WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface velocity softly-recovered

  1. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    on surface velocities recorded at the site. The Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL) under Engabreen, augmented by additional subglacial pressure and hydrological measurements, provides a invaluable observations for detailed process-oriented studies. However, the lack of complementary surface velocity data...... complicates comparisons with other surface-oriented glaciohydrological studies. One major aim of this thesis is to provide a longer record of surface velocity, enabling a more complete understanding of the glacial hydro-mechanical relationship at Engabreen. In order to extend the velocity dataset here, a time......-lapse camera based study was carried out, providing seasonal velocity maps over a large portion of an inaccessible region of the glacier. The processing and feature tracking of terrestrially based imagery, in order to obtain quantitative velocity measurements, is challenging. Whilst optical feature tracking...

  2. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    Recent studies have likened the seasonal observations of ice flow at the marginal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to those found on smaller alpine and valley counterparts. These similarities highlight the need for further small scale studies of seasonal evolution in the hydrological...... and dynamic structure of valley glaciers, to aid interpretation of observations from the margins of the GrIS. This thesis aims to collate a large suit of glacio-hydrological data from the outlet glacier Engabreen, Norway, in order to better understand the role the subglacial drainage configuration has...... on surface velocities recorded at the site. The Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL) under Engabreen, augmented by additional subglacial pressure and hydrological measurements, provides a invaluable observations for detailed process-oriented studies. However, the lack of complementary surface velocity data...

  3. Iterative reconstruction of the transducer surface velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Erwin; van Dongen, Koen

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasound arrays used for medical imaging consist of many elements placed closely together. Ideally, each element vibrates independently. However, because of mechanical coupling, crosstalk between neighboring elements may occur. To quantify the amount of crosstalk, the transducer velocity distribution should be measured. In this work, a method is presented to reconstruct the velocity distribution from far-field pressure field measurements acquired over an arbitrary surface. The distribution is retrieved from the measurements by solving an integral equation, derived from the Rayleigh integral of the first kind, using a conjugate gradient inversion scheme. This approach has the advantages that it allows for arbitrary transducer and pressure field measurement geometries, as well as the application of regularization techniques. Numerical experiments show that measuring the pressure field along a hemisphere enclosing the transducer yields significantly more accurate reconstructions than measuring along a parallel plane. In addition, it is shown that an increase in accuracy is achieved when the assumption is made that all points on the transducer surface vibrate in phase. Finally, the method has been tested on an actual transducer with an active element of 700 × 200 μm which operates at a center frequency of 12.2 MHz. For this transducer, the velocity distribution has been reconstructed accurately to within 50 μm precision from pressure measurements at a distance of 1.98 mm (=16λ0) using a 200-μm-diameter needle hydrophone.

  4. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  5. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  6. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  7. Velocity Map Imaging the Scattering Plane of Gas Surface Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, David J; Leng, Joseph G; Greaves, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D sacattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was demonstrated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the systems capabilities the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a PTFE surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  8. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  11. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  12. Measurement of surface recombination velocity on heavily doped indium phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Ghalla-Goradia, Manju; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    Surface recombination velocity (SRV) on heavily doped n-type and p-type InP was measured as a function of surface treatment. For the limited range of substrates and surface treatments studied, SRV and surface stability depend strongly on the surface treatment. SRVs of 100,000 cm/sec in both p-type and n-type InP are obtainable, but in n-type the low-SRV surfaces were unstable, and the only stable surfaces on n-type had SRVs of more than 10to the 6th cm/sec.

  13. Measuring surface current velocities in the Agulhas region with ASAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available velocities for oceanographic research in the Agulhas Current are assessed. Comparisons between radar, altimetry and surface drifters observations of the surface currents show that accurate wind fields are a strong pre-requisite to the derivation of meaningful...

  14. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  15. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  16. Surface wave velocity structure of the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    The Nanga Parbat Haramosh massif (NPHM) is located in the western syntaxis of the India-Eurasia collision zone and is subject to erosion rates that are so extreme as to impact the isostatic equilibrium of the massif. In order to investigate the interaction between large scale tectonic forces and local isostatic processes, we employ a Rayleigh wave tomography method to measure phase velocities within the massif and surrounding region at crust and mantle depths. Our inversion solves for phase velocity anomalies by representing perturbations in the wavefield as the interference of two plane waves. Our data set was obtained from a temporary seismic array deployed in 1996 and includes 53 teleseismic events with Mw ≥ 5.0, at periods from 20 to 79 s. Phase velocities at short periods are low, ranging from 3.2 km s-1 at 20 s, and increasing gradually to 3.5 km s-1 at 40 s. These velocities are 11 per cent lower than velocities observed in the Indian continental Plate at periods below 45 s. Above 50 s, phase velocities in the Nanga Parbat region are significantly higher, ranging from 3.7 km s-1 at 45 s to 4.0 km s-1 at 79 s. These high phase velocities above 60 s are consistent with average velocities measured within the Indian Plate. Comparison of these results with surface wave studies in other regions of the Tibetan plateau including the eastern syntaxis and central Tibet show a similar low velocity anomaly below 45 s. Phase velocities above 55 s, however, are significantly higher in the Nanga Parbat region compared to velocities reported for all other regions of the plateau. Shear wave inversions produce significantly low velocities in the upper crust of the NPHM but exceed average lithospheric velocities below the Moho. We suggest the combination of anomalously low velocities in the upper crust and high velocities at lithospheric depths is due to rapid exhumation of deep crustal material causing elevated geothermal gradients. Azimuthal anisotropy shows a NNW-SSE fast

  17. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  18. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  19. Estimating Stream Surface Flow Velocities from Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Brauchli, T.; Chen, Z.; Huwald, H.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface flow velocities in streams can provide important information on discharge. This information is independent of water level, the most commonly used proxy for discharge and therefore has significant potential to reduce uncertainties. Advances in cheap and commonly used imaging devices (e.g. smartphone cameras) and image processing techniques offer new opportunities to get velocity information. Short video clips of streams can be used in combination with optical flow algorithms to get proxies for stream surface velocities. Here some initial results are presented and the main challenges are discussed, especially in view of using these techniques in a citizen science context (specifically the "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water), where we try to minimize the need for site preparation and additional equipment needed to take measurements.

  20. Comparing dynamic surface tilt with velocity using an LDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Robert A.

    2004-06-01

    If a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) probe beam is normally incident on a resonating metal strip with a mirror-finish, the retro-reflected beam has corresponding dynamic deflections. These lateral beam offsets are proportional to the dynamic surface tilt and can be measured along with the LDV velocity using a separating beam-splitter and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD). On a thin unbound strip resonating with 'pure mode' deformation, these derivative motions, velocity and tilt, are completely complementary. On a thin unbound plate resonating with 'hybrid mode' deformation, velocity and now two orthogonal tilts are nearly complementary. Maximal tilt has zero velocity, and maximum deformation or velocity has zero tilt. Intermediate values range in complementary fashion except near 'cross-nodes' zones. Here both motion types drop to zero at these cross-node locations. Both velocity and tilt signals are compared simultaneously using a special test fixture. This fixture consists of a stainless steel strip supported on its edges in the center, which can be excited by small speakers at the ends. Two comparison/calibration approaches are demonstrated with a pure 3-0 mode. Significant modal details are also demonstrated by analyzing multiple modes from pulsed excitation, and mapping a 3-1 mode-shape using the combined sensing approaches.

  1. Velocity model optimization for surface microseismic monitoring via amplitude stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyu; Wang, Zhongren; Zeng, Xiaoxian; Lü, Hao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    A usable velocity model in microseismic projects plays a crucial role in achieving statistically reliable microseismic event locations. Existing methods for velocity model optimization rely mainly on picking arrival times at individual receivers. However, for microseismic monitoring with surface stations, seismograms of perforation shots have such low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) that they do not yield sufficiently reliable picks. In this study, we develop a framework for constructing a 1-D flat-layered a priori velocity model using a non-linear optimization technique based on amplitude stacking. The energy focusing of the perforation shot is improved thanks to very fast simulated annealing (VFSA), and the accuracies of shot relocations are used to evaluate whether the resultant velocity model can be used for microseismic event location. Our method also includes a conventional migration-based location technique that utilizes successive grid subdivisions to improve computational efficiency and source location accuracy. Because unreasonable a priori velocity model information and interference due to additive noise are the major contributors to inaccuracies in perforation shot locations, we use velocity model optimization as a compensation scheme. Using synthetic tests, we show that accurate locations of perforation shots can be recovered to within 2 m, even with pre-stack S/N ratios as low as 0.1 at individual receivers. By applying the technique to a coal-bed gas reservoir in Western China, we demonstrate that perforation shot location can be recovered to within the tolerance of the well tip location.

  2. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2004-08-20

    We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on velocity-resolved atomic desorption (VRAD). Using this new method, we predict the surface exciton energies for K1, KBr, KC1, and NaC1 within +0.15 eV. Our data, combined with the available EELS data for alkali fluorides, demonstrate a universal linear correlation with the inverse inter-atomic distance in these materials. The results suggest that surface excitons exist in all alkali halides and their excitation energies can be predicted from the known bulk exciton energies and the obtained correlation plot.

  3. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  4. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  5. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  6. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  7. Effect of surface thickness on the wetting front velocity during jet impingement surface cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chitranjan; Gotherwal, Deepesh; Singh, Chandradeep; Singh, Charan

    2017-02-01

    A hot stainless steel (SS-304) surface of 450 ± 10 °C initial temperature is cooled with a normally impinging round water jet. The experiments have been performed for the surface of different thickness e.g. 1, 2, 3 mm and jet Reynolds number in the range of Re = 26,500-48,000. The cooling performance of the hot test surface is evaluated on the basis of wetting front velocity. The wetting front velocity is determined for 10-40 mm downstream spatial locations away from the stagnation point. It has been observed that the wetting front velocity increase with the rise in jet flow rate, however, diminishes towards the downstream spatial location and with the rise in surface thickness. The proposed correlation for the dimensionless wetting front velocity predicts the experimental data well within the error band of ±30 %, whereas, 75 % of experimental data lies within the range of ±20 %.

  8. Prediction of fluid velocity slip at solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    methods, it allows us to directly compute the intrinsic wall-fluid friction coefficient rather than an empirical friction coefficient that includes all sources of friction for planar shear flow. The slip length predicted by our method is in excellent agreement with the slip length obtained from direct......The observed flow enhancement in highly confining geometries is believed to be caused by fluid velocity slip at the solid wall surface. Here we present a simple and highly accurate method to predict this slip using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Unlike previous equilibrium molecular dynamics...

  9. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper.It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/diffusion balance time scale,defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity.At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale,the role of the surface receding is rather important:instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity,the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  10. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper. It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/ditftmion balance time scale, defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity. At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale, the role of the surface receding is rather important: instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity, the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  11. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  12. The critical velocity and 1500-m surface performances in Finswimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, K; Ross, M; Koizumi, K; Kashimoto, S; Yano, S; Takahashi, K; Kawakami, M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the concepts of critical velocity (CV) and anaerobic swimming capacity (ASC) could be used by coaches as a reliable index in order to monitor 1500-m Surface (SF) performances in Finswimming. Thirteen Finswimmers (6 males and 7 females, 24+/-6 years), members of the Japanese national team, were instructed to swim three different swimming distances (400-, 800-, and 1500-m) at maximal effort in a 50m long course swimming pool. CV and the ASC were calculated using 400-m and 800-m swim times. Mean height and body mass were 170.2 cm and 69.7 kg in male and 160.5 and 61.0 kg in female. A highly positive correlation was found between the CV and the mean velocity of 1500-m SF (V1500) (r=0.91, P<0.01), but no correlation was found between the ASC and V1500. (r=0.46, P=0.11). However, a high correlation was found between the ASC and the residual error of V1500, calculated from the relationship between V1500 and the CV (r=0.89, P<0.01). These results suggest that the CV is a useful method for evaluating 1500-m SF performance and an aerobic performance expressed as the CV contributes to 1500-m SF performance.

  13. Mapping the Agulhas Current from space: an assessment of ASAR surface current velocities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available surface current velocities for oceanographic research are assessed. ASAR surface current velocities are compared to surface drifter data and merged altimetry observations. Maps of sea surface temperature are used to establish the ASAR’s capacity to capture...

  14. Surface wave group velocity tomography of East Asia, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Francis T.

    1993-07-01

    Group velocities of both Rayleigh and Love waves are used in a tomographic inversion to obtain group velocity maps of East Asia (60 deg E-140 deg E and 20 deg N-50 deg N). The period range studied is 30-70 seconds. For periods longer than 40 seconds, a high group velocity gradient clearly exists along longitude 105 deg E; the velocities are noticeably higher east of this longitude than west of this longitude. The Tibetan Plateau appears as a prominent low velocity (about 15%) structure in this area; central Tibet appears as the area with the lowest velocity. The North China Plain is an area of high velocities, probably as a result of thin crust. The variability of deep crustal and upper mantle structures underneath the different tectonic provinces in the study can clearly be seen. In a separate study, using the dataset above and that from the former Soviet Union, we have derived the Rayleigh tomographic images of a larger area (40 deg E-160 deg E and 20 deg N-70 deg N). While the Tibetan plateau still remains to be the most prominent low velocity features, two other features are also clear, a very high velocity Siberian platform and a high velocity ridge extending from Lake Baikal to Central Mongolia. These studies are useful in delineating tectonics.

  15. Deriving glacier surface velocities from repeat optical images

    OpenAIRE

    Heid, Torborg

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of glaciers is important for many aspects in glaciology. Mass accumulated in the accumulation area is transported down to the ablation area by deformation and sliding due to the gravitational force, and hence gla­cier velocity is connected to the mass balance of glaciers. It also contributes directly to the mass balance of calving glaciers because it is an important control of the ice discharge rate for such glaciers. Changing glacier velocities is an indicator of instable glacie...

  16. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  17. Glacier Surface Velocity Measurements from Radar Interferometry and the Principle of Mass Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Presents a relation between the three glacier surface velocity components, the surface flux-divergence, glacier thickness and bottom melt and displacement. The relation can be used as an extension to the surface parallel flow assumption often used with interferometric synthetic aperture measurements of glacier velocities. The assumptions for the derivation are described and important limitations high-lighted.

  18. UHF RiverSonde observations of water surface velocity at Threemile Slough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Ruhl, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A UHF RiverSonde system, operating near 350 MHz, has been in operation at Threemile Slough in central California, USA since September 2004. The water in the slough is dominated by tidal effects, with flow reversals four times a day and a peak velocity of about 0.8 m/s in each direction. Water level and water velocity are continually measured by the U. S. Geological Survey at the experiment site. The velocity is measured every 15 minutes by an ultrasonic velocity meter (UVM) which determines the water velocity from two-way acoustic propagation time-difference measurements made across the channel. The RiverSonde also measures surface velocity every 15 minutes using radar resonant backscatter techniques. Velocity and water level data are retrieved through a radio data link and a wideband internet connection. Over a period of several months, the radar-derived mean surface velocity has been very highly correlated with the UVM index velocity several meters below the surface, with a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.976 and an RMS difference of less than 10 cm/s. The wind has a small but measurable effect on the velocities measured by both instruments. In addition to the mean surface velocity across the channel, the RiverSonde system provides an estimate of the cross-channel variation of the surface velocity. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  19. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  20. A geomorphic and morphometric analysis of surface ice velocity variation of different valley type glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Garg, P. K.; Shukla, A.; Ahluwalia, R. S.; Singh, N.; Chauhan, P.

    2016-05-01

    Glacier surface ice velocity is one of the important parameters which determine the glacier dynamics. If the surface ice velocity is high in upper zone (accumulation zone) of the glacier, more ice is brought to the lower zone (ablation zone) of the glacier where it melts more rapidly. The surface ice velocity depends on multiple factors like geomorphology of a glacier and glacier valley, ice load, orientation of the glacier, slope and debris cover. In this study, we have used latest multi-temporal Landsat-8 satellite images to calculate the surface ice velocity of different glaciers from the Himalayan region and a relationship of velocity and geomorphology and geo-morphometry of the glacier has been studied. The standard procedure has been implied to estimate the glacial velocity using image to image correlation technique. The geo-morphometric parameters of the glacier surface have been derived using SRTM 90 m global DEM. It has been observed that the slope of the glacier is one of the main factors on which the velocity is dependent i.e. higher the slope higher is the velocity and more ice is brought by the glacier to the ablation zone. The debris cover over the glacier and at the terminus also affects the velocity of the glacier by restricting ice flow. Thus, observations suggest that the geomorphology and geo-morphometry of the glacier has a considerable control on the surface ice velocity of the glacier.

  1. Spatiotemporal variations in the surface velocities of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Velocity is an important parameter for the estimation of glacier mass balance, which directly signals the response of glaciers to climate change. Antarctic ice sheet movement and the associated spatiotemporal velocity variations are of great significance to global sea level rise. In this study, we estimate Antarctic Peninsula glacier velocities using the co-registration of optically sensed images and correlation (hereafter referred to as COSI-Corr based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer Level 1B data (hereafter referred to as MODIS L1B. The results show that the glaciers of Graham Land and the Larsen Ice Shelf have substantially different velocity features. The Graham Land glaciers primarily flow from the peninsula ridge towards the Weddell Sea and Bellingshausen Sea on the east and west sides, respectively. There are very large velocity variations among the different ice streams, with a minimum of −1 and a maximum of 1500 m a−1 (with an average of 100–150 m a−1. Over the period 2000–2012, the glaciers of Graham Land accelerated in the south but slowed down in the north. In contrast, the Larsen Ice Shelf flows in a relatively uniform direction, mainly towards the northeast into the Weddell Sea. Its average velocity is 750–800 m a−1 and the maximum is > 1500 m a−1. During the period 2000–2012, the Larsen Ice Shelf experienced significant acceleration. The use of COSI-Corr based on MODIS L1B data is suitable for glacier velocity monitoring on the Antarctic Peninsula over long time series and large spatial scales. This method is clearly advantageous for analysing macro-scale spatiotemporal variations in glacier movement.

  2. Surface wave inversion for a p-wave velocity profile: Estimation of the squared slowness gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves can be used to obtain a near-surface shear wave profile. The inverse problem is usually solved for the locally 1-D problem of a set of homogeneous horizontal elastic layers. The output is a set of shear velocity values for each layer in the profile. P-wave velocity profile can be estim

  3. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  4. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  5. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  6. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  7. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  8. Effect of airflow velocity on moisture exchange at surfaces of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2006-01-01

    The moisture transfer between air and construction are affected of the boundary layer conditions close to the surface, which is influenced by the airflow patterns in the room. Therefore an investigation of the relation be-tween the surface resistance and the airflow velocity above a material sample...... resistances decrease for increasing airflow velocity above the boundary layer of the material surface. The measured resistances are somewhat smaller than the ones esti-mated by use of the Lewis relation....

  9. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  10. Linear stability analysis in a liquid layer with a surface velocity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białecki, Jarosław; Hołyst, Janusz A

    2003-06-01

    A case of combined planar Couette-Poiseuille flow corresponding to vanishing horizontal flux has been generalized by the introduction of a model for the surface velocity gradient. A relation corresponding to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation has been derived for this model. The critical value of the surface velocity gradient has been obtained. At the critical point, the corresponding critical Reynolds number equals infinity. Using an approximated method we estimated the behavior of the critical Reynolds number for a slightly overcritical surface velocity gradient.

  11. Note: Velocity map imaging the scattering plane of gas surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, D. J.; Messider, T. M.; Leng, J. G.; Greaves, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D scattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a dielectric surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was validated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the system's capabilities, the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a polytetrafluoroethylene surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  12. Notes on the Surface Velocity Profile and Horizontal Shear across the Width of the Gulf Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Arx, William S. Von

    2011-01-01

    During a cruise across the Gulf Stream in October 1950 measurements of surface velocity were made both with the Loran-space-dead method and the electromagnetic method. A short account of the results is given with special reference to the velocity profile and the horizontal shear across the Gulf Stream.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1952.tb01006.x

  13. A new surface electromyography analysis method to determine spread of muscle fiber conduction velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, F; Van Weerden, TW; Van der Hoeven, JH

    2002-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) estimation from surface signals is widely used to study muscle function, e. g., in neuromuscular disease and in fatigue studies. However, most analysis methods do not yield information about the velocity distribution of the various motor unit action potentials

  14. Near-Surface Attenuation and Velocity Structures in Taiwan from Wellhead and Borehole Recordings Comparisons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yu-Ju; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Wu, Shao-Kai; Hsu, Hsuan-Jui; Hsiao, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the data from 28 seismic borehole stations deployed by the Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network throughout Taiwan from 2007 to 2014, we estimated the near-surface velocity (Vp and Vs) and attenuation (Qp and Qs...

  15. Glacier Surface Velocity Measurements from Radar Interferometry and the Principle of Mass Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Presents a relation between the three glacier surface velocity components, the surface flux-divergence, glacier thickness and bottom melt and displacement. The relation can be used as an extension to the surface parallel flow assumption often used with interferometric synthetic aperture...

  16. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Dept. de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain)); Pitarke, J.M. (Materia Kondentsatuaren Fisika Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Univ., Bilbo (Spain))

    1994-05-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  17. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  18. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reconstruction of Sub-Surface Velocities from Satellite Observations Using Iterative Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new method based on modified self-organizing maps is presented for the reconstruction of deep ocean current velocities from surface information provided by satellites. This method takes advantage of local correlations in the data-space to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed deep velocities. Unlike previous attempts to reconstruct deep velocities from surface data, our method makes no assumptions regarding the structure of the water column, nor the underlying dynamics of the flow field. Using satellite observations of surface velocity, sea-surface height and sea-surface temperature, as well as observations of the deep current velocity from autonomous Argo floats to train the map, we are able to reconstruct realistic high--resolution velocity fields at a depth of 1000m. Validation reveals extremely promising results, with a speed root mean squared error of ~2.8cm/s, a factor more than a factor of two smaller than competing methods, and direction errors consistently smaller than 30 degrees...

  20. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  1. Maximum Velocity of a Boulder Ejected From an Impact Crater Formed on a Regolith Covered Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G. D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the effect of regolith depth on boulder ejection velocity. A "boulder" refers to an apparently intact rock or rock fragment lying on a planetary surface, regardless of emplacement mechanism. Boulders appear in planetary images as positive relief features --- bright, sun-facing pixels adjacent to dark, shadowed pixels. We studied 12 lunar craters in high resolution (1~m) photographs from Lunar Orbiter III and V. Local regolith depth was measured using the method of small crater morphology. Ejection velocities of boulders were calculated assuming a ballistic trajectory to the final boulder location. A plot of regolith depth/crater diameter vs. maximum boulder ejection velocity shows that craters formed in deeper regolith (with respect to crater size) eject boulders at lower velocities. When ejection velocity (EjV) is in m/s, and regolith depth (Dr) and crater diameter (Dc) are in meters, the data fit the relation Dr / Dc = 1053 × EjVmax-2.823. To explain the data, we turn to impact cratering theory. An ejected particle will follow a streamline from its place of origin to its ejection point (the Z-model), and then follow a ballistic trajectory. Material ejected along more shallow streamlines is ejected at greater velocities. If shallow regolith covers the surface, the most shallow (greatest velocity) streamlines will travel only through the regolith. Boulders, however, must be ejected from the bedrock below the regolith. Thus, the boulder ejected with the greatest velocity originates just below the regolith, along the most shallow streamline through the bedrock. If the regolith is deeper, the most shallow streamline through the bedrock will be deeper, and the maximum velocity of an ejected boulder will be lower. Hence, the regolith depth and maximum ejection velocity of a boulder are correlated: greater boulder ejection velocities correspond to thinner regolith. We observe this correlation in the data.

  2. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  3. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  4. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  5. Effect of airflow velocity on moisture exchange at surfaces of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2006-01-01

    The moisture transfer between air and construction are affected of the boundary layer conditions close to the surface, which is influenced by the airflow patterns in the room. Therefore an investigation of the relation be-tween the surface resistance and the airflow velocity above a material samp...

  6. Influence of Rough Flow over Sea Surface on Dry Atmospheric Deposition Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Meteorological model and a dry deposition module were used to estimate the effects of sea surface rough flow (SSRF over the sea surface on dry deposition velocities. The dry deposition turbulence resistance, Ra, and sub-layer resistance, Rb, decreased more than 10% and 5% due to SSRF, respectively. For example, for HNO3, the mean dry deposition velocities (Vd were 0.51 cm s-1 in January, 0.58 in April, 0.65 cm s-1 in July and 0.79 cm s-1 in October with only smooth flow over the sea surface. However, the SSRF increased the Vd of HNO3 by 5 - 20% in the east China seas. These results show that SSRF is an important factor in estimating surface roughness to further improve calculation of the dry deposition velocities over the ocean. Improvements in parameterization of sea roughness length will be a worthwhile effort in related future studies.

  7. Dependence of sea-surface microwave emissivity on friction velocity as derived from SMMR/SASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, F. J.; Christensen, E. J.; Richardson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The sea-surface microwave emissivity is derived using SMMR brightness temperatures and SASS inferred friction velocities for three North Pacific Seasat passes. The results show the emissivity increasing linearly with friction velocity with no obvious break between the foam-free and foam regimes up to a friction velocity of about 70 cm/sec (15 m/sec wind speed). For horizontal polarization the sensitivity of emissivity to friction velocity greatly increases with frequency, while for vertical polarization the sensitivity is much less and is independent of frequency. This behavior is consistent with two-scale scattering theory. A limited amount of high friction velocity data above 70 cm/sec suggests an additional increase in emissivity due to whitecapping.

  8. Exploiting SENTINEL-1 Amplitude Data for Glacier Surface Velocity Field Measurements: Feasibility Demonstration on Baltoro Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascetti, A.; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Di Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed using Sentinel-1 imagery acquired over the Karakoram mountain range (North Pakistan) and Baltoro and other three glaciers have been investigated. During this study, a stack of 11 images acquired in the period from October 2014 to September 2015 has been used in order to investigate the potentialities of the Sentinel-1 SAR sensor to retrieve the glacier surface velocity every month. The aim of this test was to measure the glacier surface velocity between each subsequent pair, in order to produce a time series of the surface velocity fields along the investigated period. The necessary coregistration procedure between the images has been performed and subsequently the glaciers areas have been sampled using a regular grid with a 250 × 250 meters posting. Finally the surface velocity field has been estimated, for each image pair, using a template matching procedure, and an outlier filtering procedure based on the signal to noise ratio values has been applied, in order to exclude from the analysis unreliable points. The achieved velocity values range from 10 to 25 meters/month and they are coherent to those obtained in previous studies carried out on the same glaciers and the results highlight that it is possible to have a continuous update of the glacier surface velocity field through free Sentinel-1 imagery, that could be very useful to investigate the seasonal effects on the glaciers fluid-dynamics.

  9. Trace projection transformation: a new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  10. Technical Note: Surface water velocity observations from a camera: a case study on the Tiber River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tauro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring surface water velocity during flood events is a challenging task. Techniques based on deploying instruments in the flow are often unfeasible due to high velocity and abundant sediment transport. A low-cost and versatile technology that provides continuous and automatic observations is still not available. LSPIV (large scale particle imaging velocimetry is a promising approach to tackle these issues. Such technique consists of developing surface water velocity maps analyzing video frame sequences recorded with a camera. In this technical brief, we implement a novel LSPIV experimental apparatus to observe a flood event in the Tiber river at a cross-section located in the center of Rome, Italy. We illustrate results from three tests performed during the hydrograph flood peak and recession limb for different illumination and weather conditions. The obtained surface velocity maps are compared to the rating curve velocity and to benchmark velocity values. Experimental findings confirm the potential of the proposed LSPIV implementation in aiding research in natural flow monitoring.

  11. Seismic tomography of Yunnan region using short-period surface wave phase velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 苏伟; 叶太兰

    2004-01-01

    The data of short-period (1~18 s) surface waves recorded by 23 stations belonging to the digital seismic network of Yunnan Province of China are used in this paper. From these data, the dispersion curves of phase velocities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave along 209 paths are determined by using the two-station narrowband filtering cross-correlation method.Adopting tomography method, the distribution maps of phase velocities at various periods in Yunnan region are inverted. The maps of phase velocities on profiles along 24°N, 25°N, 26°N, 27°N and 100.5°E and the distribution maps of phase velocities at 3 periods in the study region are given. The results show that the phase velocity distribution in Yunnan region has strong variations in horizontal direction, and the phase velocity distribution in short-period range is closely related to the thickness of sedimentary layers in the shallow crust. The phase velocity in southern part of the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block encircled by the Honghe fault and Xiaojiang fault is obviously lower than that in surrounding areas. The epicentral locations of strong earthquakes in Yunnan region are mainly distributed in transitional zones between low and high phase velocities.

  12. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  13. Effect of Ion Escape Velocity and Conversion Surface Material on H- Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, Olli [University of Jyvaskyla; Kalvas, T. [University of Jyvaskyla; Komppula, J. [University of Jyvaskyla; Koivisto, H. [University of Jyvaskyla; Geros, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Stelzer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rouleau, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, K.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    According to generally accepted models surface production of negative ions depends on ion escape velocity and work function of the surface. We have conducted an experimental study addressing the role of the ion escape velocity on H- production. A converter-type ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center was employed for the experiment. The ion escape velocity was affected by varying the bias voltage of the converter electrode. It was observed that due to enhanced stripping of H- no direct gain of extracted beam current can be achieved by increasing the converter voltage. The conversion efficiency of H- was observed to vary with converter voltage and follow the existing theories in qualitative manner. We present calculations predicting relative H- yields from different cesiated surfaces with comparison to experimental observations from different types of H- ion sources. Utilizing materials exhibiting negative electron affinity and exposed to UV-light is considered for Cesium-free H-/D- production.

  14. Velocity dependence of vestibular information for postural control on tilting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Fay B; Kluzik, JoAnn; Hlavacka, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Vestibular information is known to be important for postural stability on tilting surfaces, but the relative importance of vestibular information across a wide range of surface tilt velocities is less clear. We compared how tilt velocity influences postural orientation and stability in nine subjects with bilateral vestibular loss and nine age-matched, control subjects. Subjects stood on a force platform that tilted 6 deg, toes-up at eight velocities (0.25 to 32 deg/s), with and without vision. Results showed that visual information effectively compensated for lack of vestibular information at all tilt velocities. However, with eyes closed, subjects with vestibular loss were most unstable within a critical tilt velocity range of 2 to 8 deg/s. Subjects with vestibular deficiency lost their balance in more than 90% of trials during the 4 deg/s condition, but never fell during slower tilts (0.25-1 deg/s) and fell only very rarely during faster tilts (16-32 deg/s). At the critical velocity range in which falls occurred, the body center of mass stayed aligned with respect to the surface, onset of ankle dorsiflexion was delayed, and there was delayed or absent gastrocnemius inhibition, suggesting that subjects were attempting to actively align their upper bodies with respect to the moving surface instead of to gravity. Vestibular information may be critical for stability at velocities of 2 to 8 deg/s because postural sway above 2 deg/s may be too fast to elicit stabilizing responses through the graviceptive somatosensory system, and postural sway below 8 deg/s may be too slow for somatosensory-triggered responses or passive stabilization from trunk inertia.

  15. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity of the ...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  16. Determination of minority-carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity with high spacial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam induced current in conjunction with high-resolution scanning makes it possible to evaluate the minority-carrier lifetime three dimensionally in the bulk and the surface recombination velocity two dimensionally, with a high spacial resolution. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two-dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon diodes is presented as well as a three-dimensional mapping of the changes in the minority-carrier lifetime in ion-implanted silicon.

  17. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  18. Upper-Mantle Shear Velocities beneath Southern California Determined from Long-Period Surface Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    1997-01-01

    We used long-period surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the TERRAscope network to determine phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh waves up to periods of about 170 sec and of Love waves up to about 150 sec. This enabled us to investigate the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath southern California to a depth of about 250 km. Ten and five earthquakes were used for Rayleigh and Love waves, respectively. The observed surface-wave dispersion shows a clear Love/Rayleigh-wave d...

  19. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  20. Influence of filtration velocity on DON variation in BAF for micropolluted surface water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng-Fei; Chen, You-Peng; Kang, Jia; Gao, Xu; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Biological aerated filters (BAFs) are widely used for the treatment of micropolluted surface water. However, the biological process produces dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which, as precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products, pose potential threats to drinking water safety. Therefore, to control DON in BAF effluent, it is necessary to study the influence of BAF operation parameters on DON production. In this study, the influence of filtration velocity in a BAF on DON production was investigated. Under different filtration velocity (0.5, 2, and 4 m/h) conditions, profiles of DON concentrations along the media layer were measured. The profile at a filtration velocity of 0.5 m/h showed a decreasing trend, and the ones under filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h fluctuated in a small range (from 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L). Moreover, the relatively high filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h resulted in a lower level of DON concentration. Additionally, 3D excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize DON. It is found that the patterns of DON at a relatively high filtration velocity condition (4 m/h) were obviously different from the ones under low filtration velocity conditions (0.5 and 2 m/h).

  1. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  2. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  3. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  4. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  5. Interplay of nonlocal response, damping, and low group velocity in surface-plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    augmented with quantum mechanical corrections, such as the electron spill-out effect and nonlocal response. Here, we discuss the latter and its implications on the waveguiding characteristics, such as dispersion and group velocity, of the surface-plasmon polariton mode supported at a metal-air interface....

  6. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  7. Evolution of surface velocities and ice discharge of Larsen B outlet glaciers from 1995 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wuite

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We use repeat-pass SAR data to produce detailed maps of surface motion covering the glaciers draining into the former Larsen B ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, for different epochs between 1995 and 2013. We combine the velocity maps with estimates of ice thickness to analyze fluctuations of ice discharge. The collapse of the central and northern sections of the ice shelf in 2002 led to a near-immediate acceleration of tributary glaciers as well as of the remnant ice shelf in Scar Inlet. Velocities of the glaciers discharging directly into the ocean remain to date well above the velocities of the pre-collapse period. The response of individual glaciers differs and velocities show significant temporal fluctuations, implying major variations in ice discharge and mass balance as well. Due to reduced velocity and ice thickness the ice discharge of Crane Glacier decreased from 5.02 Gt a−1 in 2007 to 1.72 Gt a−1 in 2013, whereas Hektoria and Green glaciers continue to show large temporal fluctuations in response to successive stages of frontal retreat. The velocity on Scar Inlet ice shelf increased two- to three fold since 1995, with the largest increase in the first years after the break-up of the main section of Larsen B. Flask and Leppard glaciers, the largest tributaries to Scar Inlet ice shelf, accelerated. In 2013 their discharge was 38%, respectively 45%, higher than in 1995.

  8. Evolution of surface velocities and ice discharge of Larsen B outlet glaciers from 1995 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, J.; Rott, H.; Hetzenecker, M.; Floricioiu, D.; De Rydt, J.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Nagler, T.; Kern, M.

    2015-05-01

    We use repeat-pass SAR data to produce detailed maps of surface motion covering the glaciers draining into the former Larsen B Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, for different epochs between 1995 and 2013. We combine the velocity maps with estimates of ice thickness to analyze fluctuations of ice discharge. The collapse of the central and northern sections of the ice shelf in 2002 led to a near-immediate acceleration of tributary glaciers as well as of the remnant ice shelf in Scar Inlet. Velocities of most of the glaciers discharging directly into the ocean remain to date well above the velocities of the pre-collapse period. The response of individual glaciers differs and velocities show significant temporal fluctuations, implying major variations in ice discharge as well. Due to reduced velocity and ice thickness the ice discharge of Crane Glacier decreased from 5.02 Gt a-1 in 2007 to 1.72 Gt a-1 in 2013, whereas Hektoria and Green glaciers continue to show large temporal fluctuations in response to successive stages of frontal retreat. The velocity on Scar Inlet ice shelf increased 2-3-fold since 1995, with the largest increase in the first years after the break-up of the main section of Larsen B. Flask and Leppard glaciers, the largest tributaries to Scar Inlet ice shelf, accelerated. In 2013 their discharge was 38% and 46% higher than in 1995.

  9. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  10. Short-period surface-wave phase velocities across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, G.

    2017-09-01

    Surface-wave phase-velocity maps for the full footprint of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) across the conterminous United States are developed and tested. Three-component, long-period continuous seismograms recorded on more than 1800 seismometers, most of which were deployed for 18 months or longer, are processed using a noise cross-correlation technique to derive inter-station Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves at periods between 5 and 40 s. The phase-velocity measurements are quality controlled using an automated algorithm and then used in inversions for Love and Rayleigh phase-velocity models at discrete periods on a 0.25°-by-0.25° pixel grid. The robustness of the results is examined using comparisons of maps derived from subsets of the data. A winter-summer division of the cross-correlation data results in small model differences, indicating relatively minor sensitivity of the results to seasonal variations in the distribution of noise sources. Division of the dispersion data based on inter-station azimuth does not result in geographically coherent model differences, suggesting that azimuthal anisotropy at the regional scale is weak compared with variations in isotropic velocities and does not substantially influence the results for isotropic velocities. The phase-velocity maps and dispersion measurements are documented and made available as data products of the 10-year-long USArray TA deployment.

  11. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  12. Comparison of the terminal fall velocity, surface roughness and erosion threshold for volcanic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, G. A.; Seybold, L.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Kueppers, U.,; Lo Castro, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    Pyroclasts are particles emitted during explosive volcanic eruptions. They exhibit highly variable porosities, shapes, and densities. As such, their behaviors differ from the wind-blown and fluvial sand usually studied in clastic sedimentology. In order to better constrain the specificities of pyroclastic material, and gain insights into the flow and depositional processes within dilute pyroclastic density currents, the terminal fall velocity was experimentally measured in air and compared to surface roughness and saltation threshold data obtained from wind tunnel experiments as well as with shape parameters. Two types of particles were investigated (scoriaceous material and pumices), as well as different grain sizes (0.125-4mm for scoria and 0.125-16mm for pumices in half phi fractions). The terminal fall velocity corresponds to the velocity for which the drag exerted by air on a particle counteracts its weight, so that acceleration becomes null and the velocity constant. In order to measure the terminal fall velocity, particles were dropped in a closed and large vertical tube (to avoid any perturbation by air movement present in the lab) and the velocity derived from high speed video recorded near the bottom of the tube. By repeating the experiments from different heights, the velocity was seen to increase with increasing drop-height, until reaching a constant value, taken as the terminal fall velocity. The surface roughness is a value that defines how rough a bed of particles is seen by a wind. The saltation threshold corresponds to the near-bed shear-stress necessary for particles to leave the surface and begin to bounce on the bed. Both are derived from wind profiles experimentally measured in a wind tunnel in Aarhus (Denmark; see abstract 2128). Shape parameters were measured with a Camsizer (from Retsch) in Catania (Italy) and the sphericity, symmetry, aspect ratio, and convexity derived. Since the surface roughness, saltation threshold, and terminal fall

  13. Sea surface velocities from visible and infrared multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, P. A.; Emery, W. J.; Radebaugh, M.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution (100 m), sequential Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) images were used in a study to calculate advective surface velocities using the Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique. Radiance and brightness temperature gradient magnitude images were formed from visible (0.48 microns) and infrared (11.12 microns) image pairs, respectively, of Chandeleur Sound, which is a shallow body of water northeast of the Mississippi delta, at 145546 GMT and 170701 GMT on 30 Mar. 1989. The gradient magnitude images enhanced the surface water feature boundaries, and a lower cutoff on the gradient magnitudes calculated allowed the undesirable sunglare and backscatter gradients in the visible images, and the water vapor absorption gradients in the infrared images, to be reduced in strength. Requiring high (greater than 0.4) maximum cross correlation coefficients and spatial coherence of the vector field aided in the selection of an optimal template size of 10 x 10 pixels (first image) and search limit of 20 pixels (second image) to use in the MCC technique. Use of these optimum input parameters to the MCC algorithm, and high correlation and spatial coherence filtering of the resulting velocity field from the MCC calculation yielded a clustered velocity distribution over the visible and infrared gradient images. The velocity field calculated from the visible gradient image pair agreed well with a subjective analysis of the motion, but the velocity field from the infrared gradient image pair did not. This was attributed to the changing shapes of the gradient features, their nonuniqueness, and large displacements relative to the mean distance between them. These problems implied a lower repeat time for the imagery was needed in order to improve the velocity field derived from gradient imagery. Suggestions are given for optimizing the repeat time of sequential imagery when using the MCC method for motion studies. Applying the MCC method to the infrared

  14. Crust and upper mantle heterogeneities in the southwest Pacific from surface wave phase velocity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, R.; Rouland, D.; Roult, G.; Wiens, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Direct earthquake-to-station Rayleigh and Love wave data observed on high gain broadband records are analyzed in order to improve the lateral resolution of the uppermost mantle in the southwest Pacific region. We used data of nine permanent Geoscope and Iris stations located in the southern hemisphere and nine other stations as part of two temporary networks, the first one installed in New Caledonia and Vanuatu (hereafter named Cavascope network) by ORSTOM and the EOST from Louis Pasteur University in Strasbourg (France) and the second one installed in the Fiji, Tonga and Niue islands (hereafter named Spase network) by Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In order to collect more significant details on the surficial structures, we included the analysis of short period waves down to 8 s. A multiple frequency filtering technique has been used to recover phase velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves for selected earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5.5 and with known centroid moment tensor (CMT). About 1100 well-distributed seismograms have been processed in the period range 8-100 s and corrections for topography and water depth have been applied to the observed phase velocities. The geographical distribution of phase velocity anomalies have then been computed using the tomographic method developed by Montagner [Montagner, J.P., 1986a. Regional three-dimensional structures using long-period surface waves. Ann. Geophys. 4 (B3), 283-294]. Due to a poor knowledge of dense, well-distributed, crustal thickness values and corresponding velocity models, we did not perform or speculate on the construction of an S-wave 3D velocity model; therefore, we limited this study to the interpretation of the phase velocity distribution. The location of phase velocity anomalies are well determined and the deviations are discussed within the framework of the geological context and compared with other tomographic models. At long periods, from 40 s to 100 s, our results agree well

  15. Topographic Influence on Near-Surface Seismic Velocity in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Moon, S.; Meng, L.; Davis, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Near-surface seismic velocity is commonly used to determine subsurface rock structure, properties, and ground-motion amplification. The spatial distribution of Vs30 (shear-wave seismic velocity in the top 30 m of Earth's crust) has been inferred based on the correlations of measured Vs30 with rock types and topographic slopes. Inference of Vs30 based on topographic slopes relies on the assumption that mechanically strong rocks tend to have steep slopes. The topographic slopes can thus be used to infer bedrock strength and seismic velocity. However, due to limited accessibility and logistical difficulties, there are few Vs30 measurements in sites of crystalline rocks that have measurable topographic variations. Thus, the variability of Vs30 with topographic slope for crystalline rocks has not been addressed systematically. In order to examine the local variabilities in near-surface seismic velocity in southern California, we measured the spatial distributions of near-surface seismic velocity at two sites: one in the San Gabriel Mountains (SGM) and one in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Both sites are composed of predominantly crystalline rocks with topographic slopes that range from 0.2 to 0.5. We conducted seismic refraction surveys using sledgehammer-induced impacts on a steel plate along seismic lines that were oriented roughly N-S, 240 m in length with a spacing of 5 m, and with topographic variation including both a local hilltop and valley. Using first P-wave arrivals, we constructed a P-wave seismic tomography down to 50 m. Our results show that P-wave seismic velocity in the SGM site varies significantly within hillslopes and does not linearly correlate with slope, while P-wave seismic velocity in the SBM site shows little variation in the hillslope. In the SGM site, the Vs30 beneath the valley is 25% faster than the Vs30 beneath the hillslope. These results suggest that the local variability of seismic velocity depends on differences in sediment

  16. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For $R_0 = 8$ kpc, the models have stellar mass $5 < M_* < 6 \\times 10^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$, scale length $2.0 \\le R_d \\le 2.9$ kpc, LSR circular velocity $222 \\le \\Theta_0 \\le 233$ km s$^{-1}$, and solar circle stellar surface density $34 \\le \\Sigma_d(R_0) \\le 61$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The present inter-arm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus A...

  17. Effect of ion excape velocity and conversion surface material on H- production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kenneth F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarvainen, Olli A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geros, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stelzer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rouleau, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kalvas, T. [UNIV OF JYVASKYLA; Komppula, J. [UNIV OF JYASKYLA; Carmichael, J. [ORNL

    2010-10-05

    According to generally accepted models surface production of negative ions depends on ion escape velocity and work function of the surface. We have conducted an experimental study addressing the role of the ion escape velocity on H{sup -} production. A converter-type ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center was employed for the experiment. The ion escape velocity was changed by varying the bias voltage of the converter electrode. It was observed that due to enhanced stripping of H{sup -} no direct gain of extracted beam current can be achieved by increasing the converter voltage. At the same time the conversion efficiency of H{sup -} was observed to vary with converter voltage and follow the existing theories in qualitative manner. We discuss the role of surface material on H{sup -} formation probability and present calculations predicting relative H{sup -} yields from different cesiated surfaces. These calculations are compared with experimental observations from different types of H{sup -} ion sources. The effects caused by varying cesium coverage are also discussed. Finally, we present a novel idea of utilizing materials exhibiting so-called negative electron affinity in H{sup -}/D{sup -} production under UV-light exposure.

  18. EFFECTS OF A SAND RUNNING SURFACE ON THE KINEMATICS OF SPRINTING AT MAXIMUM VELOCITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P E Alcaraz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Performing sprints on a sand surface is a common training method for improving sprint-specific strength. For maximum specificity of training the athlete’s movement patterns during the training exercise should closely resemble those used when performing the sport. The aim of this study was to compare the kinematics of sprinting at maximum velocity on a dry sand surface to the kinematics of sprinting on an athletics track. Five men and five women participated in the study, and flying sprints over 30 m were recorded by video and digitized using biomechanical analysis software. We found that sprinting on a sand surface was substantially different to sprinting on an athletics track. When sprinting on sand the athletes tended to ‘sit’ during the ground contact phase of the stride. This action was characterized by a lower centre of mass, a greater forward lean in the trunk, and an incomplete extension of the hip joint at take-off. We conclude that sprinting on a dry sand surface may not be an appropriate method for training the maximum velocity phase in sprinting. Although this training method exerts a substantial overload on the athlete, as indicated by reductions in running velocity and stride length, it also induces detrimental changes to the athlete’s running technique which may transfer to competition sprinting.

  19. A Study of DC Surface Plasma Discharge in Absence of Free Airflow: Ionic Wind Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study we are interested with the DC (Direct Current electric corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. We present experimental results related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the DC corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. We used different geometrical forms of dielectric surface such as a plate, a cylinder and a wing of aircraft of type NACA 0015. We present the current density-electric filed characteristics for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces non-thermal plasma so that it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. We have measured the ionic wind induced by the corona discharge in absence of free external airflow, we give the ionic wind velocity profiles for different surface forms and we compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity values. We notice that the maximum ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  20. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  1. Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over typical underlying surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over Gobi and mobile sand surface have been investigated experimentally in the wind tunnel. The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the relation- ship between pulsatory characteristics of instantaneous wind speed in sand flow and the motion state of sand grains. For a given underlying surface, pulsation of wind velocities in sand flow on different heights has a good correlation. As the space distance among different heights increases, fluctuation of instantaneous wind speed presents a decreasing trend and its amplitude is closely related to the mo- tion state of sand grains and their transport. Pulsatory intensity increases with the indicated wind speed, but its relative value does not depend on it, only agrees with height.

  2. EXPLOITING SENTINEL-1 AMPLITUDE DATA FOR GLACIER SURFACE VELOCITY FIELD MEASUREMENTS: FEASIBILITY DEMONSTRATION ON BALTORO GLACIER

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nascetti; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed ...

  3. Dynamics and mass balance of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica: 1. Geometry and surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, J. L.; Cuffey, K. M.; Morse, D. L.; Conway, H.; Rignot, E.

    2009-11-01

    Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, exemplifies a little-studied type of outlet glacier, one that flows slowly through a region of rugged topography and dry climate. This glacier, in addition, connects the East Antarctic Ice Sheet with the McMurdo Dry Valleys, a region much studied for geomorphology, paleoclimate, and ecology. Here we report extensive new measurements of surface velocities, ice thicknesses, and surface elevations, acquired with InSAR, GPS, and GPR. The latter two were used to construct elevation models of the glacier's surface and bed. Ice velocities in 2002-2004 closely matched those in 2000 and the mid-1970s, indicating negligible interannual variations of flow. Comparing velocities with bed elevations shows that, along much of the glacier, flow concentrates in a narrow axis of relatively fast flowing ice that overlies a bedrock trough. The flow of the glacier over major undulations in its bed can be regarded as a “cascade” it speeds up over bedrock highs and through valley narrows and slows down over deep basins and in wide spots. This pattern is an expected consequence of mass conservation for a glacier near steady state. Neither theory nor data from this Taylor Glacier study support the alternative view, recently proposed, that an outlet glacier of this type trickles slowly over bedrock highs and flows fastest over deep basins.

  4. Surface Ice Velocity Retrieval From MOA Based On NCC Feature Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Liu, Y.; Cheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    The velocity of glacier in Antarctica is a fundamental parameter to ice dynamics and projection of sea level rise, and it is as well the key indicator of global climate change. COSI-Corr, an extension of ENVI software, was employed to acquire the horizontal velocity of ice flows throughout the whole Antarctica continent from 2003-2004 and 2008-2009 MOA (MODIS Mosaic of Antarctica) compiled by NSIDC. However, conventional tracking methods severely suffer from spurious matching resulting from ice surface's variation, illumination condition, inappropriate window size etc. So it is indispensable to correct the initial output field contaminated by noises before extracting valuable information. Usually, the low-SNR areas, which denote quite poor quality, are filtered out directly based on some roles of thumb. Here we have some experiments to test performance of FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and SVD (Singularity Value Decomposition) of optimizing the estimation by cutting image into overlapped tiles. Validation was conducted by comparing the final result with respect to MEaSUREs in typical flow areas including inland stream and ice shelves. The primitive results shows that both methods can reduce RMSE to an extent of 20% 40% but FFT performs more robust. Our result shows that MOA datasets, which highlight true surface morphology, have potential for continental ice surface velocity's retrieval.

  5. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  6. The Characteristics of Near-surface Velocity During the Upwelling Season on the Northern Portugal Shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Observations made on the northern Portugal mid-shelf between May 13 and June 15, 2002 were used to characterise the near-surface velocity during one upwelling season. It was found that in the surface mixed layer, the 'tidal current' was diurnal, but the tidal elevation was semi-diurnal. Both the residual current and the major axes of all tidal constituents were nearly perpendicular to the isobaths and the tidal current ellipses rotated clockwise; the major axis of the major tidal ellipse was about 3 cm s-1. The extremely strong diurnal current in the surface layer was probably due to diurnal heating, cooling, and wind mixing that induced diurnal oscillations, including the diurnal oscillation of wind stress. This is a case different from the results measured in the other layers in this area. The near-inertial spectral peaks occurred with periods ranging from 1 047 min to 1 170 min, the longest periods being observed in deeper layers, and the shortest in the surface layer. Weak inertial events appeared during strong upwelling events, while strong inertial events appeared during downwelling or weak subinertial events. The near-inertial currents were out of phase between 5 m and 35 m layers for almost the entire measurement period, but such relationship was very weak during periods of irregular weak wind. Strong persistent southerly wind blew from May 12 to 17 and forced a significant water transport onshore and established a strong barotropic poleward jet with a surface speed exceeding 20 cm s-1. The subinertial current was related to wind variation, especially in the middle layers of 15 m and 35 m, the maximum correlation between alongshore current and alongshore wind was about 0.5 at the 5 m layer and 0.8 at the 35 m layer. The alongshore current reacted more rapidly than the cross-shore current. The strongest correlation was found at a time lag of 20 h in the upper layer and of 30 h in the deeper layer. The wind-driven surface velocity obtained from the PWP model

  7. Experimental study of the free surface velocity field in an asymmetrical confluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelle, Stephan; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schindfessel, Laurent; De Mulder, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of open channel confluences is highly complex because of the combination of different processes that interact with each other. To gain further insights in how the velocity uniformization between the upstream channels and the downstream channel is proceeding, experiments are performed in a large scale 90 degree angled concrete confluence flume with a chamfered rectangular cross-section and a width of 0.98m. The dimensions and lay-out of the flume are representative for a prototype scale confluence in e.g. drainage and irrigation systems. In this type of engineered channels with sharp corners the separation zone is very large and thus the velocity difference between the most contracted section and the separation zone is pronounced. With the help of surface particle tracking velocimetry the velocity field is recorded from upstream of the confluence to a significant distance downstream of the confluence. The resulting data allow to analyze the evolution of the incoming flows (with a developed velocity profile) that interact with the stagnation zone and each other, causing a shear layer between the two bulk flows. Close observation of the velocity field near the stagnation zone shows that there are actually two shear layers in the vicinity of the upstream corner. Furthermore, the data reveals that the shear layer observed more downstream between the two incoming flows is actually one of the two shear layers next to the stagnation zone that continues, while the other shear layer ceases to exist. The extensive measurement domain also allows to study the shear layer between the contracted section and the separation zone. The shear layers of the stagnation zone between the incoming flows and the one between the contracted flow and separation zone are localized and parameters such as the maximum gradient, velocity difference and width of the shear layer are calculated. Analysis of these data shows that the shear layer between the incoming flows

  8. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  9. Active tectonics of northwestern U.S. inferred from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert McCaffrey; Robert W. King; Suzette J. Payne; Matthew Lancaster

    2013-02-01

    Surface velocities derived from GPS observations from 1993 to 2011 at several hundred sites across the deforming northwestern United States are used to further elucidate the region's active tectonics. The new velocities reveal that the clockwise rotations, relative to North America, seen in Oregon and western Washington from earlier GPS observations, continue to the east to include the Snake River Plain of Idaho and south into the Basin and Range of northern Nevada. Regional-scale rotation is attributed to gravitationally driven extension in the Basin and Range and Pacific-North America shear transferred through the Walker Lane belt aided by potentially strong pinning below the Idaho Batholith. The large rotating section comprising eastern Oregon displays very low internal deformation rates despite seismological evidence for a thin crust, warm mantle, organized mantle flow, and elevated topography. The observed disparity between mantle and surface kinematics suggests that either little stress acts between them (low basal shear) or that the crust is strong relative to the mantle. The rotation of the Oregon block impinges on Washington across the Yakima fold-thrust belt where shortening occurs in a closing-fan style. Elastic fault locking at the Cascadia subduction zone is reevaluated using the GPS velocities and recently published uplift rates. The 18 year GPS and 80 year leveling data can both be matched with a common locking model suggesting that the locking has been stable over many decades. The rate of strain accumulation is consistent with hundreds of years between great subduction events.

  10. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  11. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  12. An experimental study on low-velocity low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, C.; Murdoch, N.; Mimoun, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) is scheduled to launch the asteroid sample-return mission, Hayabusa-2, to target body 1999 JU_3 in December 2014 [1]. The spacecraft will arrive at the C-type near-Earth asteroid in mid-2018 and deploy several science payloads to its surface. Among these payloads is a 10-kg lander, the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT), provided by the German Space Agency (DLR) with cooperation from the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). MASCOT will reach the asteroid's surface with an anticipated impact speed of 10--20 cm/s. In addition to housing four instruments for in-situ science investigation, MASCOT contains a mobility mechanism that will correct its orientation and enable it to ''hop'' to various measurement sites [2]. Based on thermal infrared observations [3,4,5] and previous space missions [6,7], it is strongly believed that 1999 JU_3 is covered by loose regolith. The asteroid's granular surface, in combination with the low surface gravity, makes it difficult to predict the lander's collision behavior from existing theoretical models. However, to ensure that MASCOT can successfully fulfill its mission, it is vital to understand the rebound dynamics of the lander in the asteroid surface environment. The objective of this work, derived from the needs of current and future asteroid missions, is to present an experiment designed to study low-velocity, low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces. The experiment measures the amount of energy lost during impact via a projectile's coefficient of restitution and also the acceleration profile of the projectile during collision. The key challenge to designing an asteroid collision experiment is finding a way to simulate reduced gravity conditions on the Earth so that the prevailing forces in micro-gravity collisions can be reflected in the experimental results. The proposed way to achieve this goal is to let a free-falling projectile impact a surface with a constant downward

  13. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  14. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  15. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  16. The influence of surface on the running velocities of elite and amateur orienteer athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, K; Jensen, K; Mourot, L; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-12-01

    We compared the reduction in running velocities from road to off-road terrain in eight elite and eight amateur male orienteer athletes to investigate whether this factor differentiates elite from amateur athletes. On two separate days, each subject ran three 2-km time trials and three 20-m sprints "all-out" on a road, on a path, and in a forest. On a third day, the running economy and maximal aerobic power of individuals were assessed on a treadmill. The elite orienteer ran faster than the amateur on all three surfaces and at both distances, in line with their better running economy and aerobic power. In the forest, the elites ran at a slightly higher percentage of their 2-km (∼3%) and 20-m (∼4%) road velocities. Although these differences did not exhibit traditional statistical significance, magnitude-based inferences suggested likely meaningful differences, particularly during 20-m sprinting. Of course, cognitive, mental, and physical attributes other than the ability to run on different surfaces are required for excellence in orienteering (e.g., a high aerobic power). However, we suggest that athlete-specific assessment of running performance on various surfaces and distances might assist in tailoring training and identifying individual strengths and/or weaknesses in an orienteer.

  17. A molecular model of proton neutralization at solid surface: the intermediate velocity region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Nedeljkovic, L.D. (Faculty of Physics, Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)); Janev, R.K. (Inst. of Physics, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Miskovic, Z.L. (Boris Kidric Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1991-06-01

    The proton neutralization (into ground hydrogen state) at solid surface is treated in the normal emergence geometry. For the intermediate proton velocity region (between v{approx equal}1 and 4 a.u.) a new, molecular-type dynamic model of the process is proposed. Evaluation of the electron transition amplitude is based on an elaboration of the Demkov-Ostrovsky method. The calculation showed that the electron transitions have a nonresonant character. Comparison with experiments leads to the conclusion that the electron capture into ground state is almost sufficient to explain the experiment data. (orig.).

  18. Precise parameterization of the recombination velocity at passivated phosphorus doped surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmerle, Achim, E-mail: achim-kimmerle@gmx.de; Momtazur Rahman, Md.; Werner, Sabrina; Mack, Sebastian; Wolf, Andreas; Richter, Armin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Haug, Halvard [Institute for Energy Technology, Instituttveien 18, 2007 Kjeller (Norway)

    2016-01-14

    We investigate the surface recombination velocity S{sub p} at the silicon-dielectric interface of phosphorus-doped surfaces for two industrially relevant passivation schemes for crystalline silicon solar cells. A broad range of surface dopant concentrations together with a high accuracy of evaluating the latter is achieved by incremental back-etching of the surface. The analysis of lifetime measurements and the simulation of the surface recombination consistently apply a set of well accepted models, namely, the Auger recombination by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 1–14 (2012)], the carrier mobility by Klaassen [Solid-State Electron. 35, 953–959 (1992); 35, 961–967 (1992)], the intrinsic carrier concentration for undoped silicon by Altermatt et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 93, 1598–1604 (2003)], and the band-gap narrowing by Schenk [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3684–3695 (1998)]. The results show an increased S{sub p} at textured in respect to planar surfaces. The obtained parameterizations are applicable in modern simulation tools such as EDNA [K. R. McIntosh and P. P. Altermatt, in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (2010), pp. 1–6], PC1Dmod [Haug et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 131, 30–36 (2014)], and Sentaurus Device [Synopsys, Sentaurus TCAD, Zürich, Switzerland] as well as in the analytical solution under the assumption of local charge neutrality by Cuevas et al. [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 40, 1181–1183 (1993)].

  19. Precise parameterization of the recombination velocity at passivated phosphorus doped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmerle, Achim; Momtazur Rahman, Md.; Werner, Sabrina; Mack, Sebastian; Wolf, Andreas; Richter, Armin; Haug, Halvard

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the surface recombination velocity Sp at the silicon-dielectric interface of phosphorus-doped surfaces for two industrially relevant passivation schemes for crystalline silicon solar cells. A broad range of surface dopant concentrations together with a high accuracy of evaluating the latter is achieved by incremental back-etching of the surface. The analysis of lifetime measurements and the simulation of the surface recombination consistently apply a set of well accepted models, namely, the Auger recombination by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 1-14 (2012)], the carrier mobility by Klaassen [Solid-State Electron. 35, 953-959 (1992); 35, 961-967 (1992)], the intrinsic carrier concentration for undoped silicon by Altermatt et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 93, 1598-1604 (2003)], and the band-gap narrowing by Schenk [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3684-3695 (1998)]. The results show an increased Sp at textured in respect to planar surfaces. The obtained parameterizations are applicable in modern simulation tools such as EDNA [K. R. McIntosh and P. P. Altermatt, in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (2010), pp. 1-6], PC1Dmod [Haug et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 131, 30-36 (2014)], and Sentaurus Device [Synopsys, Sentaurus TCAD, Zürich, Switzerland] as well as in the analytical solution under the assumption of local charge neutrality by Cuevas et al. [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 40, 1181-1183 (1993)].

  20. Sensitivities of surface wave velocities to the medium parameters in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth and inversion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar N. Bhattacharya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity kernels or partial derivatives of phase velocity (c and group velocity (U with respect to medium parameters are useful to interpret a given set of observed surface wave velocity data. In addition to phase velocities, group velocities are also being observed to find the radial anisotropy of the crust and mantle. However, sensitivities of group velocity for a radially anisotropic Earth have rarely been studied. Here we show sensitivities of group velocity along with those of phase velocity to the medium parameters VSV, VSH , VPV, VPH , h and density in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth. The peak sensitivities for U are generally twice of those for c; thus U is more efficient than c to explore anisotropic nature of the medium. Love waves mainly depends on VSH while Rayleigh waves is nearly independent of VSH . The sensitivities show that there are trade-offs among these parameters during inversion and there is a need to reduce the number of parameters to be evaluated independently. It is suggested to use a nonlinear inversion jointly for Rayleigh and Love waves; in such a nonlinear inversion best solutions are obtained among the model parameters within prescribed limits for each parameter. We first choose VSH, VSV and VPH within their corresponding limits; VPV and h can be evaluated from empirical relations among the parameters. The density has small effect on surface wave velocities and it can be considered from other studies or from empirical relation of density to average P-wave velocity.

  1. Collisional Processing of Comet and Asteroid Surfaces: Velocity Effects on Absorption Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Smith, D. C.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged where 3.9 Gyr ago, a violent reshuffling reshaped the placement of small bodies in the solar system (the Nice model). Surface properties of these objects may have been affected by collisions caused by this event, and by collisions with other small bodies since their emplacement. These impacts affect the spectrographic observations of these bodies today. Shock effects (e.g., planar dislocations) manifest in minerals allowing astronomers to better understand geophysical impact processing that has occurred on small bodies. At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have impacted forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities. We find that the amount of spectral variation, absorption wavelength, and full width half maximum of the absorbance peaks vary non-linearly with the velocity of the impact. We also find that the spectral variation increases with decreasing crystal size (single solid rock versus granular). Future analyses include quantification of the spectral changes with different impactor densities, temperature, and additional impact velocities. Results on diopside, fayalite, and magnesite can be found in Lederer et al., this meeting.

  2. Estimation of the p-wave velocity profile of elastic real data based on surface wave inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an analytical approach to invert for a smoothly varying near-surface P-wave velocity profile that has a squared slowness linearly decreasing with depth. The exact solution for such a velocity profile in the acoustic approximation can be expressed in terms of Airy functions and

  3. Microscale Controls on Ultrasonic Velocity Dispersion in Near-Surface Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettemy, G. L.

    2006-05-01

    This effort demonstrates a technique to measure poroelastic and petrophysical parameters that can be monitored over time to document diagenetic and consolidation alterations in the shallow biogeosphere. The signatures of these process effects are revealed largely through scale-dependent estimates of porosity, permeability, and the effective framework moduli that describe particle-particle mechanical interactions. Near- surface marine sediments of the Peru margin (ODP Leg 201) provide a unique dataset with which to study such near-surface processes, especially those associated with depositional, tectonic, and biogeochemical dynamics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image analysis and broadband (100-1000 kHz) ultrasonic compressional wave experiments are combined to interpret the microscale parameters revealed through velocity dispersion analysis. In particular, (i) back-scattered electron (BSE) images are processed to estimate the local porosity, tortuosity, and resultant permeability of the characteristic topology of each sample; and (ii) bounds for complex-valued grain and frame moduli, following an amended Biot formulation, are estimated by using the microscale imaging parameters and observed velocity dispersion. Several key results are highlighted, with regard to BSE imaging and velocity dispersion analysis, beyond the imaging and Biot parameter inversion. For example, microscale permeabilities are typically an order-of- magnitude larger than core (~2 cm) measurements. This discrepancy is critical to understanding spatial and temporal scale differences between, for example, diffusion and advection of nutrients supplying microbial communities versus tectonic dewatering and the resulting transient meter-scale pore pressure modulation. Broadband velocity dispersion analysis proves to be a powerful tool for detecting sub-wavelength sedimentological heterogeneity. Negative velocity dispersion, for example, can be used to estimate scatterer dimensions, consistent

  4. An improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean from drifter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Lucas C.; Mariano, Arthur J.; Lumpkin, Rick

    2017-06-01

    This work updates the methods of Lumpkin and Johnson (2013) to obtain an improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean using observations from undrogued and 15-m drogued Global Drifter Program (GDP) drifters. The proposed procedure includes the correction of the slip bias of undrogued drifters, thus recovering about half of the GDP dataset; and a new approach for decomposing Lagrangian data into mean, seasonal and eddy components, which reduces the smoothing of spatial gradients inherent in data binning methods. The sensitivity of the results to method parameters, the method performance relative to other techniques, and the associated estimation errors, are evaluated using statistics calculated for a test dataset consisting of altimeter-derived geostrophic velocities subsampled at the drifter locations, and for the full altimeter-derived geostrophic velocity fields. It is demonstrated that (1) the correction of drifter slip bias produces statistically similar mean velocities for both drogued and undrogued drifter datasets at most latitudes and reduces differences between their variance estimates, (2) the proposed decomposition method produces pseudo-Eulerian mean fields with magnitudes and horizontal scales closer to time-averaged Eulerian observations than other methods, and (3) standard errors calculated for pseudo-Eulerian quantities underestimate the real errors by a factor of almost two. The improved decomposition method and the inclusion of undrogued drifters in the analysis allows resolving details of the time-mean circulation not well defined in the previous version of the climatology, such as the cross-stream structure of western boundary currents, recirculation cells, and zonally-elongated mid-ocean striations.

  5. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Velocity Barb (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind velocity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  6. Ice Velocity Mapping of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica by Matching Surface Undulations Measured by Icesat Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Yu, Jaehyung; Scambos, Ted A.; Seo, Ki-Weon

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating the surface horizontal velocity on ice shelves using laser altimetrydata from the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat; 20032009). The method matches undulations measured at crossover points between successive campaigns.

  7. MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF FAMILIAL HYPOKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS - INVASIVE VERSUS SURFACE DETERMINATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; LINKS, TP; ZWARTS, MJ; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1994-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in the brachial biceps muscle was determined in a large family of patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) by both a surface and an invasive method. Other surface EMG parameters and the muscle force were also determined. Both the surface and the inv

  8. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  9. Space Debris Surfaces (Computer Code): Probability of No Penetration Versus Impact Velocity and Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, N.; Meibaum, R.; Olsen, G.

    1995-01-01

    A unique collection of computer codes, Space Debris Surfaces (SD_SURF), have been developed to assist in the design and analysis of space debris protection systems. SD_SURF calculates and summarizes a vehicle's vulnerability to space debris as a function of impact velocity and obliquity. An SD_SURF analysis will show which velocities and obliquities are the most probable to cause a penetration. This determination can help the analyst select a shield design that is best suited to the predominant penetration mechanism. The analysis also suggests the most suitable parameters for development or verification testing. The SD_SURF programs offer the option of either FORTRAN programs or Microsoft-EXCEL spreadsheets and macros. The FORTRAN programs work with BUMPERII. The EXCEL spreadsheets and macros can be used independently or with selected output from the SD_SURF FORTRAN programs. Examples will be presented of the interaction between space vehicle geometry, the space debris environment, and the penetration and critical damage ballistic limit surfaces of the shield under consideration.

  10. Extraction of bulk generation lifetime and surface generation velocity in high-resistivity silicon by means of gated diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Verzellesi, G; Bosisio, L; Dalla Betta, Gian Franco; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2002-01-01

    We show that the accuracy of the gated diode method for measuring bulk generation lifetime and surface generation velocity in high resistivity silicon depends critically on the gate length of the test device, as a result of nonidealities affecting the gated diode operation. Minimization of the surface generation velocity measurement error requires the gate length to be suitably decreased, while long gate length structures are needed for accurate bulk generation lifetime extraction.

  11. Influence of air velocity on droplet's wetting and evaporation conditions on a flat surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapalowicz, Z. (Technical Univ. of Szczecin (Poland). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    The paper presents results of experimental research on influence of air velocity on characteristic dimensions, spreading ratio and evaporation time of a droplet. The relation between the velocity that initiates droplet's motion and the temperature of the surface has been under research, too, and is presented in the paper as well. The research allows determination of the droplet's rest and motion areas on the wall surface.

  12. A Layer-Stripping Method for 3D Near-Surface Velocity Model Building Using Seismic First-Arrival Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taikun Shi; Jianzhong Zhang; Zhonglai Huang; Changkun Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of 3D near-surface velocity model building, we develop a layer-stripping method using seismic first-arrival times. The velocity model within a Common Mid-Point (CMP) gather is assumed to be stratified into thin layers, and the velocity of each layer var-ies linearly with depth. The thickness and velocity of the top layer are estimated using minimum-offset first-arrival data in a CMP gather. Then the top layer is stripped and the second layer becomes a new top layer. After removing the effect of the top layer from the former first-arrival data, the new first-arrival data are obtained and then used to estimate the parameters of the second layer. In this manner, the velocity model, being regarded as that at a CMP location, is built layer-by-layer from the top to the bottom. A 3D near-surface velocity model is then formed using the velocity models at all CMP locations. The tests on synthetic and observed seismic data show that the layer-stripping method can be used to build good near-surface velocity models for static correction, and its computation speed is ap-proximately hundred times faster than that of grid tomography.

  13. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  14. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects and can aid in predicting dispersal of materials throughout the ocean or in predicting long-term climate change. Parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of turbulent eddies. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and may take advantage of animations of sea surface height, in which quasi- circular, westward-propagating eddies can easily be seen.

  15. Toe clearance and velocity profiles of young and elderly during walking on sloped surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begg Rezaul K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most falls in older adults are reported during locomotion and tripping has been identified as a major cause of falls. Challenging environments (e.g., walking on slopes are potential interventions for maintaining balance and gait skills. The aims of this study were: 1 to investigate whether or not distributions of two important gait variables [minimum toe clearance (MTC and foot velocity at MTC (VelMTC] and locomotor control strategies are altered during walking on sloped surfaces, and 2 if altered, are they maintained at two groups (young and elderly female groups. Methods MTC and VelMTC data during walking on a treadmill at sloped surfaces (+3°, 0° and -3° were analysed for 9 young (Y and 8 elderly (E female subjects. Results MTC distributions were found to be positively skewed whereas VelMTC distributions were negatively skewed for both groups on all slopes. Median MTC values increased (Y = 33%, E = 7% at negative slope but decreased (Y = 25%, E = 15% while walking on the positive slope surface compared to their MTC values at the flat surface (0°. Analysis of VelMTC distributions also indicated significantly (p th percentile (Q1 values in the elderly at all slopes. Conclusion The young displayed a strong positive correlation between MTC median changes and IQR (interquartile range changes due to walking on both slopes; however, such correlation was weak in the older adults suggesting differences in control strategies being employed to minimize the risk of tripping.

  16. Phonon transport in silicon nanowires: The reduced group velocity and surface-roughness scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liyan; Li, Baowen; Li, Wu

    2016-09-01

    Using a linear-scaling Kubo simulation approach, we have quantitatively investigated the effects of confinement and surface roughness on phonon transport in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as thick as 55 nm in diameter R . The confinement effect leads to significant reduction of phonon group velocity v in SiNWs compared to bulk silicon except at extremely low phonon frequencies f , which very likely persists in SiNWs several hundreds of nanometers thick, suggesting the inapplicability of bulk properties, including anharmonic phonon scattering, to SiNWs. For instance, the velocity can be reduced by more than 30% for phonons with f >4.5 THz in 55-nm-thick nanowires. In rough SiNWs Casimir's limit, which is valid in confined macroscopic systems, can underestimate the surface scattering by more than one order of magnitude. For a roughness profile with Lorentzian correlation characterized by root-mean-square roughness σ and correlation length Lr, the frequency-dependent phonon diffusivity D follows power-law dependences D ∝Rασ-βLrγ , where α ˜2 and β ˜1 . On average, γ increases from 0 to 0.5 as R /σ increases. The mean free path and the phonon lifetime essentially follow the same power-law dependences. These dependences are in striking contrast to Casimir's limit, i.e., D ˜v R /3 , and manifest the dominant role of the change in the number of atoms due to roughness. The thermal conductivity κ can vary by one order of magnitude with varying σ and Lr in SiNWs, and increasing σ and shortening Lr can efficiently lower κ below Casimir's limit by one order of magnitude. Our work provides different insights to understand the ultralow thermal conductivity of SiNWs reported experimentally and guidance to manipulate κ via surface roughness engineering.

  17. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in flow depth and surface velocity during a large flood in a steep mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the discharge capacity of channels and changes in hydraulic properties during large storms is essential for prediction of flash floods. However, such information is limited for steep mountain channels because of their complex nature and the lack of measured data. Thus, we obtained detailed water-level and surface-velocity data during large floods of a steep mountain channel, and documented how complex channel morphology affected water flow during large storms. We installed water-level and surface-velocity sensors at a cascade and at a pool that was 10 m downstream at the Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of the University of Tokyo Forests in Japan. We successfully obtained 1-min interval data for a major storm with total precipitation of 288 mm that fell over 59 h and a maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/h. During the storm, height of the water surface from the deepest point of each cross section ranged from 0.35 to 1.57 m and surface velocity ranged from 0.35 to 4.15 m/s. As expected, the changes in flow depth, surface velocity, and velocity profiles were complex and differed even between the cascade and adjacent pool cross sections. Dramatic changes in flow conditions first occurred at the cascade when discharge increased to a certain point, when water suddenly stagnated at the foot of the cascade and submerged flow might have occurred. Thereafter, the water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and the velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. At the downstream pool, where most rocks were submerged at a mean water depth of 0.7 m, surface velocity suddenly increased dramatically and the velocity profile changed as very slow flow developed in the lower portion of the profile, while water levels increased only slightly. When the rainfall diminished, first, the surface velocity markedly declined, then the velocity profile returned to its original state at the pool, and then submerged

  18. Study of near-surface layers of Omerelu area using low velocity layer (LVL method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajani, O.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we have good knowledge of the soil type so as to appreciate the enormous resources we are stepping on. It is more compelling for oil explorationists to know more as this will go a long way to determine the success or failure of search for minerals. Seismic methods give a good overview of a wide area though they involve greater logistics and operational requirements than some other geophysical methods. The purpose of present study is to determine the depth of the weathered layer and velocities of near-surface layers over the investigated area. Twelve sample points were picked with a grid system spread over a perimeter of approximately 4km x 4km. The in-house UpSphere computer program was utilised to analyse and display result in a way that makes final interpretation very easy. This program actually removed the burden of plotting the graphs and the contour maps manually. The depth of weathered layer in the study area varies between 12m and 13m. The velocities of the weathered layer and the consolidated layer vary between 500 m/s – 550 m/s and 1790 m/s – 1875 m/s respectively. Also the dip is in the north east – south west direction.

  19. Techniques for Transition and Surface Temperature Measurements on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities- A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    A research effort to advance techniques for determining transition location and measuring surface temperatures on graphite-tipped projectiles in hypersonic flight in a ballistic range is described. Projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of approx. 4.7 km/sec into air at pressures of 190-570 Torr. Most launches had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.5-5 degrees at pressures of 380 Torr and above and 3-6 degrees at pressures of 190-380 Torr. Arcjet-ablated and machined, bead-blasted projectiles were launched; special cleaning techniques had to be developed for the latter class of projectiles. Improved methods of using helium to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) camera images were taken are described. Two ICCD cameras with a wavelength sensitivity range of 480-870 nm have been used in this program for several years to obtain images. In the last year, a third camera, with a wavelength sensitivity range of 1.5-5 microns [in the infrared (IR)], has been added. ICCD and IR camera images of hemisphere nose and 70 degree sphere-cone nose projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.7 km/sec are presented. The ICCD images clearly show a region of steep temperature rise indicative of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Preliminary temperature data for the graphite projectile noses are presented.

  20. Breakup of a droplet at high velocity impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Tseng, Kun-Cheng; Wang, Ching-Hua

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the collision between a droplet of different liquids with high impact energy and a solid plate with varied surface roughness, which is characterized by a dimensionless Weber number ( We, defined as the impact inertia of the droplet normalized by its surface force) extending up to 12,000 for water. To make such collision, a technique was developed to generate a single droplet with speed up to 42 m/s, which was initially driven by upstream air flow through a nozzle and accelerated to nearly the same velocity of the high-speed flow downstream. Via a high-speed photographing system, the various splashing mechanisms were investigated and a specific prompt splash on a smooth plate was found at sufficiently high We, which was different somehow from the conventionally defined one that was generally believed to occur only on a rough surface. The radius when multiple secondary droplets were shed out of the rim of the expanding lamella was found to scale almost invariantly with We at large values, whereas the coupled effect of liquid viscosity might affect the ultimate value.

  1. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    -partial differential equations. The spatial component of the governing equations is eliminated using a series expansion of basis functions and by applying Galerkin's method. The number of terms in the series expansion affects the convergence of the spatial component, and convergence is best determined by the von Koch rules that previously appeared for column buckling problems. After elimination of the spatial component, an ordinary integral-differential equation in time remains. The dynamic stability of elastic and viscoelastic problems is assessed using the determinant of the governing system of equations and the time component of the solution in the form exp (lambda t). The determinant is in terms of lambda where the values of lambda are the latent roots of the aero-servo-viscoelastic system. The real component of lambda dictates the stability of the system. If all the real components are negative, the system is stable. If at least one real component is zero and all others are negative, the system is neutrally stable. If one or more real components are positive, the system is unstable. In aero-servo-viscoelasticity, the neutrally stable condition is termed flutter. For an aero-servo-viscoelastic lifting surface, the unstable condition is historically termed torsional divergence. The more general aero-servo-viscoelastic theory has produced a number of important results, enumerated in the following list: 1. Subsonic panel flutter can occur before panel instability. This result overturned a long held assumption in aeroelasticity, and was produced by the novel application of the von Koch rules for convergence. Further, experimental results from the 1950s by the Air Force were retrieved to provide additional proof. 2. An expanded definition for flutter of a lifting surface. The legacy definition is that flutter is the first occurrence of simple harmonic motion of a structure, and the flight velocity at which this motion occurs is taken as the flutter speed. The expanded definition

  2. Advective surface velocity in the north west Pacific derived from NOAA AVHRR images

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Akiyama, M.; Okada, Y.; Sugimori, Y.

    Using sequential AVHRR images in November 1983, nearsurface advective velocities are derived in the region Kuroshio south of Japan. For deriving the velocities two methods are used. One is the Method of Cross Correlation (MCC), using image pair...

  3. The Influence Of Initial Velocity Distribution On Ionization Dynamics Of Rydberg Atoms Approaching Solid Surfaces In The Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božnic, D. K.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the ionization dynamics of slow hydrogenlike Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number n >> 1 ) approaching solid surface in a weak electric field. The recently obtained etalon-equation method results for the simulation of experimental signal are used to investigate the influence of the initial velocity distribution. It is demonstrated that an agreement with the experimental signal can be obtained with the broadened velocity distributions.

  4. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  5. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  6. Retrieval of sea surface velocities using sequential Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S Prasad; A S Rajawat; Yaswant Pradhan; O S Chauhan; S R Nayak

    2002-09-01

    The Indian remote sensing satellite, IRS-P4 (Oceansat-I) launched on May 26th, 1999 carried two sensors on board, i.e., the Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) and the Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) dedicated for oceanographic research. Sequential data of IRS-P4 OCM has been analysed over parts of both east and west coast of India and a methodology to retrieve sea surface current velocities has been applied. The method is based on matching suspended sediment dispersion patterns, in sequential two time lapsed images. The pattern matching is performed on a pair of atmospherically corrected and geo-referenced sequential images by Maximum Cross-Correlation (MCC) technique. The MCC technique involves computing matrices of cross-correlation coe#cients and identifying correlation peaks. The movement of the pattern can be calculated knowing the displacement of windows required to match patterns in successive images. The technique provides actual flow during a specified period by integrating both tidal and wind influences. The current velocities retrieved were compared with synchronous data collected along the east coast during the GSI cruise ST-133 of R.V. Samudra Kaustubh in January 2000. The current data were measured using the ocean current meter supplied by the Environmental Measurement and CONtrol (EMCON), Kochi available with the Geological Survey of India, Marine Wing. This current meter can measure direction and magnitude with an accuracy of ± 5° and 2% respectively. The measurement accuracies with coefficient of determination (2) of 0.99, for both magnitude (cm.s-1) and direction (deg.) were achieved.

  7. Estimation of Elastic Constants from Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity by Inverse Analysis using the Downhill Simplex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Harumichi; Nishino, Hideo; Cho, Hideo; Ogiso, Hisato; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    1998-05-01

    The measurement of surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity is used to estimate the surface properties because the velocity depends on the elastic properties near the surface.To estimate the elastic constants, we developed a new inverse method combining the Monte Carlo method and the downhill simplex method.The initial values are determined using many random numbers, instead of an arbitrarily chosen several sets of values, in order to reduce the risk of trapping by the local pseudo minima.We confirm that the estimated elastic constants agree well with the reported elastic constants of Si and the experimental SAW velocity is quite well reproduced.We estimate the elastic constants of quartz for application purposes.

  8. A hidden state space modeling approach for improving glacier surface velocity estimates using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, D.; Schubert, A.; Small, D.; Meier, E.; Lüthi, M. P.; Vieli, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method for glacier surface velocity (GSV) estimates is proposed here which combines ground- and space-based measurements with hidden state space modeling (HSSM). Examples of such a fusion of physical models with remote sensing (RS) observations were described in (Henke & Meier, Hidden State Space Models for Improved Remote Sensing Applications, ITISE 2014, p. 1242-1255) and are currently adapted for GSV estimation. GSV can be estimated using in situ measurements, RS methods or numerical simulations based on ice-flow models. In situ measurements ensure high accuracy but limited coverage and time consuming field work, while RS methods offer regular observations with high spatial coverage generally not possible with in situ methods. In particular, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can obtain useful images independent of daytime and cloud cover. A ground portable radar interferometer (GPRI) is useful for investigating a particular area in more detail than is possible from space, but provides local coverage only. Several processing methods for deriving GSV from radar sensors have been established, including interferometry and offset tracking (Schubert et al, Glacier surface velocity estimation using repeat TerraSAR-X images. ISPRS Journal of P&RS, p. 49-62, 2013). On the other hand, it is also possible to derive glacier parameters from numerical ice-flow modeling alone. Given a well-parameterized model, GSV can in theory be derived and propagated continuously in time. However, uncertainties in the glacier flow dynamics and model errors increase with excessive propagation. All of these methods have been studied independently, but attempts to combine them have only rarely been made. The HSSM we propose recursively estimates the GSV based on 1) a process model making use of temporal and spatial interdependencies between adjacent states, and 2) observations (RS and optional in situ). The in situ and GPRI images currently being processed were acquired in the

  9. Monitoring of surface velocity of hyper-concentrated flow in a laboratory flume by means of fully-digital PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Donatella; Di Leonardo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    High flow conditions, which are generally characterized by high sediment concentrations, do not permit the use of traditional measurement equipment. Traditional techniques usually are based on the intrusive measure of the vertical profile of flow velocity and on the linking of water depth with the discharge through the rating curve. The major disadvantage of these measurement techniques is that they are difficult to use and not safe for operators especially in high flow conditions. The point is that, as literature shows (see as an example Moramarco and Termini, 2015), especially in such conditions, the measurement of surface velocity distribution is important to evaluate the mean flow velocity and, thus, the flow discharge. In the last decade, image-based techniques have been increasingly used for surface velocity measurements (among others Joeau et al., 2008). Experimental program has been recently conducted at the Hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials Engineering (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy) in order to analyze the propagation phenomenon of hyper-concentrated flow in a defense channel. The experimental apparatus includes a high-precision camera and a system allowing the images recording. This paper investigates the utility and the efficiency of the digital image-technique for remote monitoring of surface velocity in hyper-concentrated flow by the aid of data collected during experiments conducted in the laboratory flume. In particular the present paper attention is focused on the estimation procedure of the velocity vectors and on their sensitivity with parameters (number of images, spatial resolution of interrogation area,) of the images processing procedure. References Jodeau M., A. Hauet, A. Paquier, Le Coz J., Dramais G., Application and evaluation of LS-PIV technique for the monitoring of river surface in high flow conditions, Flow Measurements and Instrumentation, Vol.19, No.2, 2008, pp.117

  10. Mitigation of defocusing by statics and near-surface velocity errors by interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2015-08-19

    We propose an interferometric least-squares migration method that can significantly reduce migration artifacts due to statics and errors in the near-surface velocity model. We first choose a reference reflector whose topography is well known from the, e.g., well logs. Reflections from this reference layer are correlated with the traces associated with reflections from deeper interfaces to get crosscorrelograms. These crosscorrelograms are then migrated using interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM). In this way statics and velocity errors at the near surface are largely eliminated for the examples in our paper.

  11. Very low surface recombination velocities on p-type silicon wafers passivated with a dielectric with fixed negative charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostinelli, G.; Delabie, A.; Dekkers, H.F.W.; De Wolf, S.; Beaucarne, G. [IMEC vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Leuven (Belgium); Vitanov, P.; Alexieva, Z. [CL SENES, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-11-23

    Surface recombination velocities as low as 10cm/s have been obtained by treated atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on p-type CZ silicon wafers. Low surface recombination is achieved by means of field induced surface passivation due to a high density of negative charges stored at the interface. In comparison to a diffused back surface field, an external field source allows for higher band bending, that is, a better performance. While this process yields state of the art results, it is not suited for large-scale production. Preliminary results on an industrially viable, alternative process based on a pseudo-binary system containing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are presented, too. With this process, surface recombination velocities of 500-1000cm/s have been attained on mc-Si wafers. (author)

  12. Wurtzite-Phased InP Micropillars Grown on Silicon with Low Surface Recombination Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Sun, Hao; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-11-11

    The direct growth of III-V nanostructures on silicon has shown great promise in the integration of optoelectronics with silicon-based technologies. Our previous work showed that scaling up nanostructures to microsize while maintaining high quality heterogeneous integration opens a pathway toward a complete photonic integrated circuit and high-efficiency cost-effective solar cells. In this paper, we present a thorough material study of novel metastable InP micropillars monolithically grown on silicon, focusing on two enabling aspects of this technology-the stress relaxation mechanism at the heterogeneous interface and the microstructure surface quality. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy studies show that InP grows directly on silicon without any amorphous layer in between. A set of periodic dislocations was found at the heterointerface, relaxing the 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si. Single crystalline InP therefore can grow on top of the fully relaxed template, yielding high-quality micropillars with diameters expanding beyond 1 μm. An interesting power-dependence trend of carrier recombination lifetimes was captured for these InP micropillars at room temperature, for the first time for micro/nanostructures. By simply combining internal quantum efficiency with carrier lifetime, we revealed the recombination dynamics of nonradiative and radiative portions separately. A very low surface recombination velocity of 1.1 × 10(3) cm/sec was obtained. In addition, we experimentally estimated the radiative recombination B coefficient of 2.0 × 10(-10) cm(3)/sec for pure wurtzite-phased InP. These values are comparable with those obtained from InP bulk. Exceeding the limits of conventional nanowires, our InP micropillars combine the strengths of both nanostructures and bulk materials and will provide an avenue in heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductor materials onto silicon platforms.

  13. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The surface velocity feature of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The movement of a glacier can redistribute glacier mass balance and change water and thermal conditions of the glacier.Thus,the glacier can maintain its dynamic balance.Surface velocity of a glacier is a basic feature of glacier movement.With successive monthly observations from 2006 to 2008,we obtained spatial and temporal variations for surface velocity of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain.Dynamic simulation was used to verify the findings.Results show that altitudinal distribution of glacier velocity was influenced by synthetic effects such as glacier thickness,slope,and bedrock morphology.However,seasonal variation was influenced by changing glacier thickness.

  15. Integral Length and Time Scales of Velocity, Heat and Mass At and Near a Turbulent Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, G. M.; Zappa, C. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence enhances both heat and CO2 gas exchange at a free surface. At the air-water interface, heat and mass transport is controlled by a thin thermal/diffusive boundary layer. Turbulence in the flow acts to thin the heat and mass boundary layers, thereby increasing the rate at which surface water is mixed into the bulk. Surface water is typically cool, and mixing replaces it with warmer water from the bulk. In our experiment, and in many environmental cases, the surface has a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 and carbonate species. . The dissolved gas is transported between the surface and bulk in a similar way to the heat. Because of this similarity, attempts are often made to find and exploit a relationship between the heat and mass transfer. Using a laboratory tank, which generates turbulence with very low mean shear flow, we measured heat and mass transfer by using infrared imagery to map the two-dimensional surface temperature field and by using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to map the two-dimensional subsurface CO2 flux. In addition, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure subsurface velocity fields. A comparative analysis of these results allows us to determine the similarities and differences between heat, mass, and momentum transport at a free surface. This will contribute to the use of one quantity to predict transport of the others. The setup used here, i.e., turbulence with very low mean shear at the surface, allows us to evaluate the turbulent components of interfacial flux in a way that can be applied equally well to flows created by wind, waves, or current. Here, we quantify the integral length and time scales of the surface temperature and sub-surface CO2 and velocity measurements. Initial analysis shows that the integral length scales of temperature at the surface are significantly smaller than the sub-surface velocity scales. However, the integral scale of sub-surface velocity decreases approaching the surface. The

  16. Slope-Velocity-Equilibrium and evolution of surface roughness on a stony hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slope-velocity equilibrium is hypothesized as a state that evolves naturally over time due to the interaction between overland flow and bed morphology, wherein steeper areas develop a relative increase in physical and hydraulic roughness such that flow velocity is a unique function of overland flow ...

  17. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  18. Statistical properties of the surface velocity field in the northern Gulf of Mexico sampled by GLAD drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, A. J.; Ryan, E. H.; Huntley, H. S.; Laurindo, L. C.; Coelho, E.; Griffa, A.; Özgökmen, T. M.; Berta, M.; Bogucki, D.; Chen, S. S.; Curcic, M.; Drouin, K. L.; Gough, M.; Haus, B. K.; Haza, A. C.; Hogan, P.; Iskandarani, M.; Jacobs, G.; Kirwan, A. D.; Laxague, N.; Lipphardt, B.; Magaldi, M. G.; Novelli, G.; Reniers, A.; Restrepo, J. M.; Smith, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Wei, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) used multiscale sampling and GPS technology to observe time series of drifter positions with initial drifter separation of O(100 m) to O(10 km), and nominal 5 min sampling, during the summer and fall of 2012 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Histograms of the velocity field and its statistical parameters are non-Gaussian; most are multimodal. The dominant periods for the surface velocity field are 1-2 days due to inertial oscillations, tides, and the sea breeze; 5-6 days due to wind forcing and submesoscale eddies; 9-10 days and two weeks or longer periods due to wind forcing and mesoscale variability, including the period of eddy rotation. The temporal e-folding scales of a fitted drifter velocity autocorrelation function are bimodal with time scales, 0.25-0.50 days and 0.9-1.4 days, and are the same order as the temporal e-folding scales of observed winds from nearby moored National Data Buoy Center stations. The Lagrangian integral time scales increase from coastal values of 8 h to offshore values of approximately 2 days with peak values of 3-4 days. The velocity variance is large, O>(1>) m2/s2, the surface velocity statistics are more anisotropic, and increased dispersion is observed at flow bifurcations. Horizontal diffusivity estimates are O>(103>) m2/s in coastal regions with weaker flow to O>(105>) m2/s in flow bifurcations, a strong jet, and during the passage of Hurricane Isaac. The Gulf of Mexico surface velocity statistics sampled by the GLAD drifters are a strong function of the feature sampled, topography, and wind forcing.

  19. Very low surface recombination velocity in n-type c-Si using extrinsic field effect passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ruy S.; Woodcock, Frederick; Wilshaw, Peter R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, field-effect surface passivation is characterised as either intrinsic or extrinsic, depending on the origin of the charges present in passivation dielectric layers. The surface recombination velocity of float zone, 1 Ω cm, n-type silicon was reduced to 0.15 cm/s, the lowest ever observed for a passivating double layer consisting of thermally grown silicon dioxide and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride. This result was obtained by enhancing the intrinsic chemical and field-effect passivation of the dielectric layers with uniform, extrinsic field-effect passivation induced by corona discharge. The position and stability of charges, both intrinsic and extrinsic, were characterised and their passivation effect was seen stable for two months with surface recombination velocity field-effect passivation provided a further decrease by a factor of 3.

  20. Crustal velocity structure of the Deccan Volcanic Province, Indian Peninsula, from observed surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through inversion of fundamental mode group velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves, we study the crustal and subcrustal structure across the central Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP, which is one of the world’s largest terrestrial flood basalts. Our analysis is based on broadband seismograms recorded at seismological station Bhopal (BHPL in the central India from earthquakes located near west coast of India, with an average epicentral distance about 768 km. The recording station and epicentral zone are situated respectively on the northern and southern edges of DVP with wave paths across central DVP. The period of group velocity data ranges from 5 to 60 s for Rayleigh waves and 5 to 45 s for Love waves. Using the genetic algorithm, the observed data have been inverted to obtain the crust and subcrustal velocity structure along the wavepaths. Using this procedure, a similar velocity structure was also obtained earlier for the northwestern DVP, which is in the west of the present study region. Comparison of results show that the crustal thickness decreases westward from central DVP (39.6 km to northwestern DVP (37.8 km along with the decrease of thickness of upper crust; while the thickness of lower crust remains nearly same. From east to west S-wave velocity in the upper crust decreases by 2 to 3 per cent, while P-wave velocity in the whole crust and subcrust decreases by 3 to 6 per cent. The P- and S-wave velocities are positively correlated with crustal thickness and negatively correlated with earth’s heat flow. It appears that the elevated crustal and subcrustal temperature in the western side is the main factor for low velocities on this side.

  1. Transport of ultracold neutrons through a mirror system with surface roughness as a velocity filter

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhova, L A; Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Geltenbort, P; Abele, H; Burgdörfer, J

    2012-01-01

    We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations of ultracold neutron transport through an absorbing-reflecting mirror system in the Earth's gravitational field. We show that the underlying mixed phase space of regular skipping motion and random motion due to disorder scattering can be exploited to realize a velocity filter for ultracold neutrons. The range of velocities selected is controlled by geometric parameters of the wave guide. Possible applications include investigations of transport and scattering dynamics in confined systems.

  2. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  3. Friction velocity u* and roughness length z0 of atmospheric surface boundary layer in sparse-tree land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Dexin; Zhu Tingyao; Han Shijie

    1999-01-01

    Sparse-tree land is one of the typical lands and can be considered as one typical rough surface in boundary layer meteorology. Many lands can be classified into the kind surface in the view of scale and distribution feature of the roughness elements such as agroforest, scatter planted or growing trees, savanna and so on. The structure of surface boundary layer in sparse-tree land is analyzed and the parameters, friction velocity u* and roughness length z0 are deduced based on energy balance law and other physical hypothesis. The models agree well with data of wind tunnel experiments and field measurements.

  4. Scattering of high-frequency seismic waves caused by irregular surface topography and small-scale velocity inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2015-04-01

    Based on 3-D finite difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation, we examined the processes by which the complex, scattered high-frequency (f > 1 Hz) seismic wavefield during crustal earthquakes is developed due to heterogeneous structure, which includes small-scale velocity inhomogeneity in subsurface structure and irregular surface topography on the surface, and compared with observations from dense seismic networks in southwestern Japan. The simulations showed the process by which seismic wave scattering in the heterogeneous structure develops long-duration coda waves and distorts the P-wave polarization and apparent S-wave radiation pattern. The simulations revealed that scattering due to irregular topography is significant only near the station and thus the topographic scattering effects do not accumulate as seismic waves propagate over long distances. On the other hand, scattering due to velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure distorts the seismic wavefield gradually as seismic waves propagate. The composite model, including both irregular topography and velocity inhomogeneity, showed the combined effects. Furthermore, by introducing irregular topography, the effects of seismic wave scattering on both body and coda waves were stronger than in the model with velocity inhomogeneity alone. Therefore, to model the high-frequency seismic wavefield, both topography and velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure should be taken into account in the simulation model. By comparing observations with the simulations including topography, we determined that the most preferable small-scale velocity heterogeneity model for southwestern Japan is characterized by the von Kármán power spectral density function with correlation distance a = 5 km, rms value of fluctuation ɛ = 0.07 and decay order κ = 0.5. We also demonstrated that the relative contribution of scattering due to the topography of southwestern Japan is approximately 12 per cent.

  5. Derivation of GNSS derived station velocities for a surface deformation model in the Austrian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umnig, Elke; Weber, Robert; Maras, Jadre; Brückl, Ewald

    2016-04-01

    This contribution deals with the first comprehensive analysis of GNSS derived surface velocities computed within an observation network of about 100 stations covering the whole Austrian territory and parts of the neighbouring countries. Coordinate time series are available now, spanning a period of 5 years (2010.0-2015.0) for one focus area in East Austria and one and a half year (2013.5-2015.0) for the remaining part of the tracking network. In principle the data series are stemming from two different GNSS campaigns. The former was set up to investigate intra plate tectonic movements within the framework of the project ALPAACT (seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics), the latter was designed to support a number of various requests, e.g. derivation of GNSS derived water vapour fields, but also to expand the foresaid tectonic studies. In addition the activities within the ALPAACT project supplement the educational initiative SHOOLS & QUAKES, where scholars contribute to seismological research. For the whole period of the processed coordinate time series daily solutions have been computed by means of the Bernese software. The processed coordinate time series are tied to the global reference frame ITRF2000 as well as to the frame ITRF2008. Due to the transition of the reference from ITRF2000 to ITRF2008 within the processing period, but also due to updates of the Bernese software from version 5.0 to 5.2 the time series were initially not fully consistent and have to be re-aligned to a common frame. So the goal of this investigation is to derive a nationwide consistent horizontal motion field on base of GNSS reference station data within the ITRF2008 frame, but also with respect to the Eurasian plate. In this presentation we focus on the set-up of the coordinate time series and on the problem of frame alignment. Special attention is also paid to the separation into linear and periodic motion signals, originating from tectonic or non

  6. The Friction Law Stress Exponent under Pine Island Glacier from 15 Years of Surface Elevation and Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet-chaulet, F.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Mosbeux, C.; Mouginot, J.; Remy, F.; Ritz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polar the ice-sheets mass balance largely depends on the flow of ice-streams. Rapid basal motion generally accounts for most of the velocities. In flow models, the conditions at the base of the ice in contact with the bedrock are generally parameterised using a friction law that relates the sliding velocity to the basal shear stress. The most common law has two poorly constrained parameters, the basal slipperiness c and the stress exponent m. The basal slipperiness is expected to depend on local unobservable quantities and is routinely tuned from observed surface velocities using inverse methods. Different values for m are expected depending on the processes, from hard-bed sliding to soft bed deformation, and no consensus has emerged so far for its value that range from 1 to infinity. However, several studies have shown that the transient response of the ice-sheet models to external forcing is highly sensitive to m. Therefore, the uncertainty attached to the friction law is an important limit to our ability to evaluate future dynamical evolution of coastal regions. Calibrating m can be done only if either basal stresses and/or velocities have changed significantly while c can be assumed constant in time. Here, we use Elmer/Ice to model the flow of Pine Island Glacier (PIG), Antarctica, sufficiently far upstream of the grounding line so that we can assume no change in c. Observations show an increase of surface velocities by up to 50% between 1996 and 2010, associated with an important dynamical thinning. Using a control inverse method and different values of m, we tune a spatially varying basal slipperiness field that best fit, in the same time, observed surface velocities for years 1996, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. These years correspond to the MeaSUREs project velocity datasets that have the best spatial coverage for our model domain. Surface elevations for the corresponding years are constructed using ERS and Envisat radar altimetry data. We show that the

  7. Noncontact methods for measuring water-surface elevations and velocities in rivers: Implications for depth and discharge extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; McDonald, Richard R.; Schmeeckle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed optical and videographic methods for measuring water-surface properties in a noninvasive manner hold great promise for extracting river hydraulic and bathymetric information. This paper describes such a technique, concentrating on the method of infrared videog- raphy for measuring surface velocities and both acoustic (laboratory-based) and laser-scanning (field-based) techniques for measuring water-surface elevations. In ideal laboratory situations with simple flows, appropriate spatial and temporal averaging results in accurate water-surface elevations and water-surface velocities. In test cases, this accuracy is sufficient to allow direct inversion of the governing equations of motion to produce estimates of depth and discharge. Unlike other optical techniques for determining local depth that rely on transmissivity of the water column (bathymetric lidar, multi/hyperspectral correlation), this method uses only water-surface information, so even deep and/or turbid flows can be investigated. However, significant errors arise in areas of nonhydrostatic spatial accelerations, such as those associated with flow over bedforms or other relatively steep obstacles. Using laboratory measurements for test cases, the cause of these errors is examined and both a simple semi-empirical method and computational results are presented that can potentially reduce bathymetric inversion errors.

  8. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; DeAngelo, Michael V. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Ermolaeva, Elena [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Remington, Randy [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Sava, Diana [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wagner, Donald [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wei, Shuijion [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  9. Analytical calculation of electron group velocity surfaces in uniform strained graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arias, Wilfrido A.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-12-01

    Electron group velocity for graphene under uniform strain is obtained analytically by using the tight-binding (TB) approximation. Such closed analytical expressions are useful in order to calculate the electronic, thermal and optical properties of strained graphene. These results allow to understand the behavior of electrons when graphene is subjected to strong strain and nonlinear corrections, for which the usual Dirac approach is no longer valid. Some particular cases of uniaxial and shear strain were analyzed. The evolution of the electron group velocity indicates a break-up of the trigonal warping symmetry, which is replaced by a warping consistent with the symmetry of the strained reciprocal lattice. To do this, analytical expressions for the shape of the first Brillouin zone (BZ) of the honeycomb strained reciprocal lattice are provided. Finally, the Fermi velocity becomes strongly anisotropic, i.e., for a strong pure shear strain (20% of the lattice parameter), the two inequivalent Dirac cones merge and the Fermi velocity is zero in one of the principal axis of deformation. We found that nonlinear terms are essential to describe the effects of deformation for electrons near or at the Fermi energy.

  10. Model for seawater fouling and effects of temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy on seawater fouling☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dazhang Yang; Jianhua Liu; Xiaoxue E; Linlin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic model was proposed to predict the seawater fouling process in the seawater heat exchangers. The new model adopted an expression combining depositional and removal behaviors for seawater fouling based on the Kern–Seaton model. The present model parameters include the integrated kinetic rate of deposition (kd) and the integrated kinetic rate of removal (kr), which have clear physical significance. A seawater-fouling monitoring de-vice was established to validate the model. The experimental data were wel fitted to the model, and the param-eters were obtained in different conditions. SEM and EDX analyses were performed after the experiments, and the results show that the main components of seawater fouling are magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hy-droxide. The effects of surface temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy were assessed by the model and the experimental data. The results indicate that the seawater fouling becomes aggravated as the surface tem-perature increased in a certain range, and the seawater fouling resistance reduced as the flow velocity of seawater increased. Furthermore, the effect of the surface free energy of metals was analyzed, showing that the lower sur-face free energy mitigates the seawater fouling accumulation.

  11. The impact of Surface Wind Velocity Data Assimilation on the Predictability of Plume Advection in the Lower Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Thomas; Kajino, Mizuo; Kunii, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    The authors investigated the impact of surface wind velocity data assimilation on the predictability of plume advection in the lower troposphere exploiting the radioactive cesium emitted by the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 as an atmospheric tracer. It was because the radioactive cesium plume was dispersed from the sole point source exactly placed at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and its surface concentration was measured at many locations with a high frequency and high accuracy. We used a non-hydrostatic regional weather prediction model with a horizontal resolution of 3 km, which was coupled with an ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system in this study, to simulate the wind velocity and plume advection. The main module of this weather prediction model has been developed and used operationally by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) since before March 2011. The weather observation data assimilated into the model simulation were provided from two data resources; [#1] the JMA observation archives collected for numerical weather predictions (NWPs) and [#2] the land-surface wind velocity data archived by the JMA surface weather observation network. The former dataset [#1] does not contain land-surface wind velocity observations because their spatial representativeness is relatively small and therefore the land-surface wind velocity data assimilation normally deteriorates the more than one day NWP performance. The latter dataset [#2] is usually used for real-time weather monitoring and never used for the data assimilation of more than one day NWPs. We conducted two experiments (STD and TEST) to reproduce the radioactive cesium plume behavior for 48 hours from 12UTC 14 March to 12UTC 16 March 2011 over the land area of western Japan. The STD experiment was performed to replicate the operational NWP using only the #1 dataset, not assimilating land-surface wind observations. In contrast, the TEST experiment was performed assimilating both

  12. Nonexponential decay of velocity correlations in surface diffusion: The role of interactions and ordering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Hjelt, T.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study the diffusive dynamics of adparticles in two model systems with strong interactions by considering the decay of the single-particle velocity correlation function phi (t). In accordance with previous studies, we find phi (t) to decay nonexponentially and follow a power-law phi (t)similar ......We study the diffusive dynamics of adparticles in two model systems with strong interactions by considering the decay of the single-particle velocity correlation function phi (t). In accordance with previous studies, we find phi (t) to decay nonexponentially and follow a power-law phi (t...... be rationalized in terms of interaction effects. Namely, x is typically larger than two in cases where repulsive adparticle-adparticle interactions dominate, while attractive interactions lead to x...

  13. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants.

  14. Calculation of the Arc Velocity Along the Polluted Surface of Short Glass Plates Considering the Air Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the microphysics mechanism and the factors that influence arc development along a polluted surface, the arc was considered as a plasma fluid. Based on the image method and the collision ionization theory, the electric field of the arc needed to maintain movement with different degrees of pollution was calculated. According to the force of the charged particle in an arc plasma stressed under an electric field, a calculation model of arc velocity, which is dependent on the electric field of the arc head that incorporated the effects of airflow around the electrode and air resistance is presented. An experiment was carried out to measure the arc velocity, which was then compared with the calculated value. The results of the experiment indicated that the lighter the pollution is, the larger the electric field of the arc head and arc velocity is; when the pollution is heavy, the effect of thermal buoyancy that hinders arc movement increases, which greatly reduces the arc velocity.

  15. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  16. DeepVel: Deep learning for the estimation of horizontal velocities at the solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Requerey, I. S.; Vitas, N.

    2017-07-01

    Many phenomena taking place in the solar photosphere are controlled by plasma motions. Although the line-of-sight component of the velocity can be estimated using the Doppler effect, we do not have direct spectroscopic access to the components that are perpendicular to the line of sight. These components are typically estimated using methods based on local correlation tracking. We have designed DeepVel, an end-to-end deep neural network that produces an estimation of the velocity at every single pixel, every time step, and at three different heights in the atmosphere from just two consecutive continuum images. We confront DeepVel with local correlation tracking, pointing out that they give very similar results in the time and spatially averaged cases. We use the network to study the evolution in height of the horizontal velocity field in fragmenting granules, supporting the buoyancy-braking mechanism for the formation of integranular lanes in these granules. We also show that DeepVel can capture very small vortices, so that we can potentially expand the scaling cascade of vortices to very small sizes and durations. The movie attached to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Investigation of the low-depression velocity layer in desert area by multichannel analysis of surface-wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S.; Tian, G.; Xia, J.; He, H.; Shi, Z.; ,

    2004-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface-wave method (MASW) is a newly development method. The method has been employed in various applications in environmental and engineering geophysics overseas. However, It can only be found a few case studies in China. Most importantly, there is no application of the MASW in desert area in China or abroad. We present a case study of investigating the low-depression velocity in Temple of North Taba Area in Erdos Basin. The MASW method successfully defined the low-depression velocity layer in the desert area. Comparing results obtained by the MASW method with results by refraction seismic method, we discussed efficiency and simplicity of applying the MASW method in the desert area. It is proved that the maximum investigation depth can reach 60m in the study area when the acquisition and procession parameters are carefully chosen. The MASW method can remedy the incompetence of the refraction method and the micro-seismograph log method in low-depression velocity layer's investigation. The MASW method is also a powerful tool in investigation of near-surface complicated materials and possesses many unique advantages.

  18. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  19. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  20. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  1. Variability of surface velocity in the Kuroshio Current and adjacent waters derived from Argos drifter buoys and satellite altimeter data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chao; WU Dexing; LIN Xiaopei

    2009-01-01

    By combining Argos drifter buoys and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data, the time series of sea-surface velocity fields in the Kuroshio Current (KC) and adjacent regions are established. And the variability of the KC from the Luzon Strait to the Tokara Strait is studied based on the velocity fields. The results show that the dominant variability period varies in different segments of the KC" The primary period near the Luzon Strait and to the east of Taiwan Island is the intra-seasonal time scale; the KC on the continental shelf of the ECS is the steadiest segment without obvious periodicity, while the Tokara Strait shows the period of seasonal variability. The diverse periods are caused by the Rossby waves propagating from the interior ocean, with adjustments in topography of island chain and local wind stress.

  2. Atlantic sea surface height and velocity spectra inferred from satellite altimetry and a hierarchy of numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biri, Stavroula; Serra, Nuno; Scharffenberg, Martin G.; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Frequency and wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and surface geostrophic velocity are presented, as they result for the Atlantic Ocean from a 23 year long altimeter data set and from a hierarchy of ocean model simulations with spatial resolutions of 16, 8, and 4 km. SSH frequency spectra follow a spectral decay of roughly f-1 on long periods; toward higher frequencies a spectral decay close to f-2 is found. For geostrophic velocity spectra, a somewhat similar picture emerges, albeit with flatter spectral relations. In terms of geostrophic velocity wavenumber spectra, we find a general relation close to k-3 in the high-resolution model results. Outside low-energy regions all model spectra come close to observed spectra at low frequencies and wavenumbers in terms of shape and amplitude. However, the highest model resolution appears essential for reproducing the observed spectra at high frequencies and wavenumbers. This holds especially for velocity spectra in mid and high latitudes, suggesting that eddy resolving ocean models need to be run at a resolution of 1/24° or better if one were to fully resolve the observed mesoscale eddy field. Causes for remaining discrepancies between observed and simulated results can be manifold. At least partially, they can be rationalized by taking into account an aliasing effect of unresolved temporal variability in the altimetric observations occurring on periods smaller than the 20 days Nyquist period of the altimetric data, thereby leading to an overestimate of variability in the altimetric estimates, roughly on periods below 100 days.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of air-sea gas transfer velocity and near surface turbulence at low to moderate winds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Liao, Q.; Fillingham, J. H.; Bootsma, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Parameterization of air-sea gas transfer velocity was routinely made with wind speed. Near surface turbulent dissipation rate has been shown to have better correlation with the gas transfer velocity in a variety of aquatic environments (i.e., the small eddy model) while wind speed is low to moderate. Wind speed model may underestimate gas transfer velocity at low to moderate winds when the near surface turbulence is produced by other environmental forcing. We performed a series of field experiments to measure the CO2 transfer velocity, and the statistics of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface using a novel floating PIV and chamber system. The small eddy model was evaluated and the model coefficient was found to be a non-constant, and it varies with the local turbulent level (figure 1). Measure results also suggested an appropriate scaling of the vertical dissipation profile immediately below the interface under non-breaking conditions, which can be parameterized by the wind shear, wave height and wave age (figure 2). Figure 1. Relation between the coefficient of the small eddy model and dissipation rate. The data also include Chu & Jirka (2003) and Vachon et al. (2010). The solid regression line: α = 0.188log(ɛ)+1.158 Figure 2. Non-dimensional dissipation profiles. Symbols: measured data with the floating PIV. Solid line: regression of measured data with a -0.79 decaying rate. Dash line with -2 slope: Terray et al. (1996) relation. Dash line with two layer structure: Siddiqui & Loewen (2007) relation.

  4. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  5. The influence of surface on the running velocities of elite and amateur orienteer athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hébert-Losier, K; Jensen, Kurt; Mourot, L

    2014-01-01

    . Of course, cognitive, mental, and physical attributes other than the ability to run on different surfaces are required for excellence in orienteering (e.g., a high aerobic power). However, we suggest that athlete-specific assessment of running performance on various surfaces and distances might assist...

  6. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  7. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  8. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  9. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  10. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  11. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  12. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  13. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131908)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  14. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  15. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  16. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  17. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  18. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  19. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m a(-1) exceed the vertical surface-parallel flow (SPF) components over much of the ablation area of Storstrommen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude results......) or more. This indicates that the SPF assumption may be problematic also for glaciers in steady state. Here we derive the three-dimensional surface velocity distribution of Storstrommen by using the principle of mass conservation (MC) to combine InSAR measurements from ascending and descending satellite...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  20. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharf Abdusalam M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig and computational (employing CFD software investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  1. Combined Effect of Surface Roughness and Slip Velocity on Jenkins Model Based Magnetic Squeeze Film in Curved Rough Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimit R. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the effect of slip velocity and surface roughness on the performance of Jenkins model based magnetic squeeze film in curved rough circular plates. The upper plate’s curvature parameter is governed by an exponential expression while a hyperbolic form describes the curvature of lower plates. The stochastic model of Christensen and Tonder has been adopted to study the effect of transverse surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. Beavers and Joseph’s slip model has been employed here. The associated Reynolds type equation is solved to obtain the pressure distribution culminating in the calculation of load carrying capacity. The computed results show that the Jenkins model modifies the performance of the bearing system as compared to Neuringer-Rosensweig model, but this model provides little support to the negatively skewed roughness for overcoming the adverse effect of standard deviation and slip velocity even if curvature parameters are suitably chosen. This study establishes that for any type of improvement in the performance characteristics the slip parameter is required to be reduced even if variance (−ve occurs and suitable magnetic strength is in force.

  2. Characterization of length and velocity scales of free stream turbulence and investigation of their effects on surface heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzkurt, Savash

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to address two important but unresolved problems: (1) the measurement of vertical and transverse length scales via space correlations for all Reynolds stress components and velocity-temperature correlations, both in the free stream and within the boundary layer using the existing triple and quad-wire probes; and (2) to relate the character of the free stream turbulence to the character of the turbulence within the boundary layer in order to determine the effect on surface heat transfer.

  3. Meaningful use of peak particle velocities at excavation surfaces for the optimisation of the rockburst criteria for tunnels and stopes.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Milev, AM

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Final Project Report The meaningful use of peak particle velocities at excavation surfaces for the optimisation of the rockburst criteria for tunnels and stopes A.M. Milev, S.M. Spottiswoode, B.R. Noble, L.M. Linzer, M. van Zyl, A. Daehnke & E... and Ventersdorp Contact Reef sites were carried out. A total number of 41 sites were monitored: • TauTona gold mine: a total number of 15 139 seismic events with a maximum PPV of 3 m/s was recorded during 2 437 site days; • Kloof gold mine: a total number of 6...

  4. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Nørvang Madsen, Søren; Oerter, Hans; Gundestrup, Niels S.

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m a-1 exceed the vertical surface-parallel flow (SPF) components over much of the ablation area of Storstrømmen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude results in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10m a-1 or more.This indicates that the SPFassumption may be problematic also for glaciers in steady state. Here we derive the three-dimensional surface velocity distribution of Storstrømmen by using the principle of mass conservation (MC) to combine InSAR measurements from ascending and descending satellite tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle are in better agreement with the GPS velocities than the previously calculated velocities derived with the SPFassumption.

  5. Numerical investigation of velocity slip and temperature jump effects on unsteady flow over a stretching permeable surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, E.; Loghmani, G. B.; Heydari, M.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the boundary layer flow and heat transfer of unsteady flow over a porous accelerating stretching surface in the presence of the velocity slip and temperature jump effects are investigated numerically. A new effective collocation method based on rational Bernstein functions is applied to solve the governing system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This method solves the problem on the semi-infinite domain without truncating or transforming it to a finite domain. In addition, the presented method reduces the solution of the problem to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. Graphical and tabular results are presented to investigate the influence of the unsteadiness parameter A , Prandtl number Pr, suction parameter fw, velocity slip parameter γ and thermal slip parameter φ on the velocity and temperature profiles of the fluid. The numerical experiments are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the novel proposed computational procedure. Comparisons of present results are made with those obtained by previous works and show excellent agreement.

  6. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    atmospheric pressure , and surface heat flux is provided by the 0.58 NOGAPS model every 3h (Rosmond et al. 2002); river forcing is provided via an...horizontal pressure -gradient force in an oceanic model with nonaligned vertical grid. J. Geophys. Res., 108, 3090, doi:10.1029/2001JC001047. ——, and... Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR 0602435N 73-4727-14-5 MATTHEW J. CARRIER, HANS E. NGODOCK, PHILIP MUSCARELLA, AND SCOTT SMITH Naval

  7. Near-surface velocity modeling at Yucca Mountain using borehole and surface records from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, B.A. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Walck, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for commercial radioactive waste disposal in a mined geologic repository. One critical aspect of site suitability is the tectonic stability of the repository site. The levels of risk from both actual fault displacements in the repository block and ground shaking from nearby earthquakes are being examined. In particular, it is necessary to determine the expected level of ground shaking at the repository depth for large seismic sources such as nearby large earthquakes or underground nuclear explosions (UNEs). Earthquakes are expected to cause the largest ground motions at the site, however, only underground nuclear explosion data have been obtained at the repository depth level (about 350m below the ground level) to date. In this study we investigate ground motion from Nevada Test Site underground nuclear explosions recorded at Yucca Mountain to establish a compressional velocity model for the uppermost 350m of the mountain. This model is useful for prediction of repository-level ground motions for potential large nearby earthquakes.

  8. Slicing up the San Francisco Bay Area: Block kinematics and fault slip rates from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, M. A.; Johanson, I. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Schmidt, D. A.; Murray, M. H.

    2005-06-01

    Observations of surface deformation allow us to determine the kinematics of faults in the San Francisco Bay Area. We present the Bay Area velocity unification (B?V?, "bay view"), a compilation of over 200 horizontal surface velocities computed from campaign-style and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1993 to 2003. We interpret this interseismic velocity field using a three-dimensional block model to determine the relative contributions of block motion, elastic strain accumulation, and shallow aseismic creep. The total relative motion between the Pacific plate and the rigid Sierra Nevada/Great Valley (SNGV) microplate is 37.9 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 directed toward N30.4°W ± 0.8° at San Francisco (±2σ). Fault slip rates from our preferred model are typically within the error bounds of geologic estimates but provide a better fit to geodetic data (notable right-lateral slip rates in mm yr-1: San Gregorio fault, 2.4 ± 1.0; West Napa fault, 4.0 ± 3.0; zone of faulting along the eastern margin of the Coast Range, 5.4 ± 1.0; and Mount Diablo thrust, 3.9 ± 1.0 of reverse slip and 4.0 ± 0.2 of right-lateral strike slip). Slip on the northern Calaveras is partitioned between both the West Napa and Concord/Green Valley fault systems. The total convergence across the Bay Area is negligible. Poles of rotation for Bay Area blocks progress systematically from the North America-Pacific to North America-SNGV poles. The resulting present-day relative motion cannot explain the strike of most Bay Area faults, but fault strike does loosely correlate with inferred plate motions at the time each fault initiated.

  9. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  10. Measurement of Damage Velocities in Bullet Impacts of Transparent Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Bigger, Rory; Weiss, Carl

    2013-06-01

    A series of impact experiments have been conducted to examine the response of transparent material to ballistic impact. The experiments consisted of impacting 15 mm of borosilicate glass back by 9.5 mm of Lexan. The projectile was a 0.30-cal hard steel bullet designed specifically for the experiments. Residual velocities and the residual length of the bullets (which were soft-recovered in a catch box) were measured as a function of impact velocity. High-speed imaging of the impact event and post-test analysis has permitted quantification of damage propagation and the rate of propagation. The results of several experiments are presented and compared to edge-on impact experiments that have been conducted by Strassburger et al..

  11. Planar time-resolved PIV for velocity and pressure retrieval in atmospheric boundary layer over surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Bopp, Maximilian; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling in general is important for weather, climate, fluxes. Wind wave source is crucially important for surface waves' modeling. But the wind-wave growth rate is strongly uncertain. Using direct measurements of pressure by wave-following Elliott probe [1] showed, weak and indefinite dependence of wind-wave growth rate on the wave steepness, while Grare et.al. [2] discuss the limitations of direct measurements of pressure associated with the inability to measure the pressure close to the surface by contact methods. Recently non-invasive methods for determining the pressure on the basis of technology of time-resolved PIV are actively developed [3]. Retrieving air flow velocities by 2D PIV techniques was started from Reul et al [4]. The first attempt for retrieving wind pressure field of waves in the laboratory tank from the time-resolved PIV measurements was done in [5]. The experiments were performed at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m). For 18 regimes with wind speed up to 14 m/s including presence of puddle waves, a combination of time resolved PIV technique and optical measurements of water surface form was applied to detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. Ammonium chloride smoke was used for flow visualization illuminated by two 6 Wt blue diode lasers combined into a vertical laser plane. Particle movement was captured with high-speed camera using Scheimpflug technique (up to 20 kHz frame rate with 4-frame bursts, spatial resolution about 190 μm, field of view 314x12 mm). Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave form. The resulting time resolved instantaneous velocity fields on regular grid allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from measured air velocity fluctuations. The average wind velocity patterns were

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Emad H.; Sayed, Hamed M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  13. A bio-inspired, computational model suggests velocity gradients of optic flow locally encode ordinal depth at surface borders and globally they encode self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Ringbauer, Stefan; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-09-01

    Visual navigation requires the estimation of self-motion as well as the segmentation of objects from the background. We suggest a definition of local velocity gradients to compute types of self-motion, segment objects, and compute local properties of optical flow fields, such as divergence, curl, and shear. Such velocity gradients are computed as velocity differences measured locally tangent and normal to the direction of flow. Then these differences are rotated according to the local direction of flow to achieve independence of that direction. We propose a bio-inspired model for the computation of these velocity gradients for video sequences. Simulation results show that local gradients encode ordinal surface depth, assuming self-motion in a rigid scene or object motions in a nonrigid scene. For translational self-motion velocity, gradients can be used to distinguish between static and moving objects. The information about ordinal surface depth and self-motion can help steering control for visual navigation.

  14. Analysis of muscle fiber conduction velocity enables reliable detection of surface EMG crosstalk during detection of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Alberto Biurrun; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2013-03-26

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex that induces complex muscle synergies to withdraw a limb from a potential noxious stimulus. Several studies indicate that assessment of the NWR is a valuable objective tool in relation to investigation of various pain conditions. However, existing methodologies for NWR assessment evaluate standard surface electromyography (sEMG) measured over just one muscle and do not consider the possible interference of crosstalk originating from adjacent active muscles. The present study had two aims: firstly, to investigate to which extent the presence of crosstalk may affect NWR detection using a standardized scoring criterion (interval peak z-score) that has been validated without taking crosstalk into consideration. Secondly, to investigate whether estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity can help identifying the propagating and non-propagating nature of genuine reflexes and crosstalk respectively, thus allowing a more valid assessment of the NWR. Evaluation of interval peak z-score did apparently allow reflex detection with high sensitivity and specificity (0.96), but only if the influence of crosstalk was ignored. Distinction between genuine reflexes and crosstalk revealed that evaluation of interval peak z-score incorporating a z-score threshold of 12 was associated with poor reflex detection specificity (0.26-0.62) due to the presence of crosstalk. Two different standardized methods for estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity were employed to demonstrate that significantly different muscle fiber conduction velocities may be estimated during genuine reflexes and crosstalk, respectively. This discriminative feature was used to develop and evaluate a novel methodology for reflex detection from sEMG that is robust with respect to crosstalk. Application of this conduction velocity analysis (CVA) entailed reflex detection with excellent sensitivity (1.00 and 1.00) and specificity (1.00 and 0

  15. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  16. Na(+) /H(+) exchanger NHE1 and NHE2 have opposite effects on migration velocity in rat gastric surface cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paehler Vor der Nolte, Anja; Chodisetti, Giriprakash; Yuan, Zhenglin; Busch, Florian; Riederer, Brigitte; Luo, Min; Yu, Yan; Menon, Manoj B; Schneider, Andreas; Stripecke, Renata; Nikolovska, Katerina; Yeruva, Sunil; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-12-26

    Following superficial injury, neighbouring gastric epithelial cells close the wound by rapid cell migration, a process called epithelial restitution. Na(+) /H(+) exchange (NHE) inhibitors interfere with restitution, but the role of the different NHE isoforms expressed in gastric pit cells has remained elusive. The role of the basolaterally expressed NHE1 (Slc9a1) and the presumably apically expressed NHE2 (Slc9a2) in epithelial restitution was investigated in the nontransformed rat gastric surface cell line RGM1. Migration velocity was assessed by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye DiR and following closure of an experimental wound over time. Since RGM1 cells expressed very low NHE2 mRNA and have low transport activity, NHE2 was introduced by lentiviral gene transfer. In medium with pH 7.4, RGM1 cells displayed slow wound healing even in the absence of growth factors and independently of NHE activity. Growth factors accelerated wound healing in a partly NHE1-dependent fashion. Preincubation with acidic pH 7.1 stimulated restitution in a NHE1-dependent fashion. When pH 7.1 was maintained during the restitution period, migratory speed was reduced to ∼10% of the speed at pH 7,4, and the residual restitution was further inhibited by NHE1 inhibition. Lentiviral NHE2 expression increased the steady-state pHi and reduced the restitution velocity after low pH preincubation, which was reversible by pharmacological NHE2 inhibition. The results demonstrate that in RGM1 cells, migratory velocity is increased by NHE1 activation, while NHE2 activity inhibit this process. A differential activation of NHE1 and NHE2 may therefore, play a role in the initiation and completion of the epithelial restitution process.

  17. Velocity amplitudes in global convection simulations: The role of the Prandtl number and near-surface driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Miesch, Mark S.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity κ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity ν is decreased proportionally with κ (fixing the Prandtl number Pr = ν / κ), we find that U increases but asymptotes toward a constant value, as found by Featherstone and Hindman (2016). However, if ν is held fixed while decreasing κ (increasing Pr), we find that U systematically decreases. We attribute this to an enhancement of the thermal content of downflow plumes, which allows them to carry the solar luminosity with slower flow speeds. We contrast this with the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection which is not subject to this luminosity constraint. This dramatic difference in behavior for the two paths in parameter space (fixed Pr or fixed ν) persists whether the heat transport by unresolved, near-surface convection is modeled as a thermal conduction or as a fixed flux. The results suggest that if solar convection can operate in a high-Pr regime, then this might effectively limit the velocity amplitude. Small-scale magnetism is a possible source of enhanced viscosity that may serve to achieve this high-Pr regime.

  18. Average velocity field of the air flow over the water surface in a laboratory modeling of storm and hurricane conditions in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, A. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Sergeev, D. A.; Vdovin, M. I.; Baidakov, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Channel of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near-water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The measurements showed that the logarithmic part of the velocity profile of the air flow in the channel was observed in the immediate vicinity from the water surface (at a distance of 30 mm) and could be detected only using remote methods (PIV). According to the measured velocity profiles, dependences of aerodynamic drag factors of the water surface on the wind velocity at a height of 10 m were retrieved; they were compared with results of contact measurements carried out earlier on the same setup. It is shown that they agree with an accuracy of up to 20%; at moderate and strong wind velocities the coincidence falls within the experimental accuracy.

  19. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  20. MHD flow and heat transfer of a micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with heat generation (absorption and slip velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A.A. Mahmoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of slip velocity on the flow and heat transfer for an electrically conducting micropolar fluid over a permeable stretching surface with variable heat flux in the presence of heat generation (absorption and a transverse magnetic field are investigated. The governing partial differential equations describing the problem are converted to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by using the similarity transformation, which is solved numerically using the Chebyshev spectral method. The effects of the slip parameter on the flow, micro-rotation and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress and the local Nusselt number are presented graphically. The numerical results of the local skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress and the local Nusselt number are given in a tabular form and discussed.

  1. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities--implications for mixing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects. Geostrophic turbulence models show that parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of a turbulent eddy. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and is currently underway.

  2. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  3. Three-dimensional glacier surface velocities of the Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Reeh, N; Mohr, J. J.; Madsen, S.N.; Oerter, Hans; Gundestrup, N.

    2003-01-01

    Non-steady-state vertical velocities of up to 5 m y-1 exceed the vertical surface-parallel-flow components over much of the ablation area of Storstrømmen, a large outlet glacier from the East Greenland ice sheet. Neglecting a contribution to the vertical velocity of this magnitude, results in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments t...

  4. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IV. A correlation between surface gravity and radial velocity variation and a statistical investigation of companion properties

    CERN Document Server

    Hekker, S; Aerts, C; Quirrenbach, Andreas G; Reffert, S; Mitchell, D S

    2008-01-01

    Since 1999, we have been conducting a radial velocity survey of 179 K giants using the CAT at UCO/Lick observatory. At present ~20-100 measurements have been collected per star with a precision of 5 to 8 m/s. Of the stars monitored, 145 (80%) show radial velocity (RV) variations at a level >20 m/s, of which 43 exhibit significant periodicities. Our aim is to investigate possible mechanism(s) that cause these observed RV variations. We intend to test whether these variations are intrinsic in nature, or possibly induced by companions, or both. In addition, we aim to characterise the parameters of these companions. A relation between log g and the amplitude of the RV variations is investigated for all stars in the sample. Furthermore, the hypothesis that all periodic RV variations are caused by companions is investigated by comparing their inferred orbital statistics with the statistics of companions around main sequence stars. A strong relation is found between the amplitude of the RV variations and log g in K ...

  5. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  6. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  7. Techniques for Surface-Temperature Measurements and Transition Detection on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities--Status Report No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Wilder, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in a research effort to advance techniques for measuring surface temperatures and heat fluxes and determining transition locations on projectiles in hypersonic free flight in a ballistic range are described. Spherical and hemispherical titanium projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of 4.6-5.8 km/sec into air and nitrogen at pressures of 95-380 Torr. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.22 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 5.5-8 degrees and 4.7-7 degrees, depending on whether they were launched using an evacuated launch tube or not. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.86 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.0-2.5 degrees. Three intensified-charge-coupled-device (ICCD) cameras with wavelength sensitivity ranges of 480-870 nm (as well as one infrared camera with a wavelength sensitivity range of 3 to 5 microns), were used to obtain images of the projectiles in flight. Helium plumes were used to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD camera images were taken. ICCD and infrared (IR) camera images of titanium hemisphere projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.4 km/sec are presented as well as preliminary temperature data for these projectiles. Comparisons were made of normalized temperature data for shots at approx.190 Torr in air and nitrogen and with and without the launch tube evacuated. Shots into nitrogen had temperatures 6% lower than those into air. Evacuation of the launch tube was also found to lower the projectile temperatures by approx.6%.

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity and Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of GaN Grown on (0001) Sapphire by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; LI Hong-Lang; YAN Li; CHEN Xiao-Yang; LU Da-Cheng; WANG Xiao-Hui; LIU Xiang-Lin; HAN Pei-De; YUAN Hai-Rong; WANG Du; WANG Zhan-Guo; HE Shi-Tang

    2001-01-01

    High-quality and high-resistivity GaN films were grown on (0001) sapphire face by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. To measure the surface acoustic wave properties accurately, we deposited metallized interdigital trans ducers on the GaN surface. The acoustic surface wave velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient were measured, respectively, to be 5667m/s and 1.9% by the pulse method.

  9. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  10. Determination of lifetime and surface recombination velocity of p-n junction solar cells and diodes by observing transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Fredrik A.; Liou, Juin J.; Neugroschel, Arnost; Jung, Taewon W.

    1987-01-01

    The unified view of transient methods for the determination of recombination lifetime tau and back surface recombination velocity S presented here for silicon solar cells and diodes attempts to define limitations of existing methods and to evolve improvements. The presence of sizable junction capacitance for silicon devices under forward voltage invalidates the use of conventional open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and reverse recovery. This led Green (1983) to his method of compensated open-circuit voltage decay, in which the addition of an external resistor shunting the solar cell partially corrects for the presence of the junction capacitance. Setting this resistance to zero produces an electrical short-circuit current-decay method, which has the advantage of enabling determination of both tau and S. In an alternate approach, one may insert the functional dependence of the junction capacitance on forward voltage. This new method, denoted by the acronym OCVDCAP, enables the determination of tau with apparently greater accuracy than that obtained by previous methods utilizing voltage transients. But OCVDCAP has in common with the previous methods that it determines tau only and has practical utility only for determining tau of long-base devices. This means that it is useful only for thick base regions. In principle, however, it has an advantage over short-circuit current decay: it requires only pressure contacts, not ohmic contacts, and therefore may be used to determine tau after key processing steps in manufacturing.

  11. Very low surface recombination velocities on p- and n-type c-Si by ultrafast spatial atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, F.; Veith, B.; Tiba, V.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.; Brendel, R.; Schmidt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using aluminum oxide (Al2 O3) films deposited by high-rate spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD), we achieve very low surface recombination velocities of 6.5 cm/s on p -type and 8.1 cm/s on n -type crystalline silicon wafers. Using spatially separated reaction zones instead of

  12. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  13. Estimation of surface-wave phase velocity from microtremor observation using an array with a reference station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kato, Kei; Chimoto, Kosuke; Tsuno, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for estimation of Rayleigh wave phase velocities from microtremor observations, using an array with a reference station, is investigated in this study. Simultaneous observation of microtremors at a reference station and at a strong motion observation array in the Kanto Basin, Japan, was carried out. We first calculated cross correlations between records at the reference station and those at stations in the array using a seismic interferometric processing method on a 4300-h data series. After identifying dispersive Rayleigh waves from results of multiple filtering analysis of the cross correlations, semblance analysis of the cross correlations for different segments was carried out to estimate phase velocities for fundamental and higher-mode Rayleigh waves. The phase velocities from the proposed method are more appropriate than those from conventional methods at long periods as they avoid contamination by higher mode Rayleigh waves. The fundamental Rayleigh wave phase velocities were inverted to an S-wave velocity profile for deep sedimentary layers. We also examined the variations in the phase velocity with decreasing data duration. The phase velocities at periods less than 3 s from 6-h records are similar to those from 4300-h records, suggesting that our method is possibly applicable in microtremor exploration.

  14. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  15. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  16. The meandering Gulf Stream as seen by the Geosat altimeter - Surface transport, position, and velocity variance from 73 deg to 46 deg W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the surface geostrophic velocity field for the Gulf Stream region for the position, structure, and surface transport of the Gulf Stream for 2.5 yr of the Geosat altimeter Exact Repeat Mission. Synthetic data using a Gaussian velocity profile were generated and fit to the sea surface residual heights to create a synthetic mean sea surface height field and profiles of absolute geostrophic currents. An analysis of the model parameters and the actual geostrophic velocity profiles revealed two different flow regimes for the Gulf Stream connected by a narrow transition region coincident with the New England Seamount Chain. The upstream region was found to exhibit relatively straight Gulf Stream paths, long Eulerian time scales, and eastward propagating meanders. The downstream region had more large meanders, no consistent propagation direction, and shorter Eulerian time scales. A 25-percent reduction in surface transport occurred in the transition region, with a corresponding reduction in current speed and no change in Gulf Stream width.

  17. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: a set-up for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sunday, Cecily; Cherrier, Olivier; Serrano, Sara Morales; Nardi, Claudia Valeria; Janin, Tristan; Martinez, Iris Avila; Gourinat, Yves; Mimoun, David

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ~0.1 - 1.0 m/s^2. Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop-tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, rele...

  18. A new scheme for joint surface wave and earthquake travel-time inversion and resulting 3-D velocity model for the western North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Fry, Bill

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a joint inversion of surface wave group velocity (U) and local earthquake travel-time (LET) data and applied it to the North Island, New Zealand, to improve the existing New Zealand wide 3-D seismic velocity model. This approach takes full advantage of the differing sensitivities of surface and body waves. The data are complementary, particularly at shallow depths where LET tomography suffers from vertical smearing and surface wave tomography is susceptible to horizontal smearing. The employed U observations are 2-D models at discrete periods which were developed for Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured from the 1744 interstation Green's Functions obtained by stacked cross-correlations of broadband ambient noise data. In the volume surrounding each U observation, we distribute numerous points for relating the U observation to the gridded 3-D tomography model, analogous to points along a raypath. The partial derivatives at the points are computed using the U sensitivity kernels for Vp and Vs, with Vs related to Vp and Vp/Vs perturbations. Thus, the U observations are included along with the travel-time observations in a joint inversion to best fit the data and the existing tomography model. The resulting model favors the U where there is little travel-time resolution. The combined inversion used 2949 U observations at 6-16 s period and LET from 1509 earthquakes that extend to 370 km depth, and improved the model fit by reducing the U residual data variance by 62% and the LET by 9%. The resulting model generally has better constrained depth of shallow anomalies, with decreased velocity in the upper 2 km in the western North Island, and slight focusing of crustal high velocity features at 8 km depth. Significantly, the increased resolution in the shallowest 5 km of the model improves the utility of the 3-D model for use in seismic hazard assessment, wave propagation studies, and studies comparing seismic velocities to geological mapping.

  19. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis

  20. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  1. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  2. Surface wave group velocity in the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan, estimated using ambient noise cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Somei, Kazuhiro; Miyakoshi, Ken; Aoi, Shin; Kunugi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Inter-station cross-correlation functions estimated using continuous ambient noise or microtremor records were used to extract the seismic wave propagation characteristics of the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan. Temporary continuous observations were conducted at 15 sites in the Osaka basin between 2011 and 2013. The data were analyzed using seismic interferometry. The target period range was 2-8 s. Cross-correlations between all of the possible station pairs were calculated and stacked to produce a year-long data set, and Rayleigh wave signals in the vertical and radial components and Love wave signals in the transverse component were identified from the results. Simulation of inter-station Green's functions using the finite difference method was conducted to check the performance of the current three-dimensional velocity structure model. The measured time lag between the observed and theoretical Green's functions was less than 2 s for most station pairs, which is less than the wave period of interest in the target frequency range. Group velocity tomography was applied to group delay times estimated by means of multiple filter analysis. The estimated group velocities for longer periods of 5-8 s exhibited spatial variation within the basin, which is consistent with the bedrock depth distribution; however, the group velocities for shorter periods of 2-3 s were almost constant over the studied area. The waveform and group velocity information obtained by seismic interferometry analysis can be useful for future reconstruction of a three-dimensional velocity structure model in the Osaka basin.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  4. Spall measurements in shock-loaded hemispherical shells from free-surface velocity histories. [Dynamic fracture of hemishells of copper and tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagliostro, D.J.; Warnes, R.H.; Johnson, N.L.; Fujita, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Copper and tantalum hemishells are externally loaded by a hemishell of PBX 9501 detonated at its pole. Free-surface velocity histories of the metal hemishells are measured at the pole and at 50 from the pole with a Fabry-Perot interferometer. These histories are used to determine spall strengths and depths by simple wave-interaction analyses and are compared with hydro-code (CAVEAT) predictions using simple and void-growth spall models. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Scanning transmission electron microscope analysis of amorphous-Si insertion layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition, causing low surface recombination velocities on crystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microstructures of stacked silicon-nitride/amorphous-silicon/crystalline-silicon (SiN_x/a-Si/c-Si) layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition were investigated with scanning transmission electron microscopy to clarify the origin of the sensitive dependence of surface recombination velocities (SRVs) of the stacked structure on the thickness of the a-Si layer. Stacked structures with a-Si layers with thicknesses greater than 10 nm exhibit long effective carrier lifetimes, while thos...

  6. Velocity Amplitudes in Global Convection Simulations: The Role of the Prandtl Number and Near-Surface Driving

    CERN Document Server

    O'Mara, Bridget; Featherstone, Nicholas A; Augustson, K C

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity $\\kappa$ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity $\

  7. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  8. Study the velocity and pressure exerted in front of the filter surface in the kitchen hood system by using ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuin, Norzelawati; Pairan, M. Rasidi; Isa, Norasikin Mat; Sies, Farid

    2017-04-01

    Commercial kitchen hood ventilation system is a device used to capture and filtered the plumes from cooking activities in the kitchen area. Nowadays, it is very popular in the industrial sector such as restaurant and hotel to provide hygiene food. This study focused at the KSA filter part which installed in the kitchen hood system, the purpose of this study is to identify the critical region which indicated by observing the velocity and pressure of plumes exerted at of KSA filter. It is important to know the critical location of the KSA filter in order to install the nozzle which will helps increase the filtration effectiveness. The ANSYS 16.1 (FLUENT) software as a tool used to simulate the kitchen hood systems which consist of KSA filter. The commercial kitchen hood system model has a dimension 700 mm width, 1600 mm length and 555 mm height. The system has two inlets and one outlet. The velocity of the plumes is set to be 0.235m/s and the velocity of the inlet capture jet is set to be 1.078m/s. The KSA filter is placed 45 degree from the y axis. The result shows the plumes has more tendency flowing pass through at the bottom part of KSA filter.

  9. Relation between etch-pit morphology and step retreat velocity on a calcite surface in aspartic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Natsumi; Kokawa, Ryohei

    2010-04-01

    Effects of L-aspartic acid ( L-Asp) on dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocity and dissolution rate of calcite were measured simultaneously using an AFM flow-through system. The etch-pit morphology of calcite was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results show that the etch-pit morphologies changed drastically depending on the L-Asp concentration ([ L-Asp]) in the order of rhomboidal, pentagonal, and triangular (not perfectly, but retaining an extra step). The change in obtuse step directions and appearance of the [0 1 0] step triggered these morphological changes. Addition of L-Asp accelerated all step retreats at [ L-Asp]0.01 M, L-Asp inhibited the retreats of obtuse steps and [0 1 0] step, although the retreat velocities of acute steps were constant irrespective of [ L-Asp]. These results suggest that the directional changes and the inhibition of retreat velocities of obtuse steps were attributed to the generation of [ 4 1 1] and [4 5 1] steps caused by L-Asp. Moreover, we confirmed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [4 8 1] + to [ 4 4 1] ± step edge, and proposed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [ 4 1 1] to [4 5 1] step edge.

  10. Frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser radar using dual vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes for real-time measurements of distance and radial velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) laser radar capable of real-time displaying the distance to a target object and its radial velocity as their corresponding frequency spectra is developed. The system employs a pair of oppositely frequency-swept vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs). This makes possible simultaneous detection of beat signals induced by the increment (up-ramp) and decrement (down-ramp) in laser frequencies. By mixing these two beat signals, their sum and difference frequencies are directly obtained without arithmetic processing such as averaging and subtraction. Results of the test experiments adopting axially moving block gauges as target objects show that both the distance and given velocities are accurately determined from the spectrum of the frequency mixer.

  11. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  12. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  13. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  14. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  15. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  16. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  17. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137285)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  18. Accurate Determination of Glacier Surface Velocity Fields with a DEM-Assisted Pixel-Tracking Technique from SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Yan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We obtained accurate, detailed motion distribution of glaciers in Central Asia by applying digital elevation model (DEM assisted pixel-tracking method to L-band synthetic aperture radar imagery. The paper firstly introduces and analyzes each component of the offset field briefly, and then describes the method used to efficiently and precisely compensate the topography-related offset caused by the large spatial baseline and rugged terrain with the help of DEM. The results indicate that the rugged topography not only forms the complex shapes of glaciers, but also affects the glacier velocity estimation, especially with large spatial baseline. The maximum velocity, 0.85 m∙d−1, was observed in the middle part on the Fedchenko Glacier, which is the world’s longest mountain glacier. The motion fluctuation on its main trunk is apparently influenced by mass flowing in from tributaries, as well as angles between tributaries and the main stream. The approach presented in this paper was proved to be highly appropriate for monitoring glacier motion and will provide valuable sensitive indicators of current and future climate change for environmental analysis.

  19. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  20. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  1. S-wave velocities down to 1 km below the Peteroa volcano, Argentina, obtained from surface waves retrieved by means of ambient-noise seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Simone; Gomez, Martin; Draganov, Deyan

    2015-04-01

    The main force driving the tectonics in South America is the subduction of the Nazca Plate below the South American plate. The subduction process generated numerous volcanoes in both Chile and Argentina, of which the majority is concentrated along the Chilean Argentine border. The recent explosive eruptions of some volcanoescaused concern of the population in both countries. At the beginning of 2012, a large temporary array was installed in the Malargüe region, Mendoza, Argentina, with the purpose of imaging the subsurface and monitoring the tectonic activity. The array was deployed until the end of 2012 to record continuously ambient noise and the local, regional, and global seismicity. It consisted of 38 seismic stations divided in two sub arrays, namely the PV array of six stations located on the east flank of the Peteroa volcano, and the T array of thirty two stations spread out on a plateau just north east of the town of Malargüe. Here,the focus will be on the PV array, which has a patch-like shape. Due to the intra-station distances, we chose to use for surface-wave retrieval the bands 0.8 Hz ÷ 4.0 Hz, 10 Hz ÷ 25 Hz. At the investigated area, most of the year there is little anthropogenic noise, which normally dominates frequencies above 1 Hz, meaning that the selected frequency bands can be used for surface-wave retrieval from noise. Using beamforming, we showed that for these bands, the noise is illuminating the stations from the west. This means that a correct surface-wave arrivals can be retrieved for station pairs oriented in that direction. Because of this, we used for retrieval only such station pairs. We cross-correlated the recordings on the vertical components and retrieved Rayleigh waves. By manual picking, we estimated for both bands velocity dispersion curves from the retrieved surface-wave arrivals. The curves were then inverted to obtain the velocity structure under the stations. The obtained S wave velocity depth profiles for the 10 Hz

  2. Seasonal changes of surface velocity and elevation of Columbia Glacier, Alaska using time-series TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Saurabh; Braun, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Alaskan glaciers are a major contributor to global sea-level rise from glaciers and ice caps outside the polar ice sheets. Columbia Glacier is a large tidewater glacier located on the coast of south-central Alaska. The glacier has retreated ˜ 21 km and lost half of its volume during 1957-2007, more rapidly after 1980. It is now split into two branches, known as Main/East and West branch. In this study, we used time series of high-resolution TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X stripmap satellite imagery during 2011-2014 to investigate the temporal development of glacier surface velocities, elevation and mass changes. The active SLC images of the bistatic TanDEM-X acquisitions, acquired over 11 or 22 days repeat intervals, are utilized to derive surface velocity fields using SAR intensity offset tracking. We observed a very strong seasonal variability in the surface velocities. Maximum values at the ice front reach up to 14.43 m/day in May and reduced to 2 m/day in October in the year 2012. However, at a distance of 17.5 km from the ice front, almost no seasonal variability can be observed. A significant influence in the distance to the terminus and elevation was detected. We attributed this temporal and spatial variability of surface velocity to changes in the basal hydrology and lubrification of the glacier bed. Similar fluctuations are observed in consecutive years. In a second step, we exploited TanDEM-X data by interferometrically generating time series of digital elevation models (DEMs) . For quantitative volume change estimates, we used DEMs of almost similar months of the observational years in order to minimize errors resulting from variable X-band radar penetration. The main branch gained a volume of 12.77± 2.89km^3in 2011-12, but lost -18.94± 3.21km^3in 2012-13 . A slight gain was observed with 1.05± .88km^3in 2013-14. However, the west branch gained volume only in 2011-12 and lost in the consecutive years. Moreover, the west branch retreated by ˜ 3km and lost its

  3. Very low surface recombination velocity on p-type c-Si by high-rate plasma-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kania, Daniel; Hofmann, Marc; Benick, Jan; Rentsch, Jochen; Preu, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    Aluminum oxide layers can provide excellent passivation for lowly and highly doped p-type silicon surfaces. Fixed negative charges induce an accumulation layer at the p-type silicon interface, resulting in very effective field-effect passivation. This paper presents highly negatively charged (Qox=-2.1×1012 cm-2) aluminum oxide layers produced using an inline plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, leading to very low effective recombination velocities (˜10 cm s-1) on low-resistivity p-type substrates. A minimum static deposition rate (100 nm min-1) at least one order of magnitude higher than atomic layer deposition was achieved on a large carrier surfaces (˜1 m2) without significantly reducing the resultant passivation quality.

  4. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  5. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138488)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  6. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  7. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  8. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  9. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  10. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  11. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  12. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  13. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  14. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  15. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  16. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151734)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  17. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  18. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  19. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  20. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  1. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138671)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  2. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138776)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  3. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  4. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  5. Benchmarking Passive Seismic Methods of Imaging Surface Wave Velocity Interfaces Down to 300 m — Mapping Murray Basin Thickness in Southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, A.; Czarnota, K.

    2015-12-01

    In shallow passive seismology it is generally thought that the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method is more robust than the horizontal over vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method at resolving the depth to surface-wave velocity (Vs) interfaces. Here we present results of a field test of these two methods over ten drill sites in Victoria, Australia. The target interface is the base of Cenozoic unconsolidated to semi-consolidated clastic and/or carbonate sediments of the Murray Basin, which overlie Paleozoic crystalline rocks. Drilled depths of this interface are between 27 and 300 m. A three-arm spiral array, with a radius of 250 m, consisting of 13 Trillium compact broadband seismometers was deployed at each site for 7-21 hours. The Vs architecture beneath each site was determined through nonlinear inversion of HVSR and SPAC data using the neighborhood algorithm of Sambridge (1999) implemented in geopsy by Wathelet et al (2005). The HVSR technique yielded depth estimates, of the target interface (Vs > 1000 m/s), generally within 20% error. Successful estimates were even obtained at a site with an inverted velocity profile, where Quaternary basalts overlie Neogene sediments. Half of the SPAC estimates showed significantly higher errors than obtained using HVSR. Joint inversion provided the most reliable estimates but was unstable at three sites. We attribute the surprising success of HVSR over SPAC to a low content of transient signals within the seismic record caused by low degrees of anthropogenic noise at the benchmark sites. At a few sites SPAC curves showed clear overtones suggesting that more reliable SPAC estimates maybe obtained utilizing a multi modal inversion. Nevertheless, our study seems to indicate that reliable basin thickness estimates in remote Australia can be obtained utilizing HVSR data from a single seismometer, without a priori knowledge of the surface-wave velocity of the basin material, thereby negating the need to deploy cumbersome arrays.

  6. The use of microsensors to study the role of the loading rate and surface velocity on the growth and the composition of nitrifying biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, B C; Spinola, A L G; Lamon, A W; Araujo, J C; Campos, J R

    2011-01-01

    The good composition and activity of biofilms are very important for successful operation and control of fixed-film biological reactors employed in liquid effluents treatment. During the last decade, microsensors have been applied to study microbial ecology. These sensors could provide information regarding the microbial activity concerning nitrification and denitrification that occur inside biofilms. Other techniques of molecular biology, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have also contributed to this matter because their application aids in the identification of the bacterial populations that compose the biofilms. The focus of this paper was to study the loading rate and surface velocity to promote the development of nitrifying biofilms in three distinct flow cells that were employed in the post treatment of a synthetic wastewater simulating the effluent from a UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactor. Using the FISH technique, it was found that the population of ammonia-oxidizing-bacteria was greater than that of nitrite-oxidizing-bacteria; this was also supported by the lower production of nitrate determined by physicochemical and microsensor analyses. It was verified that the loading rate and surface velocity that promoted the greatest nitrogen removal were 0.25 g N-amon m(-2)biofilm day(-1) and 1 m h(-1), respectively.

  7. Limb and gravity-darkening coefficients for the TESS satellite at several metallicities, surface gravities, and microturbulent velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We present new gravity and limb-darkening coefficients for a wide range of effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, and microturbulent velocities. These coefficients can be used in many different fields of stellar physics as synthetic light curves of eclipsing binaries and planetary transits, stellar diameters, line profiles in rotating stars, and others. Methods: The limb-darkening coefficients were computed specifically for the photometric system of the space mission tess and were performed by adopting the least-square method. In addition, the linear and bi-parametric coefficients, by adopting the flux conservation method, are also available. On the other hand, to take into account the effects of tidal and rotational distortions, we computed the passband gravity-darkening coefficients y(λ) using a general differential equation in which we consider the effects of convection and of the partial derivative (∂lnI(λ) /∂lng)Teff. Results: To generate the limb-darkening coefficients we adopt two stellar atmosphere models: atlas (plane-parallel) and phoenix (spherical, quasi-spherical, and r-method). The specific intensity distribution was fitted using five approaches: linear, quadratic, square root, logarithmic, and a more general one with four terms. These grids cover together 19 metallicities ranging from 10-5 up to 10+1 solar abundances, 0 ≤ log g ≤ 6.0 and 1500 K ≤Teff ≤ 50 000 K. The calculations of the gravity-darkening coefficients were performed for all plane-parallel ATLAS models. Tables 2-29 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A30

  8. THE HIGH-VELOCITY SYSTEM: INFALL OF A GIANT LOW-SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS GALAXY TOWARD THE CENTER OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ohyama, Youichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s{sup −1} toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ∼200 km s{sup −1} at a radius of ∼12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ∼800 km s{sup −1} distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ∼100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ∼3.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  9. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  10. Lowest surface recombination velocity on n-type crystalline silicon using PECVD a-Si:H/SiNx bi-layer passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Dmitri S.; Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2011-08-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells manufactured on thin substrates is strongly influenced by the recombination losses of photo-generated charge carriers at the surface and in its proximity. Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) deposited using DC saddle-field plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) at a low temperature of ~200°C reduces recombination losses of photo-generated carriers through passivation of defects at the surface. This study reports on high quality surface passivation achieved using a dual layer approach wherein a 70nm amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is deposited on a less than 10nm thin i-a-Si:H layer. While the a-Si:H layer is effective in passivating the interface recombination sites, SiNx is deemed to incorporate field-effect passivation, thus providing a minority carrier mirror. Additionally, SiNx layer acts as an anti-reflection coating with a low absorption coefficient in the optical frequency range of interest. The SiNx deposition conditions, known to strongly influence the passivating quality of the dual layer structure, were systematically investigated using the response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal deposition parameters obtained from the RSM study were experimentally verified to yield the lowest surface recombination velocity of 3.5 cm/s on 1-2 Ω-cm n-type FZ c-Si using a PECVD a-Si:H/SiNx bi-layer passivation stack.

  11. Exploring the influence of surface waves in the carbon dioxide transfer velocity between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier; Francisco Herrera, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Osuna, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements have been carried out in order to better understand the possible influence of ocean surface waves in the transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal zone. The CO2 fluxes are being analysed and results are shown in a contribution by Gutiérrez-Loza et al., in this session. Here we try to highlight the findings regarding the transfer velocity (kCO2) once we have incorporated direct measurements of carbon dioxide concentration in the water side. In this study direct measurements of CO2 fluxes were obtained with an eddy covariance tower located in the shoreline equipped with an infrared open-path gas analyzer (LI-7500, LI-COR) and a sonic anemometer (R3-100 Professional Anemometer, Gill Instruments), both at about 13 m above the mean sea level, and sampling at 20 Hz. For some period of time simultaneous information of waves was recorded with a sampling rate of 2 Hz using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) at 10 m depth and 350 m away from the tower. Besides, recently the concentration of CO2 in water has also been recorded making use of a SAMI-CO2 instrument. A subtle effect of the wave field is detected in the estimated kCO2. Looking into details of the surface currents being detected very near the air-sea interface through an ADPC, a certain association can be found with the gas transfer velocity. Furthermore, some of the possible effects of breaking wave induced turbulence in the coastal zone is to be addressed. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from CB-2011-01-168173 CONACYT project is greatly acknowledged.

  12. Effect of surface treatments on the spreading velocity of simplified adhesive systems Efeito de tratamentos de superfície na velocidade de escoamento de sistemas adesivos simplificados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia B. Pazinatto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the roughness of glass surfaces submitted to different treatments and to correlate it with the spreading velocity of two adhesive systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Glass slides were used as substrates to evaluate the spreading velocity of Single Bond and Prime & Bond NT adhesive systems. Six different surface treatments were compared: 1 no treatment; 2 silanization (SL; 3 sandblasting (SB; 4 SB + SL; 5 10% hydrofluoric acid treatment (HF; 6 HF + SL. Before and after treatments, surface roughness was measured by a profilometer (Ra, µm. Drop volumes (10 µl of the adhesive systems were deposited onto substrates with a micropipette to observe materials spreading during 30s. Data were expressed in mm/s as spreading velocity. Statistical significances among groups were analyzed using one-way and two-way-ANOVA designs and the SNK test. RESULTS: Significant differences in spreading velocity were found between materials (p OBJETIVO: Determinar a rugosidade de superficies submetidas a diferentes tratamentos e correlacionar rugosidade com velocidade de escoamento de sistemas adesivos MATERIAL AND MÉTODOS: Lâminas de vidro foram utilizadas como substrato para avaliar a velocidade de escoamento dos sistemas adesivos Single Bond and Prime & Bond NT. Seis diferentes tratamentos de superfície foram comparados: 1- sem tratamento; 2 - silanização (SL; 3 - jateamento (J; 4 - J + SL; 5 - condicionamento com ácido fluorídrico a 10% (HF; 6 - HF + SL. Antes e após os tratamentos, foi mensurada a rugosidade das superficies (Ra, µm. Gotas de 10 µl de adesivo foram despositadas sobre as superficies e as velocidades de escoamento foram observadas durante 30 seg. Dados de velocidade de escoamento foram expressos em mm/s. Significâncias estatísticas entre grupos foram analisadas pelos testes ANOVA (um e dois critérios e SNK. RESULTADOS: Houve diferenças significantes na velocidade de escoamento entre materiais (p < 0.001 e entre

  13. Surface Elevation Changes and Velocities from Remote-Sensing Data at Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge Glaciers on the Novaya Zemlya Icefield in the Russian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Stewart, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Ice Cap of Novaya Zemlya is the largest (22,000 km2) and most rapidly changing ice cap in the Russian High Arctic, accounting for 80% of the region's estimated 0.025 mm/yr contribution to sea level rise between 2003-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012). We use several remote sensing instruments to extend this time series forward and instead of computing a regional average, we seek a detailed glacier-by-glacier inventory of elevation and velocity changes. Here, we focus on three glaciers along the Barents Sea coast of the ice cap: Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge, all of which experienced area reduction at an average rate of roughly 1 sq. km/yr from 1990 to 2000 (Kouraev, Legrésy and Remy, 2006). Our estimates of the current surface elevation change rates (dh/dt) and velocities at these glaciers will allow us to determine the connections between thinning, dynamics and the documented climatic changes -- 2004-2009 mean summer temperatures in Novaya Zemlya were anomalously high, +0.50×0.28C greater than mean summer temperatures from 1980-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012), while Meng (2013) found that melt duration increased by 1.3 days/yr from 1996 to 2011. Based on warming and increased melt in the region, we expect to find a seasonally-related increase in velocity. Comparing acceleration (or the lack thereof) with thinning rates and combining both with existing bathymetry to calculate flux will enable us to estimate the contribution of dynamics to mass change at these glaciers relative to melt. We estimate dh/dt by applying a weighted linear regression to time series of ASTER DEMs acquired between 2003/07/29 to 2013/07/27 and Russian cartographic DEMs issued in 1970/71. Glacier velocities are calculated using automated normalized cross correlation, or 'pixel-tracking', applied to ASTER image pairs from 2003 to 2013. We supplement our ASTER time series with velocities and DEMs from very high-resolution (0.5-2 m/pixel) imagery acquired by QuickBird, WorldView and

  14. 低速下水滴撞击固体表面运动模拟%Simulation of droplets impacting on solid surface at low velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐爽; 赵宁; 王春武; 吴杰

    2013-01-01

    In the background of icing problem caused by the droplets which impacted on the surface of aircraft, the level set interface tracking method was used, the surface tension in the incompressible N-S equations was denoted by the level set function and the second-order projection method for variable-density flows was used to solve 2-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations; the water and gas multiphase problems at low velocity were simulated. In order to simulate the water and gas multiphase problems of the density ratio up to 1000, the numerical oscillations caused by the large density ratio between the interface can be eliminated by smoothing the density at the interface within a few grids. So the topological changes and movements of large droplets, which are different in surface tension when impacting on the solid interface, can be successfully simulated. The numerical results show that the method can be used to model the incompressible multi-phase flow with large density and viscosity density. Considering the surface tension, the movements of the surface at different surface tensions can be simulated.%以水滴撞击飞机部件造成结冰问题为背景,运用level set界面追踪方法,把不可压黏性方程组中的表面张力用level set函数表示,并利用2阶变密度投影算法求解二维不可压Navier-Stokes方程组,数值模拟了低速下的水气界面追踪问题.为了能够处理密度比为1 000的水气界面问题,在界面处引入了一定宽度的光滑过渡带宽,进而消除了由于界面两边大密度比引起的数值震荡,由此较为成功地模拟了大水滴在不同表面张力时撞击平板后的形态变化及其运动轨迹.数值实验结果表明本算法可以有效地处理界面处密度比和黏性很大的不可压多相流问题.考虑界面处的表面张力,本算法可模拟不同表面张力下的界面运动变化.

  15. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10 m a(-1...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  16. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  17. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  18. Correction of lunar seismograms for instrumental and near-surface effects and constraints on the velocity structure of the lunar interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, P.

    1982-01-01

    Long-period lunar seismograms were studied with the aim of identifying consistent sets of direct shear and secondary wave arrivals, thus constraining the velocities in the lunar mantle and the depths of the velocity discontinuities. Two velocity models were used to locate the natural impacts and the shallow moonquakes and to obtain the travel time residuals. Seismic sections were made of the radial, transverse, and vertical components of ground motion for impacts, shallow, and deep moonquakes in order to search for consistent sets of secondary wave arrivals. No conclusive set of secondary arrivals could be recognized on the seismic sections and thus the velocities and depths of the velocity discontinuities cannot be severely constrained by secondary arrivals. It is likely that the crust is thinner than 50 km and that a first-order discontinuity separates the upper and lower crust at a depth of between 20 and 30 km.

  19. Preliminary investigation into the impacts of assimilating SST and SLA on the surface velocities in a HYCOM of the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rapeti, T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available velocities from all drifters entering the region 26-36oS 22-34oE, between 2008 and 2009 are first calculated. The model fields are then interpolated to the median latitudinal and longitudinal positions of the daily averaged drifter velocities, using...) and drifter-derived u and v component velocities was used as a proxy for 115 the placement and timing of mesoscale features as in Backeberg et al., (2014); in the region 26-36oS 22- 34oE. An improvement in the correlation of ASSIMcombined (0.41) over...

  20. The upper and middle crustal velocity structure of the northern part of Hebei plain inferred from short period surface wave dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on short period Rayleigh wave data recorded by Beijing Seismic Telemetered Network, the dispersion curves of Raleigh wave phase velocity, with period from 2 s to 18 s, are calculated by means of two-station method, for 5 paths across the earthquake zone located in the Beijing graben and the Hebei plain. According to the dispersion features, the upper and middle crustal S wave velocity structures are respectively obtained for the northern segment of Beijing graben and the northern part of Hebei plain. The results show that there is an obvious interface at the depth of 9 km in the Beijing graben, the velocity varies little with depth in the middle crust, and there is a low-velocity-zone, with a thickness of 5 km and a buried depth of 14.6 km, in the middle crust of the Hebei plain.

  1. P and S Wave Velocity Structure of the Crust and Upper Mantle Under China and Surrounding Areas From Body and Surface Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-31

    1.9 to 1.45 s, after the inversion. [14] High velocities dominate in western China. Beneath several large depressed basins, such as the Tarim...velocity image of Moho discontinuity beneath the Weihe fault depression and its adjacent areas obtained by inversion of travel-time data of Sn waves...the crust and upper mantle. Geo- phys. J. Int. 151, 1–18. Sol, S.J., Meltzer , A., Zurek, B., Zhang, X., Zhang, J., 2004. Insight into the

  2. Lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction beneath the western United States from the joint inversion of body-wave traveltimes and surface-wave phase velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrebski, M.; Allen, R.M.; Pollitz, F.; Hung, S.-H.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the complex geological history of the western margin of the North American plate and the processes in the mantle is still not fully documented and understood. Several pre-USArray local seismic studies showed how the characteristics of key geological features such as the Colorado Plateau and the Yellowstone Snake River Plains are linked to their deep mantle structure. Recent body-wave models based on the deployment of the high density, large aperture USArray have provided far more details on the mantle structure while surface-wave tomography (ballistic waves and noise correlations) informs us on the shallow structure. Here we combine constraints from these two data sets to image and study the link between the geology of the western United States, the shallow structure of the Earth and the convective processes in mantle. Our multiphase DNA10-S model provides new constraints on the extent of the Archean lithosphere imaged as a large, deeply rooted fast body that encompasses the stable Great Plains and a large portion of the Northern and Central Rocky Mountains. Widespread slow anomalies are found in the lower crust and upper mantle, suggesting that low-density rocks isostatically sustain part of the high topography of the western United States. The Yellowstone anomaly is imaged as a large slow body rising from the lower mantle, intruding the overlying lithosphere and controlling locally the seismicity and the topography. The large E-W extent of the USArray used in this study allows imaging the 'slab graveyard', a sequence of Farallon fragments aligned with the currently subducting Juan de Fuca Slab, north of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The lithospheric root of the Colorado Plateau has apparently been weakened and partly removed through dripping. The distribution of the slower regions around the Colorado Plateau and other rigid blocks follows closely the trend of Cenozoic volcanic fields and ancient lithospheric sutures, suggesting that the

  3. Surface-wave array tomography in SE Tibet from ambient seismic noise and two-station analysis: I - Phase velocity maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, H.; Hilst, R.D. van der; Hoop, M.V. de

    2006-01-01

    Empirical Green’s functions (EGFs) between pairs of seismographs can be estimated from the time derivative of the long-time cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise. These EGFs reveal velocity dispersion at relatively short periods, which can be used to resolve structures in the crust and uppermos

  4. A Velocity Prediction Procedure for Sailing Yachts with a hydrodynamic Model based on integrated fully coupled RANSE-Free-Surface Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehm, C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important tools in today's sailing yacht design is the Velocity Prediction Program (VPP). VPPs calculate boat speed from the equilibrium of aero- and hydrodynamic flow forces. Consequently their accuracy is linked to the accuracy of the aero- and hydrodynamic data used to represent a

  5. Global air-sea surface carbon dioxide transfer velocity and flux estimated using 17 a altimeter data and a new algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Tan; HE Yijun; YAN Xiaohai

    2013-01-01

    The global distributions of the air-sea CO2 transfer velocity and flux are retrieved from TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason altimeter data from October 1992 to December 2009 using a combined algorithm. The 17 a average global, area-weighted, Schmidt number-corrected mean gas transfer velocity is 21.26 cm/h, and the full exploration of the uncertainty of this estimate awaits further data. The average total CO2 flux (calculated by carbon) from atmosphere to ocean during the 17 a was 2.58 Pg/a. The highest transfer velocity is in the circumpolar current area, because of constant high wind speeds and currents there. This results in strong CO2 fluxes. CO2 fluxes are strong but opposite direction in the equatorial east Pacific Ocean, because the air-sea CO2 partial pressure difference is the largest in the global oceans. The results differ from the previous studies calculated using the wind speed. It is demonstrated that the air-sea transfer velocity is very important for estimating air-sea CO2 flux. It is critical to have an accurate estimation for improving calculation of CO2 flux within climate change studies.

  6. A Velocity Prediction Procedure for Sailing Yachts with a hydrodynamic Model based on integrated fully coupled RANSE-Free-Surface Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehm, C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important tools in today's sailing yacht design is the Velocity Prediction Program (VPP). VPPs calculate boat speed from the equilibrium of aero- and hydrodynamic flow forces. Consequently their accuracy is linked to the accuracy of the aero- and hydrodynamic data used to represent a

  7. Monte Carlo search techniques applied to the measurement of higher mode phase velocities and anisotropic surface wave tomography. Geologica Ultraiectina (285)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we present all three stages of the inversion approach proposed by Kennett and Yoshizawa (2002). The three stage inversion approach consists of obtaining fundamental and higher mode Love and Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements through waveform fitting in the first stage, combinin

  8. Mitigation of defocusing by statics and near-surface velocity errors by interferometric least-squares migration with a reference datum

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2016-05-23

    Imaging seismic data with an erroneous migration velocity can lead to defocused migration images. To mitigate this problem, we first choose a reference reflector whose topography is well-known from the well logs, for example. Reflections from this reference layer are correlated with the traces associated with reflections from deeper interfaces to get crosscorrelograms. Interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM) is then used to get the migration image that maximizes the crosscorrelation between the observed and the predicted crosscorrelograms. Deeper reference reflectors are used to image deeper parts of the subsurface with a greater accuracy. Results on synthetic and field data show that defocusing caused by velocity errors is largely suppressed by ILSM. We have also determined that ILSM can be used for 4D surveys in which environmental conditions and acquisition parameters are significantly different from one survey to the next. The limitations of ILSM are that it requires prior knowledge of a reference reflector in the subsurface and the velocity model below the reference reflector should be accurate.

  9. Comparison of Blue Wavelengths and Scan Velocity Effects on the Detection of Enamel Surface Caries Using Steady-State Laser-Induced Autofluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosroshahi, M. E.; Khoi, N. Taghizadeh

    2014-05-01

    The results of sound and carious enamel fl uorescence emission study using (i) different blue wavelengths, (ii) different scan velocity, and (iii) spectral ratio are reported. The samples were irradiated using a tunable argon laser emitting at 459 and 488 nm and a 405 nm laser at two different scan velocities of 0.23 and 0.5 mm/s. The results showed a spectral band of 443-492 nm for 405 nm, 493-522 nm for 459 nm, and 526-625 nm for 488 nm lasers for sound teeth. It was found from the emission spectra that with increase in the excitation wavelength, the corresponding primary peaks of the carious samples showed Stokes shifts of 4, 6, and 2 nm, respectively. No signifi cant change was observed for the secondary peaks. Also, in all cases, the intensity of fl uorescence signals of sound teeth was higher than those of carious teeth. The highest shape factor of 1.82 and integrated intensity ratio of 1.20 were achieved at 405 nm, which provides relatively better tissue discrimination. Also, increasing the scan velocity reduced the signal amplitudes in both sound and carious samples.

  10. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Characterization and control of surface/interface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon thin films; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Silicon kessho usumaku ni okeru hyomen kaimen saiketsugo sokudo no hyoka to seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the result obtained during fiscal 1994 on characterization and control of surface/interface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon thin films. To optimize design and manufacture of solar cells, it is necessary to identify correctly resistance factor (or doping) of bulk of materials, bulk minority carrier life, and recombination velocity on surface, passivation interface and electrode interface. A group in the Hokkaido University has been working since a few years ago on development of non-contact and non-destructive photo-luminescence surface level spectroscopy (PLS{sup 3}). A new non-contact C-V method was also introduced. Using these methods, basic discussions were given on possibility of separate measurements on surface/interface and bulk characteristics of solar cell materials. The PLS{sup 3} method and the non-contact C-V method were used for experimental discussions on evaluation of silicon mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline materials. Discussions were given on separate evaluations by using the DLTS method. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  12. Influence of free stream velocity on runback water flow and heat transfer on anti-icing surface%来流速度对防冰表面溢流水流动换热的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑梅; 董威; 朱剑鋆; 郭之强

    2016-01-01

    为研究来流速度对防冰表面溢流水流动形态及换热的影响,基于空气-水两层相互作用的质量、动量和能量守恒,建立防冰表面溢流水水膜流动换热及破裂的数学模型,分析了防冰表面溢流水在不同来流条件下的流动形态和表面换热情况.计算分析表明:来流速度增加时,防冰表面相同位置处的连续水膜厚度减小,水膜破裂位置随之延后;较高来流速度条件下,破裂处水膜厚度稍有增加,使得破裂后形成的溪流厚度和宽度增大;作为主要的表面散热项,连续水膜表面蒸发及对流换热热流均随来流速度的增加而增大.此外,由水膜破裂引起的表面溢流水流态变化对防冰表面蒸发热流有一定影响.%The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of free stream velocity on the runback water flow and heat transfer on the anti-icing surface.Based on the mass,momentum and energy conservations of the runback water flow and the air flow,a mathematical model of the runback water film flow and rivulet flow was developed to investigate the effect of the free stream velocity on the heat and mass transfer on the anti-icing surface. The computation analysis indicates that the water film thickness at the same position on the anti-icing surface decreases with the free stream velocity increasing,and the rivulet thickness and width at the breakup point increase due to larger water film thickness at higher free stream velocity.Meanwhile,as the main heat losses on the anti-icing surface,the evaporation heat flux and the convection heat flux on the water film surface increase with the free stream velocity increasing. In addition, the characteristics of the heat and mass transfer on the dry surface,the fully wet surface and the partially wet surface were also investigated.The results show that the patterns of the runback water have some influence on the heat and mass transfer on the anti-icing surface.

  13. Seasonal variabilty of surface velocities and ice discharge of Columbia Glacier, Alaska using high-resolution TanDEM-X satellite time series and NASA IceBridge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Saurabh; Braun, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Columbia Glacier is a grounded tidewater glacier located on the south coast of Alaska. It has lost half of its volume during 1957-2007, more rapidly after 1980. It is now split into two branches, known as Main/East and West branch due to the dramatic retreat of ~ 23 km and calving of iceberg from its terminus in past few decades. In Alaska, a majority of the mass loss from glaciers is due to rapid ice flow and calving icebergs into tidewater and lacustrine environments. In addition, submarine melting and change in the frontal position can accelerate the ice flow and calving rate. We use time series of high-resolution TanDEM-X stripmap satellite imagery during 2011-2013. The active image of the bistatic TanDEM-X acquisitions, acquired over 11 or 22 day repeat intervals, are utilized to derive surface velocity fields using SAR intensity offset tracking. Due to the short temporal baselines, the precise orbit control and the high-resolution of the data, the accuracies of the velocity products are high. We observe a pronounce seasonal signal in flow velocities close to the glacier front of East/Main branch of Columbia Glacier. Maximum values at the glacier front reach up to 14 m/day were recorded in May 2012 and 12 m/day in June 2013. Minimum velocities at the glacier front are generally observed in September and October with lowest values below 2 m/day in October 2012. Months in between those dates show corresponding increase or deceleration resulting a kind of sinusoidal annual course of the surface velocity at the glacier front. The seasonal signal is consistently decreasing with the distance from the glacier front. At a distance of 17.5 km from the ice front, velocities are reduced to 2 m/day and almost no seasonal variability can be observed. We attribute these temporal and spatial variability to changes in the basal hydrology and lubrification of the glacier bed. Closure of the basal drainage system in early winter leads to maximum speeds while during a fully

  14. ROSS: The Remotely-Operated Surface Sampler - A MediumEndurance, Precision-Navigated Platform Optimized for Uncontaminated Measurement of Upper-Ocean Velocity, Density and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    ROSS : The Remotely-­‐Operated Surface Sampler A medium-­‐endurance, precision-­‐navigated  platform optimized...coas.oregonstate.edu Award N00014-­‐14-­‐1-­‐0490 http://kai.coas.oregonstate.edu/ OVERVIEW The Remotely Operated Surface   Sampler ( ROSS )  is an  open...configuration,   ROSS cruises at 4 knots,  is equipped  with  300 kHz  and 2 MHz  ADCPs,  and tows a 20-­‐m  lon thermistor/CTD  chain. Its

  15. Counterposed phase velocity and energy-transport velocity vectors in a dielectric-magnetic uniaxial medium

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhtakia, A.; McCall, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    When a plane wave is launched from a plane surface in a linear, homogenous, dielectric-magnetic, uniaxial medium, we show that its phase velocity and the energy-transport velocity vectors can be counterposed (i.e., lie on different sides of the surface normal) under certain circumstances.

  16. 海滩湿润沙面起动摩阻风速的风洞实验%Wind Tunnel Experiment of the Threshold Friction Wind Velocity on Wet Beach Sand Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩庆杰; 屈建军; 张克存; 俎瑞平; 廖空太; 牛清河

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion is one kind of important geomorphology processes and geological disasters,which has significant impacts on dune growth and desertification,and causes damages to architecture on sea coasts.The moisture of sand surface layer greatly affects the threshold wind velocity and sand stability,thus,it is also one of the important influence factors on wind erosion.In this study,we investigated the influence of surface moisture content at 1-mm depth on sand erosion in tropical humid coast of southern China,and established a new predicting model.The modeling results indicated that the threshold friction velocity increased linearly with increasing of ln100M(M is gravimetric moisture content) in condition of given sand diameters.Evaluation was given to seven popular models for predicting the threshold friction velocity on moisture sediments,and found that there were significant differences among their predicted results.At a surface sand moisture content of 0.0124(M1.5),the predicted threshold friction velocity predicted by the seven models were 34% to 195% larger than the observed threshold friction velocity on dry sands;at a surface sand moisture content of lower than 0.0062(0.5 M1.5),the predicted values by models of Chepil and Saleh well matched the experimental data;but when surface sand moisture content of more than 0.0062(0.5 M1.5),the data simulated by the Belly's empirical model were seem same as the experimental data.%风蚀是一种重要的地貌过程和地质灾害,它影响海岸沙丘的增长,加速土地沙漠化并危害沿岸建筑。沙面湿度强烈影响沙粒的临界起动风速和沙面稳定性,因此,也是影响风蚀过程的一个重要因子。本项风洞实验使用华南热带湿润海岸的海滩沙,研究了表面湿度(1mm深)对海滩沙风蚀起动的影响,建立了一个新的预测热带湿润海滩湿沙起动摩阻风速的模型,该模型指明给定粒径下,湿沙的起动摩阻风速随ln100 M

  17. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  18. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  19. The Relevance of Surface Roughness Data Qualities in Diagnostic Modeling of Wind Velocity in Complex Terrain: A Case Study from the Śnieżnik Massif (SW Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancewicz, Kacper; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2017-02-01

    Numerical modeling of wind velocity above complex terrain has become a subject of numerous contemporary studies. Regardless of the methodical approach (dynamic or diagnostic), it can be observed that information about surface roughness is indispensable to achieve realistic results. In this context, the current state of GIS and remote sensing development allows access to a number of datasets providing information about various properties of land coverage in a broad spectrum of spatial resolution. Hence, the quality of roughness information may vary depending on the properties of primary land coverage data. As a consequence, the results of the wind velocity modeling are affected by the accuracy and spatial resolution of roughness data. This paper describes further attempts to model wind velocity using the following sources of roughness information: LiDAR data (Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model), database of topographical objects (BDOT10k) and both raster and vector versions of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC). The modeling was conducted in WindStation 4.0.2 software which is based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) diagnostic solver Canyon. Presented experiment concerns three episodes of relatively strong and constant synoptic forcing: 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012 and 26 May 2012. The modeling was performed in the spatial resolution of 50 and 100 m. Input anemological data were collected during field measurements while the atmosphere boundary layer parameters were derived from the meteorological stations closest to the study area. The model's performance was verified using leave-one-out cross-validation and calculation of error indices such as bias error, root mean square error and index of wind speed. Thus, it was possible to compare results of using roughness datasets of different type and resolution. The study demonstrates that the use of LiDAR-based roughness data may result in an improvement of the model's performance in 100 and 50 m resolution

  20. 应用SAR特征匹配方法估计音苏盖提冰川表面流速%Using Feature-Tracking of ALOS PALSAR Images to Acquire the Yengisogat Glacier Surface Velocities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋宗立; 刘时银; 许君利; 王欣; 莫宏伟

    2011-01-01

    喀喇昆仑山区冰川因位于高海拔地区且远离人类正常活动的区域,使得连续的表面流速的地面观测很难实施,因此,对该区域冰川运动机理研究相对比较少.采用日本高级陆地观测卫星携带的相控阵型 L 波段合成孔径雷达(Advanced Land Observing Satellite,Phase Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar,ALOS PALSAR)特征匹配方法(Feature-Tracking)获取了音苏盖提冰川的季节表面流速,并对误差进行了分析.结果表明:季节和年均表面流速分布图上都存在两条明显快速运动的冰流;南分支冰川-斯嘎姆里冰川(Skamri Glacier)夏季的流速大于其他季节,冰流横截面流速特征表明,该分支存在明显的块体运动现象,很可能正处于跃动期.%In this paper,the surface velocities of Yengisogat Glacier in the Karakoram were acquired using Feature-Tracking of the Japan Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Arraytype L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) images.Four pairs of ALOS PALSAR images were processed and then the annual average velocities were calculated.The accuracy of calculation was discussed,and the results were compared with the previous measurements and found that they are well consistent.Two fast moving glacier flows are found.From the glacier surface flow velocity field,one can see that the south tributary(Skamri Glacier)contributes to the main flow of the glacier more in summer and were putting the glacier trunk forward.The features of the transverse profile velocity exhibit that the south tributary had evident block slide,which is an important sign of surging.The reason is probably the glacier response to precipitation increasing in winter and temperature decreasing in summer.

  1. Novel chemical cleaning of textured crystalline silicon for realizing surface recombination velocity <0.2 cm/s using passivation catalytic CVD SiN x /amorphous silicon stacked layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Nguyen, Cong; Koyama, Koichi; Higashimine, Koichi; Terashima, Shigeki; Okamoto, Chikao; Sugiyama, Shuichiro; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the development of a novel chemical cleaning method suitable for textured surfaces of crystalline silicon (c-Si) used for solar cells is demonstrated. To remove contaminants from such textured structures, chemicals have to penetrate into their complicated fine structures. Thus, the viscosity, reaction activity, and surface tension of the chemicals are adjusted by increasing the reaction temperature or introducing a surfactant. Actually, the use of concentrated (conc.) sulfuric acid (H2SO4) of 140 °C and the introduction of methanol (CH3OH) to other chemicals contribute to the improvement of the cleaning ability in textured structures. The present cleaning method in conjunction with plasma-damage-less catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD passivation with silicon-nitride (SiN x )/amorphous silicon (a-Si) stacked layers, also contributes to the decrease in the surface recombination velocity (SRV) of c-Si. The maximum estimated SRV (SRVmax), evaluated under the assumed absence of recombination in bulk c-Si, is less than 1.1 cm/s for textured surfaces, and the real SRV, evaluated by changing the c-Si substrate thickness, is less than 0.2 cm/s.

  2. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...... is horizontal, and decrease when the flow is uphill, for the longitudinal velocity component only. Since vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low wavenumber energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain....

  3. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  4. The radial velocity experiment (RAVE) : Fourth data release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Roeser, S.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Carrillo, I.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Campbell, R.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Russell, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Watson, F. G.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Conrad, C.; Famaey, B.; Faure, C.; Just, A.; Kos, J.; Matijevic, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Minchev, I.; Scholz, R.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; de Boer, E. Wylie; Zerjal, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atm

  5. The sound velocity structure of the shelf waters off Visakhapatnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sivarama Sastry

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available The vertical structure of sound velocity has been presented. The depth-sound velocity curves are drawn. The sound velocity is found to vary considerably in the surface waters during the period from November 1995 to April 1956. The variations in sound velocity have been discussed in relation to (1sinking, (2upwelling (3advection and (4diurnal and seasonal variation in temperature and salinity. The sound velocity in surface waters shows a general increase with the advance of upwelling season. The sound velocity decreases with depth in the surface layers in the upwelling seasons. In contrast; the sound velocity increases with depth in the surface layers during sinking season. At greater depths the sound velocity is found not to vary much during the entire period (November to April.

  6. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fourth Data Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Roeser, S.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Carrillo, I.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Campbell, R.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Russell, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Watson, F. G.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Conrad, C.; Famaey, B.; Faure, C.; Just, A.; Kos, J.; Matijevič, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Minchev, I.; Scholz, R.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; de Boer, E. Wylie; Žerjal, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atm

  7. Analysis of frictional contact problem for curved surface coupling with velocity using finite element algorithm%速度相关摩擦力条件下曲面接触问题有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐进元; 周炜; 陈思雨

    2012-01-01

    在弹性范围内对速度相关摩擦力条件下的曲面接触问题进行研究,给出有限元混合求解方法,用FORTRAN编制计算程序,并以直齿圆柱单齿对啮合模型为例在平面应力和准静态条件下进行求解,计算结果表明:速度对摩擦力的作用影响到接触力的分布与啮合节点对的接触状态,考虑速度对摩擦的影响对于接触的准确求解是必要的。用Ansys对所给算例进行验证,结果表明本文算法和编制程序的正确性。%The mixed finite element algorithm is used to solve contact problems coupling with friction decided by velocity for curved surface in elastic field.The computational procedure is designed with the aid of Fortran language,and the technique is employed to account for the contact problems of one pair of meshing teeth in the plane stress and quasi-static situation.The result indicates that the influence of velocity on friction affects the distribution of contact force as well as the meshing node pair’s contact status,and the consideration of the relation between velocity and friction is essential for the contact problem solutions.Ultimately the example is validated by the Ansys software.

  8. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  9. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  10. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  11. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  12. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  13. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  14. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  15. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) : Second data release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Munari, U.; Freeman, K. C.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Fulbright, J. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Campbell, R.; Seabroke, G. M.; Williams, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienayme, O.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Anguiano, B.; Boeche, C.; Burton, D.; Cass, P.; Dawe, J.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K.; Veltz, L.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brown, A.; Dehnen, W.; Evans, N. W.; Fiorentin, P. Re; Fiorucci, M.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B.; Kelz, A.; Kuijken, K.; Matijevic, G.; Minchev, I.; Parker, Q. A.; Penarrubia, J.; Quillen, A.; Read, M. A.; Reid, W.; Roeser, S.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R. -D.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Tolstoi, E.; Tomasella, L.; Vidrih, S.; De Boer, E. Wylie

    We present the second data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment ( RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters ( temperature, metallicity, surface gravity, and rotational velocity) of up to one million stars using the 6 dF multi-object

  16. Shear wave velocity structure of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgaswane, EM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available across the Bushveld Complex. Group velocities for 2–15 s periods were obtained from surface wave tomography using local and regional events, while group velocities for 20–60 s periods were taken from a published model. 1-D shear wave velocity models...

  17. The Velocity Campaign for Ignition on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires a high velocity implosion since the energy required for ignition scales like 1/v8. Beyond ignition, a higher velocity produces more robust performance, which will be useful for applications of ignition. In the velocity campaign, we will explore three methods for increasing implosion velocity: increased laser power and energy, optimized hohlraum and capsule materials, and optimized capsule thickness. The main issue with increasing the laser power and energy is the way in which LPI (laser plasma interactions) and hot electron preheat will change as we increase the laser power. Based on scalings from previous data and theory, we expect to couple 80-85% of 1.5 MJ at 475-500 TW. We can also increase the velocity by optimizing the hohlraum and capsule materials. In this campaign, we will explore depleted uranium hohlraums to reduce wall loss and optimize the capsule dopant by replacing the germanium dopant with silicon. Those two changes are expected to increase velocity by 6-7%. Finally, we will optimize the capsule thickness. The optimal capsule thickness is a trade-off between velocity and mix. A thinner capsule has higher velocity, but is more susceptible to mix of the ablator material into the hotspot due to hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by ablation surface imperfections. Once we have achieved adequate capsule areal density, we will optimize the velocity/mix trade off by varying the capsule thickness. We will also make direct measure of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by backlighting the growth of engineered features on the surface of the capsule. This will allow us to benchmark our models of mix. In this paper, we will describe the designs and experimental results of the velocity campaign. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  19. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  20. 星间洛仑兹力编队飞行的平衡点及零速度曲面%Equilibrium Points and Zero-Velocity Surfaces in the Presence of Inter-Satellite Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭超; 高扬

    2015-01-01

    提出了一种新的利用星间洛仑兹力控制卫星相对运动的方法:使主星产生自旋磁场,副星带电,通过控制副星所受的星间洛仑兹力进行编队。假设主星产生的人造磁场表现为偶极子并且运动在一条开普勒圆形轨道上,副星恒定带电并在主星附近运动,同时假设星间洛仑兹力只影响副星的运动而不影响主星的运动。推导了副星在主星 HCW(当地垂直当地地平坐标系)坐标系下的相对运动动力学方程。针对偶极子与 HCW坐标轴 X轴重合的情况下,推导了动力系统下的平衡点(并采用稳定性分析方法分析其线性化意义下的稳定性)、积分常数和零速度曲面,证明了有界相对运动的存在。最后用数值仿真验证了上述结论。%This paper studies the relative orbital motion of a charged obj ect near a spacebornemagnetic dipole, which indicates that the Lorentz force acting on the charged obj ect is taken into consideration.Assuming that a space station in a Keplerian circular reference orbit is capable of generating a rotating magnetic dipole (the axis of the dipole is in the direction of the orbital radius vector)and a constantly charged obj ect moves nearby in the artificial magnetic field,a nonlinear dynamical model of the proposed relative orbital motion,which is similar to the scenario of satellite formation flying,is established based on the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire (HCW)equation.Moreover,we suppose that the Lorentz force acts on the charged obj ect only and does not affect the circular reference orbit of the spaceborne magnetic dipole.Based on the system parameters such as the charge-to-mass ratio of the charged obj ect, magnetic dipole’s moment and rotating rate,and the angular velocity of the circular reference orbit,we firstly derived system’s equilibrium points and analyzed their stabilities.Subsequently,an integral constant and the zero-velocity surfaces of the dynamical system are

  1. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  2. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  3. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  4. Velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the line-of-sight velocity distribution of dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis, and their application to estimate the mass profiles of cosmological structures. For each of the ten massive haloes selected from the simulation box we determine the virial mass, concentration and the anisotropy parameter. In order to emulate observations from each halo we choose randomly 300 particles and project their velocities and positions along the line of sight and on the surface of the sky, respectively. After removing interlopers we calculate the profiles of the line-of-sight velocity moments and fit them with the solutions of the Jeans equations. The estimates of virial mass, concentration parameter and velocity anisotropy obtained in this way are in good agreement with the values found from the full 3D analysis.

  5. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  6. Two dimensional velocity distribution in open channels using Renyi entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the entropy concept is employed for describing the two-dimensional velocity distribution in an open channel. Using the principle of maximum entropy, the velocity distribution is derived by maximizing the Renyi entropy by assuming dimensionless velocity as a random variable. The derived velocity equation is capable of describing the variation of velocity along both the vertical and transverse directions with maximum velocity occurring on or below the water surface. The developed model of velocity distribution is tested with field and laboratory observations and is also compared with existing entropy-based velocity distributions. The present model has shown good agreement with the observed data and its prediction accuracy is comparable with the other existing models.

  7. Signals embedded in the radial velocity noise. Periodic variations in the tau Ceti velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Tinney, Chris G; Butler, R Paul; Vogt, Steve S; Barnes, John R; Wittenmyer, Robert A; O'Toole, Simon; Horner, Jonathan; Bailey, Jeremy; Carter, Brad D; Wright, Duncan J; Salter, Graeme S; Pinfield, David

    2012-01-01

    The abilities of radial velocity exoplanet surveys to detect the lowest-mass extra-solar planets are currently limited by a combination of instrument precision, lack of data, and "jitter". Jitter is a general term for any unknown features in the noise, and reflects a lack of detailed knowledge of stellar physics (asteroseismology, starspots, magnetic cycles, granulation, and other stellar surface phenomena), as well as the possible underestimation of instrument noise. We study an extensive set of radial velocities for the star HD 10700 ($\\tau$ Ceti) to determine the properties of the jitter arising from stellar surface inhomogeneities, activity, and telescope-instrument systems, and perform a comprehensive search for planetary signals in the radial velocities. We perform Bayesian comparisons of statistical models describing the radial velocity data to quantify the number of significant signals and the magnitude and properties of the excess noise in the data. We reach our goal by adding artificial signals to t...

  8. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  9. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  10. Transverse velocity shifts in protostellar jets: rotation or velocity asymmetries?

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Riera, Angels

    2016-01-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction, which have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could be originated by rotation in the flow, or by side to side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (~ 100-200 km/s), an asymmetry >~ 10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts. Our analysis indicate that side to side velocities asymmetries could ...

  11. Analysis on Velocity Characteristics of Cavitation Flow Around Hydrofoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-bin; LIU Shu-yan; WANG Guo-yu; ZHANG Bo; ZHANG Min-di

    2010-01-01

    The time-averaged velocity distributions in flows around a hydronautics hydrofoil were measured by using a digit-al particle image velocimeter (DPIV) system. The results show that the velocity distribution in the whole flow field depends on the development of cavitation structures with the decreasing of cavitation number. The high-fluctuation region with lower velocity relates to the cavitation area. The lowest velocity distribution in the cavity core becomes more uniform, and its in-fluence becomes smaller gradually as moving to downstream. The main-stream velocity distribution is even, then fluctuate and even at last. In the supercavitation stage, the fluid velocity in the cavitation region, corresponding to the front of the hydrofoil's suction surface, has a distribution close to the main stream, while the fluid velocity in other cavitation area is lower.

  12. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  13. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  14. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  15. Change of the Surface Velocity of Koxkar Baxi Glacier Interpreted from Remote Sensing Data, Tianshan Mountains%天山托木尔峰科其喀尔巴西冰川表面运动速度特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许君利; 张世强; 韩海东; 刘时银; 张盈松

    2011-01-01

    Climate warming has been resulting in continuous retreat of glaciers and ice sheet. However, there are some glaciers and ice sheets exhibiting some kinds of surprising behaviors, such as rapid advance or surging. Many of them result from glacier/ice sheet motion, as the discharge of ice mass is largely dependent on the flow velocity of glacier and ice sheet. In this study, the Koxkar Baxi Glacier, located in south slopes of the Tomur Peak in Tianshan Mountains, Northwest China was selected for glacier surface flow velocity study based on COSI-corr software and optical remote sensing images. The three pairs of ASTER images taken in 2001. 01. 12/2002. 03. 04, 2005. 05. 06/ 2006.8.13 and 2006.02.22/2007.01.04 were used for velocity extracting. Glacier flow velocity data observed by D-GPS based on the 54 stakes during May to September 2009 was used for accuracy assessment of the velocity extracting from ASTER images during 2006/2007. A mean absolute error of 3. 1 m · a-1 (11. 9%) is obtained, which, in general, indicates that the glacier flow velocity extracted from ASTER can be used to analyze the spatial distribution and change of surface flow velocity. It was found that glacier reaches its maximum flow velocity near the center part, and the velocity decreases towards both lateral margins. In a longitudinal profile, ice flow velocity in the accumulation area increases down to the equilibrium line, while decreases towards the glacier terminal.The maximum velocity, 117.9 m · a-1, was found at 4 500 ma. s. 1. near the equilibrium line altitude, while the minimum velocity, 1. 3 m · a-1,was located at the glacier terminal and lateral margin in 2006/2007. There was a significant increase of glacier flow velocity in the altitude above 3 600 ma. s. 1. from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 and 2006/ 2007, as well as a remarkable decrease below 3 600 m a.s. 1.%天山托木尔峰科其喀尔巴西冰川是典型的树枝状山谷冰川,利用3组(6期)ASTER遥感影像通过COSI

  16. 天山托木尔峰地区青冰滩72号冰川表面运动速度特征研究%Features of the Surface Flow Velocity on the Qingbingtan Glacier No.72, Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹敏; 李忠勤; 李慧林

    2011-01-01

    Movement is the main characteristic making glacier ice differ from other ice in nature.Observation of surface flow velocity is a basic method to study the glacier movement. Tomur Peak is the region with the highest concentration of glaciers in the Tianshan Mountains, and the glaciers are the main water resources for Aksu Municipality. Because of the important role of glaciers in local water resources, to study the current state and future evolution of the glaciers and glacial runoff in the municipality is urgent need. However,the study is hampered, because there is almost no observed glacier movement data here. To fill the blank, in August 2008, a large-scale scientific expedition was taken by Tianshan Glaciological Station, during which 21 stakes were set on the glacier for glacier flow velocity and mass balance observations. The Global Positioning System was applied to monitor the stake position. In July and August 2009, the measurement of the position of stakes was taken repeatedly. According to all the measured data, the features of surface flow velocity of the glacier is obtained, showing that the maximum horizontal surface velocity was around 73.4 m. a-1 , averaging at 47.1 m· a-1 in the tongue area. The spatial distribution of velocity was highly correlated with geometry of the glacier surface.There is obvious seasonality of the surface flow velocity. In detail, the velocities in the ablation season are significantly higher than that in non-melting season. In addition to the contribution of basal sliding, the ablation season velocity is also impacted by the ablation at the glacier bottom. Comparing to the corresponding features of the (U)rümqi Glacier No. 1, the velocity of Qingbingtan Glacier No. 72 is much higher, the mass transport by movement is more active, and the basal sliding is more significant. Generally, the velocity features of the Qingbingtan Glacier No. 72 are similar to those of maritime glaciers in China.%托木尔峰地区是天山最大

  17. Constraints on Shear Velocity in the Cratonic Upper Mantle From Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Dalton, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the prevailing notion of Precambrian continental lithosphere as a thick boundary layer (200-300 km), defined by a depleted composition and a steady-state conductively cooled temperature structure, has been challenged by several lines of seismological evidence. One, profiles of shear velocity with depth beneath cratons exhibit lower wave speed at shallow depths and higher wave speed at greater depths than can be explained by temperature alone. These profiles are also characterized by positive or flat velocity gradients with depth and anomalously high attenuation in the uppermost mantle, both of which are difficult to reconcile with the low temperatures and large thermal gradient expected with a thermal boundary layer. Two, body-wave receiver-function studies have detected a mid-lithospheric discontinuity that requires a large and abrupt velocity decrease with depth in cratonic regions that cannot be achieved by thermal gradients alone. Here, we used forward-modeling to identify the suite of shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves that primarily traversed cratons in North America, South America, Africa, and Australia. We considered two approaches; with the first, depth profiles of shear velocity were predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the crust and upper mantle. With the second approach, depth profiles of shear velocity were randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity was calculated from the Earth models and compared to the observed values. We show that it is very difficult to match the observations with an Earth model containing a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle; instead, the best-fit models contain a flat or positive velocity gradient with depth. We explore the implications of this result for the thermal and

  18. JET VELOCITY OF LINEAR SHAPED CHARGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vječislav Bohanek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shaped explosive charges with one dimension significantly larger than the other are called linear shaped charges. Linear shaped charges are used in various industries and are applied within specific technologies for metal cutting, such as demolition of steel structures, separating spent rocket fuel tanks, demining, cutting holes in the barriers for fire service, etc. According to existing theories and models efficiency of linear shaped charges depends on the kinetic energy of the jet which is proportional to square of jet velocity. The original method for measuring velocity of linear shaped charge jet is applied in the aforementioned research. Measurements were carried out for two different linear materials, and the results are graphically presented, analysed and compared. Measurement results show a discrepancy in the measured velocity of the jet for different materials with the same ratio between linear and explosive mass (M/C per unit of surface, which is not described by presented models (the paper is published in Croatian.

  19. Shock wave velocity measuring system based on vernier VISAR-type interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubskii, K. L.; Koshkin, D. S.; Antonov, A. S.; Mikhailuk, A. V.; Pirog, V. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a multi-line diagnostic system for measuring the surface velocity in shock physics experiments. This system is designed for simultaneous measurement of surface velocity at multiple points. It is free from ambiguity caused by harmonic dependence of interference signals on the velocity and has a time resolution of 0.8 ns.

  20. MAGNTY - Program for calculating velocities in magnified region of turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, T.; Mc Nally, W.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, MAGNFY, calculates the velocity distribution through the passage between and over blade surfaces of blade rows for turbines and compressors. Using the input of other programs, MAGNFY obtains velocities on smaller than normal finite difference mesh in any part of the blade-to-blade passage.

  1. Range of wavelengths possible to estimate phase velocities of surface waves in microtremors; Bido tansaho ni okeru suitei kanona bidochu no hyomenha iso sokudo no hacho han`i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, K.; Okada, H.; Ling, S. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    To specify the maximum wavelength of the phase velocities that can be estimated by the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method or F-K method in microtremor exploration, investigations were conducted using numerical simulation. In view of feasibility, an equilateral triangle array was employed, the maximum radius of the array having 7 observation points being 0.10km. The dispersion curve of the Rayleigh wave basic mode was calculated from an underground structure model. White noise was used as the incident wave, and, in case the waves came in from multiple directions, a different phase spectrum was assigned to each direction. In searching for the maximum wave length of phase velocities that could be estimated, a limit was imposed upon estimation, and it was prescribed that the wavelength be the limit if the difference between the theoretical value and estimated phase velocity was 5% or higher. As the result, it was found that it is possible to estimate the phase velocity when the wavelength is up to approximately 10 times longer than the array maximum radius in the SPAC method, and up to approximately 5 times longer in case of the F-K method. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A E A

    2004-01-01

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations, and produce maps of variations of velocity centroids to study their scaling properties. We compare them with those of the underlying velocity field, and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested, with success, a criteria for recovering velocity statistics from velocity centroids derived in our previous work. That is, if >> (where S is a 2D map of ``unnormalized'', v velocity, and I integrated intensity map -column density-), then the structure function of the centroids is dominated by the structure function of velocity. We show that it is possible to extract the velocity statistics using centroids for subsonic and mildly supersonic turbulence (e.g. Mach numbers ~2.5). While, towards higher Mach numbers other effects could affect significantly the statistics of centroids.

  3. Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data Modified Velocity Centroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    We address the problem of studying interstellar (ISM) turbulence using spectral line data. We construct a measure that we term modified velocity centroids (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible MHD turbulence. We prove that the MVCs are able to restore the underlying spectrum of turbulent velocity. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique that we introduced earlier. Employed together they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable. At the same time we show that MVCs allow to determine velocity spectra when the underlying statistics is not a power law and/or the turbulence is subsonic.

  4. Minimal information in velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Guillaume

    1995-01-01

    Jaynes' transformation group principle is used to derive the objective prior for the velocity of a non-zero rest-mass particle. In the case of classical mechanics, invariance under the classical law of addition of velocities, leads to an improper constant prior over the unbounded velocity space of classical mechanics. The application of the relativistic law of addition of velocities leads to a less simple prior. It can however be rewritten as a uniform volumetric distribution if the relativistic velocity space is given a non-trivial metric.

  5. Influence of speckle effect on doppler velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Changming, Zhao; Haiyang, Zhang; Suhui, Yang; Dehua, Zhang; Xingyuan, Zheng; Hongzhi, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In a coherent Lidar system, velocity measurement of a target is achieved by measuring Doppler frequency shift between the echo and local oscillator (LO) signals. The measurement accuracy is proportional to the spectrum width of Doppler signal. Actually, the speckle effect caused by the scattering of laser from a target will broaden the Doppler signal's spectrum and bring uncertainty to the velocity measurement. In this paper, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the broadening of Doppler spectrum with respect to different target's surface and motion parameters. The velocity measurement uncertainty caused by the broadening of spectrum is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we design a coherent Lidar system to measure the velocity of the targets with different surface roughness and transverse velocities. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. It is found that the target's surface roughness and transverse velocity can significantly affect the spectrum width of Doppler signal. With the increase of surface roughness and transverse velocity, the measurement accuracy becomes worse. However, the influence of surface roughness becomes weaker when the spot size of laser beam on the target is smaller.

  6. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  7. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  8. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...... with a 90° angle on the vessel. Moreover secondary flow in the abdominal aorta is illustrated by scanning on the transversal axis....

  9. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov;

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making...

  10. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  11. Kriging Interpolating Cosmic Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yu; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01

    [abridge] Volume-weighted statistics of large scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in mass-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number $n_k$ of the nearby particles to interpolate and the density $n_P$ of the observed sample are investigated. (1) We find that Kriging induces $1\\%$ and $3\\%$ systematics at $k\\sim 0.1h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ when $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-2} ({\\rm Mpc}/h)^{-3}$ and $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-3} ({\\rm Mpc...

  12. Scaling of granular convective velocity and timescale of asteroidal resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Ando, Kousuke; Morota, Tomokatsu; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    Granular convection is one of the well-known phenomena observed in a vertically vibrated granular bed. Recently, the possbile relation between granular convection and asteroidal surface processes has been discussed. The granular convection on the surface of small asteroids might be induced by seismic vibration resulting from meteorite impacts. To quantitatively evaluate the timescale of asteroidal resurfacing by granular convection, the granular convective velocity under various conditions must be revealed. As a first step to approach this problem, we experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection using a vertically vibrated glass-beads layer. By systematic experiments, a scaling form of granular convective velocity has been obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be written by a power-law product of two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity is almost proportional to gravitatinal acceleration. Using this scaling form, we have estimated the resurfacing timescale on small asteroid surface.

  13. A Computational Model for Velocity Separation in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋志尧; 严以新; 沈红艳; 孔俊

    2002-01-01

    Based on the hydrodynamical feature and the theoretical velocity profiles of tidal flow and wind-induced flow in shal-low sea, a computational model is established for the first time, which can separate observed velocity into tidal velocityand wind-induced velocity by use of the least square method. With the model, not only the surface velocities of tidal flowand wind-induced flow are obtained, but also the bed roughness height is determined and the wind velocity above the wa-ter surface is estimated. For verification of the model, the observed velocity in the Yellow River Estuary and the laborato-ry test is separated, then it is applied to the Yangtze River Estuary. All the results are satisfactory. The research resultsshow that the model is simple in method, feasible in process and reasonable in result. The model is a valid approach toanalysis and computation of field data, and can be applied to separate the observed velocity in shallow sea; at the sametime, reasonable boundary conditions of the surface and bottom can be obtained for two- and three-dimensional numericalsimulation.

  14. Analytic theory for the determination of velocity and stability of bubbles in a Hele-Shaw cell. I - Velocity selection. II - Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, S.

    1989-01-01

    An asymptotic theory is presented for the determination of velocity and linear stability of a steady symmetric bubble in a Hele-Shaw cell for small surface tension. First the bubble velocity relative to the fluid velocity at infinity is determined for small surface tension by means of a transcendentally small correction to the asymptotic series solution. In addition, a linear stability analysis shows that only the solution branch corresponding to the largest possible bubble velocity for given surface tension is stable, while all the others are unstable.

  15. Rayleigh-Wave Group-Velocity Tomography of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Mai, P. Martin; Chang, Sung-Joon; Zahran, Hani

    2017-04-01

    We use surface-wave tomography to investigate the lithospheric structure of the Arabian plate, which is traditionally divided into the Arabian shield in the west and the Arabian platform in the east. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks. The Arabian platform is primarily covered by very thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments. We develop high-resolution tomographic images from fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocities across Saudi Arabia, utilizing the teleseismic data recorded by the permanent Saudi National Seismic Network (SNSN). Our study extends previous efforts on surface wave work by increasing ray path density and improving spatial resolution. Good quality dispersion measurements for roughly 3000 Rayleigh-wave paths have been obtained and utilized for the group-velocity tomography. We have applied the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) scheme of Rawlinson (2005) to obtain Rayleigh-wave group-velocity images for periods from 8 s to 40 s on a 0.8° 0.8° grid and at resolutions approaching 2.5° based on the checkerboard tests. Our results indicate that short-period group-velocity maps (8-15 s) correlate well with surface geology, with slow velocities delineating the main sedimentary features including the Arabian platform, the Persian Gulf and Mesopotamia. For longer periods (20-40 s), the velocity contrast is due to the differences in crustal thickness and subduction/collision zones. The lower velocities are sensitive to the thicker continental crust beneath the eastern Arabia and the subduction/collision zones between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, while the higher velocities in the west infer mantle velocity.

  16. Experimental investigation of particle velocity distributions in windblown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the PDPA(Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer) measurement technology,the probability distributions of particle impact and lift-off velocities on bed surface and the particle velocity distributions at different heights are detected in a wind tunnel. The results show that the probability distribution of impact and lift-off velocities of sand grains can be expressed by a log-normal function,and that of impact and lift-off angles complies with an exponential function. The mean impact angle is between 28° and 39°,and the mean lift-off angle ranges from 30° to 44°. The mean lift-off velocity is 0.81-0.9 times the mean impact velocity. The proportion of backward-impacting particles is 0.05-0.11,and that of backward-entrained particles ranges from 0.04 to 0.13. The probability distribution of particle horizontal velocity at 4 mm height is positive skew,the horizontal velocity of particles at 20 mm height varies widely,and the variation of the particle horizontal velocity at 80 mm height is less than that at 20 mm height. The probability distribution of particle vertical velocity at different heights can be described as a normal function.

  17. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  18. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  19. Radial velocity eclipse mapping of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolov, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLauglin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blue-shifted) or receding (red-shifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet's spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet's radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt and impact factor (i.e. sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetrie...

  20. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  1. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  2. Principle and performance of the transverse oscillation vector velocity technique in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Udesen, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    to the axial blood velocity. A major drawback is that only the axial velocity component is found. Often the lateral component is most important as blood vessels run parallel to the skin surface. The talk presents the transverse oscillation approach, which also can find the lateral velocity component by using...

  3. Density dependence of the saturated velocity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    The saturated velocity of a semiconductor is an important measure in bench-marking performance for either logic or microwave applications. Graphene has been of interest for such applications due to its apparently high value of the saturated velocity. Recent experiments have suggested that this value is very density dependent and can even exceed the band limiting Fermi velocity. Some of these measurements have also suggested that the scattering is dominated by the low energy surface polar mode of the SiO2 substrate. Here, we show that the saturated velocity of graphene on SiO2 is relatively independent of the density and that the scattering is dominated by the high energy surface polar mode of the substrate.

  4. Neutrino Velocity and Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Minakata, H

    2012-01-01

    We study distances of propagation and the group velocities of the muon neutrinos in the presence of mixing and oscillations assuming that Lorentz invariance holds. Oscillations lead to distortion of the $\

  5. Statistics of Centroids of Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We review the use of velocity centroids statistics to recover information of interstellar turbulence from observations. Velocity centroids have been used for a long time now to retrieve information about the scaling properties of the turbulent velocity field in the interstellar medium. We show that, while they are useful to study subsonic turbulence, they do not trace the statistics of velocity in supersonic turbulence, because they are highly influenced by fluctuations of density. We show also that for sub-Alfv\\'enic turbulence (both supersonic and subsonic) two-point statistics (e.g. correlation functions or power-spectra) are anisotropic. This anisotropy can be used to determine the direction of the mean magnetic field projected in the plane of the sky.

  6. Estimation of real ship propelling performance by the surface velocity lattice method using model ship flow field data; Mokeisen ryujo data wo mochiita hyomen uzu koshiho ni yoru jissen suishin seino no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, H.; Ikehata, M.; Sakai, S. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    This is basically a technique wherein the wing element method is replaced by a surface vortex lattice method. A horseshoe vortex of unknown intensity and source surface of known intensity are distributed on the wing surface and, under conditions that the fluid will not cross the boundary, the intensity of horseshoe vortex circulation is calculated for the solution of the fluid field. For the simulation of a real ship in navigation, the required propeller revolution thrust is determined using the real ship resistance value and real ship thrust reduction factor estimated from a model ship resistance test by extrapolation. The calculation of propeller performance is conducted in the quasi-steady condition using the force of fluid working on one wing for each wing angle (with the wing rotated at the increment of 6 degrees), and the thrust and torque are determined using the averages of values obtained in one cycle. It is found that the torque value is overestimated in a considerable degree in the wing element theory. In the surface vortex lattice method, both thrust and torque values agree with experimental values mostly, and this method is found to be accurate enough as a navigation element calculation tool when many panels are considered. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Electrophoresis of particles with Navier velocity slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hung Mok

    2013-03-01

    In the present investigation, it is found that the electrophoretic mobility of hydrophobic particles is affected not only by the zeta potential but also by the velocity slip at the particle surface. From a physicochemical viewpoint, zeta potential represents the surface charge properties and the slip coefficient indicates the hydrophobicity of the particle surface. Thus, it is necessary to separate the contribution of zeta potential from that of slip coefficient to the particle mobility, since zeta potential can be changed by varying the bulk ionic concentration while the slip coefficient can be modified by adjusting surfactant concentration. In the present investigation, a method is devised that allows a simultaneous estimation of zeta potential and slip coefficient of micro and nanoparticles using measurements of electrophoretic mobility at various bulk ionic concentrations. Employing a nonlinear curve-fitting technique and an analytic solution of electrophoresis for a particle with velocity slip, the present technique predicts both zeta potential and slip coefficient simultaneously with reasonable accuracy using the measured values of electrophoretic mobility at various bulk ionic concentrations.

  8. VIBRATING VELOCITY RECONSTRUCTION USING IBEM AND TIKHONOV REGULARIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The inverse problem to determine the vibrating velocity from known exterior field measurement pressure, involves the solution of a discrete ill-posed problem. To facilitate the computation of a meaningful approximate solution possible, the indirect boundary element method (IBEM) code for investigating vibration velocity reconstruction and Tikhonov regularization method by means of singular value decomposition (SVD) are used. The amount of regularization is determined by a regularization parameter. Its optimal value is given by the L-curve approach. Numerical results indicate the reconstructed normal surface velocity is a good approximation to the real source.

  9. Measurement of velocity field in parametrically excited solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Paramerically excited solitary waves emerge as localized structures in high-aspect-ratio free surfaces subject to vertical vibrations. Herein, we provide the first experimental characterization of the hydrodynamics of thess waves using Particle Image Velocimetry. We show that the underlying velocity field of parametrically excited solitary waves is mainly composed by an oscillatory velocity field. Our results confirm the accuracy of Hamiltonian models with added dissipation in describing this field. Remarkably, our measurements also uncover the onset of a streaming velocity field which is shown to be as important as other crucial nonlinear terms in the current theory. The observed streaming pattern is particularly interesting due to the presence of oscillatory meniscii.

  10. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  11. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  12. Event Detection by Velocity Pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose velocity pyramid for multimediaevent detection. Recently, spatial pyramid matching is proposed to in-troduce coarse geometric information into Bag of Features framework,and is eective for static image recognition and detection. In video, notonly spatial information but also temporal information, which repre-sents its dynamic nature, is important. In order to fully utilize it, wepropose velocity pyramid where video frames are divided into motionalsub-regions. Our meth...

  13. The Re-sampling Technique Application in Action Potential Conduction Velocity Estimation of Surface Electromyography%基于重采样技术的肌电信号动作电位传导速度估计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付聪; 练士龙; 李强

    2011-01-01

    目的:本文针对表面肌电(sEMG)信号探讨动作电位传导速度(APCV)估计问题.方法:以生理学仿真sEMG信号为基础,采用基于互相关分析的时延估计技术来获取相应的APCV估计值,并利用重采样技术来提高估计的精度.结果:实验表明,针对重采样后的仿真信号,其APCV的估计误差得到了明显降低.结论:所采用方法能够有效获取满意的APCV估计效果.%Objective: The action potential conduction velocity (APCV) estimation was explored in this paper. Methods: Based on a physiological model of sEMG signal, the APCV estimation result was acquired by using the time-delay estimation of cross correlation, and the re-sampling technique was utilized to improve the estimation performance. Results: The experimental results showed that the APCV estimation error could be reduced by the re-sampling technique. Conclusion: The APCV estimation performance could be satisfac torily acquired by the proposed method.

  14. The velocity-depth ambiguity in seismic traveltime data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.S. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-05-01

    An observed disturbance in seismic traveltimes to a reflector can be caused either by an anomalous velocity zone between the surface and the reflector or by a structural variation in the reflector itself. This velocity-depth ambiguity is formulated in terms of linear estimation theory. Such a formulation allows integration of various published results in velocity-depth ambiguity and suggests improved methods of stabilizing the solution of a depth-conversion problem. By solving a relatively simple problem that is amenable to analysis -- a single reflector beneath an overburden with a variable velocity -- the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) The velocity-depth ambiguity is caused by traveltime errors and can be quantitatively related to those errors by closed-form expressions if the velocities do not vary laterally. Among other things, those expressions show that for small spread lengths (shorter than half the depth) the errors in velocity and depth are inversely proportional to the square of the spread length. Errors can thus be reduced more effectively at small spread lengths by increasing the maximum offset rather than by including more offsets. Laterally varying velocities can be estimated accurately at all but isolated points in their spatial frequency spectrum, called ''wavelengths of maximum ambiguity.'' If these ambiguous wavelengths are stabilized by damping them rather than by more traditional lateral smoothing techniques, structural or velocity features smaller than a spread length need not be smeared laterally. (3) A deep velocity anomaly is estimated with lower accuracy than is a shallow one. The theory presented here is a complement to more general methods of velocity inversion, such as tomography, which can be used to solve very complex problems beyond the scope of this analysis.

  15. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix, E-mail: nikolay@astro.ex.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  16. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification.

  17. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2016-10-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  18. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  19. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the hypothetical existence of superluminal signals would imply the logical possibility of active causal violation: an observer in relative motion with respect to a primary source could in principle emit secondary superluminal signals (triggered by the primary ones) which go back in time and deactivate the primary source before the initial emission. This is a direct consequence of the structure of the Lorentz transformations, sometimes called "Regge-Tolman paradox". It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity of the moving observer required to produce the causality violation. When applied to some recent claims of slight superluminal propagation, this formula yields a required velocity very close to the speed of light; this raises some doubts about the real physical observability of such violations. We re-compute this velocity requirement introducing a realistic delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that for -any- delay it...

  20. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  1. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  2. Study on the Velocity of Partially Submerged Landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic resistance is one of the most important factors which affect the velocity of the partially submerged landslide when it moves into river at a high speed. In this paper, an experiment system was designed including a water tank, a moving frame fixed over the tank with liquid level sensors, blocks, and velocity control apparatus. Six blocks with different areas were used for experiments and each block moved at five different velocities in water tank. Test results showed that the increment of the pressure head was proportional to the square velocity of submerged block. Based on that, the total water pressure and corresponding hydraulic resistance of the moving block in water tank were obtained, and the latter was used to analyze hydraulic resistance acting on partially submerged landslide. Method of slice was applied to calculate the forces of landslide with curved slip surface. The dynamics and kinematics equation of landslide were used to calculate the velocity. Taking the Dayantang landslide as an example, velocities with different travel distance were obtained. The results showed that the maximum velocity of Dayantang landslide considering hydraulic resistance was 18.6% less than that without considering hydraulic resistance.

  3. Direct Ejecta Velocity Measurements of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct ejecta velocity measurements of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). Chandra's high angular resolution images reveal a patchy structure of radial velocities in the ejecta that can be separated into distinct redshifted, blueshifted, and low velocity ejecta clumps or blobs. The typical velocities of the redshifted and blueshifted blobs are <~ 7,800 km/s and <~ 5,000 km/s, respectively. The highest velocity blobs are located near the center, while the low velocity ones appear near the edge as expected for a generally spherical expansion. Systematic uncertainty on the velocity measurements from gain calibration was assessed by carrying out joint fits of individual blobs with both the ACIS-I and ACIS-S detectors. We identified an annular region (~3.3'-3.5'), where the surface brightness in the Si, S, and Fe K lines reaches a peak while the line width reaches a minimum value. These minimum line widths correspond to ion temperatures of ~1 MeV for each of the three species, in excellent ...

  4. Critical velocity of floatables in combined sewer overflow (CSO) chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigana, J; Lefebvre, G; Marche, C

    2001-01-01

    Although the efficiency of underflow baffles has never been clearly proven, these underflow baffles have gained in popularity over the last few years as a viable means to intercept floatables in Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs). These pilot scale essays, performed in a 17.0 metres basin at various flowrates, show that a critical horizontal velocity (V(CR)) may develop in the overflow chamber. Whenever this critical velocity is exceeded, floatables that would normally rise to the surface are kept within the flow and never intercepted, thus rendering the underflow baffle ineffective. The equation relating the critical horizontal velocity to the vertical velocity is found to be: V(CR) = 16 w R(H) 1/6.

  5. Tachoastrometry: astrometry with radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, L; Lombardi, M; Monaco, L; Leão, I C; Delabre, B

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of composite systems (e.g., spectroscopic binaries) contain spatial information that can be retrieved by measuring the radial velocities (i.e., Doppler shifts) of the components in four observations with the slit rotated by 90 degrees in the sky. By using basic concepts of slit spectroscopy we show that the geometry of composite systems can be reliably retrieved by measuring only radial velocity differences taken with different slit angles. The spatial resolution is determined by the precision with which differential radial velocities can be measured. We use the UVES spectrograph at the VLT to observe the known spectroscopic binary star HD 188088 (HIP 97944), which has a maximum expected separation of 23 milli-arcseconds. We measure an astrometric signal in radial velocity of 276 \\ms, which corresponds to a separation between the two components at the time of the observations of 18 $\\pm2$ milli-arcseconds. The stars were aligned east-west. We describe a simple optical device to simultaneously record p...

  6. Spatiotemporal velocity-velocity correlation function in fully developed turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Canet, Léonie; Wschebor, Nicolás; Balarac, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is an ubiquitous phenomenon in natural and industrial flows. Since the celebrated work of Kolmogorov in 1941, understanding the statistical properties of fully developed turbulence has remained a major quest. In particular, deriving the properties of turbulent flows from a mesoscopic description, that is from Navier-Stokes equation, has eluded most theoretical attempts. Here, we provide a theoretical prediction for the {\\it space and time} dependent velocity-velocity correlation function of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence from the field theory associated to Navier-Stokes equation with stochastic forcing. This prediction is the analytical fixed-point solution of Non-Perturbative Renormalisation Group flow equations, which are exact in a certain large wave-number limit. This solution is compared to two-point two-times correlation functions computed in direct numerical simulations. We obtain a remarkable agreement both in the inertial and in the dissipative ranges.

  7. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  8. The dependence of sheet erosion velocity on slope angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for estimating the erosion velocity on forested natural area. As a research object for testing the methodology the authors selected Neskuchny Garden - a city Park on the Moskva river embankment, named after the cognominal Palace of Catherine's age. Here, an almost horizontal surface III of the Moskva river terrace above the flood-plain is especially remarkable, accentuated by the steep sides of the ravine parallel to St. Andrew's, but short and nameless. The crests of the ravine sides are sharp, which is the evidence of its recent formation, but the old trees on the slopes indicate that it has not been growing for at least 100 years. Earlier Russian researchers defined vertical velocity of sheet erosion for different regions and slopes with different parent (in relation to the soil rocks. The comparison of the velocities shows that climatic conditions, in the first approximation, do not have a decisive influence on the erosion velocity of silt loam soils. The velocities on the shores of Issyk-Kul lake and in Moscow proved to be the same. But the composition of the parent rocks strongly affects the sheet erosion velocity. Even low-strength rock material reduces the velocity by times. Phytoindication method gives a real, physically explainable sheet erosion velocities. The speed is rather small but it should be considered when designing long-term structures on the slopes composed of dispersive soils. On the slopes composed of rocky soils sheet erosion velocity is so insignificant that it shouldn't be taken into account when designing. However, there may be other geological processes, significantly disturbing the stability of slopes connected with cracks.

  9. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  10. EFFECT OF VELOCITY ON DUCTILITY UNDER HIGH VELOCITY FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LI Chunfeng

    2007-01-01

    The ring expansion procedures over various forming velocities are calculated with ANSYS software in order to show the effect of forming velocity on ductility of rate insensitive materials. Ring expansion procedures are simplified to one-dimensional tension by constraining the radial deformation, with element birth and death method, fracture problem of circular ring are considered. The calculated results show that for insensitive materials of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy, fracture strain increases corresponding to the increase of forming velocity. This trend agrees well with experimental results, and indicates inertia is the key factor to affect ductility; With element birth and death methods, fracture problems can be solved effectively. Experimental studies on formability of tubular workpieces are also conducted, experimental results show that the formability of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy under electromagnetic forming is higher than that under quasistatic forming, according to the characteristics of electromagnetic forming, the forming limit diagrams of the two materials tube are also built respectively, this is very important to promote the development of electromagnetic forming and guide the engineering practices.

  11. Calculation of a velocity distribution from particle trajectory end-points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lowell A.

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal component of the velocity of a particle at or near a glacier surface is considered, its position as a function of time being termed its trajectory. Functional relationships are derived for obtaining the trajectory from the spatial distribution of velocity and for obtaining the velocity distribution from the trajectory. It is established that the trajectory end-points impose only an integral condition on the velocity distribution and that no individual point on the velocity distribution can be determined if only the end-points are known.-from Author

  12. Computer program calculates velocities and streamlines in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, T.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program calculates the velocity distribution and streamlines over widely separated blades of turbomachines. It gives the solutions of a two dimensional, subsonic, compressible nonviscous flow problem for a rotating or stationary circular cascade of blades on a blade-to-blade surface of revolution.

  13. Radial velocity information in solar-type spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A criterion is developed for determining the amount of radial velocity information theoretically available at the earth's surface from a star as a function of wavelength and spectral resolution. A description of the study is provided. The wavelength dependence is examined as well as the dependence on resolution, frequency information, and the problem of time-dependent astrophysical phenomena.

  14. A 3-mode, Variable Velocity Jet Model for HH 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Variable ejection velocity jet models can qualitatively explain the appearance of successive working surfaces in Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. This paper presents an attempt to explore which features of the HH 34 jet can indeed be reproduced by such a model.

  15. An optical velocity for the Phoenix dwarf galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwin, M; Tolstoy, E

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a Very Large Telescope observing programme carried out in service mode using FORS1 on ANTU in long-slit mode to determine the optical velocities of nearby low surface brightness galaxies. As part of our programme of service observations we obtained long-slit spectra of seve

  16. Advanced Ice Velocity Mapping Using Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, M. J.; Scambos, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Haran, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improved image-to-image cross correlation software is applied to pairs of sequential Landsat 8 satellite imagery to accurately measure ice surface velocity over ice sheets and glaciers (±0.1 pixel displacement, 15 meter pixels). The high radiometric fidelity of Landsat 8's panchromatic band (12-bit), and exceptional geolocation accuracy (typically ±5 m) supports the generation of ice velocity fields over very short time intervals (e.g., 16-, 32-, or 48-day repeat images of the same scene location). The high radiometry supports velocity mapping in areas with very subtle topographic detail, including un-crevassed sastrugi regions on ice dome flanks or the ice sheet interior. New Python-based software presently under development (named PyCorr), takes two sequential Landsat 8 OLI scenes (or suitably processed ETM+ or TM scenes) and matches small sub-scenes ('chips') between the images based on similarity in their gray-scale value patterns, using an image correlation algorithm. Peak fitting in the region of maximum correlation for a chip pair yields sub-pixel fits to the feature offset vector. Vector editing after the image correlation runs seeks to eliminate spurious and cloud-impacted vectors, and correct residual geo-location error. This processing is based on plausible values of ice strain rates and known areas of near-zero ice flow (rock outcrops, ice dome areas, etc.). In preliminary processing, we have examined ~800 Landsat 8 image pairs having <20% cloud cover spanning the near-coastal Antarctic ice sheet during the 2013-14 summer season.

  17. Signal velocity for anomalous dispersive waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1983-03-11

    The concept of signal velocity for dispersive waves is usually identified with that of group velocity. When the dispersion is anomalous, this interpretation is not correct since the group velocity can assume nonphysical values. In this note, by using the steepest descent method first introduced by Brillouin, the phase velocity is shown to be the signal velocity when the dispersion is anomalous in the full range of frequencies.

  18. The integration of angular velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A common problem in physics and engineering is determination of the orientation of an object given its angular velocity. When the direction of the angular velocity changes in time, this is a nontrivial problem involving coupled differential equations. Several possible approaches are examined, along with various improvements over previous efforts. These are then evaluated numerically by comparison to a complicated but analytically known rotation that is motivated by the important astrophysical problem of precessing black-hole binaries. It is shown that a straightforward solution directly using quaternions is most efficient and accurate, and that the norm of the quaternion is irrelevant. Integration of the generator of the rotation can also be made roughly as efficient as integration of the rotation. Both methods will typically be twice as efficient naive vector- or matrix-based methods. Implementation by means of standard general-purpose numerical integrators is stable and efficient, so that such problems can ...

  19. The Pulsar Kick Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, B M S; Hansen, Brad M. S.

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sample of pulsar proper motions, taking detailed account of the selection effects of the original surveys. We treat censored data using survival statistics. From a comparison of our results with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the mean birth speed of a pulsar is 250-300 km/s, rather than the 450 km/s foundby Lyne & Lorimer (1994). The resultant distribution is consistent with a maxwellian with dispersion $ \\sigma_v = 190 km/s$. Despite the large birth velocities, we find that the pulsars with long characteristic ages show the asymmetric drift, indicating that they are dynamically old. These pulsars may result from the low velocity tail of the younger population, although modified by their origin in binaries and by evolution in the galactic potential.

  20. Multilogarithmic velocity renormalization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Kopietz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of long-range Coulomb interactions on the quasiparticle velocity in graphene. Using a nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach with partial bosonization in the forward scattering channel and momentum transfer cutoff scheme, we calculate the quasiparticle velocity, v (k ) , and the quasiparticle residue, Z , with frequency-dependent polarization. One of our most striking results is that v (k ) ∝ln[Ck(α ) /k ] where the momentum- and interaction-dependent cutoff scale Ck(α ) vanishes logarithmically for k →0 . Here k is measured with respect to one of the charge neutrality (Dirac) points and α =2.2 is the strength of dimensionless bare interaction. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the so-obtained multilogarithmic singularity is reconcilable with the perturbative expansion of v (k ) in powers of the bare interaction.

  1. Deriving large-scale glacier velocities from a complete satellite archive : Application to the Pamir-Karakoram-Himalaya

    OpenAIRE

    Dehecq, Amaury; Gourmelen, Noel; Trouve, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Mountain glaciers are pertinent indicators of climate change and their dynamics, in particular surface velocity change, is an essential climate variable. In order to retrieve the climatic signature from surface velocity, large-scale study of temporal trends spanning multiple decades is required. Satellite image feature-tracking has been successfully used to derive mountain glacier surface velocities, but most studies rely on manually selected pairs of images, which is ...

  2. Velocity Gradient Maps Directly Measured by PLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M.; Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Lima, Angelo Mv; Pepe, Iuri M.

    2000-11-01

    Flows are macroscopically classified as laminar or turbulent due to their velocity distributions, nevertheless most chemical and biological phenomena are yield or enhanced by intermolecular orientation and microscopic turbulence. Here was studied a 100micra liquid sheet produced by a slit nozzle, both flowing freely into air and over a borosilicate surface (roughness bellow 5nm), ranging from 17 to 36Re (143 to 297cm/s, similar to muscles and brain blood flow). Mono ethylene glycol was used either pure, or with sodium alkyl benzene sulfated (ABS) surfactant (24.5mol/L, submicellar), or with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (1409ppm, 4millions aw). Velocity gradients were directly measured by 514nm polarized laser induced fluorescence (PLF) with R6G as probe. Intermolecular alignment (IA) maps were obtained all over the flow (about 1,950 points, 0.02mm2 precision). The free jet average IA has increased 57% when flowing over borosilicate. With ABS, the IA increased, suggesting wall drag reduction. With PEO the IA decreases due to solvent intermolecular forces attenuation, generating wider turbulent areas. PLF proved to be an excellent method to evaluate IA within liquid thin flows. Chosen solute additions permits IA control over wide regions.

  3. S-wave velocity structure beneath Changbaishan volcano inferred from receiver function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Wu; Yuehong Ming; Lihua Fang; Weilai Wang

    2009-01-01

    The S wave velocity structure in Changbaishan volcanic region was obtained from teleseismic receiver func-tion modeling. The results show that there exist distinct low velocity layers in crust in volcano area. Beneath WQD station near to the Tianchi caldera the low velocity layer at 8 km depth is 20 km thick with the lowest S-wave velocity about 2.2 km/s. At EDO station located 50 km north of Tianchi caldera, no obvious crustal low velocity layer is detected. In the volcanic re-gion, the thickness of crustal low velocity layer is greater and the lowest velocity is more obvious with the distance shorter to the caldem. It indicates the existence of the high temperature material or magma reservoir in crust near the Tianchi caldera. The receiver functions and inversion result from different back azimuths at CBS permanent seismic station show that the thickness of near surface low velocity layer and Moho depth change with directions. The near surface low velocity layer is obviously thicker in south direction. The Moho depth shows slight uplifting in the direction of the caldera located. We con-sider that the special near surface velocity structure is the main cause of relatively lower prominent frequency of volcanic earthquake waveforms recorded by CBS station. The slight uplifting of Moho beneath Tianchi caldera indicates there is a material exchanging channel between upper mantle and magma reservoir in crust.

  4. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The technique of velocity-aligned Doppler spectrosocopy (VADS) is presented and discussed. For photolysis/probe experiments with pulsed initiation, VADS can yield Doppler profiles for nascent photofragments that allow detailed center-of-mass (c.m.) kinetic energy distributions to be extracted. When compared with traditional forms of Doppler spectroscopy, the improvement in kinetic energy resolution is dramatic. Changes in the measured profiles are a consequence of spatial discrimination (i.e., focused and overlapping photolysis and probe beams) and delayed observation. These factors result in the selective detection of species whose velocities are aligned with the wave vector of the probe radiation k/sub pr/, thus revealing the speed distribution along k/sub pr/ rather than the distribution of nascent velocity components projected upon this direction. Mathematical details of the procedure used to model VADS are given, and experimental illustrations for HI, H/sub 2/S, and NH/sub 3/ photodissociation are presented. In these examples, pulsed photodissociation produces H atoms that are detected by sequential two-photon, two-frequency ionization via Lyman-..cap alpha.. with a pulsed laser (121.6+364.7 nm), and measuring the Lyman-..cap alpha.. Doppler profile as a function of probe delay reveals both internal and c.m. kinetic energy distributions for the photofragments. Strengths and weaknesses of VADS as a tool for investigating photofragmentation phenomena are also discussed.

  5. Method for quantifiying conduction velocity during ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Ayman; Nash, Martyn P.

    2007-01-01

    Velocity of propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is important for the understanding of complex arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF). In this paper, we present a method to estimate the conduction velocity of electrical activation wavefronts that are defined to be a particular isovalue of any scalar field, such as electrical activation times, electrical phase, or indeed any other quantity that can be used to determine excitation wavefronts. This general method is based on tracking trajectories of material points that are assumed to be embedded within the wavefronts, whilst the direction of propagation is assumed to be perpendicular to the wavefront. We have derived an explicit expression for the conduction velocity in terms of the spatiotemporal gradients of the scalar field used to define wavefronts. Moreover, although it is often difficult to use activation times to compute conduction velocities during complex VF, we show that other scalar fields such as detrended voltage or electrical phase, which can faithfully represent the electrical activity during fibrillatory conduction, can be used to determine conduction velocities. We demonstrate the application of our method to determine conduction velocities from contact mapping recordings over the entire epicardial surface of the fibrillating pig heart.

  6. Convertion Shear Wave Velocity to Standard Penetration Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madun, A.; Tajuddin, S. A. A.; Abdullah, M. E.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Sani, S.; Siang, A. J. L. M.; Yusof, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Multichannel Analysis Surface Wave (MASW) measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine the soil profile based on shear wave velocity. Meanwhile, borehole intrusive technique identifies the changes of soil layer based on soil penetration resistance, i.e. standard penetration test-number of blows (SPT-N). Researchers across the world introduced many empirical conversions of standard penetration test blow number of borehole data to shear wave velocity or vice versa. This is because geophysics test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment, and thus should be promoted to compliment the site investigation work. These empirical conversions of shear wave velocity to SPT-N blow can be utilised, and thus suitable geotechnical parameters for design purposes can be achieved. This study has demonstrated the conversion between MASW and SPT-N value. The study was conducted at the university campus and Sejagung Sri Medan. The MASW seismic profiles at the University campus test site and Sejagung were at a depth of 21 m and 13 m, respectively. The shear wave velocities were also calculated empirically using SPT-N value, and thus both calculated and measured shear wave velocities were compared. It is essential to note that the MASW test and empirical conversion always underestimate the actual shear wave velocity of hard layer or rock due to the effect of soil properties on the upper layer.

  7. Velocity Correction and Measurement Uncertainty Analysis of Light Screen Velocity Measuring Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bin; ZUO Zhao-lu; HOU Wen

    2012-01-01

    Light screen velocity measuring method with unique advantages has been widely used in the velocity measurement of various moving bodies.For large air resistance and friction force which the big moving bodies are subjected to during the light screen velocity measuring,the principle of velocity correction was proposed and a velocity correction equation was derived.A light screen velocity measuring method was used to measure the velocity of big moving bodies which have complex velocity attenuation,and the better results were gained in practical tests.The measuring uncertainty after the velocity correction was calculated.

  8. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  9. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M.; Tsuru, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  10. Influence of scanning velocity on femtosecond laser direct writing lines on FOTURAN glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhong Wu; Ching-Yue Wang; Wei Jia; Xiaochang Ni; Minglie Hu; Lu Chai

    2008-01-01

    Lines are induced on the surface of a photosensitive (FOTURAN) glass by focused femtosecond laser transverse writing with scanning velocity in a wide range of 40- 1800μm/s. The formed lines are analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM). It is observed that three distinct morphologies of lines are produced depending on the scanning velocity. Lines written in low velocity level (40 - 100 μm/s) and high velocity level (1000 - 1800 μm/s) are uniform and regular, while those written in moderate velocity level (150 - 600 μm/s) are rough. The influence of scanning velocity is explained based on different pulses overlapping or cumulative dose of laser exposure in irradiated area. Fabrication of shallow groove on the surface is also demonstrated.

  11. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  12. Level-energy-dependent mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms sputtered by krypton-ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mineta, Shota [Department of Physics, Toho University, Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292, Japan and Department of Fusion Science, School of Physical Sciences, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kenmotsu, Takahiro [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Furuya, Kenji [Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Motohashi, Kenji, E-mail: motohashi@toyo.jp [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585, Japan and Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Visible emission spectra were acquired from neutral atoms sputtered by 35–60 keV Kr{sup +} ions from a polycrystalline tungsten surface. Mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms in seven different 6p states were also obtained via the dependence of photon intensities on the distance from the surface. The average velocities parallel to the surface normal varied by factors of 2–4 for atoms in the different 6p energy levels. However, they were almost independent of the incident ion kinetic energy. The 6p-level energy dependence indicated that the velocities of the excited atoms were determined by inelastic processes that involve resonant charge exchange.

  13. Peculiar velocities in dynamic spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of peculiar velocities in certain physically significant time-dependent gravitational fields. Previous studies of the motion of free test particles have focused on the \\emph{collapse scenario}, according to which a double-jet pattern with Lorentz factor $\\gamma \\to \\infty$ develops asymptotically along the direction of complete gravitational collapse. In the present work, we identify a second \\emph{wave scenario}, in which a single-jet pattern with Lorentz factor $\\gamma \\to \\infty$ develops asymptotically along the direction of wave propagation. The possibility of a connection between the two scenarios for the formation of cosmic jets is critically examined.

  14. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  15. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  16. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    travel velocities directly after seeding (representing the velocity of sediment at the bed surface subject to actual transport), or the longer term transport of sediment, helping to understand the velocity of sediment transfer in river networks as a basis for catchment-wide river restoration plans in the course of the project 'HyMoCARES', which is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund within the Alpine Space programme.

  17. Group velocity distribution of Rayleigh waves and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Chinese mainland and its vicinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 丁志峰; 叶太兰; 孙为国; 张乃铃

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long period digital surface wave data recorded by 11 CDSN stations and 11 IRIS stations, the dispersion curves of the group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves along 647 paths, with the periods from 10 s to 92 s, were measured by multi-filter. Their distribution at 25 central periods within the region of 18((54(N, 70(~140(E was inverted by Dimtar-Yanovskaya method. Within the period from 10 s to 15.9 s, the group velocity distribution is laterally inhomogeneous and is closely related to geotectonic units, with two low velocity zones located in the Tarim basin and the East China Sea and its north regions, respectively. From 21 s to 33 s, the framework of tectonic blocks is revealed. From 36.6 s to 40 s, the lithospheric subdivision of the Chinese mainland is obviously uncovered, with distinct boundaries among the South-North seismic belt, the Tibetan plateau, the North China, the South China and the Northeast China. Four cross-sections of group velocity distribution with period along 30(N, 38(N, 90(E and 120(E, are discussed, respectively, which display the basic features of the crust and upper mantle of the Chinese mainland and its neighboring regions. There are distinguished velocity differences among the different tectonic blocks. There are low-velocity-zones (LVZ) in the middle crust of the eastern Tibetan plateau, high velocity featured as stable platform in the Tarim basin and the Yangtze platform, shallow and thick low-velocity-zone in the upper mantle of the North China. The upper mantle LVZ in the East China Sea and the Japan Sea is related to the frictional heat from the subduction of the Philippine slab and the strong extension since the Himalayan orogenic period.

  18. The group velocity variation of Lamb wave in fiber reinforced composite plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2007-12-01

    Experimentally measured Lamb wave group velocities in composite materials with anisotropic characteristics are not the same as the theoretical group velocities which is calculated with the Lamb wave dispersion equation. This discrepancy arises from the fact that the angle between the group velocity direction and the phase velocity direction in anisotropic materials exists. Wave propagation in a composite material with anisotropic characteristics should be considered with respect to magnitude correction in addition to direction correction. In this study, S0 mode phase velocity dispersion curves are depicted with the variation of degree with respect to the fiber direction using a Lamb wave dispersion relation in the unidirectional, bidirectional, and quasi-isotropic composite plates. Slowness surface is sketched by the reciprocal value of the phase velocity curves. The magnitude and direction of the group velocity could be calculated from the slowness surface. The recalculated group velocities with consideration of the magnitude and direction from the slowness surface are compared with experimentally measured group velocities. The proposed method shows good agreements with theoretical and experimental results.

  19. Potential Misidentification of Love-Wave Phase Velocity Based on Three-Component Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongbo; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    People have calculated Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from vertical component of ambient seismic noise for several years. Recently, researchers started to extract Love waves from transverse component recordings of ambient noise, where "transverse" is defined as the direction perpendicular to a great-circle path or a line in small scale through observation sensors. Most researches assumed Rayleigh waves could be negligible, but Rayleigh waves can exist in the transverse component when Rayleigh waves propagate in other directions besides radial direction. In study of data acquired in western Junggar Basin near Karamay city, China, after processing the transverse component recordings of ambient noise, we obtain two energy trends, which are distinguished with Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities, in the frequency-velocity domain using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Rayleigh waves could be also extracted from the transverse component data. Because Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities are close in high frequencies (>0.1 Hz), two kinds of surface waves might be merged in the frequency-velocity domain. Rayleigh-wave phase velocities may be misidentified as Love-wave phase velocities. To get accurate surface-wave phase velocities from the transverse component data using seismic interferometry in investigating the shallow geology, our results suggest using MASW to calculate real Love-wave phase velocities.

  20. Velocity of sound in hadron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Roulet, E.

    1987-09-01

    The velocity of sound in hadron matter, in both the confined and deconfined phases, is studied. This velocity of sound appears to be an important tool to distinguish among different bag-model-based thermodynamical descriptions of hadronic matter.

  1. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  2. Velocity Measurement Based on Laser Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Yan; HUO Yu-Jing; HE Shu-Fang; GONG Ke

    2010-01-01

    @@ A novel method for velocity measurement is presented.In this scheme,a parallel-linear-polarization dualfrequency laser is incident on the target and senses the target velocity with both the frequencies,which can increase the maximum measurable velocity significantly.The theoretical analysis and verification experiment of the novel method are presented,which show that high-velocity measurement can be achieved with high precision using this method.

  3. Water velocity and the nature of critical flow in large rapids on the Colorado River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magirl, C.S.; Gartner, J.W.; Smart, G.M.; Webb, R.H.

    2009-01-01

     Rapids are an integral part of bedrock-controlled rivers, influencing aquatic ecology, geomorphology, and recreational value. Flow measurements in rapids and high-gradient rivers are uncommon because of technical difficulties associated with positioning and operating sufficiently robust instruments. In the current study, detailed velocity, water surface, and bathymetric data were collected within rapids on the Colorado River in eastern Utah. With the water surface survey, it was found that shoreline-based water surface surveys may misrepresent the water surface slope along the centerline of a rapid. Flow velocities were measured with an ADCP and an electronic pitot-static tube. Integrating multiple measurements, the ADCP returned velocity data from the entire water column, even in sections of high water velocity. The maximum mean velocity measured with the ADCP was 3.7 m/s. The pitot-static tube, while capable of only point measurements, quantified velocity 0.39 m below the surface. The maximum mean velocity measured with the pitot tube was 5.2 m/s, with instantaneous velocities up to 6.5 m/s. Analysis of the data showed that flow was subcritical throughout all measured rapids with a maximum measured Froude number of 0.7 in the largest measured rapids. Froude numbers were highest at the entrance of a given rapid, then decreased below the first breaking waves. In the absence of detailed bathymetric and velocity data, the Froude number in the fastest-flowing section of a rapid was estimated from near-surface velocity and depth soundings alone.

  4. Signal processing method for shear wave velocity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Xingmin; Qu Shuying; Shi Xiangdong

    2007-01-01

    Soil shear wave velocity (SWV) is an important parameter in geotechnical engineering. To measure the soil SWV, three methods are generally used in China, including the single-hole method, cross-hole method and the surface-wave technique. An optimized approach based on a correlation function for single-hole SWV measurement is presented in this paper. In this approach, inherent inconsistencies of the artificial methods such as negative velocities, and too-large and too-small velocities, are eliminated from the single-hole method, and the efficiency of data processing is improved. In addition, verification using the cross-hole method of upper measuring points shows that the proposed optimized approach yields high precision in signal processing.

  5. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  6. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure...... and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance...... pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America....

  7. Recording of particles velocity spectrum at the shock impact on different viscosity interface of liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experiments concerning the study of cavitational mechanism of liquid failure in a wide range of shock loading are presented in this paper. Free surface velocity of liquids and velocity spectrum of particles and jets were recorded using PDV method [1], their size was also determined. The value of spall strength of distilled water was defined.

  8. A Fabry-Perot interferometer system for high-speed velocity measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Bruinsma, A.J.A.; Prinse, W.C.; Smorenburg, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot Velocity Interferometer System (F-PVIS) is designed and built for measuring the Doppler shift of light by recording positional changes in the interferometric pattern behind the Fabry-Perot interferometer. The velocity of a surface can be deduced from the Doppler shift which is caused

  9. A Fabry-Perot interferometer system for high-speed velocity measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Bruinsma, A.J.A.; Prinse, W.C.; Smorenburg, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot Velocity Interferometer System (F-PVIS) is designed and built for measuring the Doppler shift of light by recording positional changes in the interferometric pattern behind the Fabry-Perot interferometer. The velocity of a surface can be deduced from the Doppler shift which is caused

  10. Velocity field calculation for non-orthogonal numerical grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-01

    Computational grids containing cell faces that do not align with an orthogonal (e.g. Cartesian, cylindrical) coordinate system are routinely encountered in porous-medium numerical simulations. Such grids are referred to in this study as non-orthogonal grids because some cell faces are not orthogonal to a coordinate system plane (e.g. xy, yz or xz plane in Cartesian coordinates). Non-orthogonal grids are routinely encountered at the Savannah River Site in porous-medium flow simulations for Performance Assessments and groundwater flow modeling. Examples include grid lines that conform to the sloping roof of a waste tank or disposal unit in a 2D Performance Assessment simulation, and grid surfaces that conform to undulating stratigraphic surfaces in a 3D groundwater flow model. Particle tracking is routinely performed after a porous-medium numerical flow simulation to better understand the dynamics of the flow field and/or as an approximate indication of the trajectory and timing of advective solute transport. Particle tracks are computed by integrating the velocity field from cell to cell starting from designated seed (starting) positions. An accurate velocity field is required to attain accurate particle tracks. However, many numerical simulation codes report only the volumetric flowrate (e.g. PORFLOW) and/or flux (flowrate divided by area) crossing cell faces. For an orthogonal grid, the normal flux at a cell face is a component of the Darcy velocity vector in the coordinate system, and the pore velocity for particle tracking is attained by dividing by water content. For a non-orthogonal grid, the flux normal to a cell face that lies outside a coordinate plane is not a true component of velocity with respect to the coordinate system. Nonetheless, normal fluxes are often taken as Darcy velocity components, either naively or with accepted approximation. To enable accurate particle tracking or otherwise present an accurate depiction of the velocity field for a non

  11. Featured Image: The Cosmic Velocity Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    You may have heard of the cosmic web, a network of filaments, clusters and voids that describes the three-dimensional distribution of matter in our universe. But have you ever considered the idea of a cosmic velocity web? In a new study led by Daniel Pomarde (IRFU CEA-Saclay, France), a team of scientists has built a detailed 3D view of the flows in our universe, showing in particular motions along filaments and in collapsing knots. In the image above (click for the full view), surfaces of knots (red) are embedded within surfaces of filaments (grey). The rainbow lines show the flow motion, revealing acceleration (redder tones) toward knots and retardation (bluer tones) beyond them. You can learn more about Pomarde and collaborators work and see their unusual and intriguing visualizationsin the video they produced, below. Check out the original paper for more information.CitationDaniel Pomarde et al 2017 ApJ 845 55. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa7f78

  12. Weakly nonlinear density-velocity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorowski, M J; Chodorowski, Michal J; Lokas, Ewa L

    1996-01-01

    We rigorously derive weakly nonlinear relation between cosmic density and velocity fields up to third order in perturbation theory. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, \\de. The velocity field is described by the variable \\te proportional to the velocity divergence, \\te = - f(\\Omega)^{-1} H_0^{-1} \

  13. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon;

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  14. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  15. Extending the unambiguous velocity range using multiple carrier frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Z.; Jakobsson, A.; Nikolov, Svetoslav;

    2005-01-01

    Typically, velocity estimators based on the estimation of the Doppler shift will suffer from a limited unambiguous velocity range. Proposed are two novel multiple carrier based velocity estimators extending the velocity range above the Nyquist velocity limit. Numerical simulations indicate...

  16. Low-velocity collisions of particles with a dry or wet wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Advait A.; Galvin, Janine E.; Wildemuth, Douglas J.; Davis, Robert H.

    2005-03-01

    Plastic and metal spheres were impacted at low velocities in the range 0.02-0.30 m/s with a quartz plate that was dry or covered with a thin oil layer. Collisions were performed with a specially designed device in the low-gravity environment provided by a KC-135 aircraft. A pendulum-based experimental set-up was also used to perform low-velocity collisions under normal gravity. The dry restitution coefficient (ratio of the rebound velocity and impact velocity) is found to decrease weakly with increasing approach velocity, as is the general case with materials exhibiting inelastic deformation. The wet restitution coefficient is zero below a critical velocity and then increases with the impact velocity before evening out to form a plateau. A simple model for the wet restitution coefficient, ewet=edry(1-Stc/St), was found to adequately predict the restitution coefficient, as has been reported in earlier studies at higher impact velocities, where edry is the dry restitution coefficient, St is the Stokes number and Stc is the critical Stokes number below which no rebound occurs. Surface asperities are seen to cause more scatter in the data at low velocities than at high velocities. The data from pendulum experiments coincide with those collected in low gravity, thereby affirming their applicability for performing low-velocity collisions.

  17. Should tsunami simulations include a nonzero initial horizontal velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Gabriel C.; Nava, Gabriel; Dunham, Eric M.

    2017-08-01

    Tsunami propagation in the open ocean is most commonly modeled by solving the shallow water wave equations. These equations require initial conditions on sea surface height and depth-averaged horizontal particle velocity or, equivalently, horizontal momentum. While most modelers assume that initial velocity is zero, Y.T. Song and collaborators have argued for nonzero initial velocity, claiming that horizontal displacement of a sloping seafloor imparts significant horizontal momentum to the ocean. They show examples in which this effect increases the resulting tsunami height by a factor of two or more relative to models in which initial velocity is zero. We test this claim with a "full-physics" integrated dynamic rupture and tsunami model that couples the elastic response of the Earth to the linearized acoustic-gravitational response of a compressible ocean with gravity; the model self-consistently accounts for seismic waves in the solid Earth, acoustic waves in the ocean, and tsunamis (with dispersion at short wavelengths). Full-physics simulations of subduction zone megathrust ruptures and tsunamis in geometries with a sloping seafloor confirm that substantial horizontal momentum is imparted to the ocean. However, almost all of that initial momentum is carried away by ocean acoustic waves, with negligible momentum imparted to the tsunami. We also compare tsunami propagation in each simulation to that predicted by an equivalent shallow water wave simulation with varying assumptions regarding initial velocity. We find that the initial horizontal velocity conditions proposed by Song and collaborators consistently overestimate the tsunami amplitude and predict an inconsistent wave profile. Finally, we determine tsunami initial conditions that are rigorously consistent with our full-physics simulations by isolating the tsunami waves from ocean acoustic and seismic waves at some final time, and backpropagating the tsunami waves to their initial state by solving the

  18. Extension of migration velocity analysis to transmitted wavefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameloise, Charles-Antoine; Chauris, Hervé

    2016-10-01

    Migration velocity analysis aims at automatically updating the large-scale components of the velocity model, called macromodel. Extended Common Image Gathers are panels used to evaluate focusing after imaging and are constructed as a function of a spatial shift introduced in the imaging condition. We investigate how transmitted waves can also be used in migration velocity analysis: instead of back-propagating the residuals associated with reflected waves, we propose to back-propagate the full wavefield. The image function, equivalent to the migrated section for reflected data, does not exhibit localized events in space along horizons but is still sensitive to the choice of the background velocity model and can thus be coupled to the same objective function defined in the image domain. In order to enhance the benefits of direct waves, we consider a cross-well configuration. Direct waves provide a large illumination between two vertical wells. Associated Common Image Gathers present different characteristics than the ones associated with reflected waves in surface acquisition. In particular, energy is spread over up to the maximum penetration depth. We invert cross-well seismic data along two lines. In the first case, the input data contain the full wavefield dominated by transmitted waves. It demonstrates the possibility to handle transmitted waves to determine the velocity model. It appears that the misfit in the data domain is largely reduced after inversion. In the second case, we use the same algorithm, but with reflected observed data only, as in a classical approach. Most of velocity updates are localized around the reflectivity, leading to an incorrect final model. This demonstrates the benefit of transmitted waves for migration velocity analysis in a cross-well configuration.

  19. Fine structure of Pn velocity beneath Sichuan-Yunnan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄金莉; 宋晓东; 汪素云

    2003-01-01

    We use 23298 Pn arrival-time data from Chinese national and provincial earthquake bulletins to invert fine structure of Pn velocity and anisotropy at the top of the mantle beneath the Sichuan-Yunnan and its adjacent region. The results suggest that the Pn velocity in this region shows significant lateral variation; the Pn velocity varies from 7.7 to 8.3 km/s. The Pn-velocity variation correlates well with the tectonic activity and heat flow of the region. Low Pn velocity is observed in southwest Yunnan , Tengchong volcano area, and the Panxi tectonic area. These areas have very active seismicity and tectonic activity with high surface heat flow. On the other hand, high Pn velocity is observed in some stable regions, such as the central region of the Yangtze Platform; the most pronounced high velocity area is located in the Sichuan Basin, south of Chengdu. Pn anisotropy shows a complex pattern of regional deformation. The Pn fast direction shows a prominent clockwise rotation pattern from east of the Tibetan block to the Sichuan-Yunnan diamond block to southwest Yunnan, which may be related to southeastward escape of the Tibetan Plateau material due to the collision of the Indian Plate to the Eurasia Plate. Thus there appears to be strong correlation between the crustal deformation and the upper mantle structure in the region. The delay times of events and stations show that the crust thickness decreases from the Tibetan Plateau to eastern China, which is consistent with the results from deep seismic sounding.

  20. Relações entre tamanho de sedimentos erodidos, velocidade da enxurrada, rugosidade superficial criada pelo preparo e tamanho de agregados em solo submetido a diferentes manejos Relationships between size of eroded sediments, runoff velocity, surface roughness created by tillage, and size of aggregates in a soil submmited to different managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bochi da Silva Volk

    2009-10-01

    aggregates. Considering that, this work was accomplished with the purpose of establishing quantitative relationships between the D50 index of the size distribution of the soil-eroded sediments, the runoff velocity, the SR index of the tillage-induced soil surface roughness, and the mean weight diameter (MWD of the soil aggregates, in a soil submitted to different forms of management. The study was developed in the field, at the Agricultural Experimentation Station of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (EEA/UFRGS, in Eldorado do Sul (RS, Brazil, by applying simulated rainfall on an Ultisol with a sandy clay loam texture in the surface layer and 0.115 m m-1 average slope steepness. This soil had been put into agricultural use by different manners (continuous and discontinued cultivation, with different crop sequences (winter and summer, grass and legume crop species, planted in rows, using no-tillage, for a 7.5 year period (starting at the original condition of native pasture. Seven erosion tests were performed in the study, each one of them at 63.5 mm h-1 rainfall intensity and 1.5 h duration, using the rotating-boom rainfall simulator and 3.5 x 11.0 m experimental plots. The referred erosion tests were performed in the following soil surface physical conditions: (a non-mobilized soil, with complete and no cover by crop residues, and (b soil successively mobilized by the passage of a light disc-harrow (five times, one at a time, with no cover. It was observed that the crop sequences provided values of the MWD index significantly different each other, which reflected in significantly different values of the SR index and, as consequence, of the runoff velocity and the D50 index, with the sequences with none or less time of discontinued cultivation (in the last period of the research having produced the best results. In the non-mobilized, completely mulch-covered soil, with a firm and smooth surface, the mulch of crop residues was the dominant factor either in reducing

  1. Velocity of climate change algorithms for guiding conservation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Andreas; Roberts, David R; Barber, Quinn E; Carroll, Carlos; Nielsen, Scott E

    2015-02-01

    The velocity of climate change is an elegant analytical concept that can be used to evaluate the exposure of organisms to climate change. In essence, one divides the rate of climate change by the rate of spatial climate variability to obtain a speed at which species must migrate over the surface of the earth to maintain constant climate conditions. However, to apply the algorithm for conservation and management purposes, additional information is needed to improve realism at local scales. For example, destination information is needed to ensure that vectors describing speed and direction of required migration do not point toward a climatic cul-de-sac by pointing beyond mountain tops. Here, we present an analytical approach that conforms to standard velocity algorithms if climate equivalents are nearby. Otherwise, the algorithm extends the search for climate refugia, which can be expanded to search for multivariate climate matches. With source and destination information available, forward and backward velocities can be calculated allowing useful inferences about conservation of species (present-to-future velocities) and management of species populations (future-to-present velocities).

  2. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The use of velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy (VADS) to measure center-of-mass kinetic-energy distributions of nascent photofragments produced in pulsed-initiation photolysis/probe experiments is described and demonstrated. In VADS, pulsed photolysis and probe laser beams counterpropagate through the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The theoretical principles of VADS and the mathematical interpretation of VADS data are explained and illustrated with diagrams; the experimental setup is described; and results for the photodissociation of HI, H2S, and NH3 are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. VADS is shown to give much higher kinetic-energy resolution than conventional Doppler spectroscopy.

  3. Middle and upper crust shear-wave velocity structure of the Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mei; AN Mei-jian

    2007-01-01

    In order to give a more reliable shallow crust model for the Chinese mainland, the present study collected many short-period surface wave data which are better sensitive to shallow earth structures. Different from traditional two-step surface wave tomography, we developed a new linearized surface wave dispersion inversion method to directly get a 3D S-wave velocity model in the second step instead of inverting for 1D S-velocity profile cell by cell. We convert all the regionalized dispersions into linear constraints for a 3D S-velocity model. Checkerboard tests show that this method can give reasonable results. The distribution of the middle- and upper-crust shear-wave velocity of the Chinese mainland in our model is strongly heterogeneous and related to different geotectonic terrains. Low-velocity anomalies delineated very well most of the major sedimentary basins of China. And the variation of velocities at different depths gives an indication of basement depth of the basins. The western Tethyan tectonic domain (on the west of the 95°E longitude) is characterized by low velocity, while the eastern Tethyan domain does not show obvious low velocity. Since petroleum resources often distribute in sedimentary basins where low-velocity anomaly appears, the low velocity anomalies in the western Tethyan domain may indicate a better petroleum prospect than in its eastern counterpart. Besides, low velocity anomaly in the western Tethyan domain and around the Xing'an orogenic belt may be partly caused by high crustal temperature. The weak low-velocity belt along ~105°E longitude corresponds to the N-S strong seismic belt of central China.

  4. The critical velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Prampero, Pietro E; Dekerle, Jeanne; Capelli, Carlo; Zamparo, Paola

    2008-01-01

    In supra-maximal exercise to exhaustion, the critical velocity (cv) is conventionally calculated from the slope of the distance (d) versus time (t) relationship: d = I + St. I is assumed to be the distance covered at the expense of the anaerobic capacity, S the speed maintained on the basis of the subject's maximal O(2) uptake (VO2max) This approach is based on two assumptions: (1) the energy cost of locomotion per unit distance (C) is constant and (2) VO2max is attained at the onset of exercise. Here we show that cv and the anaerobic distance (d (anaer)) can be calculated also in swimming, where C increases with the velocity, provided that VO2max its on-response, and the C versus v relationship are known. d (anaer) and cv were calculated from published data on maximal swims for the four strokes over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m, on 20 elite male swimmers (18.9 +/- 0.9 years, 75.9 +/- 6.4 kg), whose VO2max and C versus speed relationship were determined, and compared to I and S obtained from the conventional approach. cv was lower than S (4, 16, 7 and 11% in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl) and I (=11.6 m on average in the four strokes) was lower than d (anaer). The latter increased with the distance: average, for all strokes: 38.1, 60.6 and 81.3 m over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m. It is concluded that the d versus t relationship should be utilised with some caution when evaluating performance in swimmers.

  5. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...

  6. Explore Seismic Velocity Change Associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung Earthquake by Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chin-Shang; Wu, Yih-Min; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Huang, Win-Gee; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A ML 6.4 earthquake occurred on 4 March 2010 in Kaohsiung, the southern part of Taiwan, this shallow earthquake is the largest one of that area in the past few years. Some damages occurred on buildings and bridges after the earthquake, obvious surface deformation up to few cm was observed and the transportation including road and train traffic was also affected near the source area. Some studies about monitoring the velocity change induced by the big earthquake were carried out recently, most of studies used cross-correlation of the ambient noise-based method and indicated velocity drop was observed immediately after the big earthquake. However, this method is not able to constrain the depth of velocity change, and need to assume a homogeneous seismic velocity change during the earthquake. In this study, we selected 25 broadband seismic stations in the southern Taiwan and time period is from 2009/03 to 2011/03. Then we explored the velocity change associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake by applying ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. ANT is a way of using interferometry to image subsurface seismic velocity variations by using surface wave dispersions extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation of seismic station-pairs, then the 2-D group velocity map with different periods could be extracted. Compare to ambient noise-based cross-correlation analysis, we estimated sensitivity kernel of dispersion curves and converted 2-D group velocity map from "with the period" to "with the depth" to have more constraints on the depth of velocity change. By subtracting shear velocity between "before" and "after" the earthquake, we could explore velocity change associated with the earthquake. Our result shows velocity reduction about 5-10% around the focal depth after the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake and the post-seismic velocity recovery was observed with time period increasing, which may suggest a healing process of damaged rocks.

  7. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  8. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachau, R. D. M.; Trucano, T. G.; Yew, C. H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage 'gouging' on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a 'hump' in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  9. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  10. VELOCITY FIELD IN SHIP WAVES ON THE VISCOUS FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏嘉; 陶明德

    2002-01-01

    From the Navier-Stokes equations, the integral expressions of the free-surface elevation and the velocity field in ship waves of a moving waterborne body are obtained.Next, Lighthill's two-stage scheme is employed to change the above-mentioned integral expressions to algebraic expressions.Compared with the results obtained when the seawater is idealized to an inviscid fluid, the singularities are dispelled or weakened, and the accuracy of the digit information of ship waves is improved.

  11. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Methenitis Spyridon; Terzis Gerasimos; Zaras Nikolaos; Stasinaki Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fifteen moder...

  12. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Terzis, Gerasimos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fift...

  13. Measurement of the velocity of a quantum object: A role of phase and group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Mikaila; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider the motion of a quantum particle in a free space. Introducing an explicit measurement procedure for velocity, we demonstrate that the measured velocity is related to the group and phase velocities of the corresponding matter waves. We show that for long distances the measured velocity coincides with the matter wave group velocity. We discuss the possibilities to demonstrate these effects for the optical pulses in coherently driven media or for radiation propagating in waveguides.

  14. VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector): Line-imaging interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique that extends velocity measurements from single points to a line. Single-frequency argon laser light was focused through a cylindrical lens to illuminate a line on a surface. The initially stationary, flat surface was accelerated unevenly during the experiment. Motion produced a Doppler-shift of light reflected from the surface that was proportional to the velocity at each point. The Doppler-shifted image of the illuminated line was focused from the surface through a push-pull VISAR interferometer where the light was split into four quadrature-coded images. When the surface accelerated, the Doppler-shift caused the interference for each point on each line image to oscillate sinusoidally. Coherent fiber optic bundles transmitted images from the interferometer to an electronic streak camera for sweeping in time and recording on film. Data reduction combined the images to yield a continuous velocity and displacement history for all points on the surface that reflected sufficient light. The technique was demonstrated in an experiment where most of the surface was rapidly driven to a saddle shape by an exploding foil. Computer graphics were used to display the measured velocity history and to aid visualization of the surface motion. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  16. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  17. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  18. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  19. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  20. Experimental study on the ejecta-velocity distributions caused by low-velocity impacts on quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, S.; Arakawa, M.; Suzuki, A. I.; Yasui, M.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Regolith formation on asteroids is caused by successive impacts of small bodies. The ejecta velocity distribution during the crater formation process is one of the most important physical properties related to the surface-evolution process, and the distribution is also necessary to reconstruct the planetary-accretion process among planetesimals. The surface of small bodies, such as asteroids and planetesimals in the solar system, could have varying porosity, strength, and density, and the impact velocity could vary across a wide range from a few tens of m/s to several km/s. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct impact experiments by changing the physical properties of the target and the projectile in a wide velocity range in order to constrain the crater-formation process applicable to the small bodies in the solar system. Housen and Holsapple (2011) compiled the data of ejecta velocity distribution with various impact velocities, porosities, grain sizes, grain shapes, and strengths of the targets, and they improved their ejecta scaling law. But the ejecta velocity data is not enough for varying projectile densities and for impact velocities less than 1 km/s. In this study, to investigate the projectile density dependence of the ejecta velocity distribution at a low velocity region, we conducted impact experiments with projectile densities from 1.1 to 11.3 g/cm^3. Then, we try to determine the effect of projectile density on the ejecta velocity distribution by means of the observation of each individual ejecta grain. Experimental methods: We made impact cratering experiments by using a vertical-type one-stage light-gas gun (V-LGG) set at Kobe University. Targets were quartz sand (irregular shape) and glass beads (spherical shape) with the grain size of 500 μ m (porosity 44.7 %). The target container with the size of 30 cm was set in a large vacuum chamber with air pressure less than 10^3 Pa. The projectile materials that we used were lead, copper

  1. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yulin; Li, Bin; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values.

  2. Cohesive zone length of metagabbro at supershear rupture velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Eiichi; Xu, Shiqing; Yamashita, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear rupture. The strain array data along the sliding fault surfaces were obtained during the large-scale biaxial friction experiments at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience. These friction experiments were done using a pair of meter-scale metagabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5 m × 0.1 m. A 2.6-MPa normal stress was applied with loading velocity of 0.1 mm/s. Near-fault strain was measured by 32 two-component semiconductor strain gauges installed at an interval of 50 mm and 10 mm off the fault and recorded at an interval of 1 MHz. Many stick-slip events were observed in the experiments. We chose ten unilateral rupture events that propagated with supershear rupture velocity without preceding foreshocks. Focusing on the rupture front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the ruptured area. The temporal variation of strain array data is converted to the spatial variation of strain assuming a constant rupture velocity. We picked up the peak strain and zero-crossing strain locations to measure the cohesive zone length. By compiling the stick-slip event data, the cohesive zone length is about 50 mm although it scattered among the events. We could not see any systematic variation at the location but some dependence on the rupture velocity. The cohesive zone length decreases as the rupture velocity increases, especially larger than √{2} times the shear wave velocity. This feature is consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  3. Refinement of turbulent flow velocity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Bryanskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic laws of Prandtl semi-empirical turbulence theory were analyzed in the article. It was shown, that the Prandtl – Nikuradse logarithmic distribution of velocities are not strictly universal. The change of the first and second turbulence constants was analyzed on the basis of experimental data of I. Nikuradse. The logarithmic velocity profiles for smooth and rough pipes have been transformed. A united velocity logarithmic profile for flows in pipes, appropriate for any rate of hydraulic resistance was received. A more precise, consistent with the resistance laws, description of the kinematic structure of the flow with varying parameters of the velocity profiles was set. It was shown that the position of the average velocity point for the flow in pipe remained constant when the parameters of the velocity profile changed.

  4. VELOCITY PROFILES OF TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dianchang; WANG Xingkui; YU Mingzhong; LI Danxun

    2001-01-01

    The log-law and the wake law of velocity profile for open channel flows are discussed and compared in this paper. Experimental data from eight sources are used to verify the velocity distribution models.The effect of bed level on the velocity profile is analyzed. A formula to calculate the maximum velocity is proposed. In the region of y <δm , the velocity profile approximately follows the log-law. For the region of y >δm , the effect of the aspect ratio is considered. A new velocity profile model on the basis of log-law that can unify all of the hydraulic bed roughness is presented.

  5. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  6. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  7. Decreased group velocity in compositionally graded films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical formalism is presented that describes the group velocity of electromagnetic signals in compositionally graded films. The theory is first based on effective medium approximation or the Maxwell-Garnett approximation to obtain the equivalent dielectric function in a z slice. Then the effective dielectric tensor of the graded film is directly determined, and the group velocities for ordinary and extraordinary waves in the film are derived. It is found that the group velocity is sensitively dependent on the graded profile. For a power-law graded profile f(x)=ax(m), increasing m results in the decreased extraordinary group velocity. Such a decreased tendency becomes significant when the incident angle increases. Therefore the group velocity in compositionally graded films can be effectively decreased by our suitable adjustment of the total volume fraction, the graded profile, and the incident angle. As a result, the compositionally graded films may serve as candidate material for realizing small group velocity.

  8. Gas-rise velocities during kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.B. (Sedco Forex (FR))

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on experiments to examine gas migration rates in drilling muds that were performed in a 15-m-long, 200-mm-ID inclinable flow loop where air injection simulates gas entry during a kick. These tests were conducted using a xanthum gum (a common polymer used in drilling fluids) solution to simulate drilling muds as the liquid phase and air as the gas phase. This work represents a significant extension of existing correlations for gas/liquid flows in large pipe diameters with non- Newtonian fluids. Bubbles rise faster in drilling muds than in water despite the increased viscosity. This surprising result is caused by the change in the flow regime, with large slug-type bubbles forming at lower void fractions. The gas velocity is independent of void fraction, thus simplifying flow modeling. Results show that a gas influx will rise faster in a well than previously believed. This has major implications for kick simulation, with gas arriving at the surface earlier than would be expected and the gas outflow rate being higher than would have been predicted. A model of the two-phase gas flow in drilling mud, including the results of this work, has been incorporated into the joint Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR)/BP Intl. kick model.

  9. Statistics of Peculiar Velocities from Cosmic Strings

    OpenAIRE

    Moessner, R.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the probability distribution of a single component of peculiar velocities due to cosmic strings, smoothed over regions with a radius of several $h^{-1}$ Mpc. The probability distribution is shown to be Gaussian to good accuracy, in agreement with the distribution of peculiar velocities deduced from the 1.9 Jy IRAS redshift survey. Using the normalization of parameters of the cosmic string model from CMB measurements, we show that the rms values for peculiar velocities inferred fr...

  10. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  11. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...

  12. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  13. A method for determining critical swimming velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Wakayoshi, K; Hayashi, A; Sakaguchi, Y; Kitagawa, K

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the critical swimming velocity (Vcri) estimated by the swimming velocity for a distance of 300 m at maximal effort breaststroke reflects the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Twelve trained swimmers swam 50 m, 300 m and 2 000 m at maximal effort for determination of Vcri that averaged 1.167 +/- 0.045 m . sec (-1). Since Vcri was equivalent to 90.5 % of the mean swimming velocity over the distance of 300 m at maximal effort, the swimming velocity obtained by multiplying the swimming velocity for the distance of 300 m of each subject by 90.5 % was taken to be 100 % of the predicted critical swimming velocity (Vcri-pred). Then, in an MLSS test, the subjects were instructed to swim breaststroke 2 000 m (5 x 400 m) at three constant velocities (98 %, 100 %, and 102 % of Vcri-pred), interrupted by four short rest periods from 30 to 45 seconds for blood sampling and heart rate measurement. As a result, the blood lactate concentration at 100 % Vcri-pred showed a higher steady state than the slow velocity, but at high velocity did not show the steady state. In conclusion, we can accurately estimate the Vcri for breaststroke by a one-time 300-m maximal effort swimming test.

  14. Measurment of threshold friction velocities at potential dust sources in semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew A.

    The threshold friction velocities of potential dust sources in the US Southwest were measured in the field using a Portable Wind Tunnel, which is based on the Desert Research Institute's Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Laboratory (PI-SWERL). A mix of both disturbed and undisturbed surfaces were included in this study. It was found that disturbed surfaces, such as those at the Iron King Mine tailings site, which is part of the EPA's Superfund program and contains surface concentrations of arsenic and lead reaching as high as 0.5% (w/w), had lower threshold friction velocities (0.32 m s -1 to 0.40 m s-1) in comparison to those of undisturbed surfaces (0.48 to 0.61 m s-1). Surface characteristics, such as particle size distribution, had effects on the threshold friction velocity (smaller grain sized distributions resulted in lower threshold friction velocities). Overall, the threshold friction velocities of disturbed surfaces were within the range of natural wind conditions, indicating that surfaces disturbed by human activity are more prone to causing windblown dust.

  15. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Measured Shallow Soil Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, B. A.; Louie, J.; Beeston, H. E.; Skidmore, V.; Concha, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Las Vegas valley in Nevada is a deep (up to 5 km) alluvial basin filled with interlayered gravels, sands, and clays. The climate is arid. The water table ranges from a few meters to many tens of meters deep. Laterally extensive thin carbonate-cemented lenses are commonly found across parts of the valley. Lenses range beyond 2 m in thickness, and occur at depths exceeding 200 m. Shallow seismic datasets have been collected at approximately ten sites around the Las Vegas valley, to characterize shear and compression wave velocities in the near surface. Purposes for the surveys include modeling of ground response to dynamic loads, both natural and manmade, quantification of soil stiffness to aid structural foundation design, and non-intrusive materials identification. Borehole-based measurement techniques used include downhole and crosshole, to depths exceeding 100 m. Surface-based techniques used include refraction and three different methods involving inversion of surface-wave dispersion datasets. This latter group includes two active-source techniques, the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method and the Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method; and a new passive-source technique, the Refraction Mictrotremor (ReMi) method. Depths to halfspace for the active-source measurements ranged beyond 50 m. The passive-source method constrains shear wave velocities to 100 m depths. As expected, the stiff cemented layers profoundly affect local velocity gradients. Scale effects are evident in comparisons of (1) very local measurements typified by borehole methods, to (2) the broader coverage of the SASW and MASW measurements, to (3) the still broader and deeper resolution made possible by the ReMi measurements. The cemented layers appear as sharp spikes in the downhole datasets and are problematic in crosshole measurements due to refraction. The refraction method is useful only to locate the depth to the uppermost cemented layer. The surface

  16. The statistical properties of sea ice velocity fields

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Sahil

    2016-01-01

    Thorndike (1982, 1986b) argued that the surface pressure field over the Arctic Ocean can be treated as an isotropic, stationary, homogeneous, Gaussian random field and thereby estimated a number of covariance functions from two years (1979 and 1980) of data. Given the active interest in changes of general circulation quantities and indices in the polar regions during the recent few decades, the spatial correlations in sea ice velocity fields are of particular interest. We ask how persistent are these correlations? To this end, we develop a stochastic model for Arctic sea ice velocity fields based on a multi-fractal analysis of observed sea ice velocity fields from satellites and buoys for the period 1978 - 2012. Having previously found that the Arctic Equivalent Ice Extent (EIE) has a white noise structure on annual to bi-annual time scales (Agarwal et al. 2012), we assess the connection between EIE and ice motion. We demonstrate the long-term stationarity of the spatial correlation structure of the velocity ...

  17. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. A study of the river velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung Yang, Han; Lun Chiang, Jie

    2013-04-01

    Velocity measurement technology can be traced back to the pitot tube velocity measurement method in the 18th century and today's velocity measurement technology use the acoustic and radar technology, with the Doppler principle developed technology advances, in order to develop the measurement method is more suitable for the measurement of velocity, the purpose is to get a more accurate measurement data and with the surface velocity theory, the maximum velocity theory and the indicator theory to obtain the mean velocity. As the main research direction of this article is to review the literature of the velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods, and to explore the applicability of the measurement method of the velocity measurement instruments, and then to describe the advantages and disadvantages of the different mean velocity profiles analysis method. Adequate review of the references of this study will be able to provide a reference for follow-up study of the velocity measurement. Review velocity measurement literature that different velocity measurement is required to follow the different flow conditions measured be upgraded its accuracy, because each flow rate measurement method has its advantages and disadvantages. Traditional velocity instrument can be used at low flow and RiverRAD microwave radar or imaging technology measurement method may be applied in high flow. In the tidal river can use the ADCP to quickly measure river vertical velocity distribution. In addition, urban rivers may be used the CW radar to set up on the bridge, and wide rivers can be used RiverRAD microwave radar to measure the velocities. Review the relevant literature also found that using Ultrasonic Doppler Current Profiler with the Chiu's theory to the velocity of observing automation work can save manpower and resources to improve measurement accuracy, reduce the risk of measurement, but the great variability of river characteristics in Taiwan and a lot of drifting floating

  19. Projectile Velocity and Crater Formation in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravitra Chaikulngamdee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the velocity of impact and maximum crater diameter was found for two steel balls dropped into water using 300 fps video. The maximum diameter of the crater was found to be proportional to the impact velocity and independent of the diameter of the ball.

  20. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.;

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa...