WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface vibration velocity

  1. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  2. VIBRATING VELOCITY RECONSTRUCTION USING IBEM AND TIKHONOV REGULARIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The inverse problem to determine the vibrating velocity from known exterior field measurement pressure, involves the solution of a discrete ill-posed problem. To facilitate the computation of a meaningful approximate solution possible, the indirect boundary element method (IBEM) code for investigating vibration velocity reconstruction and Tikhonov regularization method by means of singular value decomposition (SVD) are used. The amount of regularization is determined by a regularization parameter. Its optimal value is given by the L-curve approach. Numerical results indicate the reconstructed normal surface velocity is a good approximation to the real source.

  3. Adaptive noncolocated velocity feedback for vibration damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, David S.; Spanos, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for adaptive noncolocated velocity feedback control of flexible structure vibrations. The approach, denoted as auto-tuning, is to drive the system into a sequence of controlled oscillations to provide accurate knowledge of the plant characteristics in the vicinity of the phase cross-over frequencies. An allpass phase notch filter cascade is used as the control architecture to phase stabilize each destabilizing mode in the plant transfer function. The allpass phase notch filter cascade is tuned precisely by the information extracted from the controlled oscillations.

  4. Vibrational states on Pd surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1997-04-01

    We present the calculation of vibrational modes and lattice relaxation for the Pd(100), (110) and (111) surfaces. The surface phonon frequencies and polarizations are obtained using embedded-atom potentials. Comparison of the calculated frequency values with available experimental data gives agreement within 0.2 THz.

  5. Iterative reconstruction of the transducer surface velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Erwin; van Dongen, Koen

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasound arrays used for medical imaging consist of many elements placed closely together. Ideally, each element vibrates independently. However, because of mechanical coupling, crosstalk between neighboring elements may occur. To quantify the amount of crosstalk, the transducer velocity distribution should be measured. In this work, a method is presented to reconstruct the velocity distribution from far-field pressure field measurements acquired over an arbitrary surface. The distribution is retrieved from the measurements by solving an integral equation, derived from the Rayleigh integral of the first kind, using a conjugate gradient inversion scheme. This approach has the advantages that it allows for arbitrary transducer and pressure field measurement geometries, as well as the application of regularization techniques. Numerical experiments show that measuring the pressure field along a hemisphere enclosing the transducer yields significantly more accurate reconstructions than measuring along a parallel plane. In addition, it is shown that an increase in accuracy is achieved when the assumption is made that all points on the transducer surface vibrate in phase. Finally, the method has been tested on an actual transducer with an active element of 700 × 200 μm which operates at a center frequency of 12.2 MHz. For this transducer, the velocity distribution has been reconstructed accurately to within 50 μm precision from pressure measurements at a distance of 1.98 mm (=16λ0) using a 200-μm-diameter needle hydrophone.

  6. Vibration velocity and frequency of underwater short-hole blasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the measuring data of underwater blasting vibrationand the regression analysis results of these data, two formulae usually used of blasting vibration velocity were compared. Factors that canaffect blasting vibration and frequency were summarized and analyzed.It is thought that the effect of the number of freedom face and burden direction on blasting vibration should be considered during blastingdesign. Based on the relevant research results and the regression results of these data, a formula to calculate under water blasting frequency was put forward.

  7. Non-contact measurement of facial surface vibration patterns during singing by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of measuring the vibration patterns on facial surfaces by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The surfaces of the face, neck, and body vibrate during phonation and, according to Titze (2001), these vibrations occur when aerodynamic energy is efficiently converted into acoustic energy at the glottis. A vocalist's vibration velocity patterns may therefore indicate his or her phonatory status or singing skills. LDVs enable laser-based non-contact measurement of the vibration velocity and displacement of a certain point on a vibrating object, and scanning LDVs permit multipoint measurements. The benefits of scanning LDVs originate from the facts that they do not affect the vibrations of measured objects and that they can rapidly measure the vibration patterns across planes. A case study is presented herein to demonstrate the method of measuring vibration velocity patterns with a scanning LDV. The objective of the experiment was to measure the vibration velocity differences between the modal and falsetto registers while three professional soprano singers sang sustained vowels at four pitch frequencies. The results suggest that there is a possibility that pitch frequency are correlated with vibration velocity. However, further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationships between vibration velocity patterns and phonation status and singing skills.

  8. Patterns and velocity field in vertically vibrated granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Istafaul H.; Alam, Meheboob

    2013-06-01

    We report experimental results on pattern formation in vertically vibrated granular materials confined in a quasitwo-dimensional container. For a deep bed of mono-disperse particles, we uncovered a new transition from the bouncing bed to an f/4-wave (f is the frequency of shaking) which eventually gives birth to an f/2-undulation wave, with increasing shaking intensity. Other patterned states for mono-disperse particles and their transition-route are compared with previous experiments. The coarse-grained velocity field for each patterned state has been obtained which helped to characterize convective rolls as well as synchronous and sub-harmonic waves in this system.

  9. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    on surface velocities recorded at the site. The Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL) under Engabreen, augmented by additional subglacial pressure and hydrological measurements, provides a invaluable observations for detailed process-oriented studies. However, the lack of complementary surface velocity data...... complicates comparisons with other surface-oriented glaciohydrological studies. One major aim of this thesis is to provide a longer record of surface velocity, enabling a more complete understanding of the glacial hydro-mechanical relationship at Engabreen. In order to extend the velocity dataset here, a time......-lapse camera based study was carried out, providing seasonal velocity maps over a large portion of an inaccessible region of the glacier. The processing and feature tracking of terrestrially based imagery, in order to obtain quantitative velocity measurements, is challenging. Whilst optical feature tracking...

  10. Vibrations on Al surfaces covered by sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a comparative study of vibrational and structural properties of the ordered (√{3}×√{3})R30∘ and c(2 × 2) phases formed by Na adatoms at room temperature on the Al(1 1 1) and Al(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively. The surface relaxation, surface phonon dispersion, and polarization of vibrational modes are calculated using the embedded-atom method. Our calculated structural parameters are in agreement with experimental and ab initio results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare fairly well with available experimental data.

  11. Simulating Displacement and Velocity Signals by Piezoelectric Sensor in Vibration Control Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Sheu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent structures with built-in piezoelectric sensor and actuator that can actively change their physical geometry and/or properties have been known preferable in vibration control. However, it is often arguable to determine if measurement of piezoelectric sensor is strain rate, displacement, or velocity signal. This paper presents a neural sensor design to simulate the sensor dynamics. An artificial neural network with error backpropagation algorithm is developed such that the embedded and attached piezoelectric sensor can faithfully measure the displacement and velocity without any signal conditioning circuitry. Experimental verification shows that the neural sensor is effective to vibration suppression of a smart structure by embedded sensor/actuator and a building structure by surface-attached piezoelectric sensor and active mass damper.

  12. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  13. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  14. Influence of millisecond time, charge length and detonation velocity on blasting vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈士海; 吴建; 张子华

    2015-01-01

    The law of blasting vibration caused by blasting in rock is very complex. Traditional numerical methods cannot well characterize all the influencing factors in the blasting process. The effects of millisecond time, charge length and detonation velocity on the blasting vibration are discussed by analyzing the characteristics of vibration wave generated by finite length cylindrical charge. It is found that in multi-hole millisecond blasting, blasting vibration superimpositions will occur several times within a certain distance from the explosion source due to the propagation velocity difference of P-wave and S-wave generated by a short column charge. These superimpositions will locally enlarge the peak velocity of blasting vibration particle. The magnitude and scope of the enlargement are closely related to the millisecond time. Meanwhile, the particle vibration displacement characteristics of rock under long cylindrical charge is analyzed. The results show that blasting vibration effect would no longer increase when the charge length increases to a certain extent. This indicates that the traditional simple calculation method using the maximum charge weight per delay interval to predict the effect of blasting vibration is unreasonable. Besides, the effect of detonation velocity on blasting vibration is only limited in a certain velocity range. When detonation velocity is greater than a certain value, the detonation velocity almost makes no impact on blasting vibration.

  15. The Investigations of Friction under Die Surface Vibration in Cold Forging Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinming, Sha

    is undergoing vibration. In the experiments, die surface orientation, frequency and amplitude of vibration, vibrating wave form and the direction of vibration has been taken into account as the parameters which influence friction behaviour in forging process. The results reveal that friction could be reduced up......The objective of this thesis is to fundamentally study the influence of die surface vibration on friction under low frequency in metal forging processes. The research includes vibrating tool system design for metal forming, theoretical and experimental investigations, and finite element simulations...... on die surface vibration in forging process. After a general introduction to friction mechanisms and friction test techniques in metal forming, the application of ultrasonic vibration in metal forming, the influence of sliding velocity on friction is described. Some earlier investigations...

  16. Active Vibration Isolation Using a Voice Coil Actuator with Absolute Velocity Feedback Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Hui Liu; Wei-Hao Wu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the active vibration isolation using a voice coil actuator with absolute velocity feedback control for highly sensitive instruments (e.g., atomic force microscopes) which suffer from building vibration. Compared with traditional isolators, the main advantage of the proposed isolation system is that it produces no isolator resonance. The absolute vibration velocity signal is acquired from an accelerator and processed through an integrator, and is then input to the controll...

  17. Exploration of Tactile Contact in a Haptic Display: Effects of Contact Velocity and Transient Vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, B T; Provancher, W R

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using a novel tactile contact rendering device to explore important factors of the tactile contact event. The effects of contact velocity and event-based transient vibrations were explored. Our research was motivated by a need to better understand the perception of the tactile contact event and to develop a means of rendering stiff surfaces with a nonspecialized haptic device. A passive tactile display, suitable for mounting on a Phantom robot, was developed and is capable of rendering the tactile sensation of contact on a fingertip over a range of velocities commonly experienced during everyday manipulation and tactile exploration. Experiments were conducted with this device to explore how tactile contact dynamics affect the perceived stiffness of a virtual surface. It was found that contact velocity does not have a significant effect on perceived stiffness. These results can be explained by prior research that defines perceived hardness (akin to stiffness) in terms of rate-hardness. However, in agreement with prior literature with stylus-based studies, the addition of transient vibrations to the contact event can, in some cases, increase the perceived stiffness.

  18. Drops on hydrophobic surfaces & vibrated fluid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein

    , and contribute this to preferred eigenmodes of the droplet oscillation. The second part of this thesis deals with a droplet bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid bath of the same liquid, a system which is the first known macroscopic example of pilot-wave dynamics. An introduction to the experimental set...

  19. Measurement of gas flow velocity: anemometer with a vibrating hot wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    I propose a new method to measure velocity of a gas flow, which utilizes the time derivative of the voltage observed on a vibrating hot-wire sensor. The wire vibrates with an amplitude a and a frequency f, and is kept perpendicular to the gas flow direction in the plane containing the flow velocity vector v(g). When the parameters of vibrations are tuned, the number of zeros per vibration period of the hot-wire voltage function changes. I demonstrate that at the point of change, the unknown gas velocity is directly expressed by the parameters of vibrations v(g)=2pifa. Therefore, the velocity can be measured without any prior calibration of the hot-wire speed-voltage curve and the method can be used for gases of slowly changing temperature or composition.

  20. Automatic stabilization of velocity for ultrasonic vibration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Describes the structure of a current feedback ultrasonicgeneration system with such characteristic as velocity stabilization and automatic frequency tracking, discusses the velocity stabilization principle, and points out that successful frequency tracking is precondition for velocity stabilization.

  1. Localized Surface Plasmons in Vibrating Graphene Nanodisks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weihua; Li, Bo-Hong; Stassen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    in graphene disks have the additional benefit to be highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined...... by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters...

  2. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    Recent studies have likened the seasonal observations of ice flow at the marginal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to those found on smaller alpine and valley counterparts. These similarities highlight the need for further small scale studies of seasonal evolution in the hydrological...... and dynamic structure of valley glaciers, to aid interpretation of observations from the margins of the GrIS. This thesis aims to collate a large suit of glacio-hydrological data from the outlet glacier Engabreen, Norway, in order to better understand the role the subglacial drainage configuration has...... on surface velocities recorded at the site. The Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL) under Engabreen, augmented by additional subglacial pressure and hydrological measurements, provides a invaluable observations for detailed process-oriented studies. However, the lack of complementary surface velocity data...

  3. Localized Surface Plasmons in Vibrating Graphene Nanodisks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weihua; Mortensen, N Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit to be highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices.

  4. Controlled locomotion of robots driven by a vibrating surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Lynch, Kevin M.

    Robots typically derive their powers of movement from onboard actuators and power sources, but other scenarios are possible where the external environment provides part or all of the necessary forcing and control. I will discuss details of a system where the ``robots'' are just planar solid objects and the requisite driving forces originate from frictional sliding-interactions with a periodically oscillated and nominally horizontal surface. For the robots to move, the temporal symmetry of the frictional forces must be broken, which is achieved here by modulating the normal force using vertical acceleration of the surface. Independent of the initial conditions and vibration waveform, a sliding locomotor reaches a unique velocity limit cycle at a given position. Its resulting motion can be described in terms of velocity fields which specify the robot's cycle-averaged velocity as a function of position. Velocity fields with non-zero spatial divergence can be generated by combining translational and rotational surface motions; this allows the simultaneous and open-loop collection, dispersal, and transport of multiple robots. Fields and field sequences can simultaneously move multiple robots between arbitrary positions and, potentially, along arbitrary trajectories. Supported by NSF CMMI #0700537.

  5. New developments in IR surface vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Lamont, C.L.A.; Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1995-12-31

    Low frequency dynamics at surfaces, particularly in the region of the adsorbate-substrate vibrational modes is of fundamental importance in areas as varied as sliding friction, catalysis, corrosion and epitaxial growth. This paper reviews the new developments in low frequency Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation as the source. Absolute changes induced in the far infrared for several adsorbate systems on Cu, including CO and H, are dominated by broadband reflectance changes and dipole forbidden vibrational modes which in some cases are an order of magnitude stronger than the dipole allowed modes. The experimental data can be explained by a theory developed by Persson, in which the dielectric response of the substrate is seen as playing a crucial role in the dynamics. In particular the relationships between the wavelength of the light, the penetration depth and the electron mean-free path, are critical.

  6. Experimental Verifications of Vibration Suppression for a Smart Cantilever Beam with a Modified Velocity Feedback Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents various experimental verifications for the theoretical analysis results of vibration suppression to a smart flexible beam bonded with a piezoelectric actuator by a velocity feedback controller and an extended state observer (ESO. During the state feedback control (SFC design process for the smart flexible beam with the pole placement theory, in the state feedback gain matrix, the velocity feedback gain is much more than the displacement feedback gain. For the difference between the velocity feedback gain and the displacement feedback gain, a modified velocity feedback controller is applied based on a dynamical model with the Hamilton principle to the smart beam. In addition, the feedback velocity is attained with the extended state observer and the displacement is acquired by the foil gauge on the root of the smart flexible beam. The control voltage is calculated by the designed velocity feedback gain multiplied by the feedback velocity. Through some experiment verifications for simulation results, it is indicated that the suppressed amplitude of free vibration is up to 62.13% while the attenuated magnitude of its velocity is up to 61.31%. Therefore, it is demonstrated that the modified velocity feedback control with the extended state observer is feasible to reduce free vibration.

  7. STABILIZATION OF VIBRATING BEAM BY VELOCITY FEEDBACK CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A flexible structure consisting of a Euler-Bernoulli beam with co-located sensors and actuators is considered.The control is a shear force in proportion to velocity.It is known that uniform exponential stability can be achieved with velocity feedback.A sensitivity asymptotic analysis of the system's eigenvalues and eigenfunctions is set up.The authors prove that,for K1 ∈ [0,+∞),all of the generalized eigenvectors of A form a Riesz basis of H.It is also proved that the optimal exponential decay rate can be obtained from the spectrum of the system for 0 < Kl < +∞.

  8. A velocity-amplified electromagnetic energy harvester for small amplitude vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J.; Zuo, L.

    2017-09-01

    Dedicated, self-powered wireless sensors are widely being studied for use throughout many industries to monitor everyday operations, maintain safety, and report performance characteristics. To enable sensors to power themselves, harvesting energy from machine vibration has been studied, however, its overall effectiveness can be hampered due to small vibration amplitudes and thus limited harvestable energy density. This paper addresses the issue by proposing a novel vibration energy harvester architecture in which a compliant mechanism and proof mass system is used to amplify the vibrational velocity of machine vibration for a linear electromagnetic generator. A prototype has been fabricated and experimentally characterized to verify its effectiveness. When operating at its natural frequency in a low base amplitude, 0.001 inch (25.4 μm) at 19.4 Hz, during lab tests, the harvester has been shown to produce up to 0.91 V AC open voltage, and a maximum power of 2 mW, amplifying the relative proof mass velocity by approximately 5.4 times. This method of locally increasing the machine vibrational velocity has been shown to be a viable option for increasing the potential power output of an energy harvester. In addition, a mathematical model is created based on pseudo-rigid-body dynamics and the analysis matches closely with experiments.

  9. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  10. The Development of High Power Materials with Enhanced Vibrational Velocity and Related Origin Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Introduction Ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, such as ultrasonic motors and piezoelectric actuators have been intensively...investigated in recent years 1-5. The materials with low loss and high vibrational velocity vo are desirable for ultrasonic motors application. Higher...velocity are an important issue, which to date has proven difficult to achieve. Heat generation is the most serious problem in ultrasonic motors , which

  11. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  12. Phase Velocity and Attenuation of Longitudinal Shear Vibrations of Hollow Poroelastic Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shah S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is devoted to the study of phase velocity and attenuation of longitudinal shear vibrations of hollow poroelastic circular cylinders in the presence of dissipation. The explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation of longitudinal shear vibrations are derived. The frequency equation of longitudinal shear vibrations and modes obtained in a previous paper are used to compute the phase velocity and attenuation for different dissipations for thin and thick poroelastic cylindrical shells and poroelastic solid cylinder. The physical parameters of sandstone saturated with kerosene and sandstone saturated with water are used for the purpose of computation. It is found that the phase velocity is linear beyond certain frequency. Phase velocity is smaller for a typical anti-symmetric mode compared to the flexural mode. It is greater for the second mode than that of the first mode. Also the phase velocity is larger for a thin poroelastic cylindrical shell than that of a thick poroelastic cylindrical shell. The same is true for attenuation also. Attenuation is very high for the considered dissipations and it increases with the increase in dissipation.

  13. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  14. Incorporating a disturbance observer with direct velocity feedback for control of human-induced vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawako, Donald; Reynolds, Paul; Hudson, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Feedback control strategies are desirable for disturbance rejection of human-induced vibrations in civil engineering structures as human walking forces cannot easily be measured. In relation to human-induced vibration control studies, most past researches have focused on floors and footbridges and the widely used linear controller implemented in the trials has been the direct velocity feedback (DVF) scheme. With appropriate compensation to enhance its robustness, it has been shown to be effective at damping out the problematic modes of vibration of the structures in which the active vibration control systems have been implemented. The work presented here introduces a disturbance observer (DOB) that is used with an outer-loop DVF controller. Results of analytical studies presented in this work based on the dynamic properties of a walkway bridge structure demonstrate the potential of this approach for enhancing the vibration mitigation performance offered by a purely DVF controller. For example, estimates of controlled frequency response functions indicate improved attenuation of vibration around the dominant frequency of the walkway bridge structure as well as at higher resonant frequencies. Controlled responses from three synthesized walking excitation forces on a walkway bridge structure model show that the inclusion of the disturbance observer with an outer loop DVF has potential to improve on the vibration mitigation performance by about 3.5% at resonance and 6-10% off-resonance. These are realised with hard constraints being imposed on the low frequency actuator displacements.

  15. Design and experimental study of a velocity amplified electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jackson A.; Zuo, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Dedicated sensors are widely used throughout many industries to monitor everyday operations, maintain safety and report performance characteristics. In order to adopt a more sustainable solution, intensive research is being conducted for self-powered sensing. To enable sensors to power themselves, harvesting energy from environmental vibration has been widely studied, however, its overall effectiveness remains questionable due to small vibration amplitudes and thus limited harvestable energy density. This paper addresses the issue by proposing a novel vibration energy harvester in which a metal compliant mechanism frame is used to house both a linear electromagnetic generator and proof mass. Due to the compliant mechanism, the proposed energy harvester is capable of amplifying machine vibration velocity for a dedicated electromagnetic generator, largely increasing the energy density. The harvester prototype is also fabricated and experimentally characterized to verify its effectiveness. When operating at its natural frequency in a low base amplitude, 0.001 in (25.4μm) at 19.4 Hz, during lab tests, the harvester has been shown to produce up to 0.91 V AC open voltage, and a maximum power of 2 mW, amplifying the relative proof mass velocity by approximately 5.4 times. In addition, a mathematical model is created based on the pseudo-rigid-body dynamics and the analysis matches closely with experiments. The proposed harvester was designed using vibration data from nuclear power plants. Further steps for improving such a design are given for broader applications.

  16. Effect of axial vibration on free surface flows in cylindrical liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Xiu-Hong; Jin Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    The influence of axial vibration on free surface flows in an open cylindrical container was studied by optical in situ observation method under isothermal conditions. This ground-based experiment was performed on an electromagnetic vibrator with oscillatory frequency of 100Hz. Water-glycerol mixture was chosen as the model liquid. Results showed that small amplitude (< 100μm) could generate a new type of steady streaming flows on a free surface, which were mainly driven by the combination of propagating surface wave and Stokes layer effect. The steady flow manifested various patterns according to the vibration amplitude level. Higher amplitude made steady flow periodical or turbulent,which could be characterized by the critical vibrational dimensionless Reynolds number (Nre)c. The calculated value of (Nre)c was of the magnitude of 10-2 - 10-1. In addition, surface streaming velocities were measured by the particle scattering technique. It was found that the velocity increased parabolically with vibration amplitude and decreased with viscosity for a fixed flow pattern.

  17. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (<300 m). In this study, we use data from a 35-km diameter array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques

  18. Effect of fingerprints orientation on skin vibrations during tactile exploration of textured surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Prevost, Alexis; Debrégeas, Georges

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the tactile perception of fine textures is mediated by skin vibrations when scanning the surface with the fingertip. These vibrations are encoded by specific mechanoreceptors, Pacinian corpuscules (PCs), located about 2 mm below the skin surface. In a recent article, we performed experiments using a biomimetic sensor which suggest that fingerprints (epidermal ridges) may play an important role in shaping the subcutaneous stress vibrations in a way which facilitates their processing by the PC channel. Here we further test this hypothesis by directly recording the modulations of the fingerpad/substrate friction force induced by scanning an actual fingertip across a textured surface. When the fingerprints are oriented perpendicular to the scanning direction, the spectrum of these modulations shows a pronounced maximum around the frequency v/lambda, where v is the scanning velocity and lambda the fingerprints period. This simple biomechanical result confirms the relevance of our previous finding for hu...

  19. Effect of fingerprints orientation on skin vibrations during tactile exploration of textured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Alexis; Scheibert, Julien; Debrégeas, Georges

    2009-09-01

    In humans, the tactile perception of fine textures is mediated by skin vibrations when scanning the surface with the fingertip. These vibrations are encoded by specific mechanoreceptors, Pacinian corpuscules (PCs), located about 2 mm below the skin surface. In a recent article, we performed experiments using a biomimetic sensor which suggest that fingerprints (epidermal ridges) may play an important role in shaping the subcutaneous stress vibrations in a way which facilitates their processing by the PC channel. Here we further test this hypothesis by directly recording the modulations of the fingerpad/substrate friction force induced by scanning an actual fingertip across a textured surface. When the fingerprints are oriented perpendicular to the scanning direction, the spectrum of these modulations shows a pronounced maximum around the frequency v/lambda, where v is the scanning velocity and lambda the fingerprints period. This simple biomechanical result confirms the relevance of our previous finding for human touch.

  20. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  1. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  2. Ultrasonic pumping of liquids in the two directions of a vertical tube by a vibrating surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that it is possible to pump a liquid into the interior of a vertical pipe when its lower end is facing a vibrating plane surface immersed in the liquid. The column of liquid pumped in a thin pipe can be higher than 2 m if the gap between the pipe end and the vibrating...... been to advance in the understanding of both phenomena. By using the Boundary Element Method, the sound pressure field in the liquid is determined. The velocity field, Lagrangian excess pressure, and sound intensity are obtained from the sound pressure. Experimental results show that the amplitude...... of the oscillations of the vibrating horizontal surface determine the direction in which the liquid is pumped. In addition, the size of the gap is also a relevant factor, which has to be significantly small. The carried out numerical simulations show that the Lagrangian excess pressure and the density of linear...

  3. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  4. Velocity Map Imaging the Scattering Plane of Gas Surface Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, David J; Leng, Joseph G; Greaves, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D sacattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was demonstrated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the systems capabilities the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a PTFE surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  5. Accurate acoustic power measurement for low-intensity focused ultrasound using focal axial vibration velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Guo, Gepu; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Hu, Jimin

    2017-07-01

    Low-intensity focused ultrasound is a form of therapy that can have reversible acoustothermal effects on biological tissue, depending on the exposure parameters. The acoustic power (AP) should be chosen with caution for the sake of safety. To recover the energy of counteracted radial vibrations at the focal point, an accurate AP measurement method using the focal axial vibration velocity (FAVV) is proposed in explicit formulae and is demonstrated experimentally using a laser vibrometer. The experimental APs for two transducers agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, showing that AP is proportional to the square of the FAVV, with a fixed power gain determined by the physical parameters of the transducers. The favorable results suggest that the FAVV can be used as a valuable parameter for non-contact AP measurement, providing a new strategy for accurate power control for low-intensity focused ultrasound in biomedical engineering.

  6. Model for continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer sensing displacements of randomly rough vibrating surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Andrews, Mark; Donabed, Ninos; Galinde, Ameya; Rappaport, Carey; Fenneman, Douglas

    2007-02-01

    An analytic model is developed for the time-dependent ultrasound field reflected off a randomly rough vibrating surface for a continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer system in bistatic configuration. Kirchhoff's approximation to Green's theorem is applied to model the three-dimensional scattering interaction of the ultrasound wave field with the vibrating rough surface. The model incorporates the beam patterns of both the transmitting and receiving ultrasound transducers and the statistical properties of the rough surface. Two methods are applied to the ultrasound system for estimating displacement and velocity amplitudes of an oscillating surface: incoherent Doppler shift spectra and coherent interferometry. Motion of the vibrometer over the randomly rough surface leads to time-dependent scattering noise that causes a randomization of the received signal spectrum. Simulations with the model indicate that surface displacement and velocity estimation are highly dependent upon the scan velocity and projected wavelength of the ultrasound vibrometer relative to the roughness height standard deviation and correlation length scales of the rough surface. The model is applied to determine limiting scan speeds for ultrasound vibrometer measuring ground displacements arising from acoustic or seismic excitation to be used in acoustic landmine confirmation sensing.

  7. Microwave absorption by nanoresonator vibrations tuned with surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosudský, Ondrej; Cifra, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Elucidating the physical and chemical parameters that govern viscous damping of nanoresonator vibrations and their coupling to electromagnetic radiation is important for understanding the behavior of matter at the nanoscale. Here we develop an analytical model of microwave absorption of a longitudinally oscillating and electrically polar rod-like nanoresonator embedded in a viscoelastic fluid. We show that the slip length, which can be tuned via surface modifications, controls the quality factor and coupling of nanoresonator vibration modes to microwave radiation. We demonstrate that the larger slip length brings the sharper frequency response of the nanoresonator vibration and electromagnetic absorption. Our findings contribute to design guidelines of fluid embedded nanoresonator devices.

  8. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. Communication: A vibrational study of propargyl cation using the vacuum ultraviolet laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Lu, Zhou; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Jingang; Ng, C Y

    2012-10-28

    By employing the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron (VUV-VMI-PE) method, we have obtained a vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectrum of gaseous propargyl radical [C(3)H(3)(X(2)B(1))] in the energy range of 0-4600 cm(-1) above its ionization energy. The cold C(3)H(3) radicals were produced from a supersonically cooled radical beam source based on 193 nm ArF photodissociation of C(3)H(3)Cl. The VUV-VMI-PE spectrum of C(3)H(3) thus obtained reveals a Franck-Condon factor (FCF) pattern with a highly dominant origin band along with weak vibrational progressions associated with excitations of the C-C ν(5)(+)(a(1)) and C≡C ν(3)(+)(a(1)) symmetric stretching modes and the CCH ν(7)(+)(b(1)) out-of-plane bending mode of C(3)H(3)(+)(X(1)A(1)). The ν(5)(+)(a(1)) vibrational frequency of 1120 cm(-1) determined in the present study is lower than the value deduced from the recent Ar-tagged infrared photodissociation study by 102 cm(-1), confirming the highly accurate vibrational frequency predictions obtained by the most recent state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations. The observation of the FCF disallowed ν(7)(+)(b(1)) mode is indicative of vibronic interactions. The discrepancy observed between the FCF pattern determined in the present study and that predicted by a recent high-level quantum theoretical investigation can be taken as evidence that the potential energy surfaces used in the latter theoretical study are in need of improvement in order to provide a reliable FCF prediction for the C(3)H(3)/C(3)H(3)(+) photoionization system.

  11. Selective excitation of adsorbate vibrations on dissipative surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The selective infrared (IR) excitation of molecular vibrations is a powerful tool to control the photoreactivity prior to electronic excitation in the ultraviolet / visible (UV/Vis) light regime ("vibrationally mediated chemistry"). For adsorbates on surfaces it has been theoretically predicted that IR preexcitation will lead to higher UV/Vis photodesorption yields and larger cross sections for other photoreactions. In a recent experiment, IR-mediated desorption of molecular hydrogen from a S...

  12. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  13. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  14. Vibrations on Cu surfaces covered with Ni monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1999-08-01

    Vibrational modes on the Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces covered with a Ni monolayer have been calculated using the embedded-atom method. A detailed discussion of the dispersion relations and polarizations of adsorbate modes and surface phonons is presented. The dispersion of the Rayleigh phonon is in good agreement with the experimental EELS data. The changes in interatomic force constants are discussed.

  15. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  16. Nonlinear free vibrations of centrifugally stiffened uniform beams at high angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhoucha, F.; Rechak, S.; Duigou, L.; Cadou, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the bending nonlinear free vibrations of a centrifugally stiffened beam with uniform cross-section and constant angular velocity. The nonlinear intrinsic equations of motion used here are geometrically exact and specific to beams exhibiting large amplitude displacements and rotations associated with small strains. Based on the Timoshenko beam model, these equations are derived from Hamilton's principle, in which the warping is considered. All coupling terms are considered including Coriolis terms. The studied beams are isotropic with clamped-free boundary conditions. By combining the Galerkin method with the harmonic balance method, the equations of motion are converted into a quadratic function treated with a continuation method: the Asymptotic Numerical Method, where the generalized displacement vector is presented as a series expansion. While analysing the effect of the angular velocity, we determine the amplitude versus frequency variations which are plotted as backbone curves. Considering the first lagging and flapping modes, the changes in beam behaviour from hardening to softening are investigated and identified as a function of the angular velocity and the effect of shear. Particular attention is paid to high angular velocities for both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams and the natural frequencies so obtained are compared with the results available in the literature.

  17. VELOCITY FIELD COMPUTATION IN VIBRATED GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN OPTICAL FLOW BASED MULTISCALE IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Debayle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An image analysis method has been developed in order to compute the velocity field of a granular medium (sand grains, mean diameter 600 μm submitted to different kinds of mechanical stresses. The differential method based on optical flow conservation consists in describing a dense motion field with vectors associated to each pixel. A multiscale, coarse-to-fine, analytical approach through tailor sized windows yields the best compromise between accuracy and robustness of the results, while enabling an acceptable computation time. The corresponding algorithmis presented and its validation discussed through different tests. The results of the validation tests of the proposed approach show that the method is satisfactory when attributing specific values to parameters in association with the size of the image analysis window. An application in the case of vibrated sand has been studied. An instrumented laboratory device provides sinusoidal vibrations and enables external optical observations of sand motion in 3D transparent boxes. At 50 Hz, by increasing the relative acceleration G, the onset and development of two convective rolls can be observed. An ultra fast camera records the grain avalanches, and several pairs of images are analysed by the proposed method. The vertical velocity profiles are deduced and allow to precisely quantify the dimensions of the fluidized region as a function of G.

  18. Measurement of surface recombination velocity on heavily doped indium phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Ghalla-Goradia, Manju; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    Surface recombination velocity (SRV) on heavily doped n-type and p-type InP was measured as a function of surface treatment. For the limited range of substrates and surface treatments studied, SRV and surface stability depend strongly on the surface treatment. SRVs of 100,000 cm/sec in both p-type and n-type InP are obtainable, but in n-type the low-SRV surfaces were unstable, and the only stable surfaces on n-type had SRVs of more than 10to the 6th cm/sec.

  19. Mitigating ground vibration by periodic inclusions and surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius; Persson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional finite-element model. The laboratory model employs soaked mattress foam placed within a box to mimic a finite volume of soil. The dynamic properties of the soaked foam ensure wavelengths representative of ground vibration in small scale. Comparison of the results from the two models leads......Ground vibration from traffic is a source of nuisance in urbanized areas. Trenches and wave barriers can provide mitigation of vibrations, but single barriers need to have a large depth to be effective-especially in the low-frequency range relevant to traffic-induced vibration. Alternatively...... well-defined behavior can be expected for transient loads and finite structures. However, some mitigation may occur. The paper aims at quantifying the mitigation effect of nearly periodic masses placed on the ground surface using two approaches: a small-scale laboratory model and a three...

  20. Measuring surface current velocities in the Agulhas region with ASAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available velocities for oceanographic research in the Agulhas Current are assessed. Comparisons between radar, altimetry and surface drifters observations of the surface currents show that accurate wind fields are a strong pre-requisite to the derivation of meaningful...

  1. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  2. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  3. Accelerometer-based estimation and modal velocity feedback vibration control of a stress-ribbon bridge with pneumatic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Schauer, Thomas; Goldack, Arndt; Bleicher, Achim; Schlaich, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight footbridges are very elegant but also prone to vibration. By employing active vibration control, smart footbridges could accomplish not only the architectural concept but also the required serviceability and comfort. Inertial sensors such as accelerometers allow the estimation of nodal velocities and displacements. A Kalman filter together with a band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) is applied to enable a drift-free estimation of these signals for the quasi-periodic motion under pedestrian excitation without extra information from other kinds of auxiliary sensors. The modal velocities of the structure are determined by using a second Kalman filter with the known applied actuator forces as inputs and the estimated nodal displacement and velocities as measurements. The obtained multi-modal velocities are then used for feedback control. An ultra-lightweight stress-ribbon footbridge built in the Peter-Behrens- Halle at the Technische Universitat Berlin served as the research object. Using two inertial sensors in optimal points we can estimate the dominant modal characteristics of this bridge. Real-time implementation and evaluation results of the proposed estimator will be presented in comparison to signals derived from classical displacement encoders. The real-time estimated modal velocities were applied in a multi-modal velocity feedback vibration control scheme with lightweight pneumatic muscle actuators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using inertial sensors for active vibration control of lightweight footbridges.

  4. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusina, G G; Eremeev, S V; Borisova, S D [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Echenique, P M; Chulkov, E V [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), 20018 San Sebastian/Donostia, Basque Country (Spain); Benedek, G [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru

    2008-06-04

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation.

  5. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Echenique, P. M.; Benedek, G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-06-01

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation.

  6. Influence of thermal and surface effects on vibration behavior of nonlocal rotating Timoshenko nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab; Akbarshahi, Amir

    2016-07-01

    This paper is proposed to study the free vibration of a rotating Timoshenko nanobeam based on the nonlocal theory considering thermal and surface elasticity effects. The governing equations and the related boundary conditions are derived using the Hamilton's principle. In order to solve the problem, generalized differential quadrature method is applied to discretize the governing differential equations corresponding to clamped-simply and clamped-free boundary conditions. In this article, the influences of some parameters such as nonlocal parameter, angular velocity, thickness of the nanobeam, and thermal and surface elasticity effects on the free vibration of the rotating nanobeam are investigated, and the results are compared for different boundary conditions. The results show that the surface effect and the nonlocal parameter and the temperature changes have significant roles, and they should not be ignored in the vibrational study of rotating nanobeams. Also, the angular velocity and the hub radius have more significant roles than temperature change effects on the nondimensional frequency. It is found that the nonlocal parameter behavior and the temperature change behavior on the frequency are different in the first mode for the rotating cantilever nanobeam.

  7. Surface wave velocity structure of the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    The Nanga Parbat Haramosh massif (NPHM) is located in the western syntaxis of the India-Eurasia collision zone and is subject to erosion rates that are so extreme as to impact the isostatic equilibrium of the massif. In order to investigate the interaction between large scale tectonic forces and local isostatic processes, we employ a Rayleigh wave tomography method to measure phase velocities within the massif and surrounding region at crust and mantle depths. Our inversion solves for phase velocity anomalies by representing perturbations in the wavefield as the interference of two plane waves. Our data set was obtained from a temporary seismic array deployed in 1996 and includes 53 teleseismic events with Mw ≥ 5.0, at periods from 20 to 79 s. Phase velocities at short periods are low, ranging from 3.2 km s-1 at 20 s, and increasing gradually to 3.5 km s-1 at 40 s. These velocities are 11 per cent lower than velocities observed in the Indian continental Plate at periods below 45 s. Above 50 s, phase velocities in the Nanga Parbat region are significantly higher, ranging from 3.7 km s-1 at 45 s to 4.0 km s-1 at 79 s. These high phase velocities above 60 s are consistent with average velocities measured within the Indian Plate. Comparison of these results with surface wave studies in other regions of the Tibetan plateau including the eastern syntaxis and central Tibet show a similar low velocity anomaly below 45 s. Phase velocities above 55 s, however, are significantly higher in the Nanga Parbat region compared to velocities reported for all other regions of the plateau. Shear wave inversions produce significantly low velocities in the upper crust of the NPHM but exceed average lithospheric velocities below the Moho. We suggest the combination of anomalously low velocities in the upper crust and high velocities at lithospheric depths is due to rapid exhumation of deep crustal material causing elevated geothermal gradients. Azimuthal anisotropy shows a NNW-SSE fast

  8. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongdae; Kim, Sangyoo; Park, Kyihwan

    2009-04-01

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  9. Suppression of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibration with active velocity feedback controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, B.; Srinil, N.

    2016-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) establish key design parameters for offshore and subsea structures subject to current flows. Understanding and predicting VIV phenomena have been improved in recent years. Further, there is a need to determine how to effectively and economically mitigate VIV effects. In this study, linear and nonlinear velocity feedback controllers are applied to actively suppress the combined cross-flow and in-line VIV of an elastically-mounted rigid circular cylinder. The strongly coupled fluid-structure interactions are numerically modelled and investigated using a calibrated reduced-order wake oscillator derived from the vortex strength concept. The importance of structural geometrical nonlinearities is studied which highlights the model ability in matching experimental results. The effectiveness of linear vs nonlinear controllers are analysed with regard to the control direction, gain and power. Parametric studies are carried out which allow us to choose the linear vs nonlinear control, depending on the target controlled amplitudes and associated power requirements.

  10. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  11. Acute effect of whole-body vibration on high velocity squat and jump performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ugrinowitsch

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the acute effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on power production of the lower limbs during squat exercise and on vertical jump height. The performance of 30 strength-trained subjects was assessed during high velocity squat exercise (HVS and countermovement vertical jump (CMJ before and after being submitted to four different vibration protocols in a counterbalanced random manner. The HVS and CMJ assessments were performed 3 min before and 6, 9 and 12 min after the WBV interventions, and 6 min before and 9 and 15 min after the interventions, respectively. The different WBV protocols did not change relative peak or average power production during HVS and CMJ. However, time exerted a main effect, with a decrease in CMJ height at 3 min (-2% and 15 min (-3.1% after treatment. These results suggest that the WBV protocols employed in this study do not induce acute improvement in performance. However, this finding does not rule out the application of WBV as a useful strategy for training or warm-up routines.

  12. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  13. Calculating vibrational spectra using modified Shepard interpolated potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, Christian R; Manthe, Uwe

    2008-07-14

    A potential energy interpolation approach based on modified Shepard interpolation and specifically designed for calculation of vibrational states is presented. The importance of the choice of coordinates for the rate of convergence is demonstrated. Studying the vibrational states of the water molecule as a test case, a coordinate system comprised of inverse bond distances and trigonometric functions of the bond angle is found to be particularly efficient. Different sampling schemes used to locate the reference points in the modified Shepard interpolation are investigated. A final scheme is recommended, which allows the construction of potential energy surfaces to sub-wave-number accuracy.

  14. Strong Coupling between Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Molecular Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmi, H.; Benson, O.; Sadofev, S.; Kalusniak, S.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the strong coupling of surface plasmon polaritons and molecular vibrations in an organic-inorganic plasmonic hybrid structure consisting of a ketone-based polymer deposited on top of a silver layer. Attenuated-total-reflection spectra of the hybrid reveal an anticrossing in the dispersion relation in the vicinity of the carbonyl stretch vibration of the polymer with an energy splitting of the upper and lower polariton branch up to 15 meV. The splitting is found to depend on the molecular layer thickness and saturates for micrometer-thick films. This new hybrid state holds a strong potential for application in chemistry and optoelectronics.

  15. Estimating Stream Surface Flow Velocities from Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Brauchli, T.; Chen, Z.; Huwald, H.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface flow velocities in streams can provide important information on discharge. This information is independent of water level, the most commonly used proxy for discharge and therefore has significant potential to reduce uncertainties. Advances in cheap and commonly used imaging devices (e.g. smartphone cameras) and image processing techniques offer new opportunities to get velocity information. Short video clips of streams can be used in combination with optical flow algorithms to get proxies for stream surface velocities. Here some initial results are presented and the main challenges are discussed, especially in view of using these techniques in a citizen science context (specifically the "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water), where we try to minimize the need for site preparation and additional equipment needed to take measurements.

  16. Vibrations on the (001) surface of 9R Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2002-06-01

    Vibrational modes, surface energy, and surface relaxation on the (001) surface (hexagonal plane type C) of 9R Li are calculated using the embedded-atom method. A detailed discussion of the local phonon densities of states, the changes in interatomic force constants, and a comparison with the results for the hexagonal surface (110) of bcc Li are presented. For both surfaces considered the surface effect on the phonon densities is found to be significant only in the first three layers. The results show that interactions between atomic layers are weaker in the surface region compared to bulk values. This effect together with a substantial softening in the phonon spectrum for the (110) surface of bcc Li may favor the nucleation of the martensitic phase along preferable directions at the surface.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  18. Passive Optical Detection of a Vibrating Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    medium from the incident side without change in frequency; reflectance is the fraction of the incident flux that is reflected.” Nicodemus defines more... differenced the images Figure 2. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of spectralon (approximately Lambertian) and grass. (Reprinted...However, we have raised more questions than we have answered. For example, what fraction of the detected intensity modulation is from surface normal

  19. Surface instabilities and reorientation induced by vibration in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of vibrated fluids and, in particular, the surface or interfacial instabilities that commonly arise in these systems have been the subject of continued experimental and theoretical attention since Faraday's seminal experiments in 1831. Both orientation and frequency are critical in determining the response of the fluid to excitation. Low frequencies are associated with sloshing while higher frequencies may generate Faraday waves or cross-waves, depending on whether the axis of vibration is perpendicular or parallel to the interface. In addition, high frequency vibrations are known to produce large scale reorientation of the fluid (vibroequilibria), an effect that becomes especially pronounced in the absence of gravity. We describe the results of investigations conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluid interfaces, particularly the interaction between Faraday waves, which arise in vertically vibrated systems, cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems, and large scale reorientation (vibroequilibria). Ongoing ground experiments utilizing a dual-axis shaker configuration are described, including the effect on pattern formation of varying the two independent forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. Theoretical results, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, are then described and compared to experiment. Finally, the interest of a corresponding microgravity experiment is discussed and implications for fluid management strategies considered.

  20. Comparing dynamic surface tilt with velocity using an LDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Robert A.

    2004-06-01

    If a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) probe beam is normally incident on a resonating metal strip with a mirror-finish, the retro-reflected beam has corresponding dynamic deflections. These lateral beam offsets are proportional to the dynamic surface tilt and can be measured along with the LDV velocity using a separating beam-splitter and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD). On a thin unbound strip resonating with 'pure mode' deformation, these derivative motions, velocity and tilt, are completely complementary. On a thin unbound plate resonating with 'hybrid mode' deformation, velocity and now two orthogonal tilts are nearly complementary. Maximal tilt has zero velocity, and maximum deformation or velocity has zero tilt. Intermediate values range in complementary fashion except near 'cross-nodes' zones. Here both motion types drop to zero at these cross-node locations. Both velocity and tilt signals are compared simultaneously using a special test fixture. This fixture consists of a stainless steel strip supported on its edges in the center, which can be excited by small speakers at the ends. Two comparison/calibration approaches are demonstrated with a pure 3-0 mode. Significant modal details are also demonstrated by analyzing multiple modes from pulsed excitation, and mapping a 3-1 mode-shape using the combined sensing approaches.

  1. Velocity model optimization for surface microseismic monitoring via amplitude stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyu; Wang, Zhongren; Zeng, Xiaoxian; Lü, Hao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    A usable velocity model in microseismic projects plays a crucial role in achieving statistically reliable microseismic event locations. Existing methods for velocity model optimization rely mainly on picking arrival times at individual receivers. However, for microseismic monitoring with surface stations, seismograms of perforation shots have such low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) that they do not yield sufficiently reliable picks. In this study, we develop a framework for constructing a 1-D flat-layered a priori velocity model using a non-linear optimization technique based on amplitude stacking. The energy focusing of the perforation shot is improved thanks to very fast simulated annealing (VFSA), and the accuracies of shot relocations are used to evaluate whether the resultant velocity model can be used for microseismic event location. Our method also includes a conventional migration-based location technique that utilizes successive grid subdivisions to improve computational efficiency and source location accuracy. Because unreasonable a priori velocity model information and interference due to additive noise are the major contributors to inaccuracies in perforation shot locations, we use velocity model optimization as a compensation scheme. Using synthetic tests, we show that accurate locations of perforation shots can be recovered to within 2 m, even with pre-stack S/N ratios as low as 0.1 at individual receivers. By applying the technique to a coal-bed gas reservoir in Western China, we demonstrate that perforation shot location can be recovered to within the tolerance of the well tip location.

  2. Surface roughness monitoring by singular spectrum analysis of vibration signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Plaza, E.; Núñez López, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed two methods for enhanced surface roughness (Ra) monitoring based on the application of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) to vibrations signals generated in workpiece-cutting tool interaction in CNC finish turning operations i.e., the individual analysis of principal components (I-SSA), and the grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA). Singular spectrum analysis is a non-parametric technique of time series analysis that decomposes a signal into a set of independent additive time series referred to as principal components. A number of experiments with different cutting conditions were performed to assess surface roughness monitoring using both of these methods. The results show that singular spectrum analysis of vibration signal processing discriminated the frequency ranges effective for predicting surface roughness. Grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA) proved to be the most efficient method for monitoring surface roughness, with optimum prediction and reliability results at a lower analytical-computational cost. Finally, the results show that singular spectrum analysis is an ideal method for analyzing vibration signals applied to the on-line monitoring of surface roughness.

  3. Experimental study on effect of surface vibration on micro textured surfaces with hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chun-Wei; Lai, Chen-Ling; Alvarado, Jorge L.; Zhou, Jiang; Aung, Kendrick T.; Mejia, Jose E.

    2017-08-01

    Artificial hydrophobic surfaces have been studied in the last ten years in an effort to understand the effects of structured micro- and nano-scale features on droplet motion and self-cleaning mechanisms. Among these structured surfaces, micro-textured surfaces consisting of a combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials have been designed, fabricated and characterized to understand how surface properties and morphology affect enhanced self-cleaning mechanisms. However, use of micro textured surfaces leads to a strong pinning effect that takes place between the droplets and the hydrophobic-hydrophilic edge, leading to a significant contact angle hysteresis effect. This research study focuses on the effects of surface vibrations on droplet shedding at different inclined angles on micro-textured surfaces. Surface vibration and shedding processes were experimentally characterized using a high speed imaging system. Experimental results show that droplets under the influence of surface vibration depict different contour morphologies when vibrating at different resonance frequencies. Moreover, droplet sliding angles can be reduced through surface vibration when the proper combination of droplet size and surface morphology is prescribed.

  4. Communication: A vibrational study of propargyl cation using the vacuum ultraviolet laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Hong; Lu Zhou; Yang Lei; Zhou Jingang; Ng, C. Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2012-10-28

    By employing the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron (VUV-VMI-PE) method, we have obtained a vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectrum of gaseous propargyl radical [C{sub 3}H{sub 3}(X{sup 2}B{sub 1})] in the energy range of 0-4600 cm{sup -1} above its ionization energy. The cold C{sub 3}H{sub 3} radicals were produced from a supersonically cooled radical beam source based on 193 nm ArF photodissociation of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}Cl. The VUV-VMI-PE spectrum of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} thus obtained reveals a Franck-Condon factor (FCF) pattern with a highly dominant origin band along with weak vibrational progressions associated with excitations of the C-C {nu}{sub 5}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) and C{identical_to}C {nu}{sub 3}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) symmetric stretching modes and the CCH {nu}{sub 7}{sup +}(b{sub 1}) out-of-plane bending mode of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}(X{sup 1}A{sub 1}). The {nu}{sub 5}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) vibrational frequency of 1120 cm{sup -1} determined in the present study is lower than the value deduced from the recent Ar-tagged infrared photodissociation study by 102 cm{sup -1}, confirming the highly accurate vibrational frequency predictions obtained by the most recent state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations. The observation of the FCF disallowed {nu}{sub 7}{sup +}(b{sub 1}) mode is indicative of vibronic interactions. The discrepancy observed between the FCF pattern determined in the present study and that predicted by a recent high-level quantum theoretical investigation can be taken as evidence that the potential energy surfaces used in the latter theoretical study are in need of improvement in order to provide a reliable FCF prediction for the C{sub 3}H{sub 3}/C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} photoionization system.

  5. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2004-08-20

    We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on velocity-resolved atomic desorption (VRAD). Using this new method, we predict the surface exciton energies for K1, KBr, KC1, and NaC1 within +0.15 eV. Our data, combined with the available EELS data for alkali fluorides, demonstrate a universal linear correlation with the inverse inter-atomic distance in these materials. The results suggest that surface excitons exist in all alkali halides and their excitation energies can be predicted from the known bulk exciton energies and the obtained correlation plot.

  6. Vibration of a carbyne nanomechanical mass sensor with surface effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwa, M. A.; Eltaher, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive model to investigate the influence of surface elasticity and residual surface tension on the natural frequency of flexural vibrations of nanomechanical mass sensor using a carbyne resonator. Carbyne is modeled as an equivalent continuum circular cross-section Timoshenko nanobeam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects. Surface stress and surface elasticity are presented via the Young-Laplace equation. The analytical solution is presented and verified with molecular dynamics solution. The results show that the carbyne resonator can measure a very small mass with weight below 10-3 zg. The effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, carbyne length, and mass position on the fundamental frequencies are illustrated. This study is helpful for characterizing the mechanical behavior of high-precision measurement devices such as chemical and biological sensor.

  7. Determining the location of buried plastic water pipes from measurements of ground surface vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Brennan, M. J.; Gao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    ‘Mapping the Underworld' is a UK-based project, which aims to create a multi-sensor device that combines complementary technologies for remote buried utility service detection and location. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics, and techniques for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular plastic water pipes, are being investigated. One of the proposed techniques involves excitation of the pipe at some known location with concurrent vibrational mapping of the ground surface in order to infer the location of the remainder of the pipe. In this paper, measurements made on a dedicated pipe rig are reported. Frequency response measurements relating vibrational velocity on the ground to the input excitation were acquired. Contour plots of the unwrapped phase revealed the location of the pipe to within 0.1-0.2 m. Magnitude contour plots revealed the excitation point and also the location of the pipe end. By examining the unwrapped phase gradients along a line above the pipe, it was possible to identify the wave-type within the pipe responsible for the ground surface vibration. Furthermore, changes in the ground surface phase speed computed using this method enabled the location of the end of the pipe to be confirmed.

  8. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  9. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  10. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  11. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  12. Investigation on the threshold control of safety blasting vibration velocity for the extraction of complicated orebody under railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Lichun; Hu Liuqing; Lai Xiuying

    2011-01-01

    The threshold control of safety blasting vibration velocity is a significant process for the underground mining of complicated ore deposit under construction, road, and water. According to the equivalent principle of displacement and velocity of mass point, differential evolution is put forward based on 3DEC dynamic analysis, making the calculation more efficient and accurate. The 3DEC model of the complicated orebody under railway is established according to the topographic maps and geological data of the eastern Pyrite Mine. The stimulus-response distribution of internal stress and displacement fields are demonstrated by analyzing the on-site monitoring vibration displacement and velocity data of the mass point. The reliability of parameter selection, such as blasting simulation waveforms, rock damping, is identified. The safety vibration velocity of railway is set to 4.5 cm/s in line with the requirement of safety blasting rules. Thus, the maximum amount of single-stage explosive in this region is 44.978 kg. The simulation result is in good agreement with the on-site monitoring datum. No displacement and settlement of the 701 railway special line was achieved by choosing the critical amount of the singlestage explosive.

  13. Vibrational properties of the Pt(111)- p(2 × 2)-K surface superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-08-01

    The vibrational spectra of the Pt(111)- p(2 × 2)-K ordered surface superstructure formed on the platinum surface upon adsorption of 0.25 potassium monolayer are calculated using the interatomic interaction potentials obtained within the tight-binding approximation. The surface relaxation, the dispersion of surface phonons, the local density of surface vibrational states, and the polarization of vibrational modes of adatoms and substrate atoms are discussed. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the recently obtained experimental data.

  14. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  15. Effect of surface thickness on the wetting front velocity during jet impingement surface cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chitranjan; Gotherwal, Deepesh; Singh, Chandradeep; Singh, Charan

    2017-02-01

    A hot stainless steel (SS-304) surface of 450 ± 10 °C initial temperature is cooled with a normally impinging round water jet. The experiments have been performed for the surface of different thickness e.g. 1, 2, 3 mm and jet Reynolds number in the range of Re = 26,500-48,000. The cooling performance of the hot test surface is evaluated on the basis of wetting front velocity. The wetting front velocity is determined for 10-40 mm downstream spatial locations away from the stagnation point. It has been observed that the wetting front velocity increase with the rise in jet flow rate, however, diminishes towards the downstream spatial location and with the rise in surface thickness. The proposed correlation for the dimensionless wetting front velocity predicts the experimental data well within the error band of ±30 %, whereas, 75 % of experimental data lies within the range of ±20 %.

  16. Active pneumatic vibration control by using pressure and velocity measurements and adaptive fuzzy sliding-mode controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Liang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2013-07-02

    This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI) system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control.

  17. Active Pneumatic Vibration Control by Using Pressure and Velocity Measurements and Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding-Mode Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Wei Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system’s nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control.

  18. The effects of non-uniform flow velocity on vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotube conveying fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem [Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Mohammad [Sirjan University of Technology, Sirjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The vibrational behavior of a viscous nanoflow-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated. The nonuniformity of the flow velocity distribution caused by the viscosity of fluid and the small-size effects on the flow field was considered. Euler-Bernoulli beam model was used to investigate flow-induced vibration of the nanotube, while the non-uniformity of the flow velocity and the small-size effects of the flow field were formulated through Knudsen number (Kn), as a discriminant parameter. For laminar flow in a circular nanotube, the momentum correction factor was developed as a function of Kn. For Kn = 0 (continuum flow), the momentum correction factor was found to be 1.33, which decreases by the increase in Kn may even reach near 1 for the transition flow regime. We observed that for passage of viscous flow through a nanotube with the non-uniform flow velocity, the critical continuum flow velocity for divergence decreased considerably as opposed to those for the uniform flow velocity, while by increasing Kn, the difference between the uniform and non-uniform flow models may be reduced. In the solution part, the differential transformation method (DTM) was used to solve the governing differential equations of motion.

  19. Vibrationally-Fluidized Granular Flows: Impact and Bulk Velocity Measurements Compared with Discrete Element and Continuum Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Kamyar

    A new laser displacement probe was developed to measure the impact velocities of particles within vibrationally-fluidized beds. The sensor output was also used to measure bulk flow velocity along the probe window and to provide a measure of the media packing. The displacement signals from the laser sensors were analyzed to obtain the probability distribution functions of the impact velocity of the particles. The impact velocity was affected by the orientation of the laser probe relative to the bulk flow velocity, and the density and elastic properties of the granular media. The impact velocities of the particles were largely independent of their bulk flow speed and packing density. Both the local impact and bulk flow velocities within a tub vibratory finisher were predicted using discrete element modelling (DEM) and compared to the measured values for spherical steel media. It was observed that the impact and bulk flow velocities were relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the contact coefficients of friction and restitution. It was concluded that the predicted impact and bulk flow velocities were dependent on the number of layers in the model. Consequently, the final DE model mimicked the key aspects of the experimental setup, including the submerged laser sensor. The DE method predictions of both impact velocity and bulk flow velocity were in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements, with maximum differences of 20% and 30%, respectively. Discrete element modeling of granular flows is effective, but requires large numerical models. In an effort to reduce computational effort, this work presents a finite element (FE) continuum model of a vibrationally-fluidized granular flow. The constitutive equations governing the continuum model were calibrated using the discrete element method (DEM). The bulk flow behavior of the equivalent continuum media was then studied using both Lagrangian and Eulerian FE formulations. The bulk flow velocities predicted

  20. Prediction of fluid velocity slip at solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    methods, it allows us to directly compute the intrinsic wall-fluid friction coefficient rather than an empirical friction coefficient that includes all sources of friction for planar shear flow. The slip length predicted by our method is in excellent agreement with the slip length obtained from direct......The observed flow enhancement in highly confining geometries is believed to be caused by fluid velocity slip at the solid wall surface. Here we present a simple and highly accurate method to predict this slip using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Unlike previous equilibrium molecular dynamics...

  1. Automatic generation of force fields and property surfaces for use in variational vibrational calculations of anharmonic vibrational energies and zero-point vibrational averaged properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Christiansen, Ove

    2006-09-28

    An automatic and general procedure for the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the energy and general property surfaces for molecular systems is developed and implemented. General expressions for an n-mode representation are derived, where the n-mode representation includes only the couplings between n or less degrees of freedom. The general expressions are specialized to derivative force fields and property surfaces, and a scheme for calculation of the numerical derivatives is implemented. The implementation is interfaced to electronic structure programs and may be used for both ground and excited electronic states. The implementation is done in the context of a vibrational structure program and can be used in combination with vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF), vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), vibrational Moller-Plesset, and vibrational coupled cluster calculations of anharmonic wave functions and calculation of vibrational averaged properties at the VSCF and VCI levels. Sample calculations are presented for fundamental vibrational energies and vibrationally averaged dipole moments and frequency dependent polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of water and formaldehyde.

  2. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper.It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/diffusion balance time scale,defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity.At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale,the role of the surface receding is rather important:instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity,the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  3. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper. It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/ditftmion balance time scale, defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity. At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale, the role of the surface receding is rather important: instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity, the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  4. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  5. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  6. Radial vibration measurements directly from rotors using laser vibrometry: The effects of surface roughness, instrument misalignments and pseudo-vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Steve J.; Halkon, Ben J.; Tirabassi, Mario; Pusey, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) offers an attractive solution when radial vibration measurement directly from a rotor surface is required. Research to date has demonstrated application on polished-circular rotors and rotors coated with retro-reflective tape. In the latter case, however, a significant cross-sensitivity to the orthogonal radial vibration component occurs and post-processing is required to resolve individual radial vibration components. Until now, the fundamentally different behaviour observed between these cases has stood as an inconsistency in the published literature, symptomatic of the need to understand the effect of surface roughness. This paper offers the first consistent mathematical description of the polished-circular and rough rotor behaviours, combined with an experimental investigation of the relationship between surface roughness and cross-sensitivity. Rotors with surface roughness up to 10 nm satisfy the polished-circular rotor definition if vibration displacement is below 100% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and below 40% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. On rotors with roughness between 10 nm and 50 nm, the polished-circular rotor definition is satisfied for vibration displacements up to 25% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and up to 10% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. As roughness increases, cross-sensitivity increases but only rotors coated in retro-reflective tape satisfied the rough rotor definition fully. Consequently, when polished-circular surfaces are not available, rotor surfaces must be treated with retro-reflective tape and measurements post-processed to resolve individual vibration components. Through simulations, the value of the resolution and correction algorithms that form the post-processor has been demonstrated quantitatively. Simulations incorporating representative instrument misalignments and measurement noise have enabled quantification of likely error levels in radial vibration measurements. On a polished

  7. Nanoscopic Vibrations of Bacteria with Different Cell-Wall Properties Adhering to Surfaces under Flow and Static Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K.; Kaper, Hans J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of

  8. The critical velocity and 1500-m surface performances in Finswimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, K; Ross, M; Koizumi, K; Kashimoto, S; Yano, S; Takahashi, K; Kawakami, M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the concepts of critical velocity (CV) and anaerobic swimming capacity (ASC) could be used by coaches as a reliable index in order to monitor 1500-m Surface (SF) performances in Finswimming. Thirteen Finswimmers (6 males and 7 females, 24+/-6 years), members of the Japanese national team, were instructed to swim three different swimming distances (400-, 800-, and 1500-m) at maximal effort in a 50m long course swimming pool. CV and the ASC were calculated using 400-m and 800-m swim times. Mean height and body mass were 170.2 cm and 69.7 kg in male and 160.5 and 61.0 kg in female. A highly positive correlation was found between the CV and the mean velocity of 1500-m SF (V1500) (r=0.91, P<0.01), but no correlation was found between the ASC and V1500. (r=0.46, P=0.11). However, a high correlation was found between the ASC and the residual error of V1500, calculated from the relationship between V1500 and the CV (r=0.89, P<0.01). These results suggest that the CV is a useful method for evaluating 1500-m SF performance and an aerobic performance expressed as the CV contributes to 1500-m SF performance.

  9. Vibration analysis based on surface acoustic wave sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnadinger Alfred P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know, whether a civil engineering structure is safe or unsafe. One way to determine this is to measure vibrations at critical locations and feeding this data into an appropriate algorithm. Albido Corporation has developed wireless strain sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW principles that are mainly employed on rotating structures and in harsh environments. Albido's sensors could also be used to measure vibrations in civil engineering structures. They are small (~1 × 3 mm, passive and inexpensive (< 1$ in volume. They are powered by the electromagnetic field emanating from the antenna of a Reader System, similar to an RFID. The Reader System is essentially a computer with special software and has signal processing capability. One Reader System can service a multitude of sensors. The Reader antenna has to be within the reading range of the sensor. If large distances are required, a small electronic component acting as a Reader System can be placed within the reading range of the sensor that receives the sensor signal, generates a radio signal and encodes the sensor information on the radio signal. Then, the final data processing center can be placed anywhere.

  10. Mitigating ground vibration by periodic inclusions and surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius; Persson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ground vibration from traffic is a source of nuisance in urbanized areas. Trenches and wave barriers can provide mitigation of vibrations, but single barriers need to have a large depth to be effective-especially in the low-frequency range relevant to traffic-induced vibration. Alternatively, per...

  11. Optimal Trajectory Planning and Linear Velocity Feedback Control of a Flexible Piezoelectric Manipulator for Vibration Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiang Lou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trajectory planning is an effective feed-forward control technology for vibration suppression of flexible manipulators. However, the inherent drawback makes this strategy inefficient when dealing with modeling errors and disturbances. An optimal trajectory planning approach is proposed and applied to a flexible piezoelectric manipulator system in this paper, which is a combination of feed-forward trajectory planning method and feedback control of piezoelectric actuators. Specifically, the joint controller is responsible for the trajectory tracking and gross vibration suppression of the link during motion, while the active controller of actuators is expected to deal with the link vibrations after joint motion. In the procedure of trajectory planning, the joint angle of the link is expressed as a quintic polynomial function. And the sum of the link vibration energy is chosen as the objective function. Then, genetic algorithm is used to determine the optimal trajectory. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulation and experiments. Both the settling time and peak value of the link vibrations along the optimal trajectory reduce significantly, with the active control of the piezoelectric actuators.

  12. Computer simulation structure and vibrations of small metal cluster on the Cu (111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Svetlana D.; Rusina, Galina G.

    2015-10-01

    Vibrational properties of the small tetrahedral cluster of Co on the Cu (111) surface are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. It was shown that interaction of the clusters with substrate leads to arising of frustrated translation and frustrated rotation in-plane polarized vibrational modes localized on the cluster atoms. The Co4 cluster on the surface the high frequency modes remain strongly localized and mixed with the nearest neighbor atoms vibrations.

  13. Computer simulation structure and vibrations of small metal cluster on the Cu (111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, Svetlana D., E-mail: svbor@ispms.tsc.ru; Rusina, Galina G., E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Vibrational properties of the small tetrahedral cluster of Co on the Cu (111) surface are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. It was shown that interaction of the clusters with substrate leads to arising of frustrated translation and frustrated rotation in-plane polarized vibrational modes localized on the cluster atoms. The Co{sub 4} cluster on the surface the high frequency modes remain strongly localized and mixed with the nearest neighbor atoms vibrations.

  14. Soft-to-hard turbulence transition in vibrated bed of powder Power law velocity fluctuations due to inelastic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Taguchi, Y; Hideki Takayasu

    1994-01-01

    Distribution functions of relative velocities among particles in a vibrated bed of powder are studied both numerically and theoretically. In the solid phase where granular particles remain around their local stable states, the probability distribution obeys Gaussian. On the other hand in the fluidized phase where the particles can exchange their positions the distribution clearly deviates from Gaussian. The non-Gaussian distribution is approximated nicely by the t-distribution which is derived theoretically by considering the effect of clustering by inelastic collisions.

  15. Numerical modelling of ground-borne noise and vibration in buildings due to surface rail traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, P.; Degrande, G.; Augusztinovicz, F.

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical computation of the structural and acoustic response of a building to an incoming wave field generated by high-speed surface railway traffic. The source model consists of a moving vehicle on a longitudinally invariant track, coupled to a layered ground modelled with a boundary element formulation. The receiver model is based on a substructuring formulation and consists of a boundary element model of the soil and a finite element model of the structure. The acoustic response of the building's rooms is computed by means of a spectral finite element formulation. The paper investigates the structural and acoustic response of a multi-story portal frame office building up to a frequency of 150 Hz to the passage of a Thalys high-speed train at constant velocity. The isolation performance of three different vibration countermeasures: a floating-floor, a room-in-room, and base-isolation, are examined.

  16. Surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Fritjof; Hagemann, Jan; Wellhausen, Mike; Funke, Sebastian; Lenth, Christoph; Rotter, Frank; Gundrum, Lars; Plachetka, Ulrich; Moormann, Christian; Strube, Moritz; Walte, Andreas; Wackerbarth, Hainer

    2013-10-01

    A detector which can detect a broad range of explosives without false alarms is urgently needed. Vibrational spectroscopy provides specific spectral information about molecules enabling the identification of analytes by their "fingerprint" spectra. The low detection limit caused by the inherent weak Raman process can be increased by the Surface Enhanced Raman (SER) effect. This is particularly attractive because it combines low detection limits with high information content for establishing molecular identity. Based on SER spectroscopy we have constructed a modular detection system. Here, we want to show a combination of SER spectroscopy and chemometrics to distinguish between chemically similar substances. Such an approach will finally reduce the false alarm rate. It is still a challenge to determine the limit of detection of the analyte on a SER substrate or its enhancement factor. For physisorbed molecules we have applied a novel approach. By this approach the performance of plasmonic substrates and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) enhancement of explosives can be evaluated. Moreover, novel nanostructured substrates for surface enhanced IR absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy will be presented. The enhancement factor and a limit of detection are estimated.

  17. Mapping the Agulhas Current from space: an assessment of ASAR surface current velocities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available surface current velocities for oceanographic research are assessed. ASAR surface current velocities are compared to surface drifter data and merged altimetry observations. Maps of sea surface temperature are used to establish the ASAR’s capacity to capture...

  18. Study of the Internal Flow and Evaporation Characteristic Inside a Water Droplet on a Vertical Vibrating Hydrophobic Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Seok; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Thermal Marangoni flow has been observed inside droplets on heated surfaces, finally resulting in a coffee stain effect. This study aims to visualize and control the thermal Marangoni flow by employing periodic vertical vibration. The variations in the contact angle and internal volume of the droplet as it evaporates is observed by using a combination of continuous light and a still camera. With regard to the internal velocity, the particle image velocimetry system is applied to visualize the internal thermal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the internal temperature gradient and surface tension on the surface of a droplet, the theoretical model based on the conduction and convection theory of heat transfer is applied. Thus, the internal velocity increases with an increase in plate temperature. The flow directions of the Marangoni and gravitational flows are opposite, and hence, it may be possible to control the coffee stain effect.

  19. Surface wave group velocity tomography of East Asia, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Francis T.

    1993-07-01

    Group velocities of both Rayleigh and Love waves are used in a tomographic inversion to obtain group velocity maps of East Asia (60 deg E-140 deg E and 20 deg N-50 deg N). The period range studied is 30-70 seconds. For periods longer than 40 seconds, a high group velocity gradient clearly exists along longitude 105 deg E; the velocities are noticeably higher east of this longitude than west of this longitude. The Tibetan Plateau appears as a prominent low velocity (about 15%) structure in this area; central Tibet appears as the area with the lowest velocity. The North China Plain is an area of high velocities, probably as a result of thin crust. The variability of deep crustal and upper mantle structures underneath the different tectonic provinces in the study can clearly be seen. In a separate study, using the dataset above and that from the former Soviet Union, we have derived the Rayleigh tomographic images of a larger area (40 deg E-160 deg E and 20 deg N-70 deg N). While the Tibetan plateau still remains to be the most prominent low velocity features, two other features are also clear, a very high velocity Siberian platform and a high velocity ridge extending from Lake Baikal to Central Mongolia. These studies are useful in delineating tectonics.

  20. Deriving glacier surface velocities from repeat optical images

    OpenAIRE

    Heid, Torborg

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of glaciers is important for many aspects in glaciology. Mass accumulated in the accumulation area is transported down to the ablation area by deformation and sliding due to the gravitational force, and hence gla­cier velocity is connected to the mass balance of glaciers. It also contributes directly to the mass balance of calving glaciers because it is an important control of the ice discharge rate for such glaciers. Changing glacier velocities is an indicator of instable glacie...

  1. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  2. Glacier Surface Velocity Measurements from Radar Interferometry and the Principle of Mass Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Presents a relation between the three glacier surface velocity components, the surface flux-divergence, glacier thickness and bottom melt and displacement. The relation can be used as an extension to the surface parallel flow assumption often used with interferometric synthetic aperture measurements of glacier velocities. The assumptions for the derivation are described and important limitations high-lighted.

  3. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  4. UHF RiverSonde observations of water surface velocity at Threemile Slough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Ruhl, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A UHF RiverSonde system, operating near 350 MHz, has been in operation at Threemile Slough in central California, USA since September 2004. The water in the slough is dominated by tidal effects, with flow reversals four times a day and a peak velocity of about 0.8 m/s in each direction. Water level and water velocity are continually measured by the U. S. Geological Survey at the experiment site. The velocity is measured every 15 minutes by an ultrasonic velocity meter (UVM) which determines the water velocity from two-way acoustic propagation time-difference measurements made across the channel. The RiverSonde also measures surface velocity every 15 minutes using radar resonant backscatter techniques. Velocity and water level data are retrieved through a radio data link and a wideband internet connection. Over a period of several months, the radar-derived mean surface velocity has been very highly correlated with the UVM index velocity several meters below the surface, with a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.976 and an RMS difference of less than 10 cm/s. The wind has a small but measurable effect on the velocities measured by both instruments. In addition to the mean surface velocity across the channel, the RiverSonde system provides an estimate of the cross-channel variation of the surface velocity. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  5. Analyses of transverse vibrations of axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeams with small size and surface effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongqiang [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Structural Strength and Vibration, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pang, Miao, E-mail: ppmmzju@163.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Fan, Lifeng [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-07-01

    The general governing equation for transverse vibration of an axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeam embedded in elastic substrate medium is formulated on the basis of the Bernoulli–Euler beam theory and the Kelvin model. The factors of structural damping, initial axial tension, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are incorporated in the formulation. The explicit expression is obtained for the vibrational frequency of a simply supported nanobeam. The impacts of these factors on the properties of transverse vibration of the nanobeam are discussed. It is demonstrated that the dependences of natural frequency on the structural damping, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are significant, whereas the effect of initial axial tension on the natural frequency is limited. In addition, it can be concluded that the energy dissipation of transverse vibration of the viscoelastic nanobeam is related to the small size effect and structural damping. - Highlights: • The properties of transverse vibration of a pretensioned embedded viscoelastic nanobeam is investigated. • The vibrational equation is formulated based on Bernoulli–Euler beam theory and Kelvin model. • Explicit expression for the complex vibrational frequency is obtained. • Small size and surface effects on vibrational frequency are discussed. • Influences of structural damping, initial axial tension and surrounding medium are analyzed.

  6. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  7. The influence of vibrations on surface roughness formed during precision boring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Dariusz; Znojkiewicz, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis of vibrations on surface roughness generated during boring with the application of the conventional boring tool and one with the damper is presented. The experiments included the measurement of vibration accelerations carried out with the piezoelectric sensor, as well as the evaluation of surface roughness parameters after each machining pass. The obtained results reveal that in the investigated range, no stability loss was found. Furthermore, the growth of the rotational speed induces the increase of vibration level, as well as the growth of the differences between the vibration values generated during boring with the conventional tool and one equipped with damper. Vibrations have also the direct influence on the machined surface roughness. In case of the tool equipped with the damper, the tool's overhang L had more intense influence than rotational speed n. However, for the conventional boring tool this dependency was unequivocal.

  8. Vibrations of small cobalt clusters on low-index surfaces of copper: Tight-binding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, S. D.; Eremeev, S. V.; Rusina, G. G.; Stepanyuk, V. S.; Bruno, P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-08-01

    Vibrational properties (frequencies, polarizations, and lifetimes) of a single adatom, dimer, and trimer of Co on low-index Cu surfaces, Cu(111), Cu(001), and Cu(110) are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. We show that structural and vibrational properties of the Co clusters strongly depend on the substrate orientation. The longest lifetimes of 1-2.5 ps have been found for high-frequency z -polarized vibrations in all the Co clusters considered. The shortest lifetimes of 0.1-0.8 ps have been obtained for low-frequency horizontal (frustrated translation) vibrational modes.

  9. A geomorphic and morphometric analysis of surface ice velocity variation of different valley type glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Garg, P. K.; Shukla, A.; Ahluwalia, R. S.; Singh, N.; Chauhan, P.

    2016-05-01

    Glacier surface ice velocity is one of the important parameters which determine the glacier dynamics. If the surface ice velocity is high in upper zone (accumulation zone) of the glacier, more ice is brought to the lower zone (ablation zone) of the glacier where it melts more rapidly. The surface ice velocity depends on multiple factors like geomorphology of a glacier and glacier valley, ice load, orientation of the glacier, slope and debris cover. In this study, we have used latest multi-temporal Landsat-8 satellite images to calculate the surface ice velocity of different glaciers from the Himalayan region and a relationship of velocity and geomorphology and geo-morphometry of the glacier has been studied. The standard procedure has been implied to estimate the glacial velocity using image to image correlation technique. The geo-morphometric parameters of the glacier surface have been derived using SRTM 90 m global DEM. It has been observed that the slope of the glacier is one of the main factors on which the velocity is dependent i.e. higher the slope higher is the velocity and more ice is brought by the glacier to the ablation zone. The debris cover over the glacier and at the terminus also affects the velocity of the glacier by restricting ice flow. Thus, observations suggest that the geomorphology and geo-morphometry of the glacier has a considerable control on the surface ice velocity of the glacier.

  10. Spatiotemporal variations in the surface velocities of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Velocity is an important parameter for the estimation of glacier mass balance, which directly signals the response of glaciers to climate change. Antarctic ice sheet movement and the associated spatiotemporal velocity variations are of great significance to global sea level rise. In this study, we estimate Antarctic Peninsula glacier velocities using the co-registration of optically sensed images and correlation (hereafter referred to as COSI-Corr based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer Level 1B data (hereafter referred to as MODIS L1B. The results show that the glaciers of Graham Land and the Larsen Ice Shelf have substantially different velocity features. The Graham Land glaciers primarily flow from the peninsula ridge towards the Weddell Sea and Bellingshausen Sea on the east and west sides, respectively. There are very large velocity variations among the different ice streams, with a minimum of −1 and a maximum of 1500 m a−1 (with an average of 100–150 m a−1. Over the period 2000–2012, the glaciers of Graham Land accelerated in the south but slowed down in the north. In contrast, the Larsen Ice Shelf flows in a relatively uniform direction, mainly towards the northeast into the Weddell Sea. Its average velocity is 750–800 m a−1 and the maximum is > 1500 m a−1. During the period 2000–2012, the Larsen Ice Shelf experienced significant acceleration. The use of COSI-Corr based on MODIS L1B data is suitable for glacier velocity monitoring on the Antarctic Peninsula over long time series and large spatial scales. This method is clearly advantageous for analysing macro-scale spatiotemporal variations in glacier movement.

  11. Influence of the surface structure and vibration mode on the resistivity of Cu films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-Ni; Qu, Shi-Xian; Xia, Ke

    2011-09-01

    The influence of the surface structure and vibration mode on the resistivity of Cu films and the corresponding size effect are investigated. The temperature dependent conductivities of the films with different surface morphologies are calculated by the algorithm based upon the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method and the Green's function technique. The thermal effect is introduced by setting the atomic displacements according to the Gaussian distribution with the mean-square amplitude estimated by the Debye model. The result shows that the surface atomic vibration contributes significantly to the resistivity of the system. Comparing the conductivities for three different vibration modes, we suggest that freezing the surface vibration is necessary for practical applications to reduce the resistivity induced by the surface electron-phonon scattering.

  12. DIAGNOSTICS OF WORKPIECE SURFACE CONDITION BASED ON CUTTING TOOL VIBRATIONS DURING MACHINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Józwik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents functional relationships between surface geometry parameters, feed and vibrations level in the radial direction of the workpiece. Time characteristics of the acceleration of cutting tool vibration registered during C45 steel and stainless steel machining for separate axes (X, Y, Z were presented as a function of feedrate f. During the tests surface geometric accuracy assessment was performed and 3D surface roughness parameters were determined. The Sz parameter was selected for the analysis, which was then collated with RMS vibration acceleration and feedrate f. The Sz parameter indirectly provides information on peak to valley height and is characterised by high generalising potential i.e. it is highly correlated to other surface and volume parameters of surface roughness. Test results presented in this paper may constitute a valuable source of information considering the influence of vibrations on geometric accuracy of elements for engineers designing technological processes.

  13. Surface wave inversion for a p-wave velocity profile: Estimation of the squared slowness gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves can be used to obtain a near-surface shear wave profile. The inverse problem is usually solved for the locally 1-D problem of a set of homogeneous horizontal elastic layers. The output is a set of shear velocity values for each layer in the profile. P-wave velocity profile can be estim

  14. 3D Characteristic Diagram of Acoustically Induced Surface Vibration with Different Landmines Buried

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴智强; 张燕丽; 王驰; 朱俊; 徐文文; 袁志文

    2016-01-01

    The 3Dcharacteristic diagram of acoustically induced surface vibration was employed to study the influence of different buried landmines on the acoustic detection signal. By using the vehicular experimental system for acoustic landmine detection and the method of scanning detection, the 3D characteristic diagrams of surface vibration were measured when different objects were buried underground, including big plastic landmine, small plastic landmine, big metal landmine and bricks. The results show that, under the given conditions, the surface vi-bration amplitudes of big plastic landmine, big metal landmine, small plastic landmine and bricks decrease in turn. The 3D characteristic diagrams of surface vibration can be used to further identify the locations of buried land-mines.

  15. Vibrational properties of small cobalt clusters on the Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, S. D.; Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2009-06-01

    Vibrational properties of small cobalt clusters (dimer and trimer) adsorbed on the Cu(111) surface are studied using interatomic interaction potentials obtained in a tight-binding approximation. The complete (lateral and vertical) relaxation of the surface, the local phonon density of states, and the polarization of vibration modes of clusters and atoms of the substrate are discussed. It is shown that the adsorption of small cobalt clusters leads to a local modification of the vibrational properties of the substrate surface and to excitation of new vibration modes localized on both the cluster adatoms and substrate surface atoms. An increase in the cluster size causes a decrease in the intensity of peaks of the local density of states and their broadening and also a shift in the frequencies of the peaks.

  16. Measuring Work Functions Of "Dirty" Surfaces With A Vibrating Capacitive Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus measures work function of possibly contaminated surface of specimen of metal or other electrically conductive material. Measures work function of specimen indirectly, by vibrating capacitive measurement of contact potential. Work function of specimen affected by microstructure and by contamination.

  17. Investigation of sandwich material surface created by abrasive water jet (AWJ via vibration emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hreha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research a of abrasive waterjet cutting of heterogeneous “sandwich“ material with different Young modulus of elasticity of the cutted surface geometry by means of vibration emission. In order to confirm hypothetical assumptions about direct relation between vibration emission and surface quality an experiment in heterogeneous material consisting of stainless steel (DIN 1.4006 / AISI 410 and alloy AlCuMg2 has been provided.

  18. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Spiridonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition of metallic surfaces by vibrating  electrode where vibrations are excited by ultrasound.

  19. Pulse-induced acoustoelectric vibrations in surface-gated GaAs-based quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S.; Stace, T. M.; Langtangen, H. P.; Kataoka, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of a numerical investigation which show the excitation of acoustoelectric modes of vibration in GaAs-based heterostructures due to sharp nanosecond electric-field pulses applied across surface gates. In particular, we show that the pulses applied in quantum information processing applications are capable of exciting acoustoelectric modes of vibration including surface acoustic modes which propagate for distances greater than conventional device dimensions. We show that the pulse-induced acoustoelectric vibrations are capable of inducing significant undesired perturbations to the evolution of quantum systems.

  20. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; DeAngelo, Michael V. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Ermolaeva, Elena [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Remington, Randy [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Sava, Diana [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wagner, Donald [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wei, Shuijion [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  1. Surface Effect on Vibration of Y-SWCNTs Embedded on Pasternak Foundation Conveying Viscose Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghorbanpour-Arani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface and small scale effects on free transverse vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT fitted with Y-junction at downstream end conveying viscose fluid is investigated in this article based on Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB model. Nonlocal elasticity theory is employed to consider small scale effects due to its simplicity and efficiency. The energy method and Hamilton’s principle are used to establish the corresponding motion equation. To discretize and solve the governing equation of motion the Galerkin method is applied. Moreover, the small-size effect, angle of Y-junction, surface layer and Pasternak elastic foundation are studied in detail. Regarding fluid flow effects, it has been concluded that the fluid flow is an effective factor on increasing the instability of Y-SWCNT. Results show that increasing the angle of Y-junction enhances the flutter fluid velocity where the first and second modes are merged. This work could be used in medical application and design of nano-electromechanical devices such as measuring the density of blood flowing through such nanotubes.

  2. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  3. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  4. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  5. Dynamic behavior of a vibrated droplet on a low-temperature micropillared surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen-chuan; Jia, Zhi-hai; Yang, Hui-nan; Zhang, Zhi-tao

    2017-02-01

    The dynamic behavior of a vibrated droplet on a micropillared hydrophobic surface under low temperature was investigated in this paper. It was observed that solidified time of droplets on the micropillared surface were much larger than on the smooth surface due to the existence of wetting transition at low temperature, without vibration. The solidified time of droplets was longer while vibration was exerted on the surfaces, even though the wetting transition time of droplets at low temperature was shorter than at room temperature. It was found that resonance frequency of droplet increased as surface tension increased due to low temperature. Moreover, when a droplet was in its resonance frequency, the wetting area between the droplet and the micropillared surface increased obviously and its solidified time decreased substantially, and it led to the decline of anti-icing performance. This work is helpful to design a more efficient anti-icing device.

  6. Optimization of Surface Finish in Turning Operation by Considering the Machine Tool Vibration using Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Munawar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of surface roughness has been one of the primary objectives in most of the machining operations. Poor control on the desired surface roughness generates non conforming parts and results into increase in cost and loss of productivity due to rework or scrap. Surface roughness value is a result of several process variables among which machine tool condition is one of the significant variables. In this study, experimentation was carried out to investigate the effect of machine tool condition on surface roughness. Variable used to represent machine tool\\'s condition was vibration amplitude. Input parameters used, besides vibration amplitude, were feed rate and insert nose radius. Cutting speed and depth of cut were kept constant. Based on Taguchi orthogonal array, a series of experimentation was designed and performed on AISI 1040 carbon steel bar at default and induced machine tool\\'s vibration amplitudes. ANOVA (Analysis of Variance, revealed that vibration amplitude and feed rate had moderate effect on the surface roughness and insert nose radius had the highest significant effect on the surface roughness. It was also found that a machine tool with low vibration amplitude produced better surface roughness. Insert with larger nose radius produced better surface roughness at low feed rate.

  7. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  8. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  9. Effect of airflow velocity on moisture exchange at surfaces of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2006-01-01

    The moisture transfer between air and construction are affected of the boundary layer conditions close to the surface, which is influenced by the airflow patterns in the room. Therefore an investigation of the relation be-tween the surface resistance and the airflow velocity above a material sample...... resistances decrease for increasing airflow velocity above the boundary layer of the material surface. The measured resistances are somewhat smaller than the ones esti-mated by use of the Lewis relation....

  10. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  11. Nonlinear vibration of viscoelastic embedded-DWCNTs integrated with piezoelectric layers-conveying viscous fluid considering surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidoon, A.; Andalib, E.; Mirafzal, A.

    2016-07-01

    This article studies the nonlinear vibration of viscoelastic embedded nano-sandwich structures containing of a double walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) integrated with two piezoelectric Zinc oxide (ZnO) layers. DWCNT and ZnO layers are subjected to magnetic and electric fields, respectively. This system is conveying viscous fluid and the related force is calculated by modified Navier-Stokes relation considering slip boundary condition and Knudsen number. Visco-Pasternak model with three parameters of the Winkler modulus, shear modulus, and damp coefficient is used for simulation of viscoelastic medium. The nano-structure is simulated as an orthotropic Timoshenko beam (TB) and the effects of small scale, structural damping and surface stress are considered based on Eringen's, Kelvin-voigt and Gurtin-Murdoch theories. Energy method and Hamilton's principle are employed to derive motion equations which are then solved using differential quadrature method (DQM). The detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of small scale effect, fluid velocity, thickness of piezoelectric layer, boundary condition, surface effects, van der Waals (vdW) force on the frequency and critical velocity of nano-structure. Results indicate that the frequency and critical velocity increases with assume of surface effects.

  12. Linear stability analysis in a liquid layer with a surface velocity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białecki, Jarosław; Hołyst, Janusz A

    2003-06-01

    A case of combined planar Couette-Poiseuille flow corresponding to vanishing horizontal flux has been generalized by the introduction of a model for the surface velocity gradient. A relation corresponding to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation has been derived for this model. The critical value of the surface velocity gradient has been obtained. At the critical point, the corresponding critical Reynolds number equals infinity. Using an approximated method we estimated the behavior of the critical Reynolds number for a slightly overcritical surface velocity gradient.

  13. Note: Velocity map imaging the scattering plane of gas surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, D. J.; Messider, T. M.; Leng, J. G.; Greaves, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D scattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a dielectric surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was validated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the system's capabilities, the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a polytetrafluoroethylene surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  14. Vertically-Vibrated Gas-Liquid Interfaces: Surface Deformation and Breakup

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hern, T J; Brooks, C F; Shelden, B; Torczynski, J R; Kraynik, A M; Romero, L A; Benavides, G L

    2010-01-01

    In his pioneering work of 1831, Faraday demonstrated that a vertically vibrated gas-liquid interface exhibits a period-doubling bifurcation from a flat state to a wavy configuration at certain frequencies or amplitudes. Typical experiments performed using thin layers of water produce "Faraday ripples", modest-amplitude nonlinear standing waves. Later experiments by Hashimoto and Sudo (1980) and Jameson (1966) as well as those performed in the present study show that much more dramatic disturbances can be generated at the gas-liquid free surface under certain ranges of vibration conditions. This breakup mechanism was examined experimentally using deep layers of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone oils over a range of viscosity and sinusoidal, primarily axial vibration conditions that can produce dramatic disturbances at the gas-liquid free surface. Large-amplitude vibrations produce liquid jets into the gas, droplets pinching off from the jets, gas cavities in the liquid from droplet impact, and bubble transp...

  15. Small Al clusters on the Cu(111) surface: Atomic relaxation and vibrational properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2010-11-01

    The relaxation and vibrational properties of both Al clusters and the (111) surface of a copper sub-strate were studied using the interatomic interaction potentials obtained in a tight-binding approximation. The presence of small aluminum clusters led to modification of the vibrational states of the substrate, a shift of the Rayleigh mode, and excitation of new Z-polarized modes. Hybridized modes localized on the cluster adatoms and the neighboring atoms of the substrate were found in the phonon spectrum. The localized dipole-active modes of the cluster and their strong hybridization with vibrations of the substrate points to desorption stability of the tri- and heptaatomic clusters.

  16. Effects of vertical vibration on surface intruder loading in a multiple-size granular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the behaviors of the large porous-alumina particles on the free surface of the small glass-grain system under vertical vibration. The experiments are performed using cylindrical container with diameter Φ = 240 mm, loaded with small glass beads to a static depth h =100 mm. We control the shaker to vibrate at the various frequencies f, from 40 to 80 Hz, and dimensionless acceleration Γ = (4π2Af2/g from 2 to 6. When the glass granular system is at rest, porous alumina particles are placed on its free surface. A parameter critical frequency fu is defined to distinguish two kinds of diffusion in particles. When the vibration frequency is less than fu, quasi-two-dimensional surface diffusion can occur in porous alumina particles, surface granules clusters formed under certain condition. The frequency and dimensionless acceleration of the vibration are varied to view their effect on the clustering and surface particle-distribution. When the vibration frequency is larger than fu, the surface diffusion disappears and a three-dimensional diffusion appears.

  17. Notes on the Surface Velocity Profile and Horizontal Shear across the Width of the Gulf Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Arx, William S. Von

    2011-01-01

    During a cruise across the Gulf Stream in October 1950 measurements of surface velocity were made both with the Loran-space-dead method and the electromagnetic method. A short account of the results is given with special reference to the velocity profile and the horizontal shear across the Gulf Stream.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1952.tb01006.x

  18. A new surface electromyography analysis method to determine spread of muscle fiber conduction velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, F; Van Weerden, TW; Van der Hoeven, JH

    2002-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) estimation from surface signals is widely used to study muscle function, e. g., in neuromuscular disease and in fatigue studies. However, most analysis methods do not yield information about the velocity distribution of the various motor unit action potentials

  19. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  20. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  1. Effect of surface layer thickness on buckling and vibration of nonlocal nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Kai-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: wenmingz@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2014-01-31

    In this Letter, the buckling and vibration behavior of nonlocal nanowires by incorporating surface elasticity is investigated. A modified core–shell model is developed to depict the size effect of Young's modulus and validated by the reported experimental data. Our results show that the buckling load and natural frequency of nanowires increase when the effect of surface layer thickness is taken into account. Moreover, as the diameter of nanowires is smaller than 50 nm, the influence of surface layer thickness becomes obvious. This work can be helpful in characterizing and predicting the buckling and vibration behavior of NWs.

  2. Effects of tibialis anterior vibration on postural control when exposed to support surface translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, David R; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2016-03-01

    The sensory re-weighting theory suggests unreliable inputs may be down-weighted to favor more reliable sensory information and thus maintain proper postural control. This study investigated the effects of tibialis anterior (TA) vibration on center of pressure (COP) motion in healthy individuals exposed to support surface translations to further explore the concept of sensory re-weighting. Twenty healthy young adults stood with eyes closed and arms across their chest while exposed to randomized blocks of five trials. Each trial lasted 8 s, with TA vibration either on or off. After 2 s, a sudden backward or forward translation occurred. Anterior-posterior (A/P) COP data were evaluated during the preparatory (first 2 s), perturbation (next 3 s), and recovery (last 3 s) phases to assess the effect of vibration on perturbation response features. The knowledge of an impending perturbation resulted in reduced anterior COP motion with TA vibration in the preparatory phase relative to the magnitude of anterior motion typically observed during TA vibration. During the perturbation phase, vibration did not influence COP motion. However, during the recovery phase vibration induced greater anterior COP motion than during trials without vibration. The fact that TA vibration produced differing effects on COP motion depending upon the phase of the perturbation response may suggest that the immediate context during which postural control is being regulated affects A/P COP responses to TA vibration. This indicates that proprioceptive information is likely continuously re-weighted according to the context in order to maintain effective postural control.

  3. Near-Surface Attenuation and Velocity Structures in Taiwan from Wellhead and Borehole Recordings Comparisons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yu-Ju; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Wu, Shao-Kai; Hsu, Hsuan-Jui; Hsiao, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the data from 28 seismic borehole stations deployed by the Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network throughout Taiwan from 2007 to 2014, we estimated the near-surface velocity (Vp and Vs) and attenuation (Qp and Qs...

  4. Glacier Surface Velocity Measurements from Radar Interferometry and the Principle of Mass Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Presents a relation between the three glacier surface velocity components, the surface flux-divergence, glacier thickness and bottom melt and displacement. The relation can be used as an extension to the surface parallel flow assumption often used with interferometric synthetic aperture...

  5. Vibrational circular dichroism from ab initio molecular dynamics and nuclear velocity perturbation theory in the liquid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Arne; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-08-28

    We report the first fully ab initio calculation of dynamical vibrational circular dichroism spectra in the liquid phase using nuclear velocity perturbation theory (NVPT) derived electronic currents. Our approach is rigorous and general and thus capable of treating weak interactions of chiral molecules as, e.g., chirality transfer from a chiral molecule to an achiral solvent. We use an implementation of the NVPT that is projected along the dynamics to obtain the current and magnetic dipole moments required for accurate intensities. The gauge problem in the liquid phase is resolved in a twofold approach. The electronic expectation values are evaluated in a distributed origin gauge, employing maximally localized Wannier orbitals. In a second step, the gauge invariant spectrum is obtained in terms of a scaled molecular moments, which allows to systematically include solvent effects while keeping a significant signal-to-noise ratio. We give a thorough analysis and discussion of this choice of gauge for the liquid phase. At low temperatures, we recover the established double harmonic approximation. The methodology is applied to chiral molecules ((S)-d2-oxirane and (R)-propylene-oxide) in the gas phase and in solution. We find an excellent agreement with the theoretical and experimental references, including the emergence of signals due to chirality transfer from the solute to the (achiral) solvent.

  6. Vibrational circular dichroism from ab initio molecular dynamics and nuclear velocity perturbation theory in the liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Arne; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We report the first fully ab initio calculation of dynamical vibrational circular dichroism spectra in the liquid phase using nuclear velocity perturbation theory (NVPT) derived electronic currents. Our approach is rigorous and general and thus capable of treating weak interactions of chiral molecules as, e.g., chirality transfer from a chiral molecule to an achiral solvent. We use an implementation of the NVPT that is projected along the dynamics to obtain the current and magnetic dipole moments required for accurate intensities. The gauge problem in the liquid phase is resolved in a twofold approach. The electronic expectation values are evaluated in a distributed origin gauge, employing maximally localized Wannier orbitals. In a second step, the gauge invariant spectrum is obtained in terms of a scaled molecular moments, which allows to systematically include solvent effects while keeping a significant signal-to-noise ratio. We give a thorough analysis and discussion of this choice of gauge for the liquid phase. At low temperatures, we recover the established double harmonic approximation. The methodology is applied to chiral molecules ((S)-d2-oxirane and (R)-propylene-oxide) in the gas phase and in solution. We find an excellent agreement with the theoretical and experimental references, including the emergence of signals due to chirality transfer from the solute to the (achiral) solvent.

  7. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Dept. de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain)); Pitarke, J.M. (Materia Kondentsatuaren Fisika Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Univ., Bilbo (Spain))

    1994-05-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  8. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  9. Surface Topography of Fine-grained ZrO2 Ceramic by Two-dimensional Ultrasonic Vibration Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ailing; WU Yan; LIU Yongjiang

    2011-01-01

    The surface quality of fine-grained ZrO2 engineering ceramic were researched using 270# diamond wheel both with and without work-piece two-dimension ultrasonic vibration grinding(WTDUVG).By AFM images,the surface topography and the micro structure of the two-dimensional ultrasonic vibration grinding ceramics were especially analyzed.The experimental results indicate that the surface roughness is related to grinding vibration mode and the material removal mechanism.Surface quality of WTDUVG is superior to that of conventional grinding,and it is easy for two-dimensional ultrasonic vibration grinding that material removal mechanism is ductile mode grinding.

  10. Structures and vibrational frequencies of CO adlayers on Rh(111) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Haiyan(肖海燕); LAI; Wenzhen(赖文珍); XIE; Daiqian(谢代前); YAN; Guosen(鄢国森)

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been carried out to study the structural and vibrational properties of carbon monoxide adsorption on Rh(111) surface. The optimized geometries, adsorption energies and vibrational frequencies have been obtained and the preferred binding sites have been determined. The results show that at low coverage CO prefers to adsorb at top site and at high coverage one molecule occupies top site while the two other molecules occupy hcp and fcc hollow sites respectively. The investigation of the vibrational properties of CO chemisorption on Rh(111) shows that the top C-O stretching frequency increases along with the increase of the coverage. The site assignments, optimized geometries and calculated vibrational frequencies are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstruction of Sub-Surface Velocities from Satellite Observations Using Iterative Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new method based on modified self-organizing maps is presented for the reconstruction of deep ocean current velocities from surface information provided by satellites. This method takes advantage of local correlations in the data-space to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed deep velocities. Unlike previous attempts to reconstruct deep velocities from surface data, our method makes no assumptions regarding the structure of the water column, nor the underlying dynamics of the flow field. Using satellite observations of surface velocity, sea-surface height and sea-surface temperature, as well as observations of the deep current velocity from autonomous Argo floats to train the map, we are able to reconstruct realistic high--resolution velocity fields at a depth of 1000m. Validation reveals extremely promising results, with a speed root mean squared error of ~2.8cm/s, a factor more than a factor of two smaller than competing methods, and direction errors consistently smaller than 30 degrees...

  13. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  14. FUNCTIONAL SURFACE MICROGEOMETRY PROVIDING THE DESIRED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRCRAFT VIBRATION SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy S. Andreev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with the methods of efficiency improving for piezoelectric vibration sensors used in aircraft industry to control the level of vibration of gas turbine engines. The study looks into the matter of surface microgeometry effect of the vibro sensor part on its transverse sensitivity ratio. Measures are proposed to improve the sensor performance without cost supplement by optimization of the functional surface microgeometry. Method. A method for determination of the best possible surface microgeometry within the specific production conditions is shown. Also, a method for microgeometry estimation of the functional surfaces using graphical criteria is used. Taguchi method is used for design of experiment for functional surfaces machining. The use of this method reduces significantly the number of experiments without validity loss. Main Results. The relationship between technological factors of manufacturing the vibration sensor parts and its sensitivity has been found out. The optimal surface machining methods and process conditions for parts ensuring the best possible sensitivity have been determined. Practical Relevance. Research results can be used by instrument-making companies to improve the process of piezoelectric vibration sensor design and manufacturing.

  15. Exact solution for the vibrations of cylindrical nanoshells considering surface energy effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessam Rouhi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been revealed that the surface stress effect plays an important role in the mechanical behavior ofstructures (such as bending, buckling and vibration when their dimensions are on the order ofnanometer. In addition, recent advances in nanotechnology have proposed several applications fornanoscale shells in different fields. Hence, in the present article, within the framework of surfaceelasticity theory, the free vibration behavior of simply-supported cylindrical nanoshells with theconsideration of the aforementioned effect is studied using an exact solution method. To this end, first,the governing equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained by an energy-basedapproach. The surface stress influence is incorporated into the formulation according to the Gurtin-Murdoch theory. The nanoshell is modeled according to the first-order shear deformation shell theory.After that, the free vibration problem is solved through an exact solution approach. To this end, thedimensionless form of governing equations is derived and then solved under the simply-supportedboundary conditions using a Navier-type solution method. Selected numerical results are presentedabout the effects of surface stress and surface material properties on the natural frequencies ofnanoshells with different radii and lengths. The results show that the surface energies significantlyaffect the vibrational behavior of nanoshells with small magnitudes of thickness. Also, it is indicatedthat the natural frequency of the nanoshell is dependent of the surface material properties.

  16. Effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on structural vibration and acoustic radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yuanjie; ZHAO Deyou; LI Sheng

    2004-01-01

    The coupled fluid-structure interaction equation is established for bodies in the haft-space fluid domain, especially sitting on the infinite plane, based on the BEM (Boundary Element Method) theory. Then, the natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation for a box are calculated, and the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane is discussed. Finally, several relative factors including the plate thickness, the structure damping and the distance between the body and the infinite plane are studied. The results show that the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on the structural natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation cannot be ignored.

  17. Maximum Velocity of a Boulder Ejected From an Impact Crater Formed on a Regolith Covered Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G. D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the effect of regolith depth on boulder ejection velocity. A "boulder" refers to an apparently intact rock or rock fragment lying on a planetary surface, regardless of emplacement mechanism. Boulders appear in planetary images as positive relief features --- bright, sun-facing pixels adjacent to dark, shadowed pixels. We studied 12 lunar craters in high resolution (1~m) photographs from Lunar Orbiter III and V. Local regolith depth was measured using the method of small crater morphology. Ejection velocities of boulders were calculated assuming a ballistic trajectory to the final boulder location. A plot of regolith depth/crater diameter vs. maximum boulder ejection velocity shows that craters formed in deeper regolith (with respect to crater size) eject boulders at lower velocities. When ejection velocity (EjV) is in m/s, and regolith depth (Dr) and crater diameter (Dc) are in meters, the data fit the relation Dr / Dc = 1053 × EjVmax-2.823. To explain the data, we turn to impact cratering theory. An ejected particle will follow a streamline from its place of origin to its ejection point (the Z-model), and then follow a ballistic trajectory. Material ejected along more shallow streamlines is ejected at greater velocities. If shallow regolith covers the surface, the most shallow (greatest velocity) streamlines will travel only through the regolith. Boulders, however, must be ejected from the bedrock below the regolith. Thus, the boulder ejected with the greatest velocity originates just below the regolith, along the most shallow streamline through the bedrock. If the regolith is deeper, the most shallow streamline through the bedrock will be deeper, and the maximum velocity of an ejected boulder will be lower. Hence, the regolith depth and maximum ejection velocity of a boulder are correlated: greater boulder ejection velocities correspond to thinner regolith. We observe this correlation in the data.

  18. Vibrations of tetrahedral Co and Cu clusters on a Cu(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, Svetlana D.; Rusina, Galina G. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, pr. Akademichesky 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Eremeev, Sergey V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, pr. Akademichesky 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, pr. Lenina 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal, 4, 20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain); Chulkov, Evgueni V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal, 4, 20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain); Depto. de Fisica de Materiales and Centro de Fisica de Materiales - CFM (CSIS-UPV/EHU), Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Apdo. 1072, 20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Vibrational properties of tetrahedral clusters of Cu and Co on the Cu(111) surface are studied by using interatomic interaction potentials constructed within tight-binding second moment approximation. It was shown that interaction of the Co{sub 4} and Cu{sub 4} clusters with the substrate leads to arising of frustrated translation and frustrated rotation in-plane polarized vibrational modes localized on the cluster atoms. The vibrational modes of the free Cu{sub 4} cluster upon its adsorption on the Cu(111) surface mix with Cu bulk phonons and become almost delocalized. Contrary to that, in the Co{sub 4} cluster on the surface the high frequency modes remain strongly localized and mixed with the nearest neighbor atoms vibrations. The highest frequency vibration of the Co{sub 4} cluster splits due to different interaction with certain groups of nearest neighbor atoms (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  20. Vibrational properties at the ordered metallic surface alloy system Au(110)-1×2-Pd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheffache, Sedik; Chadli, Rabah; Khater, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    We present a calculation for the vibrational properties of the ordered surface alloy Au(110)-1×2-Pd on a crystalline substrate of Au. The surface phonon dispersion curves and the local vibrations densities of states (LDOS) are calculated in the harmonic approximation for the system, using the phase field matching theory (PFMT) method and associated real space Green’s functions. In particular, it is shown that the surface alloy presents optic vibrational modes above the Au bulk bands, along the directions of high-symmetry ΓX¯, XS¯, SY¯ and Y Γ¯ of the corresponding two-dimensional Brillouin zone. Measurements of the surface phonon dispersion branches can hence be made by different techniques such as helium atom scattering (HAS) to compare with. The calculated LDOS for Au and Pd atomic sites in the four top surface atomic layers span a wider range of frequencies than those for the individual Au(110) or Pd(110) metallic surfaces. These LDOS provide a spectral signature for the progressive transition from the surface dynamics to that of the Au crystal bulk. Knowledge of these LDOS for the surface alloy can also serve as an input for modeling the diffusion and reaction rates of chemical species at its surface.

  1. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  2. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  3. Effect of airflow velocity on moisture exchange at surfaces of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2006-01-01

    The moisture transfer between air and construction are affected of the boundary layer conditions close to the surface, which is influenced by the airflow patterns in the room. Therefore an investigation of the relation be-tween the surface resistance and the airflow velocity above a material samp...

  4. Influence of Rough Flow over Sea Surface on Dry Atmospheric Deposition Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Meteorological model and a dry deposition module were used to estimate the effects of sea surface rough flow (SSRF over the sea surface on dry deposition velocities. The dry deposition turbulence resistance, Ra, and sub-layer resistance, Rb, decreased more than 10% and 5% due to SSRF, respectively. For example, for HNO3, the mean dry deposition velocities (Vd were 0.51 cm s-1 in January, 0.58 in April, 0.65 cm s-1 in July and 0.79 cm s-1 in October with only smooth flow over the sea surface. However, the SSRF increased the Vd of HNO3 by 5 - 20% in the east China seas. These results show that SSRF is an important factor in estimating surface roughness to further improve calculation of the dry deposition velocities over the ocean. Improvements in parameterization of sea roughness length will be a worthwhile effort in related future studies.

  5. Dependence of sea-surface microwave emissivity on friction velocity as derived from SMMR/SASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, F. J.; Christensen, E. J.; Richardson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The sea-surface microwave emissivity is derived using SMMR brightness temperatures and SASS inferred friction velocities for three North Pacific Seasat passes. The results show the emissivity increasing linearly with friction velocity with no obvious break between the foam-free and foam regimes up to a friction velocity of about 70 cm/sec (15 m/sec wind speed). For horizontal polarization the sensitivity of emissivity to friction velocity greatly increases with frequency, while for vertical polarization the sensitivity is much less and is independent of frequency. This behavior is consistent with two-scale scattering theory. A limited amount of high friction velocity data above 70 cm/sec suggests an additional increase in emissivity due to whitecapping.

  6. Examination and Research of the Surface Topography of Ultrasonic Vibration Honing Nd-Fe-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-jing ZHU; Zhi-meng LU; Jian-qing WANG; Quan CHENG

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of ultrasonic vibration honing Nd-Fe-B has been briefly elaborated after the introduction of the strategic significanoe of processing Nd-Fe-B.Based on the formation principle of Scanning Electrvnic NTicroscope (SFM),and at the exarrnination with the aid of SEM to the ultrasonic vibration honing Nd-Fe-B materials superficial microscopic topography,the paper discusses the new processing mechanism according to the SFM examination picture.The research indicates that as a result of supersonic high frequency vibration,the path of the abrasion extends at the same time,and the supersonic cavitation effect fonts the intense shock-wave,impacting Nd-Fe-B material's internal surface,providing the supersonic energy for the superficial abrasive dust's elimination,which directly explain tat the honing processing efficiency is entranced,and the processing surface rwghness is high.

  7. Exploiting SENTINEL-1 Amplitude Data for Glacier Surface Velocity Field Measurements: Feasibility Demonstration on Baltoro Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascetti, A.; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Di Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed using Sentinel-1 imagery acquired over the Karakoram mountain range (North Pakistan) and Baltoro and other three glaciers have been investigated. During this study, a stack of 11 images acquired in the period from October 2014 to September 2015 has been used in order to investigate the potentialities of the Sentinel-1 SAR sensor to retrieve the glacier surface velocity every month. The aim of this test was to measure the glacier surface velocity between each subsequent pair, in order to produce a time series of the surface velocity fields along the investigated period. The necessary coregistration procedure between the images has been performed and subsequently the glaciers areas have been sampled using a regular grid with a 250 × 250 meters posting. Finally the surface velocity field has been estimated, for each image pair, using a template matching procedure, and an outlier filtering procedure based on the signal to noise ratio values has been applied, in order to exclude from the analysis unreliable points. The achieved velocity values range from 10 to 25 meters/month and they are coherent to those obtained in previous studies carried out on the same glaciers and the results highlight that it is possible to have a continuous update of the glacier surface velocity field through free Sentinel-1 imagery, that could be very useful to investigate the seasonal effects on the glaciers fluid-dynamics.

  8. Surface Effects on the Vibration and Buckling of Double-Nanobeam-Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hui Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface effects on the transverse vibration and axial buckling of double-nanobeam-system (DNBS are examined based on a refined Euler-Bernoulli beam model. For three typical deformation modes of DNBS, we derive the natural frequency and critical axial load accounting for both surface elasticity and residual surface tension, respectively. It is found that surface effects get quite important when the cross-sectional size of beams shrinks to nanometers. No matter for vibration or axial buckling, surface effects are just the same in three deformation modes and usually enhance the natural frequency and critical load. However, the interaction between beams is clearly distinct in different deformation modes. This study might be helpful for the design of nano-optomechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  9. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm.

  10. The vibrational and buckling behaviors of piezoelectric nanobeams with surface effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Z; Jiang, L Y, E-mail: lyjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2011-06-17

    In this work, the influence of surface effects, including residual surface stress, surface elasticity and surface piezoelectricity, on the vibrational and buckling behaviors of piezoelectric nanobeams is investigated by using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The surface effects are incorporated by applying the surface piezoelectricity model and the generalized Young-Laplace equations. The results demonstrate that surface effects play a significant role in predicting these behaviors. It is found that the influence of the residual surface stress and the surface piezoelectricity on the resonant frequencies and the critical electric potential for buckling is more prominent than the surface elasticity. The nanobeam boundary conditions are also found to influence the surface effects on these parameters. This study also shows that the resonant frequencies can be tuned by adjusting the applied electrical load. The present study is envisaged to provide useful insights for the design and applications of piezoelectric-beam-based nanodevices.

  11. Trace projection transformation: a new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  12. Technical Note: Surface water velocity observations from a camera: a case study on the Tiber River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tauro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring surface water velocity during flood events is a challenging task. Techniques based on deploying instruments in the flow are often unfeasible due to high velocity and abundant sediment transport. A low-cost and versatile technology that provides continuous and automatic observations is still not available. LSPIV (large scale particle imaging velocimetry is a promising approach to tackle these issues. Such technique consists of developing surface water velocity maps analyzing video frame sequences recorded with a camera. In this technical brief, we implement a novel LSPIV experimental apparatus to observe a flood event in the Tiber river at a cross-section located in the center of Rome, Italy. We illustrate results from three tests performed during the hydrograph flood peak and recession limb for different illumination and weather conditions. The obtained surface velocity maps are compared to the rating curve velocity and to benchmark velocity values. Experimental findings confirm the potential of the proposed LSPIV implementation in aiding research in natural flow monitoring.

  13. Seismic tomography of Yunnan region using short-period surface wave phase velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 苏伟; 叶太兰

    2004-01-01

    The data of short-period (1~18 s) surface waves recorded by 23 stations belonging to the digital seismic network of Yunnan Province of China are used in this paper. From these data, the dispersion curves of phase velocities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave along 209 paths are determined by using the two-station narrowband filtering cross-correlation method.Adopting tomography method, the distribution maps of phase velocities at various periods in Yunnan region are inverted. The maps of phase velocities on profiles along 24°N, 25°N, 26°N, 27°N and 100.5°E and the distribution maps of phase velocities at 3 periods in the study region are given. The results show that the phase velocity distribution in Yunnan region has strong variations in horizontal direction, and the phase velocity distribution in short-period range is closely related to the thickness of sedimentary layers in the shallow crust. The phase velocity in southern part of the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block encircled by the Honghe fault and Xiaojiang fault is obviously lower than that in surrounding areas. The epicentral locations of strong earthquakes in Yunnan region are mainly distributed in transitional zones between low and high phase velocities.

  14. Evaluation of Breaking Performance in Vibration-Assisted Electrostatic Surface Induction Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemoto, Takeru; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Yamamoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates breaking performance of an electrostatic surface induction actuator. The actuator is equipped with piezoelectric vibrator such that the friction between the slider and the stator electrodes can be dramatically reduced by squeeze-film effect. In such an actuator, the friction...... conditions. The result clearly shows the effect of friction change in breaking performance of the actuator....

  15. Probing anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibration by heavy-ion fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, N; Kuyucak, S

    1997-01-01

    Describing fusion reactions between ^{16}O and ^{154}Dy and, between ^{16}O and ^{144}Sm by the $sd-$ and $sdf-$ interacting boson model, we show that heavy-ion fusion reactions are strongly affected by anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibrations and nuclear shape, and thus provide a powerful method to study details of nuclear structure and dynamics.

  16. Effect of Vibration Training on Anaerobic Power and Quardroceps Surface EMG in Long Jumpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Luo, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anaerobic power and surface EMG (sEMG) of quardrocep muscle in lower extremities after single vibration training intervention. Methods: 8 excellent male long jumpers voluntarily participated in this study. Four intervention modes were devised, including high frequency high amplitude (HFHA,30Hz,6mm), low frequency low…

  17. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational excitations in ethane monolayers adsorbed on graphite (0001) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    1987-01-01

    The collective vibrational excitations of two different crystalline monolayer phases of ethane (C2H6) adsorbed on the graphite (0001) surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The monolayer phases studied are the commensurate 7/8 ×4 structure in which the ethane molecules lie...

  18. Water Surface Wave in a Trough with Periodical Topographical Bottom under Vertical Vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yi; MIAO Guo-Qing; WEI Rong-Jue

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the water surface waves in a vertically vibrated long rectangular trough with several identical Plexiglas rectangles lined periodically on the bottom. The band structure is computed theoretically by the method of transfer matrix. Some interesting phenomena, such as the localized wave, especially the solitary-like wave inside the band gap, are observed in the experiments.

  19. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  20. Effect of Ion Escape Velocity and Conversion Surface Material on H- Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, Olli [University of Jyvaskyla; Kalvas, T. [University of Jyvaskyla; Komppula, J. [University of Jyvaskyla; Koivisto, H. [University of Jyvaskyla; Geros, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Stelzer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rouleau, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, K.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    According to generally accepted models surface production of negative ions depends on ion escape velocity and work function of the surface. We have conducted an experimental study addressing the role of the ion escape velocity on H- production. A converter-type ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center was employed for the experiment. The ion escape velocity was affected by varying the bias voltage of the converter electrode. It was observed that due to enhanced stripping of H- no direct gain of extracted beam current can be achieved by increasing the converter voltage. The conversion efficiency of H- was observed to vary with converter voltage and follow the existing theories in qualitative manner. We present calculations predicting relative H- yields from different cesiated surfaces with comparison to experimental observations from different types of H- ion sources. Utilizing materials exhibiting negative electron affinity and exposed to UV-light is considered for Cesium-free H-/D- production.

  1. Surface quality prediction model of nano-composite ceramics in ultrasonic vibration-assisted ELID mirror grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bo; Chen, Fan; Jia, Xiao-feng; Zhao, Chong-yang; Wang, Xiao-bo [Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo (China)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted Electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding is a highly efficient and highly precise machining method. The surface quality prediction model in ultrasonic vibration-assisted ELID mirror grinding was studied. First, the interaction between grits and workpiece surface was analyzed according to kinematic mechanics, and the surface roughness model was developed. The variations in surface roughness under different parameters was subsequently calculated and analyzed by MATLAB. Results indicate that compared with the ordinary ELID grinding, ultrasonic vibration-assisted ELID grinding is superior, because it has more stable and better surface quality and has an improved range of ductile machining.

  2. Experimental study of the Marangoni flow in evaporating water droplet placed on vertical vibration and heated hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Seok; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-11-01

    In general, the heated surface generates a Marangoni flow inside a droplet yielding a coffee stain effect in the end. This study aims to visualize and control the Marangoni flow by using periodic vertical vibration. While the droplet is evaporating, the variation of contact angle and internal volume of droplet was observed by using the combination of a continuous light and a DSLR still camera. Regarding the internal velocity, the PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) system was applied to visualize the internal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the temperature gradient inside and surface tension on the droplet, a commercial software Comsol Multiphysics was used. In the result, the internal velocity increases with the increase of the plate temperature and both flow directions of Marangoni and gravitational flow are opposite so that there seems to be a possibility to control the coffee stain effect. In addition, the Marangoni flow was controlled at relatively lower range of frequency 30 ~ 50Hz. Work supported by Korea government Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy KETEP grant No. 20134030200290, Ministry of Education NRF grant No. NRF2013R1A1A2005347.

  3. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  4. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, 1205 W. State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Proksch, Roger, E-mail: Roger.Proksch@oxinst.com [Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Ave., Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  5. Velocity dependence of vestibular information for postural control on tilting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Fay B; Kluzik, JoAnn; Hlavacka, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Vestibular information is known to be important for postural stability on tilting surfaces, but the relative importance of vestibular information across a wide range of surface tilt velocities is less clear. We compared how tilt velocity influences postural orientation and stability in nine subjects with bilateral vestibular loss and nine age-matched, control subjects. Subjects stood on a force platform that tilted 6 deg, toes-up at eight velocities (0.25 to 32 deg/s), with and without vision. Results showed that visual information effectively compensated for lack of vestibular information at all tilt velocities. However, with eyes closed, subjects with vestibular loss were most unstable within a critical tilt velocity range of 2 to 8 deg/s. Subjects with vestibular deficiency lost their balance in more than 90% of trials during the 4 deg/s condition, but never fell during slower tilts (0.25-1 deg/s) and fell only very rarely during faster tilts (16-32 deg/s). At the critical velocity range in which falls occurred, the body center of mass stayed aligned with respect to the surface, onset of ankle dorsiflexion was delayed, and there was delayed or absent gastrocnemius inhibition, suggesting that subjects were attempting to actively align their upper bodies with respect to the moving surface instead of to gravity. Vestibular information may be critical for stability at velocities of 2 to 8 deg/s because postural sway above 2 deg/s may be too fast to elicit stabilizing responses through the graviceptive somatosensory system, and postural sway below 8 deg/s may be too slow for somatosensory-triggered responses or passive stabilization from trunk inertia.

  6. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity of the ...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  7. Determination of minority-carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity with high spacial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam induced current in conjunction with high-resolution scanning makes it possible to evaluate the minority-carrier lifetime three dimensionally in the bulk and the surface recombination velocity two dimensionally, with a high spacial resolution. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two-dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon diodes is presented as well as a three-dimensional mapping of the changes in the minority-carrier lifetime in ion-implanted silicon.

  8. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  9. Upper-Mantle Shear Velocities beneath Southern California Determined from Long-Period Surface Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    1997-01-01

    We used long-period surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the TERRAscope network to determine phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh waves up to periods of about 170 sec and of Love waves up to about 150 sec. This enabled us to investigate the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath southern California to a depth of about 250 km. Ten and five earthquakes were used for Rayleigh and Love waves, respectively. The observed surface-wave dispersion shows a clear Love/Rayleigh-wave d...

  10. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  11. Theoretical study of potential energy surface and vibrational spectra of ArF2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明晖; 谢代前; 鄢国森

    2000-01-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of ArF2 system has been obtained by using MP4 calculation with a large basis set including bond functions. There are two local minimums on the PES: one is T-shaped and the other is L-shaped. The L-shaped minimum is the global minimum with a well depth of -119.62 cm- 1 at R = 0.3883nm. The T-shaped minimum has a well depth of -85.93cm -1 at R = 0.3486 nm. A saddle point is found at R = 0.3486 and θ = 61° with the well depth of -61.53 cm-1. The vibrational energy levels have been calculated by using VSCF-CI method. The results show that this PES supports 27 vibrational bound states, and the ground states are two degenerate states assigned to the L-type vibration.

  12. Theoretical study of potential energy surface and vibrational spectra of ArF2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of ArF2 system has been obtained by using MP4 calculation with a large basis set including bond functions. There are two local minimums on the PES: one is T-shaped and the other is L-shaped. The L-shaped minimum is the global minimum with a well depth of -119.62 cm-1 at R = 0.3883nm. The T-shaped minimum has a well depth of -85.93cm-1 at R = 0.3486 nm. A saddle point is found at R = 0.3486 and q = 61° with the well depth of -61.53 cm-1. The vibrational energy levels have been calculated by using VSCF-CI method. The results show that this PES supports 27 vibrational bound states, and the ground states are two degenerate states assigned to the L-type vibration.

  13. Influence of filtration velocity on DON variation in BAF for micropolluted surface water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng-Fei; Chen, You-Peng; Kang, Jia; Gao, Xu; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Biological aerated filters (BAFs) are widely used for the treatment of micropolluted surface water. However, the biological process produces dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which, as precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products, pose potential threats to drinking water safety. Therefore, to control DON in BAF effluent, it is necessary to study the influence of BAF operation parameters on DON production. In this study, the influence of filtration velocity in a BAF on DON production was investigated. Under different filtration velocity (0.5, 2, and 4 m/h) conditions, profiles of DON concentrations along the media layer were measured. The profile at a filtration velocity of 0.5 m/h showed a decreasing trend, and the ones under filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h fluctuated in a small range (from 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L). Moreover, the relatively high filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h resulted in a lower level of DON concentration. Additionally, 3D excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize DON. It is found that the patterns of DON at a relatively high filtration velocity condition (4 m/h) were obviously different from the ones under low filtration velocity conditions (0.5 and 2 m/h).

  14. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  15. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  16. Structural Integrity Assessment Using Laser Measured Surface Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    structures. Figure 2. (Left) Experimental arrangement for plaster wall assessments at the U.S. Capitol Building showing the SLDV monitoring system, a... termite -like damage to the wood. Broadband SLDV scans were obtained across the available surface of the structure providing dynamic displacement...Figure 2. (Left) Experimental arrangement for plaster wall assessments at the U.S. Capitol Building showing the SLDV monitoring system, a shaker

  17. Vibrational energies for HFCO using a neural network sum of exponentials potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Ekadashi; Brown, Alex

    2016-05-07

    A six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for formyl fluoride (HFCO) is fit in a sum-of-products form using neural network exponential fitting functions. The ab initio data upon which the fit is based were computed at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12]/cc-pVTZ-F12 level of theory. The PES fit is accurate (RMSE = 10 cm(-1)) up to 10 000 cm(-1) above the zero point energy and covers most of the experimentally measured IR data. The PES is validated by computing vibrational energies for both HFCO and deuterated formyl fluoride (DFCO) using block improved relaxation with the multi-configuration time dependent Hartree approach. The frequencies of the fundamental modes, and all other vibrational states up to 5000 cm(-1) above the zero-point energy, are more accurate than those obtained from the previous MP2-based PES. The vibrational frequencies obtained on the PES are compared to anharmonic frequencies at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ levels of theory obtained using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. The new PES will be useful for quantum dynamics simulations for both HFCO and DFCO, e.g., studies of intramolecular vibrational redistribution leading to unimolecular dissociation and its laser control.

  18. Water-Depth-Based Prediction Formula for the Blasting Vibration Velocity of Lighthouse Caused by Underwater Drilling Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lighthouses are the most important hydraulic structures that should be protected during underwater drilling blasting. Thus, the effect of blasting vibration on lighthouse should be studied. On the basis of the dimensional analysis, we deduced a revised formula for water depth based on Sodev’s empirical formula and established the linear fitting model. During the underwater reef project in the main channel of Shipu Harbor in the Ningbo–Zhoushan Port, the blasting vibration data of the lighthouse near the underwater blasting area were monitored. The undetermined coefficient, resolvable coefficient, and F value of the two formulas were then obtained. The comparison of the data obtained from the two formulas showed that they can effectively predict the blasting vibration on the lighthouse. The correction formula that considers water depth can obviously reduce prediction errors and accurately predict blasting vibration.

  19. Surface effects on the vibration behavior of flexoelectric nanobeams based on nonlocal elasticity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    In this research, vibration characteristics of a flexoelectric nanobeam in contact with Winkler-Pasternak foundation is investigated based on the nonlocal elasticity theory considering surface effects. This nonclassical nanobeam model contains flexoelectric effect to capture coupling of strain gradients and electrical polarizations. Moreover, the nonlocal elasticity theory is employed to study the nonlocal and long-range interactions between the particles. The present model can degenerate into the classical model if the nonlocal parameter, flexoelectric and surface effects are omitted. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the governing equations and the related boundary conditions which are solved applying a Galerkin-based solution. Natural frequencies are verified with those of previous papers on nanobeams. It is illustrated that flexoelectricity, nonlocality, surface stresses, elastic foundation and boundary conditions affects considerably the vibration frequencies of piezoelectric nanobeams.

  20. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic inhomogeneous nanobeams incorporating surface and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the free vibration investigation of nonlocal strain gradient-based viscoelastic functionally graded (FG) nanobeams on viscoelastic medium considering surface stress effects. Nonlocal strain gradient theory possesses a nonlocal stress field parameter and a length scale parameter for more accurate prediction of mechanical behavior of nanostructures. Surface energy effect is incorporate to the nonlocal strain gradient theory employing Gurtin-Murdoch elasticity theory. Thermo-elastic material properties of nanobeam are graded in thickness direction using power-law distribution. Hamilton's principal is utilized to obtain the governing equations of FG nanobeam embedded in viscoelastic medium. The effects of surface stress, length scale parameter, nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic medium, internal damping constant, thermal loading, power-law index and boundary conditions on vibration frequencies of viscoelastic FGM nanobeams are discussed in detail.

  1. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Laser Doppler interferometer for vibration of rotating curved surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Giin-Yuan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lin, San; Wakabayashi, Takenori; Ono, K.

    1999-10-01

    With the rapid advancement of today's ultra-high performance mechanical or mechatronic system such as magnetic or optical disk drives, improving metrology capabilities to examine the performance characteristics of these system are growing ever more important. The primary tested studied in this paper is an ultra-high precision ball-bearing spindle that possesses non-repeatable runout of less than 100nm. The metrology tool adopted is laser Doppler interferometer system that has Megahertz bandwidth and nanometer resolutions. Experimental data obtained clearly indicates that measuring vertical runout of a spindle motor is a straightforward process. However, a fundamental effect was identified, where the radial runout data was found to drift upward or downward with time, when using the laser Doppler system to measure the radial runout of ultra-high precision rotational systems whose surface profile is not flat. All of the underlying reasons that cause this undesirable effect were proposed and verified. Approaches that can be adopted to circumvent this apparent limitation on adopting the laser Doppler interferometer systems to measure rotational curved surface were implemented to further extend its application horizon. The experimental data realized and the application experience obtained were shown to further advance our measurement capabilities.

  3. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  4. Interplay of nonlocal response, damping, and low group velocity in surface-plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    augmented with quantum mechanical corrections, such as the electron spill-out effect and nonlocal response. Here, we discuss the latter and its implications on the waveguiding characteristics, such as dispersion and group velocity, of the surface-plasmon polariton mode supported at a metal-air interface....

  5. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  6. Vibrational states on vicinal surfaces of Al, Ag, Cu and Pd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1998-10-01

    We present the calculation of vibrational modes and lattice relaxation for the (110), (211), (311), (511), (331) and (221) surfaces of Al, Ag, Cu and Pd. The surface phonon frequencies and polarizations are obtained for relaxed and unrelaxed surfaces using embedded atom model potentials. On all surfaces studied step-localized vibrational modes and surface states localized on terrace atoms are found. It is shown that as the terrace width increases so does the number of surface phonons. It is found that interlayer relaxation leads to a shift in the frequencies of the surface states and to a change in the number and localization. In particular, it may cause the appearance or disappearance of step modes. It is shown that the character of relaxation on vicinal surfaces is determined by the number of atoms on a terrace. A comparison of the results with the available experimental data for the Al(221), Cu(211), and Cu(511) surfaces indicates that there is a good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Louise R; Baker, Andrew T; Elias, Damian O; Dammann, John F; Zielinski, Mark C; Polashock, Vicky S; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-01-01

    Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  8. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise R Manfredi

    Full Text Available Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  9. Surface stress effect on the vibration and instability of nanoscale pipes conveying fluid based on a size-dependent Timoshenko beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Gholami, R.; Norouzzadeh, A.; Darabi, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Presented in this paper is a precise investigation of the effect of surface stress on the vibration characteristics and instability of fluid-conveying nanoscale pipes. To this end, the nanoscale pipe is modeled as a Timoshenko nanobeam. The equations of motion of the nanoscale pipe are obtained based on Hamilton's principle and the Gurtin-Murdoch continuum elasticity incorporating the surface stress effect. Afterwards, the generalized differential quadrature method is employed to discretize the governing equations and associated boundary conditions. To what extent important parameters such as the thickness, material and surface stress modulus, residual surface stress, surface density, and boundary conditions influence the natural frequency of nanoscale pipes and the critical velocity of fluid is discussed.

  10. Local Environment and Interactions of Liquid and Solid Interfaces Revealed by Spectral Line Shape of Surface Selective Nonlinear Vibrational Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Chase, Zizwe A.; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-11-10

    Vibrational spectral lineshape contains important detailed information of molecular vibration and reports its specific interactions and couplings to its local environment. In this work, recently developed sub-1 cm-1 high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) was used to measure the -C≡N stretch vibration in the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir or Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer as a unique vibrational probe, and the spectral lineshape analysis revealed the local environment and interactions at the air/water, air/glass, air/calcium fluoride and air/-quartz interfaces for the first time. The 8CB Langmuir or LB film is uniform and the vibrational spectral lineshape of its -C≡N group has been well characterized, making it a good choice as the surface vibrational probe. Lineshape analysis of the 8CB -C≡N stretch SFG vibrational spectra suggests the coherent vibrational dynamics and the structural and dynamic inhomogeneity of the -C≡N group at each interface are uniquely different. In addition, it is also found that there are significantly different roles for water molecules in the LB films on different substrate surfaces. These results demonstrated the novel capabilities of the surface nonlinear spectroscopy in characterization and in understanding the specific structures and chemical interactions at the liquid and solid interfaces in general.

  11. Evolution of surface velocities and ice discharge of Larsen B outlet glaciers from 1995 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wuite

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We use repeat-pass SAR data to produce detailed maps of surface motion covering the glaciers draining into the former Larsen B ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, for different epochs between 1995 and 2013. We combine the velocity maps with estimates of ice thickness to analyze fluctuations of ice discharge. The collapse of the central and northern sections of the ice shelf in 2002 led to a near-immediate acceleration of tributary glaciers as well as of the remnant ice shelf in Scar Inlet. Velocities of the glaciers discharging directly into the ocean remain to date well above the velocities of the pre-collapse period. The response of individual glaciers differs and velocities show significant temporal fluctuations, implying major variations in ice discharge and mass balance as well. Due to reduced velocity and ice thickness the ice discharge of Crane Glacier decreased from 5.02 Gt a−1 in 2007 to 1.72 Gt a−1 in 2013, whereas Hektoria and Green glaciers continue to show large temporal fluctuations in response to successive stages of frontal retreat. The velocity on Scar Inlet ice shelf increased two- to three fold since 1995, with the largest increase in the first years after the break-up of the main section of Larsen B. Flask and Leppard glaciers, the largest tributaries to Scar Inlet ice shelf, accelerated. In 2013 their discharge was 38%, respectively 45%, higher than in 1995.

  12. Evolution of surface velocities and ice discharge of Larsen B outlet glaciers from 1995 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, J.; Rott, H.; Hetzenecker, M.; Floricioiu, D.; De Rydt, J.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Nagler, T.; Kern, M.

    2015-05-01

    We use repeat-pass SAR data to produce detailed maps of surface motion covering the glaciers draining into the former Larsen B Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, for different epochs between 1995 and 2013. We combine the velocity maps with estimates of ice thickness to analyze fluctuations of ice discharge. The collapse of the central and northern sections of the ice shelf in 2002 led to a near-immediate acceleration of tributary glaciers as well as of the remnant ice shelf in Scar Inlet. Velocities of most of the glaciers discharging directly into the ocean remain to date well above the velocities of the pre-collapse period. The response of individual glaciers differs and velocities show significant temporal fluctuations, implying major variations in ice discharge as well. Due to reduced velocity and ice thickness the ice discharge of Crane Glacier decreased from 5.02 Gt a-1 in 2007 to 1.72 Gt a-1 in 2013, whereas Hektoria and Green glaciers continue to show large temporal fluctuations in response to successive stages of frontal retreat. The velocity on Scar Inlet ice shelf increased 2-3-fold since 1995, with the largest increase in the first years after the break-up of the main section of Larsen B. Flask and Leppard glaciers, the largest tributaries to Scar Inlet ice shelf, accelerated. In 2013 their discharge was 38% and 46% higher than in 1995.

  13. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  14. Short-period surface-wave phase velocities across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, G.

    2017-09-01

    Surface-wave phase-velocity maps for the full footprint of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) across the conterminous United States are developed and tested. Three-component, long-period continuous seismograms recorded on more than 1800 seismometers, most of which were deployed for 18 months or longer, are processed using a noise cross-correlation technique to derive inter-station Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves at periods between 5 and 40 s. The phase-velocity measurements are quality controlled using an automated algorithm and then used in inversions for Love and Rayleigh phase-velocity models at discrete periods on a 0.25°-by-0.25° pixel grid. The robustness of the results is examined using comparisons of maps derived from subsets of the data. A winter-summer division of the cross-correlation data results in small model differences, indicating relatively minor sensitivity of the results to seasonal variations in the distribution of noise sources. Division of the dispersion data based on inter-station azimuth does not result in geographically coherent model differences, suggesting that azimuthal anisotropy at the regional scale is weak compared with variations in isotropic velocities and does not substantially influence the results for isotropic velocities. The phase-velocity maps and dispersion measurements are documented and made available as data products of the 10-year-long USArray TA deployment.

  15. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  16. Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion. I. Construction of a model potential surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epa, V. C.; Choi, J. H.; Klobukowski, M.; Thorson, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of an extended model potential surface for the bifluoride ion [FHF-] is described, based on ab initio calculations for the free ion at the CID (configuration interaction, double replacement) level with a Huzinaga-Dunning double-zeta basis set. 710 data points were generated, for displacements in the three noncyclic vibrational coordinates exploring the potential surface to a height at least 30 000 cm-1 above its minimum, and giving a realistic account of the dissociation into HF+F-. Analogous calculations were made for HF and F- using the same basis. The predicted hydrogen bond energy (De) is 48.13 kcal/mol, with equilibrium F-F separation Re =4.2905 a.u., in good agreement with other recent calculations. A model potential has been constructed, based on a superposition of Morse potentials associated with each H-F distance plus a fairly structureless correction function expressible as a 36-term least-squares polynomial in the prolate spheroidal coordinates used to describe vibrational displacements. The resulting model surface fits all 710 ab initio data points with an r.m.s. deviation of 65.6 cm-1, and points less than 15 000 cm-1 above the minimum with a deviation of 26.3 cm-1. This surface provides the basis for a series of vibrational dynamics studies on the FHF- system being done in this laboratory.

  17. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  18. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  19. The influence of surface effect on vibration behaviors of carbon nanotubes under initial stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Fang, C. Q.; Wang, X.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to solve the influence of surface effect on non-coaxial resonance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in matrix utilizing laminated structures model. Due to coupled van der Waals forces between adjacent tubes and surface effect exerted carbon nanotubes, the resonance frequencies and amplitude ratios of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under initial stresses show that the resonant characteristics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes become complex and the numbers of vibrational modes do not keep increase under identical conditions after considering surface effects. The result obtained can be used as a beneficial reference for investigating the electronic and physical behaviors of carbon nanotubes.

  20. Research on the Surface Micro-configuration in Vibration Cutting Particle Reinforced Metallic Matrix Composites SiC_p/Al

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The cutting performance of particulate reinforced me tallic matrix composites(PRMMCs) SiC p/Al in ultrasonic vibration cutting and c ommon cutting with carbide tools and PCD tools was researched in the paper. Mic rostructure of machined surface was described, the relation between cutting para meters and surface roughness was presented, and characteristic of the surface re mained stress was also presented. Furthermore, wear regularity and abrasion resi stance ability of tools in ultrasonic vibration cut...

  1. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of adsorption and vibrational features of folic acid, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A gold-capped silicon nanopillar (Au NP) with a height of 600 nm and a width of 120 nm was utilized to study the vibrational features of FA molecules adsorbed on the n...

  2. Ab-initio tensorial electronic friction for molecules on metal surfaces: nonadiabatic vibrational relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Batista, Victor S; Tully, John C

    2016-01-01

    Molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces exchange energy with substrate phonons and low-lying electron-hole pair excitations. In the limit of weak coupling, electron-hole pair excitations can be seen as exerting frictional forces on adsorbates that enhance energy transfer and facilitate vibrational relaxation or hot-electron mediated chemistry. We have recently reported on the relevance of tensorial properties of electronic friction [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217601 (2016)] in dynamics at surfaces. Here we present the underlying implementation of tensorial electronic friction based on Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory for condensed phase and cluster systems. Using local atomic-orbital basis sets, we calculate nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements and evaluate the full electronic friction tensor in the classical limit. Our approach is numerically stable and robust as shown by a detailed convergence analysis. We furthermore benchmark the accuracy of our approach by calculation of vibrational relaxation rates and li...

  3. INTRODUCTION: Surface Dynamics, Phonons, Adsorbate Vibrations and Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2004-07-01

    understanding of the underlying factors determining the optical quality of GaInNAs, such as composition, growth and annealing conditions. We are still far from establishing an understanding of the band structure and its dependence on composition. Fundamental electronic interactions such as electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering, dependence of effective mass on composition, strain and orientation, quantum confinement effects, effects of localized nitrogen states on high field transport and on galvanometric properties, and mechanisms for light emission in these materials, are yet to be fully understood. Nature and formation mechanisms of grown-in and processing-induced defects that are important for material quality and device performance are still unknown. Such knowledge is required in order to design strategies to efficiently control and eliminate harmful defects. For many potential applications (such as solar cells, HBTs) it is essential to get more information on the transport properties of dilute nitride materials. The mobility of minority carriers is known to be low in GaInNAs and related material. The experimental values are far from reaching the theoretical ones, due to defects and impurities introduced in the material during the growth. The role of the material inhomogeneities on the lateral carrier transport also needs further investigation. From the device's point of view most attention to date has been focused on the GaInNAs/GaAs system, mainly because of its potential for optoelectronic devices covering the 1.3-1.55 µm data and telecommunications wavelength bands. As is now widely appreciated, these GaAs-compatible structures allow monolithic integration of AlGaAs-based distributed Bragg reflector mirrors (DBRs) for vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers with low temperature sensitivity and compatibility with AlOx-based confinement techniques. In terms of conventional edge-emitting lasers (EELs), the next step is to extend the wavelength range for cw room

  4. Quantification of acute vocal fold epithelial surface damage with increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kojima

    Full Text Available Because the vocal folds undergo repeated trauma during continuous cycles of vibration, the epithelium is routinely susceptible to damage during phonation. Excessive and prolonged vibration exposure is considered a significant predisposing factor in the development of vocal fold pathology. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the extent of epithelial surface damage following increased time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure using an in vivo rabbit phonation model. Forty-five New Zealand white breeder rabbits were randomized to nine groups and received varying phonation time-doses (30, 60, or 120 minutes and magnitude-doses (control, modal intensity phonation, or raised intensity phonation of vibration exposure. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was used to quantify the degree of epithelial surface damage. Results revealed a significant reduction in microprojection density, microprojection height, and depth of the epithelial surface with increasing time and phonation magnitudes doses, signifying increased epithelial surface damage risk with excessive and prolonged vibration exposure. Destruction to the epithelial cell surface may provide significant insight into the disruption of cell function following prolonged vibration exposure. One important goal achieved in the present study was the quantification of epithelial surface damage using objective imaging criteria. These data provide an important foundation for future studies of long-term tissue recovery from excessive and prolonged vibration exposure.

  5. Comparison of the terminal fall velocity, surface roughness and erosion threshold for volcanic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, G. A.; Seybold, L.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Kueppers, U.,; Lo Castro, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    Pyroclasts are particles emitted during explosive volcanic eruptions. They exhibit highly variable porosities, shapes, and densities. As such, their behaviors differ from the wind-blown and fluvial sand usually studied in clastic sedimentology. In order to better constrain the specificities of pyroclastic material, and gain insights into the flow and depositional processes within dilute pyroclastic density currents, the terminal fall velocity was experimentally measured in air and compared to surface roughness and saltation threshold data obtained from wind tunnel experiments as well as with shape parameters. Two types of particles were investigated (scoriaceous material and pumices), as well as different grain sizes (0.125-4mm for scoria and 0.125-16mm for pumices in half phi fractions). The terminal fall velocity corresponds to the velocity for which the drag exerted by air on a particle counteracts its weight, so that acceleration becomes null and the velocity constant. In order to measure the terminal fall velocity, particles were dropped in a closed and large vertical tube (to avoid any perturbation by air movement present in the lab) and the velocity derived from high speed video recorded near the bottom of the tube. By repeating the experiments from different heights, the velocity was seen to increase with increasing drop-height, until reaching a constant value, taken as the terminal fall velocity. The surface roughness is a value that defines how rough a bed of particles is seen by a wind. The saltation threshold corresponds to the near-bed shear-stress necessary for particles to leave the surface and begin to bounce on the bed. Both are derived from wind profiles experimentally measured in a wind tunnel in Aarhus (Denmark; see abstract 2128). Shape parameters were measured with a Camsizer (from Retsch) in Catania (Italy) and the sphericity, symmetry, aspect ratio, and convexity derived. Since the surface roughness, saltation threshold, and terminal fall

  6. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    N. Spiridonov; A. Кudina; V. Кurash

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition ...

  7. A SENSITIVE AND STABLE CONFOCAL FABRY-PEROT INTERFEROMETER FOR SURFACE ULTRASONIC VIBRATION DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING HONG-SHENG; TONG LI-GE; CHEN GENG-HUA

    2001-01-01

    A new confocal Fabry-Pérot interferometer (CFPI) has been constructed. By using both of the conjugate rays,the sensitivity of the system was doubled. Moreover, the negative feedback control loop of a single-chip microcomputer (MCS-51) was applied to stabilize the working point at an optimum position. The system has been used in detecting the piezoelectric ultrasonic vibration on the surface of an aluminium sample.

  8. Nuclear velocity perturbation theory for vibrational circular dichroism: An approach based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function

    CERN Document Server

    Scherrer, Arne; Sebastiani, Daniel; Gross, E K U; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear velocity perturbation current-density theory (NVPT) for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) is derived from the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. This new formalism offers an exact starting point to include correction terms to the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) form of the molecular wave function, similarly to the complete-adiabatic approximation. The corrections depend on a small parameter that, in a classical treatment of the nuclei, is identified as the nuclear velocity. Apart from proposing a rigorous basis for the NVPT, we show that the rotational strength, related to the intensity of the VCD signal, contain a new contribution beyond-BO that can be evaluated with the NVPT and that only arises when the exact factorization approach is employed. Numerical results are presented for chiral and non-chiral systems to test the validity of the approach.

  9. Receptivity of the Boundary Layer to Vibrations of the Wing Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernots, Tomass; Ruban, Anatoly; Pryce, David; Laminar Flow Control UK Group Team

    2014-11-01

    In this work we study generation of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves in the boundary layer due to elastic vibrations of the wing surface. The flow is investigated based on the asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations at large values of the Reynolds number. It is assumed that in the spectrum of the wing vibrations there is a harmonic which comes in resonance with the T-S wave on the lower branch of the stability curve. It was found that the vibrations of the wing surface produce pressure perturbations in the flow outside the boundary layer which can be calculated with the help of the piston theory. As the pressure perturbations penetrate into the boundary layer, a Stokes layer forms on the wing surface which appears to be influenced significantly by the compressibility of the flow, and is incapable of producing the T-S waves. The situation changes when the Stokes layer encounters an roughness; near which the flow is described using the triple-deck theory. The solution of the triple-deck problem can be found in an analytic form. Our main concern is with the flow behaviour downstream of the roughness and, in particular, with the amplitude of the generated Tollmien-Schlichting waves. This research was performed in the Laminar Flow Control Centre (LFC-UK) at Imperial College London. The centre is supported by EPSRC, Airbus UK and EADS Innovation Works.

  10. Carbonyl iron powder surface modification of magnetorheological elastomers for vibration absorbing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Yu, Miao; Zhu, Mi; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    With excellent characteristic of magnetic-control stiffness, magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) is well suited as a spring element of vibration absorber. To improve the vibration attenuation performance of MRE vibration absorbers, this paper expects to improve the mechanical strength and reduce the loss factor of MRE by interface modification. The surface of carbonyl iron powder (CIP) was modified with silica coating by a simple and convenient approach. Several MRE samples, with different proportions of modified CIPs were fabricated under a constant magnetic field. The morphology and composition of modified CIP were characterized by scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The results indicated that the modified CIPs were coated with uniform and continuous silica, which can make a better combination between particle and matrix. The tensile strength, magnetorheological properties and the damping properties of the MRE samples were tested by material testing machine and rheometer. The experimental results demonstrated that the loss factor of the MRE which incorporated with modified CIPs decreased markedly, and the tensile strength of such material has been much improved, at the same time this kind of MRE kept high MR effect. It is expected that this MRE material will meet the requirements of vibration absorber.

  11. Simulation of cross-flow-induced vibration of tube bundle by surface vorticity method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenghao WANG; Gedong JIANG; Jong Zhang Lin

    2008-01-01

    A fluid-structure interaction model based on Surface Vorticity Method (SVM) was used to study flow-induced vibrations of tube bundles in medium space ratio. The flow-induced vibrations of four tubes in a rotated square and a staggered tube bundle in three-row and five-column arrangements were simulated in the high sub-critical Reynolds number (Re) range. The results on fluid forces, tube responses and vorticity maps were pre-sented. The vorticity maps of the four rotated-square tubes changed dramatically when the rigid tubes were replaced by the flexible tubes. From the vorticity maps and vibration responses of the staggered tube bundle of different structural parameters, it was found that with the decrease of tube natural frequency, the maximal vibration response moved from the third row to the first. The results also showed that when more flexible tubes are used, the flow pattern changed drastically and the fluid-structure interaction imposed a dominant impact on the flow.

  12. Sea surface velocities from visible and infrared multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, P. A.; Emery, W. J.; Radebaugh, M.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution (100 m), sequential Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) images were used in a study to calculate advective surface velocities using the Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique. Radiance and brightness temperature gradient magnitude images were formed from visible (0.48 microns) and infrared (11.12 microns) image pairs, respectively, of Chandeleur Sound, which is a shallow body of water northeast of the Mississippi delta, at 145546 GMT and 170701 GMT on 30 Mar. 1989. The gradient magnitude images enhanced the surface water feature boundaries, and a lower cutoff on the gradient magnitudes calculated allowed the undesirable sunglare and backscatter gradients in the visible images, and the water vapor absorption gradients in the infrared images, to be reduced in strength. Requiring high (greater than 0.4) maximum cross correlation coefficients and spatial coherence of the vector field aided in the selection of an optimal template size of 10 x 10 pixels (first image) and search limit of 20 pixels (second image) to use in the MCC technique. Use of these optimum input parameters to the MCC algorithm, and high correlation and spatial coherence filtering of the resulting velocity field from the MCC calculation yielded a clustered velocity distribution over the visible and infrared gradient images. The velocity field calculated from the visible gradient image pair agreed well with a subjective analysis of the motion, but the velocity field from the infrared gradient image pair did not. This was attributed to the changing shapes of the gradient features, their nonuniqueness, and large displacements relative to the mean distance between them. These problems implied a lower repeat time for the imagery was needed in order to improve the velocity field derived from gradient imagery. Suggestions are given for optimizing the repeat time of sequential imagery when using the MCC method for motion studies. Applying the MCC method to the infrared

  13. Crust and upper mantle heterogeneities in the southwest Pacific from surface wave phase velocity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, R.; Rouland, D.; Roult, G.; Wiens, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Direct earthquake-to-station Rayleigh and Love wave data observed on high gain broadband records are analyzed in order to improve the lateral resolution of the uppermost mantle in the southwest Pacific region. We used data of nine permanent Geoscope and Iris stations located in the southern hemisphere and nine other stations as part of two temporary networks, the first one installed in New Caledonia and Vanuatu (hereafter named Cavascope network) by ORSTOM and the EOST from Louis Pasteur University in Strasbourg (France) and the second one installed in the Fiji, Tonga and Niue islands (hereafter named Spase network) by Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In order to collect more significant details on the surficial structures, we included the analysis of short period waves down to 8 s. A multiple frequency filtering technique has been used to recover phase velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves for selected earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5.5 and with known centroid moment tensor (CMT). About 1100 well-distributed seismograms have been processed in the period range 8-100 s and corrections for topography and water depth have been applied to the observed phase velocities. The geographical distribution of phase velocity anomalies have then been computed using the tomographic method developed by Montagner [Montagner, J.P., 1986a. Regional three-dimensional structures using long-period surface waves. Ann. Geophys. 4 (B3), 283-294]. Due to a poor knowledge of dense, well-distributed, crustal thickness values and corresponding velocity models, we did not perform or speculate on the construction of an S-wave 3D velocity model; therefore, we limited this study to the interpretation of the phase velocity distribution. The location of phase velocity anomalies are well determined and the deviations are discussed within the framework of the geological context and compared with other tomographic models. At long periods, from 40 s to 100 s, our results agree well

  14. Topographic Influence on Near-Surface Seismic Velocity in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Moon, S.; Meng, L.; Davis, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Near-surface seismic velocity is commonly used to determine subsurface rock structure, properties, and ground-motion amplification. The spatial distribution of Vs30 (shear-wave seismic velocity in the top 30 m of Earth's crust) has been inferred based on the correlations of measured Vs30 with rock types and topographic slopes. Inference of Vs30 based on topographic slopes relies on the assumption that mechanically strong rocks tend to have steep slopes. The topographic slopes can thus be used to infer bedrock strength and seismic velocity. However, due to limited accessibility and logistical difficulties, there are few Vs30 measurements in sites of crystalline rocks that have measurable topographic variations. Thus, the variability of Vs30 with topographic slope for crystalline rocks has not been addressed systematically. In order to examine the local variabilities in near-surface seismic velocity in southern California, we measured the spatial distributions of near-surface seismic velocity at two sites: one in the San Gabriel Mountains (SGM) and one in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Both sites are composed of predominantly crystalline rocks with topographic slopes that range from 0.2 to 0.5. We conducted seismic refraction surveys using sledgehammer-induced impacts on a steel plate along seismic lines that were oriented roughly N-S, 240 m in length with a spacing of 5 m, and with topographic variation including both a local hilltop and valley. Using first P-wave arrivals, we constructed a P-wave seismic tomography down to 50 m. Our results show that P-wave seismic velocity in the SGM site varies significantly within hillslopes and does not linearly correlate with slope, while P-wave seismic velocity in the SBM site shows little variation in the hillslope. In the SGM site, the Vs30 beneath the valley is 25% faster than the Vs30 beneath the hillslope. These results suggest that the local variability of seismic velocity depends on differences in sediment

  15. On the weakly nonlinear, transversal vibrations of a conveyor belt with a low and time-varying velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suweken, G.; van Horssen, W.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the weakly nonlinear, transversal vibrations of a conveyor belt will be considered. The belt is assumed to move with a low and time-varying speed. Using Kirchhoff's approach a single equation of motion will be derived from a coupled system of partial differential equations describing

  16. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For $R_0 = 8$ kpc, the models have stellar mass $5 < M_* < 6 \\times 10^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$, scale length $2.0 \\le R_d \\le 2.9$ kpc, LSR circular velocity $222 \\le \\Theta_0 \\le 233$ km s$^{-1}$, and solar circle stellar surface density $34 \\le \\Sigma_d(R_0) \\le 61$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The present inter-arm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus A...

  17. Effect of ion excape velocity and conversion surface material on H- production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kenneth F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarvainen, Olli A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geros, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stelzer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rouleau, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kalvas, T. [UNIV OF JYVASKYLA; Komppula, J. [UNIV OF JYASKYLA; Carmichael, J. [ORNL

    2010-10-05

    According to generally accepted models surface production of negative ions depends on ion escape velocity and work function of the surface. We have conducted an experimental study addressing the role of the ion escape velocity on H{sup -} production. A converter-type ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center was employed for the experiment. The ion escape velocity was changed by varying the bias voltage of the converter electrode. It was observed that due to enhanced stripping of H{sup -} no direct gain of extracted beam current can be achieved by increasing the converter voltage. At the same time the conversion efficiency of H{sup -} was observed to vary with converter voltage and follow the existing theories in qualitative manner. We discuss the role of surface material on H{sup -} formation probability and present calculations predicting relative H{sup -} yields from different cesiated surfaces. These calculations are compared with experimental observations from different types of H{sup -} ion sources. The effects caused by varying cesium coverage are also discussed. Finally, we present a novel idea of utilizing materials exhibiting so-called negative electron affinity in H{sup -}/D{sup -} production under UV-light exposure.

  18. EFFECTS OF A SAND RUNNING SURFACE ON THE KINEMATICS OF SPRINTING AT MAXIMUM VELOCITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P E Alcaraz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Performing sprints on a sand surface is a common training method for improving sprint-specific strength. For maximum specificity of training the athlete’s movement patterns during the training exercise should closely resemble those used when performing the sport. The aim of this study was to compare the kinematics of sprinting at maximum velocity on a dry sand surface to the kinematics of sprinting on an athletics track. Five men and five women participated in the study, and flying sprints over 30 m were recorded by video and digitized using biomechanical analysis software. We found that sprinting on a sand surface was substantially different to sprinting on an athletics track. When sprinting on sand the athletes tended to ‘sit’ during the ground contact phase of the stride. This action was characterized by a lower centre of mass, a greater forward lean in the trunk, and an incomplete extension of the hip joint at take-off. We conclude that sprinting on a dry sand surface may not be an appropriate method for training the maximum velocity phase in sprinting. Although this training method exerts a substantial overload on the athlete, as indicated by reductions in running velocity and stride length, it also induces detrimental changes to the athlete’s running technique which may transfer to competition sprinting.

  19. A Study of DC Surface Plasma Discharge in Absence of Free Airflow: Ionic Wind Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study we are interested with the DC (Direct Current electric corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. We present experimental results related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the DC corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. We used different geometrical forms of dielectric surface such as a plate, a cylinder and a wing of aircraft of type NACA 0015. We present the current density-electric filed characteristics for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces non-thermal plasma so that it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. We have measured the ionic wind induced by the corona discharge in absence of free external airflow, we give the ionic wind velocity profiles for different surface forms and we compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity values. We notice that the maximum ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  20. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schr€odinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  1. Vibrational properties of Cu(100)-c(2×2)-Pd surface and subsurface alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2003-07-01

    Using interaction potentials from the embedded-atom method we investigated the structural and vibrational properties of a Cu(100)-c(2×2)-Pd surface alloy and an underlayer c(2×2) alloy with a mixed CuPd second layer. The calculated surface phonon frequencies are in agreement with the experimental values obtained by electron energy-loss spectroscopy. From the calculated local phonon densities of states we find that surface effects are most pronounced in the first two layers for both systems studied. The results also indicate a very strong Pd-Cu bonding accompanied by a weaker bonding of the Cu surface atoms to their nearest neighbors. This has considerable influence on the surface phonon frequencies.

  2. Spreading and atomization of droplets on a vibrating surface in a standing pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepu, P.; Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    We report the first observation and analytical model of deformation and spreading of droplets on a vibrating surface under the influence of an ultrasonic standing pressure field. The standing wave allows the droplet to spread, and the spreading rate varies inversely with viscosity. In low viscosity droplets, the synergistic effect of radial acoustic force and the transducer surface acceleration also leads to capillary waves. These unstable capillary modes grow to cause ultimate disintegration into daughter droplets. We find that using nanosuspensions, spreading and disintegration can be prevented by suppressing the development of capillary modes and subsequent break-up.

  3. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  4. Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over typical underlying surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over Gobi and mobile sand surface have been investigated experimentally in the wind tunnel. The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the relation- ship between pulsatory characteristics of instantaneous wind speed in sand flow and the motion state of sand grains. For a given underlying surface, pulsation of wind velocities in sand flow on different heights has a good correlation. As the space distance among different heights increases, fluctuation of instantaneous wind speed presents a decreasing trend and its amplitude is closely related to the mo- tion state of sand grains and their transport. Pulsatory intensity increases with the indicated wind speed, but its relative value does not depend on it, only agrees with height.

  5. EXPLOITING SENTINEL-1 AMPLITUDE DATA FOR GLACIER SURFACE VELOCITY FIELD MEASUREMENTS: FEASIBILITY DEMONSTRATION ON BALTORO GLACIER

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nascetti; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed ...

  6. Tactile Perception and Friction-Induced Vibrations: Discrimination of Similarly Patterned Wood-Like Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacleu Ndengue, Jessica; Cesini, B Ilaria; Faucheu, C Jenny; Chatelet, D Eric; Zahouani, E Hassan; Delafosse, F David; Massi, G Francesco

    2016-12-22

    The tactile perception of a surface texture is mediated by factors such as material, topography and vibrations induced by the sliding contact. In this paper, sensory characterizations are developed together with topographical and tribo-tactile characterizations to relate perceived features with objective measurements of tribological and dynamic signals. Two sets of surface samples are used in this study: the first set is made of a commercial floor covering tiles that aim at counter-typing natural wood flooring, with both a visual and a tactile texture mimicking wood. A second set is custom-made by replicating the first set using a plain purple polyurethane resin. The comparison between tribo-tactile signals and sensory analysis allowed the identification of objective indices for textures with slight topographical differences. Even though the topography of the replicated samples is the same as their corresponding commercial products, the fact that the material is different, induces differences in the contact and vibrational parameters. This in turn modifies the discrimination performances during the sensory experiment. Tactile characteristics collected during sensory procedures are found to be in agreement with objective indices such as friction coefficients and induced vibrations.

  7. Dynamics and mass balance of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica: 1. Geometry and surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, J. L.; Cuffey, K. M.; Morse, D. L.; Conway, H.; Rignot, E.

    2009-11-01

    Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, exemplifies a little-studied type of outlet glacier, one that flows slowly through a region of rugged topography and dry climate. This glacier, in addition, connects the East Antarctic Ice Sheet with the McMurdo Dry Valleys, a region much studied for geomorphology, paleoclimate, and ecology. Here we report extensive new measurements of surface velocities, ice thicknesses, and surface elevations, acquired with InSAR, GPS, and GPR. The latter two were used to construct elevation models of the glacier's surface and bed. Ice velocities in 2002-2004 closely matched those in 2000 and the mid-1970s, indicating negligible interannual variations of flow. Comparing velocities with bed elevations shows that, along much of the glacier, flow concentrates in a narrow axis of relatively fast flowing ice that overlies a bedrock trough. The flow of the glacier over major undulations in its bed can be regarded as a “cascade” it speeds up over bedrock highs and through valley narrows and slows down over deep basins and in wide spots. This pattern is an expected consequence of mass conservation for a glacier near steady state. Neither theory nor data from this Taylor Glacier study support the alternative view, recently proposed, that an outlet glacier of this type trickles slowly over bedrock highs and flows fastest over deep basins.

  8. Surface Ice Velocity Retrieval From MOA Based On NCC Feature Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Liu, Y.; Cheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    The velocity of glacier in Antarctica is a fundamental parameter to ice dynamics and projection of sea level rise, and it is as well the key indicator of global climate change. COSI-Corr, an extension of ENVI software, was employed to acquire the horizontal velocity of ice flows throughout the whole Antarctica continent from 2003-2004 and 2008-2009 MOA (MODIS Mosaic of Antarctica) compiled by NSIDC. However, conventional tracking methods severely suffer from spurious matching resulting from ice surface's variation, illumination condition, inappropriate window size etc. So it is indispensable to correct the initial output field contaminated by noises before extracting valuable information. Usually, the low-SNR areas, which denote quite poor quality, are filtered out directly based on some roles of thumb. Here we have some experiments to test performance of FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and SVD (Singularity Value Decomposition) of optimizing the estimation by cutting image into overlapped tiles. Validation was conducted by comparing the final result with respect to MEaSUREs in typical flow areas including inland stream and ice shelves. The primitive results shows that both methods can reduce RMSE to an extent of 20% 40% but FFT performs more robust. Our result shows that MOA datasets, which highlight true surface morphology, have potential for continental ice surface velocity's retrieval.

  9. Vibrations and potential energy surfaces (with Argonne V18) of4He and3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    A potential energy surface is constructed for3,4He with the two-body Argonne V18 potential. The minimization suggests a semi-rigid asymmetric top structure for4He, where the appropriate pointgroup symmetry is C 2. We calculate the Hessian matrix, determining the 6 normal modes of vibration (in the range 300-700 MeV). The breathing mode is found to lie at too high an energy to be observable and the nature of the {0}2+ excited states of the alpha particle at 20 MeV should probably be sought elsewhere. Similar investigations have been carried out for the A=3 system, finding a planar Cs configuration (scalene triangle) and three excited vibrational states (in the range 600-1900 MeV).

  10. Remote vibration measurement: a wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Ballandras, S; Alzuaga, S; Martin, G; Sandoz, P

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  11. Effects of surface topography and vibrations on wetting: Superhydrophobicity, icephobicity and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul

    Concrete and metallic materials are widely used in construction and water industry. The interaction of both these materials with water and ice (or snow) produces undesirable results and is therefore of interest. Water that gets absorbed into the pores of dry concrete expands on freezing and can lead to crack formation. Also, the ice accretion on concrete surfaces such as roadways can have disastrous consequence. Metallic components used in the water industry undergo corrosion due to contact with aqueous corrosive solutions. Therefore, it is desirable to make concrete water/ice-repellent, and to make metallic surfaces corrosion-resistant. Recent advances in micro/nanotechnology have made it possible to design functional micro/nanostructured surfaces with micro/nanotopography providing low adhesion. Some examples of such surfaces are superhydrophobic surfaces, which are extremely water repellent, and icephobic surfaces, which have low ice adhesion, repel incoming water droplets before freezing, or delay ice nucleation. This dissertation investigates the effects of surface micro/nanotopography and small amplitude fast vibrations on the wetting and adhesion of concrete with the goal of producing hydrophobic and icephobic concrete, and on the wetting of metallic surfaces to prevent corrosion. The relationship between surface micro/nanotopography and small fast vibrations is established using the method of separation of motions. Both these small scale effects can be substituted by an effective force or energy. The structure-property relationships in materials and surfaces are established. Both vibrations as well as surface micro/nanopatterns can affect wetting properties such as contact angle and surface free energy. Hydrophobic engineered cementitious composite samples are produced by controlling their surface topography and surface free energy. The surface topography is controlled by varying the concrete mixture composition. The surface free energy of concrete is

  12. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  13. The Characteristics of Near-surface Velocity During the Upwelling Season on the Northern Portugal Shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Observations made on the northern Portugal mid-shelf between May 13 and June 15, 2002 were used to characterise the near-surface velocity during one upwelling season. It was found that in the surface mixed layer, the 'tidal current' was diurnal, but the tidal elevation was semi-diurnal. Both the residual current and the major axes of all tidal constituents were nearly perpendicular to the isobaths and the tidal current ellipses rotated clockwise; the major axis of the major tidal ellipse was about 3 cm s-1. The extremely strong diurnal current in the surface layer was probably due to diurnal heating, cooling, and wind mixing that induced diurnal oscillations, including the diurnal oscillation of wind stress. This is a case different from the results measured in the other layers in this area. The near-inertial spectral peaks occurred with periods ranging from 1 047 min to 1 170 min, the longest periods being observed in deeper layers, and the shortest in the surface layer. Weak inertial events appeared during strong upwelling events, while strong inertial events appeared during downwelling or weak subinertial events. The near-inertial currents were out of phase between 5 m and 35 m layers for almost the entire measurement period, but such relationship was very weak during periods of irregular weak wind. Strong persistent southerly wind blew from May 12 to 17 and forced a significant water transport onshore and established a strong barotropic poleward jet with a surface speed exceeding 20 cm s-1. The subinertial current was related to wind variation, especially in the middle layers of 15 m and 35 m, the maximum correlation between alongshore current and alongshore wind was about 0.5 at the 5 m layer and 0.8 at the 35 m layer. The alongshore current reacted more rapidly than the cross-shore current. The strongest correlation was found at a time lag of 20 h in the upper layer and of 30 h in the deeper layer. The wind-driven surface velocity obtained from the PWP model

  14. Identification of surface species by vibrational normal mode analysis. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jian; Genest, Alexander; Rösch, Notker

    2017-10-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is an important experimental tool for identifying molecular species adsorbed on a metal surface that can be used in situ. Often vibrational modes in such IR spectra of surface species are assigned and identified by comparison with vibrational spectra of related (molecular) compounds of known structure, e. g., an organometallic cluster analogue. To check the validity of this strategy, we carried out a computational study where we compared the normal modes of three C2Hx species (x = 3, 4) in two types of systems, as adsorbates on the Pt(111) surface and as ligands in an organometallic cluster compound. The results of our DFT calculations reproduce the experimental observed frequencies with deviations of at most 50 cm-1. However, the frequencies of the C2Hx species in both types of systems have to be interpreted with due caution if the coordination mode is unknown. The comparative identification strategy works satisfactorily when the coordination mode of the molecular species (ethylidyne) is similar on the surface and in the metal cluster. However, large shifts are encountered when the molecular species (vinyl) exhibits different coordination modes on both types of substrates.

  15. Surface and thermal effects on vibration of embedded alumina nanobeams based on novel Timoshenko beam model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B AMIRIAN; R HOSSEINI-ARA; H MOOSAVI

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the free vibration analysis of circular alumina (Al2O3) nanobeams in the presence of surface and thermal effects resting on a Pasternak foun-dation. The system of motion equations is derived using Hamilton’s principle under the assumptions of the classical Timoshenko beam theory. The effects of the transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are also considered within the framework of the mentioned theory. The separation of variables approach is employed to discretize the governing equa-tions which are then solved by an analytical method to obtain the natural frequencies of the alumina nanobeams. The results show that the surface effects lead to an increase in the natural frequency of nanobeams as compared with the classical Timoshenko beam model. In addition, for nanobeams with large diameters, the surface effects may increase the natural frequencies by increasing the thermal effects. Moreover, with regard to the Pasternak elastic foundation, the natural frequencies are increased slightly. The results of the present model are compared with the literature, showing that the present model can capture correctly the surface effects in thermal vibration of nanobeams.

  16. Experimental study of the free surface velocity field in an asymmetrical confluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelle, Stephan; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schindfessel, Laurent; De Mulder, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of open channel confluences is highly complex because of the combination of different processes that interact with each other. To gain further insights in how the velocity uniformization between the upstream channels and the downstream channel is proceeding, experiments are performed in a large scale 90 degree angled concrete confluence flume with a chamfered rectangular cross-section and a width of 0.98m. The dimensions and lay-out of the flume are representative for a prototype scale confluence in e.g. drainage and irrigation systems. In this type of engineered channels with sharp corners the separation zone is very large and thus the velocity difference between the most contracted section and the separation zone is pronounced. With the help of surface particle tracking velocimetry the velocity field is recorded from upstream of the confluence to a significant distance downstream of the confluence. The resulting data allow to analyze the evolution of the incoming flows (with a developed velocity profile) that interact with the stagnation zone and each other, causing a shear layer between the two bulk flows. Close observation of the velocity field near the stagnation zone shows that there are actually two shear layers in the vicinity of the upstream corner. Furthermore, the data reveals that the shear layer observed more downstream between the two incoming flows is actually one of the two shear layers next to the stagnation zone that continues, while the other shear layer ceases to exist. The extensive measurement domain also allows to study the shear layer between the contracted section and the separation zone. The shear layers of the stagnation zone between the incoming flows and the one between the contracted flow and separation zone are localized and parameters such as the maximum gradient, velocity difference and width of the shear layer are calculated. Analysis of these data shows that the shear layer between the incoming flows

  17. Nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria with different cell-wall properties adhering to surfaces under flow and static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-26

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of the cell surfaces and dissipation shifts measured upon bacterial adhesion in a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D). Experiments were conducted with six bacterial strains with pairwise differences in cell surface characteristics. Vibrational amplitudes were highest in low ionic strength suspensions. Under fluid flow, vibrational amplitudes were lower in the direction of flow than perpendicular to it because stretching of cell surface polymers in the direction of flow causes stiffening of the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium. Under static conditions (0.57 mM), vibrational amplitudes of fibrillated Streptococcus salivarius HB7 (145 nm) were higher than that of a bald mutant HB-C12 (76 nm). Amplitudes of moderately extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) producing Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC35983 (47 nm) were more than twice the amplitudes of strongly EPS producing S. epidermidis ATCC35984 (21 nm). No differences were found between Staphylococcus aureus strains differing in membrane cross-linking. High vibrational amplitudes corresponded with low dissipation shifts in QCM-D. In streptococci, the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium is formed by fibrillar surface appendages and spring constants derived from vibrational amplitudes decreased with increasing fibrillar density. In staphylococci, EPS constitutes the main network component, and larger amounts of EPS yielded higher spring constants. Spring constants increased with increasing ionic strength and strains with smaller electrophoretically derived bacterial cell surface softnesses possessed the highest spring constants.

  18. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  19. Active tectonics of northwestern U.S. inferred from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert McCaffrey; Robert W. King; Suzette J. Payne; Matthew Lancaster

    2013-02-01

    Surface velocities derived from GPS observations from 1993 to 2011 at several hundred sites across the deforming northwestern United States are used to further elucidate the region's active tectonics. The new velocities reveal that the clockwise rotations, relative to North America, seen in Oregon and western Washington from earlier GPS observations, continue to the east to include the Snake River Plain of Idaho and south into the Basin and Range of northern Nevada. Regional-scale rotation is attributed to gravitationally driven extension in the Basin and Range and Pacific-North America shear transferred through the Walker Lane belt aided by potentially strong pinning below the Idaho Batholith. The large rotating section comprising eastern Oregon displays very low internal deformation rates despite seismological evidence for a thin crust, warm mantle, organized mantle flow, and elevated topography. The observed disparity between mantle and surface kinematics suggests that either little stress acts between them (low basal shear) or that the crust is strong relative to the mantle. The rotation of the Oregon block impinges on Washington across the Yakima fold-thrust belt where shortening occurs in a closing-fan style. Elastic fault locking at the Cascadia subduction zone is reevaluated using the GPS velocities and recently published uplift rates. The 18 year GPS and 80 year leveling data can both be matched with a common locking model suggesting that the locking has been stable over many decades. The rate of strain accumulation is consistent with hundreds of years between great subduction events.

  20. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  1. Adsorption and Vibration of Cl Atoms on Ni Low-index Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential(5-MP) of the interactions between Cl atoms and Ni surfaces was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of Cl atoms on Ni low index-surfaces were investigated with 5-MP in detail. All the critical characteristics of the system, such as adsorption site, adsorption geometry, binding energy, eigenvalues for vibration, etc. were obtained. The calculated results show that chlorine atoms are likely to be adsorbed on the high symmetry sites. Cl atoms locate on the four-fold hollow sites of the intact Ni(100) surface, while they tend to occupy three-fold sites on the Ni(111) surface. The four-fold hollow sites are the most stable adsorption sites on the Ni(110) surface for Cl, although the three-fold sites and the long-bridge sites are stable adsorption sites on the Ni(110) surface for the atoms of the first and second periods. For the Cl-Ni surface adsorption system, the surface binding energy of a Cl atom is relevant to the coarse degree of the cluster surface, and the binding energies have an order of Ni(111)<Ni(100)<Ni(110).

  2. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  3. An experimental study on low-velocity low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, C.; Murdoch, N.; Mimoun, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) is scheduled to launch the asteroid sample-return mission, Hayabusa-2, to target body 1999 JU_3 in December 2014 [1]. The spacecraft will arrive at the C-type near-Earth asteroid in mid-2018 and deploy several science payloads to its surface. Among these payloads is a 10-kg lander, the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT), provided by the German Space Agency (DLR) with cooperation from the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). MASCOT will reach the asteroid's surface with an anticipated impact speed of 10--20 cm/s. In addition to housing four instruments for in-situ science investigation, MASCOT contains a mobility mechanism that will correct its orientation and enable it to ''hop'' to various measurement sites [2]. Based on thermal infrared observations [3,4,5] and previous space missions [6,7], it is strongly believed that 1999 JU_3 is covered by loose regolith. The asteroid's granular surface, in combination with the low surface gravity, makes it difficult to predict the lander's collision behavior from existing theoretical models. However, to ensure that MASCOT can successfully fulfill its mission, it is vital to understand the rebound dynamics of the lander in the asteroid surface environment. The objective of this work, derived from the needs of current and future asteroid missions, is to present an experiment designed to study low-velocity, low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces. The experiment measures the amount of energy lost during impact via a projectile's coefficient of restitution and also the acceleration profile of the projectile during collision. The key challenge to designing an asteroid collision experiment is finding a way to simulate reduced gravity conditions on the Earth so that the prevailing forces in micro-gravity collisions can be reflected in the experimental results. The proposed way to achieve this goal is to let a free-falling projectile impact a surface with a constant downward

  4. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  5. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  6. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  7. Ab initio tensorial electronic friction for molecules on metal surfaces: Nonadiabatic vibrational relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Askerka, Mikhail; Batista, Victor S.; Tully, John C.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces exchange energy with substrate phonons and low-lying electron-hole pair excitations. In the limit of weak coupling, electron-hole pair excitations can be seen as exerting frictional forces on adsorbates that enhance energy transfer and facilitate vibrational relaxation or hot-electron-mediated chemistry. We have recently reported on the relevance of tensorial properties of electronic friction [M. Askerka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217601 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.217601] in dynamics at surfaces. Here we present the underlying implementation of tensorial electronic friction based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory for condensed phase and cluster systems. Using local atomic-orbital basis sets, we calculate nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements and evaluate the full electronic friction tensor in the Markov limit. Our approach is numerically stable and robust, as shown by a detailed convergence analysis. We furthermore benchmark the accuracy of our approach by calculation of vibrational relaxation rates and lifetimes for a number of diatomic molecules at metal surfaces. We find friction-induced mode-coupling between neighboring CO adsorbates on Cu(100) in a c (2 ×2 ) overlayer to be important for understanding experimental findings.

  8. Gold micro- and nano-particles for surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of pyridostigmine bromide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Fesenko, Olena; Kavelin, Vladyslav

    2017-01-01

    Triangular gold microprisms and spherical silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands were examined as an active nanostructures for the surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy. These particles were probed for the detection of pyridostigmine bromide as a safe analog of military...... compound sarin. Raman and infrared spectral bands of the pyridostigmine bromide were measured. Detailed correlation of obtained spectral bands with specific vibrations in pyridostigmine bromide was done. Silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands showed more essential enhancement of the Raman...

  9. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  10. Optical multi-frequency swept sensing for wide-field vibration measurement of interior surfaces in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S.; Nin, F.; Hibino, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multifrequency sensing technique adopting the wide field heterodyne detection technique is demonstrated for interior surface vibration measurements in thick biological tissue. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. The axial resolution and the accuracy of vibration amplitude measurement were estimated to be 2.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively. This wide-field tomographic sensing method can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research.

  11. Vibrational Spectra and Potential Energy Surface for Electronic Ground State of Jet-Cooled Molecule S2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Yan; DING Shi-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The vibration states of transition molecule S2O, including both bending and stretching vibrations, are studied in the framework of dynamical symmetry groups U1(4) U2(4). We get all the vibration spectra of S2O by fitting 22 spectra data with 10 parameters. The fitting rms of the Hamiltonian is 2.12 cm-1. With the parameters and Lie algebraic theory, we give the analytical expression of the potential energy surface, which helps us to calculate the dissociation energy and force constants of S2O in the electronic ground state.

  12. The influence of surface on the running velocities of elite and amateur orienteer athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, K; Jensen, K; Mourot, L; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-12-01

    We compared the reduction in running velocities from road to off-road terrain in eight elite and eight amateur male orienteer athletes to investigate whether this factor differentiates elite from amateur athletes. On two separate days, each subject ran three 2-km time trials and three 20-m sprints "all-out" on a road, on a path, and in a forest. On a third day, the running economy and maximal aerobic power of individuals were assessed on a treadmill. The elite orienteer ran faster than the amateur on all three surfaces and at both distances, in line with their better running economy and aerobic power. In the forest, the elites ran at a slightly higher percentage of their 2-km (∼3%) and 20-m (∼4%) road velocities. Although these differences did not exhibit traditional statistical significance, magnitude-based inferences suggested likely meaningful differences, particularly during 20-m sprinting. Of course, cognitive, mental, and physical attributes other than the ability to run on different surfaces are required for excellence in orienteering (e.g., a high aerobic power). However, we suggest that athlete-specific assessment of running performance on various surfaces and distances might assist in tailoring training and identifying individual strengths and/or weaknesses in an orienteer.

  13. A molecular model of proton neutralization at solid surface: the intermediate velocity region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Nedeljkovic, L.D. (Faculty of Physics, Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)); Janev, R.K. (Inst. of Physics, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Miskovic, Z.L. (Boris Kidric Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1991-06-01

    The proton neutralization (into ground hydrogen state) at solid surface is treated in the normal emergence geometry. For the intermediate proton velocity region (between v{approx equal}1 and 4 a.u.) a new, molecular-type dynamic model of the process is proposed. Evaluation of the electron transition amplitude is based on an elaboration of the Demkov-Ostrovsky method. The calculation showed that the electron transitions have a nonresonant character. Comparison with experiments leads to the conclusion that the electron capture into ground state is almost sufficient to explain the experiment data. (orig.).

  14. Precise parameterization of the recombination velocity at passivated phosphorus doped surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmerle, Achim, E-mail: achim-kimmerle@gmx.de; Momtazur Rahman, Md.; Werner, Sabrina; Mack, Sebastian; Wolf, Andreas; Richter, Armin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Haug, Halvard [Institute for Energy Technology, Instituttveien 18, 2007 Kjeller (Norway)

    2016-01-14

    We investigate the surface recombination velocity S{sub p} at the silicon-dielectric interface of phosphorus-doped surfaces for two industrially relevant passivation schemes for crystalline silicon solar cells. A broad range of surface dopant concentrations together with a high accuracy of evaluating the latter is achieved by incremental back-etching of the surface. The analysis of lifetime measurements and the simulation of the surface recombination consistently apply a set of well accepted models, namely, the Auger recombination by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 1–14 (2012)], the carrier mobility by Klaassen [Solid-State Electron. 35, 953–959 (1992); 35, 961–967 (1992)], the intrinsic carrier concentration for undoped silicon by Altermatt et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 93, 1598–1604 (2003)], and the band-gap narrowing by Schenk [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3684–3695 (1998)]. The results show an increased S{sub p} at textured in respect to planar surfaces. The obtained parameterizations are applicable in modern simulation tools such as EDNA [K. R. McIntosh and P. P. Altermatt, in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (2010), pp. 1–6], PC1Dmod [Haug et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 131, 30–36 (2014)], and Sentaurus Device [Synopsys, Sentaurus TCAD, Zürich, Switzerland] as well as in the analytical solution under the assumption of local charge neutrality by Cuevas et al. [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 40, 1181–1183 (1993)].

  15. Precise parameterization of the recombination velocity at passivated phosphorus doped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmerle, Achim; Momtazur Rahman, Md.; Werner, Sabrina; Mack, Sebastian; Wolf, Andreas; Richter, Armin; Haug, Halvard

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the surface recombination velocity Sp at the silicon-dielectric interface of phosphorus-doped surfaces for two industrially relevant passivation schemes for crystalline silicon solar cells. A broad range of surface dopant concentrations together with a high accuracy of evaluating the latter is achieved by incremental back-etching of the surface. The analysis of lifetime measurements and the simulation of the surface recombination consistently apply a set of well accepted models, namely, the Auger recombination by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 1-14 (2012)], the carrier mobility by Klaassen [Solid-State Electron. 35, 953-959 (1992); 35, 961-967 (1992)], the intrinsic carrier concentration for undoped silicon by Altermatt et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 93, 1598-1604 (2003)], and the band-gap narrowing by Schenk [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3684-3695 (1998)]. The results show an increased Sp at textured in respect to planar surfaces. The obtained parameterizations are applicable in modern simulation tools such as EDNA [K. R. McIntosh and P. P. Altermatt, in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (2010), pp. 1-6], PC1Dmod [Haug et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 131, 30-36 (2014)], and Sentaurus Device [Synopsys, Sentaurus TCAD, Zürich, Switzerland] as well as in the analytical solution under the assumption of local charge neutrality by Cuevas et al. [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 40, 1181-1183 (1993)].

  16. Sensitivities of surface wave velocities to the medium parameters in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth and inversion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar N. Bhattacharya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity kernels or partial derivatives of phase velocity (c and group velocity (U with respect to medium parameters are useful to interpret a given set of observed surface wave velocity data. In addition to phase velocities, group velocities are also being observed to find the radial anisotropy of the crust and mantle. However, sensitivities of group velocity for a radially anisotropic Earth have rarely been studied. Here we show sensitivities of group velocity along with those of phase velocity to the medium parameters VSV, VSH , VPV, VPH , h and density in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth. The peak sensitivities for U are generally twice of those for c; thus U is more efficient than c to explore anisotropic nature of the medium. Love waves mainly depends on VSH while Rayleigh waves is nearly independent of VSH . The sensitivities show that there are trade-offs among these parameters during inversion and there is a need to reduce the number of parameters to be evaluated independently. It is suggested to use a nonlinear inversion jointly for Rayleigh and Love waves; in such a nonlinear inversion best solutions are obtained among the model parameters within prescribed limits for each parameter. We first choose VSH, VSV and VPH within their corresponding limits; VPV and h can be evaluated from empirical relations among the parameters. The density has small effect on surface wave velocities and it can be considered from other studies or from empirical relation of density to average P-wave velocity.

  17. Collisional Processing of Comet and Asteroid Surfaces: Velocity Effects on Absorption Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Smith, D. C.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged where 3.9 Gyr ago, a violent reshuffling reshaped the placement of small bodies in the solar system (the Nice model). Surface properties of these objects may have been affected by collisions caused by this event, and by collisions with other small bodies since their emplacement. These impacts affect the spectrographic observations of these bodies today. Shock effects (e.g., planar dislocations) manifest in minerals allowing astronomers to better understand geophysical impact processing that has occurred on small bodies. At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have impacted forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities. We find that the amount of spectral variation, absorption wavelength, and full width half maximum of the absorbance peaks vary non-linearly with the velocity of the impact. We also find that the spectral variation increases with decreasing crystal size (single solid rock versus granular). Future analyses include quantification of the spectral changes with different impactor densities, temperature, and additional impact velocities. Results on diopside, fayalite, and magnesite can be found in Lederer et al., this meeting.

  18. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  19. Estimation of the p-wave velocity profile of elastic real data based on surface wave inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an analytical approach to invert for a smoothly varying near-surface P-wave velocity profile that has a squared slowness linearly decreasing with depth. The exact solution for such a velocity profile in the acoustic approximation can be expressed in terms of Airy functions and

  20. Microscale Controls on Ultrasonic Velocity Dispersion in Near-Surface Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettemy, G. L.

    2006-05-01

    This effort demonstrates a technique to measure poroelastic and petrophysical parameters that can be monitored over time to document diagenetic and consolidation alterations in the shallow biogeosphere. The signatures of these process effects are revealed largely through scale-dependent estimates of porosity, permeability, and the effective framework moduli that describe particle-particle mechanical interactions. Near- surface marine sediments of the Peru margin (ODP Leg 201) provide a unique dataset with which to study such near-surface processes, especially those associated with depositional, tectonic, and biogeochemical dynamics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image analysis and broadband (100-1000 kHz) ultrasonic compressional wave experiments are combined to interpret the microscale parameters revealed through velocity dispersion analysis. In particular, (i) back-scattered electron (BSE) images are processed to estimate the local porosity, tortuosity, and resultant permeability of the characteristic topology of each sample; and (ii) bounds for complex-valued grain and frame moduli, following an amended Biot formulation, are estimated by using the microscale imaging parameters and observed velocity dispersion. Several key results are highlighted, with regard to BSE imaging and velocity dispersion analysis, beyond the imaging and Biot parameter inversion. For example, microscale permeabilities are typically an order-of- magnitude larger than core (~2 cm) measurements. This discrepancy is critical to understanding spatial and temporal scale differences between, for example, diffusion and advection of nutrients supplying microbial communities versus tectonic dewatering and the resulting transient meter-scale pore pressure modulation. Broadband velocity dispersion analysis proves to be a powerful tool for detecting sub-wavelength sedimentological heterogeneity. Negative velocity dispersion, for example, can be used to estimate scatterer dimensions, consistent

  1. An improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean from drifter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Lucas C.; Mariano, Arthur J.; Lumpkin, Rick

    2017-06-01

    This work updates the methods of Lumpkin and Johnson (2013) to obtain an improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean using observations from undrogued and 15-m drogued Global Drifter Program (GDP) drifters. The proposed procedure includes the correction of the slip bias of undrogued drifters, thus recovering about half of the GDP dataset; and a new approach for decomposing Lagrangian data into mean, seasonal and eddy components, which reduces the smoothing of spatial gradients inherent in data binning methods. The sensitivity of the results to method parameters, the method performance relative to other techniques, and the associated estimation errors, are evaluated using statistics calculated for a test dataset consisting of altimeter-derived geostrophic velocities subsampled at the drifter locations, and for the full altimeter-derived geostrophic velocity fields. It is demonstrated that (1) the correction of drifter slip bias produces statistically similar mean velocities for both drogued and undrogued drifter datasets at most latitudes and reduces differences between their variance estimates, (2) the proposed decomposition method produces pseudo-Eulerian mean fields with magnitudes and horizontal scales closer to time-averaged Eulerian observations than other methods, and (3) standard errors calculated for pseudo-Eulerian quantities underestimate the real errors by a factor of almost two. The improved decomposition method and the inclusion of undrogued drifters in the analysis allows resolving details of the time-mean circulation not well defined in the previous version of the climatology, such as the cross-stream structure of western boundary currents, recirculation cells, and zonally-elongated mid-ocean striations.

  2. Vibrational spectrum at a water surface: a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hideaki; Morita, Akihiro

    2012-03-28

    A hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to the calculation of surface orientational structure and vibrational spectrum (second-order nonlinear susceptibility) at the vapor/water interface for the first time. The surface orientational structure of the QM water molecules is consistent with the previous MD studies, and the calculated susceptibility reproduces the experimentally reported one, supporting the previous results using the classical force field MD simulation. The present QM/MM MD simulation also demonstrates that the positive sign of the imaginary part of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility at the lower hydrogen bonding OH frequency region originates not from individual molecular orientational structure, but from cooperative electronic structure through the hydrogen bonding network.

  3. An ab initio potential energy surface and vibrational energy levels of HXeBr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Guo Huang; En Cui Yang; Dai Qian Xie

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional global potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of HXeBr molecule is constructed from morethan 4200 ab initio points. These points are generated using an internally contracted multi-reference configuration interactionmethod with the Davidson correction (icMRCI + Q) and large basis sets. The stabilities and dissociation barriers are identified fromthe potential energy surfaces. The three-body dissociation channel is found to be the dominate dissociation channel for HXeBr.Based on the obtained potentials, low-lying vibrational energy levels of HXeBr calculated using the Lanczos algorithm is found tobe in good agreement with the available experimental band origins.2008 Zheng Guo Huang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of Vibration Machine with Air Flow Excitation and Restrictions on Phase Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Vība, J; Beresņevičs, V; Štāls, L; Eiduks, M; Kovals, E.; Kruusmaa, M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of presented article is to show possibilities of practical use of air or liquid flow in vibration engineering. Dynamics of vibration machine with constant air or liquid flow excitation is considered. In the first part vibration motion of the machine working head under constant air or liquid flow velocity excitation is investigated. The main idea is to find out optimal control law for variation of additional surface area of vibrating object within limits. The criterion of optimiz...

  5. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Velocity Barb (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind velocity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  6. Ice Velocity Mapping of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica by Matching Surface Undulations Measured by Icesat Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Yu, Jaehyung; Scambos, Ted A.; Seo, Ki-Weon

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating the surface horizontal velocity on ice shelves using laser altimetrydata from the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat; 20032009). The method matches undulations measured at crossover points between successive campaigns.

  7. MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF FAMILIAL HYPOKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS - INVASIVE VERSUS SURFACE DETERMINATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; LINKS, TP; ZWARTS, MJ; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1994-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in the brachial biceps muscle was determined in a large family of patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) by both a surface and an invasive method. Other surface EMG parameters and the muscle force were also determined. Both the surface and the inv

  8. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  9. Space Debris Surfaces (Computer Code): Probability of No Penetration Versus Impact Velocity and Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, N.; Meibaum, R.; Olsen, G.

    1995-01-01

    A unique collection of computer codes, Space Debris Surfaces (SD_SURF), have been developed to assist in the design and analysis of space debris protection systems. SD_SURF calculates and summarizes a vehicle's vulnerability to space debris as a function of impact velocity and obliquity. An SD_SURF analysis will show which velocities and obliquities are the most probable to cause a penetration. This determination can help the analyst select a shield design that is best suited to the predominant penetration mechanism. The analysis also suggests the most suitable parameters for development or verification testing. The SD_SURF programs offer the option of either FORTRAN programs or Microsoft-EXCEL spreadsheets and macros. The FORTRAN programs work with BUMPERII. The EXCEL spreadsheets and macros can be used independently or with selected output from the SD_SURF FORTRAN programs. Examples will be presented of the interaction between space vehicle geometry, the space debris environment, and the penetration and critical damage ballistic limit surfaces of the shield under consideration.

  10. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  11. Extraction of bulk generation lifetime and surface generation velocity in high-resistivity silicon by means of gated diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Verzellesi, G; Bosisio, L; Dalla Betta, Gian Franco; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2002-01-01

    We show that the accuracy of the gated diode method for measuring bulk generation lifetime and surface generation velocity in high resistivity silicon depends critically on the gate length of the test device, as a result of nonidealities affecting the gated diode operation. Minimization of the surface generation velocity measurement error requires the gate length to be suitably decreased, while long gate length structures are needed for accurate bulk generation lifetime extraction.

  12. Influence of air velocity on droplet's wetting and evaporation conditions on a flat surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapalowicz, Z. (Technical Univ. of Szczecin (Poland). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    The paper presents results of experimental research on influence of air velocity on characteristic dimensions, spreading ratio and evaporation time of a droplet. The relation between the velocity that initiates droplet's motion and the temperature of the surface has been under research, too, and is presented in the paper as well. The research allows determination of the droplet's rest and motion areas on the wall surface.

  13. A Layer-Stripping Method for 3D Near-Surface Velocity Model Building Using Seismic First-Arrival Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taikun Shi; Jianzhong Zhang; Zhonglai Huang; Changkun Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of 3D near-surface velocity model building, we develop a layer-stripping method using seismic first-arrival times. The velocity model within a Common Mid-Point (CMP) gather is assumed to be stratified into thin layers, and the velocity of each layer var-ies linearly with depth. The thickness and velocity of the top layer are estimated using minimum-offset first-arrival data in a CMP gather. Then the top layer is stripped and the second layer becomes a new top layer. After removing the effect of the top layer from the former first-arrival data, the new first-arrival data are obtained and then used to estimate the parameters of the second layer. In this manner, the velocity model, being regarded as that at a CMP location, is built layer-by-layer from the top to the bottom. A 3D near-surface velocity model is then formed using the velocity models at all CMP locations. The tests on synthetic and observed seismic data show that the layer-stripping method can be used to build good near-surface velocity models for static correction, and its computation speed is ap-proximately hundred times faster than that of grid tomography.

  14. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  15. An ab initio potential energy surface and vibrational states of MgH2(1(1)A').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2004-09-01

    A three-dimensional global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of MgH(2) is constructed from more than 3000 ab initio points calculated using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method with the Davidson correction at the complete basis set limit. Low-lying vibrational energy levels of MgH(2) and MgD(2) are calculated using the Lanczos algorithm, and found to be in good agreement with known experimental band origins. The majority of the vibrational energy levels up to 8000 cm(-1) are assigned with normal mode quantum numbers. However, our results indicate a gradual transition from a normal mode regime for the stretching vibrations at low energies to a local mode regime near 7400 cm(-1), as evidenced by a decreasing energy gap between the (n(1),0,0) and (n(1)-1,0,1) vibrational states and bifurcation of the corresponding wave functions.

  16. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects and can aid in predicting dispersal of materials throughout the ocean or in predicting long-term climate change. Parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of turbulent eddies. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and may take advantage of animations of sea surface height, in which quasi- circular, westward-propagating eddies can easily be seen.

  17. Toe clearance and velocity profiles of young and elderly during walking on sloped surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begg Rezaul K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most falls in older adults are reported during locomotion and tripping has been identified as a major cause of falls. Challenging environments (e.g., walking on slopes are potential interventions for maintaining balance and gait skills. The aims of this study were: 1 to investigate whether or not distributions of two important gait variables [minimum toe clearance (MTC and foot velocity at MTC (VelMTC] and locomotor control strategies are altered during walking on sloped surfaces, and 2 if altered, are they maintained at two groups (young and elderly female groups. Methods MTC and VelMTC data during walking on a treadmill at sloped surfaces (+3°, 0° and -3° were analysed for 9 young (Y and 8 elderly (E female subjects. Results MTC distributions were found to be positively skewed whereas VelMTC distributions were negatively skewed for both groups on all slopes. Median MTC values increased (Y = 33%, E = 7% at negative slope but decreased (Y = 25%, E = 15% while walking on the positive slope surface compared to their MTC values at the flat surface (0°. Analysis of VelMTC distributions also indicated significantly (p th percentile (Q1 values in the elderly at all slopes. Conclusion The young displayed a strong positive correlation between MTC median changes and IQR (interquartile range changes due to walking on both slopes; however, such correlation was weak in the older adults suggesting differences in control strategies being employed to minimize the risk of tripping.

  18. Phonon transport in silicon nanowires: The reduced group velocity and surface-roughness scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liyan; Li, Baowen; Li, Wu

    2016-09-01

    Using a linear-scaling Kubo simulation approach, we have quantitatively investigated the effects of confinement and surface roughness on phonon transport in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as thick as 55 nm in diameter R . The confinement effect leads to significant reduction of phonon group velocity v in SiNWs compared to bulk silicon except at extremely low phonon frequencies f , which very likely persists in SiNWs several hundreds of nanometers thick, suggesting the inapplicability of bulk properties, including anharmonic phonon scattering, to SiNWs. For instance, the velocity can be reduced by more than 30% for phonons with f >4.5 THz in 55-nm-thick nanowires. In rough SiNWs Casimir's limit, which is valid in confined macroscopic systems, can underestimate the surface scattering by more than one order of magnitude. For a roughness profile with Lorentzian correlation characterized by root-mean-square roughness σ and correlation length Lr, the frequency-dependent phonon diffusivity D follows power-law dependences D ∝Rασ-βLrγ , where α ˜2 and β ˜1 . On average, γ increases from 0 to 0.5 as R /σ increases. The mean free path and the phonon lifetime essentially follow the same power-law dependences. These dependences are in striking contrast to Casimir's limit, i.e., D ˜v R /3 , and manifest the dominant role of the change in the number of atoms due to roughness. The thermal conductivity κ can vary by one order of magnitude with varying σ and Lr in SiNWs, and increasing σ and shortening Lr can efficiently lower κ below Casimir's limit by one order of magnitude. Our work provides different insights to understand the ultralow thermal conductivity of SiNWs reported experimentally and guidance to manipulate κ via surface roughness engineering.

  19. Possible evidence of surface vibration of strange stars from stellar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, S; Bhowmick, S; Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Jishnu; Bhowmick, Mira Dey & Siddhartha

    2004-01-01

    Emission lines in the eV and keV range by certain stellar candidates from their recent analysis invoke the question of their possible origin. These stars under consideration, are the 4U 0614+091 (0.65, 0.86, and 1.31 keV), 2S 0918-549 (0.8 keV with width 55 eV), 4U 1543-624 (0.7 keV), 4U 1850-087 (0.7 keV) and 4U 1820-30 (0.6 and 0.9 keV) and also the 0.6 keV excess emission in RX J170930.2-263927. Recently, it has been suggested that the resonance absorption at ~ in 0.7, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8 keV 1E1207-5209 and 0.35, 0.7 and 1.4 keV RX J1856.5-3754 are due to harmonic surface vibrations in strange stars. We propose that these harmonic vibrations may also responsible for emission lines in the above mentioned compact stellar candidates.

  20. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  1. Study on the nano machining process with a vibrating AFM tip on the polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Weitao [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Yan Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Hu Zhenjiang; Zhao Xuesen; Yan Jiucun; Dong Shen [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2012-01-15

    The polymer has been proved to be nano machined by a vibrating tip in tapping mode of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The force between the tip and the surface is an important factor which determines success of the machining process. Controlling this force with high accuracy is the foundation of nanomachining in AFM tapping mode. To achieve a deeper understanding on this process, the tip is modeled as a driving oscillator with damping. Factors affecting the nano machining process are studied. The Hertz elastic contact theory is used to calculate the maximum contact pressure applied by the tip which is employed as a criterion to judge the deformation state of the sample. The simulation results show that: The driven amplitude can be used as a main parameter of controlling the machined depth. Sharper tips and harder cantilevers should be used for successful nanomachining with the vibrating tip. Under the same conditions, a larger tip radius will not only result in the machining error, but also lead to failure of the nanomachining process. The higher driving frequency will lead to a larger tapping force. However it cannot be used as a parameter to control the machined depth because of its narrow variation range. But it is a main error source for the nanomachining process in AFM tapping mode. Moreover, a larger Young's modulus polymer sample will induce a smaller machined depth, a larger maximum contact pressure and a bigger tapping force.

  2. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in flow depth and surface velocity during a large flood in a steep mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the discharge capacity of channels and changes in hydraulic properties during large storms is essential for prediction of flash floods. However, such information is limited for steep mountain channels because of their complex nature and the lack of measured data. Thus, we obtained detailed water-level and surface-velocity data during large floods of a steep mountain channel, and documented how complex channel morphology affected water flow during large storms. We installed water-level and surface-velocity sensors at a cascade and at a pool that was 10 m downstream at the Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of the University of Tokyo Forests in Japan. We successfully obtained 1-min interval data for a major storm with total precipitation of 288 mm that fell over 59 h and a maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/h. During the storm, height of the water surface from the deepest point of each cross section ranged from 0.35 to 1.57 m and surface velocity ranged from 0.35 to 4.15 m/s. As expected, the changes in flow depth, surface velocity, and velocity profiles were complex and differed even between the cascade and adjacent pool cross sections. Dramatic changes in flow conditions first occurred at the cascade when discharge increased to a certain point, when water suddenly stagnated at the foot of the cascade and submerged flow might have occurred. Thereafter, the water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and the velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. At the downstream pool, where most rocks were submerged at a mean water depth of 0.7 m, surface velocity suddenly increased dramatically and the velocity profile changed as very slow flow developed in the lower portion of the profile, while water levels increased only slightly. When the rainfall diminished, first, the surface velocity markedly declined, then the velocity profile returned to its original state at the pool, and then submerged

  3. Study of near-surface layers of Omerelu area using low velocity layer (LVL method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajani, O.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we have good knowledge of the soil type so as to appreciate the enormous resources we are stepping on. It is more compelling for oil explorationists to know more as this will go a long way to determine the success or failure of search for minerals. Seismic methods give a good overview of a wide area though they involve greater logistics and operational requirements than some other geophysical methods. The purpose of present study is to determine the depth of the weathered layer and velocities of near-surface layers over the investigated area. Twelve sample points were picked with a grid system spread over a perimeter of approximately 4km x 4km. The in-house UpSphere computer program was utilised to analyse and display result in a way that makes final interpretation very easy. This program actually removed the burden of plotting the graphs and the contour maps manually. The depth of weathered layer in the study area varies between 12m and 13m. The velocities of the weathered layer and the consolidated layer vary between 500 m/s – 550 m/s and 1790 m/s – 1875 m/s respectively. Also the dip is in the north east – south west direction.

  4. Techniques for Transition and Surface Temperature Measurements on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities- A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    A research effort to advance techniques for determining transition location and measuring surface temperatures on graphite-tipped projectiles in hypersonic flight in a ballistic range is described. Projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of approx. 4.7 km/sec into air at pressures of 190-570 Torr. Most launches had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.5-5 degrees at pressures of 380 Torr and above and 3-6 degrees at pressures of 190-380 Torr. Arcjet-ablated and machined, bead-blasted projectiles were launched; special cleaning techniques had to be developed for the latter class of projectiles. Improved methods of using helium to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) camera images were taken are described. Two ICCD cameras with a wavelength sensitivity range of 480-870 nm have been used in this program for several years to obtain images. In the last year, a third camera, with a wavelength sensitivity range of 1.5-5 microns [in the infrared (IR)], has been added. ICCD and IR camera images of hemisphere nose and 70 degree sphere-cone nose projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.7 km/sec are presented. The ICCD images clearly show a region of steep temperature rise indicative of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Preliminary temperature data for the graphite projectile noses are presented.

  5. Breakup of a droplet at high velocity impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Tseng, Kun-Cheng; Wang, Ching-Hua

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the collision between a droplet of different liquids with high impact energy and a solid plate with varied surface roughness, which is characterized by a dimensionless Weber number ( We, defined as the impact inertia of the droplet normalized by its surface force) extending up to 12,000 for water. To make such collision, a technique was developed to generate a single droplet with speed up to 42 m/s, which was initially driven by upstream air flow through a nozzle and accelerated to nearly the same velocity of the high-speed flow downstream. Via a high-speed photographing system, the various splashing mechanisms were investigated and a specific prompt splash on a smooth plate was found at sufficiently high We, which was different somehow from the conventionally defined one that was generally believed to occur only on a rough surface. The radius when multiple secondary droplets were shed out of the rim of the expanding lamella was found to scale almost invariantly with We at large values, whereas the coupled effect of liquid viscosity might affect the ultimate value.

  6. Towards vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached colloids performed with a quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diethelm Johannsmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal spheres attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM produce the so-called “coupled resonances”. They are resonators of their own, characterized by a particle resonance frequency, a resonance bandwidth, and a modal mass. When the frequency of the main resonator comes close to the frequency of the coupled resonance, the bandwidth goes through a maximum. A coupled resonance can be viewed as an absorption line in acoustic shear-wave spectroscopy. The known concepts from spectroscopy apply. This includes the mode assignment problem, selection rules, and the oscillator strength. In this work, the mode assignment problem was addressed with Finite Element calculations. These reveal that a rigid sphere in contact with a QCM displays two modes of vibration, termed “slipping” and “rocking”. In the slipping mode, the sphere rotates about its center; it exerts a tangential force onto the resonator surface at the point of contact. In the rocking mode, the sphere rotates about the point of contact; it exerts a torque onto the substrate. In liquids, both axes of rotation are slightly displaced from their ideal positions. Characteristic for spectroscopy, the two modes do not couple to the mechanical excitation equally well. The degree of coupling is quantified by an oscillator strength. Because the rocking mode mostly exerts a torque (rather than a tangential force, its coupling to the resonator's tangential motion is weak; the oscillator strength consequently is small. Recent experiments on surface-adsorbed colloidal spheres can be explained by the mode of vibration being of the rocking type.

  7. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    -partial differential equations. The spatial component of the governing equations is eliminated using a series expansion of basis functions and by applying Galerkin's method. The number of terms in the series expansion affects the convergence of the spatial component, and convergence is best determined by the von Koch rules that previously appeared for column buckling problems. After elimination of the spatial component, an ordinary integral-differential equation in time remains. The dynamic stability of elastic and viscoelastic problems is assessed using the determinant of the governing system of equations and the time component of the solution in the form exp (lambda t). The determinant is in terms of lambda where the values of lambda are the latent roots of the aero-servo-viscoelastic system. The real component of lambda dictates the stability of the system. If all the real components are negative, the system is stable. If at least one real component is zero and all others are negative, the system is neutrally stable. If one or more real components are positive, the system is unstable. In aero-servo-viscoelasticity, the neutrally stable condition is termed flutter. For an aero-servo-viscoelastic lifting surface, the unstable condition is historically termed torsional divergence. The more general aero-servo-viscoelastic theory has produced a number of important results, enumerated in the following list: 1. Subsonic panel flutter can occur before panel instability. This result overturned a long held assumption in aeroelasticity, and was produced by the novel application of the von Koch rules for convergence. Further, experimental results from the 1950s by the Air Force were retrieved to provide additional proof. 2. An expanded definition for flutter of a lifting surface. The legacy definition is that flutter is the first occurrence of simple harmonic motion of a structure, and the flight velocity at which this motion occurs is taken as the flutter speed. The expanded definition

  8. Advective surface velocity in the north west Pacific derived from NOAA AVHRR images

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Akiyama, M.; Okada, Y.; Sugimori, Y.

    Using sequential AVHRR images in November 1983, nearsurface advective velocities are derived in the region Kuroshio south of Japan. For deriving the velocities two methods are used. One is the Method of Cross Correlation (MCC), using image pair...

  9. Chemical effects on vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules on metal surfaces: Coverage dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vibrational properties of chemisorbed molecules on metal surfaces are studied with a focus on the coverage dependent chemical shift of the frequencies. Available experimental data of a CO adsorption on transition metal and noble metal surfaces are analyzed in the light of the coverage dependent back-donation into the 2 π* orbitals of chemisorbed CO molecules. The vibrational frequency ωCO of the intramolecular stretching mode exhibits a downward shift of varying magnitude, depending on the amount of back-donation into the 2 π* orbitals of the chemisorbed CO. On increasing the coverage θ, ωCO usually increases due to the dipole-dipole interaction. On Cu surfaces, however, the shifts are relatively small, or in some cases, negative. So far, this anomalous frequency shift with θ is understood as a result of competitive effect between the upward dipole Ωdip and the downward chemical shift Ωchem associated with back-donation. The purpose of this paper is to establish the possible origin of the downward frequency shift through the electronic properties of an incomplete monolayer of adsorbates. The adsorbate density of states ρa is calculated by means of the coherent potential approximation, in which the electron hopping between the adsorbates (band formation effect) and the depolarization effect due to the proximity of ionized adsorbed molecules are taken into account. The change of the occupied portion of ρa and ρa ( ɛF) at the Fermi level ɛF with increasing θ then manifests itself in the coverage dependent Ωchem not only due to the static back-donation, but also due to the dynamical charge fluctuation during vibrational excitation. It is found that in a weakly chemisorbed system, such as CO/Cu, the negative Ωchem amounts to Ωdip at low θ. Consequently the apparent total frequency shift remains almost constant. As the coverage increases, Ωchem becomes larger than Ωdip due to the band effect. It is also shown that the variation of the back

  10. The Influence Of Initial Velocity Distribution On Ionization Dynamics Of Rydberg Atoms Approaching Solid Surfaces In The Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božnic, D. K.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the ionization dynamics of slow hydrogenlike Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number n >> 1 ) approaching solid surface in a weak electric field. The recently obtained etalon-equation method results for the simulation of experimental signal are used to investigate the influence of the initial velocity distribution. It is demonstrated that an agreement with the experimental signal can be obtained with the broadened velocity distributions.

  11. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  12. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  13. Size-dependent free vibration analysis of rectangular nanoplates with the consideration of surface effects using finite difference method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza karimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, finite difference method (FDM is used to study the size-dependent free vibration characteristics of rectangular nanoplates considering the surface stress effects. To include the surface effects in the equations, Gurtin-Murdoch continuum elasticity approach has been employed. The effects of surface properties including the surface elasticity, surface residual stress and surface mass density are considered to be the main causes for size-dependent behaviors that arise from the increase in surface-to-volume ratios at smaller scales. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the difference between the natural frequency obtained by considering the surface effects and that obtained without considering surface properties. It is observed that the effects of surface properties tend to diminish in thicker nanoplates, and vice versa.

  14. Whole body vibration exercise improves body balance and walking velocity in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate: Galileo and Alendronate Intervention Trail (GAIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, J; Sato, Y; Takeda, T; Matsumoto, H

    2012-09-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the effect of 6 months of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate. Fifty-two ambulatory postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age: 74.2 years, range: 51-91 years) were randomly divided into two groups: an exercise group and a control group. A four-minute WBV exercise was performed two days per week only in the exercise group. No exercise was performed in the control group. All the women were treated with alendronate. After 6 months of the WBV exercise, the indices for flexibility, body balance, and walking velocity were significantly improved in the exercise group compared with the control group. The exercise was safe and well tolerated. The reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen during the 6-month period were comparable between the two groups. The present study showed the benefit and safety of WBV exercise for improving physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate.

  15. Retrieval of sea surface velocities using sequential Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S Prasad; A S Rajawat; Yaswant Pradhan; O S Chauhan; S R Nayak

    2002-09-01

    The Indian remote sensing satellite, IRS-P4 (Oceansat-I) launched on May 26th, 1999 carried two sensors on board, i.e., the Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) and the Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) dedicated for oceanographic research. Sequential data of IRS-P4 OCM has been analysed over parts of both east and west coast of India and a methodology to retrieve sea surface current velocities has been applied. The method is based on matching suspended sediment dispersion patterns, in sequential two time lapsed images. The pattern matching is performed on a pair of atmospherically corrected and geo-referenced sequential images by Maximum Cross-Correlation (MCC) technique. The MCC technique involves computing matrices of cross-correlation coe#cients and identifying correlation peaks. The movement of the pattern can be calculated knowing the displacement of windows required to match patterns in successive images. The technique provides actual flow during a specified period by integrating both tidal and wind influences. The current velocities retrieved were compared with synchronous data collected along the east coast during the GSI cruise ST-133 of R.V. Samudra Kaustubh in January 2000. The current data were measured using the ocean current meter supplied by the Environmental Measurement and CONtrol (EMCON), Kochi available with the Geological Survey of India, Marine Wing. This current meter can measure direction and magnitude with an accuracy of ± 5° and 2% respectively. The measurement accuracies with coefficient of determination (2) of 0.99, for both magnitude (cm.s-1) and direction (deg.) were achieved.

  16. Scaling of granular convective velocity and timescale of asteroidal resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Ando, Kousuke; Morota, Tomokatsu; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    Granular convection is one of the well-known phenomena observed in a vertically vibrated granular bed. Recently, the possbile relation between granular convection and asteroidal surface processes has been discussed. The granular convection on the surface of small asteroids might be induced by seismic vibration resulting from meteorite impacts. To quantitatively evaluate the timescale of asteroidal resurfacing by granular convection, the granular convective velocity under various conditions must be revealed. As a first step to approach this problem, we experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection using a vertically vibrated glass-beads layer. By systematic experiments, a scaling form of granular convective velocity has been obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be written by a power-law product of two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity is almost proportional to gravitatinal acceleration. Using this scaling form, we have estimated the resurfacing timescale on small asteroid surface.

  17. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  18. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  19. Estimation of Elastic Constants from Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity by Inverse Analysis using the Downhill Simplex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Harumichi; Nishino, Hideo; Cho, Hideo; Ogiso, Hisato; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    1998-05-01

    The measurement of surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity is used to estimate the surface properties because the velocity depends on the elastic properties near the surface.To estimate the elastic constants, we developed a new inverse method combining the Monte Carlo method and the downhill simplex method.The initial values are determined using many random numbers, instead of an arbitrarily chosen several sets of values, in order to reduce the risk of trapping by the local pseudo minima.We confirm that the estimated elastic constants agree well with the reported elastic constants of Si and the experimental SAW velocity is quite well reproduced.We estimate the elastic constants of quartz for application purposes.

  20. Bi-objective robust optimization of machined surface quality and productivity under vibrations limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahali M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a bi-objective robust optimization of cutting parameters, with the taking into account uncertainties inherent in the tool wear and the tool deflection for a turning operation is presented. In a first step, we proceed to the construction of substitution models that connect the cutting parameters to the variables of interest based on design of experiments. Our two objectives are the best machined surface quality and the maximum productivity under consideration of limitations related to the vibrations and the range of the three cutting parameters. Then, using the developed genetic algorithm that based on a robust evaluation mechanism of chromosomes by Monte-Carlo simulations, the influence and interest of the uncertainties integration in the machining optimization is demonstrated. After comparing the classical and robust Pareto fronts, A surface quality less efficient but robust can be obtained with the consideration of uncontrollable factors or uncertainties unlike that provides the deterministic and classical optimization for the same values of productivity.

  1. Vibrational fingerprinting of bacterial pathogens by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasiri, W. Ranjith; Moir, D. T.; Ziegler, Lawrence D.

    2005-05-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of vegetative whole-cell bacteria were obtained using in-situ grown gold nanoparticle cluster-covered silicon dioxide substrates excited at 785 nm. SERS spectra of Gram-negative bacteria; E. coli and S. typhimurium, and Gram-positive bacteria; B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringeinsis and B. anthracis Sterne, have been observed. Raman enhancement factors of ~104-105 per cell are found for both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria on this novel SERS substrate. The bacterial SERS spectra are species specific and exhibit greater species differentiation and reduced spectral congestion than their corresponding non-SERS (bulk) Raman spectra. Fluorescence observed in the 785 nm excited bulk Raman emission of Bacillus species is not apparent in the corresponding SERS spectra. The surface enhancement effect allows the observation of Raman spectra at the single cell level excited by low incident laser powers (blood serum, has an observable effect on the bacterial SERS spectra. However, reproducible, species specific SERS vibrational fingerprints are still obtained. The potential of SERS for detection and identification of bacteria with species specificity on these gold nanoparticle coated substrates is demonstrated by these results.

  2. A hidden state space modeling approach for improving glacier surface velocity estimates using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, D.; Schubert, A.; Small, D.; Meier, E.; Lüthi, M. P.; Vieli, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method for glacier surface velocity (GSV) estimates is proposed here which combines ground- and space-based measurements with hidden state space modeling (HSSM). Examples of such a fusion of physical models with remote sensing (RS) observations were described in (Henke & Meier, Hidden State Space Models for Improved Remote Sensing Applications, ITISE 2014, p. 1242-1255) and are currently adapted for GSV estimation. GSV can be estimated using in situ measurements, RS methods or numerical simulations based on ice-flow models. In situ measurements ensure high accuracy but limited coverage and time consuming field work, while RS methods offer regular observations with high spatial coverage generally not possible with in situ methods. In particular, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can obtain useful images independent of daytime and cloud cover. A ground portable radar interferometer (GPRI) is useful for investigating a particular area in more detail than is possible from space, but provides local coverage only. Several processing methods for deriving GSV from radar sensors have been established, including interferometry and offset tracking (Schubert et al, Glacier surface velocity estimation using repeat TerraSAR-X images. ISPRS Journal of P&RS, p. 49-62, 2013). On the other hand, it is also possible to derive glacier parameters from numerical ice-flow modeling alone. Given a well-parameterized model, GSV can in theory be derived and propagated continuously in time. However, uncertainties in the glacier flow dynamics and model errors increase with excessive propagation. All of these methods have been studied independently, but attempts to combine them have only rarely been made. The HSSM we propose recursively estimates the GSV based on 1) a process model making use of temporal and spatial interdependencies between adjacent states, and 2) observations (RS and optional in situ). The in situ and GPRI images currently being processed were acquired in the

  3. Monitoring of surface velocity of hyper-concentrated flow in a laboratory flume by means of fully-digital PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Donatella; Di Leonardo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    High flow conditions, which are generally characterized by high sediment concentrations, do not permit the use of traditional measurement equipment. Traditional techniques usually are based on the intrusive measure of the vertical profile of flow velocity and on the linking of water depth with the discharge through the rating curve. The major disadvantage of these measurement techniques is that they are difficult to use and not safe for operators especially in high flow conditions. The point is that, as literature shows (see as an example Moramarco and Termini, 2015), especially in such conditions, the measurement of surface velocity distribution is important to evaluate the mean flow velocity and, thus, the flow discharge. In the last decade, image-based techniques have been increasingly used for surface velocity measurements (among others Joeau et al., 2008). Experimental program has been recently conducted at the Hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials Engineering (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy) in order to analyze the propagation phenomenon of hyper-concentrated flow in a defense channel. The experimental apparatus includes a high-precision camera and a system allowing the images recording. This paper investigates the utility and the efficiency of the digital image-technique for remote monitoring of surface velocity in hyper-concentrated flow by the aid of data collected during experiments conducted in the laboratory flume. In particular the present paper attention is focused on the estimation procedure of the velocity vectors and on their sensitivity with parameters (number of images, spatial resolution of interrogation area,) of the images processing procedure. References Jodeau M., A. Hauet, A. Paquier, Le Coz J., Dramais G., Application and evaluation of LS-PIV technique for the monitoring of river surface in high flow conditions, Flow Measurements and Instrumentation, Vol.19, No.2, 2008, pp.117

  4. Mitigation of defocusing by statics and near-surface velocity errors by interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2015-08-19

    We propose an interferometric least-squares migration method that can significantly reduce migration artifacts due to statics and errors in the near-surface velocity model. We first choose a reference reflector whose topography is well known from the, e.g., well logs. Reflections from this reference layer are correlated with the traces associated with reflections from deeper interfaces to get crosscorrelograms. These crosscorrelograms are then migrated using interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM). In this way statics and velocity errors at the near surface are largely eliminated for the examples in our paper.

  5. Very low surface recombination velocities on p-type silicon wafers passivated with a dielectric with fixed negative charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostinelli, G.; Delabie, A.; Dekkers, H.F.W.; De Wolf, S.; Beaucarne, G. [IMEC vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Leuven (Belgium); Vitanov, P.; Alexieva, Z. [CL SENES, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-11-23

    Surface recombination velocities as low as 10cm/s have been obtained by treated atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on p-type CZ silicon wafers. Low surface recombination is achieved by means of field induced surface passivation due to a high density of negative charges stored at the interface. In comparison to a diffused back surface field, an external field source allows for higher band bending, that is, a better performance. While this process yields state of the art results, it is not suited for large-scale production. Preliminary results on an industrially viable, alternative process based on a pseudo-binary system containing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are presented, too. With this process, surface recombination velocities of 500-1000cm/s have been attained on mc-Si wafers. (author)

  6. FFT and Wavelet-Based Analysis of the Influence of Machine Vibrations on Hard Turned Surface Topographies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With hard turning, which is an attractive alternative to existing grinding processes, surface quality is of great importance. Signal processing techniques were used to relate workpiece surface topography to the dynamic behavior of the machine tool. Spatial domain frequency analyses based on fast Fourier transform were used to analyze the tool behavior. Wavelet reconstruction was used for profile filtering. The results show that machine vibration remarkably affects the surface topography at small feed rates, but has negligible effect at high feed rates. The analyses also show how to control the surface quality during hard turning.

  7. Wurtzite-Phased InP Micropillars Grown on Silicon with Low Surface Recombination Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Sun, Hao; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-11-11

    The direct growth of III-V nanostructures on silicon has shown great promise in the integration of optoelectronics with silicon-based technologies. Our previous work showed that scaling up nanostructures to microsize while maintaining high quality heterogeneous integration opens a pathway toward a complete photonic integrated circuit and high-efficiency cost-effective solar cells. In this paper, we present a thorough material study of novel metastable InP micropillars monolithically grown on silicon, focusing on two enabling aspects of this technology-the stress relaxation mechanism at the heterogeneous interface and the microstructure surface quality. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy studies show that InP grows directly on silicon without any amorphous layer in between. A set of periodic dislocations was found at the heterointerface, relaxing the 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si. Single crystalline InP therefore can grow on top of the fully relaxed template, yielding high-quality micropillars with diameters expanding beyond 1 μm. An interesting power-dependence trend of carrier recombination lifetimes was captured for these InP micropillars at room temperature, for the first time for micro/nanostructures. By simply combining internal quantum efficiency with carrier lifetime, we revealed the recombination dynamics of nonradiative and radiative portions separately. A very low surface recombination velocity of 1.1 × 10(3) cm/sec was obtained. In addition, we experimentally estimated the radiative recombination B coefficient of 2.0 × 10(-10) cm(3)/sec for pure wurtzite-phased InP. These values are comparable with those obtained from InP bulk. Exceeding the limits of conventional nanowires, our InP micropillars combine the strengths of both nanostructures and bulk materials and will provide an avenue in heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductor materials onto silicon platforms.

  8. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the Effects of Surface Pitting and Wear on the Vibrations of a Gear Transmission System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, F. K.; Polyshchuk, V.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure to simulate and analyze the vibrations in a gear transmission system with surface pitting, 'wear' and partial tooth fracture of the gear teeth is presented. An analytical model was developed where the effects of surface pitting and wear of the gear tooth were simulated by phase and magnitude changes in the gear mesh stiffness. Changes in the gear mesh stiffness were incorporated into each gear-shaft model during the global dynamic simulation of the system. The overall dynamics of the system were evaluated by solving for the transient dynamics of each shaft system simultaneously with the vibration of the gearbox structure. In order to reduce the number of degrees-of-freedom in the system, a modal synthesis procedure was used in the global transient dynamic analysis of the overall transmission system. An FFT procedure was used to transform the averaged time signal into the frequency domain for signature analysis. In addition, the Wigner-Ville distribution was also introduced to examine the gear vibration in the joint time frequency domain for vibration pattern recognition. Experimental results obtained from a gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center were used to evaluate the analytical model.

  10. The surface velocity feature of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The movement of a glacier can redistribute glacier mass balance and change water and thermal conditions of the glacier.Thus,the glacier can maintain its dynamic balance.Surface velocity of a glacier is a basic feature of glacier movement.With successive monthly observations from 2006 to 2008,we obtained spatial and temporal variations for surface velocity of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain.Dynamic simulation was used to verify the findings.Results show that altitudinal distribution of glacier velocity was influenced by synthetic effects such as glacier thickness,slope,and bedrock morphology.However,seasonal variation was influenced by changing glacier thickness.

  11. Vibration and acoustic radiation of a finite cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth from the free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenjie; Li, Tianyun; Zhu, Xiang; Miao, Yuyue; Zhang, Guanjun

    2017-04-01

    The far-field acoustic radiation of a cylindrical shell with finite length submerged at finite depth from the water surface is studied. Two steps are utilized to solve the problem. The first step is to determine the vibration response of the submerged cylindrical shell by using an analytical method and the second one is to determine the far field sound radiation with the boundary element method. To address the vibration responses of the shell analytically, the cylindrical shell and surrounding fluid are described by the Flügge shell equations and Laplace equation in the cylindrical coordinate system respectively. The free surface effect is taken into consideration by using the image method and the Graf's addition theorem. The reliability and efficiency of the present method are validated by comparison with the finite element method. Then, based on the vibration responses of the shell obtained from the first step, the far-field sound pressure is computed by using the boundary element method. It is found that the vibration of the cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth from the free surface tends to be the same as that in infinite fluid when the submerged depth exceeds a certain value. The frequency and the submerged depth have crucial effects on the fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, while for the curve of sound pressure level versus immersion depth, the ratio of the distance between the adjacent peak points of sound pressure to the wavelength is independent of the frequency. Moreover, the petal number of the directivity of the far-field sound pressure increases with the increase of the frequency and the submerged depth. The work provides more understanding on the vibration and acoustic radiation behavior of a finite cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth.

  12. Integral Length and Time Scales of Velocity, Heat and Mass At and Near a Turbulent Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, G. M.; Zappa, C. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence enhances both heat and CO2 gas exchange at a free surface. At the air-water interface, heat and mass transport is controlled by a thin thermal/diffusive boundary layer. Turbulence in the flow acts to thin the heat and mass boundary layers, thereby increasing the rate at which surface water is mixed into the bulk. Surface water is typically cool, and mixing replaces it with warmer water from the bulk. In our experiment, and in many environmental cases, the surface has a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 and carbonate species. . The dissolved gas is transported between the surface and bulk in a similar way to the heat. Because of this similarity, attempts are often made to find and exploit a relationship between the heat and mass transfer. Using a laboratory tank, which generates turbulence with very low mean shear flow, we measured heat and mass transfer by using infrared imagery to map the two-dimensional surface temperature field and by using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to map the two-dimensional subsurface CO2 flux. In addition, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure subsurface velocity fields. A comparative analysis of these results allows us to determine the similarities and differences between heat, mass, and momentum transport at a free surface. This will contribute to the use of one quantity to predict transport of the others. The setup used here, i.e., turbulence with very low mean shear at the surface, allows us to evaluate the turbulent components of interfacial flux in a way that can be applied equally well to flows created by wind, waves, or current. Here, we quantify the integral length and time scales of the surface temperature and sub-surface CO2 and velocity measurements. Initial analysis shows that the integral length scales of temperature at the surface are significantly smaller than the sub-surface velocity scales. However, the integral scale of sub-surface velocity decreases approaching the surface. The

  13. Slope-Velocity-Equilibrium and evolution of surface roughness on a stony hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slope-velocity equilibrium is hypothesized as a state that evolves naturally over time due to the interaction between overland flow and bed morphology, wherein steeper areas develop a relative increase in physical and hydraulic roughness such that flow velocity is a unique function of overland flow ...

  14. Vibrations and spatial patterns in biomimetic surfaces: using the shark-skin effect to control blood clotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Maani, Nazanin; Rayz, Vitaliy L; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of small-amplitude fast vibrations and small-amplitude spatial patterns on various systems involving wetting and liquid flow, such as superhydrophobic surfaces, membranes and flow pipes. First, we introduce a mathematical method of averaging the effect of small spatial and temporal patterns and substituting them with an effective force. Such an effective force can change the equilibrium state of a system as well as a phase state, leading to surface texture-induced and vibration-induced phase control. Vibration and patterns can effectively jam holes in vessels with liquid, separate multi-phase flow, change membrane properties, result in propulsion and locomotion and lead to many other multi-scale, nonlinear effects including the shark-skin effect. We discuss the application of such effects to blood flow for novel biomedical 'haemophobic' applications which can prevent blood clotting and thrombosis by controlling the surface pattern at a wall of a vessel (e.g. a catheter or stent).This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  15. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  16. Three-dimensional ab initio dipole moment surfaces and stretching vibrational band intensities of the XH3 molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu An-Wen; Hu Shui-Ming; Ding Yun; Zhu Qing-Shi

    2005-01-01

    Stretching vibrational band intensities of XH3 (X=N, Sb) molecules are investigated employing three-dimensional dipole moment surfaces combined with the local mode Hamiltonian model. The dipole moment surfaces of NH3 and SbH3 are calculated with the density functional theory and at the correlated MP2 level, respectively. The calculated band intensities are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The contribution to the band intensities from the different terms in the polynomial expansion of the dipole moments of four group V hydrides (NH3, PH3, AsH3 and SbH3) are discussed. It is concluded that the breakdown of the bond dipole approximation must be considered.The intensity "borrowing" effect due to the wave function mixing among the stretching vibrational states is found to be less significant for the molecules that reach the local mode limit.

  17. Statistical properties of the surface velocity field in the northern Gulf of Mexico sampled by GLAD drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, A. J.; Ryan, E. H.; Huntley, H. S.; Laurindo, L. C.; Coelho, E.; Griffa, A.; Özgökmen, T. M.; Berta, M.; Bogucki, D.; Chen, S. S.; Curcic, M.; Drouin, K. L.; Gough, M.; Haus, B. K.; Haza, A. C.; Hogan, P.; Iskandarani, M.; Jacobs, G.; Kirwan, A. D.; Laxague, N.; Lipphardt, B.; Magaldi, M. G.; Novelli, G.; Reniers, A.; Restrepo, J. M.; Smith, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Wei, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) used multiscale sampling and GPS technology to observe time series of drifter positions with initial drifter separation of O(100 m) to O(10 km), and nominal 5 min sampling, during the summer and fall of 2012 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Histograms of the velocity field and its statistical parameters are non-Gaussian; most are multimodal. The dominant periods for the surface velocity field are 1-2 days due to inertial oscillations, tides, and the sea breeze; 5-6 days due to wind forcing and submesoscale eddies; 9-10 days and two weeks or longer periods due to wind forcing and mesoscale variability, including the period of eddy rotation. The temporal e-folding scales of a fitted drifter velocity autocorrelation function are bimodal with time scales, 0.25-0.50 days and 0.9-1.4 days, and are the same order as the temporal e-folding scales of observed winds from nearby moored National Data Buoy Center stations. The Lagrangian integral time scales increase from coastal values of 8 h to offshore values of approximately 2 days with peak values of 3-4 days. The velocity variance is large, O>(1>) m2/s2, the surface velocity statistics are more anisotropic, and increased dispersion is observed at flow bifurcations. Horizontal diffusivity estimates are O>(103>) m2/s in coastal regions with weaker flow to O>(105>) m2/s in flow bifurcations, a strong jet, and during the passage of Hurricane Isaac. The Gulf of Mexico surface velocity statistics sampled by the GLAD drifters are a strong function of the feature sampled, topography, and wind forcing.

  18. Engineering and Characterization of Peptides and Proteins at Surfaces and Interfaces: A Case Study in Surface-Sensitive Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Li, Yaoxin; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-21

    Understanding molecular structures of interfacial peptides and proteins impacts many research fields by guiding the advancement of biocompatible materials, new and improved marine antifouling coatings, ultrasensitive and highly specific biosensors and biochips, therapies for diseases related to protein amyloid formation, and knowledge on mechanisms for various membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands. Developing methods for measuring such unique systems, as well as elucidating the structure and function relationship of such biomolecules, has been the goal of our lab at the University of Michigan. We have made substantial progress to develop sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy into a powerful technique to study interfacial peptides and proteins, which lays a foundation to obtain unique and valuable insights when using SFG to probe various biologically relevant systems at the solid/liquid interface in situ in real time. One highlighting feature of this Account is the demonstration of the power of combining SFG with other techniques and methods such as ATR-FTIR, surface engineering, MD simulation, liquid crystal sensing, and isotope labeling in order to study peptides and proteins at interfaces. It is necessary to emphasize that SFG plays a major role in these studies, while other techniques and methods are supplemental. The central role of SFG is to provide critical information on interfacial peptide and protein structure (e.g., conformation and orientation) in order to elucidate how surface engineering (e.g., to vary the structure) can ultimately affect surface function (e.g., to optimize the activity). This Account focuses on the most significant recent progress in research on interfacial peptides and proteins carried out by our group including (1) the development of SFG analysis methods to determine orientations of regular as well as disrupted secondary structures, and the successful demonstration and application of an isotope

  19. Experimental study on titanium wire drawing with ultrasonic vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; Shan, Xiaobiao; Guo, Kai; Yang, Yuancai; Xie, Tao

    2017-08-12

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in aerospace and biomedical industries, however, they are classified as difficult-to-machine materials. In this paper, ultrasonic vibration is imposed on the die to overcome the difficulties during conventional titanium wire drawing processes at the room temperature. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the variation of axial stress within the contacting region and study the change of the drawing stress with several factors in terms of the longitudinal amplitude and frequency of the applied ultrasonic vibration, the diameter reduction ratio, and the drawing force. An experimental testing equipment was established to measure the drawing torque and rotational velocity of the coiler drum during the wire drawing process. The result indicates the drawing force increases with the growth of the drawing velocity and the reduction ratio, whether with or without vibrations. Application of either form of ultrasonic vibrations contributes to the further decrease of the drawing force, especially the longitudinal vibration with larger amplitude. SEM was employed to detect the surface morphology of the processed wires drawn under the three circumstances. The surface quality of the drawn wires with ultrasonic vibrations was apparently improved compared with those using conventional method. In addition, the longitudinal and torsional composite vibration was more effective for surface quality improvement than pure longitudinal vibration, however, at the cost of weakened drawing force reduction effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantum and classical vibrational relaxation dynamics of N-methylacetamide on ab initio potential energy surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Hirao, Kimihiko; Straub, John E; Stock, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Employing extensive quantum-chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP and MP2 level, a quartic force field of isolated N-methylacetamide is constructed. Taking into account 24 vibrational degrees of freedom, the model is employed to perform numerically exact vibrational configuration interaction calculations of the vibrational energy relaxation of the amide I mode. It is found that the energy transfer pathways may sensitively depend on details of the theoretical description. Moreover, the exact reference calculations were used to study the applicability and accuracy of (i) the quasiclassical trajectory method, (ii) time-dependent second-order perturbation theory, and (iii) the instantaneous normal mode description of frequency fluctuations. Based on the results, several strategies to describe vibrational energy relaxation in biomolecular systems are discussed.

  1. Very low surface recombination velocity in n-type c-Si using extrinsic field effect passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ruy S.; Woodcock, Frederick; Wilshaw, Peter R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, field-effect surface passivation is characterised as either intrinsic or extrinsic, depending on the origin of the charges present in passivation dielectric layers. The surface recombination velocity of float zone, 1 Ω cm, n-type silicon was reduced to 0.15 cm/s, the lowest ever observed for a passivating double layer consisting of thermally grown silicon dioxide and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride. This result was obtained by enhancing the intrinsic chemical and field-effect passivation of the dielectric layers with uniform, extrinsic field-effect passivation induced by corona discharge. The position and stability of charges, both intrinsic and extrinsic, were characterised and their passivation effect was seen stable for two months with surface recombination velocity field-effect passivation provided a further decrease by a factor of 3.

  2. Vibration of bioliquid-filled microtubules embedded in cytoplasm including surface effects using modified couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A; Abdollahian, M; Jalaei, M H

    2015-02-21

    This paper aims to investigate vibrational behavior of bioliquid-filled microtubules (MTs) embedded in cytoplasm considering surface effects. The interactions between the MT, considered as an orthotropic beam within the framework of Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) and Timoshenko beam (TB) models, and its surrounding elastic media are simulated by Pasternak foundation model. The modified couple stress theory (MCST) is applied so as to consider the small scale effects while motion equations are derived using energy method and Hamilto's principle for both EBB and TB models. Finally, an analytical method is employed to obtain the frequency of a bioliquid-filled MT, and therefore frequency-response curves are plotted to investigate the influences of small scale parameter, mass density of bioliquid, surface layer and surrounding elastic medium graphically. The results indicate that bioliquid and surface layers play a key role on the frequency of MTs and that the frequency of MTs is decreased with increasing of the mass density of the bioliquid. Vibration analysis of MTs is being considered as a vital problem since MTs look like the nervous system of the biological cells and transmit vibrational signals. It should be noted that the results of this work are hoped to be of use in advanced medical applications especially in the forthcoming use of MTs in transporters for bio-nanosensors.

  3. Vibration attenuation and shape control of surface mounted, embedded smart beam

    OpenAIRE

    Rathi, Vivek; Khan,Arshad Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Active Vibration Control (AVC) using smart structure is used to reduce the vibration of a system by automatic modification of the system structural response. AVC is widely used, because of its wide and broad frequency response range, low additional mass, high adaptability and good efficiency. A lot of research has been done on Finite Element (FE) models for AVC based on Euler Bernoulli Beam Theory (EBT). In the present work Timoshenko Beam Theory (TBT) is used to model a smart cantilever beam...

  4. Crustal velocity structure of the Deccan Volcanic Province, Indian Peninsula, from observed surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through inversion of fundamental mode group velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves, we study the crustal and subcrustal structure across the central Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP, which is one of the world’s largest terrestrial flood basalts. Our analysis is based on broadband seismograms recorded at seismological station Bhopal (BHPL in the central India from earthquakes located near west coast of India, with an average epicentral distance about 768 km. The recording station and epicentral zone are situated respectively on the northern and southern edges of DVP with wave paths across central DVP. The period of group velocity data ranges from 5 to 60 s for Rayleigh waves and 5 to 45 s for Love waves. Using the genetic algorithm, the observed data have been inverted to obtain the crust and subcrustal velocity structure along the wavepaths. Using this procedure, a similar velocity structure was also obtained earlier for the northwestern DVP, which is in the west of the present study region. Comparison of results show that the crustal thickness decreases westward from central DVP (39.6 km to northwestern DVP (37.8 km along with the decrease of thickness of upper crust; while the thickness of lower crust remains nearly same. From east to west S-wave velocity in the upper crust decreases by 2 to 3 per cent, while P-wave velocity in the whole crust and subcrust decreases by 3 to 6 per cent. The P- and S-wave velocities are positively correlated with crustal thickness and negatively correlated with earth’s heat flow. It appears that the elevated crustal and subcrustal temperature in the western side is the main factor for low velocities on this side.

  5. Transport of ultracold neutrons through a mirror system with surface roughness as a velocity filter

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhova, L A; Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Geltenbort, P; Abele, H; Burgdörfer, J

    2012-01-01

    We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations of ultracold neutron transport through an absorbing-reflecting mirror system in the Earth's gravitational field. We show that the underlying mixed phase space of regular skipping motion and random motion due to disorder scattering can be exploited to realize a velocity filter for ultracold neutrons. The range of velocities selected is controlled by geometric parameters of the wave guide. Possible applications include investigations of transport and scattering dynamics in confined systems.

  6. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  7. Friction velocity u* and roughness length z0 of atmospheric surface boundary layer in sparse-tree land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Dexin; Zhu Tingyao; Han Shijie

    1999-01-01

    Sparse-tree land is one of the typical lands and can be considered as one typical rough surface in boundary layer meteorology. Many lands can be classified into the kind surface in the view of scale and distribution feature of the roughness elements such as agroforest, scatter planted or growing trees, savanna and so on. The structure of surface boundary layer in sparse-tree land is analyzed and the parameters, friction velocity u* and roughness length z0 are deduced based on energy balance law and other physical hypothesis. The models agree well with data of wind tunnel experiments and field measurements.

  8. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  9. Mechanisms of free-surface breakup in vibration-induced liquid atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of droplet formation that take place during vibration-induced drop atomization are investigated experimentally. Droplet ejection results from the breakup of transient liquid spikes that form following the localized collapse of free-surface waves. Breakup typically begins with capillary pinch-off of a droplet from the tip of the spike and can be followed by additional pinch-offs of satellite droplets if the corresponding capillary number is sufficiently small (e.g., in low-viscosity liquids). If the capillary number is increased (e.g., in viscous liquids), breakup first occurs near the base of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, thread-like spike. The formation of these detached threads is governed by a breakup mechanism that is separated from the tip-dominated capillary pinch-off mechanism by an order of magnitude in terms of dimensionless driving frequency f*. The dependence of breakup time and unbroken spike length on fluid and driving parameters is established over a broad range of dimensionless driving frequencies (10-3

  10. Full Dimensional Vibrational Calculations for Methane Using AN Accurate New AB Initio Based Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Moumita; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Manzhos, Sergei

    2014-06-01

    New potential energy surfaces for methane were constructed, represented as analytic fits to about 100,000 individual high-level ab initio data. Explicitly-correlated multireference data (MRCI-F12(AE)/CVQZ-F12) were computed using Molpro [1] and fit using multiple strategies. Fits with small to negligible errors were obtained using adaptations of the permutation-invariant-polynomials (PIP) approach [2,3] based on neural-networks (PIP-NN) [4,5] and the interpolative moving least squares (IMLS) fitting method [6] (PIP-IMLS). The PESs were used in full-dimensional vibrational calculations with an exact kinetic energy operator by representing the Hamiltonian in a basis of products of contracted bend and stretch functions and using a symmetry adapted Lanczos method to obtain eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Very close agreement with experiment was produced from the purely ab initio PESs. References 1- H.-J. Werner, P. J. Knowles, G. Knizia, 2012.1 ed. 2012, MOLPRO, a package of ab initio programs. see http://www.molpro.net. 2- Z. Xie and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Theory Comput 6, 26, 2010. 3- B. J. Braams and J. M. Bowman, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 28, 577, 2009. 4- J. Li, B. Jiang and Hua Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 204103 (2013). 5- S Manzhos, X Wang, R Dawes and T Carrington, JPC A 110, 5295 (2006). 6- R. Dawes, X-G Wang, A.W. Jasper and T. Carrington Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134304 (2010).

  11. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahaye, Thibault, E-mail: thibault.delahaye@univ-reims.fr; Rey, Michaël, E-mail: michael.rey@univ-reims.fr; Tyuterev, Vladimir G. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, UMR CNRS 7331, BP 1039, F-51687, Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nikitin, Andrei [Laboratory of Theoretical Spectroscopy, Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055 Tomsk, Russia and Quamer, State University of Tomsk (Russian Federation); Szalay, Péter G. [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-09-14

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C{sub 2}H{sub 4} obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.–Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm{sup −1} for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm{sup −1} for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm{sup −1}. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm{sup −1} are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} and rovibrational levels of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  12. Scattering of high-frequency seismic waves caused by irregular surface topography and small-scale velocity inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2015-04-01

    Based on 3-D finite difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation, we examined the processes by which the complex, scattered high-frequency (f > 1 Hz) seismic wavefield during crustal earthquakes is developed due to heterogeneous structure, which includes small-scale velocity inhomogeneity in subsurface structure and irregular surface topography on the surface, and compared with observations from dense seismic networks in southwestern Japan. The simulations showed the process by which seismic wave scattering in the heterogeneous structure develops long-duration coda waves and distorts the P-wave polarization and apparent S-wave radiation pattern. The simulations revealed that scattering due to irregular topography is significant only near the station and thus the topographic scattering effects do not accumulate as seismic waves propagate over long distances. On the other hand, scattering due to velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure distorts the seismic wavefield gradually as seismic waves propagate. The composite model, including both irregular topography and velocity inhomogeneity, showed the combined effects. Furthermore, by introducing irregular topography, the effects of seismic wave scattering on both body and coda waves were stronger than in the model with velocity inhomogeneity alone. Therefore, to model the high-frequency seismic wavefield, both topography and velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure should be taken into account in the simulation model. By comparing observations with the simulations including topography, we determined that the most preferable small-scale velocity heterogeneity model for southwestern Japan is characterized by the von Kármán power spectral density function with correlation distance a = 5 km, rms value of fluctuation ɛ = 0.07 and decay order κ = 0.5. We also demonstrated that the relative contribution of scattering due to the topography of southwestern Japan is approximately 12 per cent.

  13. Derivation of GNSS derived station velocities for a surface deformation model in the Austrian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umnig, Elke; Weber, Robert; Maras, Jadre; Brückl, Ewald

    2016-04-01

    This contribution deals with the first comprehensive analysis of GNSS derived surface velocities computed within an observation network of about 100 stations covering the whole Austrian territory and parts of the neighbouring countries. Coordinate time series are available now, spanning a period of 5 years (2010.0-2015.0) for one focus area in East Austria and one and a half year (2013.5-2015.0) for the remaining part of the tracking network. In principle the data series are stemming from two different GNSS campaigns. The former was set up to investigate intra plate tectonic movements within the framework of the project ALPAACT (seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics), the latter was designed to support a number of various requests, e.g. derivation of GNSS derived water vapour fields, but also to expand the foresaid tectonic studies. In addition the activities within the ALPAACT project supplement the educational initiative SHOOLS & QUAKES, where scholars contribute to seismological research. For the whole period of the processed coordinate time series daily solutions have been computed by means of the Bernese software. The processed coordinate time series are tied to the global reference frame ITRF2000 as well as to the frame ITRF2008. Due to the transition of the reference from ITRF2000 to ITRF2008 within the processing period, but also due to updates of the Bernese software from version 5.0 to 5.2 the time series were initially not fully consistent and have to be re-aligned to a common frame. So the goal of this investigation is to derive a nationwide consistent horizontal motion field on base of GNSS reference station data within the ITRF2008 frame, but also with respect to the Eurasian plate. In this presentation we focus on the set-up of the coordinate time series and on the problem of frame alignment. Special attention is also paid to the separation into linear and periodic motion signals, originating from tectonic or non

  14. The Friction Law Stress Exponent under Pine Island Glacier from 15 Years of Surface Elevation and Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet-chaulet, F.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Mosbeux, C.; Mouginot, J.; Remy, F.; Ritz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polar the ice-sheets mass balance largely depends on the flow of ice-streams. Rapid basal motion generally accounts for most of the velocities. In flow models, the conditions at the base of the ice in contact with the bedrock are generally parameterised using a friction law that relates the sliding velocity to the basal shear stress. The most common law has two poorly constrained parameters, the basal slipperiness c and the stress exponent m. The basal slipperiness is expected to depend on local unobservable quantities and is routinely tuned from observed surface velocities using inverse methods. Different values for m are expected depending on the processes, from hard-bed sliding to soft bed deformation, and no consensus has emerged so far for its value that range from 1 to infinity. However, several studies have shown that the transient response of the ice-sheet models to external forcing is highly sensitive to m. Therefore, the uncertainty attached to the friction law is an important limit to our ability to evaluate future dynamical evolution of coastal regions. Calibrating m can be done only if either basal stresses and/or velocities have changed significantly while c can be assumed constant in time. Here, we use Elmer/Ice to model the flow of Pine Island Glacier (PIG), Antarctica, sufficiently far upstream of the grounding line so that we can assume no change in c. Observations show an increase of surface velocities by up to 50% between 1996 and 2010, associated with an important dynamical thinning. Using a control inverse method and different values of m, we tune a spatially varying basal slipperiness field that best fit, in the same time, observed surface velocities for years 1996, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. These years correspond to the MeaSUREs project velocity datasets that have the best spatial coverage for our model domain. Surface elevations for the corresponding years are constructed using ERS and Envisat radar altimetry data. We show that the

  15. A mixed space-time and wavenumber-frequency domain procedure for modelling ground vibration from surface railway tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroma, S. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Hussein, M. F. M.; Ntotsios, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying ground vibration in which the railway track is modelled in the space-time domain using the finite element method (FEM) and, for faster computation, discretisation of the ground using either FEM or the boundary element method (BEM) is avoided by modelling it in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The railway track is coupled to the ground through a series of rectangular strips located at the surface of the ground; their vertical interaction is described by a frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness matrix whose elements are represented by discrete lumped parameter models. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed firstly through frequency domain analysis using as excitation a stationary harmonic load applied on the rail. The interaction forces at the ballast/ground interface are calculated using the FE track model in the space-time domain, transformed to the wavenumber domain, and used as input to the ground model for calculating vibration in the free field. Additionally, time domain simulations are also performed with the inclusion of nonlinear track parameters. Results are presented for the coupled track/ground model in terms of time histories and frequency spectra for the track vibration, interaction forces and free-field ground vibration. For the linear track model, the results from the mixed formulation are in excellent agreement with those from a semi-analytical model formulated in the wavenumber-frequency domain, particularly in the vicinity of the loading point. The accuracy of the mixed formulation away from the excitation point depends strongly on the inclusion of through-ground coupling in the lumped parameter model, which has been found to be necessary for both track dynamics and ground vibration predictions.

  16. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999), 10.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  17. Noncontact methods for measuring water-surface elevations and velocities in rivers: Implications for depth and discharge extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; McDonald, Richard R.; Schmeeckle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed optical and videographic methods for measuring water-surface properties in a noninvasive manner hold great promise for extracting river hydraulic and bathymetric information. This paper describes such a technique, concentrating on the method of infrared videog- raphy for measuring surface velocities and both acoustic (laboratory-based) and laser-scanning (field-based) techniques for measuring water-surface elevations. In ideal laboratory situations with simple flows, appropriate spatial and temporal averaging results in accurate water-surface elevations and water-surface velocities. In test cases, this accuracy is sufficient to allow direct inversion of the governing equations of motion to produce estimates of depth and discharge. Unlike other optical techniques for determining local depth that rely on transmissivity of the water column (bathymetric lidar, multi/hyperspectral correlation), this method uses only water-surface information, so even deep and/or turbid flows can be investigated. However, significant errors arise in areas of nonhydrostatic spatial accelerations, such as those associated with flow over bedforms or other relatively steep obstacles. Using laboratory measurements for test cases, the cause of these errors is examined and both a simple semi-empirical method and computational results are presented that can potentially reduce bathymetric inversion errors.

  18. Classification of the road surface condition on the basis of vibrations of the sprung mass in a passenger car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prażnowski, K.; Mamala, J.

    2016-09-01

    In order to identify the state of the wheel balance in a passenger car on the basis of vibrations of the car body under actual conditions of its operation, it is necessary to determine the impact of random interferences resulting from a changing environment. For this purpose, the criterion for the evaluation of the road surface condition was developed on the basis of longitudinal vibrations of the car body of the tested car in the speed range from 50 km/h to 110 km/h. Selected functions such as: probability distribution and methods in the frequency domain: short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and power spectral density (PSD) were used to analyse recorded signals.

  19. Analytical calculation of electron group velocity surfaces in uniform strained graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arias, Wilfrido A.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-12-01

    Electron group velocity for graphene under uniform strain is obtained analytically by using the tight-binding (TB) approximation. Such closed analytical expressions are useful in order to calculate the electronic, thermal and optical properties of strained graphene. These results allow to understand the behavior of electrons when graphene is subjected to strong strain and nonlinear corrections, for which the usual Dirac approach is no longer valid. Some particular cases of uniaxial and shear strain were analyzed. The evolution of the electron group velocity indicates a break-up of the trigonal warping symmetry, which is replaced by a warping consistent with the symmetry of the strained reciprocal lattice. To do this, analytical expressions for the shape of the first Brillouin zone (BZ) of the honeycomb strained reciprocal lattice are provided. Finally, the Fermi velocity becomes strongly anisotropic, i.e., for a strong pure shear strain (20% of the lattice parameter), the two inequivalent Dirac cones merge and the Fermi velocity is zero in one of the principal axis of deformation. We found that nonlinear terms are essential to describe the effects of deformation for electrons near or at the Fermi energy.

  20. Model for seawater fouling and effects of temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy on seawater fouling☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dazhang Yang; Jianhua Liu; Xiaoxue E; Linlin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic model was proposed to predict the seawater fouling process in the seawater heat exchangers. The new model adopted an expression combining depositional and removal behaviors for seawater fouling based on the Kern–Seaton model. The present model parameters include the integrated kinetic rate of deposition (kd) and the integrated kinetic rate of removal (kr), which have clear physical significance. A seawater-fouling monitoring de-vice was established to validate the model. The experimental data were wel fitted to the model, and the param-eters were obtained in different conditions. SEM and EDX analyses were performed after the experiments, and the results show that the main components of seawater fouling are magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hy-droxide. The effects of surface temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy were assessed by the model and the experimental data. The results indicate that the seawater fouling becomes aggravated as the surface tem-perature increased in a certain range, and the seawater fouling resistance reduced as the flow velocity of seawater increased. Furthermore, the effect of the surface free energy of metals was analyzed, showing that the lower sur-face free energy mitigates the seawater fouling accumulation.

  1. The impact of Surface Wind Velocity Data Assimilation on the Predictability of Plume Advection in the Lower Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Thomas; Kajino, Mizuo; Kunii, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    The authors investigated the impact of surface wind velocity data assimilation on the predictability of plume advection in the lower troposphere exploiting the radioactive cesium emitted by the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 as an atmospheric tracer. It was because the radioactive cesium plume was dispersed from the sole point source exactly placed at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and its surface concentration was measured at many locations with a high frequency and high accuracy. We used a non-hydrostatic regional weather prediction model with a horizontal resolution of 3 km, which was coupled with an ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system in this study, to simulate the wind velocity and plume advection. The main module of this weather prediction model has been developed and used operationally by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) since before March 2011. The weather observation data assimilated into the model simulation were provided from two data resources; [#1] the JMA observation archives collected for numerical weather predictions (NWPs) and [#2] the land-surface wind velocity data archived by the JMA surface weather observation network. The former dataset [#1] does not contain land-surface wind velocity observations because their spatial representativeness is relatively small and therefore the land-surface wind velocity data assimilation normally deteriorates the more than one day NWP performance. The latter dataset [#2] is usually used for real-time weather monitoring and never used for the data assimilation of more than one day NWPs. We conducted two experiments (STD and TEST) to reproduce the radioactive cesium plume behavior for 48 hours from 12UTC 14 March to 12UTC 16 March 2011 over the land area of western Japan. The STD experiment was performed to replicate the operational NWP using only the #1 dataset, not assimilating land-surface wind observations. In contrast, the TEST experiment was performed assimilating both

  2. Directional motion of liquid under mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalonga, Maxime; Brunet, Philippe; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid is submitted to mechanical vibrations, steady flows or motion can be generated by non-linear effects. One example is the steady acoustic streaming one can observe when an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid. At the scale of a droplet, steady motion of the whole amount of liquid can arise from zero-mean periodic forcing. As It has been observed by Brunet et al. (PRL 2007), a drop can climb an inclined surface when submitted to vertical vibrations above a threshold in acceleration. Later, Noblin et al. (PRL 2009) showed the velocity and the direction of motion of a sessile drop submitted to both horizontal and vertical vibrations can be tuned by the phase shift between these two excitations. Here we present an experimental study of the mean motion of a sessile drop under slanted vibrations, focusing on the effects of drop properties, as well as the inclination angle of the axis of vibrations. It is shown that the volume and viscosity strongly affect the drop mean velocity, and can even change the direction of its motion. In the case of a low viscous drop, gravity can become significant and be modulated by the inclination of the axis of vibrations. Contact line dynamic during the drop oscillations is also investigated.

  3. The effect of surfaces type on vibration behavior of piezoelectric micro-cantilever close to sample surface in a humid environment based on MCS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Korayem, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been known as an innovative tool in the fields of surface topography, determination of different mechanical properties and manipulation of particles at the micro- and nanoscales. This paper has been concerned with advanced modeling and dynamic simulation of AFM micro-cantilever (MC) in the amplitude mode in the air environment. To increase the accuracy of the governing equations, modified couple stress theory appropriate in micro- and nanoscales has been utilized based on Timoshenko beam theory in the air environment near the sample surface. Also, to discretize the equations, differential quadrature method has been recommended. In modeling, geometric discontinuities due to the presence of a piezoelectric layer enclosed between two electrode layers and the change in MC cross section when connected to the MC have been considered. In addition to the effect of MC modeling on the accuracy of modeling and vibration amplitude during surface topography, understanding and modeling the environmental forces in the air environment, including van der Waals, capillary and contact forces, are important. This paper has been provided more accurate environmental forces modeling and has been investigated the vibration behavior of piezoelectric MC in the humid environment. Moreover, this paper has been examined the maximum and minimum MC amplitude in the air environment close to the surface with different kinds of topography. The results illustrate that kind of surfaces has effect on the maximum and minimum amplitude due to the decrease or increase in equilibrium MC distance.

  4. Nonexponential decay of velocity correlations in surface diffusion: The role of interactions and ordering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Hjelt, T.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study the diffusive dynamics of adparticles in two model systems with strong interactions by considering the decay of the single-particle velocity correlation function phi (t). In accordance with previous studies, we find phi (t) to decay nonexponentially and follow a power-law phi (t)similar ......We study the diffusive dynamics of adparticles in two model systems with strong interactions by considering the decay of the single-particle velocity correlation function phi (t). In accordance with previous studies, we find phi (t) to decay nonexponentially and follow a power-law phi (t...... be rationalized in terms of interaction effects. Namely, x is typically larger than two in cases where repulsive adparticle-adparticle interactions dominate, while attractive interactions lead to x...

  5. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants.

  6. Calculation of the Arc Velocity Along the Polluted Surface of Short Glass Plates Considering the Air Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the microphysics mechanism and the factors that influence arc development along a polluted surface, the arc was considered as a plasma fluid. Based on the image method and the collision ionization theory, the electric field of the arc needed to maintain movement with different degrees of pollution was calculated. According to the force of the charged particle in an arc plasma stressed under an electric field, a calculation model of arc velocity, which is dependent on the electric field of the arc head that incorporated the effects of airflow around the electrode and air resistance is presented. An experiment was carried out to measure the arc velocity, which was then compared with the calculated value. The results of the experiment indicated that the lighter the pollution is, the larger the electric field of the arc head and arc velocity is; when the pollution is heavy, the effect of thermal buoyancy that hinders arc movement increases, which greatly reduces the arc velocity.

  7. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  8. DeepVel: Deep learning for the estimation of horizontal velocities at the solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Requerey, I. S.; Vitas, N.

    2017-07-01

    Many phenomena taking place in the solar photosphere are controlled by plasma motions. Although the line-of-sight component of the velocity can be estimated using the Doppler effect, we do not have direct spectroscopic access to the components that are perpendicular to the line of sight. These components are typically estimated using methods based on local correlation tracking. We have designed DeepVel, an end-to-end deep neural network that produces an estimation of the velocity at every single pixel, every time step, and at three different heights in the atmosphere from just two consecutive continuum images. We confront DeepVel with local correlation tracking, pointing out that they give very similar results in the time and spatially averaged cases. We use the network to study the evolution in height of the horizontal velocity field in fragmenting granules, supporting the buoyancy-braking mechanism for the formation of integranular lanes in these granules. We also show that DeepVel can capture very small vortices, so that we can potentially expand the scaling cascade of vortices to very small sizes and durations. The movie attached to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state.

  10. Vibrational states of the Pt(111)- $ ≤ft( {sqrt {3} × sqrt {3} } right) $ R30°-K surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Borisov, S. D.; Eremeev, S. V.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2010-09-01

    Vibrational spectrum of the ordered Pt(111)- left( {sqrt {3} × sqrt {3} } right) R30°- K surface superstructure formed on the platinum surface with adsorption of 1/3 ML potassium is calculated with the use of the interatomic interaction potentials obtained in the strong bond approximation. Relaxation of the surface, dispersion of the surface phonons, local density of vibrational states, and polarization of phonon modes of adatoms and atoms of the substrate are discussed in the work. The theoretical results obtained agree well with the available experimental data.

  11. Investigation of the low-depression velocity layer in desert area by multichannel analysis of surface-wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S.; Tian, G.; Xia, J.; He, H.; Shi, Z.; ,

    2004-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface-wave method (MASW) is a newly development method. The method has been employed in various applications in environmental and engineering geophysics overseas. However, It can only be found a few case studies in China. Most importantly, there is no application of the MASW in desert area in China or abroad. We present a case study of investigating the low-depression velocity in Temple of North Taba Area in Erdos Basin. The MASW method successfully defined the low-depression velocity layer in the desert area. Comparing results obtained by the MASW method with results by refraction seismic method, we discussed efficiency and simplicity of applying the MASW method in the desert area. It is proved that the maximum investigation depth can reach 60m in the study area when the acquisition and procession parameters are carefully chosen. The MASW method can remedy the incompetence of the refraction method and the micro-seismograph log method in low-depression velocity layer's investigation. The MASW method is also a powerful tool in investigation of near-surface complicated materials and possesses many unique advantages.

  12. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  13. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  14. Effects of surface finish and treatment on the fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block using frequency response approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of surface finish and treatment on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block of a new two-stroke free piston engine at complex variable amplitude loading conditions using frequency response approach,Finite element modelling and frequency response analysis was conducted using finite element analysis software Package MSC.PATRAN/MSC.NASTRAN and fatigue life prediction was carried out using MSC.FATIGUE software. Based on the finite element results, different frequency response approach was applied to predict the cylinder block fatigue life. Results for different load histories and material combinations are also discussed. Results indicated great effects for all surface finish and treatment. It is concluded that polished and cast surface finish conditions give the highest and lowest cylinder block lives, respectively; and that Nitrided treatment leads to longest cylinder block life. The results were used to draw contour plots of fatigue life and damage in the worst or most damaging case.

  15. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  16. Variability of surface velocity in the Kuroshio Current and adjacent waters derived from Argos drifter buoys and satellite altimeter data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chao; WU Dexing; LIN Xiaopei

    2009-01-01

    By combining Argos drifter buoys and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data, the time series of sea-surface velocity fields in the Kuroshio Current (KC) and adjacent regions are established. And the variability of the KC from the Luzon Strait to the Tokara Strait is studied based on the velocity fields. The results show that the dominant variability period varies in different segments of the KC" The primary period near the Luzon Strait and to the east of Taiwan Island is the intra-seasonal time scale; the KC on the continental shelf of the ECS is the steadiest segment without obvious periodicity, while the Tokara Strait shows the period of seasonal variability. The diverse periods are caused by the Rossby waves propagating from the interior ocean, with adjustments in topography of island chain and local wind stress.

  17. Atlantic sea surface height and velocity spectra inferred from satellite altimetry and a hierarchy of numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biri, Stavroula; Serra, Nuno; Scharffenberg, Martin G.; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Frequency and wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and surface geostrophic velocity are presented, as they result for the Atlantic Ocean from a 23 year long altimeter data set and from a hierarchy of ocean model simulations with spatial resolutions of 16, 8, and 4 km. SSH frequency spectra follow a spectral decay of roughly f-1 on long periods; toward higher frequencies a spectral decay close to f-2 is found. For geostrophic velocity spectra, a somewhat similar picture emerges, albeit with flatter spectral relations. In terms of geostrophic velocity wavenumber spectra, we find a general relation close to k-3 in the high-resolution model results. Outside low-energy regions all model spectra come close to observed spectra at low frequencies and wavenumbers in terms of shape and amplitude. However, the highest model resolution appears essential for reproducing the observed spectra at high frequencies and wavenumbers. This holds especially for velocity spectra in mid and high latitudes, suggesting that eddy resolving ocean models need to be run at a resolution of 1/24° or better if one were to fully resolve the observed mesoscale eddy field. Causes for remaining discrepancies between observed and simulated results can be manifold. At least partially, they can be rationalized by taking into account an aliasing effect of unresolved temporal variability in the altimetric observations occurring on periods smaller than the 20 days Nyquist period of the altimetric data, thereby leading to an overestimate of variability in the altimetric estimates, roughly on periods below 100 days.

  18. Simultaneous measurements of air-sea gas transfer velocity and near surface turbulence at low to moderate winds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Liao, Q.; Fillingham, J. H.; Bootsma, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Parameterization of air-sea gas transfer velocity was routinely made with wind speed. Near surface turbulent dissipation rate has been shown to have better correlation with the gas transfer velocity in a variety of aquatic environments (i.e., the small eddy model) while wind speed is low to moderate. Wind speed model may underestimate gas transfer velocity at low to moderate winds when the near surface turbulence is produced by other environmental forcing. We performed a series of field experiments to measure the CO2 transfer velocity, and the statistics of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface using a novel floating PIV and chamber system. The small eddy model was evaluated and the model coefficient was found to be a non-constant, and it varies with the local turbulent level (figure 1). Measure results also suggested an appropriate scaling of the vertical dissipation profile immediately below the interface under non-breaking conditions, which can be parameterized by the wind shear, wave height and wave age (figure 2). Figure 1. Relation between the coefficient of the small eddy model and dissipation rate. The data also include Chu & Jirka (2003) and Vachon et al. (2010). The solid regression line: α = 0.188log(ɛ)+1.158 Figure 2. Non-dimensional dissipation profiles. Symbols: measured data with the floating PIV. Solid line: regression of measured data with a -0.79 decaying rate. Dash line with -2 slope: Terray et al. (1996) relation. Dash line with two layer structure: Siddiqui & Loewen (2007) relation.

  19. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  20. The influence of surface on the running velocities of elite and amateur orienteer athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hébert-Losier, K; Jensen, Kurt; Mourot, L

    2014-01-01

    . Of course, cognitive, mental, and physical attributes other than the ability to run on different surfaces are required for excellence in orienteering (e.g., a high aerobic power). However, we suggest that athlete-specific assessment of running performance on various surfaces and distances might assist...

  1. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  2. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  3. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  4. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  5. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  6. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  7. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  8. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131908)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  9. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  10. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  11. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  12. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  13. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  14. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m a(-1) exceed the vertical surface-parallel flow (SPF) components over much of the ablation area of Storstrommen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude results......) or more. This indicates that the SPF assumption may be problematic also for glaciers in steady state. Here we derive the three-dimensional surface velocity distribution of Storstrommen by using the principle of mass conservation (MC) to combine InSAR measurements from ascending and descending satellite...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  15. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharf Abdusalam M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig and computational (employing CFD software investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  16. Combined Effect of Surface Roughness and Slip Velocity on Jenkins Model Based Magnetic Squeeze Film in Curved Rough Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimit R. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the effect of slip velocity and surface roughness on the performance of Jenkins model based magnetic squeeze film in curved rough circular plates. The upper plate’s curvature parameter is governed by an exponential expression while a hyperbolic form describes the curvature of lower plates. The stochastic model of Christensen and Tonder has been adopted to study the effect of transverse surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. Beavers and Joseph’s slip model has been employed here. The associated Reynolds type equation is solved to obtain the pressure distribution culminating in the calculation of load carrying capacity. The computed results show that the Jenkins model modifies the performance of the bearing system as compared to Neuringer-Rosensweig model, but this model provides little support to the negatively skewed roughness for overcoming the adverse effect of standard deviation and slip velocity even if curvature parameters are suitably chosen. This study establishes that for any type of improvement in the performance characteristics the slip parameter is required to be reduced even if variance (−ve occurs and suitable magnetic strength is in force.

  17. Characterization of length and velocity scales of free stream turbulence and investigation of their effects on surface heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzkurt, Savash

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to address two important but unresolved problems: (1) the measurement of vertical and transverse length scales via space correlations for all Reynolds stress components and velocity-temperature correlations, both in the free stream and within the boundary layer using the existing triple and quad-wire probes; and (2) to relate the character of the free stream turbulence to the character of the turbulence within the boundary layer in order to determine the effect on surface heat transfer.

  18. Meaningful use of peak particle velocities at excavation surfaces for the optimisation of the rockburst criteria for tunnels and stopes.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Milev, AM

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Final Project Report The meaningful use of peak particle velocities at excavation surfaces for the optimisation of the rockburst criteria for tunnels and stopes A.M. Milev, S.M. Spottiswoode, B.R. Noble, L.M. Linzer, M. van Zyl, A. Daehnke & E... and Ventersdorp Contact Reef sites were carried out. A total number of 41 sites were monitored: • TauTona gold mine: a total number of 15 139 seismic events with a maximum PPV of 3 m/s was recorded during 2 437 site days; • Kloof gold mine: a total number of 6...

  19. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Nørvang Madsen, Søren; Oerter, Hans; Gundestrup, Niels S.

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m a-1 exceed the vertical surface-parallel flow (SPF) components over much of the ablation area of Storstrømmen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude results in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10m a-1 or more.This indicates that the SPFassumption may be problematic also for glaciers in steady state. Here we derive the three-dimensional surface velocity distribution of Storstrømmen by using the principle of mass conservation (MC) to combine InSAR measurements from ascending and descending satellite tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle are in better agreement with the GPS velocities than the previously calculated velocities derived with the SPFassumption.

  20. Numerical investigation of velocity slip and temperature jump effects on unsteady flow over a stretching permeable surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, E.; Loghmani, G. B.; Heydari, M.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the boundary layer flow and heat transfer of unsteady flow over a porous accelerating stretching surface in the presence of the velocity slip and temperature jump effects are investigated numerically. A new effective collocation method based on rational Bernstein functions is applied to solve the governing system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This method solves the problem on the semi-infinite domain without truncating or transforming it to a finite domain. In addition, the presented method reduces the solution of the problem to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. Graphical and tabular results are presented to investigate the influence of the unsteadiness parameter A , Prandtl number Pr, suction parameter fw, velocity slip parameter γ and thermal slip parameter φ on the velocity and temperature profiles of the fluid. The numerical experiments are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the novel proposed computational procedure. Comparisons of present results are made with those obtained by previous works and show excellent agreement.

  1. Nano surface interaction and mo del of vibrating prob e%纳米表面相互作用及振动测头模型∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽娟; 陈晓怀; 刘芳芳; 王景凡

    2016-01-01

    relationship between the vibration parameters of the probe and the surface interaction can be confirmed. Through theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, the appropriate vibrating parameters including resonance amplitude, velocity and frequency of the probe are designed, which can offset the surface interaction forces. In the third part, a probe is designed based on the above theories and an experimental system is set up to verify its rationality. The results show that the resonant micro/nano probe after optimizing its parameters can effectively reduce the influence of surface forces and improve the measurement accuracy.%如何实现高精度的测量是现代制造业及微电子技术领域的热点问题之一。基于微纳米测头的三坐标测量机是当前实现高精度测量的重要手段。随着测量尺寸的减小,常用的纳米/微纳尺度的测头与待测表面之间形成静态接触,其表面相互作用成为了影响其测量精度和可靠性的关键因素之一。本文基于一种触发式振动测头,研究了其动力学模型,并通过对测头纳米尺度表面相互作用的理论分析及数值模拟,确立了测头振动参数与表面相互作用之间的关联。实验研究表明,参数优化后的谐振微纳测头能有效抑制表面作用带来的干扰,提高测量精度。

  2. Vibrational properties of uracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhiping; ZHANG Fengshou; ZENG Xianghua; ZHOU Hongyu; GU Bin; CHENG Wei

    2006-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular dynamics model is developed to study the vibrational frequencies of uracil at very low kinetic temperature by using the Fourier transform of velocity autocorrelation function of trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations. The finite difference harmonic method is used to assign the vibrational frequency of each mode. The calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. Moreover, we make up for the lost vibrational modes in experiments self-consistently. A total of 30 vibrational modes and their corresponding frequencies are reported.

  3. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  4. Vibrational spectra study of phosphorus dendrimer containing azobenzene units on the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the first generation dendrimers, possessing oxybenzaldehyde (G1) or oxyphenylazobenzaldehyde (G2) terminal groups and sodium 4-[4-oxyphenyl)azo]-benzaldehyde (SOAB) were studied. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for dendrimer G2 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). These calculations gave the frequencies of vibrations, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities for the E- and Z-forms of azobenzene unit. The energy differences between the E- and Z-forms are 12.62 and 25.16 kcal/mol for SOAB and G2. The calculated in gas phase dipole moments for the E- and Z-forms are equal to 20.86, 18.28 D (SOAB) and 7.56, 8.88 D (G2). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendrimer G2 molecule has a concave lens structure with planar sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)Pdbnd S and sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd Ndbnd Nsbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd O fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of dendrimer G2 were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The strong band 1598 cm-1 in the IR spectra show marked changes of the optical density in dependence of substituents in the aromatic ring. The differences in the IR and Raman spectra of SOAB and G2 for the E- and Z-forms of azobenzene units were cleared up. During structural isomerization of azobenzene units, redistribution of band intensities appears to a much higher extent than frequency shifts.

  5. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    atmospheric pressure , and surface heat flux is provided by the 0.58 NOGAPS model every 3h (Rosmond et al. 2002); river forcing is provided via an...horizontal pressure -gradient force in an oceanic model with nonaligned vertical grid. J. Geophys. Res., 108, 3090, doi:10.1029/2001JC001047. ——, and... Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR 0602435N 73-4727-14-5 MATTHEW J. CARRIER, HANS E. NGODOCK, PHILIP MUSCARELLA, AND SCOTT SMITH Naval

  6. A Continuum Description of Vibrated Sand

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Eggers, Jens; Riecke, Hermann

    1999-01-01

    The motion of a thin layer of granular material on a plate undergoing sinusoidal vibrations is considered. We develop equations of motion for the local thickness and the horizontal velocity of the layer, where the driving comes from the violent impact of the grains on the surface. A linear stability theory reveals a novel mechanism for the excitation of waves. Comparing both the stability diagram and the dispersion relation with experiment, we are able to check the consistency of our model.

  7. Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties and sound velocities derived from a multiple Einstein method using vibrational densities of states: an application to MgO-SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael H. G.; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; van den Berg, Arie P.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed a technique that simplifies Kieffer's lattice vibrational method by representing the vibrational density of states with multiple Einstein frequencies. Here, we show that this technique can be applied to construct a thermodynamic database that accurately represents thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams for substances in the system MgO-SiO2. We extended our technique to derive shear moduli of the relevant phases in this system in pressure-temperature space. For the construction of the database, we used recently measured calorimetric and volumetric data. We show that incorporating vibrational densities of states predicted from ab initio methods into our models enables discrimination between different experimental data sets for heat capacity. We show a general technique to optimize the number of Einstein frequencies in the VDoS, such that thermodynamic properties are affected insignificantly. This technique allows constructing clones of databases from which we demonstrate that the VDoS has a significant effect on heat capacity and entropy, and an insignificant effect on volume properties.

  8. Near-surface velocity modeling at Yucca Mountain using borehole and surface records from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, B.A. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Walck, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for commercial radioactive waste disposal in a mined geologic repository. One critical aspect of site suitability is the tectonic stability of the repository site. The levels of risk from both actual fault displacements in the repository block and ground shaking from nearby earthquakes are being examined. In particular, it is necessary to determine the expected level of ground shaking at the repository depth for large seismic sources such as nearby large earthquakes or underground nuclear explosions (UNEs). Earthquakes are expected to cause the largest ground motions at the site, however, only underground nuclear explosion data have been obtained at the repository depth level (about 350m below the ground level) to date. In this study we investigate ground motion from Nevada Test Site underground nuclear explosions recorded at Yucca Mountain to establish a compressional velocity model for the uppermost 350m of the mountain. This model is useful for prediction of repository-level ground motions for potential large nearby earthquakes.

  9. Slicing up the San Francisco Bay Area: Block kinematics and fault slip rates from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, M. A.; Johanson, I. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Schmidt, D. A.; Murray, M. H.

    2005-06-01

    Observations of surface deformation allow us to determine the kinematics of faults in the San Francisco Bay Area. We present the Bay Area velocity unification (B?V?, "bay view"), a compilation of over 200 horizontal surface velocities computed from campaign-style and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1993 to 2003. We interpret this interseismic velocity field using a three-dimensional block model to determine the relative contributions of block motion, elastic strain accumulation, and shallow aseismic creep. The total relative motion between the Pacific plate and the rigid Sierra Nevada/Great Valley (SNGV) microplate is 37.9 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 directed toward N30.4°W ± 0.8° at San Francisco (±2σ). Fault slip rates from our preferred model are typically within the error bounds of geologic estimates but provide a better fit to geodetic data (notable right-lateral slip rates in mm yr-1: San Gregorio fault, 2.4 ± 1.0; West Napa fault, 4.0 ± 3.0; zone of faulting along the eastern margin of the Coast Range, 5.4 ± 1.0; and Mount Diablo thrust, 3.9 ± 1.0 of reverse slip and 4.0 ± 0.2 of right-lateral strike slip). Slip on the northern Calaveras is partitioned between both the West Napa and Concord/Green Valley fault systems. The total convergence across the Bay Area is negligible. Poles of rotation for Bay Area blocks progress systematically from the North America-Pacific to North America-SNGV poles. The resulting present-day relative motion cannot explain the strike of most Bay Area faults, but fault strike does loosely correlate with inferred plate motions at the time each fault initiated.

  10. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  11. Torsion-wagging tunneling and vibrational states in hydrazine determined from its ab initio potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodyga, Wiesław; Makarewicz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Geometries, anharmonic vibrations, and torsion-wagging (TW) multiplets of hydrazine and its deuterated species are studied using high-level ab initio methods employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) as well as the coupled cluster singles and doubles model including connected triple corrections, CCSD(T), in conjunction with extended basis sets containing diffuse and core functions. To describe the splitting patterns caused by tunneling in TW states, the 3D potential energy surface (PES) for the large-amplitude TW modes is constructed. Stationary points in the 3D PES, including equivalent local minima and saddle points are characterized. Using this 3D PES, a flexible Hamiltonian is built numerically and then employed to solve the vibrational problem for TW coupled motion. The calculated ground state rav structure is expected to be more reliable than the experimental one that has been determined using a simplified structural model. The calculated fundamental frequencies allowed resolution of the assignment problems discussed earlier in the literature. The determined energy barriers, including the contributions from the small-amplitude vibrations, to the tunneling of the symmetric and antisymmetric wagging mode of 1997 cm-1 and 3454 cm-1, respectively, are in reasonable agreement with the empirical estimates of 2072 cm-1 and 3312 cm-1, respectively [W. Łodyga et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 183, 374 (1997), 10.1006/jmsp.1997.7271]. However, the empirical torsion barrier of 934 cm-1 appears to be overestimated. The ab initio calculations yield two torsion barriers: cis and trans of 744 cm-1 and 2706 cm-1, respectively. The multiplets of the excited torsion states are predicted from the refined 3D PES.

  12. Planar time-resolved PIV for velocity and pressure retrieval in atmospheric boundary layer over surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Bopp, Maximilian; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling in general is important for weather, climate, fluxes. Wind wave source is crucially important for surface waves' modeling. But the wind-wave growth rate is strongly uncertain. Using direct measurements of pressure by wave-following Elliott probe [1] showed, weak and indefinite dependence of wind-wave growth rate on the wave steepness, while Grare et.al. [2] discuss the limitations of direct measurements of pressure associated with the inability to measure the pressure close to the surface by contact methods. Recently non-invasive methods for determining the pressure on the basis of technology of time-resolved PIV are actively developed [3]. Retrieving air flow velocities by 2D PIV techniques was started from Reul et al [4]. The first attempt for retrieving wind pressure field of waves in the laboratory tank from the time-resolved PIV measurements was done in [5]. The experiments were performed at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m). For 18 regimes with wind speed up to 14 m/s including presence of puddle waves, a combination of time resolved PIV technique and optical measurements of water surface form was applied to detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. Ammonium chloride smoke was used for flow visualization illuminated by two 6 Wt blue diode lasers combined into a vertical laser plane. Particle movement was captured with high-speed camera using Scheimpflug technique (up to 20 kHz frame rate with 4-frame bursts, spatial resolution about 190 μm, field of view 314x12 mm). Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave form. The resulting time resolved instantaneous velocity fields on regular grid allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from measured air velocity fluctuations. The average wind velocity patterns were

  13. A Comparative Study of Ground and Underground Vibrations Induced by Bench Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhi Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground vibrations originating from bench blasting may cause damage to slopes, structures, and underground workings in close proximity to an operating open-pit mine. It is important to monitor and predict ground vibration levels induced by blasting and to take measures to reduce their hazardous effects. The aims of this paper are to determine the weaker protection objects by comparatively studying bench blasting induced vibrations obtained at surface and in an underground tunnel in an open-pit mine and thus to seek vibration control methods to protect engineering objects at the site. Vibrations arising from measurement devices at surface and in an underground tunnel at the Zijinshan Open-Pit Mine were obtained. Comparative analysis of the peak particle velocities shows that, in the greatest majority of cases, surface values are higher than underground values for the same vibration distance. The transmission laws of surface and underground vibrations were established depending on the type of rock mass, the explosive charge, and the distance. Compared with the Chinese Safety Regulations for Blasting (GB6722-2014, the bench blasting induced vibrations would not currently cause damage to the underground tunnel. According to the maximum allowable peak particle velocities for different objects, the permitted maximum charges per delay are obtained to reduce damage to these objects at different distances.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Emad H.; Sayed, Hamed M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  15. A bio-inspired, computational model suggests velocity gradients of optic flow locally encode ordinal depth at surface borders and globally they encode self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Ringbauer, Stefan; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-09-01

    Visual navigation requires the estimation of self-motion as well as the segmentation of objects from the background. We suggest a definition of local velocity gradients to compute types of self-motion, segment objects, and compute local properties of optical flow fields, such as divergence, curl, and shear. Such velocity gradients are computed as velocity differences measured locally tangent and normal to the direction of flow. Then these differences are rotated according to the local direction of flow to achieve independence of that direction. We propose a bio-inspired model for the computation of these velocity gradients for video sequences. Simulation results show that local gradients encode ordinal surface depth, assuming self-motion in a rigid scene or object motions in a nonrigid scene. For translational self-motion velocity, gradients can be used to distinguish between static and moving objects. The information about ordinal surface depth and self-motion can help steering control for visual navigation.

  16. Analysis of muscle fiber conduction velocity enables reliable detection of surface EMG crosstalk during detection of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Alberto Biurrun; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2013-03-26

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex that induces complex muscle synergies to withdraw a limb from a potential noxious stimulus. Several studies indicate that assessment of the NWR is a valuable objective tool in relation to investigation of various pain conditions. However, existing methodologies for NWR assessment evaluate standard surface electromyography (sEMG) measured over just one muscle and do not consider the possible interference of crosstalk originating from adjacent active muscles. The present study had two aims: firstly, to investigate to which extent the presence of crosstalk may affect NWR detection using a standardized scoring criterion (interval peak z-score) that has been validated without taking crosstalk into consideration. Secondly, to investigate whether estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity can help identifying the propagating and non-propagating nature of genuine reflexes and crosstalk respectively, thus allowing a more valid assessment of the NWR. Evaluation of interval peak z-score did apparently allow reflex detection with high sensitivity and specificity (0.96), but only if the influence of crosstalk was ignored. Distinction between genuine reflexes and crosstalk revealed that evaluation of interval peak z-score incorporating a z-score threshold of 12 was associated with poor reflex detection specificity (0.26-0.62) due to the presence of crosstalk. Two different standardized methods for estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity were employed to demonstrate that significantly different muscle fiber conduction velocities may be estimated during genuine reflexes and crosstalk, respectively. This discriminative feature was used to develop and evaluate a novel methodology for reflex detection from sEMG that is robust with respect to crosstalk. Application of this conduction velocity analysis (CVA) entailed reflex detection with excellent sensitivity (1.00 and 1.00) and specificity (1.00 and 0

  17. Texture-induced vibrations in the forearm during tactile exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eDelhaye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans can detect and discriminate between fine variations of surface roughness using activetouch. It is hitherto believed that roughness perception is mediated mostly by cutaneous andsubcutaneous afferents located in the fingertips. However, recent findings have shown thatfollowing abolishment of cutaneous afferences resulting from trauma or pharmacologicalintervention, the ability of subjects to discriminate between textures roughness was notsignificantly altered. These findings suggest that the somatosensory system is able to collecttextural information from other sources than fingertip afference. It follows that signalsresulting of the interaction of a finger with a rough surface must be transmitted to stimulatereceptor populations in regions far away from the contact. This transmission was characterizedby measuring in the wrist vibrations originating at the fingertip and thus propagating throughthe finger, the hand and the wrist during active exploration of textured surfaces. The spectralanalysis of the vibrations taking place in the forearm tissues revealed regularities that werecorrelated with the scanned surface and the speed of exploration. In the case of periodictextures, the vibration signal contained a fundamental frequency component corresponding tothe finger velocity divided by the spatial period of the stimulus. This regularity was found for awide range of textural length scales and scanning velocities. For non-periodic textures, thespectrum of the vibration did not contain obvious features that would enable discriminationbetween the different stimuli. However, for both periodic and non-periodic stimuli, theintensity of the vibrations could be related to the microgeometry of the scanned surfaces.

  18. Bound state potential energy surface construction: ab initio zero-point energies and vibrationally averaged rotational constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettens, Ryan P A

    2003-01-15

    Collins' method of interpolating a potential energy surface (PES) from quantum chemical calculations for reactive systems (Jordan, M. J. T.; Thompson, K. C.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 102, 5647. Thompson, K. C.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 8302. Bettens, R. P. A.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 111, 816) has been applied to a bound state problem. The interpolation method has been combined for the first time with quantum diffusion Monte Carlo calculations to obtain an accurate ground state zero-point energy, the vibrationally average rotational constants, and the vibrationally averaged internal coordinates. In particular, the system studied was fluoromethane using a composite method approximating the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2p) level of theory. The approach adopted in this work (a) is fully automated, (b) is fully ab initio, (c) includes all nine nuclear degrees of freedom, (d) requires no assumption of the functional form of the PES, (e) possesses the full symmetry of the system, (f) does not involve fitting any parameters of any kind, and (g) is generally applicable to any system amenable to quantum chemical calculations and Collins' interpolation method. The calculated zero-point energy agrees to within 0.2% of its current best estimate. A0 and B0 are within 0.9 and 0.3%, respectively, of experiment.

  19. Measurement of velocity field in parametrically excited solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Paramerically excited solitary waves emerge as localized structures in high-aspect-ratio free surfaces subject to vertical vibrations. Herein, we provide the first experimental characterization of the hydrodynamics of thess waves using Particle Image Velocimetry. We show that the underlying velocity field of parametrically excited solitary waves is mainly composed by an oscillatory velocity field. Our results confirm the accuracy of Hamiltonian models with added dissipation in describing this field. Remarkably, our measurements also uncover the onset of a streaming velocity field which is shown to be as important as other crucial nonlinear terms in the current theory. The observed streaming pattern is particularly interesting due to the presence of oscillatory meniscii.

  20. Adsorption and Vibration of O Atoms on Fe Low-index and Fe (211) High-index Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential(5-MP) of the interaction between oxygen atoms and iron surfaces was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of O atoms on Fe low-index and Fe(211 ) high-index surfaces were investigated by using 5-MP. All the critical characteristics of the system, such as adsorption site, adsorption geometry, binding energy, and eigenvalues for vibration, were calculated. The calculation results show that O atoms are located at the fourfold hollow site of the Fe(100) surface with an eigenvibration at 437 cm-1. These results are in good agreement with the experimental and theoretical results obtained previously. With regard to the adsorption site of O-Fe(110) system, the authors of this study assume that the preferential adsorption state is the H3 site and not the LB site, which is not in agreement with the experimental inferences obtained earlier. However, on the Fe( 111 ) and Fe(211 ) surfaces,O atoms predominantly occupy the quasi-3-fold site.

  1. Vibrational relaxation dynamics of catalysts on TiO{sub 2} Rutile (1 1 0) single crystal surfaces and anatase nanoporous thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen M.; Anfuso, Chantelle L.; Rodríguez-Córdoba, William; Lian, Tianquan, E-mail: tlian@emory.edu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: • Investigated vibrational relaxation dynamics of a CO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst on TiO{sub 2} surfaces. • IR pump-vibration sum-frequency generation probe spectroscopy on Rutile (1 1 0) surface. • IR-pump/IR probe transient absorption spectroscopy on nano-crystalline thin films. • CO stretching modes show a ultrafast population equilibration followed by population decay. - Abstract: Time-resolved vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the vibrational relaxation dynamics of the rhenium bipyridyl CO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst Re(CO){sub 3}Cl(dcbpy) [dcbpy = 4,4′-dicarboxy-2,2′-bipyridine] adsorbed onto the (1 1 0) surface of a Rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal. IR pump-VSFG probe spectra of the a′(1) CO stretching mode indicate a ultrafast population equilibration between three CO stretching modes followed by their population relaxation via intramolecular vibrational energy transfer. Similar vibational relaxation dynamics was also observed for the same complex on anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline thin films measured by IR pump-IR probe transient absorption spectroscopy. The relaxation dynamics of ReCOA on TiO{sub 2}, in DMF solution, and immobilized on Au through alkane thiol linkers were compared to examine possible effects of adsorbate-TiO{sub 2} interaction.

  2. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  3. Na(+) /H(+) exchanger NHE1 and NHE2 have opposite effects on migration velocity in rat gastric surface cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paehler Vor der Nolte, Anja; Chodisetti, Giriprakash; Yuan, Zhenglin; Busch, Florian; Riederer, Brigitte; Luo, Min; Yu, Yan; Menon, Manoj B; Schneider, Andreas; Stripecke, Renata; Nikolovska, Katerina; Yeruva, Sunil; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-12-26

    Following superficial injury, neighbouring gastric epithelial cells close the wound by rapid cell migration, a process called epithelial restitution. Na(+) /H(+) exchange (NHE) inhibitors interfere with restitution, but the role of the different NHE isoforms expressed in gastric pit cells has remained elusive. The role of the basolaterally expressed NHE1 (Slc9a1) and the presumably apically expressed NHE2 (Slc9a2) in epithelial restitution was investigated in the nontransformed rat gastric surface cell line RGM1. Migration velocity was assessed by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye DiR and following closure of an experimental wound over time. Since RGM1 cells expressed very low NHE2 mRNA and have low transport activity, NHE2 was introduced by lentiviral gene transfer. In medium with pH 7.4, RGM1 cells displayed slow wound healing even in the absence of growth factors and independently of NHE activity. Growth factors accelerated wound healing in a partly NHE1-dependent fashion. Preincubation with acidic pH 7.1 stimulated restitution in a NHE1-dependent fashion. When pH 7.1 was maintained during the restitution period, migratory speed was reduced to ∼10% of the speed at pH 7,4, and the residual restitution was further inhibited by NHE1 inhibition. Lentiviral NHE2 expression increased the steady-state pHi and reduced the restitution velocity after low pH preincubation, which was reversible by pharmacological NHE2 inhibition. The results demonstrate that in RGM1 cells, migratory velocity is increased by NHE1 activation, while NHE2 activity inhibit this process. A differential activation of NHE1 and NHE2 may therefore, play a role in the initiation and completion of the epithelial restitution process.

  4. Passive Optical Technique to Measure Physical Properties of a Vibrating Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    was 25 megapascals, but the brief time produced only a small surface wave that propagated away from the point of impact. Sequence left to right are...optics treatise on reflectance, and defined relevant essentials of reflectance, first introducing the term bidirectional reflectance distribution...chosen to match the spatial extent of the data, ω=2π/λ is the frequency of the surface wave , λ is the wavelength of the surface wave , and ft is the time

  5. Velocity amplitudes in global convection simulations: The role of the Prandtl number and near-surface driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Miesch, Mark S.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity κ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity ν is decreased proportionally with κ (fixing the Prandtl number Pr = ν / κ), we find that U increases but asymptotes toward a constant value, as found by Featherstone and Hindman (2016). However, if ν is held fixed while decreasing κ (increasing Pr), we find that U systematically decreases. We attribute this to an enhancement of the thermal content of downflow plumes, which allows them to carry the solar luminosity with slower flow speeds. We contrast this with the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection which is not subject to this luminosity constraint. This dramatic difference in behavior for the two paths in parameter space (fixed Pr or fixed ν) persists whether the heat transport by unresolved, near-surface convection is modeled as a thermal conduction or as a fixed flux. The results suggest that if solar convection can operate in a high-Pr regime, then this might effectively limit the velocity amplitude. Small-scale magnetism is a possible source of enhanced viscosity that may serve to achieve this high-Pr regime.

  6. Average velocity field of the air flow over the water surface in a laboratory modeling of storm and hurricane conditions in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, A. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Sergeev, D. A.; Vdovin, M. I.; Baidakov, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Channel of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near-water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The measurements showed that the logarithmic part of the velocity profile of the air flow in the channel was observed in the immediate vicinity from the water surface (at a distance of 30 mm) and could be detected only using remote methods (PIV). According to the measured velocity profiles, dependences of aerodynamic drag factors of the water surface on the wind velocity at a height of 10 m were retrieved; they were compared with results of contact measurements carried out earlier on the same setup. It is shown that they agree with an accuracy of up to 20%; at moderate and strong wind velocities the coincidence falls within the experimental accuracy.

  7. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.;

    2003-01-01

    The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...... in the underlying Te layer. The Be-rich surface exhibits a (4 X 1) periodicity with alternating Te dimers and Te-Be-Te trimers. A vibration eigenfrequency of 165 cm(-1) is observed for the Te-rich surface, while eigenmodes at 157 and 188 cm(-1) are found for the Be-rich surface. The experimentally derived atomic...... geometry and the vibration modes are in very good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations....

  8. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  9. MHD flow and heat transfer of a micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with heat generation (absorption and slip velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A.A. Mahmoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of slip velocity on the flow and heat transfer for an electrically conducting micropolar fluid over a permeable stretching surface with variable heat flux in the presence of heat generation (absorption and a transverse magnetic field are investigated. The governing partial differential equations describing the problem are converted to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by using the similarity transformation, which is solved numerically using the Chebyshev spectral method. The effects of the slip parameter on the flow, micro-rotation and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress and the local Nusselt number are presented graphically. The numerical results of the local skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress and the local Nusselt number are given in a tabular form and discussed.

  10. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities--implications for mixing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects. Geostrophic turbulence models show that parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of a turbulent eddy. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and is currently underway.

  11. Vibration analysis of a rectangular thin isotropic plate with a part-through surface crack of arbitrary orientation and position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tanmoy; Mohanty, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, vibration analysis of a rectangular thin isotropic plate with a part-through surface crack of arbitrary orientation and position is performed by using the Kirchhoff plate theory. Simply supported (SSSS), clamped (CCCC) and simply supported-clamped (SCSC) boundary conditions are considered for the analysis. First, the governing differential equation of a cracked plate is formulated. A modified line spring model is then used to formulate the crack terms in the governing equation. Next, by the application of Burger's formulation, the differential equation is transformed into the well-known Duffing equation with cubic and quadratic nonlinearities. The Duffing equation is then solved by the method of multiple scales (MMS) to extract the frequency response curve. Natural frequencies are evaluated for different values of length, angle and position of a part-through surface crack. Some results are compared with the published literature. Amplitude variation with different values of length, angle and position of a part-through surface crack are presented, for all three types of the plate boundary conditions.

  12. Vibration reliability analysis for aeroengine compressor blade based on support vector machine response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hai-feng; BAI Guang-chen

    2015-01-01

    To ameliorate reliability analysis efficiency for aeroengine components, such as compressor blade, support vector machine response surface method (SRSM) is proposed. SRSM integrates the advantages of support vector machine (SVM) and traditional response surface method (RSM), and utilizes experimental samples to construct a suitable response surface function (RSF) to replace the complicated and abstract finite element model. Moreover, the randomness of material parameters, structural dimension and operating condition are considered during extracting data so that the response surface function is more agreeable to the practical model. The results indicate that based on the same experimental data, SRSM has come closer than RSM reliability to approximating Monte Carlo method (MCM); while SRSM (17.296 s) needs far less running time than MCM (10958 s) and RSM (9840 s). Therefore, under the same simulation conditions, SRSM has the largest analysis efficiency, and can be considered a feasible and valid method to analyze structural reliability.

  13. Flexural vibrations of finite composite poroelastic cylinders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandhya Rani Bandari; Srisailam Aleti; Malla Reddy Perati

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the flexural vibrations of composite poroelastic solid cylinder consisting of two cylinders that are bonded end to end. Poroelastic materials of the two cylinders are different. The frequency equations for pervious and impervious surfaces are obtained in the framework of Biot’s theory of wave propagation in poroelastic solids. The gauge invariance property is used to eliminate one arbitrary constant in the solution of the problem. This would lower the number of boundary conditions actually required. If the wavelength is infinite, frequency equations are degenerated as product of two determinants pertaining to extensional vibrations and shear vibrations. In this case, it is seen that the nature of the surface does not have any influence over shear vibrations unlike in the case of extensional vibrations. For illustration purpose, three composite cylinders are considered and then discussed. Of the three, two are sandstone cylinders and the third one is resulted when a cylindrical bone is implanted with Titanium. In either case, phase velocity is computed against aspect ratios.

  14. Distributed Absorber for Noise and Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Azoulay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to a wide-band frequency passive vibration attenuation is introduced in this paper. This aims to suppress noise and vibration of extended multimode objects like plates, panels and shells. The absorber is arranged in the form of a single-layer assembly of small inertial bodies (balls being distributed and moulded within the light visco-elastic media (e.g. silicone resin. The absorber as a whole is embedded into object face covering the critical patches of the system surface. For the purpose of characterization, the authors introduced the complex frequency response function relating the volume velocity produced by the vibrating object surface (response stimulated by a point-wise force (stimulus applied to a particular point. The simulation and optimization of the main frequency characteristics has been performed using a full scale 3-dimensional Finite Element model. These revealed some new dynamic features of absorber's structures, which can contribute to vibration attenuation. A full-scale physical experimentation with synthesised absorber's structures confirmed the main results of simulation and has shown significant noise reduction over a staggering 0–20 kHz frequency band. This was achieved with a negligible weight and volume penalty due to the addition of the absorber. The results can find multiple applications in noise and vibration control of different structures. Some examples of such applications are presented.

  15. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed.

  16. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  17. Axial buckling and transverse vibration of ultrathin nanowires: low symmetry and surface elastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiao; Narsu, B.; Yun, Guohong; Li, Jiangang; Yao, Haiyan

    2016-05-01

    Surface effects play a deterministic role in the physical and mechanical properties of nanosized materials and structures. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theoretical scheme for describing the elasticity of nanowires. The natural frequency and the critical compression force of axial buckling are obtained analytically, taking into consideration the influences of lower symmetry, additional elastic parameters, surface reconstruction, surface elasticity, and residual surface stress. Applications of the present theory to elastic systems for the    axially oriented Si and Cu nanowires and Ag    axially oriented nanowires yield good agreement with experimental data and calculated results. The larger positive value of the new elastic parameter c12α taken into account for Si    oriented nanowires drives the curves of natural frequency and critical compression force versus thickness towards the results obtained from density functional theory simulation. Negative surface stress decreases the critical load for axial buckling, thus making the nanowires very easy to bend into various structures. The present study is envisaged to provide useful insights for the design and application of nanowire-based devices.

  18. Three-dimensional glacier surface velocities of the Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Reeh, N; Mohr, J. J.; Madsen, S.N.; Oerter, Hans; Gundestrup, N.

    2003-01-01

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m y-1 exceed the vertical surface-parallel-flow components over much of the ablation area of Storstrømmen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude, results in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments t...

  19. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IV. A correlation between surface gravity and radial velocity variation and a statistical investigation of companion properties

    CERN Document Server

    Hekker, S; Aerts, C; Quirrenbach, Andreas G; Reffert, S; Mitchell, D S

    2008-01-01

    Since 1999, we have been conducting a radial velocity survey of 179 K giants using the CAT at UCO/Lick observatory. At present ~20-100 measurements have been collected per star with a precision of 5 to 8 m/s. Of the stars monitored, 145 (80%) show radial velocity (RV) variations at a level >20 m/s, of which 43 exhibit significant periodicities. Our aim is to investigate possible mechanism(s) that cause these observed RV variations. We intend to test whether these variations are intrinsic in nature, or possibly induced by companions, or both. In addition, we aim to characterise the parameters of these companions. A relation between log g and the amplitude of the RV variations is investigated for all stars in the sample. Furthermore, the hypothesis that all periodic RV variations are caused by companions is investigated by comparing their inferred orbital statistics with the statistics of companions around main sequence stars. A strong relation is found between the amplitude of the RV variations and log g in K ...

  20. Ab initio characterization of low-lying triplet state potential-energy surfaces and vibrational frequencies in the Wulf band of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2001-12-01

    Accurate ab initio potential-energy surfaces of the 3A2 and 3B1 states of ozone and their nonadiabatic coupling are reported near the ground-state equilibrium geometry using an internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method. These coupled three-dimensional potential-energy surfaces enable the first theoretical characterization of all three vibrational modes in the Wulf band. Reasonably good agreement with recent experimental observations is obtained.

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  2. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  3. Ab initio potential energy surface and excited vibrational states for the electronic ground state of Li2H

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢国森; 先晖; 谢代前

    1997-01-01

    A 285-pomt multi-reference configuration-interaction involving single and double excitations ( MRS DCI) potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of L12H is determined by using 6-311G (2df,2pd)basis set.A Simons-Parr-Finlan polynomial expansion is used to fit the discrete surface with a x2 of 4.64×106 The equn librium geometry occurs at Rc=0.172 nm and,LiHL1=94.10°.The dissociation energy for reaction I2H(2A)→L12(1∑g)+H(2S) is 243.910 kJ/mol,and that for reaction L12H(2A’)→HL1(1∑) + L1(2S) is 106.445 kl/mol The inversion barrier height is 50.388 kj/mol.The vibrational energy levels are calculated using the discrete variable representation (DVR) method.

  4. Techniques for Surface-Temperature Measurements and Transition Detection on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities--Status Report No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Wilder, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in a research effort to advance techniques for measuring surface temperatures and heat fluxes and determining transition locations on projectiles in hypersonic free flight in a ballistic range are described. Spherical and hemispherical titanium projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of 4.6-5.8 km/sec into air and nitrogen at pressures of 95-380 Torr. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.22 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 5.5-8 degrees and 4.7-7 degrees, depending on whether they were launched using an evacuated launch tube or not. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.86 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.0-2.5 degrees. Three intensified-charge-coupled-device (ICCD) cameras with wavelength sensitivity ranges of 480-870 nm (as well as one infrared camera with a wavelength sensitivity range of 3 to 5 microns), were used to obtain images of the projectiles in flight. Helium plumes were used to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD camera images were taken. ICCD and infrared (IR) camera images of titanium hemisphere projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.4 km/sec are presented as well as preliminary temperature data for these projectiles. Comparisons were made of normalized temperature data for shots at approx.190 Torr in air and nitrogen and with and without the launch tube evacuated. Shots into nitrogen had temperatures 6% lower than those into air. Evacuation of the launch tube was also found to lower the projectile temperatures by approx.6%.

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity and Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of GaN Grown on (0001) Sapphire by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; LI Hong-Lang; YAN Li; CHEN Xiao-Yang; LU Da-Cheng; WANG Xiao-Hui; LIU Xiang-Lin; HAN Pei-De; YUAN Hai-Rong; WANG Du; WANG Zhan-Guo; HE Shi-Tang

    2001-01-01

    High-quality and high-resistivity GaN films were grown on (0001) sapphire face by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. To measure the surface acoustic wave properties accurately, we deposited metallized interdigital trans ducers on the GaN surface. The acoustic surface wave velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient were measured, respectively, to be 5667m/s and 1.9% by the pulse method.

  6. Investigations of influence of vibration smoothing conditions of geometrical structure on machined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bańkowski, D.; Spadło, S.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents influence of the type of abrasive media on the operating parameters of the surface of components made of composite ceramic-glass, coated with a layer of antiferromagnetic. The research presents the possibilities offered by the use of resin bonded media with different intensities abrasive, understood as different content of abrasive grains. There were used Rollwasch smoothing media PB series – resin plastic media. Media were cone-shaped, with different abrasive properties (10%, 50% and 85%). The process was carried out by using chemical compounds - liquid supportive ME series L100 A22 / NF. Attention has also been given to the relation between the properties of abrasive media and surfaces that can be obtained after polishing with porcelain media and deburring with resin bonded media. As the output surface used the disc of hard drive. Then, to analysis of the possibility various kinds of abrasive media in vibratory finishing the analysis of surface texture with an optical profilometer Talysurf CCI Lite - Taylor Hobson were done. As a result of the effects polishing and deburring using vibratory finishing were compared.

  7. Vibrational Fingerprints of Low-Lying PtnP2n (n = 1–5) Cluster Structures from Global Optimization Based on Density Functional Theory Potential Energy Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Jedidi, Abdesslem

    2015-11-13

    Vibrational fingerprints of small PtnP2n (n = 1–5) clusters were computed from their low-lying structures located from a global exploration of their DFT potential energy surfaces with the GSAM code. Five DFT methods were assessed from the CCSD(T) wavenumbers of PtP2 species and CCSD relative energies of Pt2P4 structures. The eight first PtnP2n isomers found are reported. The vibrational computations reveal (i) the absence of clear signatures made by overtone or combination bands due to very weak mechanical and electrical anharmonicities and (ii) some significant and recurrent vibrational fingerprints in correlation with the different PP bonding situations in the PtnP2n structures.

  8. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  9. Determination of lifetime and surface recombination velocity of p-n junction solar cells and diodes by observing transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Fredrik A.; Liou, Juin J.; Neugroschel, Arnost; Jung, Taewon W.

    1987-01-01

    The unified view of transient methods for the determination of recombination lifetime tau and back surface recombination velocity S presented here for silicon solar cells and diodes attempts to define limitations of existing methods and to evolve improvements. The presence of sizable junction capacitance for silicon devices under forward voltage invalidates the use of conventional open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and reverse recovery. This led Green (1983) to his method of compensated open-circuit voltage decay, in which the addition of an external resistor shunting the solar cell partially corrects for the presence of the junction capacitance. Setting this resistance to zero produces an electrical short-circuit current-decay method, which has the advantage of enabling determination of both tau and S. In an alternate approach, one may insert the functional dependence of the junction capacitance on forward voltage. This new method, denoted by the acronym OCVDCAP, enables the determination of tau with apparently greater accuracy than that obtained by previous methods utilizing voltage transients. But OCVDCAP has in common with the previous methods that it determines tau only and has practical utility only for determining tau of long-base devices. This means that it is useful only for thick base regions. In principle, however, it has an advantage over short-circuit current decay: it requires only pressure contacts, not ohmic contacts, and therefore may be used to determine tau after key processing steps in manufacturing.

  10. Generalized Free-Surface Effect and Random Vibration Theory: a new tool for computing moment magnitudes of small earthquakes using borehole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnini, Luca; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2016-07-01

    Although optimal, computing the moment tensor solution is not always a viable option for the calculation of the size of an earthquake, especially for small events (say, below Mw 2.0). Here we show an alternative approach to the calculation of the moment-rate spectra of small earthquakes, and thus of their scalar moments, that uses a network-based calibration of crustal wave propagation. The method works best when applied to a relatively small crustal volume containing both the seismic sources and the recording sites. In this study we present the calibration of the crustal volume monitored by the High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN), along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Parkfield. After the quantification of the attenuation parameters within the crustal volume under investigation, we proceed to the spectral correction of the observed Fourier amplitude spectra for the 100 largest events in our data set. Multiple estimates of seismic moment for the all events (1811 events total) are obtained by calculating the ratio of rms-averaged spectral quantities based on the peak values of the ground velocity in the time domain, as they are observed in narrowband-filtered time-series. The mathematical operations allowing the described spectral ratios are obtained from Random Vibration Theory (RVT). Due to the optimal conditions of the HRSN, in terms of signal-to-noise ratios, our network-based calibration allows the accurate calculation of seismic moments down to Mw < 0. However, because the HRSN is equipped only with borehole instruments, we define a frequency-dependent Generalized Free-Surface Effect (GFSE), to be used instead of the usual free-surface constant F = 2. Our spectral corrections at Parkfield need a different GFSE for each side of the SAF, which can be quantified by means of the analysis of synthetic seismograms. The importance of the GFSE of borehole instruments increases for decreasing earthquake's size because for smaller earthquakes the bandwidth available

  11. Effects of electronic relaxation processes on vibrational linewidths of adsorbates on surfaces: The case of CO/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novko, D.; Alducin, M.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate nonadiabatic effects for the vibrational stretch mode of the CO molecule adsorbed on the top site of the Cu(100) surface. By studying the long-wavelength (q ≈0 ) imaginary and real parts of the density functional theory based phonon self-energy due to the electron-phonon coupling Πλ we obtain the phonon linewidth and the frequency renormalization of the CO stretch mode, respectively. To simulate electronic scattering processes that lead to further damping of the phonon modes we include a phenomenological damping in the phonon self-energy, as well as in the single-electron spectral function that enters Πλ, through the momentum distribution function. For the specific case of electron-impurity scattering we explicitly show how this process opens the indirect intraband channel and broadens the linewidth of the CO stretch mode. To emphasize the importance of accounting for electronic scattering processes we compare the phonon linewidths in the clean noninteracting limit (infinite electron lifetime) and when electronic scattering processes are phenomenologically included (finite electron lifetime) with available experimental data. We find that the agreement with experiments is improved in the latter case.

  12. Crack modelling and detection in Timoshenko FGM beam under transverse vibration using frequency contour and response surface model with GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Panigrahi, Brajesh; Pohit, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, dynamic response of cracked Timoshenko beam with functionally graded material properties are obtained by a numerical technique using Ritz approximation. In order to verify the applicability and performance of the formulation, comparisons of the present numerical method with three-dimensional FEM models are made. Crack is assumed to be transverse and open throughout the vibration cycle. Two different crack detection techniques have been proposed. Results obtained by the numerical technique are used in both of the crack detection techniques. In the first technique, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours of different modes helps in the prediction of crack location and size. In the second technique, crack is modelled using response surface methodology (RSM). The sum of the squared errors between the numerical and RSM regression model natural frequencies is used as the objective function. This objective function is minimised using genetic algorithm optimisation technique. Both the crack detection techniques and the numerical analysis have shown good agreement with each other.

  13. Arc-Surfaced Frictional Damper for Vibration Control in Container Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongxian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new arc-surfaced frictional damper (AFD is proposed and its hysteretic behavior is experimentally studied. Then the device is applied to container crane based on a seesaw mechanism. The major advantage of the seesaw damping system is that the long tension cables can be utilized as bracing between the seesaw member and the portal legs to avoid compression and buckling of the cables. A simplified trilinear force-displacement model on the basis of experimental results is adopted to represent the hysteretic behavior of AFD. After that, seismic responses of container crane with and without dampers to four earthquakes are studied using nonlinear dynamic time-history analysis. Besides this system, a diagonal-brace-AFD system is studied for comparison. A method based on the displacement and energy dissipation ratio is proposed to find the optimum slip force for seesaw damping system. Performance of AFD control system is assessed though various parameters including displacement and maximum portal frame drift angle. Results prove a feasible application of AFD control system to absorb large amounts of seismic energy and significantly reduce the structural responses.

  14. Time-Delayed Velocity-Acceleration Feedback for Active Vibration Control of Cantilever Beam%基于速度-加速度时滞反馈的振动主动控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安方; 陈卫东; 邵敏强

    2012-01-01

    The design problem of the time-delayed controller with the measured acceleration signal is presented, which is used to neutralize the effect of the group delay induced by the low-pass filter on active vibration control systems. By means of the reduction method and the state-derivative feedback strategy, a time-delayed velocity-acceleration feedback controller is proposed without the inclusion of the displacement signal, so that the accumulation errors caused by twice integration of the acceleration signal can be avoided. The developed time delayed feedback controller is examined by the computer simulation, with a special focusing on the control performance of a cantilever beam with the piezoelectric actuator and the acceleration sensor. Simulation results demonstrate that the controller can effectively reduce the free vibration response of the intelligent cantilever beam, and compared with the velocity-acceleration feedback controller, it has better control effects at different time delays.%在振动主动控制中,基于加速度测量信号,并考虑滤波器群时延引入的时滞,研究了一种时滞控制器设计方法.采用等维方法和状态导数反馈思想,提出一种速度-加速度时滞反馈控制器的设计方法.该控制器不含位移信号,可省去两次数值积分和去直流分量、趋势项这两个过程,并可避免由两次数值积分带来的累积误差.以粘帖有压电陶瓷和加速度传感器的智能梁为控制对象,采用该控制器控制其自由振动,并与速度-加速度反馈控制效果进行比较.仿真结果表明,当采用速度-加速度反馈直接控制时滞系统时,若时滞超出其稳定区间,该方法失效,而速度-加速度时滞反馈控制方法则具有良好的控制效果.

  15. Very low surface recombination velocities on p- and n-type c-Si by ultrafast spatial atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, F.; Veith, B.; Tiba, V.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.; Brendel, R.; Schmidt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using aluminum oxide (Al2 O3) films deposited by high-rate spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD), we achieve very low surface recombination velocities of 6.5 cm/s on p -type and 8.1 cm/s on n -type crystalline silicon wafers. Using spatially separated reaction zones instead of

  16. Vibration-induced droplet atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan

    The atomization of liquid drops is investigated experimentally using laser vibrometry, high-speed imaging, and particle tracking techniques. The spray is generated by a novel vibration-induced droplet atomization (VIDA) process in which a sessile drop is atomized by an underlying vibrating thin metal diaphragm, resulting in rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the free surface of the primary drop. Under some conditions, the primary drop can be atomized extremely rapidly by a bursting-like mechanism (e.g., a 0.1 ml water drop can be atomized in 0.4 seconds). The present research has focused on four major areas: global characteristics of VIDA process, instability modes and free surface dynamics of the forced drop, mechanisms of the interface breakup, and parametric characterization of the ensuing spray. Prior to atomization, the drop free surface undergoes three transitions: from axisymmetric standing waves to azimuthal waves, to a newly-observed lattice mode, and to a disordered pre-ejection state. The droplet ejection results from localized collapse of surface troughs and initiation and ultimate breakup of momentary liquid spikes. Breakup begins with capillary pinch-off from spike tips and can be followed by additional pinching of liquid droplets. For a relatively low-viscosity liquid, e.g., water, a capillary-wave instability of the spike is observed in some cases, while for a very viscous liquid, e.g., a glycerin/water solution, the first breakup occurs near the stem of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, elongated thread. Different mechanisms dominating the primary breakup of the spike are operative in the low- and high-viscosity ejection regimes. When ejection of the secondary droplets is triggered, the evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary drop and the vibrating diaphragm. Due to these dynamics, the process can be either self-intensifying or self-decaying. The resulting VIDA spray

  17. Finite-amplitude vibration of a bubble and sonoluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Zu-Wen; Xiao Ling; Guo Liang-Hao

    2004-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the differential equation for a bubble performing finite-amplitude vibration are given in detail for a variety of situations. The results demonstrate that in lower acoustic pressure (maximum Mach number very low) its vibration has bounce. When acoustic pressure is in excess of 1.18atm and the instantaneous radius of the bubble approaches its equivalent Van der Waals radius, the maximum velocity and acceleration on the surface of a bubble have a huge increase in a very short period, which seems to favour the sonoluminescence. In vacuum environment (0.1atm),an intensive sonoluminescence could be generated.

  18. A refined integro-surface energy-based model for vibration of magnetically actuated double-nanowire-systems carrying electric current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2017-02-01

    A novel surface energy-based model is developed to examine more precisely vibrations of current-carrying double-nanowire-systems immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. Using Biot-Savart and Lorentz laws, a more refined version of interwire interactional magnetic forces is presented. By employing Rayleigh beam theory, the equations of motion are derived. In fact, these are coupled integro-differential equations which are more accurate with respect to those of the previously developed models. For simply supported and clamped nanosystems, governing equations are analyzed via assumed mode method. The effects of interwire distance, slenderness ratio, electric current, magnetic field strength, and surface effect on the fundamental frequency are addressed carefully. The obtained results display the importance of exploiting the refined model for vibration analysis of nanosystems with low interwire distance, high electric current, and high magnetic field strength.

  19. The giant frequency shift of intramolecular O-H vibration band in the raman spectra of water on the silver surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kompan, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The giant frequency shift was observed in Raman spectra for inramolecular O-H vibration band. The effect was observed in SERS-condition experiment, when exciting light was focused by short-focus objective on the Ag-surface, merged in water. The shift was detected relatively to the regularl position of band, measured from the bulk of water under the same other conditions.

  20. [The study of dimethoate by means of vibrational and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Li, Si; Yu, Dan-Ni; Zhou, Gunag-Ming; Ji, Fang-Ying; Subklew, Guenter

    2010-12-01

    The vibrational structure of dimethoate, with its solid state and saturated solutions at acidic and basic conditions, was characterized with combination of means of FTIR and FT-Raman vibrational spectroscopy technology, and the comprehensive information about the dimethoate molecular groups' vibrational features was obtained. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of dimethoate at different concentrations with different acidic and basic conditions, and adsorbed on the substrate's surface of the core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles, were also obtained. The adsorption states of dimethoate's molecule on the substrate's surface of the core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles and the effects by the different acid-base conditions were investigated, with speculation of the adsorption mechanism. From the results, v(as)(NH), v(as)(CH3), v(O=C-N), tau(O=C-N), v(P-O), v(P=S), v(C-C) and delta(P-O-C) are the characteristic peaks of inner dimethoate structure's vibrations; and the concentration range in which dimethoate could interact with core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles fully is about 1.0 x 10(-3) mol * L(-1) both in acidic and basic conditions. Dimethoate's molecule interacts with SERS' substrate surface mainly through P-O-C, O=C-C, (S-CH2), P=S, and CH3 structures; and the effects of dimethoate's hydrolysis path in acidic and basic conditions on the adsorption are discussed, which give some good references for the research of organophosphorus pesticides' transformations in different environmental systems.

  1. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  2. Estimation of surface-wave phase velocity from microtremor observation using an array with a reference station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kato, Kei; Chimoto, Kosuke; Tsuno, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for estimation of Rayleigh wave phase velocities from microtremor observations, using an array with a reference station, is investigated in this study. Simultaneous observation of microtremors at a reference station and at a strong motion observation array in the Kanto Basin, Japan, was carried out. We first calculated cross correlations between records at the reference station and those at stations in the array using a seismic interferometric processing method on a 4300-h data series. After identifying dispersive Rayleigh waves from results of multiple filtering analysis of the cross correlations, semblance analysis of the cross correlations for different segments was carried out to estimate phase velocities for fundamental and higher-mode Rayleigh waves. The phase velocities from the proposed method are more appropriate than those from conventional methods at long periods as they avoid contamination by higher mode Rayleigh waves. The fundamental Rayleigh wave phase velocities were inverted to an S-wave velocity profile for deep sedimentary layers. We also examined the variations in the phase velocity with decreasing data duration. The phase velocities at periods less than 3 s from 6-h records are similar to those from 4300-h records, suggesting that our method is possibly applicable in microtremor exploration.

  3. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  4. Study on Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Grinding Force and Surface Quality in Ultrasonic Assisted Micro End Grinding of Silica Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic vibration assisted micro end grinding (UAMEG is a promising processing method for micro parts made of hard and brittle materials. First, the influence of ultrasonic assistance on the mechanism of this processing technology is theoretically analyzed. Then, in order to reveal the effects of ultrasonic vibration and grinding parameters on grinding forces and surface quality, contrast grinding tests of silica glass with and without ultrasonic assistance using micro radial electroplated diamond wheel are conducted. The grinding forces are measured using a three-component dynamometer. The surface characteristics are detected using the scanning electron microscope. The experiment results demonstrate that grinding forces are significantly reduced by introducing ultrasonic vibration into conventional micro end grinding (CMEG of silica glass; ultrasonic assistance causes inhibiting effect on variation percentages of tangential grinding force with grinding parameters; ductile machining is easier to be achieved and surface quality is obviously improved due to ultrasonic assistance in UAMEG. Therefore, larger grinding depth and feed rate adopted in UAMEG can lead to the improvement of removal rate and machining efficiency compared with CMEG.

  5. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  6. The meandering Gulf Stream as seen by the Geosat altimeter - Surface transport, position, and velocity variance from 73 deg to 46 deg W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the surface geostrophic velocity field for the Gulf Stream region for the position, structure, and surface transport of the Gulf Stream for 2.5 yr of the Geosat altimeter Exact Repeat Mission. Synthetic data using a Gaussian velocity profile were generated and fit to the sea surface residual heights to create a synthetic mean sea surface height field and profiles of absolute geostrophic currents. An analysis of the model parameters and the actual geostrophic velocity profiles revealed two different flow regimes for the Gulf Stream connected by a narrow transition region coincident with the New England Seamount Chain. The upstream region was found to exhibit relatively straight Gulf Stream paths, long Eulerian time scales, and eastward propagating meanders. The downstream region had more large meanders, no consistent propagation direction, and shorter Eulerian time scales. A 25-percent reduction in surface transport occurred in the transition region, with a corresponding reduction in current speed and no change in Gulf Stream width.

  7. 利用Kinect传感器获取振动表面的四维振动数据%The four-dimensional vibration data obtaining on vibrating surfaces by Kinect sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严慧敏; 何炳蔚

    2015-01-01

    The main weaknesses of traditional vibration measurement are that the limit measurement posi‐tions ,low dimensions and with high cost .In this paper ,the speckle ranging technique principle and sam‐pling frequency applied into real‐time four‐dimensional measurement approach have been studied to obtain information from the surfaces of vibrating objects by using Kinect sensor .It can quickly obtain the meas‐urement with four‐dimensional information on the surface with lower cost .Through the measurement test , and by the comparison to different data measured by Kinect sensor and force sensor in different frequen‐cies ,the results show that Kinect sensor can be used in low‐frequency vibration measurement .%针对目前大多数振动测量方法存在测点数量有限、维度底、成本高的问题,基于Kinect传感器的散斑测距技术原理和采样频率,研究将其应用于实时测量振动物体表面所有点的振动信息,实现高维、全域、低成本的振动测量。通过测量实验,比较不同频率下Kinect传感器和力传感器测得的数据,结果表明了Ki‐nect设备用于低频振动测量的可行性。

  8. Structure-based sampling and self-correcting machine learning for accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces and vibrational levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dral, Pavlo O.; Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Thiel, Walter

    2017-06-01

    We present an efficient approach for generating highly accurate molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) using self-correcting, kernel ridge regression (KRR) based machine learning (ML). We introduce structure-based sampling to automatically assign nuclear configurations from a pre-defined grid to the training and prediction sets, respectively. Accurate high-level ab initio energies are required only for the points in the training set, while the energies for the remaining points are provided by the ML model with negligible computational cost. The proposed sampling procedure is shown to be superior to random sampling and also eliminates the need for training several ML models. Self-correcting machine learning has been implemented such that each additional layer corrects errors from the previous layer. The performance of our approach is demonstrated in a case study on a published high-level ab initio PES of methyl chloride with 44 819 points. The ML model is trained on sets of different sizes and then used to predict the energies for tens of thousands of nuclear configurations within seconds. The resulting datasets are utilized in variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels of CH3Cl. By using both structure-based sampling and self-correction, the size of the training set can be kept small (e.g., 10% of the points) without any significant loss of accuracy. In ab initio rovibrational spectroscopy, it is thus possible to reduce the number of computationally costly electronic structure calculations through structure-based sampling and self-correcting KRR-based machine learning by up to 90%.

  9. Crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis, vibrational, thermal behavior and UV spectroscopy of (2,6-diaminopyridinium) dihydrogen arsenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Emna; Ben Hassen, Chawki; Chniba-Boudjada, Nassira; Daoud, Abdelaziz; Mhiri, Tahar; Boujelbene, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    A new organic dihydrogenomonoarsenate (C5H8N3)H2AsO4 was synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the centro-symmetric space group P21/n. Unit cell parameters are a = 10.124 (5)Ǻ, b = 6.648 (5)Ǻ, c = 13.900 (5)Ǻ, β = 105.532° with Z = 4. The crystal structure was solved and refined to R = 0.038 with 2001 independent reflections. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis were used to visualize the fidelity of the crystal structure which has been determined by X-ray data collection on single crystals (C5H8N3)H2AsO4. Due the strong hydrogen Osbnd H⋯O bond network connecting the H2AsO4 groups, the anionic arrangement must be described as infinite (H2AsO4)nn-of dimers chains spreading, in a zig zag fashion, parallel to the b direction. The organic groups (C5H8N3)+ are anchored between adjacent polyanions through multiple hydrogen bonds Nsbnd H⋯O. The thermal decomposition of precursors studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), indicate the existence of two mass loss regions correspond to degradation of the title compound. The existence of vibrational modes correspond to the organic and inorganic groups are identified by the infrared and Raman spectroscopy in the frequency ranges 500-4000 and 25-4000 cm-1, respectively.

  10. Probing the structure and nano-scale mechanical properties of polymer surfaces with scanning force microscopy and sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracias, David Hugo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) has been used to quantitatively measure the elastic modulus, friction and hardness of polymer surfaces with special emphasis on polyethylene and polypropylene. In the experiments, tips of different radii of curvature ranging from 20 nm to 1000 nm have been used and the high pressure applied by the SFM have been observed to affect the values obtained in the measurements. The contact of the SFM tip with the polymer surface is explained by fitting the experimental curves to theoretical predictions of contact mechanics. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Vibrational Spectroscopy has been used to measure vibrational spectra of polymer surfaces in the vibrational range of 2700 to 3100 cm-1. Strong correlations are established between surface chemistry and surface structure as probed by SFG and mechanical properties measured by SFM on the surfaces. In these studies segregation of low surface energy moieties, from the bulk of the polymer to the surface have been studied. It was found that surface segregation occurs in miscible polymer blends and a small concentration of surface active polymer can be used to totally modify the surface properties of the blend. A novel high vacuum SFM was built to do temperature dependent measurements of mechanical changes occurring at the surface of polypropylene during the glass transition of the polymer. Using this instrument the modulus and friction of polypropylene was measured in the range of room temperature to ˜-60°C. An increase in the ordering of the backbone of the polymer chains below the glass transition measured by SFG correlates well with the increase in modulus measured on the same surface with SFM. Friction measurements have been done on polyethylene with three different instruments by applying loads ranging from nN to sub newton i.e. over eight orders of magnitude. Pressure and contact area effects were observed to play a significant role in determining the frictional response of the polymer

  11. Research on the Influence of Cutting Condition on the Surface Microstruct ure of Ultra-thin Wall Parts in Ultrasonic Vibration Cutting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In many fields of high-tech industry the ultra-t hi n wall parts are employed. In this paper the experiments were carried out to dis cuss the surface microstructure of the camera's guided drawtube by applying ult rasonic vibration cutting device to the traditional lathe. The influence rule of the cutting condition on the surface roughness was put forward, which was drawn by comparing the ultrasonic cutting with the common cutting by use of the cemen ted carbide tool and the polycrystalline diamond (PCD) t...

  12. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: a set-up for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sunday, Cecily; Cherrier, Olivier; Serrano, Sara Morales; Nardi, Claudia Valeria; Janin, Tristan; Martinez, Iris Avila; Gourinat, Yves; Mimoun, David

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ~0.1 - 1.0 m/s^2. Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop-tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, rele...

  13. Effects of closed chain exercises for the lumbar region performed with local vibration applied to an unstable support surface on the thickness and length of the transverse abdominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kihyun; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jinsik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of closed chain exercises performed with local vibration applied to an unstable support surface on the thickness and length of the transverse abdominis. [Subjects] The subjects were 64 healthy university students who were randomly assigned to a bridge exercise with sling and vibration group (BESVG, n=30) and a bridge exercise with sling group (BESG, n=34). [Methods] The bridge exercise was repeated four times per set and a total of 18 sets were performed: 9 sets in a supine position and 9 sets in a prone position. In both the BESVG and the BESG groups, the thickness and length of the transverse abdominis (TrA) were measured using ultrasonography with the abdomen "drawn-in" and the pressure of a biofeedback unit maintained at 40 mmHg, both before and after the intervention. [Results] In intra-group comparisons, the BESVG showed significant increases in the thickness of the TrA and significant decreases in the length of the TrA. The BESG showed significant increases in the thickness of the TrA. The BESVG showed significant increases in the thickness of the TrA and significant decreases in the length of the TrA compared to BESG. [Conclusion] Closed chain exercises for the lumbar region performed with local vibration applied to slings, which are unstable support surfaces, are an effective intervention for altering the thickness and length of the TrA.

  14. Power spectral density function and spatial autocorrelation of the ambient vibration full-wavefield generated by a distribution of spatially correlated surface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunedei, Enrico; Albarello, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic dispersion curves are here computed in the frame of an ambient-vibration full-wavefield model, which relies on the description of both ambient-vibration ground displacement and its sources as stochastic fields defined on the Earth's surface, stationary in time and homogeneous in space. In this model, previously developed for computing synthetic Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio curves, the power spectral density function and the spatial autocorrelation of the displacement are naturally described as functions of the power spectral density function of the generating forces and of the subsoil properties (via the relevant Green's function), by also accounting for spatial correlation of these forces. Dispersion curves are computed from the displacement power spectral density function and from the spatial autocorrelation according with the well-known f-k and SPAC techniques, respectively. Two examples illustrate the way this new ambient-vibration model works, showing its possible use in better understanding the role of the surface waves in forming the dispersion curves, as well as its capability to capture some remarkable experimental findings.

  15. Diffraction Studies of the Atomic Vibrations of Bulk and Surface Atoms in the Reciprocal and Real Spaces of Nanocrystalline SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Weber, H.-P.; Vogel, S.; Palosz, B.; Palosz, B.

    2004-01-01

    To describe and evaluate the vibrational properties of nanoparticles it is necessary to distinguish between the surface and the core of the particles. Theoretical calculations show that vibrational density of states of the inner atoms of nanograins is similar to bulk material but shifted to higher energies which can be explained by the fact that the gain core is stressed (hardened) due to the presence of internal pressure. Theoretical calculations also show that there is a difference between vibrational properties of a crystal lattice of the grain interior in isolated particles and in a dense (sintered) nanocrystalline material. This is probably due to a coupling of the modes inside the grains via the grain boundaries in dense nanocrystalline bodies. We examined strains present in the surface shell based on examination of diamond and Sic nanocrystals in reciprocal (Bragg-type scattering) and real (PDF analysis) space analysis of neutron diffraction data. Recently we examined the atomic thermal motions in nanocrystalline Sic based on the assumption of a simple Einstein model for uncorrelated atomic notions. According to this model, the Bragg intensity is attenuated as a function of scattering angle by the Debye-Waller factor. Based on this assumption overall temperature factors were determined from the Wilson plots.

  16. MCSCF/CI ground state potential energy surface, dipole moment function, and gas phase vibrational frequencies for the nitrogen dioxide positive ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, D.G.

    1980-05-01

    The ground state potential energy surface for the nitrogen dioxide positive ion, NO/sup +//sub 2/X /sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/(..sigma../sup +/,A/sub 1/,A'), has been scanned with a correlated wave function to obtain directly, for the first time, the gas phase equilibrium geometry, force constants, vibrational frequencies, and dipole moment function. The wave function for this scan was constructed from a double-zeta plus polarization one-electron basis with a 12 configuration MCSCF determination of the orbital basis for a full valence /sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ configuration interaction expansion. The calculated equilibrium bond length is 1.12 A. The vibrational frequencies are computed to be ..nu../sub 1/=1514, ..nu../sub 2/=679, and ..nu../sub 3/=2614 cm/sup -1/ The present ab initio results differ significantly from crystalline spectroscopic studies and are, thus, the best values available for the gas phase vibrational frequencies. The dipole moment function is nonzero at the ..sigma../sup +/, A/sub 1/, and A' geometries included in the potential surface scan, and is obtained here to provide for the future a priori calculation of the infrared band intensities.

  17. Theoretical studies for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Rui [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); School of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Zheng, Limin; Yang, Minghui, E-mail: yplu@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Lu, Yunpeng, E-mail: yplu@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-10-21

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N{sub 2}O monomer is near the N{sub 2} monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm{sup −1}, which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm{sup −1}. A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers {sup 14}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O and {sup 15}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters.

  18. Studying the influence of surface effects on vibration behavior of size-dependent cracked FG Timoshenko nanobeam considering nonlocal elasticity and elastic foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Soltanpour, Mahdi; Yazdi, Ali; Safi, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    Free transverse vibration of a size-dependent cracked functionally graded (FG) Timoshenko nanobeam resting on a polymer elastic foundation is investigated in the present study. Also, all of the surface effects: surface density, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are studied. Moreover, satisfying the balance condition between the nanobeam and its surfaces was discussed. According to the power-law distribution, it is supposed that the material properties of the FG nanobeam are varying continuously across the thickness. Considering the small-scale effect, the Eringen's nonlocal theory is used; accounting the effect of polymer elastic foundation, the Winkler model is proposed. For this purpose, the equations of motion of the FG Timoshenko nanobeam and boundary conditions are obtained using Hamilton's principle. To find the analytical solutions for equations of motion of the FG nanobeam, the separation of variables method is employed. Two cases of boundary conditions, i.e., simply supported-simply supported (SS) and clamped-clamped (CC) are investigated in the present work. Numerical results are demonstrating a good agreement between the results of the present study and some available cases in the literature. The emphasis of the present study is on investigating the effect of various parameters such as crack severity, crack position, gradient index, mode number, nonlocal parameter, elastic foundation parameter and nanobeam length. It is clearly revealed that the vibrational behavior of a FG nanobeam is depending significantly on these effects. Also, these numerical results can be serving as benchmarks for future studies of FG nanobeams.

  19. A new scheme for joint surface wave and earthquake travel-time inversion and resulting 3-D velocity model for the western North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Fry, Bill

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a joint inversion of surface wave group velocity (U) and local earthquake travel-time (LET) data and applied it to the North Island, New Zealand, to improve the existing New Zealand wide 3-D seismic velocity model. This approach takes full advantage of the differing sensitivities of surface and body waves. The data are complementary, particularly at shallow depths where LET tomography suffers from vertical smearing and surface wave tomography is susceptible to horizontal smearing. The employed U observations are 2-D models at discrete periods which were developed for Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured from the 1744 interstation Green's Functions obtained by stacked cross-correlations of broadband ambient noise data. In the volume surrounding each U observation, we distribute numerous points for relating the U observation to the gridded 3-D tomography model, analogous to points along a raypath. The partial derivatives at the points are computed using the U sensitivity kernels for Vp and Vs, with Vs related to Vp and Vp/Vs perturbations. Thus, the U observations are included along with the travel-time observations in a joint inversion to best fit the data and the existing tomography model. The resulting model favors the U where there is little travel-time resolution. The combined inversion used 2949 U observations at 6-16 s period and LET from 1509 earthquakes that extend to 370 km depth, and improved the model fit by reducing the U residual data variance by 62% and the LET by 9%. The resulting model generally has better constrained depth of shallow anomalies, with decreased velocity in the upper 2 km in the western North Island, and slight focusing of crustal high velocity features at 8 km depth. Significantly, the increased resolution in the shallowest 5 km of the model improves the utility of the 3-D model for use in seismic hazard assessment, wave propagation studies, and studies comparing seismic velocities to geological mapping.

  20. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis