drops. In this paper, we experimentally, numerically and theoretically investigate the evaporation process of millimetric sessile ouzo drops (a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and trans-anethole) with low wettability on a superamphiphobic surface. The evaporation-triggered ouzo effect, i.e. the spontaneous emulsification of oil microdroplets below a specific ethanol concentration, preferentially occurs at the apex of the drop due to the evaporation flux distribution and volatility difference between water and ethanol. This observation is also reproduced by numerical simulations. The volume decrease of the ouzo drop is characterized by two distinct slopes. The initial steep slope is dominantly caused by the evaporation of ethanol, followed by the slower evaporation of water. At later stages, thanks to Marangoni forces the oil wraps around the drop and an oil shell forms. We propose an approximate diffusion model for the drying characteristics, which predicts the evaporation of the drops in agreement with experiment and numerical simulation results. This work provides an advanced understanding of the evaporation process of ouzo (multi-component) drops.

  19. Water-evaporation reduction by duplex films: application to the human tear film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, Colin F; Ho, Nghia H; Radke, C J

    2013-09-01

    Water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films is especially important to understand the physiology of the human tear film. Secreted lipids, called meibum, form a duplex film that coats the aqueous tear film and purportedly reduces tear evaporation. Lipid-layer deficiency is correlated with the occurrence of dry-eye disease; however, in-vitro experiments fail to show water-evaporation reduction by tear-lipid duplex films. We review the available literature on water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films and outline the theoretical underpinnings of spreading and evaporation kinetics that govern behavior of these systems. A dissolution-diffusion model unifies the data reported in the literature and identifies dewetting of duplex films into lenses as a key challenge to obtaining significant evaporation reduction. We develop an improved apparatus for measuring evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films including simultaneous assessment of film coverage, stability, and temperature, all under controlled external mass transfer. New data reported in this study fit into the larger body of work conducted on water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films. Duplex-oil films of oxidized mineral oil/mucin (MOx/BSM), human meibum (HM), and bovine meibum (BM) reduce water evaporation by a dissolution-diffusion mechanism, as confirmed by agreement between measurement and theory. The water permeability of oxidized-mineral-oil duplex films agrees with those reported in the literature, after correction for the presence of mucin. We find that duplex-oil films of bovine and human meibum at physiologic temperature reduce water evaporation only 6-8% for a 100-nm film thickness pertinent to the human tear film. Comparison to in-vivo human tear-evaporation measurements is inconclusive because evaporation from a clean-water surface is not measured and because the mass-transfer resistance is not characterized.

  20. Evaporation of Ethanol-Water Binary Mixture Sessile Liquid Marbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Bormashenko, Edward; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M; Dao, Dzung V; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-21

    Liquid marble is a liquid droplet coated with particles. Recently, the evaporation process of a sessile liquid marble using geometric measurements has attracted great attention from the research community. However, the lack of gravimetric measurement limits further insights into the physical changes of a liquid marble during the evaporation process. Moreover, the evaporation process of a marble containing a liquid binary mixture has not been reported before. The present paper investigates the effective density and the effective surface tension of an evaporating liquid marble that contains aqueous ethanol at relatively low concentrations. The effective density of an evaporating liquid marble is determined from the concurrent measurement of instantaneous mass and volume. Density measurements combined with surface profile fitting provide the effective surface tension of the marble. We found that the density and surface tension of an evaporating marble are significantly affected by the particle coating.

  1. Droplet evaporation dynamics on a superhydrophobic surface with negligible hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-08-27

    We report on experiments of droplet evaporation on a structured superhydrophobic surface that displays very high contact angle (CA ∼ 160 deg), and negligible contact angle hysteresis (contact-angle mode, with contact radius shrinking for almost the entire duration of evaporation. Experiments conducted on Teflon-coated smooth surface (CA ∼ 120 deg) as a baseline also support an evaporation process that is dominated by a constant-contact-angle mode. The experimental results are compared with an isothermal diffusion model for droplet evaporation from the literature. Good agreement is observed for the Teflon-coated smooth surface between the analytical expression and experimental results in terms of the total time for evaporation, transient volume, contact angle, and contact radius. However, for the structured superhydrophobic surface, the experiments indicate that the time taken for complete evaporation of the droplet is greater than the predicted time, across all droplet volumes. This disparity is attributed primarily to the evaporative cooling at the droplet interface due to the high aspect ratio of the droplet and also the lower effective thermal conductivity of the substrate due to the presence of air gaps. This hypothesis is verified by numerically evaluating the temperature distribution along the droplet interface. We propose a generalized relation for predicting the instantaneous volume of droplets with initial CA > 90 deg, irrespective of the mode of evaporation.

  2. Time-resolved interference unveils nanoscale surface dynamics in evaporating sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-06-01

    We report a simple optical technique to measure time-resolved nanoscale surface profile of an evaporating sessile fluid droplet. By analyzing the high contrast Newton-ring like dynamical fringes formed by interfering Fresnel reflections, we demonstrated λ/100 ≈ 5 nm sensitivity in surface height (at 0.01-160 nm/s rate) of an evaporating water drop. The remarkably high sensitivity allowed us to precisely measure its transient surface dynamics during contact-line slips, weak perturbations on the evaporation due to external magnetic field and partial confinement of the drop. Further, we measured evaporation dynamics of a sessile water drop on soft deformable surface to demonstrate wide applicability of this technique.

  3. A phylogenetic approach to total evaporative water loss in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sant, Matthew J; Oufiero, Christopher E; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Hammond, Kimberly A; Williams, Joseph B

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining appropriate water balance is a constant challenge for terrestrial mammals, and this problem can be exacerbated in desiccating environments. It has been proposed that natural selection has provided desert-dwelling mammals physiological mechanisms to reduce rates of total evaporative water loss. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between total evaporative water loss and body mass in mammals by using a recent phylogenetic hypothesis. We compared total evaporative water loss in 80 species of arid-zone mammals to that in 56 species that inhabit mesic regions, ranging in size from 4 g to 3,500 kg, to test the hypothesis that mammals from arid environments have lower rates of total evaporative water loss than mammals from mesic environments once phylogeny is taken into account. We found that arid species had lower rates of total evaporative water loss than mesic species when using a dichotomous variable to describe habitat (arid or mesic). We also found that total evaporative water loss was negatively correlated with the average maximum and minimum environmental temperature as well as the maximum vapor pressure deficit of the environment. Annual precipitation and the variable Q (a measure of habitat aridity) were positively correlated with total evaporative water loss. These results support the hypothesis that desert-dwelling mammals have lower rates of total evaporative water loss than mesic species after controlling for body mass and evolutionary relatedness regardless of whether categorical or continuous variables are used to describe habitat.

  4. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  5. 保水性铺装材料表面蒸发冷却效果的室内实验研究%Indoor Experiments on Surface Evaporation Cooling Effect of Water Retention Pavement Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟娇; 楼胜芳; 水谷章夫

    2011-01-01

    保水性铺装是一种通过表面蒸发冷却来有效降低铺装表面温度的方法,可以缓解城市热岛现象.保水材料的种类不同,效果各异,若进行室外蒸发冷却实验会受到气候条件的制约.本文以日光灯模拟太阳照射,制作了室内蒸发冷却实验装置,并针对此装置的可行性进行了实验及数值计算分析.而后,应用此装置进行了实验,分析了开粒度沥青表面铺装材料和具有吸水/保水性沥青表面铺装材料的表面蒸发冷却效果.%Water retention pavement is an effective method to decrease the surface temperature,which could relieve the heat island phenomenon.Different water retention materials have different evaporation cooling effects, and their outdoor evaporation cooling experiments are restricted by climatic conditions.In this paper, using the fluorescent lamp to simulate the solar radiation, the indoor evaporation cooling test facility was set up.The experiments and numerical analysis were carried out to validate the feasibility of this facility.Furthermore, surface evaporation cooling experiments for asphalt and water absorption/retention asphalt pavement materials were implemented and the effects were discussed.

  6. Controlled evaporative cooling on a superhydrophilic surface: building a green wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Suin; Shin, Sangwoo; Meggers, Forrest; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a way to design of an evaporative cooling device using continuous water flow on a superhydrophilic surface. Continuous flow helps prevent contaminant fouling on the surface of the cooler, which is a major challenge for conventional evaporative (swamp) coolers. A superhydrophilic surface leads to a reduced coolant flow rate, allowing for a maximum ratio of evaporative heat transfer to coolant thermal mass. Also, a staggered structure increases the surface area of the thin film flow of water which results in higher cooling efficiency. We performed both experimental and theoretical studies on the temperature change in the thin film flow of water. By keeping the water film thickness below 100 μm, 5 K of temperature drop in the device was achieved. The cooling device can be manufactured using conventional cost-effective processes, offering practical applications in energy-efficient buildings.

  7. Development of the mathematical model of heat and mass transfer for researching the processes of evaporation of inhomogeneous water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonov Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of experimental date the heat and mass transfer models are developed in ANSYS Fluent software package for researching the processes of evaporation of inhomogeneous water droplets. The influence of the temperature of the gases (550-850 K on the evaporation of inhomogeneous water droplets is estimated. Times of complete liquid evaporation from free surface of inhomogeneous water droplets and explosive vaporization of water droplets at different gas temperatures are established.

  8. Wetting and evaporation studies on molecularly modified surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Soolaman, Dinah Michele

    2007-01-01

    Wetting and evaporation of liquid microdroplets on solid surfaces are ubiquitous in nature. Two of the many important factors that influence how a droplet wets and “escapes”, are the chemical composition and roughness of the solid surface. In order to gain a better understanding of these processes as a whole, a systematic study on the factors that influence wetting/evaporation behaviour, including the liquid’s composition, the liquid-solid interface, and the substrate morphology has been carr...

  9. Evaporators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard

    1996-01-01

    Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients.......Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients....

  10. Evaporators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard

    1996-01-01

    Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients.......Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients....

  11. Kinetic Limited Water Evaporation in Hydrophilic Nanofluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinxiao; Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Capillary evaporation is one of the most efficient approaches for heat and mass transfer, but the interfacial resistance in capillary evaporation governed by the kinetic theory has remained poorly understood. Here we report experimental studies of the kinetic-limited water capillary evaporation in 2-D hydrophilic nanochannels. A novel hybrid nanochannel design is employed to guarantee sufficient water supply to the liquid/vapor evaporation interface and to enable precise evaporation rate measurements. We study the effects of confinement (16 ~ 105nm), temperature (20 ~ 40 °C), and relative humidity (0% ~ 60%) on the evaporation rate and the evaporation coefficient. A maximum evaporation flux of 21287 micron/s is obtained in 16-nm nanochannels at 40°C and RH =0%, which corresponds to a heat flux of 4804 W/cm°. The evaporation coefficient is found to be independent on geometrical confinement, but shows a clear dependence on temperature, decreasing from 0.55 at 20°C to 0.5 at 40 °C. These findings have implications for understanding heat and mass transport in nanofluidic devices and porous media, and shed light on further development of evaporation-based technologies for thermal management, membrane purification and lab-on-a-chip devices. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  12. Evaporation and wetted area of single droplets on waxy and hairy leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Yu, Y; Ozkan, H E; Derksen, R C; Krause, C R

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the evaporation of pesticide droplets and wetting of Leaf surfaces can increase foliar application efficiency and reduce pesticide use. Evaporation time and wetted area of single pesticide droplets on hairy and waxy geranium leaf surfaces were measured under the controlled conditions for five droplet sizes and three relative humidities. The sprays used to form droplets included water, a nonionic colloidal polymer drift retardant, an alkyl polyoxyethylene surfactant, and an insecticide. Adding the surfactant into spray mixtures greatly increased droplet wetted area on the surfaces while droplet evaporation time was greatly reduced. Adding the drift retardant into spray mixture slightly increased the droplet evaporation time and the wetted area. Also, droplets had Longer evaporation times on waxy leaves than on hairy leaves for all droplet diameters and all relative humidity conditions. Increasing relative humidity could increase the droplet evaporation time greatly but did not change the the wetted area. The droplet evaporation time and wetted area increased exponentially as the droplet size increased. Therefore, droplet size, surface characteristics of the target, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the spray mixtures (water alone, pesticide, additives) should be included as important factors that affect the efficacy and efficiency of pesticide applications.

  13. Evaporated lithium surface coatings in NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gates, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Menard, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Maingi, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schneider, H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mueller, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wampler, William R.; Roquemore, A. L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kallman, Jeffrey K. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Sabbagh, S. (Columbia University, New York, NY); LeBlanc, B. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Raman, R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Ono, M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wilgren, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Allain, J.P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Timberlake, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Stevenson, T. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Ross, P. W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Majeski, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kugel, Henry W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Skinner, C. H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gerhardt, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Paul, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Bell, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaye, S. M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaita, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Soukhanovskii, V. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Bell, Michael G. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mansfield, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ)

    2008-08-01

    Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: (1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; (2) suppression of ELMs; (3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; (4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; (5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; (6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; (7) reduced SOL plasma density; and (8) reduced edge neutral density.

  14. Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mansfield, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Bell, M. G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Gates, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kallman, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaye, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Paul, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Stevenson, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Timberlake, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wampler, W. R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Zakharov, L. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2009-01-01

    Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: (1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; (2) suppression of ELMs; (3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; (4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges: (5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; (6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; (7) reduced SOL plasma density; and (8) reduced edge neutral density. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  15. Ecohydrology of the wetland-forestland interface: hydrophobicity in leaf litter and its potential effect on surface evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probert, Samantha; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Hurley, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Riparian wetlands represent an important ecotone at the interface of peatlands and forests within the Western Boreal Plain of Canada. Water storage and negative feedbacks to evaporation in these systems is crucial for the conservation and redistribution of water during dry periods and providing ecosystem resilience to disturbance. Litter cover can alter the relative importance of the physical processes that drive soil evaporation. Negative feedbacks to drying are created as the hydrophysical properties of the litter and soil override atmospheric controls on evaporation in dry conditions, subsequently dampening the effects of external forcings on the wetland moisture balance. In this study, water repellency in leaf litter has been shown to significantly correlate with surface-atmosphere interactions, whereby severely hydrophobic leaf litter is linked to the highest surface resistances to evaporation, and therefore lowest instantaneous evaporation. Decreasing moisture is associated with increasing hydrophobicity, which may reduce the evaporative flux further as the dry hydrophobic litter creates a hydrological disconnect between soil moisture and the atmosphere. In contrast, hydrophilic litter layers exhibited higher litter moistures, which is associated with reduced resistances to evaporation and enhanced evaporative fluxes. Water repellency of the litter layer has a greater control on evaporation than the presence or absence of litter itself. Litter removal had no significant effect on instantaneous evaporation or surface resistance to evaporation except under the highest evaporation conditions, where litter layers produced higher resistance values than bare peat soils. However, litter removal modified the dominant physical controls on evaporation: moisture loss in plots with leaf litter was driven by leaf and soil hydrophysical properties. Contrastingly, bare peat soils following litter removal exhibited cooler, wetter surfaces and were more strongly correlated to

  16. Biocorrosion of evaporators of water/water heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denier, P.; Sutter, E.M.M.; Cornet, A. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts et Industries, 67 - Strasbourg (FR))

    1990-12-01

    During the last twenty years, many heat pumps were installed in Alsace (France) using groundwater. It appeared that water contained bacteria able to induce metallic corrosion. Thus, it was necessary to have a better knowledge of the situation. A statistical study on water analysis was realised. There is no noticeable relation between bacterial contamination and water chemistry or geographical location. Most of corrosion origines were - a bad water network conception (erosion, cavitation, oxygen differential cells...) - a bad use of metal coupling (galvanic corrosion). The presence of bacteria generally increases the phenomena described above. Solutions proposed are: PVC casing, stainless steel water pumps, heat pump evaporators in noble alloys or metals, PVC or resines lagging. For the actual set of heat pumps, there are less solutions but in some cases an intermediary exchanger would be a good and easy solution.

  17. Evaporation-Triggered Wetting Transition for Water Droplets upon Hydrophobic Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Peichun; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    When placed on rough hydrophobic surfaces, water droplets of diameter larger than a few millimeters can easily form pearls, as they are in the Cassie-Baxter state with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet. Intriguingly, a natural evaporating process can drive such a Fakir drop into a completely wetting (Wenzel) state. Our microscopic observations with simultaneous side and bottom views of evaporating droplets upon transparent hydrophobic microstructures elucidate the water-filling dynam...

  18. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  19. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew K.; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason M.

    2015-11-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an increase in the contact angle. However, the evaporation rate of salt-water droplets decreases as the salt concentration increases, due to the hydration of salt ions. When the water molecules have all evaporated from the droplet, two forms of salt crystals are deposited, clump and ringlike, depending on the solid-liquid interaction strength and the evaporation rate. To form salt crystals in a ring, it is crucial that there is a pinned stage in the evaporation process, during which salt ions can move from the center to the rim of the droplets. With a stronger solid-liquid interaction strength, a slower evaporation rate, and a higher salt concentration, a complete salt crystal ring can be deposited on the surface.

  20. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew K; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason M

    2015-11-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an increase in the contact angle. However, the evaporation rate of salt-water droplets decreases as the salt concentration increases, due to the hydration of salt ions. When the water molecules have all evaporated from the droplet, two forms of salt crystals are deposited, clump and ringlike, depending on the solid-liquid interaction strength and the evaporation rate. To form salt crystals in a ring, it is crucial that there is a pinned stage in the evaporation process, during which salt ions can move from the center to the rim of the droplets. With a stronger solid-liquid interaction strength, a slower evaporation rate, and a higher salt concentration, a complete salt crystal ring can be deposited on the surface.

  1. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  2. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-04

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  3. Drop evaporation on superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces driven by contact line dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S M M; Dias, J F; Canut, B

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, we experimentally study the evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile drops of water on highly hydrophobic surfaces (contact angle ∼160°), heated to temperatures ranging between 40° and 70 °C. These surfaces were initially constructed by means of controlled tailoring of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The evaporation of droplets was observed to occur in three distinct phases, which were the same for the different substrate temperatures. The drops started to evaporate in the constant contact radius (CCR) mode, then switched to a more complex mode characterized by a set of stick-slip events accompanied by a decrease in contact angle, and finally shifted to a mixed mode in which the contact radius and contact angle decreased simultaneously until the drops had completely evaporated. It is shown that in the case of superhydrophobic surfaces, the energy barriers (per unit length) associated with the stick-slip motion of a drop ranges in the nJ m(-1) scale. Furthermore, analysis of the evaporation rates, determined from experimental data show that, even in the CCR mode, a linear relationship between V(2/3) and the evaporation time is verified. The values of the evaporation rate constants are found to be higher in the pinned contact line regime (the CCR mode) than in the moving contact line regime. This behavior is attributed to the drop's higher surface to volume ratio in the CCR mode.

  4. Harnessing Potential Evaporation as a Renewable Energy Resource With Water-Saving Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, A. H.; Chen, X.; Gentine, P.; Sahin, O.

    2015-12-01

    Water's large latent heat of vaporization makes evaporation a critical component of the energy balance at the Earth's surface. An immense amount of energy drives the hydrological cycle and is an important component of various weather and climate patterns. However, the potential of harnessing evaporation has received little attention as a renewable energy resource compared to wind and solar energy. Here, we investigate the potential of harvesting energy from naturally evaporating water. Using weather data across the contiguous United States and a modified model of potential evaporation, we estimate the power availability, intermittency, and the changes in evaporation rates imposed by energy conversion. Our results indicate that natural evaporation can deliver power densities similar to existing renewable energy platforms and require little to no energy storage to match the varying power demands of urban areas. This model also predicts additional, and substantial, water savings by reducing evaporative losses. These findings suggest that evaporative energy harvesting can address significant challenges with water/energy interactions that could be of interest to the hydrology community.

  5. Experimental Measurements of the Water Evaporation Rate of a Physical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turza Róbert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As the number of indoor swimming pools and wellness centers are currently growing, it is necessary to concentrate on the parameters of indoor environments. These parameters are necessary for the design of the HVAC systems that operate these premises. In indoor swimming-pool facilities, the energy demand is large due to ventilation losses from exhaust air. Since water evaporates from a pool’s surface, exhaust air has a high water content and specific enthalpy. In this paper the results of the water evaporation rate measured from swimming pool surfaces at higher thermal water temperatures are described.

  6. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2016-04-21

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H2 from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions.

  7. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

  8. Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater

    OpenAIRE

    Sahai, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Evaporative coolers (ECs) provide significant gains in energy efficiency compared to vapor compression air conditioners, but simultaneously have significant onsite water demand. This can be a major barrier to deployment in areas of the world with hot and arid climates. To address this concern, this study determined where in the world evaporative cooling is suitable, the water consumption of ECs in these cities, and the potential that greywater can be used reduce the consumption of potable wat...

  9. Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Haddrell, Allen E; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-05-28

    Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [C(n)H(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10(-3) to 1.7 × 10(-5) as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid.

  10. Dynamics of pore-water and salt in estuarine marshes subjected to tide and evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Shen, C.; Li, L.; Lockington, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to the tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore water from unsaturated soil surface with salt left in soils, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, solute concentration and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the tidal signal, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period in a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains close to that of seawater. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water-saturated soil is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the sandy supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  11. Multicomponent Droplet Evaporation on Chemical Micro-Patterned Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minghao; Liao, Dong; Qiu, Huihe

    2017-02-01

    The evaporation and dynamics of a multicomponent droplet on a heated chemical patterned surface were presented. Comparing to the evaporation process of a multicomponent droplet on a homogenous surface, it is found that the chemical patterned surface can not only enhance evaporation by elongating the contact line, but also change the evaporation process from three regimes for the homogenous surface including constant contact line (CCL) regime, constant contact angle (CCA) regime and mix mode (MM) to two regimes, i.e. constant contact line (CCL) and moving contact line (MCL) regimes. The mechanism of contact line stepwise movement in MCL regimes in the microscopic range is investigated in detail. In addition, an improved local force model on the contact line was employed for analyzing the critical receding contact angles on homogenous and patterned surfaces. The analysis results agree well for both surfaces, and confirm that the transition from CCL to MCL regimes indicated droplet composition changes from multicomponent to monocomponent, providing an important metric to predict and control the dynamic behavior and composition of a multicomponent droplet using a patterned surface.

  12. Evaporation of a Volatile Liquid Lens on the Surface of an Immiscible Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-06-21

    The evaporation behavior of toluene and hexane lenses on the surface of deionized (DI) water is studied. The toluene and hexane lenses during evaporation experience an advancing stage and a receding stage. There exists a significant difference of the evaporation behavior between the toluene lenses and the hexane lenses. The lifetime and largest diameter of both the toluene and hexane lenses increase with increasing the initial volume of the lenses. For the evaporation of the toluene lenses, the lifetime and largest diameter of the lenses decrease with increasing the temperature of DI water. The effect of the residual of the oil molecules on the evaporation of toluene lenses at a temperature of 21 °C is investigated via the evaporation of a series of consecutive toluene lenses being placed on the same position of the surface of DI water. The temporal evolution of the toluene lenses placed after the first toluene lens deviates significantly from that of the first toluene lens. Significant increase of the receding speed occurs at the dimensionless time in a range 0.7-0.8.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Evaporation and Drainage in Wettable and Water-Repellent Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hyun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents experimental results on evaporation and drainage in both wettable and water-repellent sands whose surface wettability was artificially modified by silanization. The 2D optical and 3D X-ray computed tomographic imaging was performed during evaporation and the water retention during cyclic drainage and infiltration was measured to assess effects of wettability and initial wetting conditions. The evaporation gradually induces its front at the early stage advance regardless of the wettability and sand types, while its rate becomes higher in water-repellent Ottawa sand than the wettable one. Jumunjin sand which has a smaller particle size and irregular particle shape than Ottawa sand exhibits a similar evaporation rate independent of wettability. Water-repellent sand can facilitate the evaporation when both wettable and water-repellent sands are naturally in contact with each other. The 3D X-ray imaging reveals that the hydraulically connected water films in wettable sands facilitate the propagation of the evaporation front into the soil such that the drying front deeply advances into the soil. For cyclic drainage-infiltration testing, the evolution of water retention is similar in both wettable and water-repellent sands when both are initially wet. However, when conditions are initially dry, water-repellent sands exhibit low residual saturation values. The experimental observations made from this study propose that the surface wettability may not be a sole factor while the degree of water-repellency, type of sands, and initial wetting condition are predominant when assessing evaporation and drainage behaviors.

  14. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  15. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  16. Effect of the Heat Flux Density on the Evaporation Rate of a Distilled Water Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarev Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental dependence of the evaporation rate of a nondeaerated distilled water drop from the heat flux density on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals (copper and brass. A drop was placed on a heated substrate by electronic dosing device. To obtain drop profile we use a shadow optical system; drop symmetry was controlled by a high-speed video camera. It was found that the evaporation rate of a drop on a copper substrate is greater than on a brass. The evaporation rate increases intensively with raising volume of a drop. Calculated values of the heat flux density and the corresponding evaporation rates are presented in this work. The evaporation rate is found to increase intensively on the brass substrate with raising the heat flux density.

  17. Thermal Effects of the Substrate on Water Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David

    2012-11-01

    Since a few decades, the evaporation of a drop deposited onto a substrate has been subject to numerous research activities due to the increase of the range of applications underpinned by this phenomenon. However, this process today is always a challenging problem in soft matter physics due to the complexity of present couplings: fluid dynamic, physical chemistry of the substrate, heat and mass transfer. The originality of the presented experiment is to decouple the effects of wetting properties and thermal properties of the substrate. Thus, whereas we previously presented the role of wetting properties on evaporation by changing the surface energy and the roughness while maintaining the thermal properties constant thanks to nanoscale coatings on the substrate surface (B. Sobac and D. Brutin, Langmuir 27, 14999 (2011)), we investigate here the influence of the thermal properties of the substrate while keeping the wetting properties the same (B. Sobac and D. Brutin, Phys. Rev. E, underpress). We experimentally investigate the behavior of a pinned droplet evaporating into air. The influences of the substrate temperature and substrate thermal properties on the evaporation process are studied in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions. Experimental data are compared to the quasi-steady diffusion-driven evaporation model assuming the isothermia of the drop at the substrate temperature. This comparison permits to highlights several thermal mechanisms linked to evaporation and their respective contributions in regard of pure mass diffusion mechanism. The range of validity of the classical evaporation model is also discussed.

  18. Impact of type of salt and ambient conditions on saline water evaporation from porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri-Kuehni, Salomé M. S.; Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Webb, Colin; Shokri, Nima

    2017-07-01

    Saline water evaporation from porous media is important in many processes such as soil salinization, CO2 sequestration, crop production and water management. This process is influenced by the transport properties of porous media, properties of the evaporating solution and external conditions. In this work, we investigated the effects of external conditions and type of salt on the drying behaviour of sandy media and on the dynamics of surface salt precipitation. To do so, a comprehensive series of evaporation experiments were conducted using 33 columns packed with sand saturated with salt solutions. The evaporation experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber to investigate the effects of relative humidity, ambient temperature and type of salt on the evaporation process. Sodium Chloride, Calcium Chloride and Potassium Iodide with a wide range of concentration were used to saturate the sand columns mounted on digital balances. A digital camera was fixed at the surface of the sand packs to record the dynamics of salt precipitation at the surface. The results provide further confirmation that ambient conditions are the controlling factors during stage-1 evaporation of pure water. Additionally, the minor impact of the presence of precipitated salt at the surface on the saline water evaporation during the early stages of the process is discussed. Strong correlations between the cumulative water losses and the precipitation at the surface were found under different ambient conditions. The results obtained from different types of salt highlight the significant influence of the relationship between the saturated vapour pressure and salt concentration on the general dynamics of the process.

  19. The Evaporation Effect on the Isotopes in the Yellow River Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiaosi; LIN Xueyu; LIAO Zisheng; WANG Jinsheng

    2001-01-01

    Based on the isotope analysis result of water samples in the 18 sections of the Yellow River, the variation of δ18Oand δD have been analyzed. From near the source to the entrance to the sea, the Yellow River has a general trend that the ratios of the stable isotope increase progressively; The main factors affecting the isotopes in the river water are mixing of external water bodies, evaporation and others; In the river segment between Lanzhou and Baotou and in lower reaches, the extent of the evaporation effect on the isotope fractionation from the river water surface is limited but the evaporation from the irrigated river water and the return flow is one of the main factors affecting the isotopes in river water.

  20. Simulation of Vapor Flows Between Two Closed Surfaces of Evaporation and Condensation at High Vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭斌; 许春建; 周明

    2003-01-01

    The steady multi-component vapor flows between two closed surfaces of evaporation and condensation are investigated numerically by the nonlinear Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation. The mathematical model will make it possible to determine the profiles of the process variables between two surfaces of evaporation and condensation if the conditions of evaporation and condensation surfaces are taken into consideration. It is used to simulate the vapor behaviors of the pure dibutylphthalate and the ethylhexyl phthalate-ethylhexyl sebacate mixture. The effects of the liquid composition of the evaporation surface, the evaporation temperature, the condensation temperature and the distance between evaporation and condensation surfaces on the evaporation efficiency and separation factor are discussed.

  1. The stoichiometric approach in determining total evaporative water loss and the relationship between evaporative and non-evaporative heat loss in two resting bird species: passerine and non-passerine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valery M.Gavrilov

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evaporation is of significant ecological interest.Evaporation from an animal always results in a decrease in the temperature of the surface from which the evaporation occurs.Therefore,evaporation is a one-way transfer which causes heat loss from the organism.Biological evaporation always involves the loss of water which is a vital resource for nearly all biochemical processes.Evaporation is loss of heat via loss of body mass.Methods: The simultaneous determination of energy expenditure and loss of body mass in resting birds allows us to estimate evaporative heat loss.This method includes direct measurements of the energetic equivalent of the loss of body mass as the ratio between heat production,determined by the rate of oxygen consumption and the loss of body mass at various ambient temperatures.Results: The data indicate that evaporation was minimal at lower critical temperature and that the rate of evaporation increased at lower or higher temperatures.Obtained results indicate that passerine and non-passerine species have the ability to change their non-evaporative heat conductance the same number of times(approximately fourfold),and that their abilities in this respect are similar.Conclusions: The novelty of the study resides in the stoichiometric approach to determination of total evaporative water loss.The analysis shows that determinations by stoichiometric approach of total evaporative water loss yielded the values,which fit into the confidence intervals of all equations from literatures.The basal metabolic rate and nonevaporative thermal conductance are fundamental parameters of energetics and determine the level of physiological organization of an endothermic animal.

  2. Modelling of boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for the relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verification is planned......Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the flue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  3. Modelling of Boiler Heating Surfaces and Evaporator Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equation systems (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for these relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verication is planned......Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the ue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  4. Self-wrapping of an ouzo drop induced by evaporation on a superamphiphobic surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Versluis, Michel; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of multi-component drops is crucial to various technologies and has numerous potential applications because of its ubiquity in nature. Superamphiphobic surfaces, which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, can give a low wettability not only for water drops but also for oil

  5. Evaporation of HD Droplets From Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalance Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaporation of HD Droplets from Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalancc Wind Tunnels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAD13...hr (lightly swirled on a rotating plateau). Then, the glass was rinsed with dematerialized water and dried (using appropriate fat-free non-felting

  6. Surface morphology of thin lysozyme films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Pryds, Nini;

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of the protein, lysozyme, have been deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Frozen targets of 0.3-1.0 wt.% lysozyme dissolved in ultrapure water were irradiated by laser light at 355 mn with a fluence of 2 J/cm(2). The surface quality of the thin ly...

  7. Effect of material flexibility on the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobically induced evaporation of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabet, Y Elia; Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2017-03-13

    The evaporation of water induced by confinement between hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its suggested functional role in numerous biophysical phenomena and its importance as a general mechanism of hydrophobic self-assembly. Although much progress has been made in understanding the basic physics of hydrophobically induced evaporation, a comprehensive understanding of the substrate material features (e.g., geometry, chemistry, and mechanical properties) that promote or inhibit such transitions remains lacking. In particular, comparatively little research has explored the relationship between water's phase behavior in hydrophobic confinement and the mechanical properties of the confining material. Here, we report the results of extensive molecular simulations characterizing the rates, free energy barriers, and mechanism of water evaporation when confined between model hydrophobic materials with tunable flexibility. A single-order-of-magnitude reduction in the material's modulus results in up to a nine-orders-of-magnitude increase in the evaporation rate, with the corresponding characteristic time decreasing from tens of seconds to tens of nanoseconds. Such a modulus reduction results in a 24-orders-of-magnitude decrease in the reverse rate of condensation, with time scales increasing from nanoseconds to tens of millions of years. Free energy calculations provide the barriers to evaporation and confirm our previous theoretical predictions that making the material more flexible stabilizes the confined vapor with respect to liquid. The mechanism of evaporation involves surface bubbles growing/coalescing to form a subcritical gap-spanning tube, which then must grow to cross the barrier.

  8. Evaporation of droplets on strong and low-pinning surfaces and dynamics of the triple line

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward; Zinigrad, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Evaporation of water droplets deposited on metal and polymer substrates was studied. The evaporated droplet demonstrates different behaviors on low-pinning (polymer) and strong-pinning (metallic) surfaces. When deposited on polymer surfaces, the evaporated droplet is featured by stick-slip sliding, whereas on strong-pinning metallic surfaces it does not show such kind of motion and demonstrates the giant contact-angle hysteresis. Stick-slip motion of droplets is described satisfactorily by the Shanahan-Sefiane model relating this kind of motion to surmounting potential barriers caused by the pinning of the triple (three-phase) line. The experimentally established "stick" times coincide with the values predicted by the Shanahan-Sefiane theory. The values of potential barriers are reported. The notion of the equilibrium contact angle is refined.

  9. Evaporation of Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Surface Roughness and Small Droplet Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Ruiyuan; Li, Jintao; Hao, Chonglei; Guo, Wei; Luk, B. L.; Li, Shuai Cheng; Yao, Shuhuai; Wang, Zuankai

    2012-09-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet is a complex, nonequilibrium phenomenon. Although evaporating droplets upon superhydrophobic surfaces have been known to exhibit distinctive evaporation modes such as a constant contact line (CCL), a constant contact angle (CCA), or both, our fundamental understanding of the effects of surface roughness on the wetting transition remains elusive. We show that the onset time for the CCL-CCA transition and the critical base size at the Cassie-Wenzel transition exhibit remarkable dependence on the surface roughness. Through global interfacial energy analysis we reveal that, when the size of the evaporating droplet becomes comparable to the surface roughness, the line tension at the triple line becomes important in the prediction of the critical base size. Last, we show that both the CCL evaporation mode and the Cassie-Wenzel transition can be effectively inhibited by engineering a surface with hierarchical roughness.

  10. Effects on evaporation rates from different water-permeable pavement designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

    2011-01-01

    The urban water balance can be attenuated to the natural by water-permeable pavements (WPPs). Furthermore, WPPs have a 16% higher evaporation rate than impermeable pavements, which can lead to a better urban climate. Evaporation rates from pavements are influenced by the pavement surface and by the deeper layers. By a compared evaporation measurement between different WPP designs, the grain size distribution of the sub-base shows no influence on the evaporation rates in a significant way. On the contrary, a sub-base made of a twin-layer decreases the evaporation by 16% compared to a homogeneous sub-base. By a change in the colour of the paving stone, 19% higher evaporation rates could be achieved. A further comparison shows that the transpiration-effect of the grass in grass pavers increases the evaporation rates more than threefold to pervious concrete pavements. These high evapotranspiration rates can not be achieved with a pervious concrete paving stone. In spite of this, the broad field of application of the pervious concrete paving stone increases the importance in regard to the urban climate.

  11. Evaporation from Near-Drift Fractured Rock Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manepally, C.; Fedors, R. W.; Or, D.; Das, K.

    2007-12-01

    The amount of water entering emplacement drifts from a fractured unsaturated rock is an important variable for performance evaluation of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water entering the drifts as liquid or gas may enhance waste package corrosion rates and transport released radionuclides. Liquid water in form of droplets may emerge from fractures, or flow along the drift wall and potentially evaporate and condense at other locations. Driven by pressure and temperature gradients, vapor may be transported along fractures, or liquid water may evaporate directly from the matrix. Within the drift, heat-driven convection may redistribute the moisture leading to condensation at other locations. The geometry of the evaporation front around the drift is not fully understood and this, in turn, influences processes related to reflux, rewetting as the thermal pulse dissipates. Existing models focus on processes in the porous media (e.g., two-phase dual-permeability models for matrix and fractures), or on processes in the drift (e.g., gas-phase computational fluid dynamics models). This study focuses on the boundary between these two domains, and the corresponding models, where evaporation at the solid rock/drift air interface appears to play an important role. Studies have shown that evaporation from porous media is a complex process sensitive to factors such as (i) hydrological properties of the porous media, (ii) pressure gradients in the porous media, (iii) texture of the interface or boundary, (iv) local vapor and temperature gradients, and (v) convective flow rate and boundary layer transfer. Experimental observations based on passive monitoring at Yucca Mountain have shown that the formation surrounding the drift is able to provide and transport large amounts of water vapor over a relatively short period. This study will examine the basic processes that govern evaporation in the unsaturated rock surrounding drifts for

  12. Evaporation-Triggered Wetting Transition for Water Droplets upon Hydrophobic Microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsai, Peichun; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    When placed on rough hydrophobic surfaces, water droplets of diameter larger than a few millimeters can easily form pearls, as they are in the Cassie-Baxter state with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet. Intriguingly, a natural evaporating process can drive such a Fakir drop into a completel

  13. Evaporation-triggered wetting transition for water droplets upon hydrophobic microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peichun; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-03-19

    When placed on rough hydrophobic surfaces, water droplets of diameter larger than a few millimeters can easily form pearls, as they are in the Cassie-Baxter state with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet. Intriguingly, a natural evaporating process can drive such a Fakir drop into a completely wetting (Wenzel) state. Our microscopic observations with simultaneous side and bottom views of evaporating droplets upon transparent hydrophobic microstructures elucidate the water-filling dynamics and suggest the mechanism of this evaporation-triggered transition. For the present material the wetting transition occurs when the water droplet size decreases to a few hundreds of micrometers in radius. We present a general global energy argument which estimates the interfacial energies depending on the drop size and can account for the critical radius for the transition.

  14. Microdrops on atomic force microscope cantilevers: evaporation of water and spring constant calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-01-13

    The evaporation of water drops with radii approximately 20 microm was investigated experimentally by depositing them onto atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers and measuring the deflection versus time. Because of the surface tension of the liquid, the Laplace pressure inside the drop, and the change of interfacial stress at the solid-liquid interface, the cantilever is deflected by typically a few hundred nanometers. The experimental results are in accordance with an analytic theory developed. The evaporation process could be monitored with high accuracy even at the last stage of evaporation because (1) cantilever deflections can be measured with nanometer resolution and (2) the time resolution, given by the inverse of the resonance frequency of the cantilever of approximately 0.3 ms, is much faster than the typical evaporation time of 1 s. Experimental results indicate that evaporation of the last thin layer of water is significantly slower than the rest of the drop, which can be due to surface forces. This drop-on-cantilever system can also be used to analyze the drop impact dynamics on a surface and to determine the spring constant of cantilevers.

  15. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    developed as a Differential-Algebraic-Equation system (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In generalMATLAB has proved to be very stable for these DAE systems. Experimental verication has been carried out at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level uctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...

  16. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    developed as a Differential-Algebraic-Equation system (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for these DAE systems. Experimental verification has been carried out at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level fluctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...

  17. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  18. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  19. Forward osmosis applied to evaporative cooling make-up water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoll, Peter; Thompson, Neil; Gray, Victoria [Modern Water plc, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    Modern Water is in the process of developing a number of forward osmosis based technologies, ranging from desalination to power generation. This paper outlines the progress made to date on the development and commercial deployment of a forward osmosis based process for the production of evaporative cooling tower make-up water from impaired water sources, including seawater. Evaporative cooling requires significant amounts of good quality water to replace the water lost by evaporation, drift and blowdown. This water can be provided by conventional desalination processes or by the use of tertiary treated sewage effluent. The conventional processes are well documented and understood in terms of operation and power consumption. A new process has been successfully developed and demonstrated that provides make-up water directly, using a core platform 'forward osmosis' technology. This new technology shows significant promise in allowing various raw water sources, such as seawater, to be used directly in the forward osmosis step, thus releasing the use of scarce and valuable high grade water for other more important uses. The paper presents theoretical and operational results for the process, where it is shown that the process can produce make-up water at a fraction of the operational expenditure when compared to conventional processes, in particular regarding power consumption, which in some cases may be as low as 15 % compared to competing processes. Chemical additives to the cooling water (osmotic agent) are retained within the process, thus reducing their overall consumption. Furthermore the chemistry of the cooling water does not support the growth of Legionella pneumophila. Corrosion results are also reported. (orig.)

  20. Water evaporation particularities in the process of forest fire extinguishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strizhak Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of water massif motion through the high temperature gases corresponding to the typical conditions of forest fires was carried out. Maximal values of part by volume of liquid evaporating from water massif under its motion through the flaming burning area were determined when solving the heat and mass transfer problem under the conditions of endothermic phase transformations. Influence of liquid phase transition heat on the heat and mass transfer conditions on the track of water massif was determined. The expediency of polydisperse interspaced in time and space atomization of water massifs under the large-scale (especially, forest fires fire extinguishing was proved.

  1. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Thermal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    For future lunar extravehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon(Registered Trademark) membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using this membrane was successfully tested by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of a compact sheet membrane SWME development unit for use in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element Portable Life Support System (Vogel and et. al., ICES 2008). Major design objectives included minimizing mass, volume, and manufacturing complexity while rejecting a minimum of 810 watts of heat from water flowing through the SWME at 91 kg/hr with an inlet temperature of 291K. The design meeting these objectives consisted of three concentric cylindrical water channels interlaced with four water vapor channels. Two units were manufactured for the purpose of investigating manufacturing techniques and performing thermal testing. The extensive thermal test measured SWME heat rejection as a function of water inlet temperatures, water flow-rates, water absolute pressures, water impurities, and water vapor back-pressures. This paper presents the test results and subsequent analysis, which includes a comparison of SWME heat rejection measurements to pretest predictions. In addition, test measurements were taken such that an analysis of the commercial-off-the-shelf vapor pressure control valve could be performed.

  2. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an ...

  3. A comparison between wet canopy evaporation estimated by stable isotope ratios of water and canopy interception measured by water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeki; Hattori, Shohei; Uemura, Ryu

    2017-04-01

    Some papers proved that canopy interception is proportional to rainfall not only on a rain event basis but also on an hourly basis (e.g. Murakami, 2006, J. Hydrol.; Saito et al., 2013, J. Hydrol.). However, theoretically, evaporation does not depend on rainfall amount. These results are enigmatic and we need to reevaluate wet canopy evaporation. We measured gross rainfall and net rainfall in a plastic Christmas tree stand with a height of 165 cm placed on a 180-cm square tray as described in Murakami and Toba (2013, Hydrol. Res. Lett.). The measurement was conducted outside under natural rainfall. We also estimated wet canopy evaporation using stable isotope ratios of water. During a rain event, we manually sampled gross and net rainwater on an hourly basis. Evaporation was calculated using the difference between the δ18O (or δ2H) values in gross and net rainfall using isotope fractionation factor. Total gross rainfall in a target rain event in October, 2014, was 28.0 mm and net rainfall (discharge from the tray) was 22.7 mm, i.e. canopy interception was 5.3 mm (18.9% of gross rainfall). The δ18O (or δ2H) value in net rainfall was higher than that in gross rainfall because of fractionation by evaporation on wet canopy surface. Hourly evaporation calculated by the values of δ18O varied from 2% to 24% of gross rainfall, and the weighted average by hourly gross rainfall was 5.2% of gross rainfall. Further, we estimated rainfall interception using a tank model (Yoshida et al., 1993) assuming constant evaporation rate, i.e. 20% of gross rainfall. Total net rainfall calculated by the model was 23.1 mm, i.e. calculated canopy interception was 4.9 mm (17.5% of gross rainfall). Then, keeping the parameters of the model, we simulated net rainfall using hourly surface evaporation obtained by the δ18O values. Calculated net rainfall was 25.6 mm, i.e. wet canopy evaporation was only 2.4 mm (8.6% of gross rainfall). So far, possible explanation of the discrepancy between

  4. Dynamics of water evaporation from saline porous media with mixed wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the dynamics of salt transport and precipitation in porous media during evaporation is of crucial concern in various environmental and hydrological applications such as soil salinization, rock weathering, terrestrial ecosystem functioning, microbiological activities and biodiversity in vadose zone. Vegetation, plant growth and soil organisms can be severely limited in salt-affected land. This process is influenced by the complex interaction among atmospheric conditions, transport properties of porous media and properties of the evaporating solution (1-5). We investigated effects of mixed wettability conditions on salt precipitation during evaporation from saline porous media. To do so, we conducted a series of evaporation experiments with sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. The dynamics of salt precipitation at the surface of sand columns (mounted on digital balances to record the evaporation curves) as well as the displacement of the receding drying front (the interface between wet and partially wet zone) were recorded using an automatic imaging system at well-defined time intervals. The experiments were conducted with sand packs containing 0, 25, 40, 50, 65, and 80% fraction of hydrophobic grains. All experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber in which the relative humidity and ambient temperature were kept constant at 30% and 30 C, respectively. Our results show that partial wettability conditions had minor impacts on the evaporative mass losses from saline sand packs due to the presence of salt. This is significantly different than what is normally observed during evaporation from mixed wettability porous media saturated with pure water (6). In our experiments, increasing the fraction of hydrophobic grains did not result in any notable reduction of the evaporative mass losses from saline porous media. Our results show that the presence of hydrophobic grains on the surface

  5. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development for Lunar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Peterson, Keith; Zapata, Felipe, III; Dillon, Paul; Trevino, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future lunar extra-vehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using the Teflon membrane was tested successfully by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of the SWME development unit, which is being considered for service in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). Multiple PLSS SWME configurations were considered on the basis of thermal performance, mass, volume, and performance and manufacturing risk. All configurations were a variation of an alternating concentric water and vapor channel configuration or a stack of alternating rectangular water and vapor channels. Supporting thermal performance trades mapped maximum SWME heat rejection as a function of water channel thickness, vapor channel thickness, channel length, number of water channels, porosity of the membrane structural support, and backpressure valve throat area. Preliminary designs of each configuration were developed to determine total mass and volume as well as to understand manufacturing issues. Review of configurations led to the selection of a concentric annulus configuration that meets the requirements of 800 watts (W) of heat rejection. Detailed design of the SWME development unit will be followed by fabrication of a prototype test unit, with thermal testing expected to start in 2008.

  6. How water droplets evaporate on a superhydrophobic substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Nair, Hrudya; van Houselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Evaporation of water droplets on a superhydrophobic substrate, on which the contact line is pinned, is investigated. While previous studies mainly focused on droplets with contact angles smaller than $90^\\circ$, here we analyze almost the full range of possible contact angles (10$^\\circ$-150$^\\circ$). The greater contact angles and pinned contact lines can be achieved by the use of superhydrophobic Carbon Nanofiber substrates. The time-evolutions of the contact angle and the droplet mass are examined. The experimental data is in good quantitative agreement with the model presented by Popov (Physical Review E 71, 2005), demonstrating that the evaporation process is quasi-static, diffusion-driven, and that thermal effects play no role. Furthermore, we show that the experimental data for the evolution of both the contact angle and the droplet mass can be collapsed onto one respective universal curve for all droplet sizes and initial contact angles.

  7. Ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems with flooded evaporators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Sieres, Jaime [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No. 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    The harmful effects of water accumulation in the evaporator in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems (AARS) with flooded evaporators are a crucial issue. In this paper, the effects of the ammonia purification and the liquid entrainment and blow-down from the evaporator in AARS are analyzed. A mathematical model based on a single stage system with complete condensation has been developed. The ammonia purification is evaluated by means of the Murphree efficiencies of the stripping and rectifying sections of the distillation column. The entrainment and blow-down are taking into account considering the corresponding flow rates as a fraction of the dry vapour at the evaporator outlet. The influence of the distillation column components efficiency on the attainable distillate concentration and the effects of the distillate concentration and the liquid entrainment and blow-down on the system operating conditions and performance are analyzed and quantified. If no liquid entrainment or blow-down is considered, very high efficiencies in the distillation column are required. Small values of liquid entrainment or blow-down fractions increase significantly the operating range of the absorption system. If high values of the blow-down fraction are required, then a heat exchanger should be added to the system in order to recover the refrigeration capacity of the blow-down by additional subcooling of the liquid from the condenser. For a fixed value of the distillation column efficiency, an optimum value of the liquid blow-down fraction exists. Moreover, an optimum combination of generation temperature, reflux ratio and blow-down fraction can be found, which should be considered in designing and controlling an AARS. (author)

  8. Vortices generation in the reactive flow on the evaporative surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cha Ryeom; Lee, Chang Jin [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Vortices generation and flow dynamics are investigated by a numerical calculation with LES methodology on the evaporative surface including chemical reactions. For simplicity, fuel is radially injected from the surface in order to decouple pyrolysis of solid fuel from the governing equation and consideration of heat transfer balance. Nevertheless its simple treatment of chemical reactions and fuel pyrolysis, numerical results captured very fundamental understandings in terms of averaged temperature, velocity profile, and mixture fraction distribution. Results showed that a well-defined turbulent velocity profile at the inlet becomes twisted and highly wrinkled in the downstream reaching the maximum velocity at far above the surface, where the flame is located. And the thickness of boundary layer increases in the downstream due to the enhanced interaction of axial flow and mass injection from the surface. Also, chemical reaction appears highly active and partially concentrated along the plane where flow condition is in stoichiometric. In particular, flame front locates at the surface where mixture fraction Z equals to 0.07. Flame front severely wrinkles in the downstream by the interaction with turbulences in the flow. Partial reactions on the flame front contribute to produce hot spots periodically in the downstream attaining the max temperature at the center of each spot. This may take the role of additional unsteady heat generations and pressure perturbations in the downstream. Future study will focus on the evolution of hot spots and pressure perturbations in the post chamber of lab scale hybrid rocket motors.

  9. Evaporation and Infiltration from Water Bodies in the Lerma-Chapala Basin, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C. A.; Flores-Lopez, F. F.

    2001-05-01

    Reservoirs and ponds significantly influence the hydrology of the Lerma-Chapala river basin in Mexico and affect inflows to the receiving waters of Lake Chapala. This paper reports on remote sensing and GIS assessment of the 55,511 km2 basin, in which 81 lakes and reservoirs, and 28,895 ponds were identified from post-rainy season 1998 Thematic Mapper imagery. Digital terrain analysis coupled with sedimentation estimates from soil and land cover data were used to estimate impounded volumes in ponds, and in reservoirs for which storage data were unreported. Open water surface evaporation (3.2 - 7.4 mm/day) was determined using a surface energy balance model, Penman-Monteith, and corrected pan evaporation methods. Sediment samples were analyzed, and a pedo-transfer function was used to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity (0.2 - 6.6 mm/day) of the bed sediments, which are assumed to be the layer that limits percolation recharge to groundwater. The ponds' shallow depths and sediments with high clay and low organic matter contents result in evaporation to infiltration ratios of approximately 2:1 over the dry season. Increasing irrigation from ponds or permitting this water to flow downstream to deeper reservoirs may result in less water loss than allowing impounded water to recharge and subsequently withdrawing groundwater.

  10. Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, Rashmi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shah, Nihar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Phadke, Amol [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Evaporative coolers (ECs) provide significant gains in energy efficiency compared to vapor compression air conditioners, but simultaneously have significant onsite water demand. This can be a major barrier to deployment in areas of the world with hot and arid climates. To address this concern, this study determined where in the world evaporative cooling is suitable, the water consumption of ECs in these cities, and the potential that greywater can be used reduce the consumption of potable water in ECs. ECs covered 69percent of the cities where room air conditioners are may be deployed, based on comfort conditions alone. The average water consumption due to ECs was found to be 400 L/household/day in the United States and Australia, with the potential for greywater to provide 50percent this amount. In the rest of the world, the average water consumption was 250 L/household/day, with the potential for greywater to supply 80percent of this amount. Home size was the main factor that contributed to this difference. In the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Northern India, and the Midwestern and Southwestern United States alkalinity levels are high and water used for bleeding will likely contribute significantly to EC water consumption. Although technically feasible, upfront costs for household GW systems are currently high. In both developed and developing parts of the world, however, a direct EC and GW system is cost competitive with conventional vapor compression air conditioners. Moreover, in regions of the world that face problems of water scarcity the benefits can substantially outweigh the costs.

  11. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  12. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets on Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian H; Wells, Gary G; Xu, Ben; McHale, Glen; Wood, David; Martin, James; Stuart-Cole, Simone

    2015-11-03

    Over the past decade, the most common approach to creating liquid shedding surfaces has been to amplify the effects of nonwetting surface chemistry, using micro/nanotexturing to create superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. Recently, an alternative approach using impregnation of micro/nanotextured surfaces with immiscible lubricating liquids to create slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) has been developed. These types of surfaces open up new opportunities to study the mechanism of evaporation of sessile droplets in zero contact angle hysteresis situations where the contact line is completely mobile. In this study, we fabricated surfaces consisting of square pillars (10-90 μm) of SU-8 photoresist arranged in square lattice patterns with the center-to-center separation between pillars of 100 μm, on which a hydrophobic coating was deposited and the textures impregnated by a lubricating silicone oil. These surfaces showed generally low sliding angles of 1° or less for small droplets of water. Droplet profiles were more complicated than on nonimpregnated surfaces and displayed a spherical cap shape modified by a wetting ridge close to the contact line due to balancing the interfacial forces at the line of contact between the droplet, the lubricant liquid and air (represented by a Neumann triangle). The wetting ridge leads to the concept of a wetting "skirt" of lubricant around the base of the droplet. For the SLIP surfaces, we found that the evaporation of small sessile droplets (∼2 mm in diameter) followed an ideal constant contact angle mode where the apparent contact angle was defined from the intersection of the substrate profile with the droplet spherical cap profile. A theoretical model based on diffusion controlled evaporation was able to predict a linear dependence in time for the square of the apparent contact radius. The experimental data was in excellent quantitative agreement with the theory and enabled estimates of the diffusion

  13. Thermal management of a Li-ion battery pack employing water evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonghuan; Yu, Ziqun; Song, Guangji

    2017-08-01

    Battery thermal management (BTM) system plays a key part in vehicle thermal safety. A novel method employing water evaporation is presented in this paper. The thin sodium alginate film (SA-1 film) with water content of 99 wt% is prepared using a simple spraying method, and is attached on the surface of battery pack to explore its effectiveness on preventing heat accumulation. The result shows that under the condition with constant current charge/discharge larger than 1 C, the temperature rise rate is reduced by half. Under the condition with the New Europe Drive Cycle, the temperature could maintain stable without obvious rise. Moreover, a simple water automatic-refilling system is designed to address the dry issue of the film in terms of evaporation elimination. The proposed SA-1 film BTM system shows to be a very convenient and efficient approach in handling the thermal surge of Li-ion batteries without any change in battery pack integration and assembly.

  14. Experimental study on stable isotopic fractionation of evaporating water under varying temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ying HU; Wei-min BAO; Tao WANG; Si-min QU

    2009-01-01

    The variation of stable isotope ratios in natural waters provides valuable information that can be used to trace water movement. Evaporation plays a crucial role in determining the variation of stable isotopes. In this paper, several evaporation experiments were conducted in order to study the stable isotopic fractionation mechanism of water and analyze the influence of different temperatures on evaporation fractionation. Three group experiments of water evaporation under different temperatures and initial isotopic values were carried out. The results show that fractionation factors of hydrogen and oxygen may increase with temperature, and the average enrichment degree of hydrogen isotope D is 3.432 times that of oxygen isotope 18O. The results also show that the isotopic composition of the initial water has little influence on water evaporation fractionation, which is mainly affected by the state variables in the evaporation process, such as temperature. This research provides experimental data for further understanding the evaporation fractionation mechanism.

  15. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R; Faust, Jennifer A; Skinner, J L; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  16. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L., E-mail: skinner@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu; Nathanson, Gilbert M., E-mail: skinner@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4–8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232–252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He–water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He–water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  17. RELATIONSHIP AMONG EVAPORATION FLUX OF GROUNDWATER, DEPTH OF WATER TABLE AND NEGATIVE PRESSURE HEAD IN BARE SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Evaporation of ground water is a part of moisture circulation in the field.And it is a main natural form in which water transmits from the ground water to the soil water and atmosphere water.According to the simulated experiments, we study the relationship among the evaporation, depth of groundwater table and negative pressure.By theoretical analysis of the experimental results, the main conclusions are drawn as follows.There are two abrupt points in every Q-H curve.The locations of the abrupt points are separately in step with the height of top of the capillary fringe and the height of maximal capillary rise in the soil section.When the depth of ground water table H is small, the evaporation flux of ground water is large.While the depth of water table exceeds the maximal capillary rise of media in vadose zone, the capillary rise breaks up and evaporation flux of groundwater is small.The water content ratio in ground surface tends to be zero and the surface of soil tends to be drought.These conclusions show that the maximal capillary rise of media in vadose zone is an important value in regulating rational depth of ground water to reduce the evaporation of ground water and to increase effective quantity of water resources.In the meantime, these conclusions are of important theoretical and practical significance to reduce the evaporation of ground water, to prevent and cure the salinization of soil, and to make full use of and protect water resources in the northern plains in China.

  18. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  19. Isotope effects in the evaporation of water: a status report of the Craig-Gordon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Cohen, Shabtai

    2008-03-01

    The Craig-Gordon model (C-G model) [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen 18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] has been synonymous with the isotope effects associated with the evaporation of water from surface waters, soils, and vegetations, which in turn constitutes a critical component of the global water cycle. On the occasion of the four decades of its successful applications to isotope geochemistry and hydrology, an attempt is made to: (a) examine its physical background within the framework of modern evaporation models, (b) evaluate our current knowledge of the environmental parameters of the C-G model, and (c) comment on a general strategy for the use of these parameters in field applications. Despite its simplistic representation of evaporation processes at the water-air interface, the C-G model appears to be adequate to provide the isotopic composition of the evaporation flux. This is largely due to its nature for representing isotopic compositions (a ratio of two fluxes of different isotopic water molecules) under the same environmental conditions. Among many environmental parameters that are included in the C-G model, accurate description and calculations are still problematic of the kinetic isotope effects that occur in a diffusion-dominated thin layer of air next to the water-air interface. In field applications, it is of importance to accurately evaluate several environmental parameters, particularly the relative humidity and isotopic compositions of the 'free-atmosphere', for a system under investigation over a given time-scale of interest (e.g., hourly to daily to seasonally). With a growing interest in the studies of water cycles of different spatial and temporal scales, including paleoclimate and water resource studies, the importance and utility of the C-G model is also likely to

  20. Heat Flux at the Surface of Metal Foil Heater under Evaporating Sessile Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Marchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporating water drops on a horizontal heated substrate were investigated experimentally. The heater was made of a constantan foil with the thickness of 25 μm and size of 42 × 35 mm2. The temperature of the bottom foil surface was measured by the infrared (IR camera. To determine the heat flux density during evaporation of liquid near the contact line, the Cauchy problem for the heat equation was solved using the temperature data. The maximum heat flux density is obtained in the contact line region and exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 5–7. The average heat flux density in the region wetted by the drop exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 3–5. This fact is explained by the heat influx from the foil periphery to the drop due to the relatively high heat conductivity coefficient of the foil material and high evaporation rate in the contact line region. Heat flux density profiles for pairs of sessile droplets are also investigated.

  1. Pattern Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis via Droplet Evaporation on Micropillars Arrays at a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarrey-Arce, A; Marin, A; Massey, A; Oknianska, A; Díaz-Fernandez, Y; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Griffiths, E; Gardeniers, J G E; Snoeijer, J H; Lohse, Detlef; Raval, R

    2016-07-19

    We evaluate the effect of epoxy surface structuring on the evaporation of water droplets containing Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). During evaporation, droplets with S. epidermidis cells yield to complex wetting patterns such as the zipping-wetting1-3 and the coffee-stain effects. Depending on the height of the microstructure, the wetting fronts propagate circularly or in a stepwise manner, leading to the formation of octagonal or square-shaped deposition patterns.4,5 We observed that the shape of the dried droplets has considerable influence on the local spatial distribution of S. epidermidis deposited between micropillars. These changes are attributed to an unexplored interplay between the zipping-wetting1 and the coffee-stain6 effects in polygonally shaped droplets containing S. epidermidis. Induced capillary flows during evaporation of S. epidermidis are modeled with polystyrene particles. Bacterial viability measurements for S. epidermidis show high viability of planktonic cells, but low biomass deposition on the microstructured surfaces. Our findings provide insights into design criteria for the development of microstructured surfaces on which bacterial propagation could be controlled, limiting the use of biocides.

  2. Effects of crop residue on soil and plant water evaporation in a dryland cotton system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascano, R. J.; Baumhardt, R. L.

    1996-03-01

    Dryland agricultural cropping systems emphasize sustaining crop yields with limited use of fertilizer while conserving both rain water and the soil. Conservation of these resources may be achieved with management systems that retain residues at the soil surface simultaneously modifying both its energy and water balance. A conservation practice used with cotton grown on erodible soils of the Texas High Plains is to plant cotton into chemically terminated wheat residues. In this study, the partitioning of daily and seasonal evapotranspiration ( E t) into soil and plant water evaporation was compared for a conventional and a terminated-wheat cotton crop using the numerical model ENWATBAL. The model was configured to account for the effects of residue on the radiative fluxes and by introducing an additional resistance to latent and sensible heat fluxes derived from measurements of wind speed and vapor conductance from a soil covered with wheat-stubble. Our results showed that seasonal E t was similar in both systems and that cumulative soil water evaporation was 50% of E t in conventional cotton and 31% of E t in the wheat-stubble cotton. Calculated values of E t were in agreement with measured values. The main benefit of the wheat residues was to suppress soil water evaporation by intercepting irradiance early in the growing season when the crop leaf area index (LAI) was low. In semiarid regions LAI of dryland cotton seldom exceeds 2 and residues can improve water conservation. Measured soil temperatures showed that early in the season residues reduced temperature at 0.1 m depth by as much as 5°C and that differences between systems diminished with depth and over time. Residues increased lint yield per unit of E t while not modifying seasonal E t and reducing cumulative soil water evaporation.

  3. Sensible heat balance measurements of soil water evaporation beneath a maize canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the water budget in a cropped field. Few methods are available for continuous and independent measurement of soil water evaporation. A sensible heat balance (SHB) approach has recently been demonstrated for continuously determining soil water evapo...

  4. Leaf Surface Wettability and Implications for Drop Shedding and Evaporation from Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wettability and retention capacity of leaf surfaces are parameters that contribute to interception of rain, fog or dew by forest canopies. Contrary to common expectation, hydrophobicity or wettability of a leaf do not dictate the stickiness of drops to leaves. Crucial for the adhesion of drops is the contact angle hysteresis, the difference between leading edge contact angle and trailing edge contact angle for a running drop. Other parameters that are dependent on the static contact angle are the maximum volume of drops that can stick to the surface and the persistence of an adhering drop with respect to evaporation. Adaption of contact angle and contact angle hysteresis allow one to pursue different strategies of drop control, for example efficient water shedding or maximum retention of adhering water. Efficient water shedding is achieved if contact angle hysteresis is low. Retention of (isolated) large drops requires a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 65.5°, while maximum retention by optimum spacing of drops necessitates a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 111.6°. Maximum persistence with respect to evaporation is obtained if the static contact angle amounts to 77.5°, together with a high contact angle hysteresis. It is to be expected that knowledge of these parameters can contribute to the capacity of a forest to intercept water.

  5. Investigation of water and saline solution drops evaporation on a solid substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova Evgenija G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation water and saline solution drops evaporation on a solid substrate made of anodized aluminum is presented in the paper. Parameters characterizing drop profile have been obtained (contact angle, contact diameter, height. The specific evaporation rate has been calculated from obtained values. It was found that water and saline solution drops with concentration up to 9.1% evaporate in the pinning mode. However, with increasing the salt concentration in the solution up to 16.7% spreading mode was observed. Two stages of drop evaporation depending on change of the evaporation rate have been separated.

  6. Investigation of the falling water flow with evaporation for the passive containment cooling system and its scaling-down criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Li, Junming; Li, Le

    2017-09-01

    Falling water evaporation cooling could efficiently suppress the containment operation pressure during the nuclear accident, by continually removing the core decay heat to the atmospheric environment. In order to identify the process of large-scale falling water evaporation cooling, the water flow characteristics of falling film, film rupture and falling rivulet were deduced, on the basis of previous correlation studies. The influences of the contact angle, water temperature and water flow rates on water converge along the flow direction were then numerically obtained and results were compared with the data for AP1000 and CAP1400 nuclear power plants. By comparisons, it is concluded that the water coverage fraction of falling water could be enhanced by either reducing the surface contact angle or increasing the water temperature. The falling water flow with evaporation for AP1000 containment was then calculated and the feature of its water coverage fraction was analyzed. Finally, based on the phenomena identification of falling water flow for AP1000 containment evaporation cooling, the scaling-down is performed and the dimensionless criteria were obtained.

  7. Structured hydrological analysis for targeting fallow evaporation to improve water productivity at the irrigation system level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides results of an application of a holistic systematic approach of water accounting using remote sensing and GIS coupled with ground water modeling to evaluate water saving options by tracking non-beneficial evaporation in the Liuyuankou Irrigation System (LIS of China. Groundwater rise is a major issue in the LIS, where groundwater levels have risen alarmingly close to the ground surface (within 1 m near the Yellow River. The lumped water balance analysis showed high fallow evaporation losses and which need to be reduced for improving water productivity.

    The seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETs was estimated by applying the SEBAL algorithm for eighteen NOAA AVHRR-12 images over the year of 1990–1991. This analysis was aided by the unsupervised land use classification applied to two Landsat 5 TM images of the study area. SEBAL results confirmed that a significant amount (116.7 MCM of water can be saved by reducing ETs from fallow land which will result in improved water productivity at the irrigation system. The water accounting indicator (for the analysis period shows that the process fraction per unit of depleted water (PFdepleted is 0.52 for LIS, meaning that 52% of the depleted water is consumed by agricultural crops and 48% is lost through non-process depletion.

    Finally, the groundwater modeling was applied to simulate three land use and water management interventions to assess their effectiveness for both water savings and impact on the groundwater in LIS. MODFLOW's Zone Budget code calculates the groundwater budget of user-specified subregions, the exchange of flows between subregions and also calculates a volumetric water budget for the entire model at the end of each time step. The simulation results showed that fallow evaporation could be reduced between 14.2% (25.51 MCM and 45.3% (81.36 MCM by interventions such as canal lining and ground

  8. Effect of evaporative surface cooling on thermographic assessment of burn depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Differences in surface temperature between evaporating and nonevaporating, partial- and full-thickness burn injuries were studied in 20 male, white guinea pigs. Evaporative cooling can disguise the temperature differential of the partial-thickness injury and lead to a false full-thickness diagnosis. A full-thickness burn with blister intact may retain enough heat to result in a false partial-thickness diagnosis. By the fourth postburn day, formation of a dry eschar may allow a surface temperature measurement without the complication of differential evaporation. For earlier use of thermographic information, evaporation effects must be accounted for or eliminated.

  9. Influence of understory cover on soil water and evaporation fluxes: a trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, César; Magdalena Warter, Maria; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam

    2017-04-01

    over the sampling period due to keeping the water longer in the surface. The evaporation was driven partly by the temperature in the room, while the structural characteristics of the mosses allow the differences in evaporation rates showed along the study period.

  10. Principles of water capture, evaporation, and soil water retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful dryland crop production in semiarid environments is dependent upon efficient storage of precipitation and use of stored soil water supplies. The objectives of this presentation are to: 1. Summarize information regarding the effects of time of year; environmental parameters; residue orient...

  11. Temperature dependence of evaporation coeffcient of water in air and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure; study in water droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Zientara, M; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2008-01-01

    The evaporation coefficients of water in air and nitrogen were found as a function of temperature, by studying the evaporation of pure water droplet. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a climatic chamber maintaining atmospheric pressure. Droplet radius evolution and evaporation dynamics were studied with high precision by analyzing the angle-resolved light scattering Mie interference patterns. A model of quasi-stationary droplet evolution, accounting for the kinetic effects near the droplet surface was applied. In particular, the effect of thermal effusion (a short range analogue of thermal diffusion) was discussed and accounted for. The evaporation coefficient \\alpha in air and in nitrogen were found equal. \\alpha was found to decrease from ~ 0.18 to ~ 0.13 for the temperature range from 273.1 K to 293.1 K and follow the trend given by Arrhenius formula. The agreement with condensation coefficient values obtained with essentially different method by Li et al.[1] was found excellent...

  12. Estimation of land surface evaporation using a generalized nonlinear complementary relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Lei; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation is a key component of the hydrological cycle and affects regional water resources. Although the physics of evaporation is well understood, its estimation in practice remains a challenge. Among available methods for estimating it, the complementary principle of Bouchet has the potential to provide a practical tool for regional water resources assessment. In this study, the generalized nonlinear formulation of this principle by Brutsaert (2015) was tested against evaporation measurements from four flux stations in Australia under different climatic and vegetation conditions. The method was implemented using meteorological data and Class A pan evaporation measurements. After calibration the estimated daily evaporation values were in good agreement with flux station measurements with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.83 and a bias of 4% on average. More accurate estimates of daily evaporation were obtained when the evaporative demand or apparent potential evaporation was determined from the Penman equation instead of from pan evaporation. The obtained parameter values were found to lie well within the ranges of reported values in the literature. Advantages of the method are that only routine meteorological data are required and that it can be used to estimate long-term evaporation trends.

  13. Self-floating carbon nanotube membrane on macroporous silica substrate for highly efficient solar-driven interfacial water evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuchao

    2016-01-22

    Given the emerging energy and water challenges facing the mankind, solar-driven water evaporation has been gaining renewed research attention from both academia and industry as an energy efficient means of wastewater treatment and clean water production. In this project, a bi-layered material, consisting of a top self-floating hydrophobic CNT membrane and a bottom hydrophilic macroporous silica substrate, was rationally designed and fabricated for highly energy-efficient solar driven water evaporation based on the concept of interfacial heating. The top thin CNT membrane with excellent light adsorption capability, acted as photothermal component, which harvested and converted almost the entire incident light to heat for exclusively heating of interfacial water. On the other hand, the macroporous silica substrate provided multi-functions toward further improvement of operation stability and water evaporation performance of the material, including water pumping, mechanical support and heat barriers. The silica substrate was conducive in forming the rough surface structures of the CNT top layers during vacuum filtration and thus indirectly contributed to high light adsorption by the top CNT layers. With optimized thicknesses of the CNT top layer and silica substrate, a solar thermal conversion efficiency of 82 % was achieved in this study. The bi-layered material also showed great performance toward water evaporation from seawater and contaminated water, realizing the separation of water from pollutants, and indicating its application versatility.

  14. Ground cover influence on evaporation and stable water isotopes in soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena Warter, Maria; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Cesar D.; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Teuling, Adriaan J. Ryan

    2017-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by complex structures which influence hydrological processes such as evaporation. The vertical stratification of the forest modifies the effect of the evaporation process due to the composition and local distribution of species within the forest. The evaluation of it will improve the understanding of evaporation in forest ecosystems. To determine the influence of forest understory on the fractionation front, four ground cover types were selected from the Speulderbos forest in the Netherlands. The native species of Thamariskmoss (Thuidium thamariscinum), Rough Stalked Feathermoss (Brachythecium rutabulum), and Haircapmoss (Polytrichum commune) as well as one type of litter made up of Douglas-Fir needles (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were used to analyse the rate of evaporation and changes on the isotopic concentration of the soil water on an in-situ basis in a controlled environment. Over a period of 4 weeks soil water content and atmospheric conditions were continuously measured, while the rainfall simulations were performed with different amounts and timings. The reference water added to the boxes keeps a stable composition along the trial period with a δ ^2H value of -42.59±1.15 \\permil} and δ 18O of -6.01±0.21 \\permil}. The evaporation front in the four ground covers is located between 5 and 10 cm depth and deuterium excess values are bigger than 5 \\permil. The litter layer of Douglas-Fir needles is the cover with higher fractionation in respect to the added water at 10 cm depth (δ ^2H: -29.79 \\permil), while the Haircapmoss keeps the lower fractionation rate at 5 cm and 10 cm (δ ^2H: -33.62 and δ ^2H: -35.34 \\permil). The differences showed by the soil water beneath the different ground covers depict the influence of ground cover on fractionation rates of the soil water, underlining the importance of the spatial heterogeneity of the evaporation front in the first 15 cm of soil.

  15. Water-vortex stabilized electric arc: II. Effect of non-uniform evaporation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenista, Jirí

    1999-11-01

    The paper deals with a numerical model of an electric arc stabilized by a water vortex. The axisymmetric model involves the area between the cathode and the output nozzle of the arc. The rate of evaporation of water (production of water plasma) is determined from radial conduction and radiation heat fluxes near the water-water-vapour phase transition. The influence of non-uniform evaporation rate along the discharge coordinate on the outlet arc parameters is studied for the currents 300 and 600 A. It is found from calculations that part of the power spent on evaporation is in the range 1.4-3.1% of the total input power. The dominant source of power losses from the arc is plasma radiation, which exceeds conduction losses by a factor of two to four. Since the majority of the arc discharge is nearly thermally fully-developed, the effect of non-uniformity of evaporation on the overall arc performance is minor. The calculated arc outlet characteristics are in good agreement with our data published previously, as well as with experiments carried out on the water plasma torch operating at our Institute.

  16. The evaporation of the water-sodium chlorides solution droplets on the heated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the evaporation of a sessile water- sodium chlorides solution drop to open atmosphere on the solid substrate (anodized aluminum) under the varying heat flux. The main parameters defining drop profile were obtained: contact diameter, contact angle, height of the drop. The specific evaporation rate was calculated. The influence of the initial concentration of the evaporated solution to a value of the specific evaporation rate has been found out. The specific evaporation rate decreases with increasing of the concentration.

  17. The Research for the Greenhouse Water Evaporation Based on the Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ma

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To guide the greenhouse precision irrigation, influenced by the environmental factors, based on the definite plant, the greenhouse water evaporation characteristics are studied. The qualitative and the quantitative relationships between the environmental factors and the greenhouse water evaporation are probed into which will provide the theoretical basis for the water management of the facilities horticulture. Establishing the quantitative relations between the environmental factors and the water evaporation, between the environmental factors and the evaporation of soil water, between the environmental factors and the crop transpiration not only can reveal the environment factors to have the impact on the water evaporation changes, the soil water evaporation changes and physiological changes of the plant water, but also can use meteorological parameter to predict in the greenhouse crop transpiration for the water consumption. Then based on the predicted value timely the plant is supplied with the moderate water. Using genetic algorithm to optimize the models in different season in the different ranges value, the minimum of the evaporation of water is predicted, in order to achieve the purpose of right amount water needed for the plant, saving water, high yield and good quality.

  18. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling and thin-film evaporation on enhanced silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Shailesh

    The present work consists of two major studies. The first study investigates the effects of surface energy or wettability on nucleate pool boiling and the second study investigates the thin-film evaporative cooling for near junction thermal management. For the first study, effects of surface energy or wettability on critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer (BHT) of smooth heated surfaces was studied in saturated pool boiling of water at 1 atm. For this purpose hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces were created on one side of 1cm x 1cm double-side polished silicon substrates. A resistive heating layer was applied on the opposite side of each substrate. The surface energies of the created surfaces were characterized by measuring the static contact angles of water sessile drops. To provide a wide range of surface energies, surfaces were made of Teflon (hydrophobic), bare silicon (hydrophilic) and aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic). The measured contact angles on these surfaces were ˜108, ˜57 and ˜13 degrees respectively. The results of pool boiling tests on these surfaces clearly illustrate the connection between surface energy and CHF. CHF was shown to linearly decrease with contact angle increase, from ˜125 W/cm2 on aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic) to nearly one tenth of this value on Teflon (hydrophobic). The most hydrophilic surface also produced increasingly better BHT than plain silicon and Teflon as heat flux increased. However, below ˜5 W/cm2 the hydrophobic surface demonstrated better heat transfer due to earlier onset of nucleate boiling, reducing surface superheats by up to ˜5 degrees relative to the other two surfaces. Above ˜5 W/cm2 the BHT of the hydrophobic surface rapidly deteriorated as superheat increased towards the value at CHF. To further understand the effect of surface energy on pool boiling performance, the growth and departure of bubbles from single nucleating sites on each surface were analyzed from high-speed video recordings

  19. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  20. Interactions of bluff-body obstacles with turbulent airflows affecting evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-11-01

    Bluff-body obstacles interacting with turbulent airflows are common in many natural and engineering applications (from desert pavement and shrubs over natural surfaces to cylindrical elements in compact heat exchangers). Even with obstacles of simple geometry, their interactions within turbulent airflows result in a complex and unsteady flow field that affects surface drag partitioning and transport of scalars from adjacent evaporating surfaces. Observations of spatio-temporal thermal patterns on evaporating porous surfaces adjacent to bluff-body obstacles depict well-defined and persistent zonation of evaporation rates that were used to construct a simple mechanistic model for surface-turbulence interactions. Results from evaporative drying of sand surfaces with isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies) subjected to constant turbulent airflows were in good agreement with model predictions for localized exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces relative to smooth flat surfaces under similar conditions. The enhancement is attributed to formation of vortices that induce a thinner boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. For a practical range of air velocities (0.5-4.0 m/s), low-aspect ratio cylindrical bluff elements placed on evaporating sand surfaces enhanced evaporative mass losses (relative to a flat surface) by up to 300% for high density of elements and high wind velocity, similar to observations reported in the literature. Concepts from drag partitioning were used to generalize the model and upscale predictions to evaporation from surfaces with multiple obstacles for potential applications to natural bluff-rough surfaces.

  1. Scaling up nanoscale water-driven energy conversion into evaporation-driven engines and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Goodnight, Davis; Gao, Zhenghan; Cavusoglu, Ahmet H.; Sabharwal, Nina; Delay, Michael; Driks, Adam; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the natural environment and a dominant form of energy transfer in the Earth's climate. Engineered systems rarely, if ever, use evaporation as a source of energy, despite myriad examples of such adaptations in the biological world. Here, we report evaporation-driven engines that can power common tasks like locomotion and electricity generation. These engines start and run autonomously when placed at air-water interfaces. They generate rotary and piston-like linear motion using specially designed, biologically based artificial muscles responsive to moisture fluctuations. Using these engines, we demonstrate an electricity generator that rests on water while harvesting its evaporation to power a light source, and a miniature car (weighing 0.1 kg) that moves forward as the water in the car evaporates. Evaporation-driven engines may find applications in powering robotic systems, sensors, devices and machinery that function in the natural environment.

  2. Modelling water evaporation during frying with an evaporation dependent heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.; Somsen, D.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study a cylindrical crust-core frying model was developed including an evaporation rate dependent heat transfer coefficient. For this, we applied a Nusselt relation for cylindrical bodies and view the release of vapour bubbles during the frying process as a reversed fluidised bed. The cha

  3. Modelling water evaporation during frying with an evaporation dependent heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.; Somsen, D.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study a cylindrical crust-core frying model was developed including an evaporation rate dependent heat transfer coefficient. For this, we applied a Nusselt relation for cylindrical bodies and view the release of vapour bubbles during the frying process as a reversed fluidised bed. The cha

  4. The phenomenon of evaporative cooling from a humid surface as an alternative method for air-conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Velasco Gomez, F.C. Rey Martinez, A. Tejero Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of evaporative cooling is a common process in nature, whose applications for cooling air are being used since the ancient years. In fact, it meets this objective with a low energy consumption, being compared to the primary energy consumption of other alternatives for cooling, as it is simply based in the phenomenon of reducing the air temperature by evaporating water on it. This process can be an interesting alternative to conventional systems in these applications where no very low temperatures are needed, like the case of air-conditioning during the summer. However, the risk of contamination by legionnaire’s disease, commonly related to evaporative cooling systems, has led in recent years to the substitution of these devices in the industry by less-efficient systems, like the case of cooling towers or evaporative condensers substituted by air-condensing refrigerating processes. Therefore, these systems based in the evaporative cooling are rarely used for cooling buildings. To reduce this risk, evaporative cooling is produced from humid surfaces, in such a way that water evaporates due to the difference of vapor pressure between the surface and the air, and thus minimizing the generation of aerosols, responsible for the spread of legionnaire disease. Aerosols are nevertheless produced in conventional systems where water is sprayed or directly in contact with the stream of air; and the problem worsens if the water, which is recirculated, has been still in any moment or its temperature is adequate for the bacteria proliferation. This paper aims to introduce the thermodynamic basis in which the process is based, as well as the commercial evaporative systems and the problem associated to legionnaire’s disease in this kind of systems. Furthermore, three different experimental devices based in evaporative cooling are described, which have been designed and manufactured in the Thermal Engineering Research Group of the University of

  5. Design and Modelling of Water Chilling Production System by the Combined Effects of Evaporation and Night Sky Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y. Taha Al-Zubaydi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and mathematical modelling of thermal radiator panel to be used primarily to measure night sky radiation wet coated surface is presented in this paper. The panel consists of an upper dry surface coated aluminium sheet laminated to an ethylene vinyl acetate foam backing block as an insulation. Water is sprayed onto the surface of the panel so that an evaporative cooling effect is gained in addition to the radiation effect; the surface of a panel then is wetted in order to study and measure the night sky radiation from the panel wet surface. In this case, the measuring water is circulated over the upper face of this panel during night time. Initial TRNSYS simulations for the performance of the system are presented and it is planned to use the panel as calibrated instruments for discriminating between the cooling effects of night sky radiation and evaporation.

  6. [Method for study of phase transitions in evaporating drop and its application for evaluation of physical-chemical properties of water and water solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhno, T A; Sanin, A G; Sanina, O A; Iakhno, V G

    2012-01-01

    Spatial-temporal crystallization features of inorganic chlorides in evaporating drops of water solutions, considering solid surface wettability, were studied using a microscopic technique and the acoustical impedansometry. Physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for the difference in "dynamical portraits" of distilled water and salt solutions, as well as relaxation effects in water were discussed. The study demonstrated the potential use of a drying drop method in registration of changes in water properties under the action of physical and chemical factors.

  7. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather

  8. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather predictio

  9. Bead Evaporator for Complete Water and Salt Recovery from Brine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Brine Evaporation and Mineralization System (BEMS) is proposed for 100% water recovery from highly contaminated wastewater as well as water...

  10. Evaporation of sessile water/ethanol drops in a controlled environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-12-21

    The evaporation of water/ethanol drops with different mixing ratios was investigated at controlled vapor pressure of water (relative humidity) and ethanol in the background gas. Therefore, a drop of about 1 microL was deposited on a hydrophobized silicon substrate at room temperature in a closed cell. With a microscope camera we monitored the contact angle, the volume and the contact radius of the drops as function of time. Pure water drops evaporated in constant contact angle mode. The evaporation rate of water decreased with increasing humidity. In mixed drops ethanol did not evaporate completely at first, but a fraction still remained in the drop until the end of evaporation. Depending on ethanol concentration in the drop and on relative humidity in the background gas, water vapor condensed at the beginning of the evaporation of mixed drops. Also, at a high vapor pressure of ethanol, ethanol condensed at the beginning of the evaporation. The presence of ethanol vapor accelerated the total evaporation time of water drops.

  11. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  12. Floatable, Self-Cleaning, and Carbon-Black-Based Superhydrophobic Gauze for the Solar Evaporation Enhancement at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Chen, Jingwei; Guo, Dawei; Cao, Moyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-06-24

    Efficient solar evaporation plays an indispensable role in nature as well as the industry process. However, the traditional evaporation process depends on the total temperature increase of bulk water. Recently, localized heating at the air-water interface has been demonstrated as a potential strategy for the improvement of solar evaporation. Here, we show that the carbon-black-based superhydrophobic gauze was able to float on the surface of water and selectively heat the surface water under irradiation, resulting in an enhanced evaporation rate. The fabrication process of the superhydrophobic black gauze was low-cost, scalable, and easy-to-prepare. Control experiments were conducted under different light intensities, and the results proved that the floating black gauze achieved an evaporation rate 2-3 times higher than that of the traditional process. A higher temperature of the surface water was observed in the floating gauze group, revealing a main reason for the evaporation enhancement. Furthermore, the self-cleaning ability of the superhydrophobic black gauze enabled a convenient recycling and reusing process toward practical application. The present material may open a new avenue for application of the superhydrophobic substrate and meet extensive requirements in the fields related to solar evaporation.

  13. Evaporation of hydrocarbon compounds, including gasoline and diesel fuel, on heated metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardad, D.; Ladommatos, N. [Brunel Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uxbridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    An investigation was carried out on the evaporation of various hydrocarbon liquids on heated surfaces. Single and multicomponent hydrocarbon compounds were used, including hexane, heptane, octane, a hexane-octane mixture, gasoline and diesel fuel. The heated surface included aluminium, mild steel, cast iron and copper. Tests were also carried out with different surface textures and surface coatings. The motivation for this work was a desire to improve understanding of the evaporation processes taking place in the inlet port and, to a lesser extent, within the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. The hydrocarbon compounds were released on the heated surfaces as individual small droplets, and the subsequent evaporation was recorded using a CCD (charge coupled device) camera. These observations were then used to ascertain the effects of material, surface temperature, surface textures, surface coating and liquid composition on the heat flux and other aspects of droplet behaviour. (Author)

  14. Influence of forced air volume on water evaporation during sewage sludge bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Zheng, Guo-Di; Liu, Hong-Tao; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Mechanical aeration is critical to sewage sludge bio-drying, and the actual water loss caused by aeration can be better understood from investigations of the relationship between aeration and water evaporation from the sewage sludge bio-drying pile based on in situ measurements. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of forced air volume on the evaporation of water from a sewage sludge bio-drying pile. Dewatered sewage sludge was bio-dried using control technology for bio-drying, during which time the temperature, superficial air velocity and water evaporation were measured and calculated. The results indicated that the peak air velocity and water evaporation occurred in the thermophilic phase and second temperature-increasing phase, with the highest values of 0.063 ± 0.027 m s(-1) and 28.9 kg ton(-1) matrix d(-1), respectively, being observed on day 4. Air velocity above the pile during aeration was 43-100% higher than when there was no aeration, and there was a significantly positive correlation between air volume and water evaporation from day 1 to 15. The order of daily means of water evaporation was thermophilic phase > second temperature-increasing phase > temperature-increasing phase > cooling phase. Forced aeration controlled the pile temperature and improved evaporation, making it the key factor influencing water loss during the process of sewage sludge bio-drying.

  15. 开粒度与保水性沥青路面铺装材料表面蒸发冷却效果的比较%Comparative Study on Surface Evaporative Cooling Abilities of Asphalt and Water Retention Asphalt Pavement Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟娇; 水谷章夫

    2011-01-01

    表面铺装是影响城市热岛现象的重要因素之一,而蒸发冷却是可以降低铺装表面温度的一种有效方法.研究可知现今采用的一般表面铺装材料不具有吸水性和保水性,而蒸发冷却效果仅仅在表面洒水后的短暂时间内产生作用.本文通过对蒸发冷却效果的定量分析,研制开发出了具有吸水性和保水性的表面铺装材料,具有长时间稳定的蒸发冷却效果,可在一定程度上缓解城市热岛现象.%Surface pavement is one of the important factors that has influence on heat island phenomenon, while evaporative cooling is an effect method to decrease the rood surface temperature.Based on the studies, it was known that the normal surface pavement material does not have the properties of water absorption and water retention, the evaporative cooling could only have effect during the short time period after the surface was watered.In this paper, with the quantitative analysis, the surface pavement material with water absorption and water retention properties was developed.This material had steady performance and could relieve the heat island phenomenon at some extent.

  16. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:I.Salt—Water Dynamics in Unsaturated Soils Under Stable Evaporation Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA; 等

    1992-01-01

    A long term simulation test on salt-water dynamics in unsaturated soils with different groundwater depths and soil texture profiles under stable evaporation condition was conducted.Salinity sensors and tensiometers were used to monitor salt and water variation in soils.The experiment revealed that in the process of fresh groundwater moving upwards by capillary rise in the column,the salts in subsoil were brought upwards and accumulated in the surface soil,and consequently the salinization of surface soil took place.The rate of salt accumulation is determined mainly by the volume of capillary water flow and the conditions of salts contained in the soil profile.Water flux in soils decreased obviously when groundwater depths fell below 1.5m.When there was an interbedded clay layer 30cm in thickness in the silty loam soil profile or a clay layer 100cm in thickness at the top layer,the water flux was 3-5 times less than in the soil profile of homogeneous silty loam soil.Therefore,the rate of salt accumulation was decreased and the effect of variation of groundwater depth on the water flux in soils was weakened comparatively.If there was precipitation or irrigation supplying water to the soil,the groundwater could rarely take a direct part in the process of salt accumulation in surface soil,especially,in soil profiles with an interbedded stratum or a clayey surface soil layer.

  17. Bubble-assisted film evaporation correlation for saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures in horizontal-tube evaporator

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2013-01-01

    In falling film evaporators, the overall heat transfer coefficient is controlled by film thickness, velocity, liquid properties and the temperature differential across the film layer. This article presents the heat transfer behavior for evaporative film boiling on horizontal tubes, but working at low pressures of 0.93-3.60 kPa (corresponding solution saturation temperatures of 279-300 K) as well as seawater salinity of 15,000 to 90,000 mg/l or ppm. Owing to a dearth of literature on film-boiling at these conditions, the article is motivated by the importance of evaporative film boiling in the desalination processes such as the multi-effect distillation (MED) or multi-stage flashing (MSF): It is observed that in addition to the above-mentioned parameters, evaporative heat transfer of seawater is affected by the emergence of micro-bubbles within the thin film layer, particularly when the liquid saturation temperatures drop below 298 K (3.1 kPa). Such micro bubbles are generated near to the tube wall surfaces and they enhanced the heat transfer by two or more folds when compared with the predictions of conventional evaporative film boiling. The appearance of micro-bubbles is attributed to the rapid increase in the specific volume of vapor, i.e., dv/dT, at low saturation temperature conditions. A new correlation is thus proposed in this article and it shows good agreement to the measured data with an experimental uncertainty of 8% and regression RMSE of 3.5%. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Is the evaporation water loss of Knot Calidris canutus higher in tropical than in temperate climates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboven, N.; Piersma, T.

    1995-01-01

    To test whether Knot Calidris canutus wintering in the tropics suffer higher rates of water loss through evaporation than do Knot wintering at temperate latitudes, we tried to develop a physically realistic model to predict evaporative heat loss from air temperature, wind and humidity. In separate e

  19. The influence of surfactant on mass transfer coefficients in evaporation of volatile organic compound from water basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyakan, C.

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs have been found in wastewater of many chemical industries. Evaporation of VOCs from open water basin in waste treatment facilities causes air-pollution and has been regulated in many countries. Reduction or prevention of VOCs evaporation from open water basin is then necessary. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of surface film generated by an insoluble surfactant on the mass transfer coefficient of VOCs evaporating from water. Hexadecanol and octadecanol were used as surfactant in this investigation with the amount in the range of 0 to 35 μg/cm2 and 0 to 25 μg/cm2, respectively. The VOCs used in this study were methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene. The experimental results showed that the surfactant film can reduce the gas film and liquid coefficients by 56 and 80 %, respectively. The suitable amounts of the surfactant were 25 μg/cm2 for hexadecanol and 15 μg/cm2 for octadecanol. From this investigation we can conclude that covering the water surface with a film of hexadecanol or octadecanol could significantly reduce the VOCs evaporation rate.Finally, the empirical equations correlating gas film and liquid film coefficient to amount of surfactants were developed and verified against the experimental data. The predicted values of the overall mass transfer coefficients, obtained by using these empirical equations, were in good agreement with the measured values. Thus the empirical equations of mass transfer coefficients developed in this work can be used to predict the evaporation rates of VOCs from water surface covered by hexadecanol or octadecanol film.

  20. The 2014 water release into the arid Colorado River delta and associated water losses by evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daesslé, L.W., E-mail: walter@uabc.edu.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, CarreteraTranspeninsular Tijuana-Ensenada No. 3917, Fraccionamiento Playitas, CP 22860 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Geldern, R. van [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Orozco-Durán, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, CarreteraTranspeninsular Tijuana-Ensenada No. 3917, Fraccionamiento Playitas, CP 22860 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Barth, J.A.C. [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    For the first time in history, water was intentionally released for environmental purposes into the final, otherwise dry, 160-km stretch of the Colorado River basin, south of the Mexican border. Between March and May 2014 three pulses of water with a total volume of 132 × 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} were released to assess the restoration potential of endemic flora along its course and to reach its estuary. The latter had not received a sustained input of fresh water and nutrients from its main fluvial source for over 50 years because of numerous upstream dam constructions. During this pulse flow large amounts of water were lost and negligible amounts reached the ocean. While some of these water losses can be attributed to plant uptake and infiltration, we were able to quantify evaporation losses between 16.1 to 17.3% of the original water mass % within the first 80 km after the Morels Dam with water stable isotope data. Our results showed no evidence for freshwater reaching the upper Colorado River estuary and it is assumed that the pulse flow had only negligible influences on the coastal ecosystem. Future water releases that aim on ecological restoration need to become more frequent and should have larger volumes if more significant effects are to be established on the area. - Highlights: • Isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen quantify water lost through evaporation. • Evaporation losses between 16.1 and 17.3% during the 2014 Colorado River • Larger water volumes are required to influence the estuary ecosystem.

  1. Using Historical Precipitation, Temperature, and Runoff Observations to Evaluate Evaporation Formulations in Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Key to translating soil moisture memory into subseasonal precipitation and air temperature forecast skill is a realistic treatment of evaporation in the forecast system used - in particular, a realistic treatment of how evaporation responds to variations in soil moisture. The inherent soil moisture-evaporation relationships used in today's land surface models (LSMs), however, arguably reflect little more than guesswork given the lack of evaporation and soil moisture data at the spatial scales represented by regional and global models. Here we present a new approach for evaluating this critical aspect of LSMs. Seasonally averaged precipitation is used as a proxy for seasonally-averaged soil moisture, and seasonally-averaged air temperature is used as a proxy for seasonally-averaged evaporation (e.g., more evaporative cooling leads to cooler temperatures) the relationship between historical precipitation and temperature measurements accordingly mimics in certain important ways nature's relationship between soil moisture and evaporation. Additional information on the relationship is gleaned from joint analysis of precipitation and streamflow measurements. An experimental framework that utilizes these ideas to guide the development of an improved soil moisture-evaporation relationship is described and demonstrated.

  2. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  3. A comparative study of the mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating ethanol/water, methanol/water, and 1-propanol/water aerosol droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-02-23

    The mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating multicomponent alcohol/water droplets have been probed experimentally by examining changes in the near surface droplet composition and average droplet temperature using cavity-enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The CERS technique provides a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile alcohol component in the outer shell of the droplet, due to the exponential relationship between CERS intensity and species concentration. Such volatile droplets, which are probed on a millisecond time scale, evaporate nonisothermally, resulting in both temperature and concentration gradients, as confirmed by comparisons between experimental measurements and quasi-steady state model calculations. An excellent agreement between the experimental evaporation trends and quasi-steady state model predictions is observed. An unexpectedly slow evaporation rate is observed for the evaporation of 1-propanol from a multicomponent droplet when compared to the model; possible explanations for this observation are discussed. In addition, the propagation depth of the CERS signal, and, therefore, the region of the droplet from which compositional measurements are made, can be estimated. Such measurements, when considered in conjunction with quasi-steady state theory, can allow droplet temperature gradients to be measured and vapor pressures and activity coefficients of components within the droplet to be determined.

  4. Combined study of evaporation from liquid surface by background oriented schlieren, infrared thermal imaging and numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaksina Yu.Yu.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Temperature fields in evaporating liquids are measured by simultaneous use of Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS technique for the side view and IR thermal imaging for the surface distribution. Good agreement between the two methods is obtained with typical measurement error less than 0.1 K. Two configurations of surface layer are observed: thermocapillary convection state with moving liquid surface and small thermal cells, associated with Marangoni convection, and “cool skin” with negligible velocity at the surface, larger cells and dramatic increase of velocity within 0.1 mm layer beneath the surface. These configurations are shown to be formed in various liquids (water with various degrees of purification, ethanol, butanol, decane, kerosene, glycerine depending rather on initial conditions and ambient parameters than on the liquid. Water, which has been considered as the liquid without observable Marangoni convection, actually can exhibit both kinds of behavior during the same experimental run. Evaporation is also studied by means of numerical simulations. Separate problemsin air and liquid are considered, with thermal imaging data of surface temperature making the separation possible. It is shown that evaporation rate can be predicted by numerical simulation of the air side with appropriate boundary conditions. Comparison is made with known empirical correlations for Sherwood-Rayleigh relationship. Numerical simulations of water-side problem reveal the issue of velocity boundary conditions at the free surface, determining the structure of surface layer. Flow field similar to observed in the experiments is obtained with special boundary conditions of third kind, presenting a combination of no-slip and surface tension boundary conditions.

  5. Forces acting on a single particle in an evaporating sessile droplet on a hydrophilic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung-yeul; Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul; Koo, Junemo; Kang, Yong Tae

    2010-02-01

    The evaporating sessile droplet of a mono/didisperse colloid on a plate is a very useful and handy technique in micro/nano/bioapplications to separate, pattern, and control the particles. Although the fundamental nature of the evaporation phenomena and its applications have been extensively proposed, the crucial forces affecting a single particle motion in an evaporating droplet are not reported yet. To elucidate the impact of various forces including the drag, electrostatic, van der Waals, and surface tension forces on the particle motion in suspension, the magnitudes of them are compared using the scale analysis. In the early stage of the evaporation, in which the contact line is fixed, the motion of a single particle suspended in liquid are mostly affected by drag force. Later, with the incidence of the contact line recession, the surface tension force takes over the control of the single particle motion.

  6. In-Situ Observation of Undisturbed Surface Layer Scaler Profiles for Characterizing Evaporative Duct Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The PJ model uses the potential refractivity quantity, which calculates refractivity index using “potential temperature, potential water vapor...identify the characteristics of evaporation duct and to make diagnostic model calculations of the evaporation duct. A prototype of the profiling...a small meteorological mast. For each profiling set at a given location, 10–15 profiles were made to allow sufficient samples to derive the mean

  7. Evaporative water loss in man in a gravity-free environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Leonard, J. I.; Rambaut, P. C.; Johnson, P. C.

    1978-01-01

    Daily evaporative water losses (EWL) during the three Skylab missions were measured indirectly using mass and water-balance techniques. The mean daily values of EWL for the nine crew members who averaged 1 hr of daily exercise were: preflight 1,750 + or - 37 (SE) ml or 970 + or - 20 ml/sq m and inflight 1,560 + or - 26 ml or 860 + or - 14 ml/sq m. Although it was expected the EWL would increase in the hypobaric environment of Skylab, an average decrease from preflight sea-level conditions of 11% was measured. The results suggest that weightlessness decreased sweat losses during exercise and possibly reduced insensible skin losses. The weightlessness environment apparently promotes the formation of an observed sweat film on the skin surface during exercise by reducing convective flow and sweat drippage, resulting in high levels of skin wettedness that favor sweat suppression.

  8. Water droplet evaporation and dynamics in a mini-channel under action of the gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachenko, E. A.; Orlik, E. V.; Bykovskaya, E. F.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup was developed to study the vaporization and dynamics of liquid droplets, blown by the gas flow in a mini-channel. The shadow method was the main method of measurement; a drop was also observed from the top. A series of experiments was carried out with single water drops with volumes varying from 60 to 150 gl in the channel of 6 mm height on the polished stainless steel substrate. The experiments have resulted in the dependences of evaporation rate in the temperature range of the substrate surface from 25 to 70°C and Reynolds numbers of the gas flow from 0 to 2500. The advancing and receding contact angles were measured depending on the Re number of the gas flow. The gas flow rate at which the droplet motion over the substrate starts was determined depending on the surface temperature at different drop volumes.

  9. Self-supporting power plant. Capturing evaporated water and save energy a new source of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daal, Ludwin; Vos, Frank de [KEMA Netherlands BV, Arnhem (Netherlands). Process and Cooling Water; KEMA Energy Consulting Co.Ltd, Beijing (China); Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Environmental Systems Analysis; Heijboer, Rob [KEMA Netherlands BV, Arnhem (Netherlands). Process and Cooling Water; Bekker, Bert [KEMA Energy Consulting Co.Ltd, Beijing (China); Gao, Xiu Xiu [Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Environmental Systems Analysis

    2013-07-01

    One of the major challenges of this century is the provision of water for a growing population and industry. The shortage in water resources in arid areas requires the availability of more efficient and cheaper water production processes. In some arid regions water is even more important than electricity. A large source of water is found in the form of evaporated water emitted from different industrial processes. If for example 20% of the evaporated water from the flue gas stream of a coal fired power plant would be captured, the plant would be self-supporting from a process water point of view. This is about 30m{sup 3} of water per hour. The results of the proof of principle project (2001-2008) show that >40% recovery can be achieved. Also an overall energy efficiency improvement can be achieved for industrial plants that reheat their flue gases. Calculations show that this can be about 1% overall efficiency for a coal fired power plant utilizing flue gas reheating. With an installed capacity of more than 600GWe in China, this energy saving results in a very large economic and fuel (coal) impact. This energy efficiency will most likely be the driving force to implement the technology in both water rich and water poor regions. For the capture of evaporated water no chemicals are used, there is no waste water formed and corrosion attack in stacks is mitigated. These results have led to the set up of a large international project named CapWa which aims to produce a membrane modular system suitable for industrial applications within 2-3years. The produced demin water from this system should be competitive with existing demin water technologies. The starting point will be the water vapour selective composite membranes that are developed in the proof of principle project. The CapWa project started in 2010 and consists of 14 partners of which 9 from the EU, 3 from the African continent and 2 from the Middle East.

  10. Advanced Air Evaporation System with Reusable Wicks for Water Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Advanced Air Evaporation System (AAES) is proposed for recovering nearly 100% of water from highly contaminated wastewater without concern...

  11. Comparison of techniques for estimating evaporation from an irrigation water storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJannet, D. L.; Cook, F. J.; Burn, S.

    2013-03-01

    With the emergence of water supply and food security issues as a result of increasing population and climate change pressures, the need for efficient use of available water supplies is paramount. Management of available resources and improved efficiency require accurate specification of evaporation, which is a major water loss pathway, yet evaporation remains difficult to accurately quantify. This study uses scintillometry-derived measurements of evaporation to test the performance of water balance, pan coefficient, and combination modeling techniques, which might commonly be used by resource managers. Both pan coefficient and water balance techniques performed poorly, but the Penman-Monteith model with local site data and site-specific wind function produced estimates within 2% of those measured. Recognizing that such a model parameterization would rarely be a possibility in most environments, further testing involving the range of data sets that might be available for a location was undertaken. Modeling using over-water measurements and, generally, applicable wind functions from the literature produced estimates 26% greater than those measured. Estimates within 12% of those measured were made for the equivalent model setup using over-land meteorological data; however, when data from the nearest meteorological station was used, this difference increased to 27%. The different evaporation estimation techniques tested were shown to produce a range of estimates of water availability, which varied by nearly 30%. The large differences between measured and predicted evaporation highlight the uncertainty that still exists in evaporation estimation and the sensitivity of predictions to the source of input data.

  12. Evaporation and transport of water isotopologues from Greenland lakes: The lake size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiahong; Lauder, Alex M.; Posmentier, Eric S.; Kopec, Ben G.; Virginia, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of evaporative flux from a lake are used in many hydrological and paleoclimate studies that help constrain the water budget of a lake and/or to infer changes in climate conditions. The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a zero dimensional (0-D) model originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965). Such models generally have laminar and turbulent layers, assume a steady state condition, and neglect horizontal variations. In particular, the effect of advection on isotopic variations is not considered. While this classical treatment can be used for some sections of large open surface water bodies, such as an ocean or a large lake, it may not apply to relatively small water bodies where limited fetch does not allow full equilibration between air from land and the water surface. Both horizontal and vertical gradients in water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios may develop over a lake. These gradients, in turn, affect the evaporative fluxes of water vapor and its isotopic ratios, which is not adequately predicted by a 0-D model. We observed, for the first time, the vertical as well as horizontal components of vapor and isotopic gradients as relatively dry and isotopically depleted air advected over the surfaces of several lakes up to a 5 km fetch under winds of 1-5 m/s in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. We modeled the vapor and isotopic distribution in air above the lake using a steady state 2-D model, in which vertical diffusive transport balances horizontal advection. The model was verified by our observations, and then used to calculate evaporative fluxes of vapor and its isotopic ratios. In the special case of zero wind speed, the model reduces to 1-D. Results from this 1-D model are compared with those from the 2-D model to assess the discrepancy in isotopic fluxes between advection and no advection conditions. Since wind advection above a lake alters the concentrations, gradients, and

  13. Dropwise Evaporative Cooling of Heated Surfaces with Various Wettability Characteristics Obtained by Nanostructure Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-12-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation was conducted to analyze dropwise evaporative cooling of heated surfaces with various wettability characteristics. The surface wettability was tuned by nanostructure modifications. Spray-cooling experiments on these surfaces show that surfaces with better wettability have better heat transfer rate and higher critical heat flux (CHF). Single droplet impingement evaporative cooling of a heated surface was then investigated numerically with various wettability conditions to characterize the effect of contact angle on spray-cooling heat transfer. The volume of fluid (VOF) model with variable-time stepping was used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain with the kinetic theory model used to predict the evaporation rate at the liquid-gas interface. The numerical results agree with the spray-cooling experiments that dropwise evaporative cooling is much better on surfaces with better wettability because of the better liquid spreading and convection, better liquid-solid contact, and stronger liquid evaporation.

  14. Droplet evaporation in water jet at the motion through high temperature gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strizhak Pavel A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer model for the numerical investigation of the evaporation process of a single droplet in water jet when moving through high temperature gases was developed. The integral characteristics of the process under investigation were calculated. The macroscopic regularities of water droplet evaporation, as elements of jet, in the high temperature gas mixture (as exemplified by combustion products of typical condensed substances were determined.

  15. Difference Of Evaporation and Boiling for Heterogeneous Water Droplets in a High-Temperature Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legros Jean Claude

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation of vapor formation was carried out on water droplets on fixed graphite substrate and heterogeneous droplets (containing solid single inclusions when heating in high-temperature gas. High-speed video shooting (up to 105 frames per second, optical method (Particle Image Velocimetry and TEMA Automotive software were used. We revealed two phase change mechanisms of heterogeneous liquid droplets. Effect of evaporation and boiling on evaporation times of water droplets was determined.

  16. A Further Indication of the Self-Ordering Capacity of Water Via the Droplet Evaporation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jerman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The droplet evaporation method (DEM is increasingly used for assessing various characteristics of water. In our research we tried to use DEM to detect a possible self-ordering capability of (spring water that would be similar to the already found and described autothixotropic phenomenon, namely increasing order of non-distilled water subject to aging. The output of DEM is a droplet remnant pattern (DRP. For analysis of DRP images we used a specially developed computer program that does the frequency distribution analysis of certain parameters of the images. The results of experiments demonstrated statistically significant differences in both aging of water as well as in the glass exposed surface/volume ratio of the aged water. The most important result supporting the self-ordering character of water was found in an increasing dependence between two analyzed parameters: distance and frequency, at the peak frequency. As the result concerns mostly aging and shows increasing order it further corroborates other findings concerning increasing order by aging. Such further confirmation of self-ordering capacity of water is not important only for physical chemistry, but also for biology.

  17. Correlation between shape, evaporation mode and mobility of small water droplets on nanorough fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C S; Winzer, B; Peukert, W

    2014-03-01

    The dynamic wetting behaviour and the mobility of droplets on fibres is a very important factor in coating processes, textile fabrication, in self-cleaning processes and in the filtration of fluids. In principal, filter regeneration depends on the mobility of the droplets on the fibre surface. Mobile droplets tend to coalesce which greatly simplifies their removal from the filter. In this contribution mobility analyses of water droplets on monofilaments in air are performed. Studies of droplet evaporation on pure PET fibres and on nanorough fibres coated with SiO2 nanoparticles of diameters between 6 nm and 50 nm in a hydrophilic binder system were done. We show that the mobility of water droplets correlates with the droplet conformation which in turn is determined by the droplet-fibre interface. We demonstrate that fibre coatings can be used to tailor the conformation and mobility of water droplets. The smaller the nanoparticle diameters in the coating are, the smaller are the contact angles between water droplets and fibre and the better is the mobility of the droplets on the fibre. Our results allow a fast optimization of the fibre surface properties which are directly influencing the contact angle, the mobility and the coalescence of water droplets and thus filter regeneration.

  18. Evaporation Flux Distribution of Drops on a Hydrophilic or Hydrophobic Flat Surface by Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Liu, Guangzhi; Wang, Moran

    2016-08-16

    The evaporation flux distribution of sessile drops is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. Three evaporating modes are classified, including the diffusion dominant mode, the substrate heating mode, and the environment heating mode. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drop-substrate interactions are considered. To count the evaporation flux distribution, which is position dependent, we proposed an azimuthal-angle-based division method under the assumption of spherical crown shape of drops. The modeling results show that the edge evaporation, i.e., near the contact line, is enhanced for hydrophilic drops in all the three modes. The surface diffusion of liquid molecular absorbed on solid substrate for hydrophilic cases plays an important role as well as the space diffusion on the enhanced evaporation rate at the edge. For hydrophobic drops, the edge evaporation flux is higher for the substrate heating mode, but lower than elsewhere of the drop for the diffusion dominant mode; however, a nearly uniform distribution is found for the environment heating mode. The evidence shows that the temperature distribution inside drops plays a key role in the position-dependent evaporation flux.

  19. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo

    2011-06-07

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Passive cooling effect of RC roof covered with the ceramics having high water retention and evaporation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, M.; Kanaya, M.; Shimazu, T.; Ohashi, T.; Kato, N.; Horikoshi, T.

    2011-10-01

    Hot days in metropolitan cities have increased remarkably by the heat island phenomenon these days. Thus the authors tried to develop the porous ceramics with high water retention and evaporation capacity as a maintenance-free material to improve thermal environment. The developed ceramic pellets have high water retention of more than 60 % of water absorption and high water evaporation which is similar to water surface. In this study, three types of 5 meter squared large flat-roofed structural specimen simulated reinforced concrete (RC) slab were constructed on the outside. The variation of water content and temperature of the specimens and atmosphere temperature around the specimens were measured from summer in 2009. In the case of the ceramic pellets, the temperature under RC slab was around 15 degree C lower than that of the control. The results were probably contributed by passive cooling effect of evaporated rain water, and the effect was similar to in the case of the grasses. From the viewpoint of thermal environment improvement, substitution of a rooftop gardening by the porous ceramics could be a promising method.

  1. Evaporation estimates from the Dead Sea and their implications on its water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroud, Ibrahim M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea (DS) is a terminal hypersaline water body situated in the deepest part of the Jordan Valley. There is a growing interest in linking the DS to the open seas due to severe water shortages in the area and the serious geological and environmental hazards to its vicinity caused by the rapid level drop of the DS. A key issue in linking the DS with the open seas would be an accurate determination of evaporation rates. There exist large uncertainties of evaporation estimates from the DS due to the complex feedback mechanisms between meteorological forcings and thermophysical properties of hypersaline solutions. Numerous methods have been used to estimate current and historical (pre-1960) evaporation rates, with estimates differing by ˜100%. Evaporation from the DS is usually deduced indirectly using energy, water balance, or pan methods with uncertainty in many parameters. Accumulated errors resulting from these uncertainties are usually pooled into the estimates of evaporation rates. In this paper, a physically based method with minimum empirical parameters is used to evaluate historical and current evaporation estimates from the DS. The more likely figures for historical and current evaporation rates from the DS were 1,500-1,600 and 1,200-1,250 mm per annum, respectively. Results obtained are congruent with field observations and with more elaborate procedures.

  2. Evaporation of water droplets on "lock-and-key" structures with nanoscale features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan; Hansen, Ole; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N A; Zi, Jian

    2012-06-26

    Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with "lock-and-key" properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been investigated. For the MBAs case, the wetting radius of the droplets remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet completely dries out at the end of the evaporation process. The pinning state extends for more than 99.5% of the total evaporation time, and the pinning-shrinking transition is essentially prevented whereas in the case of the MCAs the contact radius exhibits distinct stages during evaporation and the contact line retreats significantly in the middle of the evaporation process. We explain the phenomenon by a qualitative energy balance argument based on the different shrinkage types of the nanoscale-folded contact line.

  3. Evaporative properties and pinning strength of laser-ablated, hydrophilic sites on lotus-leaf-like, nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlin, Melissa L; Yang, Dongqing; Aella, P; Garcia, Antonio A; Picraux, S T; Hayes, Mark A

    2007-04-24

    Wetting, evaporative, and pinning strength properties of hydrophilic sites on superhydrophobic, nanostructured surfaces were examined. Understanding these properties is important for surface characterization and designing features in self-cleaning, lotus-leaf-like surfaces. Laser-ablated, hydrophilic spots between 250 mum and 2 mm in diameter were prepared on silicon nanowire (NW) superhydrophobic surfaces. For larger circumference pinning sites, initial contact angle measurements resemble the contact angle of the surface within the pinning site: 65-69 degrees . As the drop volume is increased, the contact angles approach the contact angle of the NW surface without pinning sites: 171-176 degrees . The behavior of water droplets on the pinning sites is governed by how much of the water droplet is being influenced by the superhydrophobic NW surfaces versus the hydrophilic areas. During the evaporation of sinapic acid solution, drops are pinned by the spots except for the smaller circumference sites. Pinning strengths of the hydrophilic sites are a linear function of the pinning spot circumference. Protein samples prepared and deposited on the pinning sites for analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization indicate an improvement in sensitivity from that of a standard plate analysis by a factor of 5.

  4. A general model for estimating actual evaporation from non-saturated surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on energy balance equation and mass transfer equation, a general model to estimateactual evaporation from non-saturated surfaces was derived. Making use of two concepts, "relativeevaporation" and "relative drying power", a relationship was established to account for the departurefrom saturated conditions. Using this model, the actual evaporation (evapotranspiration) can becalculated without the need of potential evaporation estimation. Furthermore, the model requires onlya few meteorological parameters that are readily and routinely obtainable at standard weather stations.Based on nearly 30 years data of 432 meteorological stations and 512 hydrological stations in China,in combined with GIS, nine typical river basins were selected. Using the data of the selected riverbasins, the model was tested. The results show that the actual evaporation rate can be estimated withan error of less than 10% in most areas of China, except few years in the Yellow River Basin.

  5. Inhibiting water evaporation of sandy soil by the soil particles modified with Japanese wax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zeng-Zhi; WANG Hong-Juan; Li Cui-Lan

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to resolve the problems of water conservation of sandy soil in desertification areas. The surface of soil particles was modified by molecules of natural Japanese wax through some specially screened surfactant. The modified particles were then well sprayed onto the sand, which was placed in an artificial climate box with simulating desert environment, to form a soil film with effect of suppressing water and gas-permeability. Structure of soil film was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectrometry (IR). And its mechanism of water inhibition was illustrated with DSC and TG curves. Its influence on grass-planting was tested through the instruments of water detector. The results show that sorbitol anhydride stearate(Span 80)could well disperse the Japanese wax and make it combine with the clay which is also dispersed. The pores among soil particles grew smaller and turned from hydrophilic into hydrophobic, in which way resistance to water penetrating through the film was increased. Experimental grass grows normally on sandy soil with the soil film in the artificial desert climate box, indicating that the soil particles modified with Japanese wax is an effective method to inhibit water evaporation.

  6. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  7. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of High-Quality Cu7 S4 Nanocrystals for Efficient Light-Induced Water Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changbo; Yan, Cong; Xue, Zhenjie; Yu, Wei; Xie, Yinde; Wang, Tie

    2016-10-01

    Copper sulfides (Cu2-x S), are a novel kind of photothermal material exhibiting significant photothermal conversion efficiency, making them very attractive in various energy conversion related devices. Preparing high quality uniform Cu2-x S nanocrystals (NCs) is a top priority for further energy-and sustainability relevant nanodevices. Here, a shape-controlled high quality Cu7 S4 NCs synthesis strategy is reported using sulfur in 1-octadecene as precursor by varying the heating temperature, as well as its forming mechanism. The performance of the Cu7 S4 NCs is further explored for light-driven water evaporation without the need of heating the bulk liquid to the boiling point, and the results suggest that as-synthesized highly monodisperse NCs perform higher evaporation rate than polydisperse NCs under the identical morphology. Furthermore, disk-like NCs exhibit higher water evaporation rate than spherical NCs. The water evaporation rate can be further enhanced by assembling the organic phase Cu7 S4 NCs into a dense film on the aqueous solution surface. The maximum photothermal conversion efficiency is as high as 77.1%.

  8. Variability in cold front activities modulating cool-season evaporation from a southern inland water in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heping; Blanken, Peter D.; Weidinger, Tamas; Nordbo, Annika; Vesala, Timo

    2011-04-01

    Understanding seasonal variations in the evaporation of inland waters (e.g., lakes and reservoirs) is important for water resource management as well as the prediction of the hydrological cycles in response to climate change. We analyzed eddy covariance-based evaporation measurements from the Ross Barnett Reservoir (32°26'N, 90°02'W which is always ice-free) in central Mississippi during the cool months (i.e., September-March) of 2007 and 2008, and found that the variability in cold front activities (i.e., passages of cold fronts and cold/dry air masses behind cold fronts) played an important role in modulating the exchange of sensible (H) and latent (λE) heat fluxes. Our analysis showed that 2007's warmer cool season had smaller mean H and λE than 2008's cooler cool season. This implies that the warmer cool season did not accelerate evaporation and heat exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. Instead, more frequent cold fronts and longer periods of cold/dry air masses behind the cold fronts in 2008 resulted in overall larger H and λE as compared with 2007, this primarily taking the form of sporadic short-term rapid 'pulses' of H and λE losses from the water's surface. These results suggest that future climate-induced changes in frequency of cold fronts and the meteorological properties of the air masses behind cold fronts (e.g., wind speeds, temperature, and humidity), rather than other factors of climate change, would produce significant variations in the water surface's energy fluxes and subsequent evaporation rates.

  9. Behavior of particles in an evaporating didisperse colloid droplet on a hydrophilic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung-Yeul; Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2009-10-01

    It is well-known that the liquid and the nanoparticles in an evaporating colloid droplet on a hydrophilic surface move radially outward for the contact line to maintain its position. However, the motion of micro/nanoparticles in an evaporating didisperse colloid droplet has not been reported to date. In this study, an experiment on an evaporating didisperse colloid droplet on the hydrophilic surface is carried out. It is found that nanoparticles move radially outward and remain at the contact line while microparticles move inward toward the center of the droplet. Furthermore, the mechanism of the microparticles moving toward the center of the droplet is found to be due to the surface tension force of the liquid.

  10. Dissimilarity between temperature-humidity in the atmospheric surface layer and implications for estimates of evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelli, D. M.; Dias, N. L.; Chamecki, M.

    2012-12-01

    In several methods used in water resources to estimate evaporation from land and water surfaces, a fundamental assumption is that temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) fluctuations behave similarly in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). In the Energy-Budget Bowen Ratio method it is assumed that both eddy diffusivities are equal, while in the variance method it is often assumed that all the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) functions for the two scalars are equal. However, it is well-known that the T-q similarity does not always hold and that the dissimilarity found in practice can significantly impact the estimates of evaporation. Given the frequent dissimilarity between temperature and humidity, two important problems arise. The first one is related to the choice of the function used to characterize scalar similarity, given that not all commonly used functions are equally capable of identifying scalar dissimilarity. The second problem is associated with the identification of the physical mechanisms behind scalar dissimilarity in each particular case: local advection, nonstationarity, surface heterogeneity, active/passive roles of the scalars, entrainment fluxes at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer are typically cited as possible causes, but seldom a convincing argument is presented. In this work we combine experimental data and numerical simulations to study similarity between T and q in the ASL. Data measured over a lake in Brazil suggests a strong relationship between scalar similarity and the balance between local production and dissipation of scalar variance, which is in practice related to the strength of the surface forcing. Scalar variance and covariance budgets are used to derive a set of dimensionless Scalar Flux numbers that are capable of diagnosing the balance between gradient production and molecular dissipation of scalar variance and covariance. Experimental data shows that these Scalar Flux numbers are good predictors of scalar (dis

  11. The surface energy budget and interannual variation of the annual total evaporation over a highland lake in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian Wu; Liu, Hui Zhi; Sun, Ji Hua; Wang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The turbulence spectra and energy budget were investigated based on eddy covariance method over an open-water highland lake (Erhai Lake) in Southwest China. We estimated the annual total evaporation and CO2 emission from the lake, and the evaporation trend in the past few decades was also discussed. Due to the large thermal inertia of lake water, the surface water temperature lagged behind the air temperature. Maximum lake-air temperature difference of about 4 °C had been observed in November. Water temperature profile measurements revealed that the stratification of lake water was not evident throughout the year. The spectra and cospectra of wind speed and temperature roughly satisfied the -2/3 and -4/3 rule in inertial subrange, respectively. The w spectra were observed to have a larger contribution from higher frequencies than other variables. Obvious shifts of spectra and cospectra peaks toward higher frequencies were observed as the atmospheric stratification became more stable. The lake acted as a heat sink from March through June and quickly released heat into the atmosphere from September through December. Average energy balance closure for the lake was about 80 % in 2012. The lake majorly acted as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, but weak sinks of CO2 were observed in the summer and early fall. The total annual emission of CO2 was estimated to be 333.28 g C m-2 year-1. The annual evaporation over the lake decreased due to the increased amount of low cloud and precipitation, with the lower annual evaporation in the 1990s compared to that in the 1980s.

  12. Influence of sea ice cover on evaporation and water vapour isotopic composition in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian

    2017-04-01

    Since July 2015, water stable isotopes (HDO and H218O) have been measured at two Arctic facilities: during the summer on board of the research vessel Polarstern, and year-round at the Siberian coastal site of Samoylov, situated in the Lena delta (N 72°22', E 126°29'), close to the Laptev Sea. In both places, the isotopic composition of water vapour is analysed continuously in surface air. Additional isotopic measurements are performed on a daily basis in ocean surface water samples taken on Polarstern and on an event basis from precipitation sampled in Samoylov. The two Polarstern summer campaigns cover a large region of the western Artic Ocean, including a one-month campaign in the central and eastern Arctic crossing the North Pole in September 2015, with very cold conditions (up to -20°C). Combining ocean and atmospheric observations from Polarstern allows an evaluation of local surface water evaporation and its isotopic fingerprint relative to the oceanic and meteorological conditions as well as the partial sea ice cover. In the central and eastern Arctic, a large area of complete sea ice cover also revealed a strong impact on the advected moisture above the ice cap under very cold conditions. A first year of Siberian observations at Samoylov depicted a large seasonal variability, with extremely dry and isotopically depleted winter values. Contrasted seasonal isotopic regimes might be utilized for identifying moisture sources changes in the region, such as ocean surface closure by sea ice, or freezing of the Lena River. Besides documenting the present meteorology and changes in the Arctic, our measurements will contribute to a better interpretation of regional paleoclimate records based on water isotopes and to the evaluation of climate models in the Arctic. A first model-data comparison of our measurements with simulation results by the isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso have revealed relevant model biases in the Arctic realm.

  13. Evaporation of liquid microdroplets levitated above a solid surface heated below the saturation temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, D. P.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction of liquid microdroplets falling on a solid surface whose temperature is varied from 75 °C to 155 °C. It has been shown for the first time that droplet levitation above a solid surface is possible at a temperature below the saturation temperature. It has been found that for levitated droplets, the specific evaporation rate is constant in time, but for sessile droplets, it increases sharply. The evaporation rate for sessile droplet was found an order of magnitude higher than that for levitated droplets.

  14. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  15. Soil surface moisture estimation over a semi-arid region using ENVISAT ASAR radar data for soil evaporation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zribi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the evaluation of soil evaporation, using soil moisture estimations based on radar satellite measurements. We present firstly an approach for the estimation and monitoring of soil moisture in a semi-arid region in North Africa, using ENVISAT ASAR images, over two types of vegetation covers. The first mapping process is dedicated solely to the monitoring of moisture variability related to rainfall events, over areas in the "non-irrigated olive tree" class of land use. The developed approach is based on a simple linear relationship between soil moisture and the backscattered radar signal normalised at a reference incidence angle. The second process is proposed over wheat fields, using an analysis of moisture variability due to both rainfall and irrigation. A semi-empirical model, based on the water-cloud model for vegetation correction, is used to retrieve soil moisture from the radar signal. Moisture mapping is carried out over wheat fields, showing high variability between irrigated and non-irrigated wheat covers. This analysis is based on a large database, including both ENVISAT ASAR and simultaneously acquired ground-truth measurements (moisture, vegetation, roughness, during the 2008–2009 vegetation cycle. Finally, a semi-empirical approach is proposed in order to relate surface moisture to the difference between soil evaporation and the climate demand, as defined by the potential evaporation. Mapping of the soil evaporation is proposed.

  16. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  17. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  18. Energy transport by thermocapillary convection during Sessile-Water-droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, H; Ward, C A

    2010-09-24

    The energy transport mechanisms of a sessile-water droplet evaporating steadily while maintained on a Cu substrate are compared. Buoyancy-driven convection is eliminated, but thermal conduction and thermocapillary convection are active. The dominant mode varies along the interface. Although neglected in previous studies, near the three-phase line, thermocapillary convection is by far the larger mode of energy transport, and this is the region where most of the droplet evaporation occurs.

  19. Universal wetting transition of an evaporating water droplet on hydrophobic micro- and nano-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussonnière, Adrien; Bigdeli, Masoud B; Chueh, Di-Yen; Liu, Qingxia; Chen, Peilin; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2017-02-07

    Water-repellent, rough surfaces have a remarkable and beneficial wetting property: when a water droplet comes in contact with a small fraction of the solid, both liquid-solid adhesion and hydrodynamic drag are reduced. As a prominent example from nature, the lotus leaf-comprised of a wax-like material with micro- and nano-scaled roughness-has recently inspired numerous syntheses of superhydrophobic substrates. Due to the diverse applications of superhydrophobicity, much research has been devoted to the fabrication and investigations of hydrophobic micro-structures using established micro-fabrication techniques. However, wetting transitions remain relatively little explored. During evaporation, a water droplet undergoes a wetting transition from a (low-frictional) partial to (adhesive) complete contact with the solid, destroying the superhydrophobicity and the self-cleaning properties of the slippery surface. Here, we experimentally examine the wetting transition of a drying droplet on hydrophobic nano-structures, a previously unexplored regime. In addition, using a theoretical analysis we found a universal criterion of this wetting transition that is characterized by a critical contact angle. Different from previous results showing different critical droplet sizes, our results show a universal, geometrically-dependent, critical contact angle, which agrees well with various data for both hydrophobic micro- and nano-structures.

  20. RF surface resistance study of non-evaporable getter coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Oleg B.; Gurran, Lewis; Goudket, Philippe; Marinov, Kiril; Wilde, Stuart; Valizadeh, Reza; Burt, Graeme

    2017-02-01

    In many particle accelerators the beam parameters could be affected by the beam pipe wakefield impedance. It is vital to understand how the wakefield impedance might vary due to various coatings on the surface of the vacuum chamber, and this can be derived from surface resistance measurements. The bulk conductivity of two types of NEG films (dense and columnar) is determined. This is achieved by measuring the surface resistance of NEG-coated samples using an RF test cavity and fitting the experimental data to a standard theoretical model. The conductivity values obtained are then used to compare resistive wall wakefield effects in beam pipes coated with either of the two types of film.

  1. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  2. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  3. Experimental investigation of evaporation enhancement for water droplet containing solid particles in flaming combustion area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of integral characteristics of extinguishing liquid (water droplet evaporation in flaming combustion area has been held. Optical methods of two-phase and heterogeneous mixtures diagnostics (“Particle Image Velocimetry” and “Interferometric Particle Imaging” have been used for heat and mass transfer process investigation. It was established that small-size solid particles (for example, carbon particles in droplet structure can enhance water evaporation in flame area. It was shown that the rate of evaporation process depends on concentration and sizes of solid particles in a water droplet. The correlations have been determined between the sizes of solid particles and water droplets for maximum efficiency of fire extinguishing. The physical aspects of the problem have been discussed.

  4. The 2014 water release into the arid Colorado River delta and associated water losses by evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daesslé, L W; van Geldern, R; Orozco-Durán, A; Barth, J A C

    2016-01-15

    For the first time in history, water was intentionally released for environmental purposes into the final, otherwise dry, 160-km stretch of the Colorado River basin, south of the Mexican border. Between March and May 2014 three pulses of water with a total volume of 132×10(6) m(3) were released to assess the restoration potential of endemic flora along its course and to reach its estuary. The latter had not received a sustained input of fresh water and nutrients from its main fluvial source for over 50 years because of numerous upstream dam constructions. During this pulse flow large amounts of water were lost and negligible amounts reached the ocean. While some of these water losses can be attributed to plant uptake and infiltration, we were able to quantify evaporation losses between 16.1 to 17.3% of the original water mass % within the first 80 km after the Morels Dam with water stable isotope data. Our results showed no evidence for freshwater reaching the upper Colorado River estuary and it is assumed that the pulse flow had only negligible influences on the coastal ecosystem. Future water releases that aim on ecological restoration need to become more frequent and should have larger volumes if more significant effects are to be established on the area.

  5. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: Impact of surface forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, V.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20∘ larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak.

  6. Importance of Rain Evaporation and Continental Convection in the Tropical Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Noone, David; Bowman, Kevin; Beer, R.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Gunson, M.; Goldman, Aaron; Kulawik, S. S.; Lampel, Michael; Osterman, Gregory; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Rogders, Clive; Sander, Stanley; Shepard, Mark; Webster, Christopher R.; Worden, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric moisture cycling is an important aspect of the Earth's climate system, yet the processes determining atmospheric humidity are poorly understood. For example, direct evaporation of rain contributes significantly to the heat and moisture budgets of clouds, but few observations of these processes are available. Similarly, the relative contributions to atmospheric moisture over land from local evaporation and humidity from oceanic sources are uncertain. Lighter isotopes of water vapour preferentially evaporate whereas heavier isotopes preferentially condense and the isotopic composition of ocean water is known. Here we use this information combined with global measurements of the isotopic composition of tropospheric water vapour from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft, to investigate aspects of the atmospheric hydrological cycle that are not well constrained by observations of precipitation or atmospheric vapour content. Our measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour near tropical clouds suggest that rainfall evaporation contributes significantly to lower troposphere humidity, with typically 20% and up to 50% of rainfall evaporating near convective clouds. Over the tropical continents the isotopic signature of tropospheric water vapour differs significantly from that of precipitation, suggesting that convection of vapour from both oceanic sources and evapotranspiration are the dominant moisture sources. Our measurements allow an assessment of the intensity of the present hydrological cycle and will help identify any future changes as they occur.

  7. Spatiotemporal infrared measurement of interface temperatures during water droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity experimental characterization of sessile droplet evaporation is required to understand the interdependent physical mechanisms that drive the evaporation. In particular, cooling of the interface due to release of the latent heat of evaporation, which is not accounted for in simplified vapor-diffusion-based models of droplet evaporation, may significantly suppress the evaporation rate on nonwetting substrates, which support tall droplet shapes. This suppression is counteracted by convective mass transfer from the droplet to the air. While prior numerical modeling studies have identified the importance of these mechanisms, there is no direct experimental evidence of their influence on the interfacial temperature distribution. Infrared thermography is used here to simultaneously measure the droplet volume, contact angle, and spatially resolved interface temperatures for water droplets on a nonwetting substrate. The technique is calibrated and validated to quantify the temperature measurement accuracy; a correction is employed to account for reflections from the surroundings when imaging the evaporating droplets. Spatiotemporally resolved interface temperature data, obtained via infrared thermography measurements, allow for an improved prediction of the evaporation rate and can be utilized to monitor temperature-controlled processes in droplets for various lab-on-a-chip applications.

  8. Nanoengineered Surfaces for High Flux Thin Film Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    omniphobicity. Nature, 2011. 477(7365): p. 443-447. 50. Anand, S., et al., Enhanced Condensation on Lubricant Impregnated Nanotextured Surfaces. Acs Nano ...time, (c) corresponding droplet volume as a function of time. To explain the observations, we developed a simple quasi-steady 1-D lubrication ...consistent with experimental observations. A typical experimental data and the model prediction are shown in Fig. 11. The simple 1-D lubrication

  9. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz CHIMELI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods: Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness were produced (N=48 using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group, and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2. After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12 or mineral oil (N=12 to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (% was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%. The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05. Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%. The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions: Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  10. Thermographic investigation of surface temperature of the evaporating liquid layer under the action of gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreta Aleksei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the temperature field on the surface of horizontal liquid layer (Ethanol evaporating into gas flow (Air has been performed. Temperature gradient of the gas-liquid interface has been measured with the help of Titanium 570M IR camera. Shear stresses on gas-liquid interface induced by thermocapillary effect and inert gas flow have been defined.

  11. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of slow water flow during infiltration and evaporation by tracer motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Bechtold, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-04-01

    Water fluxes in soils control many processes in the environment like plant nutrition, solute and pollutant transport. In the last two decades non-invasive visualization methods have been adapted to monitor flux processes on the small scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), also well known from medical diagnostics, is one of the most versatile ones. It mostly probes directly the substance of interest: water, and it offers many opportunities to manipulate the observed signals for creating different contrasts and thus probing different properties of the porous medium and the embedded fluids. For example, one can make the signal sensitive to the total proton density, i. e. water content, to spatial distributions of relaxation times which reflect pore sizes, to spatial distributions of transport coefficients, and to concentration of contrast agents by using strongly T1 weighted MRI pulse sequences. In this presentation we use GdDTPA2- for monitoring flux processes in soil columns in an ultra-wide bore MRI scanner. It offers the opportunity for monitoring slow water fluxes mainly occurring in soil systems which are not monitorable with direct MRI flow imaging. This contrast agent is most convenient since it behaves conservatively, i.e. it does not sorb at different soil materials and it is chemically stable. Firstly, we show that its mode of action in natural porous media is identical to that known from medical applications as proved by the identical relaxivity parameters [1]. Secondly, the tracer is applied for the visualization of flux processes during evaporation-driven flow. Theoretical considerations by forward simulation predicted a lateral redistribution of solutes during evaporative upward fluxes from highly conductive fine material to neighbouring domains with low water content and conductivity. Here we could prove that such near-surface redistribution really takes place [2]. Thirdly, this tracer is applied for the investigation of water uptake by root systems

  13. Evaporation of Water Droplets on “Lock-and-Key” Structures with Nanoscale Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been investiga......Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been...... investigated. For the MBAs case, the wetting radius of the droplets remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet completely dries out at the end of the evaporation process. The pinning state extends for more than 99.5% of the total evaporation time, and the pinning–shrinking transition is essentially...... prevented whereas in the case of the MCAs the contact radius exhibits distinct stages during evaporation and the contact line retreats significantly in the middle of the evaporation process. We explain the phenomenon by a qualitative energy balance argument based on the different shrinkage types...

  14. Overall solution for water circulation based on evaporation; Kiertovesien kaesittelyn kokonaisratkaisu perustuen haihdutustekniikkaan - KLT 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagernaes, L.; Mckeough, P.; Buchert, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of the project is to investigate and evaluate treatment methods for concentrates from the evaporation of circulation waters. The most feasible process, from both a technical and economical viewpoint, will be identified from a group of alternative concepts. Experimental research will focus on further evaporation of concentrates of TMP filtrates. Laboratory, PDU and pilot equipment will be employed in the work. The main tasks will be to study further evaporation of concentrates and to improve evaporation with the aid of different pre- and intermediate treatments, like enzyme treatment. Process evaluation will focus on a separate final treatment of the high-solids concentrate of the TMP filtrate. Treatment concepts will be developed and a techno-economic assessment of the processes will be carried out. (orig.)

  15. Using water stable isotopes to assess evaporation and water residence time of lakes in EPA’s National Lakes Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes of water (18O and 2H) can be very useful in large-scale monitoring programs because water samples are easy to collect and water isotopes integrate information about basic hydrological processes such as evaporation as a percentage of inflow (E/I), w...

  16. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  17. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  18. Droplet evaporation with complexity of evaporation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet often exhibits a mixed evaporation mode, where the contact radius and the contact angle simultaneously vary with time. For sessile water droplets containing polymers with different initial polymer concentrations, we experimentally study their evaporation dynamics by measuring mass and volume changes. We show how diffusion-limited evaporation governs droplet evaporation, regardless of the complexity of evaporation behavior, and how the evaporation rate depends on the polymer concentration. Finally, we suggest a unified expression for a diffusion-limited evaporation rate for a sessile droplet with complexity in evaporation dynamics.

  19. Numerical simulation of convective evaporation of a droplet on a porous surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonhyeok; Son, Gihun

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulation is performed for droplet evaporation on a porous surface under an external flow condition. The droplet interface is tracked by a level-set (LS) method, which is modified to include the effects of porosity and evaporation coupled to heat and mass transfer. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and vapor fraction for the external fluid region are combined with the local volume averaged conservation equations for the porous region through the matching conditions of velocity, pressure, temperature and vapor fraction at the fluid-solid interface. The temperature and the vapor fraction at the liquid-gas interface and the evaporation mass flux are simultaneously determined from the coupled equations for the mass and energy balances at the interface and the thermodynamic relation. The numerical simulation demonstrates the droplet penetration into the porous region and the evaporation to the porous and external flow regions. The effects of external flow velocity, porosity and porous particle size on the droplet deformation and evaporation are investigated. This research was supported by the Agency for Defense Development.

  20. Measurements and predictions of surface gas fluxes and actual evaporation on mine waste rock dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabwe, L.K.; Wilson, G.W. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Long-term closure issues with respect to the mining industry and acid rock drainage (ARD) management require accurate measurements, predictions and monitoring of surface gas fluxes and actual evaporation on mine waste-rock dumps. This study uses a technique, called the dynamic closed chamber system (DCC) that measures the oxygen flux into mine waste dumps. The technique was used with an oxygen gas analyzer to directly measure the change in the oxygen concentration in the headspace of the chamber installed at the surface of the waste dumps. A SoilCover model was also used to predict evaporation fluxes on a waste-rock pile after heavy rainfall events. Measurement of actual evaporation across the surfaces of waste dumps is important in the design of soil covers. The paper discussed the site locations including the Key Lake uranium mine located at the southern rim of the Athabasca Basin in north central Saskatchewan as well as the Syncrude Canada Ltd. mine, located 30 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Materials and methods used in the study as well as results and subsequent discussion were also presented. The effect of relative humidity and the effect of soil cover system on oxygen diffusion was reviewed. It was concluded that the SoilCover numerical model can be a useful tool for prediction of actual evaporation on mine waste dumps. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Measuring low radium activity concentration in water with RAD7 by means of evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, Jaqueline; Marussig, Camila G.T.; Paschuk, Sergei; Zambianchi Junior, Pedro; Correa, Janine N.; Perna, Allan Felipe Nunes; Martin, Aline, E-mail: jaquelinekappke@gmail.com, E-mail: mila_garciatb@hotmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: zambianchi@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: allan_perna@hotmail.com, E-mail: nocamartin@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary activity measurements of low radium concentration in mineral water by using RAD7 equipment showed high values of statistical errors. Therefore, the need to develop a new protocol for measuring and proofing the evaporation test for radium measurements in water is in place. This study evaluates the possibility of using RAD7 equipment to measure Ra-226 activity in equilibrium with Rn-222 present in water samples. The technique involves evaporation process so as to increase the Ra-226 concentration in the sample in a controlled manner and thus reduce statistical errors. Two samples were compared, 10 L sample of distilled water and a 7.75 L sample of known concentration (0.1 Bq/L). The evaporation was carried out starting with different initial volumes for both samples: 500 mL, 1000 mL, 2000 mL, 4000 mL and a 250 mL sample not subject to evaporation. All samples reached a final volume of approximately 250 mL. After evaporation, the samples were stored for 30 days until secular equilibrium was achieved between Ra-226 and Rn-222. The values obtained, by using RAD7 detector, for distilled water, as expected, are near zero averaging 0.021 ± 0.016 Bq/L. The average value found in the water of known concentration was 0.099 ± 0.011 Bq/L, also close to the expected 0.1 Bq/L. The conclusion is that the application of an evaporation process is efficient and the proposed methodology is a proven alternative to decrease the statistical errors. (author)

  2. Investigation of the properties of different surfaces used in evaporation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, E. O.; Gatapova, E. Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a study of the properties of surfaces with nanocoatingsof two types:NOA 81 photoresist with silanizationand NOA 65 photoresist. These surfaces are resistant to thermal and mechanical loads. The structure of the surfaces was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The contact angle hysteresis for these surfaces wasdeterminedby the standard DSA-100 KRUSSprocedure, in which theadvancing and receding contact angles are measured, and also by a second method - measuring the contact angle under isothermal droplet evaporation. The contact angle hysteresis values measured by the two different methods are in satisfactory agreement. The contact angle hysteresis was about 20° for the NOA 81 substrateand about 50° for NOA 65.

  3. Water economy in rodents: evaporative water loss and metabolic water production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Cortés

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on water balance in desert-dwelling granivorous rodents use evaporative water loss (EWL and metabolic water production (MWP to evaluate the efficiency of water regulation, expressed by the model Ta @ MWP = EWL, defined by an ambient temperature (Ta value at (@ which MWP/EWL = 1. Here we evaluate and apply this model (1 - r² determining water regulation efficiency, based on the energetic cost (MR to maintain water balance (WB, that is MR-WB. To test the model, EWL was measured and MWP estimated in nine species of rodents from different localities of northern and north-central Chile (II and IV Regions: Octodon degus (Od and O. lunatus (Olu (Octodontidae, Abrothrix olivaceus (Ao, A. longipilis (Al, A. andinus (Ad, Phyllotis darwini (Pd, P. rupestris (Pr, P. magister (Pm, Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Ol (Muridae and Chinchilla lanigera (Cl (Chinchillidae. Literature information on rodents from xeric and mesic habitats was also analyzed. Results indicate that: 1 Cl has the lowest EWL (0.58 mg H2O/g h, followed by Od Para evaluar la eficiencia en la regulación hídrica de roedores granívoros desertícolas se usa la pérdida de agua por evaporación (EWL y la producción de agua metabólica (MWP, estando esta expresada por el modelo Ta @ MWP = EWL, que representa el valor de una temperatura ambiente (Ta al cual (@ MWP/EWL = 1. En este trabajo se evalua este modelo (1- r² y se estima la eficiencia en la regulación de agua basados en el costo energético (MR de mantención del balance hídrico (WB, es decir MR-WB. Se midió EWL y se estimó MWP en las siguientes nueve especies de roedores de diferente localidades del norte y centro de Chile (Regiones II y IV: Octodon degus (Od y O. lunatus (Olu (Octodontidae, Abrothrix olivaceus (Ao, A. longipilis (Al, A. andinus (Ad, Phyllotis darwini (Pd, P. rupestris (Pr, P. magister (Pm, Oligoryzomys longicaudatus (Ol (Muridae and Chinchilla lanigera (Cl (Chinchillidae. Se analizó además información de

  4. Experimental Study of the Cooling of Electrical Components Using Water Film Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Harmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer, which occur in the evaporation of a falling film of water, are studied experimentally. This evaporation allows the dissipation of the heat flux produced by twelve resistors, which simulate electrical components on the back side of an aluminium plate. On the front side of the plate, a falling film of water flows by the action of gravity. An inverse heat conduction model, associated with a spatial regularisation, was developed and produces the local heat fluxes on the plate using the measured temperatures. The efficiency of this evaporative process has been studied with respect to several parameters: imposed heat flux, inlet mass flow rate, and geometry. A comparison of the latent and sensible fluxes used to dissipate the imposed heat flux was studied in the case of a plexiglass sheet in front of the falling film at different distances from the aluminium plate.

  5. Tropical Ocean Evaporation/SST Sensitivity and It's Link to Water and Energy Budget Variations During ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Marshall, Susan; Oglesby, Robert; Roads, John; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The continuing debate over feedback mechanisms governing tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and tropical climate in general has highlighted the diversity of potential checks and balances within the climate system. Competing feedbacks due to changes in surface evaporation, water vapor, and cloud long- and shortwave radiative properties each may serve critical roles in stabilizing or destabilizing the climate system. It is also intriguing that even those climate variations having origins internal to the climate system - changes in ocean heat transport for example, apparently require complementary equilibrating effects by changes in atmospheric energy fluxes. Perhaps the best observational evidence of this is the relatively invariant nature of tropically averaged net radiation exiting the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) as measured by broadband satellite sensors over the past two decades. Thus, analyzing how these feedback mechanisms are operating within the context of current interannual variability may offer considerable insight for anticipating future climate change. In this paper we focus primarily on interannual variations of ocean evaporative fluxes and their significance for coupled water and energy cycles within the tropical climate system. In particular, we use both the da Silva estimates of surface fluxes (based on the Comprehensive Ocean Atmosphere Data Set, COADS) and numerical simulations from several global climate models to examine evaporation sensitivity to perturbations in SST associated with warm and cold ENSO events. The specific questions we address are as follows: (1) What recurring patterns of surface wind and humidity anomalies are present during ENSO and how do they combine to yield systematic evaporation anomalies?, (2) What is the resulting tropical ocean mean evaporation-SST sensitivity associated with this climate perturbation?, and (3) What role does this evaporation play in tropical heat and water balance over tropical oceanic regions? We

  6. Design of the Brine Evaporation Bag for Increased Water Recovery in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Anna L.; Delzeit, Lance D.

    2015-01-01

    The existing water recovery system on the International Space Station (ISS) is limited to 75% reclamation; consequently, long duration space missions are currently unfeasible due to the large quantity of water necessary to sustain the crew. The Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB) is a proposed system to supplement the existing water recovery system aboard the ISS that can to increase water recovery to 99%. The largest barrier to high water recovery is mineral scaling inside the water recovery equipment, which leads to equipment failure; therefore, some water must remain to keep the minerals dissolved. This waste stream is liquid brine containing salts, acids, organics, and water. The BEB is designed to recover this remaining water while protecting the equipment from scale. The BEB consists of a sealed bag containing a hydrophobic membrane that allows water vapor and gas to pass through. It is operated under vacuum, heated, and continuously filled with brine to boil away the water. The water vapor is recovered and the solids are contained inside the bag for disposal. The BEB can dry the brine to a solid block. Ongoing work includes improving the design of the BEB and the evaporator to prevent leaks, maximize the rate of water removal, and minimize energy use and weight. Additional testing will determine whether designs are heat- or mass-transfer limited and the optimal water recovery rate.

  7. Using MOD16 products for analyzing evapotranspiration and evaporation on the surface of lakes. Case studies in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Florentina; Madelin, Malika; Zaharia, Liliana

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration and evaporation are some of the most complex atmospheric processes and major components of the water balance. The knowledge of these processes at several spatial and temporal scales has great practical importance in the field of water resources management and agriculture. However, the direct measurement of these parameters is generally a problem, because it requires accuracy and instruments (lysimeters and pans) difficult to install; therefore many equations based on physical processes or vegetation stages have been proposed by different scientists (Thornthwaite, Penman, etc.). The use of remote sensing is a good alternative to estimate the evapotranspiration, by taking advantage of the new generation of Earth Observation Satellites. In recent years, a remote sensing product from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer - MOD16 has been developed. The MOD16 algorithm (Mu et al. 2007) combines on the one hand remote sensing data on land cover, albedo, leaf area index and in the other hand radiation, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit data, in order to estimate real evapotranspiration (ET) and potential evapotranspiration (PET), at 1 km2 resolution. Until now the MOD16 products were not used in the Romanian studies, so the product accuracy is unknown. The main objective of this study is to correlate the MOD16 ET and PET products with the evaporation (E) data measured at the surface of some lakes (Căldăruşani, Soleşti, Cinciş), located in different climate and landform conditions in Romania, in order to establish the relationships between those parameters, that could allow estimate indirectly the evaporation, based on the MODIS products. We correlated the daily recorded pan evaporation data with the MOD16 products, by taking into account R2 coefficients. Eight-day cumulative evaporation data from the considered pans was calculated to coincide with the eight-day MOD16 products over 2010 - 2012. A secondary purpose of the paper is to

  8. A systematic experimental study on the evaporation rate of supercooled water droplets at subzero temperatures and varying relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberto, S.; Reutzsch, J.; Roth, N.; Weigand, B.

    2017-05-01

    Supercooled water droplets (SWD) are present in clouds at high altitude and subjected to very low temperatures and high relative humidity. These droplets exist in a metastable state. The understanding of the evaporation of SWD at these extreme conditions is of high interest to understand rain, snow, and hail generating mechanisms in clouds. This paper focuses on the experimental results of the measurements of the evaporation rates β of supercooled water droplets. For this purpose, single SWDs are trapped by means of optical levitation. During the evaporation process, the elastically scattered light in the forward regime is recorded and evaluated. Experiments have been performed for different relative humidities φ at three constant ambient temperatures, namely, {T_∞}=268.15; 263.15; 253.15 {{K}} ({t_∞} = -5; -10; -20°C). The experimental data agrees well with direct numerical simulations (DNS) carried out with the in-house code Free Surface 3D (FS3D) and shows that the use of a simplified model is permissible for these ambient conditions.

  9. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    condensation front exhibited large accelerations, with velocity varying from few tens of m/s up to 479 (±0.5) m/s, at distances of 1.5 (±0.3) cm and in times of 0.1 ms. This process preceded the appearance of the Ar front. Our first results suggest that the evaporation of moisture induced by compression waves associated with the air shock is able to accelerate particles (ca.100s microns in size) efficiently, at short distances. This process could have broader implications in active volcanic areas where shock waves are generated, for the damage that may follow.

  10. Water on graphene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  11. Evaporation and energy balance of partially covered water reservoirs using self-assembling floating elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    The projected increase in fresh water storage to meet growing municipal and irrigation needs and mitigate effects of rainfall variability and prolonged droughts will require new measures for suppressing evaporation from reservoirs and conserve water resources. A low risk and cost effective means for evaporation suppression uses self-assembling floating elements. We seek to develop a systematic framework for quantifying impacts of various cover designs and properties on heat and mass fluxes and energy balance of water reservoirs of different characteristics and climatic regions. The vertical energy balance equation including diurnal and seasonal variations in atmospheric forcing and energy transport to the water column was employed to resolve temperature and flux dynamics from water bodies. We then consider energy coupling of a unit floating cover element with water body (including lateral heat exchanges) to evaluate effect of different cover designs, climate conditions, and reservoir characteristics on evaporation suppression and energy balance of water body. The mechanistic framework offers a means for evaluating ecological impacts of covers, enables consideration of different cover designs (shape, size, thermal and radiative properties), and advances this largely empirical resource conservation strategy into a predictive framework for design and management purposes.

  12. Water relations of the tos1 tomato mutant at contrasting evaporative demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Oliva; Albacete, Alfonso; Martínez-Ballesta, M Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Dodd, Ian C; Romero-Aranda, M Remedios

    2009-09-01

    The tos1 (tomato osmotically sensitive) mutant, isolated from an in vitro screen of root growth during osmotic stress, was less sensitive to exogenous ABA, but accumulated more ABA under osmotic stress than WT plants. We assessed growth and water relations characteristics of hydroponically grown tos1 seedlings (in the absence of osmotic stress) at low and high evaporative demands. Growth of tos1 was severely inhibited at both high and low evaporative demands. Twenty DAS, WT and tos1 genotypes had a similar leaf water and turgor potential, but mature tos1 plants (45 day old) showed a significant diurnal loss of leaf turgor, with recovery overnight. Increased evaporative demand increased turgor loss of tos1 plants. High evaporative demand at the beginning of the day decreased stomatal conductance of tos1, without diurnal recovery, thus whole plant transpiration was decreased. De-topped tos1 seedlings showed decreased root hydraulic conductance and had a 1.4-fold increase in root ABA concentration. Impaired root function of tos1 plants failed to meet transpirational water demand and resulted in shoot turgor loss, stomatal closure and growth inhibition.

  13. Assessment of water removal from oil sands tailings by evaporation and under-drainage, and the impact on tailings consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fernando F.; Sanin, Maria Victoria [Golder Associates Ltd (Canada); Sedgwick, Andrea [Total EandP Canada (Canada); Blum, Jim [JG Blum Consulting Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Tailings, left-over material produced during the extraction process that separates bitumen from oil sand, are challenging the oil sands industry. These tailings require large surface areas and contain mature fine tailings, made up of fine clay particles suspended in water, which do not settle within a reasonable timeframe. Consequently, maximizing water removal from oil sands tailings is required to accelerate tailings consolidation. The study described in this paper was developed to measure the water loss from oil sands tailings associated with evaporation and under-drainage, using laboratory drying column tests, and to evaluate the impact of water loss on the process of tailings consolidation and the gain in shear strength for different lift thicknesses. Water removal from the tailings through evaporation occurred at a nearly constant rate, while the rate of under-drainage progressively reduced with time. Additionally, it was found that thinner lifts would have better performance in terms of tailings consolidation and gain in shear strength than thick lifts.

  14. Influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism in system “water droplet-high-temperature gases” on integral characteristics of liquid evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mathematical (system of differential equations in private derivatives models of heat and mass transfer were developed to investigate the evaporation processes of water droplets and emulsions on its base moving in high-temperature (more than 1000 K gas flow. The model takes into account a conductive and radiative heat transfer in water droplet and also a convective, conductive and radiative heat exchange with high-temperature gas area. Water vapors characteristic temperature and concentration in small wall-adjacent area and trace of the droplet, numerical values of evaporation velocities at different surface temperature, the characteristic time of complete droplet evaporation were determined. Experiments for confidence estimation of calculated integral characteristics of processes under investigation - mass liquid evaporation velocities were conducted with use of cross-correlation recording video equipment. Their satisfactory fit (deviations of experimental and theoretical velocities were less than 15% was obtained. The influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism on characteristics of endothermal phase transformations in a wide temperature variation range was established by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with known theoretical data for “diffusion” mechanisms of water droplets and other liquids evaporation in gas.

  15. Formation and Mechanism of Superhydrophobic/Hydrophobic Surfaces Made from Amphiphiles through Droplet-Mediated Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Zhang, Mi; Tang, Wai-Wa; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-23

    Superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces have attracted wide attention because of their broad applications in various regions, including coating, textile, packaging, electronic devices, and bioengineering. Many studies have been focused on the fabrication of superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces using natural materials. In this paper, superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces were formed by an amphiphilic natural protein, zein, using electrospinning. Water contact angle (WCA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the hydrophobicity and surface morphology of the electrospun structures. The highest WCA of the zein electrospun surfaces could reach 155.5 ± 1.4°. To further understand the mechanism of superhydrophobic surface formation from amphiphiles using electrospinning, a synthetic amphiphilic polymer was selected, and also, a method similar to electrospinning, spray drying, was tried. The electrospun amphiphilic polymer surface showed a high hydrophobicity with a WCA of 141.4 ± 0.7°. WCA of the spray-dried zein surface could reach 125.3 ± 2.1°. The secondary structures of the zein in the electrospun film and cast-dried film were studied using ATR-FTIR, showing that α-helix to β-sheet transformation happened during the solvent evaporation in the cast drying process but not in the electrospinning process. A formation mechanism was proposed on the basis of the orientation of the amphiphiles during the solvent evaporation of different fabrication methods. The droplet-based or jet-based evaporation during electrospinning and spray drying led to the formation of the superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surface by the accumulation of the hydrophobic groups of the amphiphiles on the surface, while the surface-based evaporation during cast drying led to the formation of the hydrophilic surface by the accumulation of the hydrophilic groups of the amphiphiles on the surface.

  16. Dynamics of a slowly evaporating solvent-polymer mixture with a deformable upper surface

    KAUST Repository

    Hennessy, M. G.

    2014-06-17

    This paper examines how surface deformations affect the stability of a slowly evaporating solvent-polymer mixture. The destabilizing effect of surface-tension variations arising from evaporation-induced concentration gradients and the counteracting influence of mean gravity and surface tension are incorporated into the mathematical model. A linear stability analysis that takes advantage of the separation between the characteristic time scales of the slowly evolving base state and the perturbations is carried out in combination with numerical solutions of the linearized system. It is shown that the onset of instability can occur for Marangoni numbers that are much lower than the critical value for a non-deformable surface. Moreover, two types of Marangoni instabilities appear in the system: one is associated with the traditional stationary instability, and the other is an oscillatory instability that is not present for a non-deformable liquid surface. A region of the parameter space where the oscillatory instability dominates is identified and used to formulate appropriate conditions for future experiments. © 2014 The authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaporation of refrigerant HFC 407C on plain tubes or at an improved surface; Evaporation du refrigerant HFC 407C sur des tubes lisses ou a surface amelioree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuercher, O.; Favrat, D.; Thome, J.R.; Kattan, N.; Nidegger, E. [Ecole polytechnique federale, Lab. d`energetique industrielle, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1996-11-15

    The substitution of CFC refrigerants in refrigeration systems, heat pumps and organic Rankine cycles for heat recovery, requires good methods for predicting heat transfer of substitute fluids. The measurements in the LENI test facility (concentric tubes with water flowing in a counter-current flow) with HFC 407C, HFC 134a, HCFC 123, HFC 404a and HFC/HCFC 402A provide a new data bank for new refrigerants, and allow a coherent comparison with old refrigerants CFC 11, CFC 12, CFC/HCFC 502 and with existing correlations. The existing correlations were found to be inadequate. Because of this work, an improved flow pattern map and flow boiling model were developed, which resulted in a substantial progress in the accurate predict of heat transfer in plain, horizontal tubes for refrigerants without oil. The Kattan et al. correlation was programmed to calculate and compare predicted heat transfer coefficients to the new HFC 407C test data. The flow pattern map proposed by Kattan et al. was also programmed and compared to flow regimes observed for HFC 407C. It predicted the HFC 407C flow pattern data quite accurately. The original objective of the HFC 407C measurements was the validation of the Kattan et al. correlation applied to a zeotropic refrigerant blend. Local flow boiling heat transfer coefficients were measured for HFC 407C evaporating inside a microfin and a plain tube. In addition, microfin heat transfer augmentation relative to a plain tube was investigated. The presence of oil in the evaporator had a complex effect on heat transfer coefficients. Local flow boiling heat transfer coefficients were measured for refrigerant HFC 407C ester oil mixtures (Mobil EAL Arctic 68). A new thermodynamic approach for modeling mixtures of zeotropic refrigerant blends and lubricating oils was also developed. (author) figs., tabs., 14 refs.

  18. Effect of temperature difference between manikin and wet fabric skin surfaces on clothing evaporative resistance: how much error is there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    Clothing evaporative resistance is one of the inherent factors that impede heat exchange by sweating evaporation. It is widely used as a basic input in physiological heat strain models. Previous studies showed a large variability in clothing evaporative resistance both at intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory testing. The errors in evaporative resistance may cause severe problems in the determination of heat stress level of the wearers. In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between the manikin nude surface and wet textile skin surface on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. It was found that the temperature difference between the skin surface and the manikin nude surface could lead to an error of up to 35.9% in evaporative resistance of the boundary air layer. Similarly, this temperature difference could also introduce an error of up to 23.7% in the real clothing total evaporative resistance ( R et_real textile fabric skin temperature.

  19. Kinetics of Evaporation and Growth of Drops of Aqueous Solutions of Surface Active Substances at Negative Temperatures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-Ri56 961 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION FIND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS i/i SOLUTIONS OF SURFA .(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AlFB OH Y I...Jall IN ,I" FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 t FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION Lfl -• KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE ACTIVE...TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 25 June 1985 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-85-C-000451 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE

  20. Vapor Flow Resistance of Dry Soil Layer to Soil Water Evaporation in Arid Environment: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation from bare sandy soils is the core component of the hydrologic cycle in arid environments, where vertical water movement dominates. Although extensive measurement and modeling studies have been conducted and reported in existing literature, the physics of dry soil and its function in evaporation is still a challenging topic with significant remaining issues. Thus, an overview of the previous findings will be very beneficial for identifying further research needs that aim to advance our understanding of the vapor flow resistance (VFR effect on soil water evaporation as influenced by characteristics of the dry soil layer (DSL and evaporation zone (EZ. In this regard, six measurement and four modeling studies were overviewed. The results of these overviewed studies, along with the others, affirm the conceptual dynamics of DSL and EZ during drying or wetting processes (but not both within dry sandy soils. The VFR effect tends to linearly increase with DSL thickness (δ when δ < 5 cm and is likely to increase as a logarithmic function of δ when δ ≥ 5 cm. The vaporization-condensation-movement (VCM dynamics in a DSL depend on soil textures: sandy soils can form a thick (10 to 20 cm DSL while sandy clay soils may or may not have a clear DSL; regardless, a DSL can function as a transient EZ, a vapor condensation zone, and/or a vapor transport medium. Based on the overview, further studies will need to generate long-term continuous field data, develop hydraulic functions for very dry soils, and establish an approach to quantify the dynamics and VFR effects of DSLs during wetting-drying cycles as well as take into account such effects  when using conventional (e.g., Penman-Monteith evaporation models.

  1. Wetting and evaporative aggregation of nanofluid droplets on CVD-synthesized hydrophobic graphene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae S; Kihm, Kenneth D; Kim, Honggoo; Lim, Gyumin; Cheon, Sosan; Lee, Joon S

    2014-07-22

    The wetting and evaporative aggregation of alumina nanofluids (Al2O3) are examined for CVD-synthesized graphene-coated (GC) surfaces that are known as strongly hydrophobic (θcontact ≈ 90°). Our findings are compared to those associated with a hydrophilic cover glass (CG) substrate (θcontact ≈ 45°). The nanofluidic self-assemblies on the GC substrate are elaborately characterized in terms of the droplet wetting/crack formation, the particle migration time over the evaporative time (CR), the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek forces (FDLVO), and the relative thermal conductivity (KR). The GC substrate forms relatively thicker and larger cracks and requires a longer evaporation time. Both the GC and CG substrates share approximately the same time constant CR, which suggests the formation of coffee-ring patterns for both substrates. The GC shows negative FDLVO, which implies a repulsive force between the nanoparticles and the substrate, and the CG shows a positive FDLVO of attraction. Furthermore, a more than 3 order of magnitude larger thermal conductivity of GC compared to that of CG drives significantly different particle/fluid motions near the drop edge areas between the two substrates.

  2. An improved film evaporation correlation for saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzada, Muhammad Wakil

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents an investigation of heat transfer correlation in a falling-film evaporator working with saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures. The experiments are conducted at different salinity levels ranging from 15000 to 90000 ppm, and the pressures were maintained between 0.92 to 2.81 kPa (corresponds to saturation temperatures of 5.9 – 23 0C). The effect of salinity, saturation pressures and chilled water temperatures on the heat transfer coefficient are accounted in the modified film evaporation correlations. The results are fitted to the Han & Fletcher\\'s and Chun & Seban\\'s falling-film correlations which are used in desalination industry. We modify the said correlations by adding salinity and saturation temperature corrections with respective indices to give a better agreement to our measured data.

  3. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  4. IS THE EVAPORATIVE WATER-LOSS OF KNOT CALIDRIS-CANUTUS HIGHER IN TROPICAL THAN IN TEMPERATE CLIMATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERBOVEN, N; PIERSMA, T

    1995-01-01

    To test whether Knot Calidris canutus wintering in the tropics suffer higher rates of water loss through evaporation than do Knot wintering at temperate latitudes, we tried to develop a physically realistic model to predict evaporative heat loss from air temperature, wind and humidity. In separate e

  5. A comparison of methods for estimating open-water evaporation in small wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoner, Jason R.; Stannard, David I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared evaporation measurements from a floating pan, land pan, chamber, and the Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation. Floating pan, land pan, and meteorological data were collected from June 6 to July 21, 2005, at a small wetland in the Canadian River alluvium in central Oklahoma, USA. Evaporation measured with the floating pan compared favorably to 12 h chamber measurements. Differences between chamber and floating pan rates ranged from −0.2 to 0.3 mm, mean of 0.1 mm. The difference between chamber and land pan rates ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, mean of 1.5 mm. The mean chamber-to-floating pan ratio was 0.97 and the mean chamber-to-land pan ratio was 0.73. The chamber-to-floating pan ratio of 0.97 indicates the use of a floating pan to measure evaporation in small limited-fetch water bodies is an appropriate and accurate method for the site investigated. One-sided Paired t-Tests indicate daily floating pan rates were significantly less than land pan and PT rates. A two-sided Paired t-Test indicated there was no significant difference between land pan and PT values. The PT equation tends to overestimate evaporation during times when the air is of low drying power and tends to underestimate as drying power increases.

  6. Water ice as a matrix for film production by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, Bo Toftmann

    2007-01-01

    We have studied water ice as a matrix for the production of PEG (polyethylene glycol) films by MAPLE at 355 nm. The deposition rate is small compared with other matrices typically used in MAPLE, but the deposition of photofragments from the matrix can be avoided. At temperatures above -50 degrees...... of the target holder the deposition rate increases strongly, but the evaporation pressure in the MAPLE chamber also increases drastically....

  7. Water ice as a matrix for film production by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, Bo Toftmann;

    2007-01-01

    We have studied water ice as a matrix for the production of PEG (polyethylene glycol) films by MAPLE at 355 nm. The deposition rate is small compared with other matrices typically used in MAPLE, but the deposition of photofragments from the matrix can be avoided. At temperatures above -50 degrees...... of the target holder the deposition rate increases strongly, but the evaporation pressure in the MAPLE chamber also increases drastically....

  8. Measurement of the temperature profile during evaporation of water and ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbanova Ekaterina G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature profiles across a liquid–gas layers at normal atmospheric conditions are measured for water and ethanol. A thin liquid layer is locally heated from the bottom and evaporates from the liquid–gas interface. Micro-thermocouple with the sensor element thickness of 3 μm is used for measurements. It is shown that the temperature profile has a different character for different liquids.

  9. Surface energy balance of fresh and saline waters : AquaSEBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelrady, A.R.; Timmermans, J.; Vekerdy, Z.; Salama, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) model

  10. Components of evaporative water loss in the desert tenebrionid beetles, Eleodes armata and Cryptoglossa verrucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Water loss in Eleodes armata and Cryptoglossa verrucosa increased with increasing temperature and decreasing vapor activity (a/sub v/). Rates of evaporative water loss were always about 4 times greater in E. armata than in C. verrucosa at the different temperatures and 0.0 a/sub v/, while as a/sub v/ increased the ratio of E. armata loss to C. verrucosa decreased from 4 at 0.0 a/sub v/ to about 2 at 0.94 a/sub v/. A method for determining mesothoracic spiracular, sub-elytral abdominal, and cuticular water loss rates was described and validated for living E. armata. Sub-elytral abdominal water loss through the caudal opening was 8.0 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/, meso-thoracic spiracular water loss was approximately 7.9 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/, and cuticular loss was 26.2 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/ at 30 C and 0.0 a/sub v/. Evaporative water loss was shown to have two unidirectional components, efflux and influx, for both beetles with the use of tritiated water (H/sup 3/HO). Efflux was independent of a/sub v/, while influx increased linearly with a/sub v/, with both components having lower rates in C. verrucosa compared to E. armata.

  11. Experimental study on the effect of surface conditions on evaporation of sprayed liquid droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed R, Negeed [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); El-Sayed R, Negeed; Ishihara, N.; Tagashira, K.; Hidaka, S.; Kohno, M.; Takata, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The present study investigates experimentally the effects of thermal properties of the hot surface and droplet characteristics on the droplet evaporation. Cylindrical blocks made of Stainless Steel, Aluminum and Brass with different degrees of surface roughness were used. The droplet diameter and velocity were controlled independently. The behavior of droplet during the collision with hot surface was observed with a high-speed camera. The results presented the effect of the thermal properties of the hot surface, droplet Weber number, droplet velocity, droplet size, hot surface conditions; surface superheat and degree of surface roughness on the solid-liquid contact time and the maximum spread of droplet over the surface. Empirical correlations have been deduced describing the relationship between the hydrodynamic characteristics of an individual droplet impinging on a heated surface and concealing the affecting parameters in such process. Also, the comparison between the current results and the results due to others investigators shows good agreement in which the difference between them ranged from 5% to 25%. (authors)

  12. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Tang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC for representing the air–soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1 accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2 accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3 enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4 is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air–water volatile tracer exchange; and (5 is applicable to site, regional, and global land models.

    Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1 gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2 liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92 indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1 the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2 the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance.

    We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer

  13. Crystal deposition patterns from evaporating sessile drops on superhydrophobic and liquid impregnated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Samantha; Dash, Susmita; Varanasi, Kripa; Varanasi Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Accelerated corrosion and scale buildup near oceans is partially due to deposition of salty sea mist onto ships, cars, and building structures. Many corrosion preventative measures are expensive, time intensive, and/or have negative impacts on the environment. One solution is the use of specific surfaces that are engineered for scale resistance. In this work, we show that we can delay crystallization and reduce scale adhesion on specifically engineered liquid impregnated surfaces (LIS). The low contact angle hysteresis of the LIS results in a sliding contact line of the saline droplet during evaporation, and the elevated energy barrier of the smooth liquid interface delays crystallization. Experiments conducted on surfaces with different wettability also demonstrate the corresponding influence in controlling salt crystal polymorphism.

  14. Infrared Thermography Investigation of an Evaporating Water/Oil Meniscus in Confined Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Huang, Lu; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin

    2017-01-10

    To simulate the heat and mass transfer in real heterogeneous systems, such as metal-production processes and lubrication, the point-contact condition with the formation of narrowly confined liquid film and its surrounding meniscus was constructed to study the classical microchannel boiling problem in this work. Specifically, the evaporation and diffusion of the superheated water meniscus and water/oil droplet in the point-contact geometry were investigated. The emphasis is put on the influence of the contact-line transport behaviors on nucleation and bubble dynamics in the confined meniscus. The observations suggested that superheat is the necessary condition for bubble formation, and enough vapor supply is the necessary condition for bubble growth in the confined liquid. The oil film could significantly inhibit the evaporation and diffusion of water molecules in the superheat geometry. The water/oil droplet can exist for a long time even in the hot contact region, which could have sustained damages to the mechanical system suffering from water pollution. This work is of great significance to better understand the damage mechanism of water pollution to the mechanical system.

  15. Movement and evaporation of water droplets under conditions typical for heat-exchange chambers of contact water heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    The macroscopic regularities and integrated characteristics of the motion and evaporation of sprayed water droplets in the field of high-temperature (1100 K) combustion products under the conditions typical for water heaters of contact type (economizers) were studied using a cross-correlation complex working on the basis of panoramic optical methods (particle image velocimetry, particle tracking velocimetry, shadow photography) and high-speed (105 fps) Phantom video cameras. High-speed video recording devices with specialized software were used for continuously monitoring the motion and evaporation of droplets. Titanium dioxide nanopowder tracer particles were introduced to determine the rate of high-temperature gases. The characteristic distances covered by water droplets before their full retardation in the counter-flow of high-temperature combustion products were determined. The integrated dependences were obtained, and the main characteristics of evaporation were determined, which allow one to predict the intensity of the phase transformations of droplets (with sizes of 0.05-0.5 mm) and the distances covered by them before they completely turn in the opposite direction under the conditions corresponding to the heat-exchange chambers of contact water heaters: the vapor-droplet rate 1-5 m/s, gas flow rate 0.5-2 m/s, and gas temperature ~1100 K. Approximating expressions were derived to predict the characteristics of the processes. The performance of the economizers under study can be significantly increased by using the obtained experimental dependences, the corresponding approximating expressions, and the resulting conclusions. Conditions were determined under which the influence of phase transformations on retardation exceeds the contribution of the counter-motion and active retardation and evaporation of water droplets occur in the heat-exchange chambers of contact water heaters of typical sizes.

  16. Pinning of the Contact Line during Evaporation on Heterogeneous Surfaces: Slowdown or Temporary Immobilization? Insights from a Nanoscale Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Leroy, Frédéric

    2015-07-14

    The question of the effect of surface heterogeneities on the evaporation of liquid droplets from solid surfaces is addressed through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanism behind contact line pinning which is still unclear is discussed in detail on the nanoscale. Model systems with the Lennard-Jones interaction potential were employed to study the evaporation of nanometer-sized cylindrical droplets from a flat surface. The heterogeneity of the surface was modeled through alternating stripes of equal width but two chemical types. The first type leads to a contact angle of 67°, and the other leads to a contact angle of 115°. The stripe width was varied between 2 and 20 liquid-particle diameters. On the surface with the narrowest stripes, evaporation occurred at constant contact angle as if the surface was homogeneous, with a value of the contact angle as predicted by the regular Cassie-Baxter equation. When the width was increased, the contact angle oscillated during evaporation between two boundaries whose values depend on the stripe width. The evaporation behavior was thus found to be a direct signature of the typical size of the surface heterogeneity domains. The contact angle both at equilibrium and during evaporation could be predicted from a local Cassie-Baxter equation in which the surface composition within a distance of seven fluid-particle diameters around the contact line was considered, confirming the local nature of the interactions that drive the wetting behavior of droplets. More importantly, we propose a nanoscale explanation of pinning during evaporation. Pinning should be interpreted as a drastic slowdown of the contact line dynamics rather than a complete immobilization of it during a transition between two contact angle boundaries.

  17. The evaporation of the charged and uncharged water drops suspended in a wind tunnel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohini V Bhalwankar; A B Sathe; A K Kamra

    2004-06-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the effect of ventilation on the rate of evaporation of the millimeter sized charged and uncharged water drops suspended in a vertical wind tunnel. The linear relationship, = 0.907 + 0.282 , observed between the mean ventilation coefficient, , and a non-dimensional parameter , ( = $N^{1/3}_{Sc,v} N^{1/2}_{Re}$ where Sc,v is Schmidt number and Re is Reynold's number) is in agreement with the results of earlier investigations for uncharged water drops. However, in case of charged drops carrying 10−10C of charge, this relationship gets modified to = 0.4877 + 0.149. Thus, the rate of evaporation of charged drops is slower than that of uncharged drops of the same size. Oscillations of the drop and the change in airflow around drops are suggested to contribute to lowering of the ventilation coefficients for charged drops. Applicability of the results to a small fraction of highly charged raindrops falling through the sub-cloud layer below thunderstorm is discussed. The relaxation time required for a ventilated drop to reach its equilibrium temperature increases with the drop size and is higher for the charged than for the uncharged drops. It is concluded that in a given distance, charged drops will evaporate less than that of uncharged drops.

  18. Progress in remote sensing of global land surface heat fluxes and evaporations with a turbulent heat exchange parameterization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Bob

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing has provided us an opportunity to observe Earth land surface with a much higher resolution than any of GCM simulation. Due to scarcity of information for land surface physical parameters, up-to-date GCMs still have large uncertainties in the coupled land surface process modeling. One critical issue is a large amount of parameters used in their land surface models. Thus remote sensing of land surface spectral information can be used to provide information on these parameters or assimilated to decrease the model uncertainties. Satellite imager could observe the Earth land surface with optical, thermal and microwave bands. Some basic Earth land surface status (land surface temperature, canopy height, canopy leaf area index, soil moisture etc.) has been produced with remote sensing technique, which already help scientists understanding Earth land and atmosphere interaction more precisely. However, there are some challenges when applying remote sensing variables to calculate global land-air heat and water exchange fluxes. Firstly, a global turbulent exchange parameterization scheme needs to be developed and verified, especially for global momentum and heat roughness length calculation with remote sensing information. Secondly, a compromise needs to be innovated to overcome the spatial-temporal gaps in remote sensing variables to make the remote sensing based land surface fluxes applicable for GCM model verification or comparison. A flux network data library (more 200 flux towers) was collected to verify the designed method. Important progress in remote sensing of global land flux and evaporation will be presented and its benefits for GCM models will also be discussed. Some in-situ studies on the Tibetan Plateau and problems of land surface process simulation will also be discussed.

  19. Water based suspensions of iron oxide obtained by laser target evaporation for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, I.P. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Science and Technology Park “Fabrica”, Gaidara St. 6, 236022 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Samatov, O.M. [Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Beketov, I.V.; Medvedev, A.I. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurlyandskaya, G.V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    In this work spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were obtained by laser target evaporation technique (LTE). Water based suspensions were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs and their properties were also studied including inductive heat capacity. Their structure and properties were studied by a number of techniques including magnetometry and heat capacity measurements. Magnetic induction heating experiment show the specific loss power (SLP) value in the narrow range from 1.30 to 1.45 W/g for all samples under consideration when using alternating magnetic field of 1.7 kA/m and frequency of 210 kHz. These parameters insure that LTE MNPs are interesting materials promising for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Spheric oxide nanoparticles obtained by productive laser target evaporation method. • Experiment shows the specific loss power value in the narrow range for all samples. • Obtained results insure these objects as interesting material for hyperthermia.

  20. Quantification of surface energy fluxes from a small water body using scintillometry and eddy covariance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGloin, Ryan; McGowan, Hamish; McJannet, David

    2014-01-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporation from small water storages is essential for water management and planning, particularly in water-scarce regions. In order to ascertain suitable methods for direct measurement of evaporation from small water bodies, this study presents a comparison of eddy......% greater than eddy covariance measurements. We suggest possible reasons for this difference and provide recommendations for further research for improving measurements of surface energy fluxes over small water bodies using eddy covariance and scintillometry. Key Points Source areas for Eddy covariance...... and scintillometry were on the water surface Reasonable agreement was shown between the sensible heat flux measurements Scintillometer estimates of latent heat flux were greater than eddy covariance...

  1. Droplet evaporation from porous surfaces; model validation from field and wind tunnel experiments for sand and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R. F.; Roberts, I. D.

    The evaporation model of Roberts and Griffiths (1995 Atmospheric Environment 29, 1307-1317) has been subjected to an extensive validation exercise based on a major campaign of field experiments on evaporation from surfaces composed of sand and of concrete. This complements the previous validation which was limited to wind tunnel experiments on sand surfaces. Additionally, the validation using wind tunnel data has been extended to include concrete surfaces. The model describes the constant-rate and falling-rate periods that characterise evaporation from porous media. During the constant-rate period, the evaporation is solely determined by the vapour transport rate into the air. During the falling-rate period, the process in the porous medium is modelled as a receding evaporation front, the overall evaporation rate being determined by the combined effects of vapour transport through the pore network and subsequently into the air. The field trials programme was conducted at sites in the USA and the UK, and examined the evaporation of diethyl malonate droplets from sand and concrete surfaces. Vapour concentrations at several heights in the plume were measured at the centre of a 1 m radius annular source (of width 10 cm) contaminated by uniformly sized droplets (2.4 or 4.1 mm in diameter), key meteorological data being measured at the same time. The evaporation was quantified by coupling concentration and wind speed data. In all, 22 trials were performed on sand and concrete; a further 8 were performed on non-porous surfaces (aluminium foil and slate) as references. The model performance was evaluated against the experimental data in terms of two quantities, the initial evaporation rate of the embedded droplets, and the mass-fraction remaining in the substrate at intervals over the evaporation episode. Overall, the model performance was best in the case of the field experiments for concrete, and the wind tunnel experiments for sand; the performance for wind tunnel

  2. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  3. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional...... mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have...... not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water.In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical...

  4. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  5. Influence of surface roughness and porosity of inclusion in water droplet on heat transfer enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Anastasia G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using high-speed camera, the experiments were performed to research evaporation of 10 μl water droplets containing 2 mm solid inclusions in the shape of cube, when heated (up to 850 K in combustion products of technical ethanol. Adding solid inclusions in water droplets allowed considerably decreasing (by 70% their evaporation times. Also, the artificial irregularities (roughness and porosity at the surfaces of solid inclusions were manufactured to increase heat transfer area. Such approach enabled to decrease evaporation times of heterogeneous liquid droplets in high-temperature gases by 40% (when comparing inclusions with artificial irregularities and smooth surface.

  6. Surface-tension-driven convection in pure liquid layers evaporating into ambient air: influence of liquid volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Fabien; Dehaeck, Sam; Colinet, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    The spontaneous surface-tension-driven convective patterns induced by evaporation of a pure liquid layer are studied experimentally. A volatile liquid layer placed in a cylindrical container is left free to evaporate into air at rest under ambient conditions. The thermal dynamics of the evaporating liquid layer is visualized using an infrared camera. Evaporation rate and liquid thickness are measured by weighting. We focus on the transition between the convective state and the conductive state appearing at a certain instant during the drying of the liquid layer. The critical Marangoni number Mac associated to this transition is estimated from evaporation rate and layer thickness measurements at this instant. The effect of the evaporation rate on Mac and kc (the critical wavenumber) has been investigated by changing the container height and, separately, the effect of the liquid volatility has been studied by using different liquids. Interestingly, it appears that Mac does not depend on the evaporation rate while it depends strongly on the liquid volatility. Given the typical uncertainties associated with liquid properties, a quite reasonable agreement is found with a ``one-sided'' linear stability analysis of this problem. Supported by ESA & BELSPO, by the EU, by ULB, and by FRS - FNRS.

  7. Pinning-depinning mechanism of the contact line during evaporation on chemically patterned surfaces: A lattice Boltzmann study

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qing; Yan, H J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the pinning and depinning mechanism of the contact line during droplet evaporation on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces is numerically investigated using a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with liquid-vapor phase change. A local force balance in the context of diffuse interfaces is introduced to explain the equilibrium states of droplets on chemically patterned surfaces. It is shown that, when the contact line is pinned on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic boundary, different contact angles can be interpreted as the variation of the length of the contact line occupied by each component. The stick-slip-jump behavior of evaporating droplets on chemically patterned surfaces is well captured by the LB simulations. Particularly, a slow movement of the contact line is clearly observed during the stick (pinning) mode, which shows that the pinning of the contact line during droplet evaporation on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces is actually a dynamic pinning process and the dynamic equili...

  8. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  9. On the origin of surface imposed anisotropic growth of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids crystals during droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłek, Maciej; Cysewski, Piotr; Pawelec, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Kobierski, Mirosław

    2015-03-01

    In this paper droplet evaporative crystallization of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) crystals on different surfaces, such as glass, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and paraffin was studied. The obtained crystals were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. In order to better understand the effect of the surface on evaporative crystallization, crystals deposited on glass were scraped off. Moreover, evaporative crystallization of a large volume of solution was performed. As we found, paraffin which is non-polar surface promotes formation of crystals morphologically similar to those obtained via bulk evaporative crystallization. On the other hand, when crystallization is carried out on the polar surfaces (glass and PVA), there is a significant orientation effect. This phenomenon is manifested by the reduction of the number of peaks in PXRD spectrum recorded for deposited on the surface crystals. Noteworthy, reduction of PXRD signals is not observed for powder samples obtained after scraping crystals off the glass. In order to explain the mechanism of carboxylic crystals growth on the polar surfaces, quantum-chemical computations were performed. It has been found that crystal faces of the strongest orientation effect can be characterized by the highest surface densities of intermolecular interactions energy (IIE). In case of SA and ASA crystals formed on the polar surfaces the most dominant faces are characterized by the highest adhesive and cohesive properties. This suggests that the selection rules of the orientation effect comes directly from surface IIE densities.

  10. Model test study of evaporation mechanism of sand under constant atmospheric condition

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yu Jun; Ding, Wenqi; SONG, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation mechanism of Fontainebleau sand using a large-scale model chamber is studied. First, the evaporation test on a layer of water above sand surface is performed under various atmospheric conditions, validating the performance of the chamber and the calculation method of actual evaporation rate by comparing the calculated and measured cumulative evaporations. Second,the evaporation test on sand without water layer is conducted under constant atmospheric condition. Both the evoluti...

  11. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; Hossain, A.; Islam, M A

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  12. Major water balance variables Estimation, soil moisture and evaporation time series, using X-band SAR moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrab, Azza; Simonneaux, Vincent; Zribi, Mehrez; Saadi, Sameh; Lili-Chabaane, Zohra

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades, the rain scarcity in front of long periods of drought especially in semi-arid regions, have a negative impact on the available water resources. In addition, a major part of the intercepted water is lost either by evaporation from the soil back to the atmosphere or by drainage, deep percolation and subsurface runoff. Therefore, knowledge and calculating the water fluxes within the soil-atmosphere system is a major issue for the improvement of water use efficiency. Many studies have been carried out to quantify these fluxes by developing various tools which estimate the soil water regime and may consequently the sustainable management of natural resources (Simmoneaux et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2010; Sutanto et al., 2012 and Saadi et al., 2015). The amount of water stored in the soil is a crucial parameter that can be used as inputs to simulate surface evaporation fluxes and vertical water circulation as surface water capillarity movements and underground percolation. Great progress has been made in the recent decades aiming at developing soil moisture (SM) retrieval techniques by using Imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors. Several algorithms have been developed to retrieve SM from radar data (Zribi et al., 2011 Baghdadi et al., 2008 and Gorrab et al., 2015). The assimilation of SM SAR products into hydrological balance models is one exciting aspect that offers an opportunity to improve hydrologic model forecasts. In this context, the present study highlighted the capability of the high resolution TerraSAR-X SM products in reproducing real conditions of SM variations. We developed a soil hydrological model MHYSAN (Modelisation de Bilan HYdrique des Sols Agricoles Nus) over agricultural bare soil in Central Tunisia (North Africa). The MHYSAN tool computes surface evaporation and SM time series to simulate water balance in Central Tunisia. The accuracy of the MHYSAN tool was assessed at both regional scale (calibration based on ground

  13. Droplets, Evaporation and a Superhydrophobic Surface: Simple Tools for Guiding Colloidal Particles into Complex Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Sperling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of complexly structured and shaped supraparticles can be achieved by evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA starting from colloidal dispersions deposited on a solid surface; often a superhydrophobic one. This versatile and interesting approach allows for generating rather complex particles with corresponding functionality in a simple and scalable fashion. The versatility is based on the aspect that basically one can employ an endless number of combinations of components in the colloidal starting solution. In addition, the structure and properties of the prepared supraparticles may be modified by appropriately controlling the evaporation process, e.g., by external parameters. In this review, we focus on controlling the shape and internal structure of such supraparticles, as well as imparted functionalities, which for instance could be catalytic, optical or electronic properties. The catalytic properties can also result in self-propelling (supra-particles. Quite a number of experimental investigations have been performed in this field, which are compared in this review and systematically explained.

  14. Evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis with WRF: A regional precipitation recycling study for West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnault, Joel; Knoche, Richard; Wei, Jianhui; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Regional precipitation recycling is the measure of the contribution of local evaporation E to local precipitation. This study provides a set of two methods developed in the Weather Research and Forecasting WRF model system for investigating regional precipitation recycling mechanisms: (1) tracking of tagged atmospheric water species originating from evaporation in a source region, ie E-tagging, and (2) three-dimensional budgets of total and tagged atmospheric water species. These methods are used to quantify the effect of return flow and non-well vertical mixing neglected in the computation of the bulk precipitation recycling ratio. The developed algorithms are applied to a WRF simulation of the West African Monsoon 2003. The simulated region is characterized by vertical wind shear condition, i.e. southwesterlies in the low levels and easterlies in the mid-levels, which favours return flow and non-well vertical mixing. Regional precipitation recycling is investigated in 100x100 and 1000x1000 km2 areas. A prerequisite condition for evaporated water to contribute to the precipitation process in both areas is that it is lifted to the mid-levels where hydrometeors are produced. In the 100x100 (1000x1000) km2 area the bulk precipitation recycling ratio is 0.9 (7.3) %. Our budget analysis reveals that return flow and non-well vertically mixed outflow increase this value by about +0.2 (2.9) and +0.2 (1.6) %, respectively, thus strengthening the well-known scale-dependency of regional precipitation recycling.

  15. Surface morphology of polyethylene glycol films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE): Dependence on substrate temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, K.; Czuba, P.; Toftmann, B.;

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of the surface morphology on the substrate temperature during film deposition was investigated for polyethylene glycol (PEG) films by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The surface structure was studied with a combined technique of optical imaging and AFM measurements...

  16. Visualization study of evaporation of single n-pentane drops in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, N.; Nojima, K.; Mori, Y. H.

    1993-12-01

    A laser shadowgraph system was constructed to enable successive filming of a drop or a bubble rising or falling in an immiscible liquid confined within a vertical column. The assembly was applied to a study of the evaporation of n-pentane drops in a stagnant medium of water. The liquid/vapor two-phase bubble evolving from each pentane drop was observed together with its wake, the morphology and the dynamics of which are our primary concern in considering the mechanism of the medium-to-bubble heat transfer.

  17. How to repel hot water from a superhydrophobic surface?

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhejun

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces, with water contact angles greater than 150° and slide angles less than 10°, have attracted a great deal of attention due to their self-cleaning ability and excellent water-repellency. It is commonly accepted that a superhydrophobic surface loses its superhydrophobicity in contact with water hotter than 50 °C. Such a phenomenon was recently demonstrated by Liu et al. [J. Mater. Chem., 2009, 19, 5602], using both natural lotus leaf and artificial leaf-like surfaces. However, our work has shown that superhydrophobic surfaces maintained their superhydrophobicity, even in water at 80 °C, provided that the leaf temperature is greater than that of the water droplet. In this paper, we report on the wettability of water droplets on superhydrophobic thin films, as a function of both their temperatures. The results have shown that both the water contact and slide angles on the surfaces will remain unchanged when the temperature of the water droplet is greater than that of the surface. The water contact angle, or the slide angle, will decrease or increase, however, with droplet temperatures increasingly greater than that of the surfaces. We propose that, in such cases, the loss of superhydrophobicity of the surfaces is caused by evaporation of the hot water molecules and their condensation on the cooler surface. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  18. Improvement of the gamma radioactivity measurements in water by the evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Serradell, V. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: vserradell@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Ballesteros, L.; Zarza, I. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    Frequently to measure gamma radioactivity in water, the water is poured in a tray covered with a plastic film and dried in an oven. Then, the film is folded and introduced in a Petri box to be measured in a Ge(HP) detector. The present paper studies the effect, that an irregular deposition of the residue left on the plastic film when evaporating the water, introduces in the results of the measurement. The quantitative analyses of gamma radioactivity imply a previous calibration of the instrument. Calibration samples are prepared in the same way as any other, then the calibration process becomes affected by the same previously mentioned effect. The study evaluates the maximum discrepancies that can be expected from this irregular deposition of the residue. Monte Carlo program MCNP is used to simulate the experimental measurements carried out, that easily allows to study intermediate situations. Lastly, a method to avoid this type of systematic error is recommended.

  19. Development of a preprototype thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem for water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H. E.; Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A three-man urine water recovery preprototype subsystem using a new concept to provide efficient potable water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Low power, compactness, and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber polysulfone membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. Application and integration of these key elements have solved problems inherent in previous reclamation subsystem designs. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than a waste liquid recirculation pump and a product water withdrawal pump. Tubular membranes provide structural integrity, improving on previous flat sheet membrane designs. A thermoelectric heat pump provides latent energy recovery.

  20. Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

  1. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHUGH, Devesh [University of Florida, Gainesville; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Moghaddam, Saeed [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the

  2. Morphology, surface topography and optical studies on electron beam evaporated MgO thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; J Kumar

    2006-10-01

    Electron beam evaporated thin films of MgO powder synthesized by burning of magnesium ribbon in air and sol–gel technique are studied for their microstructure (SEM), surface topography (AFM), and optical transmission behaviour (UV-visible spectroscopy). MgO thin films are shown to be either continuous or have mesh like morphology. The bar regions are believed to be of magnesium hydroxide formed due to absorption of moisture. Their AFM images exhibit columnar/pyramidal/truncated cone structure, providing support to the 3D Stranski–Krastanov model for film growth. Further, they are shown to have high transmittance (∼90%) in the wavelength range 400–600 nm, but absorb radiation below 350 nm substantially giving signature of a band transition.

  3. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface-energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-11-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for many hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSMs). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists of estimating ETP through an unstressed surface-energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). The ETP underlying the reference evaporation proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, (computed at a daily time step) has also been analysed and compared. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions shows that USEB and FAO's ETP estimations differ, especially in arid areas. However, they produce similar values when the FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by that of the model's. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for the FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the agreement between the daily mean estimates of ETP is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed by comparing trends in these formulations for the 21st century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity than the FAO's. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to two empirical approximations based on net radiation and mass transfer (Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these ETP estimates is

  4. Relationship between the inorganic chemical composition of water, precipitation and evaporation in the basin of Rio Grande, Chone, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Carrera

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2015/01/19 - Accepted: 2015/03/25In the Rio Grande basin, the Chone Multi-Purpose dam (PMCH is built with an investment of approximately $66 million, to irrigate over 7000ha. The marked differences in precipitation could impair the quality of water; therefore the aim of this study was to establish the relationship between the ions and their location in the graph: relationship of ions and mechanisms of chemical processes, water behavior and trend setting. The study was a non-experimental, cross-sectional and descriptive research. 111 samples were collected in the group of channels that form the Rio Grande basin, in 2013 and 2014 during times of drought and rain. The parameters were measured in the sample anions and cations. The processes that control the chemistry of surface water in the studied area during the rainy season have a predisposition to mineralization in equilibrium with rocks. However, in the time of drought, water movement was observed towards the area where evaporation with respect to precipitation predominates, increasing the inorganic chemistry of the waters that, in time, could be extended.

  5. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-06-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step) provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are able to reproduce

  6. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barella-Ortiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential evaporation (ETP is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman–Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM. This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method. The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992. ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley–Taylor and Rohwer, respectively. The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are

  7. Atomistic modelling of evaporation and explosive boiling of thin film liquid argon over internally recessed nanostructured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate evaporation and explosive boiling phenomena of thin film liquid argon on nanostructured solid surface with emphasis on the effect of solid-liquid interfacial wettability. The nanostructured surface considered herein consists of trapezoidal internal recesses of the solid platinum wall. The wetting conditions of the solid surface were assumed such that it covers both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions and hence effect of interfacial wettability on resulting evaporation and boiling phenomena was the main focus of this study. The initial configuration of the simulation domain comprised of a three phase system (solid platinum, liquid argon and vapor argon) on which equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. After equilibrium of the three-phase system was established, the wall was set to different temperatures (130 K and 250 K for the case of evaporation and explosive boiling respectively) to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat flux normal to the solid surface was also calculated to illustrate the effectiveness of heat transfer for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces in cases of both nanostructured surface and flat surface. The results obtained show that both the wetting condition of the surface and the presence of internal recesses have significant effect on normal evaporation and explosive boiling of the thin liquid film. The heat transfer from solid to liquid in cases of surface with recesses are higher compared to flat surface without recesses. Also the surface with higher wettability (hydrophilic) provides more favorable conditions for boiling than the low-wetting surface (hydrophobic) and therefore, liquid argon responds quickly and shifts from liquid to vapor phase faster in

  8. Numerical Investigation of Evaporation Induced Self-Assembly of Sub-Micron Particles Suspended in Water

    CERN Document Server

    Tayeb, Raihan; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of sub-micron particles suspended in a water film is investigated numerically. The liquid medium is allowed to evaporate leaving only the sub-micron particles. A coupled CFD-DEM approach is used for the simulation of fluid-particle interaction. Momentum exchange and heat transfer between particles and fluid and among particles are considered. A history dependent contact model is used to compute the contact force among sub-micron particles. Simulation is done using the open source software package CFDEM which basically comprises of two other open source packages OpenFOAM and LIGGGHTS. OpenFOAM is a widely used solver for CFD related problems. LIGGGHTS, a modification of LAMMPS, is used for DEM simulation of granular materials. The final packing structure of the sub-micron particles is discussed in terms of distribution of coordination number and radial distribution function (RDF). The final packing structure shows that particles form clusters and exhibit a definite pattern as water evaporates awa...

  9. Evaporative assembly of MEH-PPV rings using mixed solvents at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kung-Po; Biswal, Sibani L

    2014-04-22

    Controlling the morphology of conjugated polymers has recently attracted considerable attention because of their applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, we describe the self-assembly of a common conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), into ringlike structures via solvent evaporation on an air/water interface. The films are monitored using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and transferred onto a solid substrate by either the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method and further characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The morphology of the MEH-PPV thin film at the air/water interface can be controlled by the spreading solvent. By mixing solvents of varying spreading coefficients and evaporation rates, such as chloroform and chlorobenzene, MEH-PPV can be assembled into micrometer-sized ring structures. The optical properties of these MEH-PPV ring structures are also characterized. Lastly, MEH-PPV can be used as a soft template to organize microscale structures of nanoparticles.

  10. Understanding thermal Marangoni flow in water sessile evaporating drops via 3D-PTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Marin, Alvaro; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the flow inside sessile evaporating drops is of great interest both from a fundamental and technological point of view. Despite strong research efforts in the recent years, a complete picture on the phenomena involved in this process and a way to control them is still far to be reached. This is due to a lack of reliable experimental data on the internal flow but more dramatically on the interfacial flow. A relevant open debate concerns the role played by the Marangoni flow induced by thermal gradients. We recently show how 3D particle tracking techniques are suitable to measure the internal flow of drops and to derive quantities such as surface shear and surface tension differences. Such experiments also indicated an increase of the thermal Marangoni flow as the droplet becomes thinner, in disagreement with current theoretical models and simulations. A possible reason for that could be a discrepancy of the imposed boundary conditions in the simulations and the experimental ones. This work follows up these observations with fully 3D time-resolved measurements of the flow inside drops evaporating on a quartz substrate, which temperature is controlled using a feedback temperature control and a microscope incubator system. Supported by DFG, Grant No. KA 1808/22.

  11. Evaluation of a remotely sensed evaporative stress index for monitoring patterns of anomalous water-use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought assessment is a complex endeavor, requiring monitoring of deficiencies in multiple components of the hydrologic budget. Precipitation anomalies reflect variability in water supply to the land surface, while soil moisture (SM), ground and surface water anomalies reflect deficiencies in moist...

  12. Selective retardation of perfume oil evaporation from oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by either surfactant or nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-12-07

    We have used dynamic headspace analysis to investigate the evaporation rates of perfume oils from stirred oil-in-water emulsions into a flowing gas stream. We compare the behavior of an oil of low water solubility (limonene) and one of high water solubility (benzyl acetate). It is shown how the evaporation of an oil of low water solubility is selectively retarded and how the retardation effect depends on the oil volume fraction in the emulsion. We compare how the evaporation retardation depends on the nature of the adsorbed film stabilizing the emulsion. Surfactant films are less effective than adsorbed films of nanoparticles, and the retardation can be further enhanced by compression of the adsorbed nanoparticle films by preshrinking the emulsion drops.

  13. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol particles, we illustrate how the

  14. Desalting of sea water by a wall-less evaporation process; Dessalement de l'eau de mer par un procede d'evaporation sans paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, C.; Sachine, P.; Vuillemey, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-06-01

    The need for fresh water supplies in many parts of the globe has given a great impetus to the study of the desalting of sea-water. Research into this problem has been very varied. Although it is possible in the more-or-less near future that methods based on freezing may be developed, only evaporation methods have industrial applications at the present time. Amongst the many techniques using this method, the most favorably placed installations from the technical and economic points of view are those based on multiple effects and wall-less heat transfer. We have defined the characteristics of a wall-less evaporation process using the various factors involved in this evaporation: energy source, corrosion, furring, heat transfer, maximum temperature, etc... The unit considered in this work has a daily output of 100,000 m{sup 3}, and makes use of the multi-stage technique with an organic heat-carrier. The maximum temperature of the first stage is 150 deg C and the evaporation factor is 0.4. After the description of the process and, the calculation of the equipment, an economic estimate is given of the cost-price : 1.49 F/m{sup 3}. It is likely that more detailed study of the process (technique, equipment and energy consumed) should make it possible to obtain a significant improvement in the process and to reduce the price to 1 F/m{sup 3}. (authors) [French] Le probleme de l 'approvisionnement en eau de nombreuses regions du globe a mis a 1'ordre du jour le dessalement de l'eau de mer. Des recherches sur cette question ont ete faites dans de multiples directions. Si dans un avenir plus ou moins proche les procedes par congelation peuvent se developper, actuellement seules les methodes d'evaporation ont des applications industrielles. Parmi les nombreuses techniques qui visent a mettre en oeuvre ce principe, les installations a multiples effets et transfert de chaleur sans paroi semblent les mieux placees du point de vue technique et economique. A

  15. Hollow Fiber Flight Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Design and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Vogel, Matt; Makinen, Janice; Tsioulos, Gus

    2010-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits and to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology. This results in a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow-fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent extensive testing as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for continued SWME prototype development. The current design was based on a previous design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape. This was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting of 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which is formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of 10 nested stacks. The new design replaced metal components with plastic ones, and has a custom built flight like backpressure valve mounted on the side of the SWME housing to reduce backpressure when fully open. The spacers that provided separation of the chevron fiber stacks were eliminated. Vacuum chamber testing showed improved heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure compared with the previous design. Other tests pushed the limits of tolerance to freezing and showed suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment with and without a sweep gas. Tolerance to contamination by constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by distillation processes was tested in a conventional way by allowing constituents to accumulate in the coolant as evaporation occurs. For this purpose, the SWME cartridge has endured an equivalent of 30 EVAs exposure and demonstrated minimal performance decline.

  16. Evaluation of the return periods of water crises and evaporation in Monte Cotugno reservoir (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copertino, Vito; Lo Vecchio, Giuseppina; Marotta, Lucia; Pastore, Vittoria; Ponzio, Giuseppe; Scavone, Giuseppina; Telesca, Vito; Vita, Michele

    2010-05-01

    In the past water resources management has been dealt and solved increasing water availabilities; today such opportunities have been considerably reduced and the technical-scientific perspectives are addressed above all to improve water system effectiveness and to promote an use of water resources that holds account of the droughts frequency and based on a correct estimate of the hydrologic balance. In this work a study on the water stored in Monte Cotugno reservoir in Sinni river - Basilicata (Southern Italy) - is proposed, estimating water crises return periods and reservoir evaporation. For such purpose the runs method was applied, based on the comparison between the temporal series of the "water volume" hydrological variable and a threshold representative of the "normal" conditions regarding which the availability in excess or defect was estimated. This allowed to individualize the beginning and the end of a water crisis event and to characterize the droughts in terms of duration, sum deficit and intensity. Therefore the return period was evaluated by means of the methodology proposed by Shiau and Shen in 2001, turned out equal approximately to 6 years. Such value was then verified with a frequency analysis of the "water volume" random variable, using the Weibull's distribution. Subsequently, the Fourier's analysis in the last twenty years was carried out, obtaining the same result of the previous methods. Moreover, in proximity of the Monte Cotugno reservoir the weather station of Senise is located, managed by ALSIA (Agenzia Lucana di Sviluppo e Innovazione in Agricultura), that provides in continuous measurements of air temperature and humidity, wind speed and direction, and global solar radiation since 2000. Such parameters allowed to apply five methods for reservoir evaporation estimate selected from those proposed in the literature, of which the first three, the Jensen-Haise's method, Makkink's method and Stephens-Stewart's one are based on solar radiation

  17. Water availability in almond orchards on marl soils in southeast Spain: The role of evaporation and runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerkerk, A.; van Wesemael, B.; Cammeraat, E.

    2008-01-01

    Clean sweeping (i.e., frequent and shallow tillage in orchards) is a common practice in semi-arid areas. A potential drawback in dry areas is that the tree roots cannot access the water in the plough layer. Our objective was to quantify the loss of water by evaporation and the loss or gain by

  18. Evaporation, transpiration, and ecosystem water use efficiency in a multi-annual sugarcane production system in Hawai’i, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and biofuel production will require practices that increase water use efficiency in order to have future sustainability in a water-constrained environment. One possible practice is the use of food and energy crops with multi-annual growing periods, which could reduce bare soil evaporation. We...

  19. Water availability in almond orchards on marl soils in southeast Spain: The role of evaporation and runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Meerkerk; B. van Wesemael; E. Cammeraat

    2008-01-01

    Clean sweeping (i.e., frequent and shallow tillage in orchards) is a common practice in semi-arid areas. A potential drawback in dry areas is that the tree roots cannot access the water in the plough layer. Our objective was to quantify the loss of water by evaporation and the loss or gain by overla

  20. Effects of near surface soil moisture profiles during evaporation on far-field ground-penetrating radar data: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the effect of vapor flow on the drying front that develops in soils when water evaporates from the soil surface and on GPR data. The results suggest the integration of the full-wave GPR model with a coupled water, vapor, and heat flow model to accurately estimate the soil hydraulic properties. We investigated the Effects of a drying front that emerges below an evaporating soil surface on the far-field ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. First, we performed an analysis of the width of the drying front in soils with 12 different textures by using an analytical model. Then, we numerically simulated vertical soil moisture profiles that develop during evaporation for the soil textures. We performed the simulations using a Richards flow model that considers only liquid water flow and a model that considers coupled water, vapor, and heat flows. The GPR signals were then generated from the simulated soil water content profiles taking into account the frequency dependency of apparent electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity. The analytical approach indicated that the width of the drying front at the end of Stage I of the evaporation was larger in silty soils than in other soil textures and smaller in sandy soils. We also demonstrated that the analytical estimate of the width of the drying front can be considered as a proxy for the impact that a drying front could have on far-field GPR data. The numerical simulations led to the conclusion that vapor transport in soil resulted in S-shaped soil moisture profiles, which clearly influenced the GPR data. As a result, vapor flow needs to be considered when GPR data are interpreted in a coupled inversion approach. Moreover, the impact of vapor flow on the GPR data was larger for silty than for sandy soils. These Effects on the GPR data provide promising perspectives regarding the use of radars for evaporation monitoring. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI

  1. Comparison of evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces resolved by remotely sensed and in-situ temperature and soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, B.; Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The estimation of evaporation has important implications in modeling climate at the regional and global scale, the hydrological cycle and estimating environmental stress on agricultural systems. In field and laboratory studies, remote sensing and in-situ techniques are used to collect thermal and soil moisture data of the soil surface and subsurface which is then used to estimate evaporative fluxes, oftentimes using the sensible heat balance method. Nonetheless, few studies exist that compare the methods due to limited data availability and the complexity of many of the techniques, making it difficult to understand flux estimates. This work compares different methods used to quantify evaporative flux based on remotely sensed and in-situ temperature and soil moisture data. A series of four laboratory experiments were performed under ambient and elevated air temperature conditions with homogeneous and heterogeneous soil configurations in a small two-dimensional soil tank interfaced with a small wind tunnel apparatus. The soil tank and wind tunnel were outfitted with a suite of sensors that measured soil temperature (surface and subsurface), air temperature, soil moisture, and tank weight. Air and soil temperature measurements were obtained using infrared thermography, heat pulse sensors and thermistors. Spatial and temporal thermal data were numerically inverted to obtain the evaporative flux. These values were then compared with rates of mass loss from direct weighing of the samples. Results demonstrate the applicability of different methods under different surface boundary conditions; no one method was deemed most applicable under every condition. Infrared thermography combined with the sensible heat balance method was best able to determine evaporative fluxes under stage 1 conditions while distributed temperature sensing combined with the sensible heat balance method best determined stage 2 evaporation. The approaches that appear most promising for determining the

  2. Treatment of a waste oil-in-water emulsion from a copper-rolling process by ultrafiltration and vacuum evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Gemma; Lobo, Alberto; Benito, José M; Coca, José; Pazos, Carmen

    2011-01-30

    A process is proposed for the treatment of a waste oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion generated in an industrial copper-rolling operation. The use of demulsifier agents improves the subsequent treatment by techniques such as ultrafiltration (UF) or evaporation. The effluent COD is reduced up to 50% when the O/W emulsion is treated by UF using a flat 30 nm TiO(2) ceramic membrane (ΔP = 0.1 MPa) and up to 70% when it is treated by vacuum evaporation, after an emulsion destabilization pretreatment in both cases. Increases in the UF permeate flux and in the evaporation rate are observed when a chemical demulsifier is used in the pretreatment step. A combined process consisting of destabilization/settling, UF, and vacuum evaporation can yield a very high-quality aqueous effluent that could be used for process cooling or emulsion reformulation.

  3. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  4. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  5. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  6. Full-Scale Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Dillon, Paul; Weaver, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the superior candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. Although a number of design variants were considered, one that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was deemed best for further development. An analysis of test data showed that eight layer stacks of the HoFi sheets that had good exposure on each side of the stack would evaporate water with high efficiency. A design that has 15,000 tubes, with 18 cm of exposed tubes between headers has been built and tested that meets the size, weight, and performance requirements of the SWME. This full-scale prototype consists of 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Testing has been performed to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the sensitivity to surfactants.

  7. On the uniqueness of the receding contact angle: effects of substrate roughness and humidity on evaporation of water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittoni, Paola G; Lin, Chia-Hui; Yu, Teng-Shiang; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2014-08-12

    Could a unique receding contact angle be indicated for describing the wetting properties of a real gas-liquid-solid system? Could a receding contact angle be defined if the triple line of a sessile drop is not moving at all during the whole measurement process? To what extent is the receding contact angle influenced by the intrinsic properties of the system or the measurement procedures? In order to answer these questions, a systematic investigation was conducted in this study on the effects of substrate roughness and relative humidity on the behavior of pure water drops spreading and evaporating on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces characterized by different morphologies. Dynamic, advancing, and receding contact angles were found to be strongly affected by substrate roughness. Specifically, a receding contact angle could not be measured at all for drops evaporating on the more rugged PC surfaces, since the drops were observed strongly pinning to the substrate almost until their complete disappearance. Substrate roughness and system relative humidity were also found responsible for drastic changes in the depinning time (from ∼10 to ∼60 min). Thus, for measurement observations not sufficiently long, no movement of the triple line could be noted, with, again, the failure to find a receding contact angle. Therefore, to keep using concepts such as the receding contact angle as meaningful specifications of a given gas-liquid-solid system, the imperative to carefully investigate and report the inner characteristics of the system (substrate roughness, topography, impurities, defects, chemical properties, etc.) is pointed out in this study. The necessity of establishing methodological standards (drop size, measurement method, system history, observation interval, relative humidity, etc.) is also suggested.

  8. Interpreting the inter-model spread in regional precipitation projections in the tropics: role of surface evaporation and cloud radiative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Boutheina; Bony, Sandrine; Risi, Camille; Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate and quantify different contributors to inter-model differences in regional precipitation projections among CMIP5 climate models. Contributors to the spread are very contrasted between land and ocean. While circulation changes dominate the spread over oceans and continental coasts, thermodynamic changes associated with water vapor increase dominate over inland regions. The inter-model spread in the dynamic component is associated with the change in atmospheric radiative cooling with warming, which largely relates to atmospheric cloud radiative effects. Differences in the thermodynamic component result from the differences in the change in surface evaporation that is explained by decreases in surface humidity and limited surface water availability over land. Secondary contributions to the inter-model spread in thermodynamic and dynamic components result respectively from present-day climatology (owing to the Clausius-Clapeyron scaling) and from the shape of the vertical velocity profile associated with changes in surface temperature gradients. Advancing the physical understanding of the cloud-circulation and precipitation-evaporation couplings and improving their representation in climate models may stand the best chance to reduce uncertainty in regional precipitation projections.

  9. Potential Evaporation Computation through an Unstressed Surface Energy Balance and its Sensitivity to Climate Change Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Polcher, Jan; Tuzet, Andrée; Laval, Katia

    2013-04-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method). The values provided confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented (Milly, 1992). ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step) provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In the first place, a comparison for a reference period of 11 years shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Additionally, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) is also substituted by either ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity mainly due to FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions and to a lesser extent, to the approximation proposed for the VPD. Both FAO's VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as ORCHIDEE's aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to 3 empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley - Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). When compared to the USEB method

  10. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  11. The role of current characteristics of the arc evaporator in formation of the surface metal-coating composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikhunov, V. V.; Petrov, L. M.; Grigorovich, K. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of current characteristics of the vacuum arc evaporator on the interaction process of plasma streams with the surface under treatment during generation of the physicochemical properties of the formed metal-coating composite is considered. It is shown that the interaction of plasma streams with the processed surface provides surface heating, defects elimination, change in energy properties, and mass transfer of plasma stream elements activating surface diffusion processes whose intensity is evaluated by the arc current magnitude and location of the processed surface relative to the cathode axis.

  12. Water based suspensions of iron oxide obtained by laser target evaporation for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselova, I. P.; Safronov, A. P.; Samatov, O. M.; Beketov, I. V.; Medvedev, A. I.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this work spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were obtained by laser target evaporation technique (LTE). Water based suspensions were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs and their properties were also studied including inductive heat capacity. Their structure and properties were studied by a number of techniques including magnetometry and heat capacity measurements. Magnetic induction heating experiment show the specific loss power (SLP) value in the narrow range from 1.30 to 1.45 W/g for all samples under consideration when using alternating magnetic field of 1.7 kA/m and frequency of 210 kHz. These parameters insure that LTE MNPs are interesting materials promising for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

  13. Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Tsioulos, Gus; Settles, Joseph; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew; Vonau, Walt

    2010-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. A design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment.

  14. Experimental method and preliminary studies of the passive containment water film evaporation mass transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [State Nuclear Power Technology Research, Beijing (China). Development Center; State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Beijing (China); Yang, Lin; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Shan; Du, Wangfang; Gao, Zhan; Li, Honegsen [State Nuclear Power Technology Research, Beijing (China). Development Center

    2017-05-15

    For larger containments and higher operation parameters, characteristics of the outside cooling of the PCCS are very important for the analysis on the containment integrity. A preliminary analysis was made and a four-step experimental method was used to numerically analyze the falling water film evaporation for the advanced passive containment. Then, the water flow stability along the outside wall of the containment was studied. The results fit well with those correlations without airflow when the air velocity is less than 5.0 m/s. However, when the air velocity is larger than 5.0 m/s, the influence of the air velocity on the water film will appear and the mean water film thickness will be thicker. Based on the prototype operation parameters, experimental studies were carried and the results were compared with the Dittus-Boelter correlation within the operation ranges. A modification factor was proposed for the conservative application of this correlation for nuclear safety analysis.

  15. Influence of air velocity on droplet's wetting and evaporation conditions on a flat surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapalowicz, Z. (Technical Univ. of Szczecin (Poland). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    The paper presents results of experimental research on influence of air velocity on characteristic dimensions, spreading ratio and evaporation time of a droplet. The relation between the velocity that initiates droplet's motion and the temperature of the surface has been under research, too, and is presented in the paper as well. The research allows determination of the droplet's rest and motion areas on the wall surface.

  16. Evaporative supercooling characteristics of single water droplet in ice-slurry production system with evaporative supercooled water%蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴的蒸发过冷特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫俊海; 张小松

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the evaporation characteristics of single water droplet in low temperature and low humidity ratio air in ice production system with evaporative supercooled water, a mathematical model of evaporative supercooling process of single water droplet was proposed. The evaporation process of droplet in supercooling stage was simulated with theoretical model and the results are basically consistent with the experiment on suspended single water droplet, so it is feasible to predict the evaporative supercooling characteristics of small water droplet by the mathematical model. The influence of initial diameter and temperature of water droplet, air temperature, humidity ratio of air, and air velocity on the temperature of water droplet during its evaporative supercooling process was analyzed. The numerical results show that smaller diameter and lower temperature of water droplet and larger air velocity can increase the cooling rate of water droplet and shorten the supercooling time reaching steady state evaporation stage. Additionally, lowering the temperature or humidity ratio of air can not only improve the cooling rate of water droplet, but also increase the supercooling degree of water droplet reaching steady state evaporation stage. The investigation of evaporative supercooling process of water droplet can provide a foundation for improving the efficiency of ice production and optimal design for ice-making system with evaporative supercooled water.%为分析蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴在此低温低湿空气环境中的蒸发特性,建立了水滴蒸发过冷过程的数理模型.通过悬挂水滴实验与模拟结果的对比,验证了模型的有效性.因此利用该数学模型预测微小直径水滴的蒸发特性是可行的.通过模拟计算获得了水滴初始直径、初始水温、空气温度、空气含湿量和空气流速对水滴蒸发过冷过程的影响.结果表明,水滴初始直径越小、温度越低或空气流速越大,

  17. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2013-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2011-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

  20. Concept Paper : Defining wetland water requirements and evaporative rates relative to the Lahontan Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The calculations in this report are to determine average surface water requirements are for planning purposes and are not intended to represent actual Lahontan...

  1. Evaporative enrichment and time lags between delta18O of leaf water and organic pools in a pine stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Romain L; Salmon, Yann; Kodama, Naomi; Sörgel, Karin; Holst, Jutta; Rennenberg, Heinz; Gessler, Arthur; Buchmann, Nina

    2007-05-01

    Understanding ecosystem water fluxes has gained increasing attention, as climate scenarios predict a drier environment for many parts of the world. Evaporative enrichment of (18)O (Delta(18)O) of leaf water and subsequent enrichment of plant organic matter can be used to characterize environmental and physiological factors that control evaporation, based on a recently established mechanistic model. In a Pinus sylvestris forest, we measured the dynamics of oxygen isotopic composition (delta(18)O) every 6 h for 4 d in atmospheric water vapour, xylem sap, leaf water and water-soluble organic matter in current (N) and previous year (N-1) needles, phloem sap, together with leaf gas exchange for pooled N and N-1 needles, and relevant micrometeorological variables. Leaf water delta(18)O showed strong diel periodicity, while delta(18)O in atmospheric water vapour and in xylem sap showed little variation. The Delta(18)O was consistently lower for N than for N-1 needles, possibly related to phenological stage. Modelled leaf water Delta(18)O showed good agreement with measured values when applying a non-steady state evaporative enrichment model including a Péclet effect. We determined the time lags between delta(18)O signals from leaf water to water-soluble foliar organic matter and to phloem sap at different locations down the trunk, which clearly demonstrated the relevance of considering these time-lag effects for carbon transport, source-sink and carbon flux partitioning studies.

  2. Evaporative gold nanorod assembly on chemically stripe-patterned gradient surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Imtiaz; Jansen, H Patrick; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Ganser, Christian; Teichert, Christian; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Kooij, E Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Experimentally we explore the potential of using pre-defined motion of a receding contact line to control the deposition of nanoparticles from suspension. Stripe-patterned wettability gradients are employed, which consist of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes with increasing macroscopic surface energy. Nanoparticle suspensions containing nanorods and nanospheres are deposited onto these substrates and left to dry. After moving over the pattern and evaporation of the solvent, characteristic nanoparticle deposits are found. The liquid dynamics has a pronounced effect on the spatial distribution. Nanoparticles do not deposit on the hydrophobic regions; there is high preference to deposit on the wetting stripes. Moreover, the fact that distributed nanoparticle islands are formed suggests that the receding of the contact line occurs in a stick-slip like fashion. Furthermore, the formation of liquid bridges covering multiple stripes during motion of the droplet over the patterns is modeled. We discuss their origin and show that the residue after drying, containing both nanoparticles and the stabilizing surfactant, also resembles such dynamics. Finally, zooming into individual islands reveals that highly selective phase separation occurs based on size and shape of the nanoparticles.

  3. Surface functionalization of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) with evaporated TiO{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Fissi, Lamia, E-mail: lamia.elfissi@uclouvain.be [ICTEAM Institute, Université catholique du Louvain, place de Levant 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vandormael, Denis [SIRRIS Liege Science Park, 4102 Seraing (Belgium); Houssiau, Laurent [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Francis, Laurent A. [ICTEAM Institute, Université catholique du Louvain, place de Levant 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/COC (cyclic olefin copolymer) hybrid material for BioMEMS applications. • Thin layer of TiO{sub 2} was deposed on cyclic olefin copolymer using physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. • The coating possess the highest level of adhesion with an excellent morphology of the hybrid material (TiO{sub 2}/COC). - Abstract: Cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) is a new class of thermoplastic polymers used for a variety of applications ranging from bio-sensing to optics. However, the hydrophobicity of native COC hampers the further development and application of this material [1]. In this work, we report the structural, morphological, and optical properties of the TiO{sub 2}/COC hybrid material, which provides a desirable substrate for optical devices and subsequent surface modifications. The TiO{sub 2} film on COC substrate was deposited by the evaporation method, and it was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), profilometry and atomic force microscope (AFM). Using an UV-vis spectrophotometer, we found that the transmittance of the TiO{sub 2}/COC hybrid material in the visible domain reached 80%. The TiO{sub 2}/COC hybrid appeared to be stable in most of the assessed polar solvents and acid/basic solutions. The new TiO{sub 2}/COC hybrid material and the robust fabrication method are expected to enable a variety of BioMEMS applications.

  4. Is large-scale inverse modelling of unsaturated flow with areal average evaporation and surface soil moisture as estimated from remote sensing feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddes, R. A.; Menenti, M.; Kabat, P.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.

    1993-03-01

    The potentiality of combining large-scale inverse modelling of unsaturated flow with remote sensing determination of areal evaporation and areal surface moisture is assessed. Regional latent and sensible heat fluxes are estimated indirectly using remotely sensed measurements by parameterizing the surface energy balance equation. An example of evapotranspiration mapping from northern and central Egypt is presented. The inverse problem is formulated with respect to the type of information available. Two examples of estimation of soil hydraulic properties by the dynamic one-dimensional soil-water-vegetation model SWATRE are given: one refers to a classical lysimeter scale and another one to a catchment scale. It is concluded that small-scale soil physics may describe large-scale hydrological behaviour adequately, and that the effective hydraulic parameters concerned may be derived by an inverse modelling approach. Remotely sensed data on surface reflectance, surface temperature and soil moisture content derived from multifrequency microwave techniques provide a useful data set on the mesoscale. The inverse modelling approach presented combined with a meso-scale data set on evaporation and surface soil moisture, considerable potentialities arise to determine effective meso-scale hydraulic properties.

  5. Evaporation and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, T.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the influence of climate change on evaporation is discussed. The emphasis is on open water evaporation. Three methods for calculating evaporation are compared considering only changes in temperature and factors directly dependent on temperature. The Penman-method is used to

  6. Evaporation and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, T.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the influence of climate change on evaporation is discussed. The emphasis is on open water evaporation. Three methods for calculating evaporation are compared considering only changes in temperature and factors directly dependent on temperature. The Penman-method is used to investiga

  7. Effects of Bell Speed and Flow Rate on Evaporation of Water Spray from a Rotary Bell Atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Ray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A phase doppler anemometer (PDA was used to determine the effects of evaporation on water spray for three rotary bell atomizer operational variable parameters: shaping air, bell speed and liquid flow. Shaping air was set at either 200 standard liters per minute (L/min or 300 L/min, bell speed was set to 30, 40 or 50 thousand rotations per minute (krpm and water flow rate was varied between 100, 200 or 300 cubic centimeters per minute (cm3/min. The total evaporation between 22.5 and 37.5 cm from the atomizer (cm3/s was calculated for all the combinations of those variables. Evaporation rate increased with higher flow rate and bell speed but no statistically significant effects were obtained for variable shaping air on interactions between parameters.

  8. Total evaporation estimates from a Renosterveld and dryland wheat/fallow surface at the Voëlvlei Nature Reserve (South Africa)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, Nebojsa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate quantification of the water balance, in particular evapotranspiration, is fundamental in managing water resources, especially in semi-arid areas. The objective of this study was to compare evaporation from endemic vegetation...

  9. Quasi-static motion of microparticles at the depinning contact line of an evaporating droplet on PDMS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying-Song; Xia, Xue-Lian; Zheng, Xu; Huang, Xianfu; Zhou, Jin-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, evaporation of sessile water droplets containing fluorescent polystyrene (PS) microparticles on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with different curing ratios was studied experimentally using laser confocal microscopy. At the beginning, there were some microparticles located at the contact line and some microparticles moved towards the line. Due to contact angle hysteresis, at first both the contact line and the microparticles were pinned. With the depinning contact line, the microparticles moved together spontaneously. Using the software ImageJ, the location of contact lines at different time were acquired and the circle centers and radii of the contact lines were obtained via the least square method. Then the average distance of two neighbor contact lines at a certain time interval was obtained to characterize the motion of the contact line. Fitting the distance-time curve at the depinning contact line stage with polynomials and differentiating the polynomials with time, we obtained the velocity and acceleration of both the contact line and the microparticles located at the line. The velocity and the maximum acceleration were, respectively, of the orders of 1 μm/s and 20-200 nm/s2, indicating that the motion of the microparticles located at the depinning contact line was quasi-static. Finally, we presented a theoretical model to describe the quasi-static process, which may help in understanding both self-pinning and depinning of microparticles.

  10. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trambauer, P.; Dutra, E.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; Van Beek, L.P.H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle, with implications ranging from water management, to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological or land-surface models. However, it

  11. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trambauer, P.; Dutra, E.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; Van Beek, L.P.H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle with implications ranging, inter alia, from water management to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological models or land-surface m

  12. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trambauer, P.; Dutra, E.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; Van Beek, L.P.H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle, with implications ranging from water management, to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological or land-surface models. However, it

  13. Pinning-Depinning Mechanism of the Contact Line during Evaporation on Chemically Patterned Surfaces: A Lattice Boltzmann Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhou, P; Yan, H J

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, the pinning and depinning mechanism of the contact line during droplet evaporation on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces is numerically investigated using a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with liquid-vapor phase change. A local force balance in the context of diffuse interfaces is introduced to explain the equilibrium states of droplets on chemically patterned surfaces. It is shown that when the contact line is pinned on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic boundary, different contact angles can be interpreted as the variation of the length of the contact line occupied by each component. The stick-slip-jump behavior of evaporating droplets on chemically patterned surfaces is well captured by the LB simulations. Particularly, a slow movement of the contact line is clearly observed during the stick (pinning) mode, which shows that the pinning of the contact line during droplet evaporation on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces is actually a dynamic pinning process and the dynamic equilibrium is achieved by the self-adjustment of the contact lines occupied by each component. Moreover, it is shown that when the surface tension varies with the temperature, the Marangoni effect has an important influence on the depinning of the contact line, which occurs when the horizontal component (toward the center of the droplet) of the force caused by the Marangoni stress overcomes the unbalanced Young's force toward the outside.

  14. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  15. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  16. Impacts of Evaporation Ponds of Ethanol Distillery Spent Wash on Underground Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *M. T. Mahar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This preliminary study was designed to monitor the effect of distillery spent wash evaporation ponds on underground water. The water samples (3 spent wash and 32 underground (total 35 were analyzed for the parameters, pH, Electrical conductivity (E.C, Total dissolved salts (TDS, Total hardness (TH, Chloride, Total phosphate-P, M-alkalinity, Sulfate, Nitrate-N, Dissolved Oxygen (DO and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD. The physico-chemical parameters of the water samples for spent wash and underground were found in the following ranges; pH 7.2-7.7 & 6.8-7.7, electrical conductivity 38.2-44.7 ms/cm & 0.47-32.0 ms/cm, TDS 24448-28608 mg/l & 302-19840 mg/l, Total hardness 17400-18000 mg/l & 170-4150 mg/l, chlorides 7446-13293.5 mg/l & 85.0-2836 mg/l , Total phosphate-p 229.5-328.5 mg/l & 0.005-2.29 mg/l, Methyl red Alkalinity 1702.5-2352.5 mg/l & 115-657.5 mg/l , Sulfate 3157.8-3552.6 mg/l & 10-417.1 mg/l, Nitrate-N 471.5-539.1 mg/l & 0.0-28.0 mg/l, COD 20080-24320 mg/l & 0.0-53.0 mg/l, DO 0.036-0.12 mg/l & 1.1-7.7 mg/l respectively. The underground water was observed being affected by the spent wash. It was observed that the distillery industry discharges various pollutants in concentration above NEQS for industrial effluents. Greater concentration of these pollutants is responsible for underground water pollution of study area.

  17. Heat transfer characteristics of water film flash evaporation in vacuum ice making%水膜闪蒸真空制冰的换热特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪珺; 章学来; 刘小微; 吴云云; 韩中; 杨阳

    2013-01-01

    A water film flash evaporation vacuum ice-making system is developed. The experiment was carried out to investigate the influence of flash evaporation pressure, thickness and initial temperature of water film on the flash evaporation process. The thickness of the water film was 15, 35, 55 and 75 mm. Initial temperature of water film ranged from 2℃ to 10℃ , and flash evaporation pressure varied from 100 Pa to 600 Pa. The characteristics of the flash evaporation process were recorded using a CCD camera of the visualization system. The experimental results show that under the operating conditions, lower flash evaporation pressure leads to faster change of water film temperature at constant initial temperature of water film. Higher initial temperature of water film makes the water film temperature varies more quickly at constant pressure. As water film thickness increases, the decrease rate of water film temperature reduces. Based on the experimental results, a correlation for water film temperature with flash evaporation pressure, thickness and initial temperature of water film is presented with the maximum error of 24. 19%.

  18. EVAPORATION FORM OF ICE CRYSTALS IN SUBSATURATED AIR AND THEIR EVAPORATION MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    ゴンダ, タケヒコ; セイ, タダノリ; Takehiko, Gonda; Tadanori, Sei

    1987-01-01

    The evaporation form and the evaporation mechanism of dendritic ice crystals grown in air of 1.0×(10)^5 Pa and at water saturation and polyhedral ice crystals grown in air of 4.0×10 Pa and at relatively low supersaturation are studied. In the case of dendritic ice crystals, the evaporation preferentially occurs in the convex parts of the crystal surfaces and in minute secondary branches. On the other hand, in the case of polyhedral ice crystals, the evaporation preferentially occurs in the pa...

  19. Effect of soil property on evaporation from bare soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the actual evaporation rate from bare soils remains a challenging task as it not only associates with the atmospheric demand and liquid water saturation on the soil surface, but also the properties of the soils (e.g., porosity, pore size distribution). A physically based analytical model was developed to describe the surface resistance varying with the liquid water saturation near the soil surface. This model considers the soil pore size distribution, hydraulic connection between the main water cluster and capillary water in the soil surface when the soil surface is wet and the thickness of the dry soil layer when the soil surface is dry. The surface resistance model was then integrated to a numerical model based on water balance, heat balance and surface energy balance equations. The integrated model was validated by simulating water and heat transport processes during six soil column drying experiments. The analysis indicates that the when soil surface is wet, the consideration of pore size distribution in the surface resistance model offers better estimation of transient evaporation among different soil types than the estimations given by empirically based surface resistance models. Under fixed atmospheric boundary condition and liquid water saturation, fine sand has greater evaporation rate than coarse sand as stronger capillary force devlivers more water from the main water cluster. When the soil surface becomes dry, the impact of soil property to evaporation becomes trivial as the thickness of the dry soil layer turns to be the key factor to determine the evaporation rate.

  20. Evolutionary shifts in habitat aridity predict evaporative water loss across squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christian L; Cox, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Aridity is an important determinant of species distributions, shaping both ecological and evolutionary diversity. Lizards and snakes are often abundant in deserts, suggesting a high potential for adaptation or acclimation to arid habitats. However, phylogenetic evidence indicates that squamate diversity in deserts may be more strongly tied to speciation within arid habitats than to convergent evolution following repeated colonization from mesic habitats. To assess the frequency of evolutionary transitions in habitat aridity while simultaneously testing for associated changes in water-balance physiology, we analyzed estimates of total evaporative water loss (EWL) for 120 squamate species inhabiting arid, semiarid, or mesic habitats. Phylogenetic reconstructions revealed that evolutionary transitions to and from semiarid habitats were much more common than those between arid and mesic extremes. Species from mesic habitats exhibited significantly higher EWL than those from arid habitats, while species from semiarid habitats had intermediate EWL. Phylogenetic comparative methods confirmed this association between habitat aridity and EWL despite phylogenetic signal in each. Thus, the historical colonization of arid habitats by squamates is repeatedly associated with adaptive changes in EWL. This physiological convergence, which may reflect both phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation, has likely contributed to the success of squamates in arid environments.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Droplet Evaporation of Water with Ground Admixtures while Motion in a Flame of Liquid Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriyenko Margarita A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaporation features for the atomized flow of suspension on the base of water with ground admixtures in an area of high-temperature combustion products of liquid flammable substance (acetone were investigated experimentally by the optical methods of gas flow diagnostic and the high-speed video recording. The scales of influence of clay and silt concentration in droplets of atomized flow on the intensity of its evaporation were determined. The approximation dependences describing a decrease in typical size of suspension droplets at various values of ground admixtures were obtained.

  2. Lake Nasser evaporation reduction study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M.I. Ebaid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the reduction of evaporation of Lake Nasser’s water caused by disconnecting (fully or partially some of its secondary channels (khors. This evaluation integrates remote sensing, Geographic Information System (GIS techniques, aerodynamic principles, and Landsat7 ETM+ images. Three main procedures were carried out in this study; the first derived the surface temperature from Landsat thermal band; the second derived evaporation depth and approximate evaporation volume for the entire lake, and quantified evaporation loss to the secondary channels’ level over one month (March by applied aerodynamic principles on surface temperature of the raster data; the third procedure applied GIS suitability analysis to determine which of these secondary channels (khors should be disconnected. The results showed evaporation depth ranging from 2.73 mm/day at the middle of the lake to 9.58 mm/day at the edge. The evaporated water-loss value throughout the entire lake was about 0.86 billion m3/month (March. The analysis suggests that it is possible to save an approximate total evaporation volume loss of 19.7 million m3/month (March, and thus 2.4 billion m3/year, by disconnecting two khors with approximate construction heights of 8 m and 15 m. In conclusion, remote sensing and GIS are useful for applications in remote locations where field-based information is not readily available and thus recommended for decision makers remotely planning in water conservation and management.

  3. Separating soil evaporation and crop transpiration to improve crop water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Lee; Nguyen, Long; Gong, Daozhi; Mei, Xurong; Amenzou, Noureddine

    2014-05-01

    A network of a FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on "Managing Irrigation Water to Enhance Crop Productivity under Water-Limiting Conditions: A Role for Isotopic Techniques", involving seven countries was implemented from 2007 to 2012, to identify approaches to improve crop water productivity (production per unit of water input) under water-limiting conditions using isotopic and related techniques. This paper presents findings from the two of the studied sites, one in China and another in Morocco, in using both isotopic and conventional techniques to separate soil evaporation (E) and crop transpiration (T) from total water losses in evapotranspiration (ET) for winter wheat grown under different climatic conditions and methods of irrigation management practices. In the North China Plain (NCP), the estimated E/ET of winter wheat by the isotopic method (Keeling plot using delta oxygen-18 (δ18O)) was in agreement with that obtained by conventional methods (eddy covariance and micro-lysimeter). The high correlation between these methods (R2=0.85, n=27) showed that the E from wheat-growing field contributes an average of 30% of water losses for the whole growing season (Nov-June), with higher E percentage (68%) can be expected before elongation stage due to incomplete canopy cover. The results also showed that through deficit irrigation and improved irrigation scheduling, soil E losses could be reduced by 10-30% of the total water loss compared with full irrigation. In Morocco, field Keeling plot isotopic E and T separation study was carried out for two days in spring of 2012 at Sidi Rahal. The percentage contribution of T to total ET was approximately 73%. The experimental results obtained from both China and Moroccan sites were used to validate FAO's AquaCrop model for E and T, and for improving irrigation scheduling and agronomic practices. Good correlation (R2=0.83) was obtained between measured (isotopic) and AquaCrop simulated ET from NCP. The measured

  4. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...... in warm/hot and dry environment where dehumidification of outdoor air is not needed. A laboratory experiment was designed and conducted to evaluate the cooling effectiveness of this technology. The experiment was conducted in a twin-climate chamber. One chamber simulated warm/hot and dry outdoor...... environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water...

  5. Estimation of evaporation from open water - A review of selected studies, summary of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers data collection and methods, and evaluation of two methods for estimation of evaporation from five reservoirs in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations responsible for the management of water resources, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are tasked with estimation of evaporation for water-budgeting and planning purposes. The USACE has historically used Class A pan evaporation data (pan data) to estimate evaporation from reservoirs but many USACE Districts have been experimenting with other techniques for an alternative to collecting pan data. The energy-budget method generally is considered the preferred method for accurate estimation of open-water evaporation from lakes and reservoirs. Complex equations to estimate evaporation, such as the Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, and Priestley-Taylor, perform well when compared with energy-budget method estimates when all of the important energy terms are included in the equations and ideal data are collected. However, sometimes nonideal data are collected and energy terms, such as the change in the amount of stored energy and advected energy, are not included in the equations. When this is done, the corresponding errors in evaporation estimates are not quantifiable. Much simpler methods, such as the Hamon method and a method developed by the U.S. Weather Bureau (USWB) (renamed the National Weather Service in 1970), have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of evaporation when compared to energy-budget method estimates. Data requirements for the Hamon and USWB methods are minimal and sometimes perform well with remotely collected data. The Hamon method requires average daily air temperature, and the USWB method requires daily averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Estimates of annual lake evaporation from pan data are frequently within 20 percent of energy-budget method estimates. Results of evaporation estimates from the Hamon method and the USWB method were compared against historical pan data at five selected reservoirs in Texas (Benbrook Lake, Canyon Lake, Granger Lake, Hords Creek Lake, and Sam

  6. Effects of Substrate Heating and Wettability on Evaporation Dynamics and Deposition Patterns for a Sessile Water Droplet Containing Colloidal Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Patil, Nagesh D; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Sharma, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Effects of substrate temperature, substrate wettability and particles concentration are experimentally investigated for evaporation of a sessile water droplet containing colloidal particles. Time-varying droplet shapes and temperature of the liquid-gas interface are measured using high-speed visualization and infrared thermography, respectively. The motion of the particles inside the evaporating droplet is qualitatively visualized by an optical microscope and profile of final particle deposit is measured by an optical profilometer. On a non-heated hydrophilic substrate, a ring-like deposit forms after the evaporation, as reported extensively in the literature; while on a heated hydrophilic substrate, a thinner ring with an inner deposit is reported in the present work. The latter is attributed to Marangoni convection and recorded motion of the particles as well as measured temperature gradient across the liquid-gas interface confirms this hypothesis. The thinning of the ring scales with the substrate temperat...

  7. Stable isotope estimates of evaporation: inflow and water residence time for lakes across the United States as a tool for national lake water quality assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope ratios of water (delta18O and delta2H) can be very useful in large-scale monitoring programs because water samples are easy to collect and isotope ratios integrate information about basic hydrologic processes such as evaporation as a percentage of inflow (E/I) and ...

  8. Evaporation of Water Droplets on “Lock-and-Key” Structures with Nanoscale Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    prevented whereas in the case of the MCAs the contact radius exhibits distinct stages during evaporation and the contact line retreats significantly in the middle of the evaporation process. We explain the phenomenon by a qualitative energy balance argument based on the different shrinkage types...

  9. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  10. Electromembrane recycling of highly mineralized alkaline blowdown water from evaporative water treatment plants at thermal power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Lyapin, A. I.; Minibaev, A. I.; Silov, I. Yu.; Tolmachev, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal power stations (TPS) are the main source of highly mineralized effluents affecting the environment. An analysis of their water systems demonstrates that alkaline effluents prevail at TPSs. Extraction of an alkali from highly mineralized effluents can make the recycling of effluents economically feasible. A method is proposed of electromembrane recycling of liquid alkaline highly mineralized wastes from TPSs. The process includes electromembrane apparatuses of two types, namely, a diffusion dialysis extractor (DDE) intended for extraction of the alkali from a highly mineralized solution having a complex composition and an electrodialysis concentrator for increasing the concentration of the extracted solution to a value suitable for use in water treatment plants at TPSs. For implementation of the first process (i.e. the extraction of alkali from alkaline-salt solution) various membranes from various manufacturers were studied: CM-PAD and AM-PAD (Ralex, Czechia), MK-40, MA-40, MA-41, MA-414, and MB-2 (OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot", Russia), AR103-QDF and CR61-CMP (Ionies Inc., USA). The experiments demonstrate that the acceptable degree of separation of the alkali and the salt is achieved in a pair of cation-exchange membranes with the efficiency of separation being higher without an electric field. The highest efficiency was attained with Russian-made membranes (MK-40, OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot"). A full scale experiment on recycling of highly-mineralized blowdown water from the evaporating water treatment system at the Kazan cogeneration power station No. 3 (TETs-3) was performed in a pilot unit consisting of two electromembrane apparatuses made by UAB "Membraninės Technologijos LT". In the experiments every ton of blowdown water yielded 0.1 t of concentrated alkaline solution with an alkali content of up to 4 wt % and 0.9 t of the softened salt solution suitable for the reuse in the TPS cycle. The power rate is 6 kWh / ton of blowdown water.

  11. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    objective of this task is to perform bench scale testing on various frits that have been used at DWPF or in test programs at SRNL to determine the quantity of de-ionized (DI) water required to mitigate dusting per mass basis of frit. The quantity of DI water required was determined visually by observing the effluent port of the mixer, and DI water addition was made to the point where no visible dust was observed leaving the effluent port. A total of eight different frits were selected for testing. Secondary objectives in this task include the following: (1) Video taping of the de-dusting procedure, (2) Particle size distribution analyses of the dry and wetted frits at the weight fraction of water required for de-dusting, (3) Plate flow tests to determine angle of flow and quantity of material remaining on plate at 90 degrees, (4) Microscopy of dry and wetted frit, and (5) Effect of excess water for selected frits on plate flow. The above analyses were performed within one hour of water addition, to minimize the effect of evaporative water losses. To better understand the size of dust particles, perform settling tests on selected frits and capture the fines. Analyze the fines for particle size distribution. Finally, it is expected that the surface area of frit is an important parameter in the quantity of water required for dust mitigation. An analysis of particle size distribution (PSD) data of as-received frit analyzed by SRNL over the past two to three years will be performed to determine the variation in the distribution of as-received frit. The following objectives were stated in the Technical Task Request4 as objectives that given adequate time would provide insight in helping DWPF in assessing equipment or processes for de-dusting and processing of dry frit. Due to time constraints, commercial methods for dedusting are provided. These results are detailed in section 3.7. Obtain design information from Hanford with respective to equipment used for dedusting. Suggestions

  12. A study of the evaporation of heterogeneous water droplets under active heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim; Legros, Jean Claude; Strizhak, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Using high-speed video registration tools with a sample rate of 102-104 frames per second (fps), we studied the patterns in the evaporation of water droplets containing 1 and 2 mm individual metallic inclusions in a high-temperature gas environment. The materials of choice for the inclusions were steels (AISI 1080 carbon steel and AISI type 316L stainless steel) and pure nickel. We established the lifetimes τh of the liquid droplets under study with a controlled increase in the gas environment temperature up to 900 K. We also considered the physical aspects behind the τh distribution in the experiments conducted and specified the conditions for more effective cooling of metallic inclusions. Following the experimental research findings, a method was devised for effective reactor vessel cooling to avoid a meltdown at a nuclear power plant. The optimization of heat and mass transfer modes was performed within the framework of the strategic plan for the development of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University as one of the world-leading universities.

  13. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. The current spacesuit team has looked at this technology from the standpoint of using the ISS EMU to demonstrate the SWME technology while EVA, and from the standpoint of augmenting EMU cooling in the case of a fouled EMU cooling system. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  14. Let’s not forget the critical role of surface tension in xylem water relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Christophe Domec

    2011-01-01

    The widely supported cohesion–tension theory of water transport explains the importance of a continuous water column and the mechanism of long-distance ascent of sap in plants (Dixon 1914, Tyree 2003, Angeles et al. 2004). The evaporation of water from the surfaces of mesophyll cells causes the air–water interface to retreat into the cellulose matrix of the plant cell...

  15. Effect of Water to Cement Ratio and Age on Portland Composite Cement Mortar Porosity, Strength and Evaporation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enamur R. Latifee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Durability and the compressive strength of concrete are directly related to the porosity. Water to cement ratio is the main parameter behind the nature and amount of pores within the matrix. Porosity is also influenced by the degree of cement hydration and the length of moist-curing. Even after the standard moist curing period, i.e. 28 days the concrete can gain strength and porosity can be reduced under ambient relative humidity and temperature. However, this fact, that is the age effect on porosity reduction of the cement mortar or concrete, kept in air with ambient relative humidity and temperature for long duration could not be found in the literature. Therefore, in this research, different w/c were used with constant amount Portland Composite Cement to find out whether the mortar porosity decreases significantly over time, after 28 days of water curing, while kept in air and if there is any interaction effect between the age of the mortar and different w/c; regarding porosity. It was also intended to find out if water-loss rate variation with different w/c has similar trend as porosity variation with different w/c. It was found that, there is significant decrease in porosity with time for the first six weeks in air and after that it dwindles down gradually, and there is no interaction between age and w/c. Also, after 100 days in air, samples were submerged under water for 24 hours and then kept in air for the evaporation in subsequent days. It has been found that the water evaporation vs. w/c curve, using 11-day evaporation of water from different w/c specimens in ambient condition is almost parallel to porosity vs. w/c curve. Therefore, 11-day evaporation of aged saturated mortar or concrete sample, such as core can also be used as a durability index, which can be used for old structure evaluation.

  16. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  17. Evaporative demand and water requirements of the principal crops of the Guadalentin valley (SE Spain) in drought periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Toribio, M. I.; Garcia-Marin, R.; Conesa-Garcia, C.; Lopez-Bermudez, F.

    2010-07-01

    The drought periods that affect the province of Murcia, especially the Guadalentin Valley, are aggravated by an increase in evaporative demand. The aim of the present study was to characterize the increased water demand of woody and herbaceous crops during drought periods in the Guadalentin Valley, an agricultural zone with an excellent climate for specialty crops, which is of great economic importance for Murcia. After defining the drought periods of the last three decades in time and space by means of the standard index of rainfall drought (IESP), several methods were used to determine the reference evapotranspiration (ETo): the Penman-Monteith model (ASCE and FAO models for grass), the Hargreaves method (ETo-ASCE for alfalfa), and ETo using the FAO Radiation method. Finally, the crop water requirements for each to crop type and area of cultivation were estimated using monthly crop coefficients (K{sub c}) and the mean monthly evaporative demand values were obtained by the best fitting method. The increase in the evaporative demand reflected the increased water deficits that occur in the drought years, both in summer and winter (1.23 hm{sup 3} yr{sup -}1). Drought periods are also responsible for reducing the areas dedicated to horticultural crops, because of their high water demands and the additional costs involved, resulting an aggravated socioeconomic position and increased unemployment. (Author) 25 refs.

  18. Effects of Surface Roughness of Capillary Wall on the Profile of Thin Liquid Film and Evaporation Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Wei; Ma Tongze

    2001-01-01

    The surface of capillary wall can be treated to have a periodic microrelief mathematically. The roughness is micro enough compared with the thickness of the liquid film. So, the surface roughness only exerts influence on the adsorptive potential. Macroscopically, the flow field of the liquid film can be considered as that when the rough surface has an equivalent smooth surface, whose position is at the crests of the microrelief. The mechanism of heat transfer is in connection with two resistances: the thermal resistance of the liquid film conduction and the thermal resistance of the interfacial evaporation. The capillary pressure between the two sides of the vapor-liquid interface due to the interfacial curvature and the disjoining pressure owing to the thin liquid film are considered simultaneously. Several micro tubes with different micro rough surfaces are studied. The length of the evaporating interfacial region decreases with the increase of roughness angle and/or the increase of the roughness height. The heat transfer coefficient and the temperature of the vapor-liquid interface will change to fit the constant mass flow rate.

  19. Effects of water vapor density on cutaneous resistance to evaporative water loss and body temperature in green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygoda, Mark L; Kersten, Constance A

    2013-01-01

    Increased cutaneous resistance to evaporative water loss (Rc) in tree frogs results in decreased water loss rate and increased body temperature. We examined sensitivity of Rc to water vapor density (WVD) in Hyla cinerea by exposing individual frogs and agar models to four different WVD environments and measuring cutaneous evaporative water loss rate and body temperature simultaneously using a gravimetric wind tunnel measuring system. We found that water loss rate varied inversely and body temperature directly with WVD but that models were affected to a greater extent than were animals. Mean Rc was significantly different between the highest WVD environment and each of the three drier environments but did not differ among the drier environments, indicating that Rc initially increases and then reaches a plateau in response to decreasing WVD. Rc was equivalent when calculated using either WVD difference or WVD deficit as the driving force for evaporation. We also directly observed secretions from cutaneous glands while measuring body temperature and tested secretions and skin samples for the presence of lipids. We found that irregular transient body temperature depressions observed during wind tunnel trials occur due to evaporative cooling from intermittent skin secretions containing lipids, although we were unable to identify lipid-secreting glands.

  20. Rice leaf growth and water potential are resilient to evaporative demand and soil water deficit once the effects of root system are neutralized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Boris; Suard, Benoît; Serraj, Rachid; Tardieu, François

    2010-08-01

    Rice is known to be sensitive to soil water deficit and evaporative demand, with a greatest sensitivity of lowland-adapted genotypes. We have analysed the responses of plant water relations and of leaf elongation rate (LER) to soil water status and evaporative demand in seven rice genotypes belonging to different species, subspecies, either upland- or lowland-adapted. In the considered range of soil water potential (0 to -0.6 MPa), stomatal conductance was controlled in such a way that the daytime leaf water potential was similar in well-watered, droughted or flooded conditions (isohydric behaviour). A low sensitivity of LER to evaporative demand was observed in the same three conditions, with small differences between genotypes and lower sensitivity than in maize. The sensitivity of LER to soil water deficit was similar to that of maize. A tendency towards lower sensitivities was observed in upland than lowland genotypes but with smaller differences than expected. We conclude that leaf water status and leaf elongation of rice are not particularly sensitive to water deficit. The main origin of drought sensitivity in rice may be its poor root system, whose effect was alleviated in the study presented here by growing plants in pots whose soil was entirely colonized by roots of all genotypes.

  1. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    -99. Heat transfer coefficients were determined from thermal measurements in the test apparatus. All experiments were conducted inside an ISO Class 5 clean room enclosure. It was observed that when a liquid water droplet impinged upon the ZnO nanostructured at surface temperatures less than 140 degrees C, the nominally spherical droplet spread into a thin film over the surface. The film thickness depended on many parameters but in general it measured approximately 100-400 micrometers. As a result, it was found that the droplet evaporated by film evaporation without initiating nucleate boiling. At wall superheat levels of 10-20 degrees C, it was found in some cases that the heat transfer coefficients were nearly 4 times greater than for those of nucleate boiling at the same superheat level. For these conditions, no bubble nucleation was observed visually, and, nevertheless, extremely high heat transfer coefficients resulting from rapid evaporation of the thin liquid film formed by the spreading droplet were observed. At high wall superheat levels, the vaporization process exhibited Leidenfrost droplet vaporization. The extreme wetting of the nanostructured surfaces resulted in high Leidenfrost transition temperatures in the range of 310-376 degrees C, among the highest in the literature, exceeding those exhibited by bare metal surfaces by 100 degrees C or more. The Leidenfrost transition was detected from a recording of the acoustic signal generated from each experiment during the deposition and subsequent evaporation process. It was defined as the first point for which there is no disturbance to the acoustical signal in the form of a sizzling sound beyond the initial violent popping generated during the droplet deposition. The results document a trend of increasing Leidenfrost temperature with decreasing contact angle, which is consistent with earlier studies. The results of this study are compared with earlier work in this area and the implications for applications are

  2. The features of heterogeneous water droplet evaporation in high-temperature combustion products of typical flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results on heating and evaporation features of heterogeneous (with opaque solid particles – the size of 0.05-0.5 mm, relative mass concentration 0-1% water droplets (the initial size – radius 1-3 mm during their motion through high-temperature (500-1800 K gases. A significant increase in the integral characteristics of evaporation by introducing opaque inclusions into droplets was observed. The influence of energy accumulation on the conditions of droplet evaporation at the internal solid/liquid interfaces was established. For proportioned inclusions, the conditions of intensive vaporization (leading to the explosive disintegration of droplets at internal inclusion/liquid interfaces was set. To summarize research results, experiments were conducted with the combustion products of kerosene, gasoline, industrial alcohol, acetone, and oil. The particles of graphite, carbon, and aluminum as solid inclusions were used. The investigation compared integral characteristics of heterogeneous droplet evaporation under the conditions of non-stationary (gas temperature varied from 1800 K to 500 K over the length of channel and nearly stationary (gas temperature was maintained at about 1100 K heating.

  3. Predictive Determination of the Integral Characteristics of Evaporation of Water Droplets in Gas Media with a Varying Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysokomornaya, O. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of using three heat-transfer models based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) has been analyzed with account taken of the relevant endothermic phase transformations to predict the integral characteristics of evaporation of liquid droplets (with the example of water) in gas media with a varying temperature. The existing formulations with "diffusive" and "kinetic" approximations to the description of the process of evaporation have been considered, and a new model has been developed according to approximations obtained from the results of conducted experiments (with the use of high-speed cameras and cross-correlation software and hardware systems). Two integral characteristics of the process of evaporation were monitored: the mass rate of vaporization and the lifetime (time of complete evaporation) of a droplet. A comparison of simulation results and experimental data allowed us to draw the conclusion on the expediency of use of ODE-based "diffusive" and "phase-transition" models in a limited temperature range (to 600 K). At high gas temperatures (particularly, higher than 1000 K), a satisfactory correlation with experimental data can be provided by a model that takes account of the substantially nonlinear dependence of the vaporization rate on temperature, the formation of a buffer (steam) layer between the droplet and the gas medium, and the basic mechanisms of heat transfer in the liquid and in the gas medium.

  4. Surface Energy Balance of Fresh and Saline Waters: AquaSEBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelrady

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System model for large water bodies and add the effect of water salinity to the evaporation rate. Firstly, SEBS is modified for fresh-water whereby new parameterizations of the water heat flux and sensible heat flux are suggested. This is achieved by adapting the roughness heights for momentum and heat transfer. Secondly, a salinity correction factor is integrated into the adapted model. Eddy covariance measurements over Lake IJsselmeer (The Netherlands are carried out and used to estimate the roughness heights for momentum (~0.0002 m and heat transfer (~0.0001 m. Application of these values over the Victoria and Tana lakes (freshwater in Africa showed that the calculated latent heat fluxes agree well with the measurements. The root mean-square of relative-errors (rRMSE is about 4.1% for Lake Victoria and 4.7%, for Lake Tana. Verification with ECMWF data showed that the salinity reduced the evaporation at varying levels by up to 27% in the Great Salt Lake and by 1% for open ocean. Our results show the importance of salinity to the evaporation rate and the suitability of the adapted-SEBS model (AquaSEBS for fresh and saline waters.

  5. Influence of a Propagating Megahertz Surface Acoustic Wave on the Pattern Deposition of Solute Mass off an Evaporating Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Sameer; Zigelman, Anna; Abezgauz, Ludmila; Manor, Ofer

    2016-09-20

    We study the influence of a megahertz Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), propagating in a solid substrate, on the pattern deposition of a solute mass off an evaporating solution. An experimental procedure, where a film of a solution undergoes a controlled evaporation in a chamber, shows that the SAW alters the state of the pattern deposition. Increasing the power of the SAW supports an increase in the density of the deposited patterns. Beyond threshold conditions, the deposited patterns merge and we observe the deposition of a solid film. A simplified theory suggests that the SAW deforms the geometry of the film, which is predominantly governed by the capillary stress. The deformation of the film taking place alongside with the evaporation of the solution increases the concentration near the pinned three phase contact line at the front of the film, which is closer to the source of the SAW, on the expense of the concentration at the rear. The increased concentration translates to the deposition of solute mass over an increased area near the front of the film, which explains the experimental observation.

  6. Evaporation mitigation by floating modular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. M.; Peirson, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of drought and consequent evaporation from open water bodies in arid parts of Australia continue to be a threat to water availability for agricultural production. Over many parts of Australia, the annual average evaporation exceeds the annual precipitation by more than 5 times. Given its significance, it is surprising that no evaporation mitigation technique has gained widespread adoption to date. High capital and maintenance costs of manufactured products are a significant barrier to implementation. The use of directly recycled clean plastic containers as floating modular devices to mitigate evaporation has been investigated for the first time. A six-month trial at an arid zone site in Australia of this potential cost effective solution has been undertaken. The experiment was performed using clean conventional drinking water bottles as floating modules on the open water surface of 240-L tanks with three varying degrees of covering (nil, 34% and 68%). A systematic reduction in evaporation is demonstrated during the whole study period that is approximately linearly proportional to the covered surface. These results provide a potential foundation for robust evaporation mitigation with the prospect of implementing a cost-optimal design.

  7. Studying surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Fallah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of water exchange in a region or area, which emphasizes the principle of conservation of matter in the water cycle, is called balance. Investigating their balance is the basis for managing the rivers’ water management, the results of which refer to the change rate in surface water supply and can efficiently be used in decision making and optimal use of water resources. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS. In so doing, digital topographic maps, soil map of the area, and meteorological data retrieved from the regional stations were used to prepare layers of precipitation, evaporation and infiltration of rainwater into the soil. Discharge-arearegion comparative method was employed to measure the amount of runoff and base flow for each sub-basin in raster form saved per unit area which was subsequently overlapped based on balance equation, and the balance of the region was displayed in a graphical mode. The results indicated that more surface water is wasted in the southeast and central area of the province.

  8. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  9. A common genetic determinism for sensitivities to soil water deficit and evaporative demand: meta-analysis of quantitative trait Loci and introgression lines of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcker, Claude; Sadok, Walid; Dignat, Grégoire; Renault, Morgan; Salvi, Silvio; Charcosset, Alain; Tardieu, François

    2011-10-01

    Evaporative demand and soil water deficit equally contribute to water stress and to its effect on plant growth. We have compared the genetic architectures of the sensitivities of maize (Zea mays) leaf elongation rate with evaporative demand and soil water deficit. The former was measured via the response to leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit in well-watered plants, the latter via the response to soil water potential in the absence of evaporative demand. Genetic analyses of each sensitivity were performed over 21 independent experiments with (1) three mapping populations, with temperate or tropical materials, (2) one population resulting from the introgression of a tropical drought-tolerant line in a temperate line, and (3) two introgression libraries genetically independent from mapping populations. A very large genetic variability was observed for both sensitivities. Some lines maintained leaf elongation at very high evaporative demand or water deficit, while others stopped elongation in mild conditions. A complex architecture arose from analyses of mapping populations, with 19 major meta-quantitative trait loci involving strong effects and/or more than one mapping population. A total of 68% of those quantitative trait loci affected sensitivities to both evaporative demand and soil water deficit. In introgressed lines, 73% of the tested genomic regions affected both sensitivities. To our knowledge, this study is the first genetic demonstration that hydraulic processes, which drive the response to evaporative demand, also have a large contribution to the genetic variability of plant growth under water deficit in a large range of genetic material.

  10. Results of applying a non-evaporative mitigation technique to laser-initiated surface damage on fused-silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bolourchi, M; Bude, J D; Guss, G M; Matthews, M J; Nostrand, M C

    2010-10-26

    We present results from a study to determine an acceptable CO{sub 2} laser-based non-evaporative mitigation protocol for use on surface damage sites in fused-silica optics. A promising protocol is identified and evaluated on a set of surface damage sites created under ICF-type laser conditions. Mitigation protocol acceptability criteria for damage re-initiation and growth, downstream intensification, and residual stress are discussed. In previous work, we found that a power ramp at the end of the protocol effectively minimizes the residual stress (<25 MPa) left in the substrate. However, the biggest difficulty in determining an acceptable protocol was balancing between low re-initiation and problematic downstream intensification. Typical growing surface damage sites mitigated with a candidate CO{sub 2} laser-based mitigation protocol all survived 351 nm, 5 ns damage testing to fluences >12.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The downstream intensification arising from the mitigated sites is evaluated, and all but one of the sites has 100% passing downstream damage expectation values. We demonstrate, for the first time, a successful non-evaporative 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser mitigation protocol applicable to fused-silica optics used on fusion-class lasers like the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  11. Estimation of the Heat Balance of the Liquid Hydrocarbons Evaporation Process from the Open Surface During Geotechnical Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    Researchers in Tyumen State Oil and Gas University (TSOGU) have conducted a complex research of the heat and mass transfer processes and thermophysical properties of hydrocarbons, taking into account their impact on the reliability and safety of the hydrocarbon transport and storage processes. It has been shown that the thermodynamic conditions on the surface and the color of oil influence the degree of temperature rise in the upper layers of oil when exposed to direct solar radiation. In order to establish the nature of solar radiation impact on the surface temperature the experimental studies were conducted in TSOGU on the hydrocarbon evaporation and the temperature change of various petroleum and petroleum products on the free surface with varying degrees of thermal insulation of the side walls and bottom of the vessel.

  12. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  13. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  14. Formation of Tough Films by Evaporation of Water from Dispersions of Elastomer Microspheres Crosslinked with Rotaxane Supramolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshige, Seina; Kureha, Takuma; Aoki, Daichi; Sawada, Jun; Aoki, Daisuke; Takata, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2017-06-22

    Compared to rigid microspheres that consist, for example, of polystyrene or silica, soft and deformable elastomer microspheres can be used to generate colorless transparent films upon evaporating the solvent from microsphere-containing dispersions. To obtain tough films, a post-polymerization reaction to crosslink the microspheres is usually necessary, which requires extra additives during the drying process. This restriction renders this film-formation technology complex and rather unsuitable for applications in which impurities are undesirable. In the present study, it is demonstrated that tough elastomer microspheres that are crosslinked with rotaxanes can form tough bulk films upon evaporation of water from microsphere dispersions, so that post-polymerization reactions are not required. The results of this study should thus lead to new applications including coatings for biomaterials that need complete removal of all impurities from the materials prior to use. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaporation and Vapor Formation of Graphite Suspensions Based on Water in a High-Temperature Gas Environment: an Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Anastasia G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experimental research on evaporation and vapor formation of water droplets containing large (2 mm in size and small (0.05 mm and 0.2 mm in diameter graphite inclusions, when heated in a high-temperature gas environment. We applied a high-speed (up to 104 fps video recording to establish mechanisms of the processes considered. Moreover, we revealed the positive influence of addition of small graphite inclusions on intensifying the evaporation of heterogeneous suspension droplets. In addition, we made the assumption on the formation of vapor layer around the 10 and 15 μl suspension droplets, as well as its negative influence on the lifetimes of suspension droplets τh (increasing the times in a high-temperature gas environment.

  16. Trace elements and petroleum hydrocarbons in the aquatic bird food chain of process water evaporation ponds at the Little America Refinery, Casper, Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study determined the nature and extent of trace elements, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons in evaporation ponds used for the disposal of process water from...

  17. 氨水溶液降膜蒸发实验%Experiment of ammonia water falling film evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆超; 龚宇烈; 马伟斌

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of vertical out-tube falling film heat transfer with different inlet spray densities of ammonia water mixture and inlet hot water temperatures was conducted.The falling film evaporator had a total height of 6000mm and the cycling working fluids were high concentration 60% and 50% ammonia water.We mainly studied the influence of spray density and inlet temperature of hot water on heat transfer coefficient,ammonia vapor amount and evaporation pressure.The experiment showed that heat transfer coefficient and ammonia vapor amount increased first and then decreased with increasing inlet spray density.The higher the hot water temperature,the higher the evaporation pressure.Heat transfer coefficient increased lineany with increasing hot water temperature.The experimental heat transfer coefficient of ammonia water solution was significantly higher than that of water reported in literature.For 50% water,optimum spray density was between 0.2200 and 0.2500 kg/(m·s);for 60% ammonia water,optimum spray density was between 0.2600 and 0.2900 kg/(m·s).In this experiment,heat transfer performance of 60% ammonia water was better than 50% ammonia water.%发生器和吸收器的传热性能是影响制冷机组和双工质发电机组做功效率的关键因素,为了提高中低温地热(余热)在热泵机组和地热双工质发电系统中的利用效率,本文选用50%和60%的氨水溶液作为循环工质,对约6 m长的竖管降膜蒸发器的传热特性进行实验研究,分别讨论喷淋密度和热水温度对垂直降膜蒸发器的传热系数、氨蒸气量和蒸发压力的影响。结果表明,降膜蒸发器的传热系数和氨蒸气量随喷淋密度的增加先增大后减小,传热系数和蒸发压力随着热源温度的增大而增加;50%和60%的氨水溶液喷淋密度最佳值分别在0.2200~0.2500 k

  18. Stable isotope fingerprint of open-water evaporation losses and effective drainage area fluctuations in a subarctic shield watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. J.; Reid, R.

    2010-02-01

    SummaryStable isotopes of water, oxygen-18 and deuterium, were measured at biweekly to monthly intervals during the open-water season in a small, headwater lake (Pocket Lake, 4.8 ha) near Yellowknife Northwest Territories, and concurrently in a nearby string-of-lakes watershed (Baker Creek, 137 km 2) situated in the subarctic Precambrian Shield region. As measured in water samples collected over a 12 year period (1997-2008), the levels of evaporative isotopic enrichment in both lake and watershed outflow were differentially offset, and seasonal variations were found in both to be driven by variations in open-water evaporation. Systematic differences measured in the magnitude of the offset between the lake and watershed outflow are interpreted as being caused by changes in the effective drainage area contributing to runoff. Based on the observed and extremely consistent relationship between isotopic compositions of lake water and watershed outflow ( r2 = 0.849, p isotopic signals transferred downstream in a typical shield drainage system within the Mackenzie Basin.

  19. Maldistribution in air-water heat pump evaporators. Part 2: Economic analysis of counteracting technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Gunda; Palm, Björn; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In this study a methodology is applied to quantify the effect of evaporator maldistributionon operating costs of airewater heat pumps. The approach is used to investigate the cost-effectivenessof two technologies enabling to counteract maldistribution: a flash gasbypass setup and the individual...

  20. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) for Water Year 2003 (WY 2003) (October I, 2002 to September 30, 2003) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at...

  1. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  2. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  3. The influence of snow sublimation and meltwater evaporation on δD of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer of central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Emanuel; Kohler, Martin; Schneider, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Post-depositional fractionation of stable water isotopes due to fractionating surface evaporation introduces uncertainty to various isotope applications such as the reconstruction of paleotemperatures, paleoaltimetry, and the investigation of groundwater formation. In this study, we investigate isotope fractionation at snow-covered moisture sources by combining 17 months of observations of isotope concentration ratios [HD16O] / [H216O] in low-level water vapor in central Europe with a new Lagrangian isotope model. The isotope model is capable of reproducing variations of the observed isotope ratios with a correlation coefficient R of 0.82. Observations from 38 days were associated with cold snaps and moisture uptake in snow-covered regions. Deviations between modeled and measured isotope ratios during the cold snaps were related to differences in skin temperatures (Tskin). Analysis of Tskin provided by the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) of the NCEP implies the existence of two regimes of Tskin with different types of isotope fractionation during evaporation: a cold regime with Tskin studies at snow-covered sites are needed to better constrain the Tsubl,max and to further investigate isotope fractionation in the two regimes.

  4. Potential for natural evaporation as a reliable renewable energy resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Ahmet-Hamdi; Chen, Xi; Gentine, Pierre; Sahin, Ozgur

    2017-09-26

    About 50% of the solar energy absorbed at the Earth's surface drives evaporation, fueling the water cycle that affects various renewable energy resources, such as wind and hydropower. Recent advances demonstrate our nascent ability to convert evaporation energy into work, yet there is little understanding about the potential of this resource. Here we study the energy available from natural evaporation to predict the potential of this ubiquitous resource. We find that natural evaporation from open water surfaces could provide power densities comparable to current wind and solar technologies while cutting evaporative water losses by nearly half. We estimate up to 325 GW of power is potentially available in the United States. Strikingly, water's large heat capacity is sufficient to control power output by storing excess energy when demand is low, thus reducing intermittency and improving reliability. Our findings motivate the improvement of materials and devices that convert energy from evaporation.The evaporation of water represents an alternative source of renewable energy. Building on previous models of evaporation, Cavusoglu et al. show that the power available from this natural resource is comparable to wind and solar power, yet it does not suffer as much from varying weather conditions.

  5. The effect of fibers on the loss of water by evaporation and shrinkage of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. P. Pillar

    Full Text Available Shrinkage is one of the least desirable attributes in concrete. Large areas of exposed concrete surfaces , such as in shotcrete tunnel linings, where it is practically impossible to make a moist cure, are highly susceptible to plastic shrinkage at early ages. The autogenous and drying shrinkage can lead to states of greater than threshold strength, causing fracture, mechanical damage and lack of durability of concrete structures. The addition of fibers can greatly reduce plastic shrinkage, but has limited effect in mitigating autogenous and drying shrinkage. To evaluate the performance of polypropylene and steel fibers to understand their effect on shrinkage of concrete, a study was carried out to relate the loss of water from the paste and the shrinkage during the first 28 days of age, and compare it with a control mix without fiber. The loss of water was obtained by the weight loss of the specimens at different ages, since the only component that could contribute for the loss of weight was the water lost by the paste of the concrete. And the paste itself is the only source of shrinkage. Uniaxial compressive tests from very early ages enabled the determination of time when plastic shrinkage ended. It was observed that the control concrete mix lost three times more water and developed plastic and drying shrinkage 60 % higher than the fiber reinforced concrete mixes. It was possible to demonstrate that the reduced loss of water caused by the incorporation of fibers is related to the mitigation of plastic shrinkage. It was observed that the fibers are effective to restrain the movement of water through the cement paste in the plastic state, however such effect is limited after concrete starts the hardening state.

  6. The impacts of precipitating cloud radiative effects on ocean surface evaporation, precipitation, and ocean salinity in coupled GCM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Wang, Yi-Hui; Lee, Tong; Waliser, Duane; Lee, Wei-Liang; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Chun; Fetzer, Eric; Hasson, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    The coupled global climate model (GCM) fidelity in representing upper ocean salinity including near sea surface bulk salinity (SSS) is evaluated in this study, with a focus on the Pacific Ocean. The systematic biases in ocean surface evaporation (E) minus precipitation (P) and SSS are found to be fairly similar in the twentieth century simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 3 (CMIP3) and Phase 5 (CMIP5) relative to the observations. One of the potential causes of the CMIP model biases is the missing representation of the radiative effects of precipitating hydrometeors (i.e., snow) in most CMIP models. To examine the radiative effect of cloud snow on SSS, sensitivity experiments with and without such effect are conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research-coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM). This study investigates the difference in SSS between sensitivity experiments and its relationship with atmospheric circulation, E - P and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that the exclusion of the cloud snow radiative effect in CESM produces weaker Pacific trade winds, resulting in enhanced precipitation, reduced evaporation, and a reduction of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical and subtropical Pacific. The latter results in an improved comparison with climatological upper ocean bulk salinity. The introduction of cloud snow also altered the budget terms that maintain the time-mean salinity in the mixed layer.

  7. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  8. Anomalous water drop bouncing on a nanotextured surface by the Leidenfrost levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Jin; Song, Young Seok

    2016-05-01

    We report an anomalous liquid drop bouncing phenomenon that is generated by the Leidenfrost levitation due to a vapor layer reducing energy dissipation during the collision. The Leidenfrost levitation of water drops on both a hydrophobic surface and nanotextured Cassie surface is investigated. When the water drop is positioned onto the hydrophobic surface, a superhydrophobic feature is observed by the levitation effect due to the vapor film, which results in a slow evaporation of the drop due to the low thermal conductivity of the vapor layer that inhibits heat transfer between the heated surface and the water drop. In contrast, for the nanotextured surface, the water drop can bounce off after impact on the surface when it overcomes gravitational and adhesion forces. The spontaneous water drop bouncing on the nanotextured surface is powered by the combination effect of the Leidenfrost levitation and the non-wetting Cassie state.

  9. [Dynamics of Irreversible Evaporation of a Water-Protein Droplet and a Problem of Structural and Dynamical Experiments with Single Molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Armeev, G A; Shaytan, A K

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of isothermal and adiabatic evaporation of water on the state of a water-protein droplet. The discussed problem is of current importance due to development of techniques to perform single molecule experiments using free electron lasers. In such structure-dynamic experiments the delivery of a sample into the X-ray beam is performed using the microdroplet injector. The time between the injection and delivery is in the order of microseconds. In this paper we developed a specialized variant of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the study of irreversible isothermal evaporation of the droplet. Using in silico experiments we determined the parameters of isothermal evaporation of the water-protein droplet with the sodium and chloride ions in the concentration range of 0.3 M at different temperatures. The energy of irreversible evaporation determined from in silico experiments at the initial stages of evaporation virtually coincides with the specific heat of evaporation for water. For the kinetics of irreversible adiabatic evaporation an exact analytical solution was obtained in the limit of high thermal conductivity of the droplet (or up to the droplet size of -100 Å). This analytical solution incorporates parameters that are determined using in silico. experiments on isothermal droplet evaporation. We show that the kinetics of adiabatic evaporation and cooling of the droplet scales with the droplet size. Our estimates of the water-protemi droplet. freezing rate in the adiabatic regime in a vacuum chamber show that additional techniques for stabilizing the temperature inside the droplet should be used in order to study the conformational transitions of the protein in single molecules. Isothermal and quasi-isothermal conditions are most suitable for studying the conformational transitions upon object functioning. However, in this case it is necessary to take into account the effects of dehydration and rapid increase of ionic strength in an

  10. Analysis of tank 4 (FTF-4-15-22, 23) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment control, corrosion control and evaporator feed qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-09

    This report provides the results of analyses on Savannah River Site Tank 4 surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program (CCP) and the Evaporator Feed Qualification (EFQ) Program. The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 4 in August 2015 was to determine if the supernatant liquid would be “acceptable feed” to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  11. Improved Adhesion of Gold Thin Films Evaporated on Polymer Resin: Applications for Sensing Surfaces and MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrang Moazzez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present and analyze a method to improve the morphology and mechanical properties of gold thin films for use in optical sensors or other settings where good adhesion of gold to a substrate is of importance and where controlled topography/roughness is key. To improve the adhesion of thermally evaporated gold thin films, we introduce a gold deposition step on SU-8 photoresist prior to UV exposure but after the pre-bake step of SU-8 processing. Shrinkage and distribution of residual stresses, which occur during cross-linking of the SU-8 polymer layer in the post-exposure baking step, are responsible for the higher adhesion of the top gold film to the post-deposition cured SU-8 sublayer. The SU-8 underlayer can also be used to tune the resulting gold film morphology. Our promoter-free protocol is easily integrated with existing sensor microfabrication processes.

  12. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  13. Metabolic rate, evaporative water loss and thermoregulatory state in four species of bats in the Negev desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Larraín, Paloma; Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo; Williams, Joseph B; Pinshow, Berry; Korine, Carmi

    2016-01-01

    Life in deserts is challenging for bats because of their relatively high energy and water requirements; nevertheless bats thrive in desert environments. We postulated that bats from desert environments have lower metabolic rates (MR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) than their mesic counterparts. To test this idea, we measured MR and TEWL of four species of bats, which inhabit the Negev desert in Israel, one species mainly restricted to hyper-arid deserts (Otonycteris hemprichii), two species from semi-desert areas (Eptesicus bottae and Plecotus christii), and one widespread species (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We also measured separately, in the same individuals, the two components of TEWL, respiratory water loss (RWL) and cutaneous evaporative water loss (CEWL), using a mask. In all the species, MR and TEWL were significantly reduced during torpor, the latter being a consequence of reductions in both RWL and CEWL. Then, we evaluated whether MR and TEWL in bats differ according to their geographic distributions, and whether those rates change with Ta and the use of torpor. We did not find significant differences in MR among species, but we found that TEWL was lowest in the species restricted to desert habitats, intermediate in the semi-desert dwelling species, and highest in the widespread species, perhaps a consequence of adaptation to life in deserts. Our results were supported by a subsequent analysis of data collected from the literature on rates of TEWL for 35 bat species from desert and mesic habitats.

  14. Design and development of low pressure evaporator/condenser unit for water-based adsorption type climate control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanan, Arjun; Rios Perez, Carlos A.; Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    2016-11-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are the future of clean transportation and driving range is one of the important parameters which dictates its marketability. In order to increase driving range, electrical battery energy consumption should be minimized. Vapor-compression refrigeration systems currently employed in EVs for climate control consume a significant fraction of the battery charge. Thus, by replacing this traditional heating ventilation and air-conditioning system with an adsorption based climate control system one can have the capability of increasing the drive range of EVs.The Advanced Thermo-adsorptive Battery (ATB) for climate control is a water-based adsorption type refrigeration cycle. An essential component of the ATB is a low pressure evaporator/condenser unit (ECU) which facilitates both the evaporation and condensation processes. The thermal design of the ECU relies predominantly on the accurate prediction of evaporation/boiling heat transfer coefficients since the standard correlations for predicting boiling heat transfer coefficients have large uncertainty at the low operating pressures of the ATB. This work describes the design and development of a low pressure ECU as well as the thermal performance of the actual ECU prototype.

  15. Experimental study on the relation between the water content of surface soil and the acoustic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the relation between the water content changing of surface soil and micro-quake recorded before earthquakes, we carried out a simulation experiment in laboratory. Its purpose is to explore whether the acoustic wave generated by micro-fracturing before earthquake are able to change water content of surface soil, so as to understand the relation between thermal anomaly in the remote sensing image got from the seismogenic area and the coming earthquake. The result of the experiment shows that when the acoustic wave enters into the surface soil the water content here increases on the background of decreasing due to natural evaporation. In the meantime, temperature here decreases.

  16. Passivation of surface states in the ZnO nanowire with thermally evaporated copper phthalocyanine for hybrid photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Ding, Huaiyi; Wu, Yukun; Sui, Mengqiao; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Su, Wenming; Cui, Zheng; Chen, Liwei

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption of O2/H2O molecules on the ZnO nanowire (NW) surface results in the long lifetime of photo-generated carriers and thus benefits ZnO NW-based ultraviolet photodetectors by suppressing the dark current and improving the photocurrent gain, but the slow adsorption process also leads to slow detector response time. Here we show that a thermally evaporated copper phthalocyanine film is effective in passivating surface trap states of ZnO NWs. As a result, the organic/inorganic hybrid photodetector devices exhibit simultaneously improved photosensitivity and response time. This work suggests that it could be an effective way in interfacial passivation using organic/inorganic hybrid structures.The adsorption of O2/H2O molecules on the ZnO nanowire (NW) surface results in the long lifetime of photo-generated carriers and thus benefits ZnO NW-based ultraviolet photodetectors by suppressing the dark current and improving the photocurrent gain, but the slow adsorption process also leads to slow detector response time. Here we show that a thermally evaporated copper phthalocyanine film is effective in passivating surface trap states of ZnO NWs. As a result, the organic/inorganic hybrid photodetector devices exhibit simultaneously improved photosensitivity and response time. This work suggests that it could be an effective way in interfacial passivation using organic/inorganic hybrid structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section includes materials growth, device fabrication, device characterization and the measurement process. Supplementary results and discussion includes electrical properties of the ZnO NW/CuPc device, fitting functions and parameters of photoresponse. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01088k

  17. Isotopic Estimation of Water Balance and Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions of Tropical Wetland Lakes in the Pantanal, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, J.; Johnson, M. S.; Weiler, M.; Couto, E. G.

    2009-12-01

    The Pantanal is the largest and most pristine wetland of the world, yet hydrological research there is still in its infancy. In particular the water balance of the millions of lakes and ponds and their interaction with the groundwater and the rivers are not known. The aim of this study was to assess the hydrological behaviour between different water bodies in the dry season of the northern Pantanal wetland, Brazil, to provide a more general understanding of the hydrological functioning of tropical floodplain lakes and surface water-groundwater interactions of wetlands. In the field 6-9 water sample of seven different lakes were taken during 3 months and were analyzed for stable water isotopes and chloride. In addition meteorological data from a nearby station was used to estimate daily evaporation from the water surface. This information was then used to predict the hydrological dynamics to determine whether the lakes are evaporation-controlled or throughflow-dominated systems. A chloride mass balance served to evaluate whether Cl- enrichment took place due to evaporation only, or whether the system has significant inflow and/or outflow rates. The results of those methods showed that for all lakes the water budget in the dry season, output was controlled by strong evaporation while significant inflow rates were also apparent. Inflow rates and their specific concentrations in stable isotopes and chloride were successfully estimated using the simple mass balance model MINA TrêS. This approach enabled us to calculate the water balance for the lakes as well as providing an information on source water flowing into the lakes.

  18. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  19. Born Dry in the Photo-Evaporation Desert: Kepler's Ultra-Short-Period Planets Formed Water-Poor

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    Recent surveys have uncovered an exciting new population of ultra-short-period (USP) planets with orbital periods less than a day. These planets typically have radii 2 Earth radii today, which is inconsistent with the observed evaporation desert, indicating that most USP planets likely formed from water-poor material within the snow-line. Finally, I examine the special case of 55 Cancri e and its possible composition in the light of recent observations, and discuss the prospects for further characterizing this population with future observations.

  20. Developments in Zedivap evaporators; Zedivap jatkokehitys - EKY 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaakkola, H. [Ahlstrom Machinery Oy, Helsinki (Finland). Heat Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Pulp and paper industry is looking forward to find economical ways to minimize their fresh water consumption and to reduce their impact in environment. One way to achieve the target is to replace fresh water by producing pure water from effluent. Zedivap technology has been developed to evaporate effluents and have been operated in full scale for few years. In this project Zedivap-technology was developed further to minimize fouling of heat transfer surfaces, to improve evaporator availability and to increase the knowledge of wastewater properties. To reach an uniform evaporator body construction to utilise different sources of energy, like electricity, high pressure steam or low temperature waste heat, the heat transfer surfaces will in most cases be of lamella type made of metallic sheets improving remarkably the availability compared to original design with plastic heating surfaces. As a result also the cleaning demands for a wastewater evaporator has reduced remarkably by replacing liquid distributor tray by spray nozzles. (orig.)

  1. In-situ observations of water vapor isotopes in near surface air over Lakes Superior and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Meyer, A. L.; Griffis, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes play an important role in the climate of the midwestern to northeastern United States. Evaporation from the lakes is not well quantified, and the factors controlling lake evaporation are not fully understood. Two isotopic tracer methods have been used to study lake evaporation. The first is a lake water isotopic mass balance to solve for evaporation rates from precipitation and runoff inputs and the residual lake water. The second method is monitoring downwind precipitation and atmospheric water vapor for evidence of lake evaporation. Accurate estimates of the isotopic composition of evaporation from the lakes are critical inputs in both methods for modern and paleo studies. Traditionally, evaporation is assumed to follow the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic fractionation. To our knowledge, this model has not been tested on large lakes like the Great Lakes, whose evaporation flux strongly influences the moisture in the air above the lake. To test the Craig-Gordon model, we made measurements of the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios above the surface of Lakes Superior and Michigan during June 2016 during a 4-day cruise on the R/V Blue Heron research vessel that traveled from Duluth, MN to Milwaukee, WI. Air was sampled at 2 intakes, approximately 5 m and 15 m above the lake surface, using an LGR triple water vapor isotope analyzer. The isotopic composition of lake water became more enriched in the heavy isotopes from Lake Superior to Lake Michigan. The timing of these measurements in late spring is not an optimal time to observe evaporation off the lakes, because often the lake temperature is cooler than the air temperature, thereby suppressing the evaporation flux. At times, vertical gradients of water vapor mixing in the near surface air approached 2,000-3,000 ppm, with higher moisture at the lower intake than the upper intake. At night, we observed times when this gradient reversed, and there was higher moisture aloft compared to the

  2. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  3. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  4. Soil water stable isotopes reveal evaporation dynamics at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface of the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the influence of vegetation on water storage and flux in the upper soil is crucial in assessing the consequences of climate and land use change. We sampled the upper 20 cm of podzolic soils at 5 cm intervals in four sites differing in their vegetation (Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) and heather (Calluna sp. and Erica Sp)) and aspect. The sites were located within the Bruntland Burn long-term experimental catchment in the Scottish Highlands, a low energy, wet environment. Sampling took place on 11 occasions between September 2015 and September 2016 to capture seasonal variability in isotope dynamics. The pore waters of soil samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition (δ2H and δ18O) with the direct-equilibration method. Our results show that the soil waters in the top soil are, despite the low potential evaporation rates in such northern latitudes, kinetically fractionated compared to the precipitation input throughout the year. This fractionation signal decreases within the upper 15 cm resulting in the top 5 cm being isotopically differentiated to the soil at 15-20 cm soil depth. There are significant differences in the fractionation signal between soils beneath heather and soils beneath Scots pine, with the latter being more pronounced. But again, this difference diminishes within the upper 15 cm of soil. The enrichment in heavy isotopes in the topsoil follows a seasonal hysteresis pattern, indicating a lag time between the fractionation signal in the soil and the increase/decrease of soil evaporation in spring/autumn. Based on the kinetic enrichment of the soil water isotopes, we estimated the soil evaporation losses to be about 5 and 10 % of the infiltrating water for soils beneath heather and Scots pine, respectively. The high sampling frequency in time (monthly) and depth (5 cm intervals) revealed high temporal and spatial variability of the isotopic composition of soil waters, which can be critical, when using stable isotopes as tracers

  5. Static and dynamic contact angles of evaporating liquids on heated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaev, Vladimir S; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2010-02-15

    We studied both static and dynamic values of the apparent contact angle for gravity-driven flow of a volatile liquid down a heated inclined plane. The apparent contact line is modeled as the transition region between the macroscopic film and ultra-thin adsorbed film dominated by disjoining pressure effects. Four commonly used disjoining pressure models are investigated. The static contact angle is shown to increase with heater temperature, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The angle is less sensitive to the details of the disjoining pressure curves than in the isothermal regime. A generalization of the classical Frumkin-Derjaguin theory is proposed to explain this observation. The dynamic contact angle follows the Tanner's law remarkably well over a range of evaporation conditions. However, deviations from the predictions based on the Tanner's law are found when interface shape changes rapidly in response to rapid changes of the heater temperature. The Marangoni stresses are shown to result in increase of the values of apparent contact angles.

  6. Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the

  7. Simulation of temporal and spatial distribution of required irrigation water by crop models and the pan evaporation coefficient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-min; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shu-min; Hu, Yu-kun

    2009-07-01

    Hebei Plain is the most important agricultural belt in North China. Intensive irrigation, low and uneven precipitation have led to severe water shortage on the plain. This study is an attempt to resolve this crucial issue of water shortage for sustainable agricultural production and water resources management. The paper models distributed regional irrigation requirement for a range of cultivated crops on the plain. Classic crop models like DSSAT- wheat/maize and COTTON2K are used in combination with pan-evaporation coefficient method to estimate water requirements for wheat, corn, cotton, fruit-trees and vegetables. The approach is more accurate than the static approach adopted in previous studies. This is because the combination use of crop models and pan-evaporation coefficient method dynamically accounts for irrigation requirement at different growth stages of crops, agronomic practices, and field and climatic conditions. The simulation results show increasing Required Irrigation Amount (RIA) with time. RIA ranges from 5.08×109 m3 to 14.42×109 m3 for the period 1986~2006, with an annual average of 10.6×109 m3. Percent average water use by wheat, fruit trees, vegetable, corn and cotton is 41%, 12%, 12%, 11%, 7% and 17% respectively. RIA for April and May (the period with the highest irrigation water use) is 1.78×109 m3 and 2.41×109 m3 respectively. The counties in the piedmont regions of Mount Taihang have high RIA while the central and eastern regions/counties have low irrigation requirement.

  8. A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-04-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture.

  9. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R. [Resource Technology Corp., Laramie, WY (United States); Harju, J.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  10. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  11. A New Equation for the Aerodynamics of Pan Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W.; Roderick, M. L.; Hobbins, M. T.; Wong, S.; Groeneveld, P. J.; Sun, F.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    This research is a response to worldwide observations reporting a decline in pan evaporation over the last 30 to 50 years. We constructed an instrumented US Class A pan that replicates an operational pan at Canberra Airport in Australia. The aim of the experimental setup was to investigate the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. We monitored the water level (to determine the evaporation rate), (short- and long-wave) radiation, temperature (air, water surface, bulk water, inner and outer pan wall), atmospheric pressure, air vapour pressure and the wind speed at a standard reference height (2 m above ground level). All these measurements are recorded at five-minute intervals for a 3-year period (2007-2010). Here, we present a framework for quantifying vapour transfer by coupling Fick's First Law of Diffusion with boundary layer theory (assuming that water surface temperature measurements are available). This approach adequately represented pan evaporation measurements over short time intervals (half-hourly) under non-steady state conditions. It involved estimating the boundary layer thickness and other properties of air above the evaporating surface for a pan. Our results are consistent with the "envelope of theoretical curves" concept for the wind function proposed by Thom et al. (1981). Reference: Thom, A. S., J. L. Thony, and M. Vauclin (1981), On the proper employment of evaporation of evaporation pans and atmometers in estimating potential transpiration, Quart. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 107(453), 711-736, doi: 10.1002/qj.49710745316.

  12. Effect of Deposition Rate on Structure and Surface Morphology of Thin Evaporated Al Films on Dielectrics and Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill BORDO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al films with thickness of 100 nm were grown on unheated glass, silicon and mica substrates by electron beam evaporation. The deposition rates were adjusted in the range between 0.1 nm/s and 2 nm/s, the pressure in the vac­uum chamber during deposition was lower than 1·10–3 Pa. The structure and surface morphology of the as-deposited Al films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. SEM imaging of the films showed that the mean grain size of thin Al films on all of the substrates increased from 20 nm – 30 nm to 50 nm – 70 nm with increase of the deposition rate. Quantitative AFM characterization showed that for all substrates the root mean square surface roughness increases monotonically with increasing the deposition rate from 0.1 nm/s to 2 nm/s. The observed effects of the deposition rate on the grain size and surface roughness are explained by the fundamental characteristics of the island growth mode, the influence of the background gases and the surface morphology of the bare substrates.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3088

  13. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  14. Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Surface Water Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset showing the locations of surface water intakes. These intake locations are part of the safe drinking water information system...

  15. A continuous stream flash evaporator for the calibration of an IR cavity ring down spectrometer for isotopic analysis of water

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Johnsen, Sigfus J; Blunier, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for high resolution simultaneous isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}\\mathrm{O}$ and $\\delta\\mathrm{D}$ in liquid water is presented. A continuous stream flash evaporator has been designed that is able to vaporise a stream of liquid water in a continuous mode and deliver a stable and finely controlled water vapour sample to a commercially available Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer. Injection of sub $\\mu l$ amounts of the liquid water is achieved by pumping liquid water sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporising it with a 100% efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of $170 ^{o}$C. The system's simplicity, low power consumption and low dead volume together with the possibility for automated unattended operation, provides a solution for the calibration of laser instruments performing isotopic analysis of water vapour. Our work is mainly driven by the possibility to perform high resolution on line water isotopic analysis on Continuous Flow Analysis systems ...

  16. Effect of DOC on evaporation from small Wisconsin lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watras, C. J.; Morrison, K. A.; Rubsam, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation (E) dominates the loss of water from many small lakes, and the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E) often governs water levels. In this study, evaporation rates were estimated for three small Wisconsin lakes over several years using 30-min data from floating evaporation pans (E-pans). Measured E was then compared to the output of mass transfer models driven by local conditions over daily time scales. The three lakes were chosen to span a range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (3-20 mg L-1), a solute that imparts a dark, tea-stain color which absorbs solar energy and limits light penetration. Since the lakes were otherwise similar, we hypothesized that a DOC-mediated increase in surface water temperature would translate directly to higher rates of evaporation thereby informing climate response models. Our results confirmed a DOC effect on surface water temperature, but that effect did not translate to enhanced evaporation. Instead the opposite was observed: evaporation rates decreased as DOC increased. Ancillary data and prior studies suggest two explanatory mechanisms: (1) disproportionately greater radiant energy outflux from high DOC lakes, and (2) the combined effect of wind speed (W) and the vapor pressure gradient (es - ez), whose product [W(es - ez)] was lowest on the high DOC lake, despite very low wind speeds (changes in the variables that drive E can have measurable effects on water levels by shifting the balance between P and E.

  17. Anti-Aliased Rendering of Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Qin; Eihachiro Nakamae; Wei Hua; Yasuo Nagai; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Water surface is one of the most important components of landscape scenes. When rendering spacious far from the viewpoint. This is because water surface consists of stochastic water waves which are usually modeled by periodic bump mapping. The incident rays on the water surface are actually scattered by the bumped waves,pattern, we estimate this solid angle of reflected rays and trace these rays. An image-based accelerating method is adopted so that the contribution of each reflected ray can be quickly obtained without elaborate intersection calculation. We also demonstrate anti-aliased shadows of sunlight and skylight on the water surface. Both the rendered images and animations show excellent effects on the water surface of a reservoir.

  18. Analysis of climate change impacts on surface energy balance of Lake Huron (estimation of surface energy balance components: Remote sensing approach for water -- atmosphere parameterization)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchprayoon, Pakorn

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the physical processes of energy exchange between the water surface and atmosphere of Lake Huron in order to explain the processes behind such changes in long-term water levels and to monitor their spatial and temporal fluctuations. The lake surface water temperature and the four components of surface energy balance, including net radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and heat storage, as well as evaporation rate, were estimated using the daily remotely sensed data from eleven years (2002--2012) with a multi-spatial resolution of 1 km to 5 km using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board Terra satellite, together with in-situ measurements. The regression analysis of the entire lake daily mean water surface temperature revealed a positive trend of 0.1 °C per year, indicating that the lake surface temperature increased by 1.1°C during the period 2002-2012. The warming rate was found to be greatest in the deepest areas of the lake, with a statistically-significant correlation between warming rate and depth. The four components of surface energy balance showed temporal and spatial heterogeneities. There were strong seasonal patterns for all of the components, which were very high in summer and low in winter for net radiation and heat storage. In contrast, the latent heat and sensible heat were very high in the winter and very low in the summer. Approximately 70% of the annual mean 30 min evaporation occurred during the fall and winter seasons, whereas the lowest evaporation rate occurred in March, which was only 3% of the annual mean of 30 min evaporation. There was an increase in the evaporation rate of approximately 1.4 mm m-2 over the 2005--2012 observation period, the water level decreased by 0.04 m during the period 2002--2012, and there was a decrease in total water storage by 1.18 cm during the entire study period (2004--2012). There was obviously a negative correlation between lake

  19. Determination of Soil Evaporation Fluxes Using Distributed Temperature Sensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, J.; Serna, J. L.; Suarez, F. I.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the main process for water vapor exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. Evaporation from shallow groundwater tables is important in arid zones and is influenced by the water table depth and by the soil's hydrodynamic characteristics. Measuring evaporation, however, is still challenging. Thus, it is important to develop new measuring techniques that can better determine evaporation fluxes. The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) to study the processes that control evaporation from soils with shallow water tables. To achieve this objective, an experimental column was instrumented with traditional temperature probes, time-domain-reflectometry probes, and an armored fiber-optic cable that allowed the application of heat pulses to estimate the soil moisture profile. The experimental setup also allowed to fix the water table at different depths and to measure evaporation rates at the daily scale. Experiments with different groundwater table depths were carried out. For each experiment, the evaporation rates were measured and the moisture profile was determined using heat pulses all through the DTS cable. These pulses allowed estimation of the moisture content with errors smaller than 0.045 m3/m3 and with a spatial resolution of ~6.5 mm. The high spatial resolution of the moisture profile combined with mathematical modeling permitted to investigate the processes that control evaporation from bare soils with shallow groundwater tables.

  20. Impact of plant water uptake strategy on soil moisture and evaporation dynamics during drydown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Hupet, F.; Troch, P.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown that plants can compensate for water stress in the upper, more densely rooted, soil layers by increasing the water uptake from deeper layers. By adapting root water uptake to water availability, plants are able to extend the period of unstressed transpiration. This strategy co

  1. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN THE RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA DUMITRAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is an increasingly important and why it is important to surfacewater quality, which is given by the analysis of physical - chemical, biological andobserving the investigation of water, biota, environments investigation. Analysis ofthe Prut river in terms of biological and physical elements - chemical. Evaluationof ecological and chemical status of water was done according to order of approvalof the standard classification nr.161/2006 surface water to determine the ecologicalstatus of water bodies

  2. Effect of Soil Surface Evaporation with Fly Ash as Sandy Soil Amendment%施用粉煤灰对沙土土面蒸发的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成钢; 赵亮; 孙鹏程; 唐泽军

    2011-01-01

    Based on evaporation experiment in natural condition, research were carried out to study the effect of water retention capacity of sandy soil under four fly ash application rate (10%, 20%, 30%, 40%). Results showed that, the usage of fly ash reduced evaporation capability and enhance water reten- tion capacity of sandy soil. The evaporation capability always reduced by the effort of fly ash application throughout the experiment, and showed that less evaporation effect with increasing fly ash application rate. As total evaporation, compared with controlled experiment, the total evaporation of three treatments of 20%, 30%, 40% reduced 8.3%, 13.0%, 27.2% except 10% treatment has similar evaporation.%通过自然条件下蒸发试验,研究了4种粉煤灰施用率对沙土土面蒸发的影响。结果表明,粉煤灰的施用减弱了沙土土面蒸发水平,增强了沙土的保水性能。通过对蒸发过程的日观察,粉煤灰的施用始终表现出减弱沙土蒸发的能力,且呈现出随粉煤灰施用率增多而蒸发能力愈弱的特点。施用率10%处理土壤总蒸发量与对照试验大致相同,施用率20%、30%、40%三种处理总蒸发量分别较对照试验减少8.3%、13.0%、27.2%。

  3. Evaporation-induced failure of hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H.; Liu, T.; Ma, J.; Wang, P.; Wang, Y.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Jing, G.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophobic coatings have tremendous applications in many fields of industries, and their robustness is an important subject of investigation. Here we experimentally demonstrate the detachment of hydrophobic coating and the formation of the residual deposit resulting from an evaporating drop of water. A hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT) coating is employed to enhance the hydrophobicity of ZnO nanowire arrays (advancing and receding contact angle of 165° and 128°, respectively). Being a model system of the unique bonding interaction between ODT and ZnO, water drop drying on the structure of ODT/ZnO is examined. Our experimental results showed the significant depression and even failure of the hydrophobicity on this composite surface resulting from collecting the deposits of ODT molecules during the drop drying. By analyzing energy criterion and force balance, surface tension at the moving contact line is identified as a dominating destructive force to unstick the coating molecules. Interestingly, a normal rinsing stream does not damage this coating to alter its hydrophobicity, but rather is overshadowed by the evaporation of the tinny water drop. The drops of rain or condensed water outdoor may thus play the same role to damage the functional coatings after their evaporation. Our findings indicate that more delicate designs are needed to prevent the destructive effects of drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Electrical properties and surface morphology of electron beam evaporated p-type silicon thin films on polyethylene terephthalate for solar cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, P. C.; Ibrahim, K.; Pakhuruddin, M. Z. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    One way to realize low-cost thin film silicon (Si) solar cells fabrication is by depositing the films with high-deposition rate and manufacturing-compatible electron beam (e-beam) evaporation onto inexpensive foreign substrates such as glass or plastic. Most of the ongoing research is reported on e-beam evaporation of Si films on glass substrates to make polycrystalline solar cells but works combining both e-beam evaporation and plastic substrates are still scarce in the literature. This paper studies electrical properties and surface morphology of 1 µm electron beam evaporated Al-doped p-type silicon thin films on textured polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for application as an absorber layer in solar cells. In this work, Si thin films with different doping concentrations (including an undoped reference) are prepared by e-beam evaporation. Energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) showed that the Si films are uniformly doped by Al dopant atoms. With increased Al/Si ratio, doping concentration increased while both resistivity and carrier mobility of the films showed opposite relationships. Root mean square (RMS) surface roughness increased. Overall, the Al-doped Si film with Al/Si ratio of 2% (doping concentration = 1.57×10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 3}) has been found to provide the optimum properties of a p-type absorber layer for fabrication of thin film Si solar cells on PET substrate.

  5. Temporal upscaling of instantaneous evapotranspiration on clear-sky days using the constant reference evaporative fraction method with fixed or variable surface resistances at two cropland sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ronglin; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Xiaomin; Bi, Yuyun

    2017-01-01

    Surface evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of water and energy in land and atmospheric systems. This paper investigated whether using variable surface resistances in the reference ET estimates from the full-form Penman-Monteith (PM) equation could improve the upscaled daily ET estimates in the constant reference evaporative fraction (EFr, the ratio of actual to reference grass/alfalfa ET) method on clear-sky days using ground-based measurements. Half-hourly near-surface meteorological variables and eddy covariance (EC) system-measured latent heat flux data on clear-sky days were collected at two sites with different climatic conditions, namely, the subhumid Yucheng station in northern China and the arid Yingke site in northwestern China and were used as the model input and ground-truth, respectively. The results showed that using the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)-PM equation, the American Society of Civil Engineers-PM equation, and the full-form PM equation to estimate the reference ET in the constant EFr method produced progressively smaller upscaled daily ET at a given time from midmorning to midafternoon. Using all three PM equations produced the best results at noon at both sites regardless of whether the energy imbalance of the EC measurements was closed. When the EC measurements were not corrected for energy imbalance, using variable surface resistance in the full-form PM equation could improve the ET upscaling in the midafternoon, but worse results may occur in the midmorning to noon. Site-to-site and time-to-time variations were found in the performances of a given PM equation (with fixed or variable surface resistances) before and after the energy imbalance was closed.

  6. Evaporative processes for desalination of produced water; Processos evaporativos para dessalinizacao de agua produzida a fins de reuso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Vivian T.; Dezotti, Marcia W. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Schuhli, Juliana B.; Gomes, Marcia T.; Pereira Junior, Oswaldo A. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, it gets the moment when a big quantity of produced water comes together with the oil. It can achieve 99% in the end of its economical life. The thermal desalination of the formation water is one of the most common technologies for achieving its reuse. This way, it was constructed one 'Robert' evaporator. The tests used different sodium chloride concentrations from 2,000 mg/L to 80,000 mg/L simulating concentrations found in the produced water from PETROBRAS wells. The tests were conducted in three different vacuum pressures. It was observed, increasing the vacuum applied to the system, results in reduction of solution boiling point. The salt concentrations of the brine blowdown were influenced by the sodium chloride concentration at the feed flow, by the vacuum applied to the system and, consequently, by the solution boiling point and flow rates. The produced distillate water presented sodium chloride concentration lower than 2 mg/L, indicating that this system can produce water to reuse in irrigation. (author)

  7. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Trambauer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle, with implications ranging from water management, to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological or land-surface models. However, it appears that most global or continental-scale hydrological models underestimate evaporative fluxes in some regions of Africa, and as a result overestimate stream flow. Other studies suggest that land-surface models may overestimate evaporative fluxes. In this study, we computed actual evaporation for the African continent using a continental version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB, which is based on a water balance approach. Results are compared with other independently computed evaporation products: the evaporation results from the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim and ERA-Land (both based on the energy balance approach, the MOD16 evaporation product, and the GLEAM product. Three other alternative versions of the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological model were also considered. This resulted in eight products of actual evaporation, which were compared in distinct regions of the African continent spanning different climatic regimes. Annual totals, spatial patterns and seasonality were studied and compared through visual inspection and statistical methods. The comparison shows that the representation of irrigation areas has an insignificant contribution to the actual evaporation at a continental scale with a 0.5° spatial resolution. The choice of meteorological forcing data has a larger effect on the evaporation results, especially in the case of the precipitation input as different precipitation input resulted in significantly different evaporation in some of the studied regions. ERA-Interim evaporation is generally the highest of the selected products followed by ERA-Land evaporation. The satellite based products (GLEAM and MOD16 do not show regular

  8. Modeling evaporation from spent nuclear fuel storage pools: A diffusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Bruce Robert

    Accurate prediction of evaporative losses from light water reactor nuclear power plant (NPP) spent fuel storage pools (SFPs) is important for activities ranging from sizing of water makeup systems during NPP design to predicting the time available to supply emergency makeup water following severe accidents. Existing correlations for predicting evaporation from water surfaces are only optimized for conditions typical of swimming pools. This new approach modeling evaporation as a diffusion process has yielded an evaporation rate model that provided a better fit of published high temperature evaporation data and measurements from two SFPs than other published evaporation correlations. Insights from treating evaporation as a diffusion process include correcting for the effects of air flow and solutes on evaporation rate. An accurate modeling of the effects of air flow on evaporation rate is required to explain the observed temperature data from the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 4 SFP during the 2011 loss of cooling event; the diffusion model of evaporation provides a significantly better fit to this data than existing evaporation models.

  9. Manufacturing and characterisation of water repellent surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Botija, Pablo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    design criteria for such surfaces. The problem of adapting this behaviour to artificially roughened surfaces is addressed by providing design criteria for superhydrophobic, water-repellent and self-cleaning surfaces according to the concrete performance desired for them. Different kind of manufacturing...

  10. Assessing climate change induced modification of Penman potential evaporation and runoff sensitivity in a large water-limited basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; McVicar, Tim R.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryPotential evaporation (Ep) reflects the combined effects of four key meteorological variables: (i) net radiation (Rn); (ii) wind speed (u); (iii) relative humidity (rh); and (iv) air temperature (Ta). Here, attribution analysis was conducted to investigate the contribution of the four key meteorological variables to changes of a physically-based Ep in a large water-limited basin, the Yellow River Basin (YRB), China. Then the influences of these changes, and precipitation (P) changes, on streamflow (Q) were explored analytically. Results show that: (i) Ep presented different temporal trends for the water yielding region (WYR) and water consuming region (WCR) with a overall changes of +0.16 mm a-2 and -0.66 mm a-2 during 1961-2010, respectively; (ii) trend analysis of Ep and the four key meteorological variables at the basin scale showed that increasing trend in Ta increased Ep during 1961-2010, while changes in Rn and u increased the 1961-1979 Ep rate and reduced it during 1980-1994 and 1995-2010; (iii) revealed by attribution analysis, Ep increased by changes in Ta and rh and reduced by changes of Rn and u in both WYR and WCR, in all, Ep rate presented positive and negative trends in the WYR and WCR, respectively; (iv) the changes of Q and actual evaporation (E) are much more sensitive to changes in P than the changes in Ep; and (v) of critical importance for water resource management of the YRB changes in Q are mainly attributed to changes in catchment-specific parameter (n) and P, while Ep reduced Q in WYR and increased Q in WCR. These results indicated that the causes of trend of Ep rates, influenced by combined effects of radiative and aerodynamic variables should be explicitly explained using fully physically based Ep formulations. Additionally, in the water-limited YRB, changes of Q are primarily controlled by the changes in catchment conditions, and secondarily by hydroclimatic factors where the available water (P) rather than energy condition (Ep) is

  11. Daily Evaporative Fraction Parameterization Scheme Driven by Day–Night Differences in Surface Parameters: Improvement and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, a daily evaporative fraction (EF parameterization scheme was derived based on day–night differences in surface temperature, air temperature, and net radiation. Considering the advantage that incoming solar radiation can be readily retrieved from remotely sensed data in comparison with surface net radiation, this study simplified the daily EF parameterization scheme using incoming solar radiation as an input. Daily EF estimates from the simplified scheme were nearly equivalent to the results from the original scheme. In situ measurements from six Ameriflux sites with different land covers were used to validate the new simplified EF parameterization scheme. Results showed that daily EF estimates for clear skies were consistent with the in situ EF corrected by the residual energy method, showing a coefficient of determination of 0.586 and a root mean square error of 0.152. Similar results were also obtained for partly clear sky conditions. The non-closure of the measured energy and heat fluxes and the uncertainty in determining fractional vegetation cover were likely to cause discrepancies in estimated daily EF and measured counterparts. The daily EF estimates of different land covers indicate that the constant coefficients in the simplified EF parameterization scheme are not strongly site-specific.

  12. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The MN Department of Agriculture (MDA) is charged with periodically collecting and analyzing water samples from selected locations throughout the state to determine...

  13. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  14. Reply to "comment on a model for soil surface evaporation based on Campbell's retention curve by Zarei et al." by M. Sadeghi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ghasem; Homaee, Mehdi; Liaghat, Abdol Majid; Hoorfar, Abdol Hosain

    2015-12-01

    Sadeghi (2015) has been commented on an analytical solution we derived for evaporation from bare soils with a descending shallow groundwater table (Zarei et al., 2010). The evaporation rate in this solution was described as a function of shallow water table depth drawdown using the parameters of Campbell's soil water retention model. Sadeghi (2015) took issue with a simplifying assumption in the derivation about the pressure head distribution above the water table that allowed us to obtain the approximate solution. This response aims to demonstrate that the derivation of Zarei et al. (2010) works reasonably well in the presence of a shallow water table by providing a more detailed discussion and additional experimen