WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface transportation implications

  1. Ternary Complexation on Bacterial Surfaces: Implications for Subsurface Anion Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, L. C.; Higginbottom, C. M.; Fowle, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological controls on contaminant mobilities in aquatic ecosystems must be determined to establish the threat that contamination poses to the environment. Quantitative models of contaminant mobilities are required as a prerequisite to guide remediation efforts and to prioritize the potential hazard to the ecosystem of each contaminated site. It is well established that mineral surface adsorption is an important control on contaminant mobilities, and many studies have utilized thermodynamics to quantify metal/organic adsorption in order to yield predictive models of contaminant transport. However, these models of contaminant transport may not be representative of the reactions which control contaminant mobilities as most mineral surfaces are coated with organic acids, bacteria, and extracellular polymers. Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated that bacterial cell walls have a high affinity for binding metal cations, and field studies indicate that a significant proportion of bacteria cells and associated extracellular matrices are coated with small scale hydrous metal oxides. The small size of bacteria, and in many cases the nanoscale of their associated mineral phases, suggests these bacteria-mineral composites may represent a large proportion of surface area exposed to fluid flow. Therefore, due to the affinity of bacterial cell walls for cations and biominerals, bacteria may also have a significant impact on anionic contaminant mobility in many natural systems. The extent of metal-bacteria adsorption reactions varies drastically as a function of pH and solution chemistry. Current adsorption models have focused on the interactions of positively charged metal cations with bacterial surfaces, however in many oxidizing environments metals such as Cr exist as anions or anionic complexes. We have studied the ability of non-metabolizing cells of the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrifaciens to adsorb aqueous Cr

  2. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Doorn, Stephen K

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  3. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  4. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of surface ozone (O3 concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage

  5. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kan; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George; Zhang, Jiachen; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Yanli; Tao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    The response of surface ozone (O3) concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR) analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage between basin-scale SST

  6. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  7. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  8. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) geochemical transport modeling is used to demonstrate the effects of speciation and sorption reactions on the ground-water transport of Np and Pu, two redox-sensitive elements. Earlier 1D simulations (Reardon, 1981) considered the kinetically limited dissolution of calcite and its effect on ion-exchange reactions (involving 90Sr, Ca, Na, Mg and K), and documented the spatial variation of a 90Sr partition coefficient under both transient and steady-state chemical conditions. In contrast, the simulations presented here assume local equilibrium for all reactions, and consider sorption on constant potential, rather than constant charge, surfaces. Reardon's (1981) seminal findings on the spatial and temporal variability of partitioning (of 90Sr) are reexamined and found partially caused by his assumption of a kinetically limited reaction. In the present work, sorption is assumed the predominant retardation process controlling Pu and Np transport, and is simulated using a diffuse-double-layer-surface-complexation (DDLSC) model. Transport simulations consider the infiltration of Np- and Pu-contaminated waters into an initially uncontaminated environment, followed by the cleanup of the resultant contamination with uncontaminated water. Simulations are conducted using different spatial distributions of sorption capacities (with the same total potential sorption capacity, but with different variances and spatial correlation structures). Results obtained differ markedly from those that would be obtained in transport simulations using constant Kd, Langmuir or Freundlich sorption models. When possible, simulation results (breakthrough curves) are fitted to a constant K d advection-dispersion transport model and compared. Functional differences often are great enough that they prevent a meaningful fit of the simulation results with a constant K d (or even a Langmuir or Freundlich) model, even in the case of Np, a weakly sorbed radionuclide under the

  9. Implication of surface modified NZVI particle retention in the porous media: Assessment with the help of 1-D transport model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trishikhi Raychoudhury; Vikranth Kumar Surasani

    2017-06-01

    Retention of surface-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles in the porous media near the point of injection has been reported in the recent studies. Retention of excess particles in porous media can alter the media properties. The main objectives of this study are, therefore, to evaluate the effect of particle retention on the porous media properties and its implication on further NZVI particle transport under different flow conditions. To achieve the objectives, a one-dimensional transport model is developed by considering particle deposition, detachment, and straining mechanisms along with the effect of changes in porosity resulting from retention of NZVI particles. Two different flow conditions are considered for simulations. The first is a constant Darcy’s flow rate condition, which assumes a change in porosity, causes a change in pore water velocity and the second, is a constant head condition, which assumes the change in porosity, influence the permeability and hydraulic conductivity (thus Darcy’s flow rate). Overall a rapid decrease in porosity was observed as a result of high particle retention near the injection points resulting in a spatial distribution of deposition rate coefficient. In the case of constant head condition, the spatial distribution of Darcy’s velocities is predicted due to variation in porosity and hydraulic conductivity. The simulation results are compared with the data reported from the field studies; which suggests straining is likely to happen in the real field condition.

  10. Observed and modeled surface Lagrangian transport between coastal regions in the Adriatic Sea with implications for marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Griffa, Annalisa; Zambianchi, Enrico; Suaria, Giuseppe; Corgnati, Lorenzo; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Russo, Aniello; Bellomo, Lucio; Mantovani, Carlo; Celentano, Paolo; Molcard, Anne; Borghini, Mireno

    2016-04-01

    Surface drifters and virtual particles are used to investigate transport between seven coastal regions in the central and southern Adriatic Sea to estimate the degree to which these regions function as a network. Alongshore coastal currents and cyclonic gyres are the primary circulation features that connected regions in the Adriatic Sea. The historical drifter observations span 25 years and, thus, provide estimates of transport between regions realized by the mean surface circulation. The virtual particle trajectories and a dedicated drifter experiment show that southeasterly Sirocco winds can drive eastward cross-Adriatic transport from the Italian coast near the Gargano Promontory to the Dalmatian Islands in Croatia. Southeasterly winds disrupt alongshore transport on the west coast. Northwesterly Mistral winds enhanced east-to-west transport and resulted in stronger southeastward coastal currents in the western Adriatic current (WAC) and export to the northern Ionian Sea. The central Italian regions showed strong connections from north to south, likely realized by alongshore transport in the WAC. Alongshore, downstream transport was weaker on the east coast, likely due to the more complex topography introduced by the Dalmatian Islands of Croatia. Cross-Adriatic connection percentages were higher for east-to-west transport. Cross-Adriatic transport, in general, occurred via the cyclonic sub-gyres, with westward (eastward) transport observed in the northern (southern) arms of the central and southern gyres.

  11. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm−2 h−1. Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na+ transport at a rate of 5 μL cm−2 h−1. Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na+ transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [3H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of 22Na+ was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5–10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na+ channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:26333829

  12. A pre-Paleogene unconformity surface of the Sikeshu Sag, Junggar Basin: Lithological, geophysical and geochemical implications for the transportation of hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyue Gao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unconformity surface at the bottom of the Paleogene is one of the most important migration pathways in the Sikeshu Sag of the Junggar Basin, which consists of three layers: upper coarse clastic rock, lower weathering crust and leached zone. The upper coarse clastic rock is characterized by higher density and lower SDT and gamma-ray logging parameters, while the lower weathering crust displays opposite features. The transport coefficient of the unconformity surface is controlled by its position in respect to the basal sandstone; it is higher in the ramp region but lower in the adjacent uplifted and sag areas. The content of saturated hydrocarbons increases with the decrease of the content of non-hydrocarbons and asphaltenes. The content of benzo[c] carbazole decreases as the content of benzo[a] carbazole and [alkyl carbazole]/[alkyl + benzo carbazole] increases. This suggests that the unconformity surface is an efficient medium for the transportation of hydrocarbons.

  13. The roles of fluid transport and surface reaction in reaction-induced fracturing, with implications for the development of mesh textures in serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The distinct element method was used to simulate chemical-mechanical-hydraulic processes that occur during serpentinization (volume-increasing hydration) within the oceanic lithosphere. The proposed model considers water transported in two ways: advective flow along fractures and through matrices. Variations in fracture pattern and system evolution were examined using two nondimensional parameters: the ratios of the rates of flow in fracture ( Ψ F) and matrix ( Ψ M) to the surface reaction rate. In cases of fixed Ψ F and Ψ M with sufficiently low reaction rates, the fracture pattern is not dependent on the surface reaction rate. Otherwise, the fracture pattern varies systematically as a function of Ψ F and Ψ M. At low Ψ F (≤1) and low Ψ M (≤1), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms fine fractures layer by layer. At high Ψ F (≥10,000) and low Ψ M (≤10), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms polygonal fracture networks. As Ψ M increases (>100), the reaction tends to proceed homogeneously from the boundaries without fracturing. A comparison of natural and simulated textures reveals that the following conditions are necessary to develop mesh textures during serpentinization in the oceanic lithosphere. (1) The surface reaction rate must be similar to or higher than the fluid flow rate in the matrix (or than the diffusive transport of water), and much lower than the fluid flow rate along fractures. (2) Original olivine grain boundaries act as pathways for fluid transport; these pathways may result from thermal or tectonic stress-induced cracking prior to serpentinization.

  14. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Kundu, Nilay

    2015-01-01

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an applic...

  15. Vacancy Transport and Interactions on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0317 VACANCY TRANSPORT AND INTERACTIONS ON METAL SURFACES Gert Ehrlich UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN Final Report 03/06/2014...30, 2012 Gert Ehrlich , PI Abstract This proposal is a study of vacancy transport and vacancy interaction on metal surfaces. Adatom self...Trembułowicz, Gert Ehrlich , Grażyna Antczak,Surface diffusion of gold on quasihexagonal-reconstructed Au(100) ,Physical Review B 84 (2011) 245445-1

  16. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, Jay [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles andInternational Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kundu, Nilay [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)

    2016-06-06

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  17. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Kundu, Nilay

    2016-06-01

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  18. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  19. Aspheric surface testing by irradiance transport equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomali, Ramin; Darudi, Ahmad; Nasiri, Sadollah; Asgharsharghi Bonab, Armir

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a method for aspheric surface testing is presented. The method is based on solving the Irradiance Transport Equation (ITE).The accuracy of ITE normally depends on the amount of the pick to valley of the phase distribution. This subject is investigated by a simulation procedure.

  20. Magnetic Flux Transport at the Solar Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, J; Cameron, R H; Solanki, S K; Gizon, L; Upton, L

    2014-01-01

    After emerging to the solar surface, the Sun's magnetic field displays a complex and intricate evolution. The evolution of the surface field is important for several reasons. One is that the surface field, and its dynamics, sets the boundary condition for the coronal and heliospheric magnetic fields. Another is that the surface evolution gives us insight into the dynamo process. In particular, it plays an essential role in the Babcock-Leighton model of the solar dynamo. Describing this evolution is the aim of the surface flux transport model. The model starts from the emergence of magnetic bipoles. Thereafter, the model is based on the induction equation and the fact that after emergence the magnetic field is observed to evolve as if it were purely radial. The induction equation then describes how the surface flows -- differential rotation, meridional circulation, granular, supergranular flows, and active region inflows -- determine the evolution of the field (now taken to be purely radial). In this paper, we...

  1. INFLUENCE OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ON ARMORED SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katinka KOLL; Andreas DITTRICH

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to study the characteristics of sediment transport in steep streams. The question is discussed wether an armoured surfaces is destroyed due to the transport of material, because additional impulses are acting on it, or the layer is sheltered by the transported material, because a part of the stream power is used to move the material. According to the results of the presented experiments, in which the influence of the feeding rate and the feeding duration have been investigated, transported material reaching an armoured river section from upstream always remobilzes bed material, which is immobile under clear water flow conditions. To decide if a static armour layer is either destroyed or not, two simple criteria were chosen: oneconsidering the grain-size distribution of the eroded bed material, and another, which referes to the amount of eroded bed material.

  2. School Transportation Issues, Laws and Concerns: Implications for Future Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durick, Jody M.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all building administrators are confronted with a variety of transportation issues. Challenges, concerns and questions can arise from various aspects, including student misbehaviors, transportation laws and its implications at the school level, to importance and implementation of a school bus safety program. As new and upcoming future…

  3. Transport of Aerosols: Regional and Global Implications for Climate, Weather, and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine; Kahn, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant impact on global climate, regional weather, and local air quality. In this study, we use a global model GOCART together with satellite data and ground-based measurements to assess the emission and transport of pollution, dust, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols and their implications. In particular, we will show the impact of emissions and long-range transport of aerosols from major pollution and dust source regions to (1) the surface air quality, (2) the atmospheric heating rates, and (3) surface radiation change near the source and downwind regions.

  4. A different route to health: implications of transport policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dora, Carlos [World Health Organisation, European Centre for Environment and Health, Rome (Italy)

    1999-06-19

    This paper presents a review of the health implications of transport policies covering the health benefits of walking and cycling, the high level of accidents and injuries related to cars, the impact of road transport on climate change and air pollution, the noise factor, and psychosocial effects due to busy streets discouraging walking and cycling. The need to evaluate the health costs of transport policies is examined. (uk)

  5. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  6. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  7. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section 1926... Explosives § 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives. (a) Transportation of explosives shall meet the... Carriers. (b) Motor vehicles or conveyances transporting explosives shall only be driven by, and be in the...

  8. Life Sciences Implications of Lunar Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Abercromby, Andrew F.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document preliminary, predicted, life sciences implications of expected operational concepts for lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). Algorithms developed through simulation and testing in lunar analog environments were used to predict crew metabolic rates and ground reaction forces experienced during lunar EVA. Subsequently, the total metabolic energy consumption, the daily bone load stimulus, total oxygen needed, and other variables were calculated and provided to Human Research Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate stakeholders. To provide context to the modeling, the report includes an overview of some scenarios that have been considered. Concise descriptions of the analog testing and development of the algorithms are also provided. This document may be updated to remain current with evolving lunar or other planetary surface operations, assumptions and concepts, and to provide additional data and analyses collected during the ongoing analog research program.

  9. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South...in mathematical methods for detecting key Lagrangian transport structures in velocity field data sets for spatially complex, time- dependent, ocean...surface flows. Such transport structures are typically not inherently obvious in snapshots of the Eulerian velocity field and require analysis

  10. Lagrangian Transport Through Surfaces in Volume-Preserving Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advective transport of scalar quantities through surfaces is of fundamental importance in many scientific applications. From the Eulerian perspective of the surface it can be quantified by the well-known integral of the flux density. The recent development of highly accurate semi-Lagrangian methods for solving scalar conservation laws and of Lagrangian approaches to coherent structures in turbulent (geophysical) fluid flows necessitate a new approach to transport from the (Lagrangian) material perspective. We present a Lagrangian framework for calculating transport of conserved quantities through a given surface in $n$-dimensional, fully aperiodic, volume-preserving flows. Our approach does not involve any dynamical assumptions on the surface or its boundary.

  11. 76 FR 50312 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... transportation safety planning strategies for surface transportation systems and improvements; (5) Improving... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program...

  12. Nonlinear Transport In Gases, Traps And Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuvakov, M.; Marjanovic, S.

    2010-07-01

    We will present our numerical study of three different charge transport processes and we will compare properties, specially the nonlinearity, of these processes. First process is electron transport in gases in swarm regime. We used well tested Monte Carlo techique to investigate kinetic phenomena such as negative diferencial conductivity (NDC) or negative apsolute mobility (NAM). We explain these phenomena analysing the spatial profiles of the swarm and collision events. In the second part we will apply the same technique on positron transport to obtain the same level of understanding of positron transport as has been achieved for electrons. The influence of positronium formation, non-conservative process, is much larger than any comparable effects in electron transport due to attachment and/or ionisation. As a result several new phenomena have been observed, such as NDC for the bulk drift velocity. Additionaly, the same Monte Carlo technique is used for modeling and optimisation of Surko like positron traps in different geometries and field configurations. Third process we studied is the charge transport under voltage bias via single-electron tunnelings through the junctions between metallic particles on nanoparticle films. We show how the regular nanoparticle array and topologically inhomogeneous nanonetworks affect the charge transport. We find long-range correlations in the time series of charge fluctuation at individual nanoparticles and of flow along the junctions within the network. These correlations explain the occurrence of a large non-linearity in the simulated and experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics and non-Gaussian fluctuations of the current at the electrode.

  13. Oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Qin, Qi Hang; Shah, Ali; Ras, Robin H. A.; Tian, Xuelin; Jokinen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Directional liquid transportation is important for a variety of biological processes and technical applications. Although surface engineering through asymmetric chemical modification or geometrical patterning facilitates effective liquid manipulation and enables water droplet self-transportation on synthetic surfaces, self-transportation of oil droplets poses a major challenge because of their low surface tension. We report oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces that are microtextured with radial arrays of undercut stripes. More significantly, we observe three modes of oil motion on various sample surfaces, namely, inward transportation, pinned, and outward spreading, which can be switched by the structure parameters, including stripe intersection angle and width. Accompanying theoretical modeling provides an in-depth mechanistic understanding of the structure–droplet motion relationship. Finally, we reveal how to optimize the texture parameters to maximize oil droplet self-transportation capability and demonstrate spontaneous droplet movement for liquids down to a surface tension of 22.4 mN/m. The surfaces presented here open up new avenues for power-free liquid transportation and oil contamination self-removal applications in various analytical and fluidic devices. PMID:27386574

  14. Interannual variability of surface and bottom sediment transport on the Laptev Sea shelf during summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wegner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sediment transport dynamics were studied during ice-free conditions under different atmospheric circulation regimes on the Laptev Sea shelf (Siberian Arctic. To study the interannual variability of suspended particulate matter (SPM dynamics and their coupling with the variability in surface river water distribution on the Laptev Sea detailed oceanographic, optical (turbidity and Ocean Color satellite data, and hydrochemical (nutrients, SPM, stable oxygen isotopes process studies were carried out continuously during the summers of 2007 and 2008. Thus, for the first time SPM and nutrient variations on the Laptev Sea shelf under different atmospheric forcing and the implications for the turbidity and transparency of the water column can be presented.

    The data indicate a clear link between different surface distributions of riverine waters and the SPM transport dynamics within the entire water column. The summer of 2007 was dominated by shoreward winds and an eastward transport of riverine surface waters. The surface SPM concentration on the south-eastern inner shelf was elevated, which led to decreased transmissivity and increased light absorption. Surface SPM concentrations in the Central and Northern Laptev Sea were comparatively low. However, the SPM transport and concentration within the bottom nepheloid layer increased considerably on the entire eastern shelf. The summer of 2008 was dominated by offshore-winds and northwards transport of the river plume. The surface SPM transport was enhanced and extended onto the mid-shelf whereas the bottom SPM transport and concentration was diminished. This study suggests that the SPM concentration and transport in both, the surface and bottom nepheloid layers, are associated with the distribution of riverine surface waters which are linked to the atmospheric circulation patterns over the Laptev Sea and the adjacent Arctic Ocean during open water season. A continuing trend toward shoreward winds

  15. New variational bounds on convective transport. II. Computations and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Andre; Tobasco, Ian; Doering, Charles R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the maximal rate of scalar transport between parallel walls separated by distance h, by an incompressible fluid with scalar diffusion coefficient κ. Given velocity vector field u with intensity measured by the Péclet number Pe =h2 1/2 / κ (where is space-time average) the challenge is to determine the largest enhancement of wall-to-wall scalar flux over purely diffusive transport, i.e., the Nusselt number Nu . Variational formulations of the problem are studied numerically and optimizing flow fields are computed over a range of Pe . Implications of this optimal wall-to-wall transport problem for the classical problem of Rayleigh-Bénard convection are discussed: the maximal scaling Nu Pe 2 / 3 corresponds, via the identity Pe2 = Ra (Nu - 1) where Ra is the usual Rayleigh number, to Nu Ra 1 / 2 as Ra -> ∞ . Supported in part by National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-0813964, awards OISE-0967140, PHY-1205219, DMS-1311833, and DMS-1515161, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

  16. Comparison of alternative concepts for lunar surface transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Uwe

    The lunar surface transportation system is a key element in lunar development. The decision which means of conveyance should be preferred depends on a lot of influencing factors such as transportation requirements, physical boundary conditions and economics. Starting with a systematic approach to define and structure the problem, a model to compare alternative transportation systems has been built. From the pool of possible means of conveyance, chemical rockets, electric cars, maglev-trains and mass-drivers have been chosen as candidates for investigation. With these candidates five different surface transportation systems were defined. For a reference lunar development scenario the systems were compared on the basis of a cost-to-benefit ratio. Preliminary results indicate that under the assumption that LH2 could be produced on lunar surface, LOX/LH2 propulsed "Hoppers" seem very attractive up to medium transportation demands. For large amounts of bulk cargo, mass driver transportation seems to have advantages, and electric cars should be used for all transportation tasks if the transportation demand is high. Maglev-trains seem to be competitive only for very large transportation demand and long life cycles.

  17. Vertical Transport of Subwavelength Localized Surface Electromagnetic Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Shi, Xihang; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Transport of subwavelength electromagnetic (EM) energy has been achieved through near-field coupling of highly confined surface EM modes supported by plasmonic nanoparticles, in a configuration usually staying on a two-dimensional (2D) substrate. Vertical transport of similar modes along the third dimension, on the other hand, can bring more flexibility in designs of functional photonic devices, but this phenomenon has not been observed in reality. In this paper, designer (or spoof) surface plasmon resonators (plasmonic meta-atoms) are stacked in the direction vertical to their individual planes in demonstrating vertical transport of subwavelength localized surface EM modes. Dispersion relation of this vertical transport is determined from coupled mode theory and is verified with near-field transmission spectrum and field mapping with a microwave near-field scanning stage. This work extends the near-field coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) theory into the vertical direction, and may find applications ...

  18. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  19. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  20. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nouri

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy.

  1. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  2. Studying Polymer Transport on Soft and Hard Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    We have employed experiments and simulations to understand the factors controlling the transport of polymers on surfaces. From an experimental viewpoint we have focused on the transport of DNA (single stranded) on lipid bilayers. We show that this behavior is slaved to the mobility of the lipids. More surprisingly, it appears that the transport of molecules adsorbed on surfaces follows the same dependence on lipid mobility as for molecules incorporated into the lipid layer. The ability to control this surface diffusion through the introduction of posts or varying the strength of adsorption (by the use of an AC field normal to the surfaces) will also be studied. Theoretically we have used molecular dynamics simulations of a polymer chain of length N dissolved in explicit solvent and adsorbed as a pancake at the solid-liquid interface to discriminate between respective influences on surface diffusion of hydrodynamics and adsorption energetics. Only for analytically-smooth surfaces do we observe a strong influence of hydrodynamics; the polymer lateral diffusion constant, D, scales as D 1/N^3/4, more weakly than for implicit solvent. For atomistic surface corrugation with uniform surface chemical makeup, D 1/N instead. This suggests that while we can understand the results for diffusion on lipid surfaces, more recent experimental observations of stronger N dependence for diffusion on hard solid surfaces originate not in hydrodynamic interactions but in spatially patchy energetic interactions.

  3. Sea surface temperature and Ekman transport in the Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available   The wind drift motion of the water which is produced by the stress of the wind exerted upon the surface of the ocean is described by Ekmans theory (1905. Using the mean monthly values for the wind stress and SST, seasonal Ekman transport for the Persian Gulf was computed and contoured. The geostrophic winds have combined with the SST to estimate the effect of cooling due to Ekman transport of colder northern waters and inflow from the Oman Sea. The monthly SST mainly obtained from the 10 10 grided data of Levitus atlas and Hormuz Cruis Experiment for 1997.   Analyses show a NW to SE Ekman transport due to wind stress and significant interannual variability of SST on sea surface in the Persian Gulf. The seasonal variation of SST shows a continental pattern due to severe interaction between the land and sea. But these variations somehow moderates because of Ekman transport in Persian Gulf.

  4. Environmental Transformations of Engineered Nanoparticles: Implications for Nanoparticle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, G. V.; Levard, C.; Reinsch, B.; Ma, R.; Kirschling, T.; Brown, G. E.; Tilton, R.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical transformations that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) may undergo in different environments very poorly characterized. Sulfidation of metallic nanoparticles (NPs), particularly class B soft metals such as Ag NPs, is expected in the environment. Transformation will alter the surface properties and fate of Ag NPs. ENMs are often coated with a polymeric coating to prevent aggregation or to provide specific functionality. These coatings dramatically impact their transport properties. The potential for biological processes to remove covalently bound polymeric coatings from nanoparticles, and the effect of coating loss on the particle's transport properties is not known. The objectives of this work were to 1) better understand the environmental conditions that would promote sufidation of class B soft metal nanoparticles (Ag NPs and ZnO NPs), and to determine the effect that this has on their surface properties and aggregation potential, and 2) to determine if microbes can access covalently bound polymeric coatings from an engineered NP, and the effect on their surface properties and aggregation potential. Ag and ZnO NPs were synthesized and characterized for size, shape, coating mass, charge, crystal structure, and chemical composition using a range of analytical methods (TEM, DLS, TGA, EPM, XAS). These particles were sulfidized in the laboratory, biosolids, and wetland soils and the transformed materials were characterized. Sulfidation was rapid in all cases and resulted in a mixed crystalline/amorphous Ag2S/Ag2O particle depending on the ratio of Ag to HS- in the system. Sulfidation decreased surface charge and displayed significant aggregation compared to the unsulfidized materials. Sulfidation also occurred in biosolids and in wetland soils. Polymer coatings covalently bound to ENMs are bioavailable. Model poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brush-coated nanoparticles (30 nm hydrodynamic radius) were synthesized to obtain a nanomaterial in which biodegradation was

  5. Nuclear transport of galectin-3 and its therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Raz, Avraham; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3, a member of β-galactoside-binding gene family is a multi-functional protein, which regulates pleiotropic biological functions such as cell growth, cell adhesion, cell-cell interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis and mRNA processing. Its unique structure enables it to interact with a plethora of ligands in a carbohydrate dependent or independent manner. Galectin-3 is mainly a cytosolic protein, but can easily traverse the intracellular and plasma membranes to translocate into the nucleus, mitochondria or get externalized. Depending on the cell type, specific experimental conditions in vitro, cancer type and stage, galectin-3 has been reported to be exclusively cytoplasmic, predominantly nuclear or distributed between the two compartments. In this review we have summarized the dynamics of galectin-3 shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the nuclear transport mechanisms of galectin-3, how its specific interactions with the members of β-catenin signaling pathways affect tumor progression, and its implications as a therapeutic target. PMID:24657939

  6. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  7. Surface hall effect and nonlocal transport in SmB₆: evidence for surface conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D J; Thomas, S; Grant, T; Botimer, J; Fisk, Z; Xia, Jing

    2013-11-06

    A topological insulator (TI) is an unusual quantum state in which the insulating bulk is topologically distinct from vacuum, resulting in a unique metallic surface that is robust against time-reversal invariant perturbations. The surface transport, however, remains difficult to isolate from the bulk conduction in most existing TI crystals (particularly Bi₂Se₃, Bi₂Te₃ and Sb₂Te₃) due to impurity caused bulk conduction. We report in large crystals of topological Kondo insulator (TKI) candidate material SmB₆ the thickness-independent surface Hall effects and non-local transport, which persist after various surface perturbations. These results serve as proof that at low temperatures SmB₆ has a metallic surface that surrounds an insulating bulk, paving the way for transport studies of the surface state in this proposed TKI material.

  8. 75 FR 38605 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... research to address congestion reduction efforts; (4) Developing transportation safety planning strategies... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program...

  9. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  10. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics f

  11. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831921

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics

  12. Barents Sea heat – transport, storage and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Skagseth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of the Barents Sea to variation in ocean heat transport and surface fluxes is explored using a 1-D column model. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force model results that reproduce the observed winter convection and surface warming and freshening well. Model results are compared to existing estimates of the ocean to air heat fluxes and horizontally averaged profiles for the southern and northern Barents Sea. Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production. The northern Barents Sea, the major part of the area, receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss in the north, the balance is achieved by long wave loss removing most of the solar heating, and the model also suggests a positive sensible heat gain. During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. Despite large changes the Barents Sea heat loss remains robust, the temperature adjusts, and the yearly cycle remains. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport probably leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  13. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.S.N. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Huang, R.Z., E-mail: renzhonghuang@synu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Gao, T.F. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Zhang, R.J. [School of Information Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Handan Road 220, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Y.M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu (0 0 1) surface in the presence of vacancies. • Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. • The jumping and the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (E–S) diffusion barrier can be reduced by tip manipulation. - Abstract: Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich–Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  14. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  15. Surface history of Mercury - Implications for terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Strom, R. G.; Trask, N. J.; Gault, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A plausible surface history of Mercury is presented which is suggested by Mariner 10 television pictures. Five periods are postulated which are delineated by successive variations in the modification of the surface by external and internal processes: accretion and differentiation, terminal heavy bombardment, formation of the Caloris basin, flooding of that basin and other areas, and light cratering accumulated on the smooth plains. Each period is described in detail; the overall history is compared with the surface histories of Venus, Mars, and the moon; and the implications of this history for earth are discussed. It is tentatively concluded that: Mercury is a differentiated planet most likely composed of a large iron core enclosed by a relatively thin silicate layer; heavy surface bombardment occurred about four billion years ago, which probably affected all the inner planets, and was followed by a period of volcanic activity; no surface modifications caused by tectonic, volcanic, or atmospheric processes took place after the volcanic period.

  16. Surface history of Mercury - Implications for terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Strom, R. G.; Trask, N. J.; Gault, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A plausible surface history of Mercury is presented which is suggested by Mariner 10 television pictures. Five periods are postulated which are delineated by successive variations in the modification of the surface by external and internal processes: accretion and differentiation, terminal heavy bombardment, formation of the Caloris basin, flooding of that basin and other areas, and light cratering accumulated on the smooth plains. Each period is described in detail; the overall history is compared with the surface histories of Venus, Mars, and the moon; and the implications of this history for earth are discussed. It is tentatively concluded that: Mercury is a differentiated planet most likely composed of a large iron core enclosed by a relatively thin silicate layer; heavy surface bombardment occurred about four billion years ago, which probably affected all the inner planets, and was followed by a period of volcanic activity; no surface modifications caused by tectonic, volcanic, or atmospheric processes took place after the volcanic period.

  17. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3 exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'−w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  18. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3 exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'−w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  19. The Effect of Surface Roughness on Fluid Configuration and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    When describing the configuration of water in unsaturated media, a distinction is often made between water that is held by capillary forces between grains (capillary water), and water associated with adsorbed films on solid surfaces (film water). The objective of this work was to better understand the nature of the water associated with solid surfaces, with emphasis on understanding the configuration of water on rough natural surfaces. Stereoscopic SEM was used to determine elevation maps on a range of different natural solid surfaces. A computational technique was then developed to calculate the configuration of water on the surfaces as a function of capillary pressure. Calculations of fluid configurations show that, except at extremely high capillary pressures, fluid configuration is dominated by bridging of surface roughness features, even for extremely smooth surfaces. Results suggest that true adsorbed films are likely extremely rare in the environment except under near-dry, ultra-high capillary pressure conditions. This result has significant implications for understanding fate and transport within the unsaturated zone. Preliminary simulations exploring the impact on transport will be discussed.

  20. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  1. Quantum Transport and Surface Scattering in Magnetic Metallic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yin; DONG Zheng-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Taking into account the quantum size effect and the spin dependence of the electronic band structure,and including the spin dependence of the scattering from bulk impurities and two different sets of surface roughness,we present a theory on the electronic transport in magnetic film,in which the average autocorrelation function (ACF) for surface roughness is described by a Gaussion model.Our result shows that the conductivity is a sensitive function of surface roughness and exchange energy.It is also found that in the thin film limit and in the lower-order approximation of the surface scattering,the total conductivity is given by a sum of conductivities of all the subbands and the two spin channels,for each subband and each spin channel the scattering rates due to the impurities and two surfaces are additive.

  2. Band bending and electrical transport at chemically modified silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopinski, Greg; Ward, Tim; Hul'Ko, Oleksa; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2002-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and electrical transport measurements have been used to investigate how various chemical modifications give rise to band bending and alter the conductivity of Si(111) surfaces. HREELS is a sensitive probe of band bending through observations of the low frequency free carrier plasmon mode. For hydrogen terminated surfaces, prepared by the standard etch in ammonium flouride, HREELS measurements on both n and n+ substrates are consistent with nearly flat bands. Chlorination of these surfaces results in substantial upward band bending due to the strong electron withdrawing nature of the chlorine, driving the surface into inversion. The presence of this inversion layer on high resistivity n-type samples is observed through a substantial enhancement of the surface conductivity (relative to the H-terminated surface), as well as through broadening of the quasi-elastic peak in the HREELS measurements. We have also begun to examine organically modified silicon surfaces, prepared by various wet chemical reactions with the H-terminated surface. Decyl modified Si(111) surfaces are seen to exhibit a small degree of band bending, attributed to extrinsic defect states cause by a small degree of oxidation accompanying the modification reaction. The prospects of using conductivity as an in-situ monitor of the rate of these reactions will be discussed.

  3. Astrobiological and Geological Implications of Convective Transport in Icy Outer Planet Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Zhong, Shi-Jie; Barr, Amy

    2005-01-01

    The oceans of large icy outer planet satellites are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. The goal of our project has been to develop models of ice convection in order to understand convection as an astrobiologically relevant transport mechanism within icy satellites, especially Europa. These models provide valuable constraints on modes of surface deformation and thus the implications of satellite surface geology for astrobiology, and for planetary protection. Over the term of this project, significant progress has been made in three areas: (1) the initiation of convection in large icy satellites, which we find probably requires tidal heating; (2) the relationship of surface features on Europa to internal ice convection, including the likely role of low-melting-temperature impurities; and (3) the effectiveness of convection as an agent of icy satellite surface-ocean material exchange, which seems most plausible if tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection work in combination. Descriptions of associated publications include: 3 published papers (including contributions to 1 review chapter), 1 manuscript in revision, 1 manuscript in preparation (currently being completed under separate funding), and 1 published popular article. A myriad of conference abstracts have also been published, and only those from the past year are listed.

  4. Droplet Transport Mechanism on Horizontal Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    A fluid transport technique is a key issue for the development of microfluidic systems. In this study, the movement of a droplet on horizontal hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces, which is a new concept to transport droplets without external power sources that was recently proposed by the author, was simulated using an in-house solution code(PowerCFD). This code employs an unstructured cell-centered method based on a conservative pressure-based finite-volume method with interface capturing method(CICSAM) in a volume of fluid(VOF) scheme for phase interface capturing. The droplet transport mechanism is examined through numerical results that include velocity vectors, pressure contours, and total kinetic energy inside and around the droplet.

  5. Surface Diffusion Effect on Gas Transport in Nanoporous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2016-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells are one of the promising candidates for power sources of electric vehicles. For further improvement of their efficiency in high current density operation, a better understanding of oxygen flow inside the cells, which have micro- or nanoporous structures, is necessary. Molecular simulations such as the direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) are necessary to elucidate flow phenomena in micro- or nanostructures since the Knudsen number is close to unity. Our previous report showed that the oxygen diffusion resistance in porous structures with a characteristic pore size of 100 nm calculated by DSMC agrees well with that measured experimentally. On the other hand, when it comes to the transport in structures with much smaller pore sizes, it is expected that the surface diffusion has a significant impact on gas transport because of their higher specific surface area. Here we present the calculation of gas transport in porous structures with considering surface diffusion. The numerical porous structure models utilized in our simulations are constructed from three-dimensional imaging of materials. The effect of the distance of random walk on the total diffusion resistance in the structures is discussed. This paper is based on results obtained from a project commissioned by the New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

  6. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  7. 3D Airflow patterns over coastal foredunes: implications for aeolian sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, Andrew G.; Baas, Andreas C. W.; Lynch, Kevin; Beyers, Meiring

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental criterion for the development of coastal sand dunes is usually highlighted as a significant onshore wind component of the local wind field. The presence of large sand dune systems on coasts where the predominant wind blows offshore is therefore difficult to explain and usually they are attributed to the past occurrence of onshore winds and, by implication, subsequent changes in climate. Recent studies have shown that offshore winds can be deflected or 'steered' by existing dunes so that their direction changes. This can occur to such an extent that a process known as 'flow reversal' can arise, whereby the initially offshore wind actually flows onshore at the beach. This process is important because it can cause sand to be blown from the beach and into the dunes, causing them to grow. This may be central in explaining the presence of extensive dunes on coasts where the dominant wind is offshore, but is also important in how dunes recover after periods of wave erosion during storms. Offshore winds have traditionally been excluded from sediment budget calculations for coastal dunes, but when they do transport sand onshore, this may have been an important oversight leading to significant underestimates of the volume of sand being transported by wind. This work investigates the controls on the processes and the mechanisms involved in deformation of the flow and resulting sediment transport at coastal foredunes in Northern Ireland. We use a combination of field measurement of wind and sediment transport coupled with state-of-the-art aerodynamic modelling using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3-D sonic anemometry. Our working hypothesis is that offshore winds contribute substantially to foredune behaviour on leeside coasts. Preliminary results show strong reverse flow eddies in the seaward side of the foredunes during offshore wind events. These secondary flow reversals have been above velocity threshold and are transport capable. Using CFD modelling

  8. Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces and Droplet Transportation by Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J. T.; Geraldi, N. R.; Guan, J. H.; McHale, G.; Wells, G. G.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2017-01-01

    On a solid surface, a droplet of liquid will stick due to the capillary adhesion, and this causes low droplet mobility. To reduce contact line pinning, surface chemistry can be coupled to micro- and/or nanostructures to create superhydrophobic surfaces on which a droplet balls up into an almost spherical shape, thus, minimizing the contact area. Recent progress in soft matter has now led to alternative lubricant-impregnated surfaces capable of almost zero contact line pinning and high droplet mobility without causing droplets to ball up and minimize the contact area. Here we report an approach to surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW) actuated droplet transportation enabled using such a surface. These surfaces maintain the contact area required for efficient energy and momentum transfer of the wave energy into the droplet while achieving high droplet mobility and a large footprint, therefore, reducing the threshold power required to induce droplet motion. In our approach, we use a slippery layer of lubricating oil infused into a self-assembled porous hydrophobic layer, which is significantly thinner than the SAW wavelength, and avoid damping of the wave. We find a significant reduction (up to 85%) in the threshold power for droplet transportation compared to that using a conventional surface-treatment method. Moreover, unlike droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces, where interaction with the SAW induces a transition from a Cassie-Baxter state to a Wenzel state, the droplets on our liquid-impregnated surfaces remain in a mobile state after interaction with the SAW.

  9. Choline Transporters in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma: Expression and Functional Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell survival and proliferation, however, the expression and function of choline transporters have not been well identified in cancer. In this study, we detected the mRNA and protein expression of organic cation transporter OCT3, carnitine/cation transporters OCTN 1 and OCTN2,and choline transporter-like protein CTL1 in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549, H1299 and SPC-A-1.Their expression pattern was further confirmed in 25 human primary adenocarcinoma tissues. The choline uptake in these cell lines was significantly blocked by CTL1 inhibitor, but only partially inhibited by OCT or OCTN inhibitors. The efficacy of these inhibitors on cell proliferation is closely correlated with their abilities to block choline transport. Under the native expression of these transporters, the total choline uptake was notably blocked by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitors. These results describe the expression of choline transporters and their relevant function in cell proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma, thus providing a potential"choline-starvation" strategy of cancer interference through targeting choline transporters, especially CTL1.

  10. Spatiotemporal Structure of Aeolian Particle Transport on Flat Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiya, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2017-05-01

    We conduct numerical simulations based on a model of blowing snow to reveal the long-term properties and equilibrium state of aeolian particle transport from 10-5 to 10 m above the flat surface. The numerical results are as follows. (i) Time-series data of particle transport are divided into development, relaxation, and equilibrium phases, which are formed by rapid wind response below 10 cm and gradual wind response above 10 cm. (ii) The particle transport rate at equilibrium is expressed as a power function of friction velocity, and the index of 2.35 implies that most particles are transported by saltation. (iii) The friction velocity below 100 µm remains roughly constant and lower than the fluid threshold at equilibrium. (iv) The mean particle speed above 300 µm is less than the wind speed, whereas that below 300 µm exceeds the wind speed because of descending particles. (v) The particle diameter increases with height in the saltation layer, and the relationship is expressed as a power function. Through comparisons with the previously reported random-flight model, we find a crucial problem that empirical splash functions cannot reproduce particle dynamics at a relatively high wind speed.

  11. Spatiotemporal Structure of Aeolian Particle Transport on Flat Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Niiya, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We conduct numerical simulations based on a model of blowing snow to reveal the long-term properties and equilibrium state of aeolian particle transport from $10^{-5} \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{m}$ to $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{m}$ above the flat surface. The numerical results are s follows. (i) Time-series data of particle transport are divided into development, relaxation, and equilibrium phases, which are formed by rapid wind response below $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{cm}$ and gradual wind response above $10 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mathrm{cm}$. (ii) The particle transport rate at equilibrium is expressed as a power function of friction velocity, and the index of 2.35 implies that most particles are transported by saltation. (iii) The friction velocity below $100 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm{m}$ remains roughly constant and lower than the fluid threshold at equilibrium. (iv) The mean particle speed above $300 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm{m}$ is less than the wind speed, whereas that below $300 \\hspace{0.5 ex} \\mu\\mathrm...

  12. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  13. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  14. TRANSPORT OF BICOMPONENT CONTAMINANT IN FREE-SURFACE WETLAND FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bin; ZENG Li; WU Yi-hong; JI Ping; ZHAO Yi-jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of a pulsed bicomponent contaminant emission into a free-surface wetland flow.The basic equations are for the bicomponent contaminant transport in the wetland flow under the combined action of advection,mass dispersion,and ecological reaction at the phase averaged scale.The effect of the ecological reaction is separated from the hydrodynamic effect via a set of widely used transforms.The analytical solution for the evolution of the depth-averaged concentration is rigorously derived,with a limiting case covering the known solution for the single component contaminant transport.It is found that the depth-averaged species concentration of the bicomponent contaminant can approach an equilibrium state determined by the distribution coefficient.

  15. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  16. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  17. Ab initio transport across bismuth selenide surface barriers

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2014-11-24

    © 2014 American Physical Society. We investigate the effect of potential barriers in the form of step edges on the scattering properties of Bi2Se3(111) topological surface states by means of large-scale ab initio transport simulations. Our results demonstrate the suppression of perfect backscattering, while all other scattering processes, which do not entail a complete spin and momentum reversal, are allowed. Furthermore, we find that the spin of the surface state develops an out-of-plane component as it traverses the barrier. Our calculations reveal the existence of quasibound states in the vicinity of the surface barriers, which appear in the form of an enhanced density of states in the energy window corresponding to the topological state. For double barriers we demonstrate the formation of quantum well states. To complement our first-principles results we construct a two-dimensional low-energy effective model and illustrate its shortcomings. Our findings are discussed in the context of a number of recent experimental works.

  18. Surface air quality implications of volcanic injection heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Manu Anna; Brännström, Niklas; Persson, Christer; Grahn, Håkan; von Schoenberg, Pontus; Robertson, Lennart

    2017-10-01

    Air quality implications of volcanic eruptions have gained increased attention recently in association with the 2010 Icelandic eruption that resulted in the shut-down of European air space. The emission amount, injection height and prevailing weather conditions determine the extent of the impact through the spatio-temporal distribution of pollutants. It is often argued that in the case of a major eruption in Iceland, like Laki in 1783-1784, that pollutants injected high into the atmosphere lead to substantially increased concentrations of sulfur compounds over continental Europe via long-range transport in the jet stream and eventual large-scale subsidence in a high-pressure system. Using state-of-the-art simulations, we show that the air quality impact of Icelandic volcanoes is highly sensitive to the injection height. In particular, it is the infinitesimal injections into the lower half of the troposphere, rather than the substantial injections into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere that contribute most to increased pollutant concentrations, resulting in atmospheric haze over mainland Europe/Scandinavia. Besides, the persistent high pressure system over continental Europe/Scandinavia traps the pollutants from dispersing, thereby prolonging the haze.

  19. Topology of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian M.; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Venema, Koen

    1996-01-01

    Four in-frame translational fusions to both the reporter proteins beta-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase support a topological model of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of several bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis, in which the N-terminal part is located intracellularly and one tr

  20. Topology of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian M.; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Venema, Koen

    Four in-frame translational fusions to both the reporter proteins beta-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase support a topological model of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of several bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis, in which the N-terminal part is located intracellularly and one

  1. Aquaglyceroporins and metalloid transport: implications in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporin (AQP) channels facilitate the diffusion of a wide range of neutral solutes, including water, glycerol, and other small uncharged solutes. More recently, AQPs have been shown to allow the passage of trivalent arsenic and antimony compounds. Arsenic and antimony are metalloid elements. At physiological pH, the trivalent metalloids behave as molecular mimics of glycerol, and are conducted through AQP channels. Arsenicals and antimonials are extremely toxic to cells. Despite their toxicity, both metalloids are used as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer and protozoan parasitic diseases. The metalloid homeostasis property of AQPs can be a mixed blessing. In some cases, AQPs form part of the detoxification pathway, and extrude metalloids from cells. In other instances, AQPs allow the transport of metalloids into cells, thereby conferring sensitivity. Understanding the factors that modulate AQP expression will aid in a better understanding of metalloid toxicity and also provide newer approaches to metalloid based chemotherapy.

  2. Oceanic transport of surface meltwater from the southern Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-07-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamics and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  3. Oceanic Transport of Surface Meltwater from the Southern Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamic1 and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  4. Medical complications of intra-hospital patient transports: implications for architectural design and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Roger S; Zhu, Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Literature on healthcare architecture and evidence-based design has rarely considered explicitly that patient outcomes may be worsened by intra-hospital transport (IHT), which is defined as transport of patients within the hospital. The article focuses on the effects of IHTs on patient complications and outcomes, and the implications of such impacts for designing safer, better hospitals. A review of 22 scientific studies indicates that IHTs are subject to a wide range of complications, many of which occur frequently and have distinctly detrimental effects on patient stability and outcomes. The research suggests that higher patient acuity and longer transport durations are associated with more frequent and serious IHT-related complications and outcome effects. It appears no rigorous research has compared different hospital designs and layouts with respect to having possibly differential effects on transport-related complications and worsened outcomes. Nonetheless, certain design implications can be extracted from the existing research literature, including the importance of minimizing transport delays due to restricted space and congestion, and creating layouts that shorten IHT times for high-acuity patients. Limited evidence raises the possibility that elevator-dependent vertical building layouts may increase susceptibility to transport delays that worsen complications. The strong evidence indicating that IHTs trigger complications and worsen outcomes suggests a powerful justification for adopting acuity-adaptable rooms and care models that substantially reduce transports. A program of studies is outlined to address gaps in knowledge.Key WordsPatient transports, transports within hospitals, patient safety, evidence-based design, hospital design, healthcare architecture, intra-hospital transport complications, acuity-adaptable care, elevators, outcomes.

  5. Moist synoptic transport of carbon dioxide along midlatitude storm tracks, transport uncertainty, and implications for carbon dioxide flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.

    Mass transport along moist isentropic surfaces on baroclinic waves represents an important component of the atmospheric heat engine that operates between the equator and poles. This is also an important vehicle for tracer transport, and is correlated with ecosystem metabolism because large-scale baroclinicity and photosynthesis are both driven seasonally by variations in solar radiation. In this research, I pursue a dynamical framework for explaining atmospheric transport of CO2 by synoptic weather systems at middle and high latitudes. A global model of atmospheric tracer transport, driven by meteorological analysis in combination with a detailed description of surface fluxes, is used to create time varying CO2 distributions in the atmosphere. Simulated mass fluxes of CO2 are then decomposed into a zonal monthly mean component and deviations from the monthly mean in space and time. Mass fluxes of CO2 are described on moist isentropic surfaces to represent frontal transport along storm tracks. Forward simulations suggest that synoptic weather systems transport large amounts of CO2 north and south in northern mid-latitudes, up to 1 PgC month-1 during winter when baroclinic wave activity peaks. During boreal winter when northern plants respire, warm moist air, high in CO2, is swept upward and poleward along the east side of baroclinic waves and injected into the polar vortex, while cold dry air, low in CO 2, that had been transported into the polar vortex earlier in the year is advected equatorward. These synoptic eddies act to strongly reduce seasonality of CO2 in the biologically active mid-latitudes by 50% of that implied by local net ecosystem exchange while correspondingly amplifying seasonality in the Arctic. Transport along stormtracks is correlated with rising, moist, cloudy air, which systematically hides this CO2 transport from satellite observing systems. Meridional fluxes of CO2 are of comparable magnitude as surface exchange of CO2 in mid-latitudes, and

  6. TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability and transport of radiolabeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study incl...

  7. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... transportation in accordance with 43 CFR 36.11(c), (d), (e), and (g). ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

  8. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  9. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  10. Cigarette smoke toxins deposited on surfaces: implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Martins-Green

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered - Thirdhand smoke (THS - the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential health threat to children, spouses of smokers and workers in environments where smoking is or has been allowed. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of THS on liver, lung, skin healing, and behavior, using an animal model exposed to THS under conditions that mimic exposure of humans. THS-exposed mice show alterations in multiple organ systems and excrete levels of NNAL (a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker similar to those found in children exposed to SHS (and consequently to THS. In liver, THS leads to increased lipid levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a precursor to cirrhosis and cancer and a potential contributor to cardiovascular disease. In lung, THS stimulates excess collagen production and high levels of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting propensity for fibrosis with implications for inflammation-induced diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. In wounded skin, healing in THS-exposed mice has many characteristics of the poor healing of surgical incisions observed in human smokers. Lastly, behavioral tests show that THS-exposed mice become hyperactive. The latter data, combined with emerging associated behavioral problems in children exposed to SHS/THS, suggest that, with prolonged exposure, they may be at significant risk for developing more severe neurological disorders. These results provide a basis for studies on the toxic effects of THS in humans and inform potential regulatory policies to prevent involuntary exposure to THS.

  11. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Opstal, van E.J.; Alink, G.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/s

  12. Predicting Solar Cycle 25 using Surface Flux Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Shinsuke; Iijima, Haruhisa; Hotta, Hideyuki; Shiota, Daiko; Kusano, Kanya

    2017-08-01

    It is thought that the longer-term variations of the solar activity may affect the Earth’s climate. Therefore, predicting the next solar cycle is crucial for the forecast of the “solar-terrestrial environment”. To build prediction schemes for the next solar cycle is a key for the long-term space weather study. Recently, the relationship between polar magnetic field at the solar minimum and next solar activity is intensively discussed. Because we can determine the polar magnetic field at the solar minimum roughly 3 years before the next solar maximum, we may discuss the next solar cycle 3years before. Further, the longer term (~5 years) prediction might be achieved by estimating the polar magnetic field with the Surface Flux Transport (SFT) model. Now, we are developing a prediction scheme by SFT model as a part of the PSTEP (Project for Solar-Terrestrial Environment Prediction) and adapting to the Cycle 25 prediction. The predicted polar field strength of Cycle 24/25 minimum is several tens of percent smaller than Cycle 23/24 minimum. The result suggests that the amplitude of Cycle 25 is weaker than the current cycle. We also try to obtain the meridional flow, differential rotation, and turbulent diffusivity from recent modern observations (Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory). These parameters will be used in the SFT models to predict the polar magnetic fields strength at the solar minimum. In this presentation, we will explain the outline of our strategy to predict the next solar cycle and discuss the initial results for Cycle 25 prediction.

  13. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  14. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    , but not all, older or recent wind tunnel observations. Similarly some measurements performed with uniform sand samples having grain diameters of the order of 0.25-0.40 mm indicate that ripple spacing depends on friction velocity in a similar way as particle jump length. The observations are thus in agreement with a recent ripple model that link the typical jump length to ripple spacing. A possible explanation for contradictory observations in some experiments may be that long observation sequences are required in order to assure that equilibrium exists between ripple geometry and wind flow. Quantitative understanding of saltation characteristics on Mars still lacks important elements. Based upon image analysis and numerical predictions, aeolian ripples have been thought to consist of relatively large grains (diameter > 0.6 mm) and that saltation occurs at high wind speeds (> 26 m/s) involving trajectories that are significantly longer than those on Earth (by a factor of 10-100). However, this is not supported by recent observations from the surface of Mars, which shows that active ripples in their geometry and composition have characteristics compatible with those of terrestrial ripples (Sullivan et al., 2008). Also the highest average wind speeds on Mars have been measured to be terrestrial conditions electric fields typically observed are not intense enough to significantly affect sand transport rates while little is known in the case of extra-terrestrial environments.

  15. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    CERN Document Server

    Shocron, Amit N

    2016-01-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  16. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    setup, but the terminology used and data analysis were also ameliorated in order to simplify the interpretation of the results. We used the mentioned technique in the following projects: • The electronic transport dimensionality of epitaxial grahene grown on SiC is detected and important physical......This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  17. The Role of Colloids in the Transport of Plutonium and Americium: Implications for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, A B

    2003-09-17

    Colloids are small particulates (ranging in size from 1 to 0.001 micron) composed of inorganic and organic material and found in all natural water. Due to their small size, they have the ability to remain suspended in water and transported. Small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) can adsorb (attach) to colloids, and/or form colloidal-sized polymers and migrate in water. At Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) sedimentation and resuspension of particulates and colloids in surface waters represent the dominant process for Pu and Am migration. The amount of Pu and Am that can be transported at RFETS has been quantified in the Pathway Analysis Report. The Pathway Analysis Report shows that the two dominant pathways for Pu and Am transport at RFETS are air and surface water. Shallow groundwater and biological pathways are minor.

  18. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mobility as a positional good : implications for transport policy and planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T. [Victoria Transport Policy Institute, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2007-01-17

    Social position refers to a person's social rank. Many goods have positional value because they increase the status of their consumers. Positional goods include fashionable jewellery and clothing, luxurious homes and vehicles, and extravagant entertainment. Many motorists choose vehicles with greater potential speeds and off-road abilities than actually needed because these features are considered prestigious. This paper examined how positional value affects transportation decisions and investigated the resulting economic impacts. These included impacts on social welfare and external costs. The paper also discussed implications for transport policy and planning. The paper discussed the science of happiness and included an excerpt from a newspaper article on money and happiness. The paper also included an analysis of popular television shows and Internet blogs. Transportation impacts were also examined, with reference to motor vehicle ownership, luxury vehicles, mode choice, long-distance recreation travel, planning practices, and industrial development policy. A table was also presented that summarized the categories of prestige value travel impacts. The paper also presented possible offsetting benefits and implications for planning. 40 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  20. Aeolian transport in the field: A comparison of the effects of different surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhibao; Lv, Ping; Zhang, Zhengcai; Qian, Guangqiang; Luo, Wanyin

    2012-05-01

    Aeolian transport represents the result of wind-surface interactions, and therefore depends strongly on variations in the characteristics of the sediment surface. We conducted field observations of aeolian transport of typical dune sand in three 80 m × 80 m plots with different surface treatments: gravel-covered sand, enclosed shifting sand, and open (unprotected) shifting sand. The study was performed at the Shapotou Aeolian Experiment Site in the southeastern part of China's Tengger Desert to compare the effects of these different surface treatments on aeolian transport. To do so, we analyzed the flux density profiles and transport rates above each surface. The flux density profiles for all three treatments followed the exponential decay law that was proposed by most previous researchers to describe the saltation flux density profiles. Coefficients of the exponential decay function were defined as a function of the surface and the wind velocity. The enclosed and open plots with shifting sand had similar flux density profiles, but the flux density above gravel-covered plots showed that transport decayed more slowly with increasing height, producing flux density profiles with a higher average saltation height. The transport rate above the three treatment plots tended to increase proportionally with the cube of the mean wind velocity and with the maximum wind velocity during the observation period, but was more strongly correlated with the square of drift potential. Transport rates above the plot with open shifting sand were greater than those above the plots with enclosed shifting sand and the gravel-covered plot.

  1. Curvature-dependent surface energy and implications for nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapadia, P.; Mohammadi, P.; Sharma, P.

    2011-10-01

    At small length scales, several size-effects in both physical phenomena and properties can be rationalized by invoking the concept of surface energy. Conventional theoretical frameworks of surface energy, in both the mechanics and physics communities, assume curvature independence. In this work we adopt a simplified and linearized version of a theory proposed by Steigmann-Ogden to capture curvature-dependence of surface energy. Connecting the theory to atomistic calculations and the solution to an illustrative paradigmatical problem of a bent cantilever beam, we catalog the influence of curvature-dependence of surface energy on the effective elastic modulus of nanostructures. The observation in atomistic calculations that the elastic modulus of bent nanostructures is dramatically different than under tension - sometimes softer, sometimes stiffer - has been a source of puzzlement to the scientific community. We show that the corrected surface mechanics framework provides a resolution to this issue. Finally, we propose an unambiguous definition of the thickness of a crystalline surface.

  2. Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is a memorandum regarding Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, which provides long-term funding certainty for surface transportation infrastructure planning

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyls removal from contaminated soils using a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit: implications for emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Xue, Nandong; Ding, Qiong; Vogt, Rolf David; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng; Wu, Guanglong; Zhang, Shilei; Zhou, Dandan; Liu, Bo; Yan, Yunzhong

    2014-11-01

    An assessment in China of the application of a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit for the remediation of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) demonstrated that it is well suited to remove PCBs from soils. A remarkable reduction of total PCBs in soils from 163-770 μg g(-1) to 0.08-0.15 μg g(-1) was achieved. This represented removal efficiencies of greater than 99.9% and an approximate 100% removal of the toxic equivalent of the PCBs. Furthermore, the emissions to the atmosphere from the unit were in compliance with current PCBs regulations. In conclusion, remediation of PCBs-contaminated soils based on a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit appears to be a highly efficient and environmentally sound treatment technology that has huge implications for cleaning thousands of regionally dispersed sites of PCBs contamination in China.

  4. On Limiting Behavior of Contaminant Transport Models in Coupled Surface and Groundwater Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J. Ervin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of work on models for coupling surface-water with groundwater flows which is at its core the Stokes-Darcy problem. The resulting (Stokes-Darcy fluid velocity is important because the flow transports contaminants. The analysis of models including the transport of contaminants has, however, focused on a quasi-static Stokes-Darcy model. Herein we consider the fully evolutionary system including contaminant transport and analyze its quasi-static limits.

  5. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-07

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano's theorem. Additionally, Lewis' approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano's and Lewis' approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano's theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis' theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms.

  6. Serotonin-induced down-regulation of cell surface serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Christensen, Peter Møller; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic signaling and enables refilling of synaptic vesicles by mediating reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) released into the synaptic cleft. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT activity and surface expression are not fully understood...

  7. 75 FR 9638 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ...; 49 CFR 1.48. Issued on: February 23, 2010. Victor M. Mendez, Administrator. Surface Transportation... Chapter 25 references FHWA Order 6640.2 FHWA Actions to address Environmental Justice in minority and...

  8. Transport Rate of Surface Erosion by the Hydrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The coherence and exposure degree are used in analyzing initiation of slope sediment.The initial ve- locity is built by using a critical roiling model.A transport rate formula of slope erosion is established using the Meyer-Peter model.The formula is tested by experiment and agrees well but the errors are big when the flow discharge and rain intensity are smaller.

  9. Interfaces in aquatic ecosystems: Implications for transport and impact of anthropogenic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knulst, J.

    1996-11-01

    Mechanisms that govern transport, accumulation and toxicity of persistent pollutants at interfaces in aquatic ecosystems were the foci of this thesis. Specific attention was paid to humic substances, their occurrence, composition, and role in exchange processes across interfaces. It was concluded that: The composition of humic substances in aquatic surface microlayers is different from that of the subsurface water and terrestrial humic matter. Levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aquatic surface microlayer reflect the DOC levels in the subsurface water. While the levels and enrichment of DOC in the microlayer generally show small variations, the levels and enrichment of particulate organic carbon (POC) vary to a great extent. Similarities exist between aquatic surface films, artificial semi-permeable and biological membranes regarding their structure and functioning. Acidification and liming of freshwater ecosystems affect DOC:POC ratio and humic composition of the surface film, thus influencing the partitioning of pollutants across aquatic interfaces. Properties of lake catchment areas extensively govern DOC:POC ratio both in the surface film and subsurface water. Increased UV-B irradiation changes the DOC:POC ratio in the surface film and thus affect transfer of matter across the interface. Transport of lipophilic, persistent organic pollutants across semi-permeable membranes is influenced by the solutes organic composition. 106 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  10. Enhanced Thermal Transport of Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Deposition 4 3. Results/ Analysis 5 4. Conclusion 7 5. References 8 Distribution List 9 iv List of Figures Fig. 1 Contact angle...by measuring the contact angle (σ) formed between a droplet of liquid and the surface (Fig. 1). Qualitatively , surfaces with a water contact angle...several seconds and dried with filtered nitrogen. The samples were then immersed in 0.01-M aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 20 s. The deposition

  11. Surface activity, lipid profiles and their implications in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profiles of lipids in normal and cancerous tissues may differ revealing information about cancer development and progression. Lipids being surface active, changes in lipid profiles can manifest as altered surface activity profiles. Langmuir monolayers offer a convenient model for evaluating surface activity of biological membranes. Aims: The aims of this study were to quantify phospholipids and their effects on surface activity of normal and cancerous human cervical tissues as well as to evaluate the role of phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM in cervical cancer using Langmuir monolayers. Methods and Materials: Lipid quantification was done using thin layer chromatography and phosphorus assay. Surface activity was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. Monolayers were formed on the surface of deionized water by spreading tissue organic phase corresponding to 1 mg of tissue and studying their surface pressure-area isotherms at body temperature. The PC and SM contents of cancerous human cervical tissues were higher than those of the normal human cervical tissues. Role of PC and SM were evaluated by adding varying amounts of these lipids to normal cervical pooled organic phase. Statistical analysis: Student′s t-test (p < 0.05 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. Results: Our results reveals that the phosphatidylglycerol level in cancerous cervical tissue was nearly five folds higher than that in normal cervical tissue. Also PC and sphingomyelin SM were found to be the major phospholipid components in cancerous and normal cervical tissues respectively. The addition of either 1.5 µg DPPC or 0.5 µg SM /mg of tissue to the normal organic phase changed its surface activity profile to that of the cancerous tissues. Statistically significant surface activity parameters showed that PC and SM have remarkable roles in shifting the normal cervical lipophilic surface activity towards that of cancerous lipophilic

  12. Hydrogen mediated transport of Sn to Ru film surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faradzhev, N.; Sidorkin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report on the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Sn and thin Ru film at room temperature. The study is done using a combination of photoelectron and low energy ion scattering spectroscopies as well as scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption of hydrogen on a Sn surface leads to the

  13. Hydrogen mediated transport of Sn to Ru film surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faradzhev, N.; Sidorkin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report on the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Sn and thin Ru film at room temperature. The study is done using a combination of photoelectron and low energy ion scattering spectroscopies as well as scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption of hydrogen on a Sn surface leads to the

  14. Implications of anthropogenic river stage fluctuations on mass transport in a valley fill aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutt, D.F.; Fleming, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In humid regions a strong coupling between surface water features and groundwater systems may exist. In these environments the exchange of water and solute depends primarily on the hydraulic gradient between the reservoirs. We hypothesize that daily changes in river stage associated with anthropogenic water releases (such as those from a hydroelectric dam) cause anomalous mixing in the near-stream environment by creating large hydraulic head gradients between the stream and adjacent aquifer. We present field observations of hydraulic gradient reversals in a shallow aquifer. Important physical processes observed in the field are explicitly reproduced in a physically based two-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow coupled to a simplistic surface water boundary condition. Mass transport simulations of a conservative solute introduced into the surface water are performed and examined relative to a stream condition without stage fluctuations. Simulations of 20 d for both fluctuating river stage and fixed high river stage show that more mass is introduced into the aquifer from the stream in the oscillating case even though the net water flux is zero. Enhanced transport by mechanical dispersion leads to mass being driven away from the hydraulic zone of influence of the river. The modification of local hydraulic gradients is likely to be important for understanding dissolved mass transport in near-stream aquifer environments and can influence exchange zone processes under conditions of high-frequency stream stage changes. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Transport mechanism of an initially spherical droplet on a combined hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kwon, Young Hoo [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Fluid transport is a key issue in the development of microfluidic systems. Recently, Myong (2014) has proposed a new concept for droplet transport without external power sources, and numerically validated the results for a hypothetical 2D shape, initially having a hemicylindrical droplet shape. Myong and Kwon (2015) have also examined the transport mechanism for an actual water droplet, initially having a 3D hemispherical shape, on a horizontal hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface, based on the numerical results of the time evolution of the droplet shape, as well as the total kinetic, gravitational, pressure and surface free energies inside the droplet. In this study, a 3D numerical analysis of an initially spherical droplet is carried out to establish a new concept for droplet transport. Further, the transport mechanism of an actual water droplet is examined in detail from the viewpoint of the capillarity force imbalance through the numerical results of droplet shape and various energies inside the droplet.

  16. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  17. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  18. Electrical transport properties of graphene on SiO2 with specific surface structures

    OpenAIRE

    Nagashio, K.; Yamashita, T; Nishimura, T.; K. Kita; Toriumi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The mobility of graphene transferred on a SiO2/Si substrate is limited to ~10,000 cm2/Vs. Without understanding the graphene/SiO2 interaction, it is difficult to improve the electrical transport properties. Although surface structures on SiO2 such as silanol and siloxane groups are recognized, the relation between the surface treatment of SiO2 and graphene characteristics has not yet been elucidated. This paper discusses the electrical transport properties of graphene on specific surface stru...

  19. Interplay between hydrophilicity and surface barriers on water transport in zeolite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Matteo; Humplik, Thomas; Bevilacqua, Alessio; Tsapatsis, Michael; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Wang, Evelyn N.; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive understanding of molecular transport within nanoporous materials remains elusive in a broad variety of engineering and biomedical applications. Here, experiments and atomistic simulations are synergically used to elucidate the non-trivial interplay between nanopore hydrophilicity and surface barriers on the overall water transport through zeolite crystals. At these nanometre-length scales, these results highlight the dominating effect of surface imperfections with reduced permeability on the overall water transport. A simple diffusion resistance model is shown to be sufficient to capture the effects of both intracrystalline and surface diffusion resistances, thus properly linking simulation to experimental evidence. This work suggests that future experimental work should focus on eliminating/overcoming these surface imperfections, which promise an order of magnitude improvement in permeability.

  20. Theory connecting nonlocal sediment transport, earth surface roughness, and the Sadler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Rina; Taloni, Alessandro; Furbish, David Jon

    2017-03-01

    Earth surface evolution, like many natural phenomena typified by fluctuations on a wide range of scales and deterministic smoothing, results in a statistically rough surface. We present theory demonstrating that scaling exponents of topographic and stratigraphic statistics arise from long-time averaging of noisy surface evolution rather than specific landscape evolution processes. This is demonstrated through use of "elastic" Langevin equations that generically describe disturbance from a flat earth surface using a noise term that is smoothed deterministically via sediment transport. When smoothing due to transport is a local process, the geologic record self organizes such that a specific Sadler effect and topographic power spectral density (PSD) emerge. Variations in PSD slope reflect the presence or absence and character of nonlocality of sediment transport. The range of observed stratigraphic Sadler slopes captures the same smoothing feature combined with the presence of long-range spatial correlation in topographic disturbance.

  1. Stigmatic surface in the Vochysiaceae: reproductive and taxonomic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Carmo-Oliveira, Renata; Morretes,Berta Lange de

    2009-01-01

    The Vochysiaceae are Neotropical trees and shrubs, common in the savanna areas in Central Brazil (Cerrados). The family has been traditionally divided into two tribes: Erismeae, with three genera, and Vochysieae, with five genera. We investigated the stigmatic surface of six Vochysiaceae species, belonging to four genera of Vochysieae: Vochysia, Salvertia, Callisthene and Qualea. Flowers and buds at different developmental stages were collected. Morphological features were observed on fresh m...

  2. Machining of Additively Manufactured Parts: Implications for Surface Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelola, O.; Crawforth, P.; M'Saoubi, R.; Clare, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing methods continue to move towards production ready technologies with the widely extolled virtues of rapid transition from design to part and enhanced design freedoms. However, due to fundamental limitations of laser based processes for metal additive manufacturing, there is a significant ongoing need for these parts to be subject to additional machining operations. This paper reports on a study to investigate the machining behavior and surface integrity of Ti-6Al-4 V com...

  3. Machining of Additively Manufactured Parts: Implications for Surface Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelola, O.; Crawforth, P.; M'Saoubi, R.; Clare, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing methods continue to move towards production ready technologies with the widely extolled virtues of rapid transition from design to part and enhanced design freedoms. However, due to fundamental limitations of laser based processes for metal additive manufacturing, there is a significant ongoing need for these parts to be subject to additional machining operations. This paper reports on a study to investigate the machining behavior and surface integrity of Ti-6Al-4 V com...

  4. Constraints on surface evapotranspiration: implications for modeling and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The continental hydrological cycle and especially evapotranspiration are constrained by additional factors such as the energy availability and the carbon cycle. As a results trying to understand and predict the surface hydrologic cycle in isolation might be highly unreliable. We present two examples were constraints induced by 1) radiation control through cloud albedo feedback and 2) carbon control on the surface water use efficiency are essential to correctly predict the seasonal hydrologic cycle. In the first example we show that correctly modeling diurnal and seasonal convection and the associated cloud-albedo feedback (through land-atmosphere and convection-large-scale circulation feedbacks) is essential to correctly model the surface hydrologic cycle in the Amazon, and to correct biases observed in all general circulation models. This calls for improved modeling of convection to correctly predict the tropical continental hydrologic cycle.In the second example we show that typical drought index based only on energy want water availability misses vegetation physiological and carbon feedback and cannot correctly represent the seasonal cycle of soil moisture stress. The typical Palmer Drought Stress Index is shown to be incapable of rejecting water stress in the future. This calls for new drought assessment metrics that may include vegetation and carbon feedback.

  5. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  6. Interactions between laponite and microbial biofilms in porous media: implications for colloid transport and biofilm stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Morales, C Felipe; Leis, Andrew P; Strathmann, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2004-09-01

    Quartz sand columns and sand-filled microscope flow cells were used to investigate the transport characteristics of the clay colloid laponite, and a biofilm-forming bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81. Separate experiments were performed with each particle to determine their individual transport characteristics in clean sand columns. In a second set of experiments, bacterial biofilms were formed prior to introduction of the clay colloids. In the independent transport experiments, bacteria and laponite each conformed to known physicochemical principles. A sodium chloride concentration of 7 x 10(-2) M caused complete retention of the laponite within the sand columns. P. aeruginosa SG81 was generally less influenced by ionic strength effects; it showed relatively low mobility at all ionic strengths tested and some (albeit reduced) mobility when introduced to the columns in 1M NaCl, the highest concentration tested, but nevertheless showed reproducible trends. Under conditions favourable to laponite retention and biofilm stability (7 x 10(-2) MNaCl), laponite suspensions were able to remobilise a portion of the attached bacterial biomass. At low ionic strength, the profile of laponite elution was also altered in the presence of a P. aeruginosa biofilm. These observations suggest that while a reduction in ionic strength has a dominant influence on the mobilisation of biological and inorganic colloids, the presence of laponite and biomass can have a distinct influence on the mobility of both types of colloids. Since these events are likely to occur in subsurface environments, our results suggest that colloid-biofilm interactions will have implications for colloid-bound contaminant transport and the remobilisation of pathogens.

  7. The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, Erik Michael

    Pumping of incident hydrogen and impurity ions by lithium enables control of the particle inventory and fueling profile in magnetic-confined plasmas, and may raise the plasma temperature near the wall. As a result, the density gradient is expected to contribute substantially to the free-energy, affecting particle and thermal transport from micro-turbulence which is typically the dominant transport mechanism in high-temperature fusion experiments. Transport in gyrokinetic simulations of density-gradient-dominated profiles is characterized by a small linear critical gradient, large particle flux, and preferential diffusion of cold particles. As a result, the heat flux is below 5/2 or even 3/2 times the particle flux, usually assumed to be the minimum for convection. While surprising, this result is consistent with increasing entropy. Coupled TEM-ITG (ion-temperature-gradient) simulations using η e = ηi find η = ∇ T/∇n ≈ 0.8 maximizes the linear critical pressure gradient, which suggests that experiments operating near marginal ITG stability with larger η would increase the linear critical pressure gradient by transferring free-energy from the temperature gradient to the density gradient. Simulations were performed with profiles predicted for the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) if ion thermal transport was neoclassical, while electron thermal transport and particle transport were a fixed ratio above the neoclassical level. A robust TEM instability was found for the outer half radius, while the ITG was found to be driven unstable as well during gas puff fueling. This suggests that TEM transport will be an important transport mechanism in high-temperature low-recycling fusion experiments, and in the absence of stabilizing mechanisms, may dominate over neoclassical transport. A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure hydrogen and impurity emission in LTX in order to determine the lower bound on recycling that can be achieved in a small tokamak using

  8. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yuki, E-mail: ynagao@jaist.ac.jp; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin film was investigated. • The thin film structure differed greatly from the partially protonated one. • Proton transport occurs on the surface, not inside of the thin film. • This result contributes to biological transport systems such as bacteriorhodopsin. - Abstract: Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120–670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  9. Catalytic peptide hydrolysis by mineral surface: Implications for prebiotic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bowman, Karina; Ohara, Shohei; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Hazen, Robert M.; Cleaves, H. James

    2010-10-01

    The abiotic polymerization of amino acids may have been important for the origin of life, as peptides may have been components of the first self-replicating systems. Though amino acid concentrations in the primitive oceans may have been too dilute for significant oligomerization to occur, mineral surface adsorption may have provided a concentration mechanism. As unactivated amino acid polymerization is thermodynamically unfavorable and kinetically slow in aqueous solution, we studied mainly the reverse reaction of polymer degradation to measure the impact of mineral surface catalysis on peptide bonds. Aqueous glycine (G), diglycine (GG), diketopiperazine (DKP), and triglycine (GGG) were reacted with minerals (calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, pyrite, rutile, or amorphous silica) in the presence of 0.05 M, pH 8.1, KHCO 3 buffer and 0.1 M NaCl as background electrolyte in a thermostatted oven at 25, 50 or 70 °C. Below 70 °C, reaction kinetics were too sluggish to detect catalytic activity over amenable laboratory time-scales. Minerals were not found to have measurable effects on the degradation or elongation of G, GG or DKP at 70 °C in solution. At 70 °C pyrite was the most catalytic mineral with detectible effects on the degradation of GGG, although several others also displayed catalytic behavior. GGG degraded ˜1.5-4 times faster in the presence of pyrite than in control reactions, depending on the ratio of solution concentration to mineral surface area. The rate of pyrite catalysis of GGG hydrolysis was found to be saturable, suggesting the presence of discrete catalytic sites on the mineral surface. The mineral-catalyzed degradation of GGG appears to occur via a GGG → DKP + G mechanism, rather than via GGG → GG + G, as in solution-phase reactions. These results are compatible with many previous findings and suggest that minerals may have assisted in peptide synthesis in certain geological settings, specifically by speeding the approach to equilibrium

  10. Ricci Curvature on Polyhedral Surfaces via Optimal Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Loisel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correctly defining geometric objects, such as the curvature, is a hard one in discrete geometry. In 2009, Ollivier defined a notion of curvature applicable to a wide category of measured metric spaces, in particular to graphs. He named it coarse Ricci curvature because it coincides, up to some given factor, with the classical Ricci curvature, when the space is a smooth manifold. Lin, Lu and Yau and Jost and Liu have used and extended this notion for graphs, giving estimates for the curvature and, hence, the diameter, in terms of the combinatorics. In this paper, we describe a method for computing the coarse Ricci curvature and give sharper results, in the specific, but crucial case of polyhedral surfaces.

  11. Implications of climate change for economic development in northern Canada: energy, resource, and transportation sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Terry D; Furgal, Chris; Chouinard, Rebecca; Melling, Humfrey; Milburn, David; Smith, Sharon L

    2009-07-01

    Northern Canada is projected to experience major changes to its climate, which will have major implications for northern economic development. Some of these, such as mining and oil and gas development, have experienced rapid expansion in recent years and are likely to expand further, partly as the result of indirect effects of changing climate. This article reviews how a changing climate will affect several economic sectors including the hydroelectric, oil and gas, and mining industries as well as infrastructure and transportation, both marine and freshwater. Of particular importance to all sectors are projected changes in the cryosphere, which will create both problems and opportunities. Potential adaptation strategies that could be used to minimize the negative impacts created by a climate change are also reviewed.

  12. A New Concept to Transport a Droplet on Horizontal Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A fluid transport technique is a key issue for the development of microfluidic systems. In this paper, a new concept for transporting a droplet without external power sources is proposed and verified numerically. The proposed device is a heterogeneous surface which has both hydrophilic and hydrophobic horizontal surfaces. The numerical simulation to demonstrate the new concept is conducted by an in-house solution code (PowerCFD) which employs an unstructured cell-centered method based on a conservative pressure-based finite-volume method with interface capturing method (CICSAM) in a volume of fluid (VOF) scheme for phase interface capturing. It is found that the proposed concept for droplet transport shows superior performance for droplet transport in microfluidic systems.

  13. Drainage pits in cohesionless materials: implications for surface of Phobos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, K C; Melosh, H J

    1989-09-10

    Viking orbiter images show grooves and chains of pits crossing the surface of Phobos, many of which converge toward the large crater Stickney or its antipode. Although it has been proposed that the pits and grooves are chains of secondary craters, their morphology and geometric relations suggest that they are the surface traces of fractures in the underlying solid body of Phobos. Several models have been proposed to explain the pits, of which the most plausible are gas venting and drainage of regolith into open fractures. the latter mechanism is best supported by the image data and is the mechanism studied in this investigation. Drainage pits and fissures are modeled experimentally by using two rigid substrate plates placed edge to edge and covered by uniform thicknesses of dry fragmental debris (simulated regolith). Fracture extension is simulated by drawing the plates apart, allowing drainage of regolith into the newly created void. A typical drainage experiment begins with a shallow depression on the surface of the regolith, above the open fissure. Increased drainage causes local drainage pits to form; continued drainage causes the pits to coalesce, forming a cuspate groove. The resulting experimental patterns of pits and grooves have pronounced similarities to those observed on Phobos. Characteristics such as lack of raised rims, linearity of grooves and chains of pits, uniform spacing of pits, and progression from discrete pits to cuspate grooves are the same in the experiments and on Phobos. In contrast, gas-venting pits occur in irregular chains and have raised rims. These experiments thus indicate that the Phobos grooves and pits formed as drainage structures. The pit spacing in an experiment is measured at the time that the maximum number of pits forms, prior to groove development. The average pit spacing is compared to the regolith thickness for each material. Regression line fits indicate that the average spacing of drainage pits in unconsolidated

  14. Applications of asymmetric nanotextured parylene surface using its wetting and transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeroglu, Koray

    In this thesis, basic digital fluidics devices were introduced using polymeric nanorods (nano-PPX) inspired from nature. Natural inspiration ignited this research by observing butterfly wings, water strider legs, rye grass leaves, and their asymmetric functions. Nano-PPX rods, manufactured by an oblique angle polymerization (OAP) method, are asymmetrically aligned structures that have unidirectional wetting properties. Nano-PPX demonstrates similar functions to the directional textured surfaces of animals and plants in terms of wetting, adhesion, and transport. The water pin-release mechanism on the asymmetric nano-PPX surface with adhesion function provides a great transport property. How the asymmetry causes transport is discussed in terms of hysteresis and interface contact of water droplets. In this study, the transport property of nano-PPX rods is used to guide droplets as well as transporting cargo such as microgels. With the addition of tracks on the nano-PPX rods, the surfaces were transformed into basic digital fluidics devices. The track-assisted nano-PPX has been employed to applications (i.e. sorting, mixing, and carrying cargo particles). Thus, digital fluidics devices fabricated on nano-PPX surface is a promising pathway to assemble microgels in the field of bioengineering. The characterization of the nano textured surface was completed using methods such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Contact Angle Goniometry, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. These methods helped to understand the physical and chemical properties of nano-PPX. Parameters such as advancing and receding contact angles, nanorod tilt angle, and critical drop volumes were utilized to investigate the anisotropic wetting properties of nano-PPX surface. This investigation explained the directional wetting behavior of the surface as well as approaching new design parameters for adjusting surface properties. The nanorod tilt angle was a key parameter

  15. Fluvial Erosion and Transportation of an Impact Regolith Layer: Implications for Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; Breton, Sylvain

    2014-11-01

    Large regions of Titan appear to be eroded cratered terrain. If this is correct, then Titan’s surface could have been characterized by a regolith hundreds of meters thick with abundant unconsolidated debris in the size range that could be fluvially transported and serving as tools for bedrock incision. We utilized a variant on our Landform Evolution Model, originally developed to understand fluvial erosion on Mars, to study this issue. We see two end-member results. Slopes covered with coarse grained material develop a drainage network that essentially becomes stabilized after a sufficient time. They become paved with gravel that can only be eroded very slowly, if at all, after some degree of erosion. Simulations with finer sediment (for example with the maximum grain size only 16 mm) the flow can transport a good bit of sediment throughout the simulation, and drainage basins are initially created, but the topography evolves into a gentle slope of parallel drainage. For gravel channel systems under high sediment transport situations, there is no downstream concavity - the channels are essentially uniform in slope so that no drainage basins form. However, for coarser sediment we are near the threshold of motion near the end of the simulation, and channel gradients decrease downstream, implying a well-developed drainage network will form. However, if boulders are intermixed with the fines (which is reasonable), upland surfaces could eventually become mantled with a pavement of coarse debris after differential removal of transportable sediment, thus limiting net erosion unless a weathering (rock-disintegrating) process occurs on Titan. Titan’s fluvial networks could have been quickly established, then become somewhat impervious to further landscape evolution even if the precipitation rates and intensities persisted for long times.

  16. A putative cell surface receptor for white spot syndrome virus is a member of a transporter superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Ting Huang

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV, a large enveloped DNA virus, can cause the most serious viral disease in shrimp and has a wide host range among crustaceans. In this study, we identified a surface protein, named glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, which could also interact with WSSV envelope protein, VP53A. Sequence analysis revealed that Glut1 is a member of a large superfamily of transporters and that it is most closely related to evolutionary branches of this superfamily, branches that function to transport this sugar. Tissue tropism analysis showed that Glut1 was constitutive and highly expressed in almost all organs. Glut1's localization in shrimp cells was further verified and so was its interaction with Penaeus monodon chitin-binding protein (PmCBP, which was itself identified to interact with an envelope protein complex formed by 11 WSSV envelope proteins. In vitro and in vivo neutralization experiments using synthetic peptide contained WSSV binding domain (WBD showed that the WBD peptide could inhibit WSSV infection in primary cultured hemocytes and delay the mortality in shrimps challenged with WSSV. These findings have important implications for our understanding of WSSV entry.

  17. Transport properties governed by surface barriers in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Dan T.; Zeldov, Eli; Rappaport, Michael; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Ooi, Shuuichi; Shtrikman, Hadas

    1998-01-01

    One of the most common investigation techniques of type-II superconductors is the transport measurement, in which an electrical current is applied to a sample and the corresponding resistance is measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field. At temperatures well below the critical temperature, Tc, the resistance of a superconductor is usually immeasurably low. But at elevated temperatures and fields, in the so-called vortex liquid phase, a substantial linear resistance is observed. In this dissipative state, which in anisotropic high-temperature superconductors like Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 may occupy most of the mixed-state phase diagram, the transport current is usually assumed to flow uniformly across the sample as in a normal metal. To test this assumption, we have devised a measurement approach which allows determination of the flow pattern of the transport current across the sample. The surprising result is that, in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 crystals, most of the current flows at the edges of the sample rather than in the bulk, even in the highly resistive state, due to the presence of strong surface barriers. This finding has significant implications for the interpretation of existing resistivity data and may be of importance for the development of high-temperature superconducting wires and tapes.

  18. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  19. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of anthropogenic pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Li, X.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Emmons, L. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Guo, Y.; Tao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies as well as a fully-tagged approach, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  20. Light-Driven Transport of a Liquid Marble with and against Surface Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavokine, Nikita; Anyfantakis, Manos; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Bickel, Thomas; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-01

    Liquid marbles, that is, liquid drops coated by a hydrophobic powder, do not wet any solid or liquid substrate, making their transport and manipulation both highly desirable and challenging. Herein, we describe the light-driven transport of floating liquid marbles and emphasize a surprising motion behavior. Liquid marbles are deposited on a water solution containing photosensitive surfactants. Irradiation of the solution generates photoreversible Marangoni flows that transport the liquid marbles toward UV light and away from blue light when the thickness of the liquid substrate is large enough (Marangoni regime). Below a critical thickness, the liquid marbles move in the opposite direction to that of the surface flow at a speed increasing with decreasing liquid thickness (anti-Marangoni). We demonstrate that the anti-Marangoni motion is driven by the free surface deformation, which propels the non-wetting marble against the surface flow. We call this behavior "slide effect".

  1. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  2. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  3. Tunable Surface Hydrophobicity and Fluid Transport through Nanoporous Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Joseph H. J.

    There are more than three billion people across the globe that struggle to obtain clean drinkable water. One of the most promising avenues for generating potable water is through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Both solutions require a semipermeable membrane that prohibits passage of unwanted solute particles but allows passage of the solvent. Atomically thin two-dimensional membranes based on porous graphene show great promise as semipermeable materials, but modeling fluid flow on length scales between the microscopic (nanometer and smaller) and macroscopic (micron and larger) regimes presents formidable challenges. This thesis explores both equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of this problem and develops new methodology for simulating systems away from thermal equilibrium. First, we hypothesize that there is a wetting penalty for water as it tries to breach a sheet of graphene that should be naturally hydrophobic. By using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the hydrophobicity depends sensitively on the degree of electrical doping, offering an opportunity to tune the hydrophobic effect of graphene using small amounts of doping. The wetting contact angle, a measure of hydrophobicity, changes dramatically with the voltage applied to single layer graphene. We find that the sensitivity of the hydrophobic effect to voltage depends not on hydrogen bonding motifs at the interface between graphene and water, but instead on a phenomenon known as electrowetting. The theory of electrowetting predicts that the difference in surface tensions that defines the contact angle is quartic in the voltage, rather than quadratic, as it would be in bilayer graphene or in a two-dimensional metal. To explore the nonequilibrium aspects of fluid passage through atomically thin membranes, we developed a molecular dynamics methodology for simulating fluid flow at constant flux based on Gauss's principle of least constraint. This method develops microscopic

  4. Corresponding-states principle and its practice thermodynamic, transport and surface properties of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Hong Wei

    2005-01-01

    The corresponding-states principle helps the understanding and calculating of thermodynamic, transport, and surface properties of substances in various states, required by our modern lifestyle. The Corresponding-States Principle and its Practice: Thermodynamic, Transport and Surface Properties of Fluids describes the origins and applications of the principle from a universal point of view with comparisons to experimental data where possible. It uses the universal theory to explain present theories. Emphasis is on the properties of pure systems, and the corresponding-states theory can also be e

  5. A simple approach to fabricate the rose petal-like hierarchical surfaces for droplet transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chao; Huang, Mengyu; Yu, Xingjian; Ma, Yupu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-11-01

    Precise transportation of liquid microdroplets is a great challenge in the microfluidic field. A sticky superhydrophobic surface with a high static contact angle (CA) and a large contact angle hysteresis (CAH) is recognized as the favorable tool to deal with the challenging job. Some approaches have been proposed to fabricate such surface, such as mimicing the dual-scale hierarchical structure of a natural material, like rose petal. However, the available approaches normally require multiple processing steps or are carried out with great expense. In this study, we report a straightforward and inexpensive method for fabricating the sticky superhydrophobic surfaces. The fabrication relies on electroless galvanic deposition to coat the copper substrates with a textured layer of silver. The whole fabrication process is carried out under ambient conditions by using conventional laboratory materials and equipments, and generally take less than 15 min. Despite the simplicity of this fabrication method, the rose petal-like hierarchical structures and the corresponding sticky superhydrophobic wetting properties were well achieved on the artificial surfaces. For instance, the surface with a deposition time of 10 s exhibits the superhydrophobity with a CA of 151.5°, and the effective stickiness with a CAH of 56.5°. The prepared sticky superhydrophobic surfaces are finally shown in the application of droplet transportation, in which the surface acts as a mechanical hand to grasp and transport the water droplet.

  6. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  7. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  8. Prediction of Flow and Solute Transport in Fractured Media: Comparison of Metrics to Describe Effects of Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slottke, D.; Ketcham, R. A.; Sharp, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    Fractures dominate fluid flow and transport of solutes when they are open and connected. The prediction of flow through fractured media has implications for development of water resources, petroleum reservoir exploitation, contamination and remediation assessment, and site evaluation for waste repositories. Assessing the impact of surface roughness on fluid flow and solute transport through fractured media from samples on the order of 100 cm2 assumes the existence of a relationship between fracture morphology and discharge that is scale invariant or at least smoothly transformable. Although some studies assume that the length scale at which surface roughness significantly contributes to the discharge through a fracture falls within the size of a typical hand sample, there is a dearth of empirical data supporting an extension of the relationships found at small scales to larger samples. Furthermore, an appropriate metric to describe a fracture volume accurately must be chosen. We compile data from physical flow tests and numerical modeling of two discrete natural fractures of different scales in rhyolitc tuff. The University of Texas HRXCT facility provided computed tomography representations of the fractures that allow analysis of surface roughness and aperture statistics at 0.25mm grid resolution, which form the basis for transmissivity field inputs to numerical models. We show that although a small (10cm2) representative surface can describe roughness, aperture fields are not so well behaved. We compare physical flow test results, modeled flow, and analytical solutions of the cubic law using various methods of assigning a meaningful aperture to illustrate the challenges of accurate modeling of fracture flow without a priori flow information. While a geometric mean aperture of the entire aperture field closely approximates the hydraulic aperture, an arbitrary profile mean aperture has little utility for predictive purposes.

  9. Downward transport of ozone rich air and implications for atmospheric chemistry in the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Tobias; Wei, Dandan; Chase, Randy J.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Andreoli, Rita V.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo A.; Freire, Livia S.; Jardine, Angela B.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Nascimento dos Santos, Rosa M.; von Randow, Celso; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Stoy, Paul C.; Tóta, Julio; Trowbridge, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    From April 2014 to January 2015, ozone (O3) dynamics were investigated as part of GoAmazon 2014/5 project in the central Amazon rainforest of Brazil. Just above the forest canopy, maximum hourly O3 mixing ratios averaged 20 ppbv (parts per billion on a volume basis) during the June-September dry months and 15 ppbv during the wet months. Ozone levels occasionally exceeded 75 ppbv in response to influences from biomass burning and regional air pollution. Individual convective storms transported O3-rich air parcels from the mid-troposphere to the surface and abruptly enhanced the regional atmospheric boundary layer by as much as 25 ppbv. In contrast to the individual storms, days with multiple convective systems produced successive, cumulative ground-level O3 increases. The magnitude of O3 enhancements depended on the vertical distribution of O3 within storm downdrafts and origin of downdrafts in the troposphere. Ozone mixing ratios remained enhanced for > 2 h following the passage of storms, which enhanced chemical processing of rainforest-emitted isoprene and monoterpenes. Reactions of isoprene and monoterpenes with O3 are modeled to generate maximum hydroxyl radical formation rates of 6 × 106 radicals cm-3s-1. Therefore, one key conclusion of the present study is that downdrafts of convective storms are estimated to transport enough O3 to the surface to initiate a series of reactions that reduce the lifetimes of rainforest-emitted hydrocarbons.

  10. Formulation Effects and the Off-target Transport of Pyrethroid Insecticides from Urban Hard Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Controlled rainfall experiments utilizing drop forming rainfall simulators were conducted to study various factors contributing to off-target transport of off-the-shelf formulated pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces. Factors evaluated included active ingredient, product formulation, time between application and rainfall (set time), and rainfall intensity. As much as 60% and as little as 0.8% of pyrethroid applied could be recovered in surface runoff depending primarily on product f...

  11. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning.

  12. Mass Transport in a Thin Layer of Bi-Viscous Mud Under Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG Chiu-on; FU Sau-chung; BAI Yu-chuan(白玉川)

    2002-01-01

    The mass transport in a thin layer of non-Newtonian bed mud under surface waves is examined with a two-fluidStokes boundary layer model. The mud is assumed to be a bi-viscous fluid, which tends to resist motion for small-appliedstresses, but flows readily when the yield stress is exceeded. Asymptotic expansions suitable for shallow fluid layers areapplied, and the second-order solutions for the mass transport induced by surface progressive waves are obtained numeri-cally. It is found that the stronger the non-Newtonian behavior of the mud, the more pronounced intermittency of theflow. Consequently, the mass transport velocity is diminished in magnitude, and can even become negative (i. e., oppo-site to wave propagation) for a certain range of yield stress.

  13. Ambipolar surface state transport in nonmetallic stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syers, Paul; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-01-01

    Achieving true bulk insulating behavior in Bi2Se3 , the archetypal topological insulator with a simplistic one-band electronic structure and sizable band gap, has been prohibited by a well-known self-doping effect caused by selenium vacancies, whose extra electrons shift the chemical potential into the bulk conduction band. We report a synthesis method for achieving stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals that exhibit nonmetallic behavior in electrical transport down to low temperatures. Hall-effect measurements indicate the presence of both electron- and holelike carriers, with the latter identified with surface state conduction and the achievement of ambipolar transport in bulk Bi2Se3 crystals without gating techniques. With carrier mobilities surpassing the highest values yet reported for topological surface states in this material, the achievement of ambipolar transport via upward band bending is found to provide a key method to advancing the potential of this material for future study and applications.

  14. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  15. Nonadiabaticity and single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten; Niu, Q.; Pustilnik, M.

    1999-01-01

    Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves (SAW) through a narrow constriction, formed in a two-dimensional electron gas, is studied theoretically. Due to long-range Coulomb interaction, the tunneling coupling between the electron gas and the moving minimum of the SAW...

  16. Modeling Fate and Transport of Chloride from Deicers in Urban Floodplains: Implications for Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, S. H.; Lautz, L.

    2015-12-01

    Road salting in urban areas of the northeastern United States increases chloride concentrations in urban streams. Groundwater storage of saline road runoff results in increased surface water chloride concentrations through time, even in non-winter months. Stream-groundwater (SW-GW) interactions promote buffering of large seasonal swings in stream chloride concentrations, resulting in lower surface water chloride in winter and higher concentrations in summer, relative to streams hydrologically disconnected from riparian floodplains. However, the hydrogeologic processes controlling salt storage and transport in urban floodplain aquifers have not been fully investigated. We developed a 3D numerical groundwater flow and solute transport model of an urban floodplain in Syracuse, New York, using MODFLOW and MT3DMS. We ran the model for 1 year, calibrating to three conditions: water table elevations along a riparian transect, measurements of net groundwater flux to the stream along the 500-m reach, and chloride concentrations in groundwater through time in riparian wells. Chloride enters the riparian aquifer via three pathways: hillslope groundwater discharge, hyporheic exchange, and groundwater recharge during overbank flooding events. Winter overbank flooding events are the primary source of chloride to floodplain sediments. While hillslope groundwater discharge results in relatively uniform chloride through time in high conductivity units, surficial floodplain sediments with lower conductivity have high chloride concentrations from winter overbank flood events. When compared to road salt application rates (up to 20 tons of salt per lane kilometer per year), the 0.013 km2 floodplain holds only a tiny fraction of chloride applied in a watershed (>100 km of road in the watershed). To promote riparian aquifer storage of road salt and buffering of stream chloride concentrations, urban planners should design urban floodplains for frequent winter flooding events, and allow

  17. Quantum transport and two-parameter scaling at the surface of a weak topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Roger S K; Bardarson, Jens H; Moore, Joel E

    2012-02-17

    Weak topological insulators have an even number of Dirac cones in their surface spectrum and are thought to be unstable to disorder, which leads to an insulating surface. Here we argue that the presence of disorder alone will not localize the surface states; rather, the presence of a time-reversal symmetric mass term is required for localization. Through numerical simulations, we show that in the absence of the mass term the surface always flow to a stable metallic phase and the conductivity obeys a one-parameter scaling relation, just as in the case of a strong topological insulator surface. With the inclusion of the mass, the transport properties of the surface of a weak topological insulator follow a two-parameter scaling form.

  18. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  19. Reliable transport through a microfabricated X-junction surface-electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth; Amini, Jason M.; Faircloth, Daniel L.; Volin, Curtis; Doret, S. Charles; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Landgren, David W.; Denison, Douglas; Killian, Tyler; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2013-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap that supports controlled transport through the two-dimensional intersection of linear trapping zones arranged in a 90° cross. The trap is fabricated with very large scalable integration techniques which are compatible with scaling to a large quantum information processor. The shape of the radio-frequency electrodes is optimized with a genetic algorithm to reduce axial pseudopotential barriers and minimize ion heating during transport. Seventy-eight independent dc control electrodes enable fine control of the trapping potentials. We demonstrate reliable ion transport between junction legs and determine the rate of ion loss due to transport. Doppler-cooled ions survive more than 105 round-trip transits between junction legs without loss and more than 65 consecutive round trips without laser cooling.

  20. Heating and ion transport in a Y-junction surface-electrode trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, G; Volin, C; Buikema, A; Nichols, C S; Stick, D; Brown, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    We measure ion heating following transport throughout a Y-junction surface-electrode ion trap. By carefully selecting the trap voltage update rate during adiabatic transport along a trap arm, we observe minimal heating relative to the anomalous heating background. Transport through the junction results in an induced heating between 37 and 150 quanta in the axial direction per traverse. To reliably measure heating in this range, we compare the experimental sideband envelope, including up to fourth-order sidebands, to a theoretical model. The sideband envelope method allows us to cover the intermediate heating range inaccessible to the first-order sideband and Doppler recooling methods. We conclude that quantum information processing in this ion trap will likely require sympathetic cooling in order to support high fidelity gates after junction transport.

  1. A justice-theoretic approach to the distribution of transportation benefits: Implications for transportation planning practice in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, C.J.C.M.; Golub, A.; Robinson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Transportation improvements inevitably lead to an uneven distribution of user benefits, in space and by network type (private and public transport). This paper makes a moral argument for what would be a fair distribution of these benefits. The argument follows Walzer’s ‘‘Spheres of Justice’’ approac

  2. Microfour-point probe for studying electronic transport through surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Grey, Francois; Shiraki, I.

    2000-01-01

    Microfour-point probes integrated on silicon chips have been fabricated with probe spacings in the range 4-60 mum. They provide a simple robust device for electrical transport measurements at surfaces, bridging the gap between conventional macroscopic four-point probes and scanning tunneling...... microscopy. Measurements on Si(111) surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum reveal that the Si(111)-root 3x root3-Ag structure induced by a monolayer of Ag atoms has a four-point resistance two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Si(111)-7x7 clean surface. We attribute this remarkable difference to direct...

  3. Quantum transport in the surface states of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kai; Wu, Lin; Gong, Xinxin; Xiao, Shunhao; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Although bulk Bi is a prototypical semimetal with a topologically trivial electronic band structure, we show by various quantum transport measurements that epitaxial Bi(111) thin films have unexpected and nontrivial properties. Not only the top and the bottom but also the side surfaces of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films are always robustly metallic while the interior has already become insulating. We identify the coupling between the top and the bottom surface states that drives the two originally independent surface conducting channels into a single connected one. The properties of Bi(111) thin films realized could lead to promising applications in spintronics.

  4. Rapid transport from the surface to wells in fractured rock: a unique infiltration tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Jana K; Novakowski, Kent S

    2012-04-01

    A unique infiltration tracer experiment was performed whereby a fluorescent dye was applied to the land surface in an agricultural field, near Perth, Ontario, Canada, to simulate the transport of solutes to two pumped monitoring wells drilled into the granitic gneiss aquifer. This experiment, interpreted using the discrete-fracture capability of the numerical model HydroGeoSphere, showed that solute transport from the surface through thin soil (less than 2m) to wells in fractured bedrock can be extremely rapid (on the order of hours). Also, it was demonstrated that maximum concentrations of contaminants originating from the ground surface will not necessarily be the highest in the shallow aquifer horizon. These are important considerations for both private and government-owned drinking water systems that draw water from shallow fractured bedrock aquifers. This research illustrates the extreme importance of protecting drinking water at the source.

  5. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragulskis, M [Department of Mathematical Research in Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-222, 51638 Kaunas (Lithuania); Sanjuan, M A F [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: minvydas.ragulskis@ktu.lt, E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2008-08-15

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications.

  6. Role of specific amine surface configurations for grafted surfaces: implications for nanostructured CO2 adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Steven; Song, Changsik; Strano, Michael

    2011-03-15

    Amine-grafted porous materials that capture CO2 from emission streams have been considered to be potential alternatives to the more energy-intensive liquid amine systems currently employed. An underappreciated fact in the uptake mechanism of these materials is that under dry, anhydrous conditions each CO2 molecule must react with two adjacent amine groups to adsorb onto the surface, which makes the configuration of amine groups on the surface critically important. Using this chemical mechanism, we developed a semiempirical adsorption isotherm equation that allows straightforward computation of the adsorption isotherm from an arbitrary surface configuration of grafted amines for honeycomb, square, and triangular lattices. The model makes use of the fact that the distribution of amines with respect to the number of nearest neighbors, referred to as the z-histogram, along with the amine loading and equilibrium constant, uniquely determine the adsorption characteristics to a very good approximation. This model was used to predict the range of uptakes possible just through surface configuration, and it was used to fit experimental data in the literature to give a meaningful equilibrium constant and show how efficiently amines were utilized. We also demonstrate how the model can be utilized to design more efficient nanostructured adsorbents and polymer-based adsorbents. Recommendations for exploiting the role of surface configuration include the use of linear instead of branched polyamines, higher amine grafting densities, the use of flexible, less bulky, long, and rotationally free amine groups, and increased silanol densities.

  7. Mesospheric nitric oxide transport: Model-data comparisons and ionospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskind, D. E.; Sassi, F.; Friedrich, M.; Hervig, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) with specified dynamics has been used to simulate the vertical and horizontal transport of wintertime nitric oxide. Three simulations have been performed for year 2009. Two are constrained with the NOGAPS-ALPHA (Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System-Advanced Level Physics High Altitude) analysis which extends up to 92 km, using two different values of the Prandtl number. The third simulation is constrained by the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) which only extends up to 50 km. Validation of the resultant nitric oxide and methane fields are performed with data from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) instrument on the NASA/AIM satellite. The calculated atomic oxygen is compared with a recently published climatology of lower mesospheric atomic oxygen. These fields are then used to as input to a model of the ionospheric D region and compared with a database of sounding rocket measurements dating back to the 1960s. The results suggest that with an improved model of mesospheric nitric oxide, good agreement can be obtained between calculated and observed D region electron densities. The implication of these results for our understanding of such classic aeronomical problems as the D region winter anomaly is discussed.

  8. Implications of high density operation on SOL transport: A multimachine investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carralero, D., E-mail: daniel.carralero@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr., 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, H.W. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr., 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Komm, M.; Adamek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, IPP.CR, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Birkenmeier, G. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr., 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brix, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Center (United Kingdom); Janky, F.; Hacek, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, IPP.CR, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Marsen, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Center (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany); Reimold, F. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr., 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Silva, C. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Stroth, U.; Wischmeier, M.; Wolfrum, E. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr., 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    The transition reported in L-mode plasmas leading to the formation of a density “shoulder” in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) of tokamaks is investigated in the three ITER stepladder machines: COMPASS, ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and JET. In AUG and JET, the broadening of the profiles can be observed at similar relative densities (n{sub e}/n{sub GW} ∼ 0.4–0.5) and coincides with a clear increase in the size of SOL filaments and the onset of the outer divertor detachment. In COMPASS, no transition is observed in the same density range: the divertor does not detach and no clear effect is observed neither in the profiles nor in the turbulence. This is explained as the result of an increase of intermittent transport triggered by the increased resistivity along filaments associated to divertor detachment. The transition conditions in AUG and JET are compared to foreseen ITER SOL parameters, and the implications are briefly discussed.

  9. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Papadimitriou, Giannis; Ligterink, Norbert; Hausberger, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro 5 and Euro 6 ones. Mean NOx emission factor levels used in the most popular EU vehicle emission models (COPERT, HBEFA and VERSIT+) are compared with latest emission information collected in the laboratory over real-world driving cycles and on the road using portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS). The comparison shows that Euro 5 passenger car (PC) emission factors well reflect on road levels and that recently revealed emissions control failures do not call for any significant corrections. However Euro 5 light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and Euro 6 PCs in the 2014-2016 period exhibit on road emission levels twice as high as used in current models. Moreover, measured levels vary a lot for Euro 6 vehicles. Scenarios for future evolution of Euro 6 emission factors, reflecting different degree of effectiveness of emissions control regulations, show that total NOx emissions from diesel Euro 6 PC and LCV may correspond from 49% up to 83% of total road transport emissions in 2050. Unless upcoming and long term regulations make sure that light duty diesel NOx emissions are effectively addressed, this will have significant implications in meeting future air quality and national emissions ceilings targets.

  10. Surface Effect on Oil Transportation in Nanochannel: a Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haixia; Du, Yonggang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Xiaofang; Lu, Shuangfang; Jin, Yakang

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. It is demonstrated that the interaction between oil molecules and nanochannel has a great effect on the transportation properties of oil in nanochannel. Because of different interactions between oil molecules and channel, the center of mass (COM) displacement of oil in a 6-nm channel is over 30 times larger than that in a 2-nm channel, and the diffusion coefficient of oil molecules at the center of a 6-nm channel is almost two times more than that near the channel surface. Besides, it is found that polarity of oil molecules has the effect on impeding oil transportation, because the electrostatic interaction between polar oil molecules and channel is far larger than that between nonpolar oil molecules and channel. In addition, channel component is found to play an important role in oil transportation in nanochannel, for example, the COM displacement of oil in gold channel is very few due to great interaction between oil and gold substrate. It is also found that nano-sized roughness of channel surface greatly influences the speed and flow pattern of oil. Our findings would contribute to revealing the mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannels and therefore are very important for design of oil extraction in nanochannels.

  11. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian

    oxidation of sulphide centimeters down in marine sediment to the reduction of oxygen at the very surface1 . This electric coupling of spatially separated redox half-reactions seems to be mediated by centimeter long filamentous Desulfubulbus affiliated bacteria with morphological and ultra......Anaerobic oxidation of organic matter in marine sediment is traditionally considered to be coupled to oxygen reduction via a cascade of redox processes and transport of intermittent electron donors and acceptors. Electric currents have been found to shortcut this cascade and directly couple......-structural properties suggesting that they are living electric micro cables. The mode of action of these organisms has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electro migration of ions in marine sediment. The ability of Desulfubulbus filaments to bridge...

  12. Influence of enterococcal surface protein (esp) on the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Xu, Shangping

    2012-02-07

    Enterococcus was selected by US EPA as a Gram-positive indicator microorganism for groundwater fecal contamination. It was recently reported that enterococcal surface protein (esp) was more prevalent in Enterococcus from human sources than in Enterococcus from nonhuman sources and esp could potentially be used as a source tracking tool for fecal contamination (Scott et al., 2005). In this research, we performed laboratory column transport experiments to investigate the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands. Particularly, we used a wild type strain (E1162) and a mutant (E1162Δesp) to examine the influence of esp on the transport behavior of E. faecium. Our results showed that esp could significantly enhance the attachment of E. faecium cells onto the surface of silica sands and thus lower the mobility of E. faecium within sand packs. Cell surface properties (e.g., zeta potential) were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was applied to explain the effects of esp on the retention of E. faecium. Overall, our results suggested that E. faecium strains with esp could display lower mobility within saturated sand packs than E. faecium strains without esp. The disparity in the transport behavior of E. faecium with and without esp could limit the effectiveness of esp as a source tracking tool within the groundwater system.

  13. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered......The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  14. Retention mechanisms and the flow wetted surface - implications for safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the state-of-the-art concerning the flow wetted surface, its importance for radionuclide transport in the geosphere and review various suggestions on how to increase the present knowledge. Definitions are made of the various concepts used for the flow wetted surface as well as the various model parameters used. In the report methods proposed to assess the flow wetted surface are reviewed and discussed, tracer tests, tunnel and borehole investigations, geochemical studies, heat transport studies and theoretical modelling. Furthermore, a review is made of how the flow wetted surface has been treated in various safety analyses. Finally, an overall discussion with recommendations is presented, where it is concluded that at present no individual method for estimating the flow wetted surface can be selected that satisfies all requirements concerning giving relevant values, covering relevant distances and being practical to apply. Instead a combination of methods must be used. In the long-term research as well as in the safety assessment modelling focus should be put on assessing the ratio between flow wetted surface and water flux. The long-term research should address both the detailed flow within the fractures and the effective flow wetted surface along the flow paths. 55 refs.

  15. Magnetically Controlled Electronic Transport Properties of a Ferromagnetic Junction on the Surface of a Topological Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Qin; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Deng, Ming-Xun; Hu, Liang-Bin

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of the Dirac fermions through a ferromagnetic barrier junction on the surface of a strong topological insulator. The current-voltage characteristic curve and the tunneling conductance are calculated theoretically. Two interesting transport features are predicted: observable negative differential conductances and linear conductances tunable from unit to nearly zero. These features can be magnetically manipulated simply by changing the spacial orientation of the magnetization. Our results may contribute to the development of high-speed switching and functional applications or electrically controlled magnetization switching. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11174088, 11175067, 11274124

  16. Measurements of wind friction speeds over lava surfaces and assessment of sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Wind velocity profiles were obtained over alluvial plains, lava flows, and a cinder cone in the Mojave Desert to determine the wind shear and the potential for particle transport. It was found that aerodynamic roughness for winds increases nearly a factor of 5 as flow crosses from the alluvium to the lava surface, resulting in wind shear that is 21 percent greater. Thus, wind erosion and sand flux may be substantially enhanced over the lava field. Moreover, wind flow turbulence is enhanced in the wake of the cinder cone, which also increases erosion and sediment transportation by the wind.

  17. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Kuroshio Transport East of Taiwan and the Sea Surface Height Anomaly from the Interior Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LIU Qinyu; JIA Yinglai

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the Kuroshio transport to the east of Taiwan and the SSHA(Sea Surface Height Anomaly)field is studied based on the World Ocean Circulation Experiment(WOCE)PCM-1 moored current meter array observation, the satellite altimeter data from the MSLA(Map of Sea Level Anomaly)products merged with the ERS and TOPEX/POSEIDON(T/P)data sets, and the WOCE satellite-tracked drifting buoy data. It is confirmed that the Kuroshio transport across PCM-1 array highly correlates with the SSHA upstream(22°-24°, 121.75°-124°E). The SSHA is not locally generated by the developed Kuroshio meandering but is from the interior ocean and is propagating westward or northwestward. During the period from October 1992 to January 1998, two events of the northwestward propagating negative SSHA occurred, during which the SSHA merged into the Kuroshio and caused the remarkable low transport events in contrast to the normal westward propagating negative SSHA. It is also shown that the lower Kuroshio transport event would be generated in different ways. The negative anomaly in the upstream of PCM-1 array can reduce the Kuroshio transport by either offshore or onshore Kuroshio meandering. The positive anomaly, which is strong enough to detour the Kuroshio, can cause an offshore meandering and a low transport event at the PCM-1 array.

  19. Predicting uncertainty in sediment transport and landscape evolution - the influence of initial surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G. R.; Coulthard, T. J.; Lowry, J. B. C.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical landscape evolution models were initially developed to examine natural catchment hydrology and geomorphology and have become a common tool to examine geomorphic behaviour over a range of time and space scales. These models all use a digital elevation model (DEM) as a representation of the landscape surface and a significant issue is the quality and resolution of this surface. Here we focus on how subtle perturbations or roughness on the DEM surface can produce alternative model results. This study is carried out by randomly varying the elevations of the DEM surface and examining the effect on sediment transport rates and geomorphology for a proposed rehabilitation design for a post-mining landscape using multiple landscape realisations with increasing magnitudes of random changes. We show that an increasing magnitude of random surface variability does not appear to have any significant effect on sediment transport over millennial time scales. However, the random surface variability greatly changes the temporal pattern or delivery of sediment output. A significant finding is that all simulations at the end of the 10,000 year modelled period are geomorphologically similar and present a geomorphological equifinality. However, the individual patterns of erosion and deposition were different for repeat simulations with a different sequence of random perturbations. The alternative positions of random perturbations strongly influence local patterns of hillslope erosion and evolution together with the pattern and behaviour of deposition. The findings demonstrate the complex feedbacks that occur even within a simple modelled system.

  20. Enhanced Hydrogen Transport over Palladium Ultrathin Films through Surface Nanostructure Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Salvatore; Giorgianni, Gianfranco; Gentiluomo, Serena; Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda

    2015-11-01

    Palladium ultrathin films (around 2 μm) with different surface nanostructures are characterized by TEM, SEM, AFM, and temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and evaluated in terms of H2 permeability and H2-N2 separation. A change in the characteristics of Pd seeds by controlled oxidation-reduction treatments produces films with the same thickness, but different surface and bulk nanostructure. In particular, the films have finer and more homogeneous Pd grains, which results in lower surface roughness. Although all samples show high permeo-selectivity to H2 , the samples with finer grains exhibit enhanced permeance and lower activation energy for H2 transport. The analysis of the data suggests that grain boundaries between the Pd grains at the surface favor H2 transfer from surface to subsurface. Thus, the surface nanostructure plays a relevant role in enhancing the transport of H2 over the Pd ultrathin film, which is an important aspect to develop improved membranes that function at low temperatures and toward new integrated process architectures in H2 and syngas production with enhanced sustainability.

  1. Inducing Changes in Surface Topography of Copper Thin Films: Implications for Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. L.; Mitchell, E. J. R.; Koeck, D. C.; Galloway, H. C.

    2000-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of pH and corrosion inhibitors on the surface of Cu films when exposed and polished in H_2O2 based slurries. Acetic Acid was used to buffer H_2O2 into the acidic range necessary to keep the corrosion inhibitor, benzotriazole (BTA) in solution. Surface characteristics were examined using atomic force microscopy and profilometry. Some conditions cause dramatic changes in the surface topography of the Cu films. The original small "grains" that give the film a uniform roughness, disappear and leave large crystalline appearing structures with terrace widths of up to 600 Åand heights of 200-1000 ÅWe believe these changes have strong implications for Chemical Mechanical Polishing processes used to manufacture integrated circuits and will discuss how these changes in surface topography may be occurring.

  2. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  3. Atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust to the ocean: implications for research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Prospero, Joseph M; Baker, Alex R; Dentener, Frank; Ickes, Luisa; Liss, Peter S; Mahowald, Natalie M; Nickovic, Slobodan; García-Pando, Carlos Pérez; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sarin, Manmohan; Tegen, Ina; Duce, Robert A

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews our knowledge of the measurement and modeling of mineral dust emissions to the atmosphere, its transport and deposition to the ocean, the release of iron from the dust into seawater, and the possible impact of that nutrient on marine biogeochemistry and climate. Of particular concern is our poor understanding of the mechanisms and quantities of dust deposition as well as the extent of iron solubilization from the dust once it enters the ocean. Model estimates of dust deposition in remote oceanic regions vary by more than a factor of 10. The fraction of the iron in dust that is available for use by marine phytoplankton is still highly uncertain. There is an urgent need for a long-term marine atmospheric surface measurement network, spread across all oceans. Because the southern ocean is characterized by large areas with high nitrate but low chlorophyll surface concentrations, that region is particularly sensitive to the input of dust and iron. Data from this region would be valuable, particularly at sites downwind from known dust source areas in South America, Australia, and South Africa. Coordinated field experiments involving both atmospheric and marine measurements are recommended to address the complex and interlinked processes and role of dust/Fe fertilization on marine biogeochemistry and climate.

  4. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  5. Reliable transport through a microfabricated X-junction surface-electrode ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Kenneth; Faircloth, Daniel L; Volin, Curtis; Doret, S Charles; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Landgren, David W; Denison, Douglas; Killian, Tyler; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap that supports controlled transport through the two-dimensional intersection of linear trapping zones arranged in a ninety-degree cross. The trap is fabricated with very-large-scalable-integration (VLSI) techniques which are compatible with scaling to a larger quantum information processor. The shape of the radio-frequency (RF) electrodes is optimized with a genetic algorithm to minimize axial pseudopotential barriers and to minimize ion heating during transport. Seventy-eight independent DC control electrodes enable fine control of the trapping potentials. We demonstrate reliable ion transport between junction legs, trapping of ion chains with nearly-equal spacing in one of the trap's linear sections, and merging and splitting ions from these chains. Doppler-cooled ions survive more than 10^5 round-trip transits between junction legs without loss and more than sixty-five consecutive round trips without lase...

  6. Chemical interactions between the present-day Martian atmosphere and surface minerals: Implications for sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, Ronald; Fegley, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Thermochemical and photochemical reactions between surface minerals and present-day atmospheric constituents are predicted to produce microscopic effects on the surface of mineral grains. Relevant reactions hypothesized in the literature include conversions of silicates and volcanic glasses to clay minerals, conversion of ferrous to ferric compounds, and formation of carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates. These types of surface-atmosphere weathering of minerals, biological potential of the surface environment, and atmospheric stability in both present and past Martian epochs. It is emphasized that the product of these reactions will be observable and interpretable on the microscopic surface layers of Martian surface rocks using modern techniques with obvious implications for sample return from Mars. Macroscopic products of chemical weathering reactions in past Martian epochs are also expected in Martian surface materials. These products are expected not only as a result of reactions similar to those proceeding today but also due to aqueous reactions in past epochs in which liquid water was putatively present. It may prove very difficult or impossible, however, to determine definitively from the relic macroscopic product alone either the exact weathering process which led to its formation of the identity of its weathering parent mineral. The enormous advantages of studying the Martian chemical weathering by investigating the microscopic products of present-day chemical reactions on sample surfaces are very apparent.

  7. Intracellular protein transport to the thyrocyte plasma membrane: potential implications for thyroid physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvan, P; Kim, P S; Kuliawat, R; Prabakaran, D; Muresan, Z; Yoo, S E; Abu Hossain, S

    1997-02-01

    We present a snapshot of developments in epithelial biology that may prove helpful in understanding cellular aspects of the machinery designed for the synthesis of thyroid hormones on the thyroglobulin precursor. The functional unit of the thyroid gland is the follicle, delimited by a monolayer of thyrocytes. Like the cells of most simple epithelia, thyrocytes exhibit specialization of the cell surface that confronts two different extracellular environments-apical and basolateral, which are separated by tight junctions. Specifically, the basolateral domain faces the interstitium/bloodstream, while the apical domain is in contact with the lumen that is the primary target for newly synthesized thyroglobulin secretion and also serves as a storage depot for previously secreted protein. Thyrocytes use their polarity in several important ways, such as for maintaining basolaterally located iodide uptake and T4 deiodination, as well apically located iodide efflux and iodination machinery. The mechanisms by which this organization is established, fall in large part under the more general cell biological problem of intracellular sorting and trafficking of different proteins en route to the cell surface. Nearly all exportable proteins begin their biological life after synthesis in an intracellular compartment known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), upon which different degrees of difficulty may be encountered during nascent polypeptide folding and initial export to the Golgi complex. In these initial stages, ER molecular chaperones can assist in monitoring protein folding and export while themselves remaining as resident proteins of the thyroid ER. After export from the ER, most subsequent sorting for protein delivery to apical or basolateral surfaces of thyrocytes occurs within another specialized intracellular compartment known as the trans-Golgi network. Targeting information encoded in secretory proteins and plasma membrane proteins can be exposed or buried at different

  8. Evaluation of influence of surface barrier in solid on ion reflection by bipartition model of ion transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dai-Lun; WU Zhang-Wen

    2004-01-01

    The influence of surface barrier of solid upon ion reflection was studied in a few papers of other authors by using the Monte-Carlo simulation. Based on the bipartition model of ion transport, a new analytical theory has been developed instead of the MC simulation, due to important implication of the effect for fusion research. In the present paper we have calculated the number reflection coefficients of H+, D+, He and T+ normally incident on C,Al and Cu for ion energy from several eV to one hundred keV respectively. Our computational results accorded with the MC simulation. The results have shown that the effect of surface barrier on ion reflection becomes evident when the energy of incident ions is lower than one keV. In particular, for the ion energy from several eV to one hun dred eV, the discrepancies of number reflection coefficients can increase up to 0.1~0.3, showing this influence to be very important.

  9. Tuning thermal transport in ultrathin silicon membranes by surface nanoscale engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Reparaz, J Sebastian; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Wagner, Markus R; Sledzinska, Marianna; Shchepetov, Andrey; Prunnila, Mika; Ahopelto, Jouni; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Donadio, Davide

    2015-04-28

    A detailed understanding of the connections of fabrication and processing to structural and thermal properties of low-dimensional nanostructures is essential to design materials and devices for phononics, nanoscale thermal management, and thermoelectric applications. Silicon provides an ideal platform to study the relations between structure and heat transport since its thermal conductivity can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude by nanostructuring. Combining realistic atomistic modeling and experiments, we unravel the origin of the thermal conductivity reduction in ultrathin suspended silicon membranes, down to a thickness of 4 nm. Heat transport is mostly controlled by surface scattering: rough layers of native oxide at surfaces limit the mean free path of thermal phonons below 100 nm. Removing the oxide layers by chemical processing allows us to tune the thermal conductivity over 1 order of magnitude. Our results guide materials design for future phononic applications, setting the length scale at which nanostructuring affects thermal phonons most effectively.

  10. New efficient optimal mass transport approach for single freeform surface design

    CERN Document Server

    Bösel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a new optimal mass transport approach for the design of a continuous single freeform surface for collimated beams. By applying the law of reflection/refraction and the well-known integrability condition, it is shown that the design process in a small angle approximation can be decoupled into the calculation of a raymapping by optimal mass transport methods and the subsequent construction of the freeform surface by a steady linear advection equation. It is shown that the solution of this linear advection equation can be obtained by a decomposition into two dimensional subproblems and solving these by standard integrals. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by applying it to two challenging design examples.

  11. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-11-10

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation.

  12. Anisotropic surface hole-transport property of triphenylamine-derivative single crystal prepared by solution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Minoru; Katagiri, Mitsuhiko; Shironita, Sayoko; Nagayama, Norio

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the anisotropic hole transport at the triphenylamine-derivative single crystal surface prepared by a solution method. Triphenylamine derivatives are commonly used in a hole-transport material for organic photoconductors of laser-beam printers, in which the materials are used as an amorphous form. For developing organic photovoltaics using the photoconductor's technology, preparation of a single crystal seems to be a specific way by realizing the high mobility of an organic semiconductor. In this study, a single crystal of 4-(2,2-diphenylethenyl)-N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl)-benzenamine (TPA) was prepared and its anisotropic hole-transport property measured. First, the hole-transport property of the TPA was investigated based on its chemical structure and electrochemical redox characteristics. Next, a large-scale single crystal formation at a high rate was developed by employing a solution method based on its solubility and supersolubility curves. The grown TPA was found to be a single crystal based on the polarization micrograph observation and crystallographic analysis. For the TPA single crystal, an anisotropic surface conduction was found, which was well explained by its molecular stack structure. The measured current in the long-axis direction is one order of magnitude greater than that of amorphous TPA.

  13. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min, E-mail: sjhanmin@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination. - Highlights: • We study photo-enhanced electron conductance of a hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle array. • The light-induced conductance enhancement is as high as 20 folds at 10 K. • The enhancement is correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. • Coulomb blockades is overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field.

  14. Density wave like transport anomalies in surface doped Na2IrO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Mehlawat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report that the surface conductivity of Na2IrO3 crystal is extremely tunable by high energy Ar plasma etching and can be tuned from insulating to metallic with increasing etching time. Temperature dependent electrical transport for the metallic samples show signatures of first order phase transitions which are consistent with charge or spin density wave like phase transitions predicted recently. Additionally, grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS reveal that the room temperature surface structure of Na2IrO3 does not change after plasma etching.

  15. Surface and transport properties of Cu-Sn-Ti liquid alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Novakovic; E. Ricci; S. Amore; T. Lanata

    2006-01-01

    The lack of experimental data and / or limited experimental information concerning both surface and transport properties of liquid alloys often require the prediction of these quantities. An attempt has been made to link the thermophysical properties of a ternary Cu-Sn-Ti system and its binary Cu-Sn, Cu-Ti and Sn-Ti subsystems with the bulk through the study of the concentration dependence of various thermodynamic, structural, surface and dynamic properties in the frame of the statistical mechanical theory in conjunction with the quasi-lattce theory (QLT). This formalism provides valuable qualitative insight into mixing processes that occur in molten alloys.

  16. Mineral dust aerosols over the Sahara: Meteorological controls on emission and transport and implications for modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippertz, Peter; Todd, Martin C.

    2012-02-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has recently become an important research field in Earth system science because of its impacts on radiation, clouds, atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, air quality, and biogeochemical cycles. Studying and modeling dust emission and transport over the world's largest source region, the Sahara, is particularly challenging because of the complex meteorology and a very sparse observational network. Recent advances in satellite retrievals together with ground- and aircraft-based field campaigns have fostered our understanding of the spatiotemporal variability of the dust aerosol and its atmospheric drivers. We now have a more complete picture of the key processes in the atmosphere associated with dust emission. These cover a range of scales from (1) synoptic scale cyclones in the northern sector of the Sahara, harmattan surges and African easterly waves, through (2) low-level jets and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems (particularly over the Sahel), to (3) microscale dust devils and dusty plumes, each with its own pronounced diurnal and seasonal characteristics. This paper summarizes recent progress on monitoring and analyzing the dust distribution over the Sahara and discusses implications for numerical modeling. Among the key challenges for the future are a better quantification of the relative importance of single processes and a more realistic representation of the effects of the smaller-scale meteorological features in dust models. In particular, moist convection has been recognized as a major limitation to our understanding because of the inability of satellites to observe dust under clouds and the difficulties of numerical models to capture convective organization.

  17. Advection and diffusion in random media implications for sea surface temperature anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Piterbarg, Leonid I

    1997-01-01

    The book presents the foundations of the theory of turbulent transport within the context of stochastic partial differential equations. It serves to establish a firm connection between rigorous and non-rigorous results concerning turbulent diffusion. Mathematically all of the issues addressed in this book are concentrated around a single linear equation: stochastic advection-diffusion (transport) equation. There is no attempt made to derive universal statistics for turbulent flow. Instead emphasis is placed on a statistical description of a passive scalar (tracer) under given velocity statistics. An application concerning transport of sea surface temperature anomalies reconciles the developed theory and a highly practical issue of modern physical oceanography by using the newly designed inversion techniques which take advantage of powerful maximum likelihood and autoregressive estimators. Audience: Graduate students and researchers in mathematics, fluid dynamics, and physical oceanography.

  18. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, M.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2008-09-01

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  19. Transportation-Driven Mars Surface Operations Supporting an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Larry; Brown, Kendall; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study evaluating options for supporting a series of human missions to a single Mars surface destination. In this scenario the infrastructure emplaced during previous visits to this site is leveraged in following missions. The goal of this single site approach to Mars surface infrastructure is to enable "Steady State" operations by at least 4 crew for up to 500 sols at this site. These characteristics, along with the transportation system used to deliver crew and equipment to and from Mars, are collectively known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). Information in this paper is presented in the sequence in which it was accomplished. First, a logical buildup sequence of surface infrastructure was developed to achieve the desired "Steady State" operations on the Mars surface. This was based on a concept of operations that met objectives of the EMC. Second, infrastructure capabilities were identified to carry out this concept of operations. Third, systems (in the form of conceptual elements) were identified to provide these capabilities. This included top-level mass, power and volume estimates for these elements. Fourth, the results were then used in analyses to evaluate three options (18t, 27t, and 40t landed mass) of Mars Lander delivery capability to the surface. Finally, Mars arrival mass estimates were generated based upon the entry, descent, and landing requirements for inclusion in separate assessments of in-space transportation capabilities for the EMC.

  20. Interactions between glycine derivatives and mineral surfaces: Implications for the origins of life on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bowman, K. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Various mechanisms could have delivered amino acids to the prebiotic Earth (Miller and Orgel 1974). The polymerization of amino acids may have been important for the origin of life, as peptides may have been components for the first self-replicating systems (Kauffman 1971; Yao et al 1998). Though amino acid concentrations in the primitive oceans were likely too dilute for significant oligomerization to occur (Cleaves et al 2009), mineral surface adsorption may have concentrated these biomolecules (Bernal 1951; Lambert 2008). Few studies have examined the catalytic effects of mineral surfaces on aqueous peptide oligomerization or degradation. As unactivated amino acid polymerization is thermodynamically unfavorable and kinetically slow in aqueous solution, we studied the reverse reaction of polymer degradation to measure potential mineral catalysis. Glycine (G) derivatives glycylglycine (GG), diketopiperazine (DKP), and glycylglycylglycine (GGG) were reacted with different minerals (calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, rutile, amorphous silica, and pyrite) in the presence of 0.05 M pH 8.1 KHCO3 buffer and 0.1 M NaCl as background electrolyte. Experiments were performed by reacting the aqueous amino acid derivative-mineral mixtures in a thermostatted oven (modified to accommodate a mechanical rotator) at 25°, 50° or 70°C. Samples were removed after 30, 60, 90, and 140 hours. Samples were then analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography to quantify the products. Besides mineral catalysis, it was determined that degradation of GGG proceeds principally via a GGG → DKP + G mechanism, rather than via GGG → GG + G. Below 70°C kinetics were generally too sluggish to detect catalytic activity over reasonable laboratory time-scales at this pH. At 70°C, pyrite was the only mineral with detectible catalytic effects on the degradation of GGG. GGG degraded ~ 1.5 - 4 x faster in the presence of pyrite than in control reactions, depending on the ratio of solution

  1. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone: U TRANSPORT IN A GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER TRANSITION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Murray, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hammond, Glenn [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico USA

    2016-03-01

    A tightly spaced well-field within a groundwater uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a three year period for groundwater elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from mountain snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trends for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal well-to well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common temporal behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Concentration hot spots were observed in groundwater that varied in location with increasing water table elevation. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized U was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While uranium time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year to year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of the river water intrusion event.

  2. Impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Srinivasa Ranga, Vijay Penagonda; Mao, Yongjun; Chen, Kevin; Qiao, Hanzi

    2008-03-01

    Genetic markers have been in popular use for tracing microbial movement in the environment. However, the impact of genetic marker insertion on microbial surface properties and consequent transport is often ignored. For this research, we investigated the impact of luminescence-based genetic marker insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport. Typical Gram-positive bacterial strains of Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mitis and Micrococcus luteus were used as model bacterial strains in this research. We manipulated gene transfer to observe the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties based on contact angle measurements, and we conducted column experiments to evaluate the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial transport. After lux gene insertion, bacterial interactions with the porous media increased, demonstrating stronger deposition potential in the porous media. Accordingly, retention of the daughter strains increased. Lux gene insertion also resulted in an increase in bacterial dispersion and equilibrium adsorption in the porous media. The bacterial deposition coefficient was found to correlate with the free energy of interactions between bacteria and the porous media.

  3. Passive scalar transport to and from the surface of a Pocillopora coral colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of flow through a single Pocillopora coral colony were performed to examine the interaction between the flow conditions and scalar transport near a coral colony. With corals currently undergoing a third global bleaching event, a fuller understanding of the transport of nutrients, weak temperature gradients, and other passive scalars to and from the coral polyp tissue is more important than ever. The complex geometry of a coral colony poses a significant challenge for numerical simulation. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, the immersed boundary method was implemented. Large eddy simulation was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field in the range of realistic Reynolds numbers of 5,000 to 30,000 and turbulent Schmidt numbers of up to 1,000. Both uniform and oscillatory flows through the colony were investigated. Significant differences were found between the cases when the scalar originated at the edge of the flow domain and was transported into the colony, versus when the scalar originated on the surface of the colony and was transported away from the coral. The domain-to-colony transport rates were found to be orders of magnitude higher than the colony-to-domain rates.

  4. 7Be and 210Pb radioactivity and implications on sources of surface ozone at Mt. Waliguan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiangdong; WANG Guojiang; TANG Jie; ZHANG Xiaochun; YANG Wei; H. N. Lee; WANG Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    Beryllium-7 (7Be) and lead-210 (210Pb) radioac- tivity in aerosols collected, from October 2002 to January 2004 at Mt. Waliguan, by the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) Station, Qinghai Province is presented. The data were analyzed together with simultaneously measured surface ozone concentrations. We found that short time variations of 7Be and 210Pb were linked to alternations of synoptic weather around the Mt. Waliguan region. 210Pb showed the lowest concentration in summer while 7Be showed no obvious sea- sonal changes. Relatively high 7Be and 210Pb radioactivity was observed at Mt. Waliguan when compared with the ob- servations at other mountain sites in other parts of the world. Surface ozone and 7Be showed a consistent seasonal variation. Surface ozone correlated fairly well with 7Be/210Pb ratio. This suggested that vertical transport from higher altitudes of the atmosphere has predominant effects on the budget of surface ozone at Mt. Waliguan.

  5. Human transporters, PEPT1/2, facilitate melatonin transportation into mitochondria of cancer cells: An implication of the therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiaokui; Wang, Chao; Yu, Zhenlong; Peng, Yulin; Wang, Shumei; Feng, Shengnan; Zhang, Shouji; Tian, Xiangge; Sun, Chengpeng; Liu, Kexin; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is present in virtually all organisms from bacteria to mammals, and it exhibits a broad spectrum of biological functions, including synchronization of circadian rhythms and oncostatic activity. Several functions of melatonin are mediated by its membrane receptors, but others are receptor-independent. For the latter, melatonin is required to penetrate membrane and enters intracellular compartments. However, the mechanism by which melatonin enters cells remains debatable. In this study, it was identified that melatonin and its sulfation metabolites were the substrates of oligopeptide transporter (PEPT) 1/2 and organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, respectively. The docking analysis showed that the binding of melatonin to PEPT1/2 was attributed to their low binding energy and suitable binding conformation in which melatonin was embedded in the active site of PEPT1/2 and fitted well with the cavity in three-dimensional space. PEPT1/2 transporters play a pivotal role in melatonin uptake in cells. Melatonin's membrane transportation via PEPT1/2 renders its oncostatic effect in malignant cells. For the first time, PEPT1/2 were identified to localize in the mitochondrial membrane of human cancer cell lines of PC3 and U118. PEPT1/2 facilitated the transportation of melatonin into mitochondria. Melatonin accumulation in mitochondria induced apoptosis of PC3 and U118 cells. Thus, PEPT1/2 can potentially be used as a cancer cell-targeted melatonin delivery system to improve the therapeutic effects of melatonin in cancer treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A field study of colloid transport in surface and subsurface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Yu; Xian, Qing-Song; Weisbrod, Noam; Yang, Jae E.; Wang, Hong-Lan

    2016-11-01

    Colloids have been recognized to enhance the migration of strongly-sorbing contaminants. However, few field investigations have examined combined colloid transport via surface runoff and subsurface flows. In a headwater catchment of the upper Yangtze River, a 6 m (L) by 4 m (W) sloping (6°) farmland plot was built by cement walls to form no-flow side boundaries. The plot was monitored in the summer of 2014 for the release and transport of natural colloids via surface runoff and subsurface flows (i.e., the interflow from the soil-mudrock interface and fracture flow from the mudrock-sandstone interface) in response to rain events. The water sources of the subsurface flows were apportioned to individual rain events using a two end-member model (i.e., mobile pre-event soil water extracted by a suction-cup sampler vs. rainwater (event water)) based on δ18O measurements. For rain events with high preceding soil moisture, mobile pre-event soil water was the main contributor (generally >60%) to the fracture flow. The colloid concentration in the surface runoff was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that in the subsurface flows. The lowest colloid concentration was found in the subsurface interflow, which was probably the result of pore-scale colloid straining mechanisms. The rainfall intensity and its temporal variation govern the dynamics of the colloid concentrations in both surface runoff and subsurface flows. The duration of the antecedent dry period affected not only the relative contributions of the rainwater and the mobile pre-event soil water to the subsurface flows but also the peak colloid concentration, particularly in the fracture flow. The rain period because their transport in association with colloids may occur rapidly over long distances via both surface runoff and subsurface flows with rainfall.

  7. A physically-based integrated numerical model for flow, upland erosion, and contaminant transport in surface-subsurface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE ZhiGuo; WU WeiMing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based integrated hydrologic model that can simulate the rain-fall-induced 2D surface water flow, 3D variably saturated subsurface flow, upland soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the surface-subsurface system of a watershed.The model couples surface and subsurface flows based on the assumption of continuity conditions of pressure head and exchange flux at the ground, considering infiltration and evapotranspiration.The upland rill/interrill soil erosion and transport are simulated using a non-equilibrium transport model.Con-taminant transport in the integrated surface and subsurface domains is simulated using advec-tion-diffusion equations with mass changes due to sediment sorption and desorption and exchanges between two domains due to infiltration, diffusion, and bed change.The model requires no special treatments at the interface of upland areas and streams and is suitable for wetland areas and agricul-tural watersheds with shallow streams.

  8. Examining Lagrangian surface transport during a coastal upwelling in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeche-Ellmann, Nicole; Mingelaitė, Toma; Soomere, Tarmo

    2017-07-01

    We employ in-situ surface drifters and satellite derived sea surface temperature data to examine the impact that an upwelling event may have on mixing and Lagrangian transport of surrounding surface waters. The test area is located near the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland where easterly winds are known to trigger intense coastal upwellings. The analysis is based on the comparison of motions of three drifters that follow the currents in the uppermost layer with a thickness of 2 m with MODIS-based sea surface temperature data and high-quality open sea wind time series. The presence of an upwelling event superseded the classic Ekman-type drift of the surface layer and considerably slowed down the average speed of surface currents in the region affected by the upwelled cold water jet and its filaments. The drifters tended to stay amidst the surrounding surface waters. The properties of mixing were evaluated using the daily rate of temperature change along several transects. The upwelled cooler water largely kept its identity during almost the entire duration of the upwelling event. Intense mixing started at a later stage of the upwelling and continued after the end of the event when the winds that have driven the entire process began to subside.

  9. A multiphase ion-transport analysis of the electrostatic disjoining pressure: implications for binary droplet coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lachlan; Gebauer, Felix; Bart, Hans-Jörg; Stevens, Geoffrey; Harvie, Dalton

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the physics of emulsion coalescence is critical for the robust simulation of industrial solvent extraction processes, in which loaded organic and raffinate phases are separated via the coalescence of dispersed droplets. At the droplet scale, predictive collision-outcome models require an accurate description of the repulsive surface forces arising from electrical-double-layer interactions. The conventional disjoining-pressure treatment of double-layer forces, however, relies on assumptions which do not hold generally for deformable droplet collisions: namely, low interfacial curvature and negligible advection of ion species. This study investigates the validity bounds of the disjoining pressure approximation for low-inertia droplet interactions. A multiphase ion-transport model, based on a coupling of droplet-scale Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations, predicts ion-concentration fields that are consistent with the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution; indicating that the disjoining-pressure approach is valid for both static and dynamic interactions in low-Reynolds-number settings. The present findings support the development of coalescence kernels for application in macro-scale population balance modelling.

  10. Emergent Conformal Symmetry and Geometric Transport Properties of Quantum Hall States on Singular Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T.; Chiu, Y. H.; Laskin, M.; Wiegmann, P.

    2016-12-01

    We study quantum Hall states on surfaces with conical singularities. We show that the electronic fluid at the cone tip possesses an intrinsic angular momentum, which is due solely to the gravitational anomaly. We also show that quantum Hall states behave as conformal primaries near singular points, with a conformal dimension equal to the angular momentum. Finally, we argue that the gravitational anomaly and conformal dimension determine the fine structure of the electronic density at the conical point. The singularities emerge as quasiparticles with spin and exchange statistics arising from adiabatically braiding conical singularities. Thus, the gravitational anomaly, which appears as a finite size correction on smooth surfaces, dominates geometric transport on singular surfaces.

  11. The impact of synoptic weather on UK surface ozone and implications for premature mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, R. J.; Butt, E. W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Doherty, R. M.; Fenech, S.; Schmidt, A.; Arnold, S. R.; Savage, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollutants, such as ozone, have adverse impacts on human health and cause, for example, respiratory and cardiovascular problems. In the United Kingdom (UK), peak surface ozone concentrations typically occur in the spring and summer and are controlled by emission of precursor gases, tropospheric chemistry and local meteorology which can be influenced by large-scale synoptic weather regimes. In this study we composite surface and satellite observations of summer-time (April to September) ozone under different UK atmospheric circulation patterns, as defined by the Lamb weather types. Anticyclonic conditions and easterly flows are shown to significantly enhance ozone concentrations over the UK relative to summer-time average values. Anticyclonic stability and light winds aid the trapping of ozone and its precursor gases near the surface. Easterly flows (NE, E, SE) transport ozone and precursor gases from polluted regions in continental Europe (e.g. the Benelux region) to the UK. Cyclonic conditions and westerly flows, associated with unstable weather, transport ozone from the UK mainland, replacing it with clean maritime (North Atlantic) air masses. Increased cloud cover also likely decrease ozone production rates. We show that the UK Met Office regional air quality model successfully reproduces UK summer-time ozone concentrations and ozone enhancements under anticyclonic and south-easterly conditions for the summer of 2006. By using established ozone exposure-health burden metrics, anticyclonic and easterly condition enhanced surface ozone concentrations pose the greatest public health risk.

  12. Fate and transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in surface waters of agricultural basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, R.H.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Capel, P.D.; Gregoire, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops and is heavily used on soybeans, corn and cotton. Glyphosate is used in almost all agricultural areas of the United States, and the agricultural use of glyphosate has increased from less than 10 000 Mg in 1992 to more than 80 000 Mg in 2007. The greatest intensity of glyphosate use is in the midwestern United States, where applications are predominantly to genetically modified corn and soybeans. In spite of the increase in usage across the United States, the characterization of the transport of glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on a watershed scale is lacking. Results: Glyphosate and AMPA were frequently detected in the surface waters of four agricultural basins. The frequency and magnitude of detections varied across basins, and the load, as a percentage of use, ranged from 0.009 to 0.86% and could be related to three general characteristics: source strength, rainfall runoff and flow route. Conclusions: Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water; however, the watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff and a flow route that does not include transport through the soil. ?? 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Modeling pollutant transport in overland flow over non-planar and non-homogenous infiltrating surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo HE; Gokmen TAYFUR; Qi-hua RAN; Hao-xuan WENG

    2013-01-01

    Pollutant transport in overland flow over surfaces with spatially varying microtopography,roughness,and infiltration was investigated using the diffusion wave equation and transport rate-based equation.The finite volume method in space and an implicit backward difference scheme in time were employed in the numerical solution of the 2D governing equations.The developed model was first tested against an analytical solution and an experimental study involving overland flow and the associated pollutant transport,subsequently a series of numerical tests were carried out.Non-point source pollution was investigated under spatially varying microtopography,roughness,and infiltration.The simulation results showed that microtopography and roughness were the dominant factors causing significant spatial variations in solute concentration.When the spatially varying microtopography was replaced by a smooth surface,the result was an overestimation of the solute rate at the outlet of the upland.On the other hand,when the spatially varying roughness was replaced by the average roughness and spatially varying infiltration rate by the average infiltration rate,the pollutant discharge at the outlet of the upland was not significantly affected.The numerical results further showed that one cannot ignore the spatial variations of slope and roughness when investigating the local pollutant concentration distribution.

  14. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and AMPA into Surface Waters of Agricultural Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, R.; Kalkhoff, S.; Capel, P.; Gregoire, C.

    2010-12-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops, but is particularly heavily used on crops which are genetically modified to be glyphosate tolerant: predominately soybeans, corn, potatoes, and cotton. Glyphosate is used extensively in almost all agricultural areas of the United States, and annual application has increased from less than 10,000 Mg in 1992 to more than 80,000 Mg in 2007. The greatest areal use is in the Midwest where glyphosate is applied on genetically modified corn and soybeans. Although use is increasing, the characterization of glyphosate transport on the watershed scale is lacking. Glyphosate, and its degradate AMPA [aminomethylphosphoric acid], was frequently detected in the surface waters of four agricultural watersheds. The load as a percent of use of glyphosate ranged from 0.009 to 0.86 percent and can be related to three factors: source strength, hydrology, and flowpath. Glyphosate use within a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water at the part per billion level; however watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff, and a flowpath that does not include transport through the soil.

  15. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of Mercury Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Parameterizations for Incorporation into Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, T.; Agnan, Y.; Obrist, D.; Selin, N. E.; Urban, N. R.; Wu, S.; Perlinger, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Inadequate representation of process-based mechanisms of exchange behavior of elemental mercury (Hg0) and decoupled treatment of deposition and emission are two major limitations of parameterizations of atmosphere-surface exchange flux commonly incorporated into chemical transport models (CTMs). Of nineteen CTMs for Hg0 exchange we reviewed (ten global, nine regional), eight global and seven regional models have decoupled treatment of Hg0 deposition and emission, two global models include no parameterization to account for emission, and the remaining two regional models include coupled deposition and emission parameterizations (i.e., net atmosphere-surface exchange). The performance of atmosphere-surface exchange parameterizations in CTMs depends on parameterization uncertainty (in terms of both accuracy and precision) and feasibility of implementation. We provide a comparison of the performance of three available parameterizations of net atmosphere-surface exchange. To evaluate parameterization accuracy, we compare predicted exchange fluxes to field measurements conducted over a variety of surfaces compiled in a recently developed global database of terrestrial Hg0 surface-atmosphere exchange flux measurements. To assess precision, we estimate the sensitivity of predicted fluxes to the imprecision in parameter input values, and compare this sensitivity to that derived from analysis of the global Hg0 flux database. Feasibility of implementation is evaluated according to the availability of input parameters, computational requirements, and the adequacy of uncertainty representation. Based on this assessment, we provide suggestions for improved treatment of Hg0 net exchange processes in CTMs.

  17. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially-local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport are investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas $\\rm \\textbf{1}$, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transpo...

  18. Surface oxygen vacancy and oxygen permeation flux limits of perovskite ion transport membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Anton

    2015-09-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The mechanisms and quantitative models for how oxygen is separated from air using ion transport membranes (ITMs) are not well understood, largely due to the experimental complexity for determining surface exchange reactions at extreme temperatures (>800°C). This is especially true when fuels are present at the permeate surface. For both inert and reactive (fuels) operations, solid-state oxygen surface vacancies (δ) are ultimately responsible for driving the oxygen flux, JO2. In the inert case, the value of δ at either surface is a function of the local PO2 and temperature, whilst the magnitude of δ dictates both the JO2 and the inherent stability of the material. In this study values of δ are presented based on experimental measurements under inert (CO2) sweep: using a permeation flux model and local PO2 measurements, collected by means of a local gas-sampling probe in our large-scale reactor, we can determine δ directly. The ITM assessed was La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF); the relative resistances to JO2 were quantified using the pre-defined permeation flux model and local PO2 values. Across a temperature range from 825°C to 1056°C, δ was found to vary from 0.007 to 0.029 (<1%), safely within material stability limits, whilst the permeate surface exchange resistance dominates. An inert JO2 limit was identified owing to a maximum sweep surface δ, δmaxinert. The physical presence of δmaxinert is attributed to a rate limiting step shift from desorption to associative electron transfer steps on the sweep surface as PO2 is reduced. Permeate surface exchange limitations under non-reactive conditions suggest that reactive (fuel) operation is necessary to accelerate surface chemistry for future work, to reduce flux resistance and push δpast δmaxinert in a stable manner.

  19. Imaging and quantifying solute transport across periosteum: implications for muscle-bone crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaohan; Price, Christopher; Lu, Xin Lucas; Wang, Liyun

    2014-09-01

    Muscle and bone are known to act as a functional unit and communicate biochemically during tissue development and maintenance. Muscle-derived factors (myokines) have been found to affect bone functions in vitro. However, the transport times of myokines to penetrate into bone, a critical step required for local muscle-bone crosstalk, have not been quantified in situ or in vivo. In this study, we investigated the permeability of the periosteum, a major barrier to muscle-bone crosstalk by tracking and modeling fluorescent tracers that mimic myokines under confocal microscopy. Periosteal surface boundaries and tracer penetration within the boundaries were imaged in intact murine tibiae using reflected light and time-series xz confocal imaging, respectively. Four fluorescent tracers including sodium fluorescein (376Da) and dextrans (3kDa, 10kDa and 40kDa) were chosen because they represented a wide range of molecular weights (MW) of myokines. We found that i) murine periosteum was permeable to the three smaller tracers while the 40kDa could not penetrate beyond 40% of the outer periosteum within 8h, suggesting that periosteum is semi-permeable with a cut-off MW of approximately 40kDa, and ii) the characteristic penetration time through the periosteum (~60μm thick) increased with tracer MW and fit well with a relationship tcs=-4.43×10(4)-0.57×MWDa-4×10(4)-8.65×10(8)MWDa-4×10(4), from which, the characteristic penetration times of various myokines were extrapolated. To achieve effective muscle-bone crosstalk, likely signaling candidates should have shorter penetration time than their bioactive time, which we assumed to be 5 times of the molecule's half-lifetime in the body. Myokines such as PGE2, IGF-1, IL-15 and FGF-2 were predicted to satisfy this requirement. In summary, a novel imaging approach was developed and used to investigate the transport of myokine mimicking-tracers through the periosteum, enabling further quantitative studies of muscle

  20. The effects of surface aging on nanoparticle fate and transport in natural and engineered porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M.

    Nanomaterials will be subjected to various surface transformations in the environment and within water and wastewater treatment systems. A comprehensive understanding of the fate and transport behavior of "aged" nanomaterials in both natural and engineered porous media is required in order to accurately quantify ecological and human health risks. This research sought to (1) evaluate the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light aging on nanoparticle transport in water-saturated porous media; and (2) assess the effects of influent water quality on silver nanoparticle retention and dissolution in ceramic water filters. Additionally, the value of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) data in nanoparticle fate and transport studies was evaluated by comparing deposition behavior in complementary QCM-D and sand columns experiments. Silver (nAg) and iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to UV light were up to 50% more strongly retained in porous media compared with freshly prepared suspensions due to less negative surface charge and larger aggregate sizes. UV-aged nAg were more prone to dissolution in sand columns, resulting in effluent Ag+ concentrations as high as 1.2 mg/L. In ceramic water filters, dissolution and cation exchange processes controlled silver release into treated water. The use of acidic, high salinity, or high hardness water accelerated oxidative dissolution of the silver coating and resulted in effluent silver concentrations 5-10 times above international drinking water guidelines. Results support the recommendation for a regular filter replacement or silver re-application schedule to ensure ongoing efficacy. Taken in concert, these research findings suggest that oxidative aging of nanomaterial surfaces (either through exposure to UV light or aggressive water chemistries) will alter the fate of nanomaterials in the environment and may decrease the effective lifetime of devices which utilize nanotechnology. Corresponding QCM-D and column experiments revealed that

  1. Electrostatic potential variation on the flux surface and its impact on impurity transport

    CERN Document Server

    García-Regaña, J M; Turkin, Y; Kleiber, R; Helander, P; Maaßberg, H; Alonso, J A; Velasco, J L

    2015-01-01

    The particle transport of impurities in magnetically confined plasmas under some conditions does not find, neither quantitatively nor qualitatively, a satisfactory theory-based explanation. This compromise the successful realization of thermo-nuclear fusion for energy production since its accumulation is known to be one of the causes that leads to the plasma breakdown. In standard reactor-relevant conditions this accumulation is in most stellarators intrinsic to the lack of toroidal symmetry, that leads to the neoclassical electric field to point radially inwards. This statement, that the standard theory allows to formulate, has been contradicted by some experiments that showed weaker or no accumulation under such conditions \\cite{Ida_pop_16_056111_2009, Yoshinuma_nf_49_062002_2009}. The charge state of the impurities makes its transport more sensitive to the electric fields. Thus, the short length scale turbulent electrostatic potential or its long wave-length variation on the flux surface $\\Phi_{1}$ -- that...

  2. Entanglements in Marginal Solutions: A Means of Tuning Pre-Aggregation of Conjugated Polymers with Positive Implications for Charge Transport

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Hanlin

    2015-06-17

    The solution-processing of conjugated polymers, just like commodity polymers, is subject to solvent and molecular weight-dependent solubility, interactions and chain entanglements within the polymer, all of which can influence the crystallization and microstructure development in semi-crystalline polymers and consequently affect charge transport and optoelectronic properties. Disentanglement of polymer chains in marginal solvents was reported to work via ultrasonication, facilitating the formation of photophysically ordered polymer aggregates. In this contribution, we explore how a wide range of technologically relevant solvents and formulations commonly used in organic electronics influence chain entanglement and the aggregation behaviour of P3HT using a combination of rheological and spectrophotometric measurements. The specific viscosity of the solution offers an excellent indication of the degree of entanglements in the solution, which is found to be related to the solubility of P3HT in a given solvent. Moreover, deliberately disentangling the solution in the presence of solvophobic driving forces, leads consistently to formation of photophysically visible aggregates which is indicative of local and perhaps long range order in the solute. We show for a broad range of solvents and molecular weights that disentanglement ultimately leads to significant ordering of the polymer in the solid state and a commensurate increase in charge transport properties. In doing so we demonstrate a remarkable ability to tune the microstructure which has important implications for transport properties. We discuss its potential implications in the context of organic photovoltaics.

  3. Phosphorus transport with runoff of simulated rainfall from purple-soil cropland of different surface conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang; ZHANG Jin-zhong; ZHU Bo; ZHOU Pei; MIAO Chi-yuan; WANG Tao

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the patterns of phosphorus transport from purple-soil cropland of 5° and 10° slopes with bare and vegetated surfaces, respectively. Each type of land was tested under a simulated moderate rainfall of 0.33 mm/min, a downfall of 0.90 mm/min, and a rainstorm of 1.86 mm/min. Runoff dynamics and changes in the export amount of phosphorus are influenced by the rainfall intensity, the slope and surface conditions of cropland. The vegetation diverts rain water from the surface into soil and helps the formation of a subsurface runoff, but has little influence on runoff process at the same sloping degree. Vegetated soil has a smaller phosphorous loss, particularly much less in the particulate form. A heavier rainfall flushes away more phosphorous. Rainwater percolating soil carries more dissolved phosphorous than particulate phosphorous. Understanding the patterns of phosphorous transport under various conditions from purple soil in the middle of Sichuan basin is helpful for developing countermeasures against non-point-source pollution resulting in the eutrophication of water bodies in this region that could, if not controlled properly, deteriorate the water quality of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  4. A propagating ATPase gradient drives transport of surface-confined cellular cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Neuman, Keir C; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    The faithful segregation of duplicated genetic material into daughter cells is critical to all organisms. In many bacteria, the segregation of chromosomes involves transport of "centromere-like" loci over the main body of the chromosome, the nucleoid, mediated by a two-protein partition system: a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and an ATPase stimulator, ParB, which binds to the centromere-like loci. These systems have previously been proposed to function through a filament-based mechanism, analogous to actin- or microtubule-based movement. Here, we reconstituted the F-plasmid partition system using a DNA-carpeted flow cell as an artificial nucleoid surface and magnetic beads coated with plasmid partition complexes as surface-confined cargo. This minimal system recapitulated directed cargo motion driven by a surface ATPase gradient that propagated with the cargo. The dynamics are consistent with a diffusion-ratchet model, whereby the cargo dynamically establishes, and interacts with, a concentration gradient of the ATPase. A chemophoresis force ensues as the cargo perpetually chases the ATPase gradient, allowing the cargo to essentially "surf" the nucleoid on a continuously traveling wave of the ATPase. Demonstration of this non-filament-based motility mechanism in a biological context establishes a distinct class of motor system used for the transport and positioning of large cellular cargo.

  5. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  6. Large scale reactive transport of nitrate across the surface water divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortunov, E.; Lu, C.; Amos, R.; Grathwohl, P.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater pollution caused by agricultural and atmospheric inputs is a pressing issue in environmental management worldwide. Various researchers have studied different aspects of nitrate contamination since the substantial increase of the agriculture pollution in the second half of the 20th century. This study addresses large scale reactive solute transport in a typical Germany hilly landscapes in a transect crossing 2 valleys: River Neckar and Ammer. The numerical model was constructed compromising a 2-D cross-section accounting for typical fractured mudstones and unconsolidated sediments. Flow modelling showed that the groundwater divide significantly deviates from the surface water divide providing conditions for inter-valley flow and transport. Reactive transport modelling of redox-sensitive solutes (e.g. agriculture nitrate and natural sulfate, DOC, ammonium) with MIN3P was used to elucidate source of nitrate in aquifers and rivers. Since both floodplains, in the Ammer and Neckar valley contain Holocene sediments relatively high in organic carbon, agricultural nitrate is reduced therein and does not reach the groundwater. However, nitrate applied in the hillslopes underlain by fractured oxidized mudrock is transported to the high yield sand and gravel aquifer in the Neckar valley. Therefore, the model predicts that nitrate in the Neckar valley comes, to a large extent, from the neighboring Ammer valley. Moreover, nitrate observed in the rivers and drains in the Ammer valley is very likely geogenic since frequent peat layers there release ammonium which is oxidized as it enters the surface water. Such findings are relevant for land and water quality management.

  7. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  8. Short communication: expression of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the female lower genital tract: implications for microbicide research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Cost, Marilyn; Poloyac, Samuel; Rohan, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Topical vaginal microbicides have been considered a promising option for preventing the male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV; however, clinical trials to date have not clearly demonstrated robust and reproducible effectiveness results. While multiple approaches may help enhance product effectiveness observed in clinical trials, increasing the drug exposure in lower genital tract tissues is a compelling option, given the difficulty in achieving sufficient drug exposure and positive correlation between tissue exposure and microbicide efficacy. Since many microbicide drug candidates are substrates of transporters and/or metabolizing enzymes, there is emerging interest in improving microbicide exposure and efficacy through local modulation of transporters and enzymes in the female lower genital tract. However, no systematic information on transporter/enzyme expression is available for ectocervical and vaginal tissues of premenopausal women, the genital sites most relevant to microbicide drug delivery. The current study utilized reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to examine the mRNA expression profile of 22 transporters and 19 metabolizing enzymes in premenopausal normal human ectocervix and vagina. Efflux and uptake transporters important for antiretroviral drugs, such as P-gp, BCRP, OCT2, and ENT1, were found to be moderately or highly expressed in the lower genital tract as compared to liver. Among the metabolizing enzymes examined, most CYP isoforms were not detected while a number of UGTs such as UGT1A1 were highly expressed. Moderate to high expression of select transporters and enzymes was also observed in mouse cervix and vagina. The implications of this information on microbicide research is also discussed, including microbicide pharmacokinetics, the utilization of the mouse model in microbicide screening, as well as the in vivo functional studies of cervicovaginal transporters and enzymes.

  9. Rainfall intensity and phosphorus source effects on phosphorus transport in surface runoff from soil trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Francirose; Sharpley, Andrew; Prochnow, Luis Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Phosphorus runoff from agricultural fields amended with mineral fertilizers and manures has been linked to freshwater eutrophication. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different rainfall intensities and P sources differing in water soluble P (WSP) concentration on P transport in runoff from soil trays packed with a Berks loam and grassed with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Triple superphosphate (TSP; 79% WSP), low-grade super single phosphate (LGSSP; 50% WSP), North Carolina rock phosphate (NCRP; 0.5% WSP) and swine manure (SM; 70% WSP), were broadcast (100 kg total P ha-1) and rainfall applied at 25, 50 and 75 mm h-1 1, 7, 21, and 56 days after P source application. The concentration of dissolved reactive (DRP), particulate (PP), and total P (TP) was significantly (Prunoff with a rainfall intensity of 75 than 25 mm h-1 for all P sources. Further, runoff DRP increased as P source WSP increased, with runoff from a 50 mm h-1 rain 1 day after source application having a DRP concentration of 0.25 mg L-1 for NCRP and 28.21 mg L-1 for TSP. In contrast, the proportion of runoff TP as PP was greater with low (39% PP for NCRP) than high WSP sources (4% PP for TSP) averaged for all rainfall intensities. The increased PP transport is attributed to the detachment and transport of undissolved P source particles during runoff. These results show that P source water solubility and rainfall intensity can influence P transport in runoff, which is important in evaluating the long-term risks of P source application on P transport in surface runoff.

  10. Aerosol transport from Chiang Mai, Thailand to Mt. Lulin, Taiwan - Implication of aerosol aging during long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Engling, Guenter; Chang, Shih-Yu; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chang, You-Jia; Hong, Guo-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosol from Indochina may cause a potential effect on climate change in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Western Pacific. Up to now, the understanding of BB aerosol composition modification during long-range transport (LRT) is still very limited due to the lack of observational data. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at the Suthep/Doi Ang Khang (DAK) mountain sites in Chiang Mai, Thailand and the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (Mt. Lulin) in central Taiwan from March to April 2010 and from February to April 2013, respectively. During the study period, an upwind and downwind relationship between the Suthep/DAK and Lulin sites (2400 km apart) was validated by backward trajectories. Comprehensive aerosol properties were resolved for PM2.5 water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous content, water-soluble/insoluble organic carbon (WSOC/WIOC), dicarboxylic acids and their salts (DCAS), and anhydrosugars. A Modification Factor (MF) is proposed by employing non-sea-salt potassium ion (nss-K+) or fractionalized elemental carbon evolved at 580 °C after pyrolized OC correction (EC1-OP) as a BB aerosol tracer to evaluate the mass fraction changes of aerosol components from source to receptor regions during LRT. The MF values of nss-SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, OC1 (fractionalized organic carbon evolved from room temperature to 140 °C), OP (pyrolized OC fraction), DCAS, and WSOC were above unity, which indicated that these aerosol components were enhanced during LRT as compared with those in the near-source region. In contrast, the MF values of anhydrosugars ranged from 0.1 to 0.3, indicating anhydrosugars have degraded during LRT.

  11. Atmospheric transport and chemistry of trace gases in LMDz5B: evaluation and implications for inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Representation of atmospheric transport is a major source of error in the estimation of greenhouse gas sources and sinks by inverse modelling. Here we assess the impact on trace gas mole fractions of the new physical parameterisations recently implemented in the Atmospheric Global Climate Model LMDz to improve vertical diffusion, mesoscale mixing by thermal plumes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL, and deep convection in the troposphere. At the same time, the horizontal and vertical resolution of the model used in the inverse system has been increased. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the impact of these developments on the representation of trace gas transport and chemistry, and to anticipate the implications for inversions of greenhouse gas emissions using such an updated model. Comparison of a one-dimensional version of LMDz with large eddy simulations shows that the thermal scheme simulates shallow convective tracer transport in the PBL over land very efficiently, and much better than previous versions of the model. This result is confirmed in three dimensional simulations, by a much improved reproduction of the Radon-222 diurnal cycle. However, the enhanced dynamics of tracer concentrations induces a stronger sensitivity of the new LMDz configuration to external meteorological forcings. At larger scales, the inter-hemispheric exchange is slightly slower when using the new version of the model, bringing them closer to observations. The increase in the vertical resolution (from 19 to 39 layers significantly improves the representation of stratosphere/troposphere exchange. Furthermore, changes in atmospheric thermodynamic variables, such as temperature, due to changes in the PBL mixing, significantly modify chemical reaction rates and the equilibrium value of reactive trace gases. One implication of LMDz model developments for future inversions of greenhouse gas emissions is the ability of the updated system to assimilate a larger

  12. Coupling of morphology to surface transport in ion-beam-irradiated surfaces: normal incidence and rotating targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Garcia, Javier [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC) and School of Mathematical Sciences and Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes (Spain); Castro, Mario [GISC and Grupo de Dinamica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas de Madrid, E-28015 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javiermunozgarcia@gmail.com, E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es, E-mail: mariocastro73@gmail.com

    2009-06-03

    Continuum models have proved their applicability to describe nanopatterns produced by ion-beam sputtering of amorphous or amorphizable targets at low and medium energies. Here we pursue the recently introduced 'hydrodynamic approach' in the cases of bombardment at normal incidence, or of oblique incidence onto rotating targets, known to lead to self-organized arrangements of nanodots. Our approach stresses the dynamical roles of material (defect) transport at the target surface and of local redeposition. By applying results previously derived for arbitrary angles of incidence, we derive effective evolution equations for these geometries of incidence, which are then numerically studied. Moreover, we show that within our model these equations are identical (albeit with different coefficients) in both cases, provided surface tension is isotropic in the target. We thus account for the common dynamics for both types of incidence conditions, namely formation of dots with short-range order and long-wavelength disorder, and an intermediate coarsening of dot features that improves the local order of the patterns. We provide for the first time approximate analytical predictions for the dependence of stationary dot features (amplitude and wavelength) on phenomenological parameters, that improve upon previous linear estimates. Finally, our theoretical results are discussed in terms of experimental data.

  13. Transport-related fringe benefits: implications for moving and the journey to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommeren, van Jos; Vlist, van der A.J.; Nijkamp, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Firms offer compensation not only through wages, but also offer transport-related fringe benefits such as transport benefits (company cars, travel, and parking benefits) and relocation benefits to job applicants. We argue that these benefits are not randomly offered to employees, but depend on the j

  14. Transport-related fringe benefits: implications for moving and the journey to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommeren, van Jos; Vlist, van der A.J.; Nijkamp, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Firms offer compensation not only through wages, but also offer transport-related fringe benefits such as transport benefits (company cars, travel, and parking benefits) and relocation benefits to job applicants. We argue that these benefits are not randomly offered to employees, but depend on the

  15. New insight in expression, transport, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Implications in brainrelated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki; Adachi; Tadahiro; Numakawa; Misty; Richards; Shingo; Nakajima; Hiroshi; Kunugi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) attracts increasing attention from both research and clinical fields because of its important functions in the central nervous system. An adequate amount of BDNF is critical to develop and maintain normal neuronal circuits in the brain. Given that loss of BDNF function has beenreported in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases, understanding basic properties of BDNF and associated intracellular processes is imperative. In this review, we revisit the gene structure, transcription, translation, transport and secretion mechanisms of BDNF. We also introduce implications of BDNF in several brain-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, depression and schizophrenia.

  16. The Pricing Evolution in the Air Transportation Industry. Implication for the Romanian Tourism Sector in the Era of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Marin-Pantelescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The globalization process involves the liberalization of the services and the air transportation industry is responsive to this reality. There is a developing tendency for global alliances and strategies in major airline companies. The globalization implies extending service networks in the whole world. Currently we are witnessing lower prices for domestic and foreign airline flights with benefits for the tourists’ business and leisure activities. The last minute offers and early booking prices provide a win-win situation, for the airline companies on one side and for the customers on the other side. The positive online reviews influence people buying decision because customers are more sensitive than ever to the services prices. Under this condition it is very interesting to see the evolution of pricing in the air transportation industry and the implication for the Romanian tourism sector.

  17. A charge transport study in diamond, surface passivated by high-k dielectric oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovi, Kiran Kumar, E-mail: KiranKumar.Kovi@angstrom.uu.se; Majdi, Saman; Gabrysch, Markus; Isberg, Jan [Division for Electricity, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 21 (Sweden)

    2014-11-17

    The recent progress in the growth of high-quality single-crystalline diamond films has sparked interest in the realization of efficient diamond power electronic devices. However, finding a suitable passivation is essential to improve the reliability and electrical performance of devices. In the current work, high-k dielectric materials such as aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide were deposited by atomic layer deposition on intrinsic diamond as a surface passivation layer. The hole transport properties in the diamond films were evaluated and compared to unpassivated films using the lateral time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the near surface hole mobility in diamond films of up to 27% is observed when using aluminum oxide passivation.

  18. A Controlled Field Pilot for Testing Near Surface CO2 Detection Techniques and Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L.

    2007-12-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow horizontal, well slotted over 70m of its length and divided into seven zones via packers with mass flow control in each individual zone. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects and those design parameters will be discussed. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, the National Energy Technology Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and West Virginia University. Techniques included eddy covariance, soil gas measurements, hyperspectral imaging for plant stress detection, differential absorption LIDAR (both free space atmospheric and below surface soil gas), tracer studies, water sampling, stable isotope studies, and soil flux chambers. An overview of these results will be presented.

  19. Bulk and surface electron transport in topological insulator candidate YbB{sub 6-δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, Vladimir V.; Demishev, Sergey V.; Sluchanko, Nikolay E. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bozhko, Alexey D.; Bogach, Alexey V.; Semeno, Alexey V.; Voronov, Valeriy V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dukhnenko, Anatoliy V.; Filipov, Volodimir B.; Shitsevalova, Natalya Yu. [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science NAS, Krzhyzhanovsky str. 3, 03680, Kiev (Ukraine); Kondrin, Mikhail V. [Vereshchagin Institute of High Pressure Physics of RAS, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Alexey V.; Sannikov, Ilia I. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Kashirskoe Shosse 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    We report the study of transport and magnetic properties of the YbB{sub 6-δ}single crystals grown by inductive zone melting. A strong disparity in the low temperature resistivity, Seebeck and Hall coefficients is established for the samples with the different level of boron deficiency. The effective parameters of the charge transport in YbB{sub 6-δ} are shown to depend on the concentration of intrinsic defects, which is estimated to range from 0.09% to 0.6%. The pronounced variation of Hall mobility μ{sub H} found for bulk holes is induced by the decrease of transport relaxation time from τ ∼ 7.7 fs for YbB{sub 5.994} to τ ∼ 2.2 fs for YbB{sub 5.96}. An extra contribution to conductivity from electrons with μ{sub H}∼ -1000 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} and the very low concentration n /n{sub Yb}∼ 10{sup -6} discovered below 20 K for all the single crystals under investigation is suggested to arise from the surface electron states appeared in the inversion layer due to the band bending. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells.

  1. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  2. Impaired motoneuronal retrograde transport in two models of SBMA implicates two sites of androgen action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Michael Q; Poort, Jessica L; Baqri, Rehan M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2011-11-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) impairs motor function in men and is linked to a CAG repeat mutation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Defects in motoneuronal retrograde axonal transport may critically mediate motor dysfunction in SBMA, but the site(s) where AR disrupts transport is unknown. We find deficits in retrograde labeling of spinal motoneurons in both a knock-in (KI) and a myogenic transgenic (TG) mouse model of SBMA. Likewise, live imaging of endosomal trafficking in sciatic nerve axons reveals disease-induced deficits in the flux and run length of retrogradely transported endosomes in both KI and TG males, demonstrating that disease triggered in muscle can impair retrograde transport of cargo in motoneuron axons, possibly via defective retrograde signaling. Supporting the idea of impaired retrograde signaling, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor treatment of diseased muscles reverses the transport/trafficking deficit. Transport velocity is also affected in KI males, suggesting a neurogenic component. These results demonstrate that androgens could act via both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms to disrupt axonal transport in motoneurons affected by SBMA.

  3. Influence of near-surface blisters on deuterium transport in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Manhard, A.; von Toussaint, U.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of near-surface blisters on deuterium transport in tungsten is studied by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gentle deuterium plasma loading of different durations and subsequent NRA depth profiling is performed in heavily pre-blistered and unblistered areas on self-damaged tungsten samples. Comparison of the deuterium depth profiles reveals a considerable reduction of the deuterium transport into the bulk due to the presence of near-surface blisters. SEM and NRA results identify the enhanced re-emission of deuterium from the sample due to open blisters as the underlying mechanism, which reduces the deuterium flux into the bulk. Based on a simple analytical hydrogen retention model, the re-emitted deuterium flux by open blisters is determined to be 80% of the implanted deuterium flux in the present conducted experiment. In addition, the deuterium flux into the bulk is reduced by 60% compared to the unblistered case. Hence the presence of blisters is not a general disadvantage in the context of retention, but can be beneficial in slowing down the build up of a certain hydrogen inventory and in reducing the permeation flux.

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface.

  5. Factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from urban surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Brant C; Wissel-Tyson, Christopher; Young, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides used in urban and suburban contexts have been found in urban creek sediments and associated with toxicity in aquatic bioassays. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the main factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from surfaces typical of residential landscapes. Controlled rainfall simulations over concrete, bare soil, and turf plots treated individually with pyrethroid insecticides in a suspension concentrate, an emulsifiable concentrate, or a granule formulation were conducted at different rainfall intensities and different product set-time intervals. Pyrethroid mass washoff varied by several orders of magnitude between experimental treatments. Suspension concentrate product application to concrete yielded significantly greater washoff than any other treatment; granule product application to turf yielded the least washoff. Fractional losses at 10 L of runoff ranged from 25.9 to 0.011% of pyrethroid mass applied, and 10 L nominal mass losses ranged from 3970 to 0.18 μg. Mass washoff depended principally on formulation and surface type combination and, to a lesser degree, on set-time interval and rainfall intensity. Treatment effects were analyzed by ANOVA on main factors of formulation, surface type, and set time. Factor effects were not purely additive; a significant interaction between formulation and surface type was noted.

  6. Modeling Hydrodynamics and Heat Transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, and Implications for Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Hoilman, Gene R.; Lindenberg, Mary K.; Wellman, Roy E.

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional numerical model UnTRIM was used to model hydrodynamics and heat transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, between mid-June and mid-September in 2005 and between mid-May and mid-October in 2006. Data from as many as six meteorological stations were used to generate a spatially interpolated wind field to use as a forcing function. Solar radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity data all were available at one or more sites. In general, because the available data for all inflows and outflows did not adequately close the water budget as calculated from lake elevation and stage-capacity information, a residual inflow or outflow was used to assure closure of the water budget. Data used for calibration in 2005 included lake elevation at 3 water-level gages around the lake, water currents at 5 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) sites, and temperature at 16 water-quality monitoring locations. The calibrated model accurately simulated the fluctuations of the surface of the lake caused by daily wind patterns. The use of a spatially variable surface wind interpolated from two sites on the lake and four sites on the shoreline generally resulted in more accurate simulation of the currents than the use of a spatially invariant surface wind as observed at only one site on the lake. The simulation of currents was most accurate at the deepest site (ADCP1, where the velocities were highest) using a spatially variable surface wind; the mean error (ME) and root mean square error (RMSE) for the depth-averaged speed over a 37-day simulation from July 26 to August 31, 2005, were 0.50 centimeter per second (cm/s) and 3.08 cm/s, respectively. Simulated currents at the remaining sites were less accurate and, in general, underestimated the measured currents. The maximum errors in simulated currents were at a site near the southern end of the trench at the mouth of Howard Bay (ADCP7), where the ME and RMSE in the depth-averaged speed were 3.02 and 4.38 cm

  7. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); David, N.A. [Environmental Res., Inst. of Michigan, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Irvine, J.M. [Environmental Res. Inst. of Michigan, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  8. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennina Taylor-Wells

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1 mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL, spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  9. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL), spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  10. Heterologous expression of a membrane-spanning auxin importer: implications for functional analyses of auxin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, David John; Abu Bakar, Norliza Tendot; Lawler, Karen; Dorrian, James Matthew; Haider, Ameena; Bennett, Malcolm John; Kerr, Ian Derek

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical studies of plant auxin transporters in vivo are made difficult by the presence of multiple auxin transporters and auxin-interacting proteins. Furthermore, the expression level of most such transporters in plants is likely to be too low for purification and downstream functional analysis. Heterologous expression systems should address both of these issues. We have examined a number of such systems for their efficiency in expressing AUX1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that a eukaryotic system based upon infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus provides a high level, easily scalable expression system capable of delivering a functional assay for AUX1. Furthermore, a transient transfection system in mammalian cells enables localization of AUX1 and AUX1-mediated transport of auxin to be investigated. In contrast, we were unable to utilise P. pastoris or L. lactis expression systems to reliably express AUX1.

  11. No-Loss Transportation of Water Droplets by Patterning a Desired Hydrophobic Path on a Superhydrophobic Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibao; Yu, Sixiao; Song, Dong

    2016-07-26

    The directional transportation of droplets on solid surfaces is essential in a wide range of engineering applications. It is convenient to guide liquid droplets in a given direction by utilizing the gradient of wettability, by which the binding forces can be produced. In contrast to the mass-loss transportation of a droplet moving along hydrophilic paths on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, we present no-loss transportation by fabricating a hydrophobic path on the same surface under tangential wind. In experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, the conditions of no-loss transportation of a droplet are mainly considered. We demonstrate that the lower (or upper) critical wind velocity, under which the droplet starts on the path (or is derailed from the path), is determined by the width of the path, the length of the contact area in the direction parallel to the path, the drift angle between the path and the wind direction, and the surface wettability of the pattern. Meanwhile, the no-loss transportation of water droplets along the desired path zigzagging on a superhydrophobic surface can be achieved steadily under appropriate conditions. We anticipate that such robust no-loss transportation will find an extensive range of applications.

  12. A Study of Transport and Impact Strength of Fukushima Nuclear Pollutants in the North Pacific Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hongli; LI Wei; ZHANG Xuefeng; HAN Guijun; WANG Xidong; WU Xinrong; ZHANG Lianxin

    2014-01-01

    Based on the statistics of surface drifter data of 1979-2011 and the simulation of nuclear pollutant particulate move-ments simulated using high quality ocean reanalysis surface current dataset, the transport pathways and impact strength of Fuku-shima nuclear pollutants in the North Pacific have been estimated. The particulates are used to increase the sampling size and en-hance the representativeness of statistical results. The trajectories of the drifters and particulates are first examined to identify typical drifting pathways. The results show that there are three types of transport paths for nuclear pollutants at the surface: 1) most pollutant particles move eastward and are carried by the Kuroshio and Kuroshio-extension currents and reach the east side of the North Pacific after about 3.2-3.9 years;2) some particles travel with the subtropical circulation branch and reach the east coast of China after about 1.6 years according to one drifter trajectory and about 3.6 years according to particulate trajectories;3) a little of them travel with local, small scale circulations and reach the east coast of China after about 1.3-1.8 years. Based on the par-ticulates, the impact strength of nuclear pollutants at these time scales can be estimated according to the temporal variations of relative concentration combined with the radioactive decay rate. For example, Cesium-137, carried by the strong North Pacific current, mainly accumulates in the eastern North Pacific and its impact strength is 4%of the initial level at the originating Fuku-shima area after 4 years. Due to local eddies, Cesium-137 in the western North Pacific is 1%of the initial pollutant level after 1.5 years and continuously increases to 3%after 4 years. The vertical movement of radioactive pollutants is not taken into account in the present study, and the estimation accuracy would be improved by considering three-dimensional flows.

  13. Transport and fate of nitrate at the ground-water/surface-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, L.J.; Zamora, C.; Essaid, H.; Wilson, J.T.; Johnson, H.M.; Brayton, M.J.; Vogel, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Although numerous studies of hyporheic exchange and denitrification have been conducted in pristine, high-gradient streams, few studies of this type have been conducted in nutrient-rich, low-gradient streams. This is a particularly important subject given the interest in nitrogen (N) inputs to the Gulf of Mexico and other eutrophic aquatic systems. A combination of hydrologic, mineralogical, chemical, dissolved gas, and isotopic data, were used to determine the processes controlling transport and fate of NO3- in streambeds at five sites across the USA. Water samples were collected from streambeds at depths ranging from 0.3 to 3 m at three to five points across the stream and in two to five separate transects. Residence times of water ranging from 0.28 to 34.7 d m-1 in the streambeds of N-rich watersheds played an important role in allowing denitrification to decrease NO3- concentrations. Where potential electron donors were limited and residence times were short, denitrification was limited. Consequently, in spite of reducing conditions at some sites, NO3- was transported into the stream. At two of the five study sites, NO3- in surface water infiltrated the streambeds and concentrations decreased, supporting current models that NO3- would be retained in N-rich streams. At the other three study sites, hydrogeologic controls limited or prevented infiltration of surface water into the streambed, and ground-water discharge contributed to NO 3- loads. Our results also show that in these low hydrologic-gradient systems, storm and other high-flow events can be important factors for increasing surface-water movement into streambeds. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface runoff from manured cropping systems assessed by the paired-watershed method, part 1: P, N, and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transport of P, N, and sediment via runoff from crop fields can contribute to degradation of surface waters. We established a paired-watershed study in central Wisconsin to evaluate surface runoff losses of nutrients, sediment, and pathogens from different manure/crop/tillage management systems for ...

  15. High resolution imaging of vadose zone transport using surface and crosswell ground penetrating radar methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kowalsky, Mike B.; Peterson, John E.

    2002-11-05

    To effectively clean up many contaminated sites there is a need for information on heterogeneities at scales ranging from one centimeter to tens of meters, as these features can alter contaminant transport significantly. At the Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington site heterogeneities of interest can range from localized phenomena such as silt or gravel lenses, fractures, clastic dikes, to large-scale lithologic discontinuities. In the vadose zone it is critical to understand the parameters controlling flow. These features have been suspected of leading to funneling and fingering, additional physical mechanisms that could alter and possibly accelerate the transport of contaminants to underlying groundwater. For example, it has been observed from the studies to date that over relatively short distances there are heterogeneities in the physical structure of the porous medium and structural differences between repacked soil cores and the field site from which the materials initially came (Raymond and Shdo, 1966). Analysis of cores taken from the vadose zone (i.e., soil surface to water table) has been useful in identifying localized zones of contamination. Unfortunately, these analyses are sparse (limited to a few boreholes) and extremely expensive. The high levels of radioactivity at many of the contaminated sites increase drilling and sample costs and analysis time. Cost of drilling and core analysis for the SX tank farm has exceeded $1M per borehole (50 meter deep) for sampling. The inability to track highly mobile species through the vadose zone highlights an important need: the need for methods to describe the complete vadose zone plume and to determine processes controlling accelerated contamination of groundwater at Hanford. A combination of surface and crosswell (i.e. borehole) geophysical measurements is one means to provide this information. The main questions addressed with the radar methods in this study are: (1) What parts of the vadose zone

  16. Understanding global cycling of atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, N. E.; Giang, A.; Song, S.; Pike-thackray, C.; Friedman, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We combine modeling approaches with data analysis to provide quantitative constraints on the global biogeochemical cycling of pollutants such as mercury (Hg) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These pollutants, released by human activities, continue to cycle between land, ocean, and atmosphere surfaces, extending their effective lifetimes in the environment. Measurement data are limited for all of these substances, providing few constraints on the magnitude of surface-atmosphere fluxes and thus the timescales of their cycling. This limits our ability to trace emissions to impacts for these substances, particularly in the context of both ongoing policies and climate change. We present a suite of modeling and analysis tools, including uncertainty analysis, that can provide quantitative constraints on cycling for these data-limited problems, and we illustrate their applicability through examples of Hg and selected POPs. Specifically, we summarize recent insights from inverse modeling of mercury, polynomial chaos-based methods for PAHs. Finally, we assess how uncertainty in timescales affects the entire emissions-to-impacts pathway for atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants. We discuss the implications of this analysis for policies under the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions.

  17. Determinants of satisfaction with campus transportation services: Implications for service quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Charbatzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a number of countries, buses are a critical element of public transportation, providing the most inclusive and sustainable mode of transportation to all forms of citizenry, including staff and students of universities.Objectives: The study examines the determinants of satisfaction with campus bus transportation. The article is primarily discursive and based on the synthesis of existing service literature supported by data obtained from a survey of 847 respondents.Method: Structural equation modelling is undertaken using AMOS 19, allowing for the examination of compound relationships between service engagement variables.Results: Results show statistically significant differences between perceived service quality and travel routes. The authors argue that managerial attention to service user experiences does not only hold the key to ongoing competitive success in campus transportation services but also that those services can be significantly enriched through greater managerial attention to the interface between risk of financial loss (which increases when the campus bus transportation service provider becomes less able to compete and service quality.Conclusion: The authors argue that if providers of campus bus transportation services are to rise to their service delivery challenges and also maintain or improve upon their market positions, they must conceptualise their services in a manner that takes into consideration the two-way interrelationship between risk of financial loss and service quality. It must also be noted that, although this study may have relevance for firm–firm scenarios, its focus is primarily on service supplier firm–customer service engagements.Keywords: Modelling; Transportation; Service

  18. Onsager heat of transport of carbon dioxide at the surface of aqueous ammonia: The remarkable effect of carbamate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Phillips, Leon F.

    2010-11-01

    The Onsager heat of transport Q∗ has been measured for CO 2 at the surface of aqueous ammonia. The heat of transport incorporates the enthalpy of reaction of gaseous CO 2 with ammonia, adsorbed on the liquid surface, to form adsorbed ammonium carbamate, with the result that -Q∗ has the unusually large value of 180 kJ mol -1. Measurement of Q∗ for transfer of a reactive species through a surfactant monolayer is proposed as a new method of studying reactions at liquid and quasi-liquid surfaces.

  19. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  20. Transport rectification in nanopores with outer membranes modified with surface charges and polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-22

    This work reports a comprehensive theoretical study of the transport-rectification properties of cylindrical nanopores with neutral inner walls and chemically modified outer membrane. The chemical species on the two outer sides of the membrane have charges of opposite sign and can be either surface-confined species (i.e., surface charges) or polyelectrolyte brushes. The advantage of this design over other types of rectifying nanopores is that it requires controlling the composition of the outer walls of the pore (which are easy to access) rather than the inner walls, thus simplifying the fabrication process. Ion-current rectification in nanopores with charged outer walls is ascribed to applied-potential-induced changes in the ionic concentration within the pore. The rectification efficiency is studied as a function of pore length, radius, surface charge and bulk electrolyte concentration. An analytical model is derived for the case of surface-confined charges that predicts the current-potential curves in very good agreement with the numerical calculations. Neutral nanopores with polyelectrolyte-modified outer walls have two distinct advantages compared to surface-charged systems: (i) they exhibit higher rectification factors due to the large charge density immobilized by the polyelectrolyte brushes, and (ii) the applied potential deforms the polyelectrolyte chains toward the oppositely charged electrode. This deformation brings the polyelectrolyte brushes into the pore in the low conductivity state and expels them from the pore in the high conductivity regime. Calculations of the potentials of mean-force suggest that the applied-field-induced conformational changes can be used to control the translocation of cargoes larger than ions, such as proteins and nanoparticles.

  1. Suspended sediment transport in distributary channel networks and its implication on the evolution of delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suying, Ou; hao, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) transport in distributary channels play an important role on the evolution of deltas and estuaries. Under the interactions between river discharge, tide, and bathymetry of Pearl River delta (PRD) in south China, the spatial and temporal characteristics of suspended sediment transport are investigated by using the field data of July 16 to 25, 1999 and February 7 to 15, 2001. The PRD, as one of the most complex tributary system in the world and composed of 324 transversal and longitudinal tributaries, with eight outlets to the three sub-estuaries, has higher suspended sediment load in middle delta including six outlets than in right and left tidal dominant channels of PRD, that is Humen channel and Yamen channel system. Under large river discharge of one flood in summer, the tidal averaged SS transport from channel to the estuaries, the SS concentration of middle delta is 10~20 times and the transport rate is 100~500 times of dry season. But the transport rate changes little between flood season and dry season in the upper channel system of Yamen and Humen, and in dry season the tidal averaged transport change direction from estuary to these channel systems. About 70~85% of total Pearl River SS load transport along the main channel of West River, then transport about 45~55% into the lower West river delta, about 30% of total SS load flushed into the Modaomen outlets. Under the bathymetry of branched channels, SS load which advected from the Pearl River and resuspended from bed, redistributed 4~8 times in the PRD and then cause the different changes of channels. It found that in flood season, the suspended sediment load from Pearl River including East, West, North River and Tanjiang, Liuxi River into the PRD is less than that discharged into the estuaries through eight outlets, which indicated the erosion in the channels of PRD especially in the lower part of PRD. Suspended sediment budget in dry season during neap-spring cycle indicated that

  2. Modeling Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction and Contaminant Transport of Chlorinated Solvent Contaminated Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimer Ebrahim, Girma; Jonoski, Andreja; van Griensven, Ann; Dujardin, Juliette; Baetelaan, Okke; Bronders, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Chlorinated-solvent form one of the largest groups of environmental chemicals. Their use and misuse in industry have lead to a large entry of these chemicals into the environment, resulting in widespread dissemination and oftentimes environmental contamination. Chlorinated solvent contamination of groundwater resources has been widely reported. For instance, there has been much interest in the assessment of these contaminant levels and their evolutions with time in the groundwater body below the Vilvoorde-Machelen industrial area (Belgium). The long industrial history of the area has lead to complex patterns of pollution from multiple sources and the site has been polluted to the extent that individual plumes are not definable any more. Understanding of groundwater/surface water interaction is a critical component for determining the fate of contaminant both in streams and ground water due to the fact that groundwater and surface water are in continuous dynamic interaction in the hydrologic cycle. The interaction has practical consequences in the quantity and quality of water in either system in the sense that depletion and/or contamination of one of the system will eventually affect the other one. The transition zone between a stream and its adjacent aquifer referred to as the hyporheic zone plays a critical role in governing contaminant exchange and transformation during water exchange between the two water bodies. The hyporheic zone of Zenne River ( the main receptor ) is further complicated due to the fact that the river banks are artificially trained with sheet piles along its reach extending some 12 m below the surface. This study demonstrates the use of MODFLOW, a widely used modular three-dimensional block-centred finite difference, saturated flow model for simulating the flow and direction of movement of groundwater through aquifer and stream-aquifer interaction and the use of transport model RT3D, a three-dimensional multi-species reactive transport model

  3. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-02-05

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences.

  5. Dispersion stability and electrokinetic properties of intrinsic plutonium colloids: implications for subsurface transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I; Zhou, Dongxu; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Tarimala, Sowmitri; Ware, S Doug; Keller, Arturo A

    2013-06-04

    Subsurface transport of plutonium (Pu) may be facilitated by the formation of intrinsic Pu colloids. While this colloid-facilitated transport is largely governed by the electrokinetic properties and dispersion stability (resistance to aggregation) of the colloids, reported experimental data is scarce. Here, we quantify the dependence of ζ-potential of intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids on pH and their aggregation rate on ionic strength. Results indicate an isoelectric point of pH 8.6 and a critical coagulation concentration of 0.1 M of 1:1 electrolyte at pH 11.4. The ζ-potential/pH dependence of the Pu(IV) colloids is similar to that of goethite and hematite colloids. Colloid interaction energy calculations using these values reveal an effective Hamaker constant of the intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids in water of 1.85 × 10(-19) J, corresponding to a relative permittivity of 6.21 and refractive index of 2.33, in agreement with first principles calculations. This relatively high Hamaker constant combined with the positive charge of Pu(IV) colloids under typical groundwater aquifer conditions led to two contradicting hypotheses: (a) the Pu(IV) colloids will exhibit significant aggregation and deposition, leading to a negligible subsurface transport or (b) the Pu(IV) colloids will associate with the relatively stable native groundwater colloids, leading to a considerable subsurface transport. Packed column transport experiments supported the second hypothesis.

  6. Mass Transport in Surface Diffusion of van der Waals Bonded Systems: Boosted by Rotations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgeland, Holly; Sacchi, Marco; Singh, Pratap; McIntosh, Andrew J; Jardine, Andrew P; Alexandrowicz, Gil; Ward, David J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Allison, William; Ellis, John

    2016-12-01

    Mass transport at a surface is a key factor in heterogeneous catalysis. The rate is determined by excitation across a translational barrier and depends on the energy landscape and the coupling to the thermal bath of the surface. Here we use helium spin-echo spectroscopy to track the microscopic motion of benzene adsorbed on Cu(001) at low coverage (θ ∼ 0.07 ML). Specifically, our combined experimental and computational data determine both the absolute rate and mechanism of the molecular motion. The observed rate is significantly higher by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.1 than is possible in a conventional, point-particle model and can be understood only by including additional molecular (rotational) coordinates. We argue that the effect can be described as an entropic contribution that enhances the population of molecules in the transition state. The process is generally relevant to molecular systems and illustrates the importance of the pre-exponential factor alongside the activation barrier in studies of surface kinetics.

  7. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  8. Surface-to-mountaintop transport characterised by radon observations at the Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric composition measurements at Jungfraujoch are affected intermittently by thermally-driven (anabatic mountain winds as well as by other vertical transport mechanisms. Using radon-222 observations, and a new analysis method, we quantify the land surface influence hour-by-hour and detect the presence of anabatic winds on a daily basis. During 2010–2011, anabatic winds occurred on roughly 40% of days, but only from April–September. Anabatic wind days were associated with warmer air temperatures over a large fraction of Europe and with a shift in airmass properties. Shifts were evident even when comparing the same radon concentrations, a proxy for land-surface influence. Aerosol washout, when quantified as a function of rain-rate using a radon normalisation technique, was also influenced by anabatic winds being more pronounced on non-anabatic days. Excluding the influence of anabatic winds, however, did not lead to a better definition of the unperturbed aerosol background than a definition based on radon alone, supporting the use of a radon threshold to identify periods with weak land-surface influence.

  9. Formulation effects and the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from urban hard surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Brant C; Young, Thomas M

    2010-07-01

    Controlled rainfall experiments utilizing drop-forming rainfall simulators were conducted to study various factors contributing to off-target transport of off-the-shelf formulated pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces. Factors evaluated included active ingredient, product formulation, time between application and rainfall (set time), and rainfall intensity. As much as 60% and as little as 0.8% of pyrethroid applied could be recovered in surface runoff depending primarily on product formulation, and to a lesser extent on product set time. Resulting wash-off profiles during one-hour storm simulations could be categorized based on formulation, with formulations utilizing emulsifying surfactants rather than organic solvents resulting in unique wash-off profiles with overall higher wash-off efficiency. These higher wash-off efficiency profiles were qualitatively replicated by applying formulation-free neat pyrethroid in the presence of independently applied linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) surfactant, suggesting that the surfactant component of some formulated products may be influential in pyrethroid wash-off from urban hard surfaces.

  10. Particle transport in evolving protoplanetary disks: Implications for results from Stardust

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Anna L H

    2010-01-01

    Samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by Stardust confirm that substantial quantities of crystalline silicates were incorporated into the comet at formation. We investigate the constraints that this observation places upon protoplanetary disk physics, assuming that outward transport of particles processed at high temperatures occurs via advection and turbulent diffusion in an evolving disk. We also look for constraints on particle formation locations. Our results are based upon 1D disk models that evolve with time under the action of viscosity and photoevaporation, and track solid transport using an ensemble of individual particle trajectories. We find that two classes of disk model are consistent with the Stardust findings. One class features a high particle diffusivity (a Schmidt number Sc 1, such models are unlikely to be viable, and significant outward transport requires that the particles of interest settle into a midplane layer that experiences an outward gas flow. In either class of models, the mass ...

  11. Implications Of Technology Learning in Energy-Economy Models of the Transport Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzyzanowski, D.A.; Kypreos, S.; Gutzwiller, L.; Barreto, L

    2005-07-01

    Diffusion of hydrogen fuelled fuel cell vehicles is foreseen by many as the future for the transportation sector. However, high technological advancement over conventional power trains and improved performance of fuel cells as technology, do not guarantee that fuel cell vehicles will actually play a significant role in the transportation sector in the coming decades. In this study, an attempt is made to evaluate selected factors, which may have a stimulating or hindering effect on the market diffusion of fuel cell vehicles. The analysis evaluates the influence of technological learning of fuel cell stack components, prices of fuel cells, hydrogen and crude oil based fuels as well as governmental initiatives to penalise for CO{sub 2} emissions coming from the transportation sector, on market diffusion of fuel cell vehicles in the coming years. (author)

  12. Hereditary tubular transport disorders: implications for renal handling of Ca2+ and Mg2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimke, Henrik; Hoenderop, Joost G; Bindels, René J;

    2010-01-01

    The kidney plays an important role in maintaining the systemic Ca2+ and Mg2+ balance. Thus the renal reabsorptive capacity of these cations can be amended to adapt to disturbances in plasma Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations. The reabsorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+ is driven by transport of other electrolytes......, sometimes through selective channels and often supported by hormonal stimuli. It is, therefore, not surprising that monogenic disorders affecting such renal processes may impose a shift in, or even completely blunt, the reabsorptive capacity of these divalent cations within the kidney. Accordingly, in Dent......'s disease, a disorder with defective proximal tubular transport, hypercalciuria is frequently observed. Dysfunctional thick ascending limb transport in Bartter's syndrome, familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, and diseases associated with Ca2+-sensing receptor defects, markedly...

  13. Analysis of transpacific transport of black carbon during HIPPO-3: implications for black carbon aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range transport of black carbon (BC is a growing concern as a result of the efficiency of BC in warming the climate and its adverse impact on human health. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 using a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to constrain Asian BC emissions and estimate the source of BC over the North Pacific. We find that different sources of BC dominate the transport to the North Pacific during the southbound (29 March 2010 and northbound (13 April 2010 measurements in HIPPO-3. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia (SE contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% of BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia (EA during the April mission. GEOS-Chem simulations generally resolve the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but are unable to reproduce the low and high tails of the observed BC distribution. We find that the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling fail to improve model simulations significantly. This failure indicates that uncertainties in BC transport, rather than in emissions, account for the major biases in GEOS-Chem simulations of BC. The aging process, transforming BC from hydrophobic into hydrophilic form, is one of the key factors controlling wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. Sensitivity tests on BC aging suggest that the aging time scale of anthropogenic BC from EA is several hours, faster than assumed in most global models, while the aging process of biomass burning BC from SE may occur much slower, with a time scale of a few days. To evaluate the effects of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized model of BC transport. We find that the mid-latitude air masses sampled during HIPPO-3 may have experienced a series of precipitation events, particularly near the EA and SE source

  14. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces, and implications for rock breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, J. L.; Byrne, S.; Le, J.-L.

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the macroscopic thermomechanical behavior of lunar boulders by modeling their response to diurnal thermal forcing. Our results reveal a bimodal, spatiotemporally-complex stress response. During sunrise, stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients developed due to overnight cooling. During sunset, stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller diameters, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤ 30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown. As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10 s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. As the thermal wave loses contact with the boulder interior, stresses become limited to the near-surface. This suggests that the survival time of a boulder is not only controlled by the amplitude of induced stress, but also by its diameter as compared to the diurnal skin depth. While stresses on the order of 10 MPa are enough to drive crack propagation in terrestrial environments, crack propagation rates in vacuum are not well constrained. We explore the relationship between boulder size, stress, and the direction of crack propagation, and discuss the implications for the relative breakdown rates and estimated lifetimes of boulders on airless body surfaces.

  15. Surface charges and interfaces: implications for mineral roles in prebiotic chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PONTES-BUARQUE MILA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists an extensive literature on the possible roles of minerals in the prebiotic stages of the chemical evolution of life (Bernal 1951, Cairns-Smith 1982, Wächtershäuser 1992, Vieyra et al. 1995, Tessis et al. 1999, see Lahav (1994 for a review. Among the original proposals, minerals have been considered in: (a processes that would discriminate molecular chirality; (b condensation reactions of biomolecular precursors; (c prebiotic catalysis; (d biochemical templates; and (e autocatalytic metabolism. In this communication it is emphazised the complex properties of both surface reactions and interfaces between minerals and aqueous solutions simulating Archean scenarios. The properties of pyrite surface net charge and of its interface with a solution simulating primitive seawater are discussed and their implications to the autocatalytic model (Wächtershäuser 1988a 1992 are presented in order to demonstrate their relevance. The proposed roles of iron-sulfide minerals (mainly pyrite as physical support for primitive bidimensional metabolism and chiral discriminator (Wächtershäuser 1988a, Huber & Wächtershäuser 1998 are revised. It is shown that: (a the net surface charge can be modulated by the pyrite-aqueous solution interface; (b mononucleotides attachment to pyrite require a cationic bridge; and (c direct absorption of acetate - a molecule proposed as carbon source in primitive aqueous environments - also modulates the interface properties and would have masked pyrite's bulk structure. These results indicate that physicochemical changes of mineral surfaces - caused by environments simulating Archean aqueous scenarios - should be taken into account in the proposals of mineral prebiotic roles.

  16. Transport and scavenging of Pu in surface waters of the Southern Hemisphere Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaud, J.; Povinec, P.P.; Aoyama, M.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of 239Pu in Atlantic and Indian Ocean waters about four decades after their main injection from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests is discussed. Recent data obtained in the framework of the SHOTS (Southern Hemisphere Ocean Tracer Studies) projects are evaluated and compared...... with previous investigations. Seawater samples were collected during the round the globe BEAGLE2003 (Blue Ocean Global Expedition) along the 30°S transect in the Atlantic and the 20°S transect in the Indian Ocean. The results indicate transport of surface waters labelled with 239Pu from the western North...... Pacific via the Indonesian Seas to the South Indian Ocean and then to the South Atlantic Ocean. Along the whole BEAGLE2003 sampling route, the Atlantic Ocean has the lowest 239Pu content due to its particle scavenging on the long way from the western North Pacific. On the other hand, concentrations...

  17. Using Contaminant Transport Modeling to Determine Historical Discharges at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwell, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    When it is determined that a contaminated site needs to be remediated, the issue of who is going to pay for that remediation is an immediate concern. This means that there needs to be a determination of who the responsible parties are for the existing contamination. Seldom is it the case that records have been made and kept of the surface contaminant discharges. In many cases it is possible to determine the relative amount of contaminant discharge at the surface of the various responsible parties by employing a careful analysis of the history of contaminant transport through the surface, through the vadose zone, and within the saturated zone. The process begins with the development of a dynamic conceptual site model that takes into account the important features of the transport of the contaminants through the vadose zone and in the groundwater. The parameters for this model can be derived from flow data available for the site. The resulting contaminant transport model is a composite of the vadose zone transport model, together with the saturated zone (groundwater) flow model. Any calibration of the model should be carefully employed in order to avoid using information about the conclusions of the relative discharge amounts of the responsible parties in determining the calibrated parameters. Determination of the leading edge of the plume is an important first step. It is associated with the first discharges from the surface of the site. If there were several discharging parties at the same time, then it is important to establish a chemical or isotopic signature of the chemicals that were discharged. The time duration of the first discharger needs to be determined as accurately as possible in order to establish the appropriate characterization of the leading portion of the resulting plume in the groundwater. The information about the first discharger and the resulting part of the plume associated with this discharger serves as a basis for the determination of the

  18. Can Surface Flux Transport Account for the Weak Polar Field in Cycle 23?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Cameron, Robert H.; Schmitt, Dieter; Schüssler, Manfred

    2013-06-01

    To reproduce the weak magnetic field on the polar caps of the Sun observed during the declining phase of cycle 23 poses a challenge to surface flux transport models since this cycle has not been particularly weak. We use a well-calibrated model to evaluate the parameter changes required to obtain simulated polar fields and open flux that are consistent with the observations. We find that the low polar field of cycle 23 could be reproduced by an increase of the meridional flow by 55% in the last cycle. Alternatively, a decrease of the mean tilt angle of sunspot groups by 28% would also lead to a similarly low polar field, but cause a delay of the polar field reversals by 1.5 years in comparison to the observations.

  19. Can surface flux transport account for the weak polar field in cycle 23?

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Jie; Schmitt, Dieter; Schuessler, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    To reproduce the weak magnetic field on the polar caps of the Sun observed during the declining phase of cycle 23 poses a challenge to surface flux transport models since this cycle has not been particularly weak. We use a well-calibrated model to evaluate the parameter changes required to obtain simulated polar fields and open flux that are consistent with the observations. We find that the low polar field of cycle 23 could be reproduced by an increase of the meridional flow by 55% in the last cycle. Alternatively, a decrease of the mean tilt angle of sunspot groups by 28% would also lead to a similarly low polar field, but cause a delay of the polar field reversals by 1.5 years in comparison to the observations.

  20. Simulation of soluble waste transport and buildup in surface waters using tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Soluble tracers can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of soluble wastes that might have been introduced or are planned for introduction into surface waters. Measured tracer-response curves produced from the injection of a known quantity of soluble tracer can be used in conjunction with the superposition principle to simulate potential waste buildup in streams, lakes, and estuaries. Such information is particularly valuable to environmental and water-resource planners in determining the effects of proposed waste discharges. The theory, techniques, analysis, and presentation of results of tracer-waste simulation tests in rivers, lakes, and estuaries are described. This manual builds on other manuals dealing with dye tracing by emphasizing the expanded use of data from time-of-travel studies.

  1. From the surface to the seafloor: How giant larvaceans transport microplastics into the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katija, Kakani; Choy, C Anela; Sherlock, Rob E; Sherman, Alana D; Robison, Bruce H

    2017-08-01

    Plastic waste is a pervasive feature of marine environments, yet little is empirically known about the biological and physical processes that transport plastics through marine ecosystems. To address this need, we conducted in situ feeding studies of microplastic particles (10 to 600 μm in diameter) with the giant larvacean Bathochordaeus stygius. Larvaceans are abundant components of global zooplankton assemblages, regularly build mucus "houses" to filter particulate matter from the surrounding water, and later abandon these structures when clogged. By conducting in situ feeding experiments with remotely operated vehicles, we show that giant larvaceans are able to filter a range of microplastic particles from the water column, ingest, and then package microplastics into their fecal pellets. Microplastics also readily affix to their houses, which have been shown to sink quickly to the seafloor and deliver pulses of carbon to benthic ecosystems. Thus, giant larvaceans can contribute to the vertical flux of microplastics through the rapid sinking of fecal pellets and discarded houses. Larvaceans, and potentially other abundant pelagic filter feeders, may thus comprise a novel biological transport mechanism delivering microplastics from surface waters, through the water column, and to the seafloor. Our findings necessitate the development of tools and sampling methodologies to quantify concentrations and identify environmental microplastics throughout the water column.

  2. Surface Flux Transport and the Evolution of the Sun's Polar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the polar fields occupies a central place in flux transport (Babcock-Leighton) models of the solar cycle. We discuss the relationship between surface flux transport and polar field evolution, focusing on two main issues: the latitudinal profile of the meridional flow and the axial tilts of active regions. Recent helioseismic observations indicate that the poleward flow speed peaks at much lower latitudes than inferred from magnetic feature tracking, which includes the effect of supergranular diffusion and thus does not represent the actual bulk flow. Employing idealized simulations, we demonstrate that flow profiles that peak at mid latitudes give rise to overly strong and concentrated polar fields. We discuss the differences between magnetic and white-light measurements of tilt angles, noting the large uncertainties inherent in the sunspot group measurements and their tendency to underestimate the actual tilts. We find no clear evidence for systematic cycle-to-cycle variations in Joy's law during cycles 21-23. Finally, based on the observed evolution of the Sun's axial dipole component and polar fields up to the end of 2015, we predict that cycle 25 will be similar in amplitude to cycle 24.

  3. Implications in the transport of sugar in bulk at port of santos: "company a"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Roberto Gomes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to investigate the processes of transport of sugar in the activity of the bulk loading and unloading at the terminal of "The Company" in the port of Santos. Thus, it was known by the case study of exploratory nature, the following issues: a - which are currently used combinations of modes in moving their products, b - the process of loading and unloading c - the system of supply chain management, d - possible limiting factors in the model of transport of the current volume transported. On these issues we tried to analyze the factors that directly influence the productivity of the company researched, taking into consideration the various factors involving this type of transport due to seasonality of the load. There is the case study presented, be of extreme importance to loyalty in the supply chain management, as the minimum failure to underestimate the factors involving the operation of loading and unloading in the port terminal, caused huge losses that directly affect the operator port and the various stakeholders involved, which in turn directly influences the image of this organization. Finally, it is also about the possibility of elements which can increase the productivity of the operation by the choice of technology conteinerização of the load.

  4. Amino acid composition analysis of human secondary transport proteins and implications for reliable membrane topology prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2016-07-08

    Secondary transporters in humans are a large group of proteins that transport a wide range of ions, metals, organic and inorganic solutes involved in energy transduction, control of membrane potential and osmotic balance, metabolic processes and in the absorption or efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. They are also emerging as important targets for development of new drugs and as target sites for drug delivery to specific organs or tissues. We have performed amino acid composition (AAC) and phylogenetic analyses and membrane topology predictions for 336 human secondary transport proteins and used the results to confirm protein classification and to look for trends and correlations with structural domains and specific substrates and/or function. Some proteins showed statistically high contents of individual amino acids or of groups of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. One recurring trend was a correlation between high contents of charged and/or polar residues with misleading results in predictions of membrane topology, which was especially prevalent in Mitochondrial Carrier family proteins. We demonstrate how charged or polar residues located in the middle of transmembrane helices can interfere with their identification by membrane topology tools resulting in missed helices in the prediction. Comparison of AAC in the human proteins with that in 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli revealed similar overall trends along with differences in average contents for some individual amino acids and groups of similar amino acids that are presumed to result from a greater number of functions and complexity in the higher organism.

  5. Transport and retention of phosphorus in surface water in an urban slum area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, P. M.; Meijer, L. M. G.; Foppen, J. W.; Kulabako, R.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-08-01

    The transport of excessive phosphorus (P) discharged from unsewered informal settlements (slums) due to poor on-site sanitation is largely unknown. Hence, we investigated the processes governing P transport in a 28 km2 slum-dominated catchment in Kampala, Uganda. During high runoff events and a period of base flow, we collected hourly water samples (over 24 h) from a primary channel draining the catchment and from a small size tertiary channel draining one of the contributing slum areas (0.5 km2). Samples were analyzed for orthophosphate (PO4-P), particulate P (PP), total P (TP) and selected hydro-chemical parameters. Channel bed and suspended sediments were collected to determine their sorption potential, geo-available metals and dominant P forms. We found that P inputs in the catchment originated mainly from domestic wastewater as evidenced by high concentrations of Cl (36-144 mg L-1), HCO3 and other cations in the channels. Most P discharged during low flow conditions was particulate implying that much of it was retained in bed sediments. Retained P was mostly bound to Ca and Fe/Al oxides. Hence, we inferred that mineral precipitation and adsorption to Ca-minerals were the dominant P retention processes. Bed sediments were P-saturated and showed a tendency to release P to discharging waters. P released was likely due to Ca-bound P because of the strong correlation between Ca and total P in sediments (r2 = 0.9). High flows exhibited a strong flush of PP and SS implying that part of P retained was frequently flushed out of the catchment by surface erosion and resuspension of bed sediment. Our findings suggest that P accumulated in the channel bed during low flows and then was slowly released into surface water. Hence, it will likely take some time, even with improved wastewater management practices, before P loads to downstream areas can be significantly reduced.

  6. Transport and retention of phosphorus in surface water in an urban slum area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Nyenje

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The transport of excessive phosphorus (P discharged from unsewered informal settlements (slums due to poor on-site sanitation is largely unknown. Hence, we investigated the processes governing P transport in a 28 km2 slum-dominated catchment in Kampala, Uganda. During high runoff events and a period of base flow, we collected hourly water samples (over 24 h from a primary channel draining the catchment and from a small size tertiary channel draining one of the contributing slum areas (0.5 km2. Samples were analyzed for orthophosphate (PO4-P, particulate P (PP, total P (TP and selected hydro-chemical parameters. Channel bed and suspended sediments were collected to determine their sorption potential, geo-available metals and dominant P forms. We found that P inputs in the catchment originated mainly from domestic wastewater as evidenced by high concentrations of Cl (36–144 mg L-1, HCO3 and other cations in the channels. Most P discharged during low flow conditions was particulate implying that much of it was retained in bed sediments. Retained P was mostly bound to Ca and Fe/Al oxides. Hence, we inferred that mineral precipitation and adsorption to Ca-minerals were the dominant P retention processes. Bed sediments were P-saturated and showed a tendency to release P to discharging waters. P released was likely due to Ca-bound P because of the strong correlation between Ca and total P in sediments (r2 = 0.9. High flows exhibited a strong flush of PP and SS implying that part of P retained was frequently flushed out of the catchment by surface erosion and resuspension of bed sediment. Our findings suggest that P accumulated in the channel bed during low flows and then was slowly released into surface water. Hence, it will likely take some time, even with improved wastewater management practices, before P loads to downstream areas can be significantly reduced.

  7. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport: a design principles study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Shankaran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor-ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation.

  8. Internationalisation in Road Transport of Goods in Norway: Safety Outcomes, Risk Factors and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor-Olav Nævestad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Union (EU promotes a gradual lifting of restrictions on foreign hauliers involved in domestic road transport of goods (cabotage, and liberalization of the current road cabotage rules may further increase the proportion of foreign heavy goods vehicles (HGVs on Norwegian roads. The aims of the present study are to: (1 Examine the safety outcomes of increasing internationalisation in (Norwegian road transport of goods; and (2 Discuss the importance of potential risk factors related to increasing proportions of foreign HGVs on Norwegian roads. We use four data sources to shed light on the aims. Results show that foreign HGVs account for 6% of the average domestic transport in Norway, and 11% of the HGVs involved in personal injury accidents. Additionally, foreign HGVs have a three times higher risk of single vehicle accidents, and twice the risk of head-on collisions. Foreign HGV drivers also seem more likely to trigger fatal accidents. We conclude that two risk factors seem to be important: (1 experience with/competence on Norwegian roads and (2 winter driving. Thus, the safety challenge is not that the drivers are foreign, but that they to some extent lack experience with, and competence on, the Norwegian road networks and the challenges that these roads may pose (e.g., narrow roads with high gradients, many curves, snow and ice. Previous research from other countries has also found that lacking experience with national road networks is an important risk factor. Given our results on risk factors, we may hypothesize that if foreign HGV drivers get more experience and education on Norwegian driving conditions, then increased internationalization could perhaps be of less concern in road safety. When discussing the higher accident risk and lower experience of foreign HGV drivers in Norway, it is important to note that the reason for foreign HGV drivers, working for foreign hauliers, to drive in Norway is that there are customers of the

  9. Effects of noradrenaline on the cell-surface glucose transporters in cultured brown adipocytes: novel mechanism for selective activation of GLUT1 glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Satoh, S; Yano, H; Minokoshi, Y; Cushman, S W; Shimazu, T

    1998-01-01

    Glucose transport into rat brown adipocytes has been shown to be stimulated directly by the sympathetic neurotransmitter, noradrenaline, without a significant increase in the protein content of either GLUT1 or GLUT4 glucose transporter in the plasma membrane [Shimizu, Kielar, Minokoshi and Shimazu (1996) Biochem. J. 314, 485-490]. In the present study, we labelled the exofacial glucose-binding sites of GLUT1 and GLUT4 with a membrane-impermeant photoaffinity reagent, 2-N-[4-(1-azitrifluoroethyl)benzoyl]-[2-3H]1,3-bis- (D-mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-[3H]BMPA), to determine which isoform is responsible for the noradrenaline-induced increase in glucose transport into intact brown adipocytes in culture. Insulin stimulated the rate of hexose transport by increasing ATB-[3H]BMPA-labelled cell-surface GLUT4. In contrast, the noradrenaline-induced increase in glucose transport was not accompanied by an increased ATB-[3H]BMPA labelling of GLUT4, nor with an increased amount of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane fraction as assessed by Western blotting, indicating that noradrenaline does not promote the translocation of GLUT4. However, noradrenaline induced an increase in photoaffinity labelling of cell-surface GLUT1 without an apparent increase in the immunoreactive GLUT1 protein in the plasma membrane. This is suggestive of an increased affinity of GLUT1 for the ligand. In fact, the Ki value of non-radioactive ATB-BMPA for 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake was significantly decreased after treatment of the cells with noradrenaline. The increased photoaffinity labelling of GLUT1 and increased glucose transport caused by noradrenaline were inhibited by a cAMP antagonist, cAMP-S Rp-isomer. These results demonstrate that noradrenaline stimulates glucose transport in brown adipocytes by enhancing the functional activity of GLUT1 through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:9461536

  10. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant plumes with enhanced concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined the origin of these pollutant plumes, and their potential to photochemically produce ozone (O3 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Their possible contribution to the Atlantic O3 maximum is also discussed. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning carbon monoxide (CO tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African biomass burning fires. The plumes measured in the mid troposphere (MT had significantly higher pollutant concentrations over West Africa compared to the upper tropospheric (UT plume. The mesoscale model reproduces these differences and the two different pathways for the plumes at different altitudes: transport to the north-east of the fire region, moist convective uplift and transport to West Africa for the upper tropospheric plume versus north-west transport over the Gulf of Guinea for the mid-tropospheric plume. Lower concentrations in the upper troposphere are mainly due to enhanced mixing during upward transport. Model simulations suggest that MT and UT plumes are 16 and 14 days old respectively when measured over West Africa. The ratio of tracer concentrations at 600 hPa and 250 hPa was estimated for 14–15 August in the region of the observed plumes and compares well with the same ratio derived from observed carbon dioxide (CO2 enhancements in both plumes. It is estimated that, for the period 1–15 August, the ratio of Biomass Burning (BB tracer concentration transported in the UT to the ones transported in the MT is 0.6 over West Africa and the equatorial South Atlantic.

    Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, initialized with the observations, were used to estimate

  11. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, E.; Orlandi, E.; Law, K. S.; Fierli, F.; Josset, D.; Cairo, F.; Schlager, H.; Borrmann, S.; Kunkel, D.; Volk, C. M.; McQuaid, J. B.; Stewart, D. J.; Lee, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovski, A.; Liousse, C.

    2010-03-01

    Pollutant plumes with enhanced concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined the origin of these pollutant plumes, and their potential to photochemically produce ozone (O3) downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Their possible contribution to the Atlantic O3 maximum is also discussed. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning carbon monoxide (CO) tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African biomass burning fires. The plumes measured in the mid troposphere (MT) had significantly higher pollutant concentrations over West Africa compared to the upper tropospheric (UT) plume. The mesoscale model reproduces these differences and the two different pathways for the plumes at different altitudes: transport to the north-east of the fire region, moist convective uplift and transport to West Africa for the upper tropospheric plume versus north-west transport over the Gulf of Guinea for the mid-tropospheric plume. Lower concentrations in the upper troposphere are mainly due to enhanced mixing during upward transport. Model simulations suggest that MT and UT plumes are 16 and 14 days old respectively when measured over West Africa. The ratio of tracer concentrations at 600 hPa and 250 hPa was estimated for 14-15 August in the region of the observed plumes and compares well with the same ratio derived from observed carbon dioxide (CO2) enhancements in both plumes. It is estimated that, for the period 1-15 August, the ratio of Biomass Burning (BB) tracer concentration transported in the UT to the ones transported in the MT is 0.6 over West Africa and the equatorial South Atlantic. Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, initialized with the observations, were used to estimate in-situ net photochemical O3 production rates in these plumes

  12. Environmental and financial implications of ethanol as a bioethylene feedstock versus as a transportation fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Jon; Pourbafrani, Mohammad; Saville, Bradley A.; MacLean, Heather L.

    2015-12-01

    Bulk chemicals production from biomass may compete with biofuels for low-cost and sustainable biomass sources. Understanding how alternative uses of biomass compare in terms of financial and environmental parameters is therefore necessary to help ensure that efficient uses of resources are encouraged by policy and undertaken by industry. In this paper, we compare the environmental and financial performance of using ethanol as a feedstock for bioethylene production or as a transport fuel in the US life cycle-based models are developed to isolate the relative impacts of these two ethanol uses and generate results that are applicable irrespective of ethanol production pathway. Ethanol use as a feedstock for bioethylene production or as a transport fuel leads to comparable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil energy consumption reductions relative to their counterparts produced from fossil sources. By displacing gasoline use in vehicles, use of ethanol as a transport fuel is six times more effective in reducing petroleum energy use on a life cycle basis. In contrast, bioethylene predominately avoids consumption of natural gas. Considering 2013 US ethanol and ethylene market prices, our analysis shows that bioethylene is financially viable only if significant price premiums are realized over conventional ethylene, from 35% to 65% depending on the scale of bioethylene production considered (80 000 t yr-1 to 240 000 t yr-1). Ethanol use as a transportation fuel is therefore the preferred pathway considering financial, GHG emissions, and petroleum energy use metrics, although bioethylene production could have strategic value if demand-side limitations of ethanol transport fuel markets are reached.

  13. The Effect of Global Change on Surface Ozone and Reactive Nitrogen Concentrations: Implications for the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. G.; Murazaki, K.; Emmons, L.; Lamarque, J.

    2005-12-01

    We simulated two ten year periods using the global chemical transport model MOZART-2 (Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers version 2): 1990-2000 and 2090-2100. In each case MOZART-2 is driven by meteorology from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) coupled Climate Systems Model (CSM) 1.0 forced with the (SRES) A1 scenario. Profound future changes in the summertime climate over the U.S. are found including changes in temperature, water vapor and clouds and the frequency of synoptic venting of the boundary layer. Even allowing for no changes in emissions in the future, the changes in climate alone drive a significant increase in the ozone concentration over the eastern U.S. (up to 5 ppbv on average) and an increase in the persistence of pollution events. Implications of these changes on the biosphere are assessed with and without allowing for the impact of climate on biogenic emissions. Furthermore the changes in climate alone cause large changes in the partitioning of NOy, decreasing PAN by over 20% over the U.S. Coupled with changes in precipitation; this induces significant changes in the deposition of nitrogen species to the biosphere in a future climate.

  14. Surface properties of the Pettit wind streak on Mars Implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Satellite imagery of the Pettit streak on Amazonis Planitia are discussed in terms of the details of wind streaks and their associated sediments. Increasingly more detailed blow-ups of the available imagery demonstrate that the Pettit streak holds both a Type I bright streak (at the crater rim) and a Type II dark streak beginning at the dark patch within the crater. The lowest albedos measured, 0.20-0.22, are associated with the highest thermal inertia, indicative of grain diameters similar to medium sand, i.e., ranging from 250-350 microns. The brightest portions of the streak have albedos over 0.26 and a low thermal inertia, in the range 3-4, which implies the presence of fine-grained sand, diameters from 50-100 microns. The particle grains are less than 50 microns diameter in the surrounding plains, which have an approximately uniform albedo (0.27) and a thermal inertia of 2.5, characteristics typical of silt or clay. Current streak models describe the dark streak well, but do not account for the bright streak, which may be optically thick patches of very fine dust.

  15. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure and quantum transport in the graphene-C(111) diamond surface system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor; Leoni, Stefano; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David; Seifert, Gotthard

    2013-10-30

    We investigate the interaction of a graphene monolayer with the C(111) diamond surface using ab initio density functional theory. To accommodate the lattice mismatch between graphene and diamond, the overlayer deforms into a wavy structure that binds strongly to the diamond substrate. The detached ridges of the wavy graphene overlayer behave electronically as free-standing polyacetylene chains with delocalized π electrons, separated by regions containing only sp(3) carbon atoms covalently bonded to the (111) diamond surface. We performed quantum transport calculations for different geometries of the system to study how the buckling of the graphene layer and the associated bonding to the diamond substrate affect the transport properties. The system displays high carrier mobility along the ridges and a wide transport gap in the direction normal to the ridges. These intriguing, strongly anisotropic transport properties qualify the hybrid graphene-diamond system as a viable candidate for electronic nanodevices.

  16. A model for the biosynthesis and transport of plasma membrane-associated signaling receptors to the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Claudia Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein transport is emerging as critical in determining the outcome of receptor-activated signal transduction pathways. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating receptor synthesis and transport to the cell surface. Recent advances in this field indicate that signaling pathways and intracellular transport machinery converge and coordinate to render receptors competent for signaling at their plasma membrane activity sites. The biogenesis and transport to the cell surface of signaling receptors appears to require both general trafficking and receptor-specific factors. Several molecular determinants, residing or associated with compartments of the secretory pathway and known to influence aspects in receptor biogenesis, are discussed and integrated into a predictive cooperative model for the functional expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane.

  17. Visualization of droplet departure on a superhydrophobic surface and implications to heat transfer enhancement during dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, C.; Rykaczewski, K.; Fedorov, A. G.; Joshi, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Droplet departure frequency is investigated using environmental scanning electron microscopy with implications to enhancing the rate of dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces. Superhydrophobic surfaces, formed by cupric hydroxide nanostructures, allow the condensate to depart from a surface with a tilt angle of 30° from the horizontal. The resulting decrease in drop departure size shifts the drop size distribution to smaller radii, which may enhance the heat transfer rate during dropwise condensation. The heat transfer enhancement is estimated by modifying the Rose and Le Fevre drop distribution function to account for a smaller maximum droplet size on a superhydrophobic surface.

  18. Transport of Dirac fermions on the surface of strong topological insulator and graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Arijit

    2012-06-14

    In this dissertation I study electronic transport through Dirac Fermions on the surface of strong topological insulator and graphene. I start by reviewing the physics of topological insulator and graphene and the low energy effective theory for the electronic states of the surface of a 3D strong topological insulator and graphene. Using this theory the electronic structure of the surface states of strong topological insulators of geometries with large surface to bulk ratio like nanowire and thin film are obtained. Then the energy spectrum and the spin-parity structure of the eigenstates for a finite size topological insulator quantum dot of the shape of a nanotube are considered. Numerical calculations show that even at the lowest energy scales, the ''spin-surface locking'' is broken, that is, the spin direction in a topologically protected surface mode is not locked to the surface. The calculations also show the existence of ''zero-momentum'' modes, and sub-gap states localized near the ''caps'' of the dot. Both the energy spectrum and the spin texture of the eigenstates are basically reproduced from an analytical surface Dirac fermion description. The results are compared to microscopic calculations using a tight-binding model for a strong topological insulator in a finite-length nanowire geometry, which shows qualitative similarity. Then, a theoretical study of electron-phonon scattering effects in thin films made of a strong topological insulator is presented. Phonons are modeled by isotropic elastic continuum theory with stress-free boundary conditions, and the interaction with the helical surface Dirac fermions is mediated by the deformation potential. The temperature-dependent electrical resistivity ρ(T) and the quasi-particle decay rate Γ(T) observable in photo-emission are computed numerically. The low and high-temperature power laws for both quantities are obtained analytically. Detailed

  19. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gulikova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust

  1. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant plumes with enhanced levels of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined both the origin of these pollutant plumes and their potential to produce O3 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning CO tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African fires. The plumes in the mid troposphere had significantly higher pollutant concentrations due to the fact that transport occurred from a region nearer or even over the fire region. In contrast, plumes transported into the upper troposphere over West Africa had been transported to the north-east of the fire region before being uplifted. Modelled tracer results showed that pollutants resided for between 9 and 12 days over Central Africa before being transported for 4 days, in the case of the mid-troposphere plume and 2 days in the case of the upper tropospheric plume to the measurement location over the southern part of West Africa. Around 35% of the biomass burning tracer was transported into the upper troposphere compared to that remaining in the mid troposphere. Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, were used to estimate the net photochemical O3 production potential of these plumes. The mid tropospheric plume was still very photochemically active (up to 7 ppbv/day especially during the first few days of transport westward over the Atlantic Ocean. The upper tropospheric plume was also still photochemically active, although at a slower rate (1–2 ppbv/day. Trajectories show this plume being recirculated around an upper tropospheric anticyclone back towards the African continent (around 20° S. The potential of theses plumes to produce O3 supports the hypothesis that biomass burning pollutants are

  2. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  3. Transport Properties of Amine/Carbon Dioxide Reactive Mixtures and Implications to Carbon Capture Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2015-08-19

    The structure and transport properties of physisorbed and chemisorbed CO2 in model polyamine liquids (hexamethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine) are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Such systems are relevant to CO2 absorption processes where nonaqueous amines are used as absorbents (e.g., when impregnated or grafted onto mesoporous media or misted in the gas phase). It is shown that accounting for the ionic speciation resulting from CO2 chemisorption enabled us to capture the qualitative changes in extent of absorption and fluidity with time that are observed in thermogravimetric experiments. Simulations reveal that high enough concentration of reacted CO2 leads to strong intermolecular ionic interactions and the arrest of molecular translations. The transport properties obtained from the simulations of the ionic speciated mixtures are also used to construct an approximate continuum-level model for the CO2 absorption process that mimics thermogravimetric experiments.

  4. Implications of Sustainability for the United States Light-Duty Transportation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Chris

    2016-06-29

    Climate change is a problem that must be solved. The primary cause of this problem is burning of fossil fuels to generate energy. A dramatic reduction in carbon emissions must happen soon, and a significant fraction of this reduction must come from the transportation sector. This paper reviews existing literature to assess the consensus of the scientific and engineering communities concerning the potential for the United States' light-duty transportation sector to meet a goal of 80% reduction in vehicle emissions and examine what it will take to meet this target. It is unlikely that reducing energy consumption in just vehicles with gasoline-based internal combustion drivetrains will be sufficient to meet GHG emission-reduction targets. This paper explores what additional benefits are possible through the adoption of alternative energy sources, looking at three possible on-vehicle energy carriers: carbon-based fuels, hydrogen, and batteries.

  5. Distribution and functions of TonB-dependent transporters in marine bacteria and environments: implications for dissolved organic matter utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria play critical roles in marine nutrient cycles by incorporating and redistributing dissolved organic matter (DOM and inorganic nutrients in the ocean. TonB-dependent transporter (TBDT proteins allow Gram-negative bacteria to take up scarce resources from nutrient-limiting environments as well as siderophores, heme, vitamin B12, and recently identified carbohydrates. Thus, the characterization of TBDT distribution and functions is essential to better understand the contribution TBDT to DOM assimilation and its consequences on nutrient cycling in the environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study presents the distribution of encoded known and putative TBDT proteins in the genomes of microorganisms and from the Global Ocean Survey data. Using a Lek clustering algorithm and substrate specificities, the TBDT sequences were mainly classified into the following three groups: (1 DOM transporters; (2 Siderophores/Vitamins transporters; and (3 Heme/Hemophores/Iron(heme-binding protein transporters. Diverse TBDTs were found in the genomes of oligotroph Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354 and Citromicrobium sp JLT1363 and were highly expressed in the stationary phase of bacterial growth. The results show that the Gammaproteobacteria and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB group bacteria accounted for the majority of the TBDT gene pool in marine surface waters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study confirm the ecological importance of TBDTs in DOM assimilation for bacteria in marine environments owing to a wide range of substrate utilization potential in the ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria and CFB group bacteria.

  6. Thermal transport study across interface “nanostructured solid surface / fluid” by photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitenko, K.; Isaiev, M.; Pastushenko, A.; Andrusenko, D.; Kuzmich, A.; Lysenko, V.; Burbelo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the paper the experimental study of heat transport across the interface “porous silicon/liquid” by photoacoustic technique is reported. Two cases with and without liquid covering of porous silicon surface were considered. Thermal perturbations were excited at the surface of porous silicon as a result of absorption of the light with modulated intensity. The resulting thermal-elastic stresses arising in the system were registered with piezoelectric transducer. The amplitude-frequency dependencies of the voltage on the piezoelectric electrodes were measured. The presence of the liquid film leads to decreasing of the amplitude of photoacoustic signal as a result of the thermal energy evacuation from the porous silicon into the liquid. The experimental dependencies were fitted with the results of simulation that takes into account heat fluxes separation at the porous silicon/liquid interface. With the presented method one can precisely measure heat fluxes transferred from the solid into contacting fluid. Moreover, the presented approach can be easily adopted for the thermal conductivity study of the different nanofluids as well as thermal resistance at the interface nanostructured solid/fluid.

  7. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 3: implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Current observations and sediment characteristics acquired within and along the rim of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine, were used to characterize periods of sediment transport and to investigate conditions favorable to the settling of suspended sediment. Hourly averaged Shields parameters determined from horizontal current velocity profiles within the center of each pockmark never exceed the critical value (approximated with the theoretical model of Dade et al. 1992). However, Shields parameters estimated at the pockmark rims periodically exceed the critical value, consistent with conditions that support the onset of sediment transport and suspension. Below the rim in the near-center of each pockmark, depth-averaged vertical velocities were less than zero (downward) 60% and 55% of the time in the northern and southern pockmarks, and were often comparable to depth-averaged horizontal velocities. Along the rim, depth-averaged vertical velocities over the lower 8 m of the water column were primarily downward but much less than depth-averaged horizontal velocities indicating that suspended sediment may be moved to distant locations. Maximum grain sizes capable of remaining in suspension under terminal settling flow conditions (ranging 10–170 μm) were typically much greater than the observed median grain diameter (about 7 μm) at the bed. During upwelling flow within the pockmarks, and in the absence of flocculation, suspended sediment would not settle. The greater frequency of predicted periods of sediment transport along the rim of the southern pockmark is consistent with pockmark morphology in Belfast Bay, which transitions from more spherical to more elongated toward the south, suggesting near-bed sediment transport may contribute to post-formation pockmark evolution during typical conditions in Belfast Bay.

  8. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 3: implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-02-01

    Current observations and sediment characteristics acquired within and along the rim of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine, were used to characterize periods of sediment transport and to investigate conditions favorable to the settling of suspended sediment. Hourly averaged Shields parameters determined from horizontal current velocity profiles within the center of each pockmark never exceed the critical value (approximated with the theoretical model of Dade et al. 1992). However, Shields parameters estimated at the pockmark rims periodically exceed the critical value, consistent with conditions that support the onset of sediment transport and suspension. Below the rim in the near-center of each pockmark, depth-averaged vertical velocities were less than zero (downward) 60% and 55% of the time in the northern and southern pockmarks, and were often comparable to depth-averaged horizontal velocities. Along the rim, depth-averaged vertical velocities over the lower 8 m of the water column were primarily downward but much less than depth-averaged horizontal velocities indicating that suspended sediment may be moved to distant locations. Maximum grain sizes capable of remaining in suspension under terminal settling flow conditions (ranging 10-170 μm) were typically much greater than the observed median grain diameter (about 7 μm) at the bed. During upwelling flow within the pockmarks, and in the absence of flocculation, suspended sediment would not settle. The greater frequency of predicted periods of sediment transport along the rim of the southern pockmark is consistent with pockmark morphology in Belfast Bay, which transitions from more spherical to more elongated toward the south, suggesting near-bed sediment transport may contribute to post-formation pockmark evolution during typical conditions in Belfast Bay.

  9. Implications of Sustainability for the United States Light-Duty Transportation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Chris

    2017-01-12

    Climate change is a problem that must be solved. The primary cause of this problem is burning of fossil fuels to generate energy. A dramatic reduction in carbon emissions must happen soon, and a significant fraction of this reduction must come from the transportation sector. This paper reviews existing literature to assess the consensus of the scientific and engineering communities concerning the potential for the United States' light-duty transportation sector to meet a goal of 80 percent reduction in vehicle emissions and examine what it will take to meet this target. It is unlikely that reducing energy consumption in just vehicles with gasoline-based internal combustion drivetrains will be sufficient to meet GHG emission-reduction targets. This paper explores what additional benefits are possible through the adoption of alternative energy sources, looking at three possible on-vehicle energy carriers: carbon-based fuels, hydrogen, and batteries. potential for the United States' light-duty transportation sector to meet a goal of 80 percent reduction in vehicle emissions and examine what it will take to meet this target. It is unlikely that reducing energy consumption in just vehicles with gasoline-based internal combustion drivetrains will be sufficient to meet GHG emission-reduction targets. This paper explores what additional benefits are possible through the adoption of alternative energy sources, looking at three possible on-vehicle energy carriers: carbon-based fuels, hydrogen, and batteries.

  10. Dust photophoretic transport around a T Tauri star: Implications for comets composition

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, D; Tognelli, E

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidences for the presence of crystalline material in comets. These crystals are believed to have been annealed in the inner part of the proto-solar nebula, while comets should have been formed in the outer regions. Several transport processes have been proposed to reconcile these two facts; among them a migration driven by photophoresis. The primarily goal of this work is to assess whether disk irradiation by a Pre-Main Sequence star would influence the photophoretic transport. To do so, we have implemented an evolving 1+1D model of an accretion disk, including advanced numerical techniques, undergoing a time-dependent irradiation, consistent with the evolution of the proto-Sun along the Pre-Main Sequence. The photophoresis is described using a formalism introduced in several previous works. Adopting the opacity prescription used in these former studies, we find that the disk irradiation enhances the photophoretic transport: the assumption of a disk central hole of several astronom...

  11. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport: implications for resource exchange in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Mensah, Jerry A; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-11-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis.

  12. Surface States Transport in Topological Insulator Bi_{0.83}Sb_{0.17} Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Huber, T. E.; Ansermet, J.-P.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the transport properties of topological insulator (TI) Bi_{0.83}Sb_{0.17} nanowires. Single-crystal nanowire samples with diameters ranging from 75 nm to 1.1 μ m are prepared using high frequency liquid phase casting in a glass capillary; cylindrical single crystals with (10bar{1}1) orientation along the wire axis are produced. Bi_{0.83}Sb_{0.17} is a narrow-gap semiconductor with an energy gap at the L point of the Brillouin zone, Δ E = 21 meV. The resistance of the samples increases with decreasing temperature, but a decrease in resistance is observed at low temperatures. This effect is a clear manifestation of TI properties (i.e., the presence of a highly conducting zone on the TI surface). When the diameter of the nanowire decreases, the energy gap Δ E grows as 1 / d (for diameter d = 1.1 μ m and d =75 nm Δ E = 21 and 45 meV, respectively), which proves the presence of the quantum size effect in these samples. We investigate the magnetoresistance of Bi_{0.83}Sb_{0.17} nanowires at various magnetic field orientations. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed in Bi_{0.83}Sb_{0.17} nanowires at T = 1.5 K, demonstrating the existence of high mobility (μ_S = 26{,}700-47{,}000 cm^2V^{-1}s^{-1}) two-dimensional (2D) carriers in the surface areas of the nanowires, which are nearly perpendicular to the C_3 axis. From the linear dependence of the nanowire conductance on nanowire diameter at T = 4.2 K, the square resistance R_sq of the surface states of the nanowires is obtained (R_sq =70 Ohm).

  13. Phonon transport in silicon nanowires: The reduced group velocity and surface-roughness scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liyan; Li, Baowen; Li, Wu

    2016-09-01

    Using a linear-scaling Kubo simulation approach, we have quantitatively investigated the effects of confinement and surface roughness on phonon transport in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as thick as 55 nm in diameter R . The confinement effect leads to significant reduction of phonon group velocity v in SiNWs compared to bulk silicon except at extremely low phonon frequencies f , which very likely persists in SiNWs several hundreds of nanometers thick, suggesting the inapplicability of bulk properties, including anharmonic phonon scattering, to SiNWs. For instance, the velocity can be reduced by more than 30% for phonons with f >4.5 THz in 55-nm-thick nanowires. In rough SiNWs Casimir's limit, which is valid in confined macroscopic systems, can underestimate the surface scattering by more than one order of magnitude. For a roughness profile with Lorentzian correlation characterized by root-mean-square roughness σ and correlation length Lr, the frequency-dependent phonon diffusivity D follows power-law dependences D ∝Rασ-βLrγ , where α ˜2 and β ˜1 . On average, γ increases from 0 to 0.5 as R /σ increases. The mean free path and the phonon lifetime essentially follow the same power-law dependences. These dependences are in striking contrast to Casimir's limit, i.e., D ˜v R /3 , and manifest the dominant role of the change in the number of atoms due to roughness. The thermal conductivity κ can vary by one order of magnitude with varying σ and Lr in SiNWs, and increasing σ and shortening Lr can efficiently lower κ below Casimir's limit by one order of magnitude. Our work provides different insights to understand the ultralow thermal conductivity of SiNWs reported experimentally and guidance to manipulate κ via surface roughness engineering.

  14. Effects of Moisture and Grain Sizes on Rainsplash Transport with Implications for Desert Plant-Soil Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, S. R.; Furbish, D. J.; Roberts, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    Soil mounds beneath desert shrubs can develop from sediment transport associated with rainsplash of soil grains around the plants. As the canopy of a plant protects the underlying soil from the raindrop impacts, sediment accumulates beneath the shrub canopy due to differential rainsplash of grains. Previous work has clarified how rainsplash transport varies with raindrop momentum and with different sizes of dry sediment, focusing on the transfer of momentum of the drops to grains during drop impacts. Details of this transfer of momentum and grain mobilization for moist sediment conditions are not well known, which is important for understanding sediment transport by rainsplash during the progression of storms. Moreover, related work suggests that relatively immobile coarse soil grains are less likely to be splashed beneath shrub canopies than are small grains, so that smaller grains are more likely to accumulate within shrub mounds. However, systematic measurements of sediment grain sizes around and beneath desert shrubs in the Cibola National Forest, New Mexico, suggest that, aside from the coarsest lag material, larger grain sizes (0.5 - 1.5 mm) are preferentially concentrated within the mound surfaces close to the shrubs. This pattern of grain-size sorting is likely associated with effects of moisture, wherein small grains tend to be ejected during drop impacts as grain clumps rather than individually due to surface tension, and thereby behave as relative coarse grains with shorter splash distances. High-speed imaging of drop impacts on sediment reveals this clumping behavior. These results may be useful in determining the dispersal of nutrients and contaminants that preferentially adhere to the smaller grain sizes. This information also extends our understanding of rainsplash transport beyond dry conditions, that is, to storm conditions where soil moisture and grain detachment rates are changing.

  15. Surface-Water to Groundwater Transport of Pharmaceuticals in a Wastewater-Impacted Stream in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. M.; Barber, L. B.; Duris, J. W.; Foreman, W. T.; Furlong, E. T.; Hubbard, L. E.; Hutchinson, K. J.; Keefe, S. H.; Kolpin, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Wastewater pharmaceutical contamination of shallow groundwater is a substantial concern in effluent-dominated streams, due to aqueous mobility and designed bioactivity of pharmaceuticals and due to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Improved understanding of the environmental fate and transport of wastewater-derived pharmaceuticals is essential for effective protection of vital aquatic ecosystem services, environmental health, and drinking-water supplies. Substantial longitudinal (downstream) transport of pharmaceutical contaminants has been documented in effluent-impacted streams. The comparative lack of information on vertical and lateral transport (infiltration) of wastewater contaminants from surface-water to hyporheic and shallow groundwater compartments is a critical scientific data gap, given the potential for contamination of groundwater supplies in effluent-impacted systems. Growing dependencies on bank filtration and artificial recharge applications for release of wastewater to the environment and for pretreatment of poor-quality surface-water for drinking water emphasize the critical need to better understand the exchange of wastewater contaminants, like pharmaceuticals, between surface-water and groundwater compartments. The potential transport of effluent-derived pharmaceutical contaminants from surface-water to hyporheic-water and shallow groundwater compartments was examined in a wastewater-treatment-facility (WWTF) impacted stream in Ankeny, Iowa under effluent-dominated (71-99% of downstream flow) conditions. Strong hydraulic gradients and hydrologic connectivity were evident between surface-water and shallow-groundwater compartments in the vicinity of the WWTF outfall. Carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, and immunologically-related compounds were detected in groundwater 10-20 meters from the stream bank. Direct aqueous-injection HPLC-MS/MS revealed high percentage detections of pharmaceuticals (110 total analytes) in surface-water and groundwater

  16. Oregon inlet: Hydrodynamics, volumetric flux and implications for larval fish transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Springs, MD (United States); Pietrafesa, L.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-05-01

    The temporal response of Oregon Inlet currents to atmospheric forcing and sea level fluctuations is analyzed using time and frequency domain analysis. Temporally persistent and spatially extensive ebb and flood events are identified using data sets from both within and outside of Oregon Inlet. Prism estimates are made to generate a time series of volumetric flux of water transported through the inlet. Water masses flooding into the Pamlico Sound via Oregon Inlet are identified in temperature (T) and salinity (S) space to determine their source of origin. Correlations are examined between the atmospheric wind field, the main axial slope of the inlet`s water level, inlet flow and T, S properties. Synoptic scale atmospheric wind events are found to dramatically and directly affect the transport of water towards (away from) the inlet on the ocean side, in concert with the contemporaneous transport away from (towards) the inlet on the estuary side, and a subsequent flooding into (out of) the estuary via Oregon Inlet. Thus, while astronomical tidal flooding and ebbing events are shown to be one-sided as coastal waters either set-up or set-down, synoptic scale wind events are shown to be manifested as a two-sided in-phase response set-up and set-down inside and outside the inlet, and thus are extremely effective in driving currents through the inlet. These subinertial frequency flood events are believed to be essential for both the recruitment and subsequent retention of estuarine dependent larval fish from the coastal ocean into Pamlico Sound. Year class strength of these finish may be determined annually by the relative strength and timing of these climatological wind events.

  17. Oregon inlet: Hydrodynamics, volumetric flux and implications for larval fish transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Springs, MD (United States); Pietrafesa, L.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-05-01

    The temporal response of Oregon Inlet currents to atmospheric forcing and sea level fluctuations is analyzed using time and frequency domain analysis. Temporally persistent and spatially extensive ebb and flood events are identified using data sets from both within and outside of Oregon Inlet. Prism estimates are made to generate a time series of volumetric flux of water transported through the inlet. Water masses flooding into the Pamlico Sound via Oregon Inlet are identified in temperature (T) and salinity (S) space to determine their source of origin. Correlations are examined between the atmospheric wind field, the main axial slope of the inlet`s water level, inlet flow and T, S properties. Synoptic scale atmospheric wind events are found to dramatically and directly affect the transport of water towards (away from) the inlet on the ocean side, in concert with the contemporaneous transport away from (towards) the inlet on the estuary side, and a subsequent flooding into (out of) the estuary via Oregon Inlet. Thus, while astronomical tidal flooding and ebbing events are shown to be one-sided as coastal waters either set-up or set-down, synoptic scale wind events are shown to be manifested as a two-sided in-phase response set-up and set-down inside and outside the inlet, and thus are extremely effective in driving currents through the inlet. These subinertial frequency flood events are believed to be essential for both the recruitment and subsequent retention of estuarine dependent larval fish from the coastal ocean into Pamlico Sound. Year class strength of these finish may be determined annually by the relative strength and timing of these climatological wind events.

  18. The imprint of surface fluxes and transport on variations in total column carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppel-Aleks, G [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Wennberg, PO [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Washenfelder, RA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin; Wunch, D [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Schneider, T [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Toon, GC [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Blavier, J-F [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Connor, B [BC Consulting; Davis, K. J. [Pennsylvania State University; Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Messerschmidt, J [University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Notholt, J [University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Roehl, CM [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sherlock, V [National Institue of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand; Stephens, BB [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Vay, SA [NASA Langley Research Center; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University

    2012-01-01

    New observations of the vertically integrated CO{sub 2} mixing ratio, , from ground-based remote sensing show that variations in are primarily determined by large-scale flux patterns. They therefore provide fundamentally different information than observations made within the boundary layer, which reflect the combined influence of large-scale and local fluxes. Observations of both and CO{sub 2} concentrations in the free troposphere show that large-scale spatial gradients induce synoptic-scale temporal variations in in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes through horizontal advection. Rather than obscure the signature of surface fluxes on atmospheric CO{sub 2}, these synoptic-scale variations provide useful information that can be used to reveal the meridional flux distribution. We estimate the meridional gradient in from covariations in and potential temperature, {theta}, a dynamical tracer, on synoptic timescales to evaluate surface flux estimates commonly used in carbon cycle models. We find that simulations using Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (CASA) biospheric fluxes underestimate both the seasonal cycle amplitude throughout the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and the meridional gradient during the growing season. Simulations using CASA net ecosystem exchange (NEE) with increased and phase-shifted boreal fluxes better fit the observations. Our simulations suggest that climatological mean CASA fluxes underestimate boreal growing season NEE (between 45-65{sup o} N) by {approx}40%. We describe the implications for this large seasonal exchange on inference of the net Northern Hemisphere terrestrial carbon sink.

  19. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian

    redox half-reactions in distant regions of the sediment leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sulphides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers...... to sulfate, and iron sulphides are the major sources for sulfide in the system. Procaryotes with the ability to perform long distance electron transmission may flourishes in marine sediments exposed to transient oxygen depletion, leaving distinct signatures of such events in the geological record....

  20. Baby boomers’ mobility patterns and preferences. What are the implications for future transport? (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Haustein, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    , and it is expected that they will differ from their parents’ generation when growing old. In order to understand how the aging boomers may impact the future travel demand, their travel behaviour and expectations were analysed based on 1772 standardized telephone interviews. Baby boomers reported in general being...... healthy, independent and highly (auto)mobile. They also showed optimism regarding the level of mobility, use of different transport modes, and leading an independent life in the future. However, there were significant gender differences in terms of present and expected car use in old age somewhat similar...

  1. Implications of sediment transport by subglacial water flow for interpreting contemporary glacial erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2017-04-01

    The role of glaciers in landscape evolution is central to the interactions between climate and tectonic forces at high latitudes and in mountainous regions. Sediment yields from glacierized basins are used to quantify contemporary erosion rates on seasonal to decadal timescales, often under the assumption that subglacial water flow is the main contributor to these yields. Two recent studies have furthermore used such sediment fluxes to calibrate a glacial erosion rule, where erosion rate scales with ice sliding speed raised to a power greater than one. Subglacial sediment transport by water flow has however seldom been studied, thus the controls on sediment yield from glacierized basins remain enigmatic. To bridge this gap, we develop a 1-D model of morphodynamics in semi-circular bedrock-floored subglacial channels. We adapt a sediment conservation law from the fluvial literature, developed for both mixed bedrock / alluvial and alluvial conditions, to subglacial channels. Channel evolution is a function of the traditional melt-opening due to viscous heat dissipation from the water flow, and creep closure of the overlying ice, to which we add the closure or enlargement due to sediment deposition or removal, respectively. Using a simple ice geometry representing a land-terminating glacier, we find that the shear stresses produced by the water flow on the bed decrease significantly near the terminus. As the ice thins, creep closure decreases and large hydraulic potential gradients cannot be sustained. The resulting gradients in sediment transport lead to a bottleneck, and sediment accumulates if the sediment supply is adequate. A similar bottleneck occurs if a channel is well established and water discharge drops. Whether such constriction happens in space of time, in the presence of a sufficiently large sediment supply sediment accumulates temporarily near the terminus, followed shortly thereafter by enhanced sediment transport. Reduction in the cross-sectional area

  2. Morphological representation of drainage networks, implications on solute transport and distributed simulation at the basin scale

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Jaramillo, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Resumen: La conexión entre los procesos de transporte de solutos en ríos y la diversidad en las configuraciones morfológicas que toman lugar a lo largo de la red de drenaje de una cuenca no ha sido ampliamente estudiada en un contexto regional de análisis. En la escala de tramo se han desarrollado precisas aproximaciones mediante la implementación y calibración de modelos de almacenamiento temporal (ADZ y TS) que permiten considerar de forma agregada los efectos de una o más zonas de retenció...

  3. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour.

  4. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  5. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-04-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  6. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in the Tokyo area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-08-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  7. The zinc transporter, Slc39a7 (Zip7 is implicated in glycaemic control in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Myers

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional zinc signaling is implicated in disease processes including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. Of the twenty-four mammalian zinc transporters, ZIP7 has been identified as an important mediator of the 'zinc wave' and in cellular signaling. Utilizing siRNA targeting Zip7 mRNA we have identified that Zip7 regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle cells. An siRNA targeting Zip7 mRNA down regulated Zip7 mRNA 4.6-fold (p = 0.0006 when compared to a scramble control. This was concomitant with a reduction in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism including Agl, Dlst, Galm, Gbe1, Idh3g, Pck2, Pgam2, Pgm2, Phkb, Pygm, Tpi1, Gusb and Glut4. Glut4 protein expression was also reduced and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis was decreased. This was associated with a reduction in the mRNA expression of Insr, Irs1 and Irs2, and the phosphorylation of Akt. These studies provide a novel role for Zip7 in glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and highlight the importance of this transporter in contributing to glycaemic control in this tissue.

  8. Cell-surface signaling in Pseudomonas: stress responses, iron transport, and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, María A; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo; Lamont, Iain L

    2014-07-01

    Membrane-spanning signaling pathways enable bacteria to alter gene expression in response to extracytoplasmic stimuli. Many such pathways are cell-surface signaling (CSS) systems, which are tripartite molecular devices that allow Gram-negative bacteria to transduce an extracellular stimulus into a coordinated transcriptional response. Typically, CSS systems are composed of the following: (1) an outer membrane receptor, which senses the extracellular stimulus; (2) a cytoplasmic membrane-spanning protein involved in signal transduction from the periplasm to the cytoplasm; and (3) an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor that initiates expression of the stimulus-responsive gene(s). Members of genus Pseudomonas provide a paradigmatic example of how CSS systems contribute to the global control of gene expression. Most CSS systems enable self-regulated uptake of iron via endogenous (pyoverdine) or exogenous (xenosiderophores, heme, and citrate) carriers. Some are also implicated in virulence, biofilm formation, and cell-cell interactions. Incorporating insights from the well-characterized alginate regulatory circuitry, this review will illustrate common themes and variations at the level of structural and functional properties of Pseudomonas CSS systems. Control of the expression and activity of ECF sigma factors are central to gene regulation via CSS, and the variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing these processes will be discussed.

  9. A Double-Ring Algorithm for Modeling Solar Active Regions: Unifying Kinematic Dynamo Models and Surface Flux-Transport Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H; Yeates, Anthony R

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation and meridional circulation is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed $\\alpha$-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on active region eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations we first show that an axisymmetric formulation -- which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models -- can reasonably approximate the surface flux dy...

  10. Rheological implications of sediment transport for continental rifting and its impact in margin geometry and major unconformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Armitage, John; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The inner dynamics of the Earth such as mantle convection, geochemical reactions and isostasy have been typically interpreted as the main engine of plate tectonics and crustal deformation. However, nowadays it is well established that processes transporting material along the surface of the Earth influence the inner dynamics. Surface processes play a key role particularly during rifting, where great subsidence rates occur at synrift basins while shoulder uplift provides rock to be eroded for later infilling of these basins. Erosion implies unloading of the crust which favours uplift, and sedimentation at basins results in loading which favours subsidence. Consequently, erosion and sedimentation amplify stresses and the flexural response of the lithosphere in situations with extensive faulting. These changes to the stress field may be large enough to result in changes in the evolution of rifting and its modes of extension. Additionally, higher subsidence rates and thermal blanketing due to sediments may result in higher geotherms and consequently, a weaker/more-viscous behaviour of the crustal rocks. This would also have a large impact on the deformation style during extension. Here, we explore the interactions between surface processes and tectonics using numerical modelling. Experiments are run with the absence of sediment transport and with different sediment transport regimes for 35 and 40 km crustal thicknesses. Tests with higher transport coefficient show more effective localization of deformation into upper crustal faults which results in effective crustal thinning, larger blocks and longer-lived faults. Our experiments also prove that more effective surface processes reduce the length of margins generated by sequential faulting. For our end member situations, high sedimentation rates lead to pure shear extension of the crust induced by high temperatures, which finally results in broad extension and symmetric margins. Furthermore, our model allows for the

  11. The effects of steam on the surface properties of palygorskite: Implications for palygorskite-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Abhy

    decreased by 40-50% after steam treatment. The reduced affinity for water and EGME may represent a reduced affinity for polar molecules in general. These results, particularly the XPS spectra and the observed large changes in rheological properties, suggest that steam altered the H + ion environment and/or concentration on palygorskite's surface. Exposing palygorskite to steam may have significant implications for its industrial applications, adversely affecting some applications and enhancing others.

  12. Transport and fate of hexachlorocyclohexanes in the oceanic air and surface seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Xie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs are ubiquitous organic pollutants derived from pesticide application. They are subject to long-range transport, persistent in the environment, and capable of accumulation in biota. Shipboard measurements of HCH isomers (α-, γ- and β-HCH in surface seawater and boundary layer atmospheric samples were conducted in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean in October to December of 2008. ΣHCHs concentrations (the sum of α-, γ- and β-HCH in the lower atmosphere ranged from 11.8 to 36.9 pg m−3 (mean: 26.6 ± 11.0 pg m−3 in the Northern Hemisphere (NH, and from 1.5 to 4.0 pg m−3 (mean: 2.8 ± 1.1 pg m−3 in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, respectively. Water concentrations were: α-HCH 0.33–46.8 pg l−1, γ-HCH 0.02–33.2 pg l−1 and β-HCH 0.11–2 pg l−1. HCH concentrations decreased from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean, indicating historical use of HCHs in the NH. Spatial distribution showed increasing concentrations from the equator towards North and South latitudes illustrating the concept of cold condensation and less interhemispheric mixing process. In comparison to concentrations measured in 1987–1999/2000, gaseous HCHs were slightly lower, while dissolved HCHs decreased by factor of 2–3 orders of magnitude. Air-water exchange gradients suggested net deposition for α-HCH (mean: 3759 pg m−2 day−1 and γ-HCH (mean: 1987 pg m−2 day−1, whereas β-HCH varied between equilibrium (volatilization: <0–12 pg m−2 day−1 and net deposition (range: 6–687 pg m−2 day−1, indicating a multi-hopper transport behavior. Climate change may significantly accelerate the releasing process of "old" HCHs from continental storage (e.g. soil, vegetation and high mountains and drive long-range transport from sources to deposition in the

  13. The effects of surface functionalization on rheology, structure and transport properties of nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Moulik A.

    In this thesis, the effects of surface functionalization using hydrophobic silanes on properties of nanocomposites comprising 42 nm silica particles suspended in a melt of polyethylene-glycol (PEG) are studied using rheological, static and dynamic x-ray scattering studies. The nanocomposites are studied in the low molecular weight unentangled (PEG-400) and high molecular weight entangled (PEG-20000) regimes. We find no differences in the properties of the bare and silanized particles in the low volume fraction regime up to where the interparticle separation distance h > 6Rg. In the region of 6Rg > h > 3Rg (5Rg > h > 3Rg, in case of entangled melts), we find substantial differences in the rheological, structure and transport properties when comparing the bare and silanized particles. In the unentangled melts, we observe up to four orders of magnitude drop in the viscosity of the composites at the highest levels of silanization and observe shear thinning behavior that is unlike what is universally seen for hard spheres. For the entangled melts, a yield stress is observed for the silanized particles that is absent in the case of the bare particles and there is a divergence in the elastic modulus in comparison to bare particles. We observe an anomalous speed up in the density relaxations and an associated maxima in structure properties in the case of unentangled melts which has been reported previously for particles experiencing soft repulsive potentials. A clear reentrant behavior in structure and transport properties is observed for bare particles in the entangled melts that have been previously reported for particles interacting with soft repulsive potentials such as square shoulder and ramp potentials. In the silanized systems, the density relaxation times although lower than bare particles, is ii unaffected by increasing volume fraction up to h ~ 3Rg and is decoupled from the structure properties which are non-monotonic similar to bare particles. In the region of

  14. Chaotic Advection at the Pore Scale: Mechanisms, Upscaling and Implications for Macroscopic Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the porescale generate chaotic advection, involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements,the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit t...

  15. Vertical and horizontal transport of mesospheric Na: Implications for the mass influx of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles as they enter the Earth's upper atmosphere. We show that the downward fluxes of these metal atoms, induced locally by waves and turbulence, are related in a straightforward way to the meteoric influxes of the metals, their chemical losses and their advective transport by the large-scale vertical and horizontal motions associated with the meridional circulation system. Above the peak of the metal layers where chemical losses and large-scale vertical motions are small, the wave-induced flux is insensitive to changes in local wave activity. If the downward transport velocity increases, because wave activity increases, then in response, the metal densities will decrease to maintain a constant vertical flux. By fitting the theoretical Na flux profile to the annual mean vertical flux profile measured during the night at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, we derive improved estimates for the global influxes of both Na and cosmic dust. The mean Na influx is 22,500±1050 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 389±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor. If the Na composition of the dust particles is identical to CI chondritic meteorites (4990 ppm by mass), then the global influx of cosmic dust is 176±38 t/d. If the composition is identical to ordinary chondrites (7680 ppm), the global dust influx is 107±22 t/d.

  16. Trends in CO2 Emissions from China-Oriented International Marine Transportation Activities and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualong Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demand for marine transportation and its associated CO2 emissions are growing rapidly as a result of increasing international trade and economic growth. An activity-based approach is developed for forecasting CO2 emissions from the China-oriented international seaborne trade sector. To accurately estimate the aggregated emissions, CO2 emissions are calculated individually for five categories of vessels: crude oil tanker, product tanker, chemical tanker, bulk carrier, and container. A business-as-usual (BAU scenario was developed to describe the current situation without additional mitigation policies, whilst three alternative scenarios were developed to describe scenarios with various accelerated improvements of the key factors. The aggregated CO2 emissions are predicted to reach 419.97 Mt under the BAU scenario, and 258.47 Mt under the optimal case, AD3. These predictions are 4.5 times and 2.8 times that of the aggregated emissions in 2007. Our analysis suggests that regulations for monitoring, reporting, and verifying the activities of vessels should be proposed, in order to quantify the CO2 emissions of marine transportation activities in Chinese territorial waters. In the long-term future, mitigation policies should be employed to reduce CO2 emissions from the marine trade sector and to address the climatic impact of shipping.

  17. Micromechanism of oxygen transport during initial stage oxidation in Si(100) surface: A ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Liu, Yilun; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhai, Zhi; Xu, Fei; Liu, Yijun

    2017-06-01

    The early stage oxidation in Si(100) surface has been investigated in this work by a reactive force field molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulation, manifesting that the oxygen transport acted as a dominant issue for initial oxidation process. Due to the oxidation, a compressive stress was generated in the oxide layer which blocked the oxygen transport perpendicular to the Si(100) surface and further prevented oxidation in the deeper layer. In contrast, thermal actuation was beneficial to the oxygen transport into deeper layer as temperature increases. Therefore, a competition mechanism was found for the oxygen transport during early stage oxidation in Si(100) surface. At room temperature, the oxygen transport was governed by the blocking effect of compressive stress, so a better quality oxide film with more uniform interface and more stoichiometric oxide structure was obtained. Indeed, the mechanism presented in this work is also applicable for other self-limiting oxidation (e.g. metal oxidation) and is helpful for the design of high-performance electronic devices.

  18. Diverse policy implications for future ozone and surface UV in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A. H.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Young, P. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the success of the Montreal Protocol in limiting emissions of ozone-depleting substances, concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane will control the evolution of total column and stratospheric ozone by the latter half of the 21st century. As the world proceeds down the path of reducing climate forcing set forth by the 2015 Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 21), a broad range of ozone changes are possible depending on future policies enacted. While decreases in tropical stratospheric ozone will likely persist regardless of the future emissions scenario, extratropical ozone could either remain weakly depleted or even increase well above historical levels, with diverse implication for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The ozone layer’s dependence on future emissions of these gases creates a complex policy decision space for protecting humans and ecosystems, which includes unexpected options such as accepting nitrous oxide emissions in order to maintain historical column ozone and surface UV levels.

  19. TCR¿ is transported to and retained in the Golgi apparatus independently of other TCR chains: implications for TCR assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst

    1999-01-01

    deltaepsilon complex was not formed. Interestingly, TCRzeta was exported from the ER independently of other TCR chains and was predominantly located in a compartment identified as the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, in the TCRzeta-negative cell line MA5.8, the hexameric CD3gammaepsilonTi alphabetaCD3...... deltaepsilon complex was allowed to exit the ER and was also predominantly located in the Golgi apparatus. However, neither hexameric TCR complexes nor TCRzeta chains were efficiently expressed at the cell surface without the other. The observations that TCRzeta and hexameric TCR complexes are transported from...... the ER to the Golgi apparatus independently of each other and that these partial TCR complexes are unable to be efficiently expressed at the cell surface suggest that final TCR assembly occurs in the Golgi apparatus....

  20. Fate of Uranium During Transport Across the Groundwater-Surface Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, Peter R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-30

    Discharge of contaminated groundwater to surface waters is of concern at many DOE facilities. For example, at F-Area and TNX-Area on the Savannah River Site, contaminated groundwater, including uranium, is already discharging into natural wetlands. It is at this interface where contaminants come into contact with the biosphere. These this research addressed a critical knowledge gap focusing on the geochemistry of uranium (or for that matter, any redox-active contaminant) in wetland systems. Understanding the interactions between hydrological, microbial, and chemical processes will make it possible to provide a more accurate conceptual and quantitative understanding of radionuclide fate and transport under these unique conditions. Understanding these processes will permit better long-term management and the necessary technical justification for invoking Monitored Natural Attenuation of contaminated wetland areas. Specifically, this research did provide new insights on how plant-induced alterations to the sediment biogeochemical processes affect the key uranium reducing microorganisms, the uranium reduction, its spatial distribution, the speciation of the immobilized uranium, and its long-term stability. This was achieved by conducting laboratory mesocosm wetland experiments as well as field measurements at the SRNL. Results have shown that uranium can be immobilized in wetland systems. To a degree some of the soluble U(VI) was reduced to insoluble U(IV), but the majority of the immobilized U was incorporated into iron oxyhydroxides that precipitated onto the root surfaces of wetland plants. This U was immobilized mostly as U(VI). Because it was immobilized in its oxidized form, results showed that dry spells, resulting in the lowering of the water table and the exposure of the U to oxic conditions, did not result in U remobilization.

  1. Campylobacter fetus surface layer proteins are transported by a type I secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S A; Shedd, O L; Ray, K C; Beins, M H; Jorgensen, J P; Blaser, M J

    1998-12-01

    The virulence of Campylobacter fetus, a bacterial pathogen of ungulates and humans, is mediated in part by the presence of a paracrystalline surface layer (S-layer) that confers serum resistance. The subunits of the S-layer are S-layer proteins (SLPs) that are secreted in the absence of an N-terminal signal sequence and attach to either type A or B C. fetus lipopolysaccharide in a serospecific manner. Antigenic variation of multiple SLPs (encoded by sapA homologs) of type A strain 23D occurs by inversion of a promoter-containing DNA element flanked by two sapA homologs. Cloning and sequencing of the entire 6.2-kb invertible region from C. fetus 23D revealed a probable 5.6-kb operon of four overlapping genes (sapCDEF, with sizes of 1,035, 1,752, 1,284, and 1,302 bp, respectively) transcribed in the opposite direction from sapA. The four genes also were present in the invertible region of type B strain 84-107 and were virtually identical to their counterparts in the type A strain. Although SapC had no database homologies, SapD, SapE, and SapF had predicted amino acid homologies with type I protein secretion systems (typified by Escherichia coli HlyBD/TolC or Erwinia chrysanthemi PrtDEF) that utilize C-terminal secretion signals to mediate the secretion of hemolysins, leukotoxins, or proteases from other bacterial species. Analysis of the C termini of four C. fetus SLPs revealed conserved structures that are potential secretion signals. A C. fetus sapD mutant neither produced nor secreted SLPs. E. coli expressing C. fetus sapA and sapCDEF secreted SapA, indicating that the sapCDEF genes are sufficient for SLP secretion. C. fetus SLPs therefore are transported to the cell surface by a type I secretion system.

  2. Baby boomers’ mobility patterns and preferences: What are the implications for future transport (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja

    The demographic grand challenge of population ageing will be reflected in most areas of society and, to a great extent, in the area of transportation as well. It will have an impact on, for example, travel demand, infrastructure needs, traffic safety and the climate. The post-World War II cohorts......, the so-called “baby boomers”, will comprise a large share of tomorrow’s older population, and it is expected that they will differ from their parents’ generation when they grow old. In order to better understand how the ageing baby boomers may affect future travel demand, the travel behaviour...... and expectations of Danish baby boomers were analysed based on 1772 standardised telephone interviews. In general, the baby boomers reported being healthy, independent and highly (auto)mobile. They were also optimistic regarding their level of mobility, capability to use a variety of travel modes and ability...

  3. Baby boomers’ mobility patterns and preferences: What are the implications for future transport?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Haustein, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The demographic grand challenge of population ageing will be reflected in most areas of society and, to a great extent, in the area of transportation as well. It will have an impact on, for example, travel demand, infrastructure needs, traffic safety and the climate. The post-World War II cohorts......, the so-called “baby boomers”, will comprise a large share of tomorrow’s older population, and it is expected that they will differ from their parents’ generation when they grow old. In order to better understand how the ageing baby boomers may affect future travel demand, the travel behaviour...... and expectations of Danish baby boomers were analysed based on 1772 standardised telephone interviews. In general, the baby boomers reported being healthy, independent and highly (auto)mobile. They were also optimistic regarding their level of mobility, capability to use a variety of travel modes and ability...

  4. Band Bending in Conjugated Polymer Films: Role of Morphology and Implications for Bulk Charge Transport Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wenderott, J. K. [University of Michigan; Dong, Ban Xuan [University of Michigan

    2017-08-14

    The performance of power conversion devices is impacted by the energy level alignment at the interface between the conjugated polymer and conductive substrate. While band bending has been known to vary between conjugated polymers, we show that the degree of band bending within the same polymer can be just as significant with morphology change. Specifically, a significant band bending effect, studied via Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was exhibited by poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films fabricated using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) in contrast to the conventional spin-cast P3HT films. This finding is associated with a broadening of the density of states (DOS) in the MAPLE-deposited P3HT films, originating from the more disordered structure of the film. These findings, to the best of our knowledge, illustrate for the first time a strong connection between morphology, energy level alignment, and bulk transport in conjugated polymer films.

  5. Fate and Transport of Nutrients in Groundwater and Surface Water in an Urban Slum Catchment Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyenje, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the generation, transport and fate of sanitation-related nutrients in groundwater and surface water in an urban slum area in sub-Saharan Africa. In excess, nutrients can cause eutrophication of downstream water bodies. The study argues that nitrogen-containing rains and

  6. 50 CFR 36.12 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams and other means of surface transportation traditionally...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams... Subsistence Uses § 36.12 Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams and other means of surface transportation... provision of subchapter C of title 50 CFR the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams and other means...

  7. Fate and Transport of Nutrients in Groundwater and Surface Water in an Urban Slum Catchment Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyenje, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the generation, transport and fate of sanitation-related nutrients in groundwater and surface water in an urban slum area in sub-Saharan Africa. In excess, nutrients can cause eutrophication of downstream water bodies. The study argues that nitrogen-containing rains and domes

  8. Reactive transport in surface sediments. II. Media: an object-oriented problem-solving environment for early diagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The MEDIA (Modelling Early DIAgenesis) software package comprises a flexible and extensible software system that provides problem-solving assistance for simulating 1D reactive transport in surface sediments. MEDIA allows multiple diagenetic models to be built by extending a model template with new m

  9. Magnetic transport apparatus for the production of ultracold atomic gases in the vicinity of a dielectric surface

    CERN Document Server

    Haendel, S; Wiles, T P; Hopkins, S A; Cornish, S L

    2011-01-01

    We present an apparatus designed for studies of atom-surface interactions using quantum degenerate gases of $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb in the vicinity of a room temperature dielectric surface. The surface to be investigated is a super-polished face of a glass Dove prism mounted in a glass cell under ultra-high vacuum (UHV). To maintain excellent optical access to the region surrounding the surface magnetic transport is used to deliver ultracold atoms from a separate vacuum chamber housing the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We present a detailed description of the vacuum apparatus highlighting the novel design features; a low profile MOT chamber and the inclusion of an obstacle in the transport path. We report the characterization and optimization of the magnetic transport around the obstacle, achieving transport efficiencies of 70% with negligible heating. Finally we demonstrate the loading of a hybrid optical-magnetic trap with $^{87}$Rb and the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates via forced evaporative cooling ...

  10. Estrogen transport in surface runoff from agricultural fields treated with two different application methods of dairy manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the land-application of animal manure provides many benefits, concerns exist regarding the subsequent transport of hormones and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. This study compares two methods of dairy manure application, surface broadcasting and shallow disk injection, on the fate and...

  11. Trace-metal concentrations in African dust: effects of long-distance transport and implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia; Lamothe, Paul; Morman, Suzette; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Gilkes, Robert; Prakongkep, Nattaporn

    2010-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel lose billions of tons of eroded mineral soils annually to the Americas and Caribbean, Europe and Asia via atmospheric transport. African dust was collected from a dust source region (Mali, West Africa) and from downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad-Tobago (TT) and U.S. Virgin Islands (VI)] and analysed for 32 trace-elements. Elemental composition of African dust samples was similar to that of average upper continental crust (UCC), with some enrichment or depletion of specific trace-elements. Pb enrichment was observed only in dust and dry deposition samples from the source region and was most likely from local use of leaded gasoline. Dust particles transported long-distances (VI and TT) exhibited increased enrichment of Mo and minor depletion of other elements relative to source region samples. This suggests that processes occurring during long-distance transport of dust produce enrichment/depletion of specific elements. Bioaccessibility of trace-metals in samples was tested in simulated human fluids (gastric and lung) and was found to be greater in downwind than source region samples, for some metals (e.g., As). The large surface to volume ratio of the dust particles (<2.5 µm) at downwind sites may be a factor.

  12. Stratification, Sediment Transport, and the Early Wet Surface of Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Athena Science Team

    2004-12-01

    the spectral gap in the size distribution of eolian dunes and ripples. A further clue to the likely subaqueous origin for Eagle cross-laminae is provided by their festoon geometry which requires that the reconstructed ripples have three-dimensional geometry defined by highly sinuous crestlines. In terrestrial settings such bedforms are known only to develop in subaqueous, subcritical flows, with velocities of less than one meter per second. On Mars, the initiation of subaqueous sediment movement is expected to occur at velocities lower than on earth, by a factor of 1.34. With respect to length scales, such as bedform dimensions, the scaling factor turns out to have the opposite sense so that, given dynamically similar flows, ripples on Mars might be larger by a factor of 1.34. Neither of these rescaling effects influences the interpretation that cm-scale, festoon cross-lamination at Eagle crater most probably requires sediment transport in subaqueous, low-velocity flows across the Meridiani plains. The assemblage of primary facies recorded at Eagle crater is most consistent with an environment characterized by episodic inundation by surface water to shallow depths, followed by evaporation, and exposure and desiccation. Terrestrial analogs for such a suite of facies and surface processes include small interdune depressions, playa lakes, and sabkhas adjacent to marginal seaways. All rover observations indicate that the evaporite-bearing cross-bedded unit extends at least on the order of 1 km though MOC and THEMIS data suggest it extends much further.

  13. Upscaling of the specific surface area for reactive transport modelling in fractured rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    The impact of flow heterogeneity on chemical transport from single to multiple fractures, is investigated. The emphasis is on the dynamic nature of the specific surface area (SSA) due to heterogeneity of the flow, relative to a purely geometrical definition. It is shown how to account for SSA as a random variable in modelling multi-component reactions. The flow-dependent SSA is interpreted probabilistically, following inert tracer particles along individual fractures. Upscaling to a fracture network is proposed as a time-domain random walk based on the statistics of SSA for single fractures. Statistics of SSA are investigated for three correlation structures of transmissivity, one classical multi-gaussian, and two non-Gaussian. The coefficient of variation of single fracture SSA decreases monotonously with the distance over the fracture length; the CV of the upscaled SSA reduces further such that after ca 20 fractures it is under 0.1 for a disconnected field, and around 0.2 for connected and multi-gaussian fields. This implies that after 10-20 fractures, uncertainty in SSA is significantly reduced, justifying the use of an effective value. A conservative, lower bound for the dimensionless upscaled effective SSA was found to be 1, suitable for all heterogeneity structures, assuming the cubic hydraulic law applicable.

  14. EHD-driven mass transport enhancement in surface dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglioli, M.; Shaw, A.; Wright, A.; FitzPatrick, B.; Neretti, G.; Seri, P.; Borghi, C. A.; Iza, F.

    2016-12-01

    Surface dielectric barrier discharges (S-DBDs) have received renewed attention in recent years for their potential application in emerging biomedical, environmental and agricultural applications. In most of these applications, the plasma is not in direct contact with the substrate being treated and the transport of reactive species from the plasma to the substrate is typically assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Here, we demonstrate that generally this is not the case and that electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces can produce jets that enhance the delivery of these species, thereby influencing the efficacy of the S-DBD device. In particular, we have studied the degradation of potassium indigotrisulfonate solutions exposed to S-DBDs generated in devices with annular electrodes of diameters varying between 10 mm and 50 mm. All the devices were driven at constant linear power density (watts per cm of plasma length) and although local plasma properties remained the same in all the devices, a three-fold efficacy enhancement was observed for devices of diameter ~30 mm due to EHD effects.

  15. A Review of Removable Surface Contamination on Radioactive Materials Transportation Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Jr, W. E.; Watson, E. C.; Murphy, D. W.; Harrer, B. J.; Harty, R.; Aldrich, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of removable surface contamination on radioactive materials transportation containers. The purpose of the study is to provide information to the NRC during their review of existing regulations. Data was obtained from both industry and literature on three major topics: 1) radiation doses, 2) economic costs, and 3) contamination frequencies. Containers for four categories of radioactive materials are considered including radiopharmaceuticals, industrial sources, nuclear fuel cycle materials, and low-level radioactive waste. Assumptions made in this study use current information to obtain realistic yet conservative estimates of radiation dose and economic costs. Collective and individual radiation doses are presented for each container category on a per container basis. Total doses, to workers and the public, are also presented for spent fuel cask and low-level waste drum decontamination. Estimates of the additional economic costs incurred by lowering current limits by factors of 10 and 100 are presented. Current contamination levels for each category of container are estimated from the data collected. The information contained in this report is designed to be useful to the NRC in preparing their recommendations for new regulations.

  16. A Versatile Lifting Device for Lunar Surface Payload Handling, Inspection & Regolith Transport Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, William; Dorsey, John; Collins, Tim; King, Bruce; Mikulas, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Devices for lifting and transporting payloads and material are critical for efficient Earth-based construction operations. Devices with similar functionality will be needed to support lunar-outpost construction, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation, grading and payload placement. Past studies have proposed that only a few carefully selected devices are required for a lunar outpost. One particular set of operations involves lifting and manipulating payloads in the 100 kg to 3,000 kg range, which are too large or massive to be handled by unassisted astronauts. This paper will review historical devices used for payload handling in space and on earth to derive a set of desirable features for a device that can be used on planetary surfaces. Next, an innovative concept for a lifting device is introduced, which includes many of the desirable features. The versatility of the device is discussed, including its application to lander unloading, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation and site preparation. Approximate rules, which can be used to size the device for specific payload mass and reach requirements, are provided. Finally, details of a test-bed implementation of the innovative concept, which will be used to validate the structural design and develop operational procedures, is provided.

  17. Surface Evolution of the Sun's Magnetic Field: A Historical Review of the Flux-Transport Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeley Jr. Neil R.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews our attempts to understand the transport of magnetic flux on the Sun from the Babcock and Leighton models to the recent revisions that are being used to simulate the field over many sunspot cycles. In these models, the flux originates in sunspot groups and spreads outward on the surface via supergranular diffusion; the expanding patterns become sheared by differential rotation, and the remnants are carried poleward by meridional flow. The net result of all of the flux eruptions during a sunspot cycle is to replace the initial polar fields with new fields of opposite polarity. A central issue in this process is the role of meridional flow, whose relatively low speed is near the limit of detection with Doppler techniques. A compelling feature of Leighton’s original model was that it reversed the polar fields without the need for meridional flow. Now, we think that meridional flow is central to the reversal and to the dynamo itself.

  18. Geocenter motion due to surface mass transport from GRACE satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, R. E. M.; van der Wal, W.; Lavallée, D. A.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of mass redistribution from satellite gravimetry are insensitive to geocenter motions. However, geocenter motions can be constrained by satellite gravity data alone if we partition mass changes between land and oceans, under the assumption that the ocean is passive (i.e., in gravitational equilibrium with the land load and the solid earth). Here, we make use of 8 years (2003-2010) of optimally filtered monthly GRACE-based solutions produced at TU Delft to determine changes in the land load and the corresponding geocenter motion, through an iterative procedure. We pay particular attention to correcting for signal leakage caused by the limited spatial resolution of GRACE. We also investigate how the choice of a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) affects the estimated geocenter motion trend due to present-day surface mass transport. Finally, we separate the contribution of ice masses from that of land hydrology and show how they have a different sensitivity to the chosen GIA model and observational time-span.

  19. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  20. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  1. Economic impact and policy implications from urban shared transportation: The case of Pittsburgh's shared bike system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Zacharias, Christos; Kokkodis, Marios; Lappas, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    During the last years the number of cities that have installed and started operating shared bike systems has significantly increased. These systems provide an alternative and sustainable mean of transportation to the city dwellers. Apart from the energy sustainability benefits, shared bike systems can have a positive effect on residents' health, air quality and the overall condition of the currently crumbling road network infrastructure. Anecdotal stories and survey studies have also identified that bike lanes have a positive impact on local businesses. In this study, driven by the rapid adoption of shared bike systems by city governments and their potential positive effects on a number of urban life facets we opt to study and quantify the value of these systems. We focus on a specific aspect of this value and use evidence from the real estate market in the city of Pittsburgh to analyze the effect on dwellers' properties of the shared bike system installed in the city in June 2015. We use quasi-experimental techniques and find that the shared bike system led to an increase in the housing prices (both sales and rental prices) in the zip codes where shared bike stations were installed. We further bring into the light potential negative consequences of this impact (i.e., gentrification) and discuss/propose two public policies that can exploit the impact of the system for the benefit of both the local government as well as the city dwellers.

  2. Zinc Transporters, Mechanisms of Action and Therapeutic Utility: Implications for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Myers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element that plays a vital role in maintaining many biological processes and cellular homeostasis. Dysfunctional zinc signaling is associated with a number of chronic disease states including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes. Cellular homeostasis requires mechanisms that tightly control the uptake, storage, and distribution of zinc. This is achieved through the coordinated actions of zinc transporters and metallothioneins. Evidence on the role of these proteins in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is now emerging. Zinc plays a key role in the synthesis, secretion and action of insulin in both physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, recent studies highlight zinc’s dynamic role as a “cellular second messenger” in the control of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. This suggests that zinc plays an unidentified role as a novel second messenger that augments insulin activity. This previously unexplored concept would raise a whole new area of research into the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and introduce a new class of drug target with utility for diabetes pharmacotherapy.

  3. Zinc transporters, mechanisms of action and therapeutic utility: implications for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Stephen A; Nield, Alex; Myers, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that plays a vital role in maintaining many biological processes and cellular homeostasis. Dysfunctional zinc signaling is associated with a number of chronic disease states including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes. Cellular homeostasis requires mechanisms that tightly control the uptake, storage, and distribution of zinc. This is achieved through the coordinated actions of zinc transporters and metallothioneins. Evidence on the role of these proteins in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is now emerging. Zinc plays a key role in the synthesis, secretion and action of insulin in both physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, recent studies highlight zinc's dynamic role as a "cellular second messenger" in the control of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. This suggests that zinc plays an unidentified role as a novel second messenger that augments insulin activity. This previously unexplored concept would raise a whole new area of research into the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and introduce a new class of drug target with utility for diabetes pharmacotherapy.

  4. The Amino Terminus of Tau Inhibits Kinesin-Dependent Axonal Transport: Implications for Filament Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Nichole E.; Morfini, Gerardo; Pigino, Gustavo; Gaisina, Irina N.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Binder, Lester I.; Brady, Scott T.

    2009-01-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies is characterized by filamentous deposits of the microtubule-associated protein tau, but the relationship between tau polymerization and neurotoxicity is unknown. Here, we examined effects of filamentous tau on fast axonal transport (FAT) using isolated squid axoplasm. Monomeric and filamentous forms of recombinant human tau were perfused in axoplasm, and their effects on kinesin- and dynein-dependent FAT rates were evaluated by video microscopy. Although perfusion of monomeric tau at physiological concentrations showed no effect, tau filaments at the same concentrations selectively inhibited antero-grade (kinesin-dependent) FAT, triggering the release of conventional kinesin from axoplasmic vesicles. Pharmacological experiments indicated that the effect of tau filaments on FAT is mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activities. Moreover, deletion analysis suggested that these effects depend on a conserved 18-amino-acid sequence at the amino terminus of tau. Interestingly, monomeric tau isoforms lacking the C-terminal half of the molecule (including the microtubule binding region) recapitulated the effects of full-length filamentous tau. Our results suggest that pathological tau aggregation contributes to neurodegeneration by altering a regulatory pathway for FAT. PMID:18798283

  5. On the structure of turbulent gravel bed flow: Implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the turbulent flow field over gravel particles as a first step towards understanding sediment transport in a gravel bed river. Specifically, the vertical momentum flux in gravel bed turbulent flow was investigated with particular attention to the near-bed region. Spatial organization of vertical momentum flux was studied with stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a horizontal layer 1mm above the gravel crests. The vertical momentum flux through the water column was described with digital PIV measurements in three vertical planes. The data showed that near the gravel bed, net turbulent momentum flux spatially varies with respect to bed topography. Analysis of the vertical velocity data revealed that near the gravel particle crests, there is a significant net vertical form-induced momentum flux approximately with the same order of magnitude as the net vertical turbulent momentum flux. Above the crests, total net vertical momentum flux is positive. However, below the crests, despite noticeable positive form-induced momentum flux, total net vertical momentum flux is negative. Results of quadrant analysis show that variation of turbulent net vertical momentum flux through water column is in agreement with prevalence of upward movement of low velocity flow (known as ejection) above gravel crests and downward movement of high velocity flow (known as sweep) below gravel crests. Below gravel crests (- 0.1 particles but their contribution is not sufficient to move fine particles in the longitudinal direction.

  6. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  7. Mechanism of Crystallization and Implications for Charge Transport in Poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) Thin Films

    KAUST Repository

    Duong, Duc T.

    2014-04-09

    In this work, crystallization kinetics and aggregate growth of poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) (P3EHT) thin films are studied as a function of film thickness. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption show that individual aggregates and crystallites grow anisotropically and mostly along only two packing directions: the alkyl stacking and the polymer chain backbone direction. Further, it is also determined that crystallization kinetics is limited by the reorganization of polymer chains and depends strongly on the film thickness and average molecular weight. Time-dependent, field-effect hole mobilities in thin films reveal a percolation threshold for both low and high molecular weight P3EHT. Structural analysis reveals that charge percolation requires bridged aggregates separated by a distance of ≈2-3 nm, which is on the order of the polymer persistence length. These results thus highlight the importance of tie molecules and inter-aggregate distance in supporting charge percolation in semiconducting polymer thin films. The study as a whole also demonstrates that P3EHT is an ideal model system for polythiophenes and should prove to be useful for future investigations into crystallization kinetics. Recrystallization kinetics and its relationship to charge transport in poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) (P3EHT) thin films are investigated using a combination of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, and field-effect transistor measurements. These results show that thin film crystallization kinetics is limited by polymer chain reorganization and that charge percolation depends strongly on the edge-to-edge distance between aggregates. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Accessory neurovascular foramina on the lingual surface of mandible: Incidence, topography, and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Murlimanju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It was suggested that the accessory neurovascular foramina of the mandible might be of significance in relation to the effectiveness of local anesthesia following the routine inferior alveolar nerve block. Aims: To investigate the incidence of neurovascular foramina over the lingual surface of the mandible in South Indian population. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at the department of anatomy. Materials and Methods: The study included 67 human adult dry mandibles, the exact ages and sexes of which were not known. The location and number of neurovascular foramina were topographically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics. Results: The foramina were observed in 64 mandibles (95.5% and were often multiple in most of the cases. They were located between the two medial incisors in 8 mandibles (1.9%, between the medial and lateral incisor in 34 mandibles (50.7%; 25-bilateral; 7-right; 2-left, between the lateral incisor and canine in 7 mandibles (10.4%; 2-bilateral; 3-right; 2-left, between the canine and first premolar in 6 cases (8.9%; 3 on each side. Foramina were also present around the genial tubercle in 56 mandibles (83.6%. Among them, 52 mandibles showed a single foramen just above the genial tubercle, 34 mandibles had foramina below the tubercles, 13 mandibles had foramina on the right side of genial tubercle and 17 were having on the left side. Conclusion: Since the anatomical details of these foramina are important to various fields of dentistry and oncology, the present investigation was undertaken. The clinical significance and implications are emphasized.

  9. Wind streaks in Tharsis and Elysium - Implications for sediment transport by slope winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Thomas, P. C.; Veverka, J.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed maps of wind streaks in Tharsis and Elysium have been compiled from Viking Orbiter observations spanning one complete Martian year. The streak pattern is controlled by slope winds on the central volcanoes and on the flanks of the Tharsis bulge, while the global circulation dominates in Elysium. Dust erosion by downslope winds occurs over much of Tharsis and in the vicinity of Elysium Mons; this process is effective even at the low atmospheric pressures found near the summits of the large volcanoes. Erosional streaks are largely absent in Elysium Planitia; net deposition of dust might have occurred during the period of the observations. Surface properties such as slope, thermal inertia, and roughness may influence the efficiency of slope wind production sufficiently to account for the pronounced differences in streak types and patterns present in these two regions.

  10. GPS based surface displacements – a proxy for discharge and sediment transport from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hasholt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The elastic respond of the Earth's surface to mass changes has been measured with Global Positioning System (GPS. Mass loss as accumulated runoff and sediment transport from a 10 000 km2 segment of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS correlated very well (R2 = 0.83 with GPS measured uplift. Accumulated winter precipitation correlated fairly well with surface depression (R2 = 0.69. The relationships are based on seven years of runoff and sediment transport observations from the Watson River (2007–2013, winter precipitation from Kangerlussuaq Airport and GPS observations at Kellyville. GPS recordings of surface subsidence and uplift from 1996–2013 are used to calculate 18 years time series of annual runoff, sediment and solute transport and winter precipitation. Runoff and related transport of sediment and solutes increase over the period, while winter precipitation (land depression tends to decrease. Based on the entire GPS record (1996–2013, it is shown that until 2005–2006 the mass balance of this segment of the GrIS was rather stable – since then there has been an increasing loss of mass, culminating in 2012.

  11. Vertical Transport through Europa's Crust: Implications for Oxidant Delivery and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Bombardment of the surface of Europa by energetic charged particles produces oxidants and other biologically useful substances, but they can only contribute to the habitability of the ocean if they are delivered down through the icy crust. The thickness of the oxygenated layer of ice has previously been estimated (e.g. by Chyba and Phillips) to be only a few meters, assuming that impact gardening is the dominant factor that distributes oxidants below the radiation zone. Such a layer could contribute significantly to the habitability of the ocean only if it were delivered frequently enough, via undefined mechanisms, as shown by Hand et al. However, consideration of the types of processes that continually resurface Europa (e.g. crack dilation, emplacement of new material on the old surface as in ridge formation, or melt) suggests that the oxygenated layer thickness is greater than 300 m, possibly as thick as the entire ice crust, and certainly far more than the few meters indicated by impact gardening alone. The estimated delivery rate to the ocean is enough that the oxygen levels could now be high enough to support macrofauna and, at 3×1011 moles/yr of oxygen, it could support the respiration rates of 3 million tons of fish, or their Europan equivalents. These values are independent of any additional contributions due to possible photosynthesis. Initial formation of life would be difficult with so much oxygen, but the start of oxidant delivery into the ocean would have been delayed by 1 - 2 billion years while the crust became loaded with oxidants. In the ocean, this delay would have allowed time for prebiotic assemblages and anaerobic biological development, prior to the increasing oxygen concentration, which could then have been harnessed for development of more plentiful and complex life.

  12. Equilibrative nucleoside (ENTs) and cationic amino acid (CATs) transporters: implications in foetal endothelial dysfunction in human pregnancy diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanello, Paola; Escudero, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD, characterized by abnormal D-glucose metabolism), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, a disease associated with reduced oxygen delivery (hypoxia) to the foetus), and preeclampsia (PE, a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria and increased vascular resistance), induce foetal endothelial dysfunction with implications in adult life and increase the risk of vascular diseases. Synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and uptake of L-arginine (the NO synthase (NOS) substrate) and adenosine (a vasoactive endogenous nucleoside) by the umbilical vein endothelium is altered in pregnancies with GD, IUGR or PE. Mechanisms underlying these alterations include differential expression of equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs), cationic amino acid transporters (CATs), and NOS. Modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS expression and activity in endothelium involves protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases p42 and p44 (p42/44(mapk)), calcium, and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3k), among others. Elevated extracellular D-glucose and hypoxia alter human endothelial function. However, information regarding the transcriptional modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS is limited. This review focuses on the effect of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in the modulation of ENTs and CATs, and NOS expression and activity, and the consequences for foetal endothelial function in GD, IUGR and PE. The available information will contribute to a better understanding of the cell and molecular basis of the altered vascular endothelial function in these pregnancy diseases and will emphasize the key role of this type of epithelium in placental function and the normal foetal development and growth.

  13. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments of the South China Sea and its significance for in sediment sources and transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建国; 陈木宏; 陈忠; 颜文

    2010-01-01

    Clay minerals of surface sediments in the South China Sea (SCS) are analyzed with X-ray diffraction, and their transport is explored with a grain size trend analysis (GSTA) model. Results show that clay mineral types in various sedimentary environments have different sediment sources and transport routes. Sediments in the northern SCS (north of 20°N) between the southwest of Taiwan Island and the outer mouth of the Pearl River have high contents of illite and chlorite, which are derived mainly from sediment...

  14. Transport and deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxian

    Tropospheric ozone is an important photochemical air pollutant, which increases respiratory-related diseases, decreases crop yields, and causes other environmental problems. This research has focused on the measurement of soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide (NO), one of the precursors for ozone formation, from intensively managed soils in the Southeast US, and examined the transport and deposition of NOx (NO + NO2) and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer, and the effects of NO emissions and its chemical reactions on ozone flux and deposition to the earth's surface. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured from an intensively managed agricultural soil, in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina (near Plymouth, NC), using a dynamic chamber technique. Measurements of soil NO emissions in several crop canopies were conducted at four different sites in North Carolina during late spring and summer of 1994-1996. The turbulent fluxes of NO2 and O3 at 5 m and 10 m above the ground were measured using the eddy-correlation technique near Plymouth, NC during late spring of 1995 and summer of 1996, concurrent with measurements of soil NO emissions using the dynamic chamber system. Soil NO emission from within the corn field was high averaging approximately 35 ng N/m2/s during the measurement period of 1995. In another study, vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610 m tall tower located 15 km Southeast of Raleigh, NC during the summers of 1993-1997, as part of an effort by the State of North Carolina to develop a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. A strong correlation was observed between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations in the residual layer (CR) above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (C o max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, an empirical regression equation (Co max = 27.67*exp(0.016 CR)) was developed for predicting maximum ground level ozone

  15. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Massman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank–Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m−2. The Hertz–Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50–90 °C. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure, which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous

  16. Biomimetic Bacterial Identification Platform Based on Thermal Wave Transport Analysis (TWTA) through Surface-Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen Redeker, Erik; Eersels, Kasper; Akkermans, Onno; Royakkers, Jeroen; Dyson, Simba; Nurekeyeva, Kunya; Ferrando, Beniamino; Cornelis, Peter; Peeters, Marloes; Wagner, Patrick; Diliën, Hanne; van Grinsven, Bart; Cleij, Thomas Jan

    2017-05-12

    This paper introduces a novel bacterial identification assay based on thermal wave analysis through surface-imprinted polymers (SIPs). Aluminum chips are coated with SIPs, serving as synthetic cell receptors that have been combined previously with the heat-transfer method (HTM) for the selective detection of bacteria. In this work, the concept of bacterial identification is extended toward the detection of nine different bacterial species. In addition, a novel sensing approach, thermal wave transport analysis (TWTA), is introduced, which analyzes the propagation of a thermal wave through a functional interface. The results presented here demonstrate that bacterial rebinding to the SIP layer resulted in a measurable phase shift in the propagated wave, which is most pronounced at a frequency of 0.03 Hz. In this way, the sensor is able to selectively distinguish between the different bacterial species used in this study. Furthermore, a dose-response curve was constructed to determine a limit of detection of 1 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), indicating that TWTA is advantageous over HTM in terms of sensitivity and response time. Additionally, the limit of selectivity of the sensor was tested in a mixed bacterial solution, containing the target species in the presence of a 99-fold excess of competitor species. Finally, a first application for the sensor in terms of infection diagnosis is presented, revealing that the platform is able to detect bacteria in clinically relevant concentrations as low as 3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1) in spiked urine samples.

  17. Modeling Biogeochemical Reactive Transport in Fractured Granites: Implications for the Performance of a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, J.; Samper, J.; Pedersen, K.; Puigdomenech, I.

    2003-12-01

    Several countries around the world are considering deep repositories in fractured granitic formations for the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Evaluating the long term safety of such repositories requires sound conceptual and numerical models which are being developed from data and knowledge gained from in situ experiments carried out at deep underground laboratories such as that of Žsp” in Sweden. One of the key aspects for performance assessment concerns to groundwater redox conditions because: (a) the presence of oxygen will affect to the corrosion of canisters, (b) possible production of hydrogen sulphide from sulphate reduction will also have a negative effect on these metallic containers, and (c) several long-lived radionuclides are much more soluble and mobile under oxidizing conditions. Several projects have been performed at Žsp” to investigate different aspects of the groundwater redox evolution. The vast amount of in situ-generated information has been used in this work to set up coupled hydrobiogeochemical models. Numerical models account for saturated groundwater flow, solute transport by advection, dispersion and molecular diffusion, geochemical reactions involving both the liquid and solid phases, and microbially-catallyzed processes. For the Žsp” site, modelling results provide quantitative support for the following conclusions. (A) At the operational phase of the repository, shallow fresh groundwater could reach the depth of the underground facility. Shallow groundwaters loose dissolved oxygen during the infiltration through soil layers and then, respiration of dissolved organic matter is induced along the flow paths through the reduction of Fe(III)-bearing minerals of the fracture zones. Microbial anaerobic respiration of DOC provides additional reducing capacity at the depth of the tunnel. (B) After repository closure, atmospheric oxygen will remain trapped within the tunnel. Abiotic consumption of this oxygen has been

  18. Implications of heterogeneity on transport simulations at large scale: the Morroa aquifer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Jose Pérez-García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El acuífero Morroa, localizado en el departamento de Sucre (Colombia, representa la única fuente de suministro de agua potable de cerca de 500.000 habitantes que incluyen la totalidad de los habitantes de la capital del departamento Sincelejo. Aunque se han desarrollado muchos estudios en esta zona que incluyen la recolección de gran cantidad de información relacionada con niveles piezométricos, información estratigráfica, pruebas de bombeo, esta información es difusa, heterogénea y fraccionada. La incertidumbre asociada a esta información afecta cualquier intento de cuantificar la respuesta del acuífero, por esta razón el punto de partida de esta investigación es el desarrollo de una metodología capaz de integrar todas las variables en un modelo conceptual. Para considerar la incertidumbre se generaron múltiples realizaciones del acuífero de tal manera que todas respetan las propiedades estadísticas de la información disponible. Para generar estas realizaciones se utilizaron dos metodologías: (1 SISIM, que es un método basado en estadísticas de dos puntos (semivariograma, y (2 SNESIM, que es un algoritmo basado en el concepto de imágenes de entrenamiento (estadística de puntos múltiples. Resultados de las simulaciones muestran la gran capacidad de este último para reproducir geometrías curvilíneas complejas. En una segunda fase, se desarrollaron simulaciones de flujo y transporte de contaminantes de una manera integrada usando los dos modelos conceptuales obtenidos a través de las dos aproximaciones geoestadísticas. Condiciones de flujo estacionario y un contaminante conservativo fueron asumidos para todas las simulaciones. Los resultados obtenidos muestran una influencia notable de la heterogeneidad en general, así como una gran sensibilidad al método geoestadístico usado para generar la heterogeneidad. Las diferencias observadas tendrían un gran efecto en el diseño de políticas de manejo integral del recurso

  19. Model uncertainties affecting satellite-based inverse modeling of nitrogen oxides emissions and implications for surface ozone simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2012-06-01

    for emission inversion without corrections. The modifications however cannot account for the large model underestimates in cities and other extremely polluted areas (particularly in the north as compared to satellite retrievals, likely pointing to underestimates of the a priori emission inventory in these places with important implications for understanding of atmospheric chemistry and air quality. Post-model modifications also have large impacts on surface ozone concentrations with the peak values in July over North China decreasing by about 15 ppb. Individually, modification for the uptake of the hydroperoxyl radical on aerosols has the largest impact for both NO2 and ozone, followed by various other parameters important for some species in some seasons. Note that these modifications are simplified and should be used with caution for error apportionment.

  20. Kinesin-5/Eg5 is important for transport of CARTS from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Julien; van Galen, Josse; Cruz-Garcia, David; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Here we report that the kinesin-5 motor Klp61F, which is known for its role in bipolar spindle formation in mitosis, is required for protein transport from the Golgi complex to the cell surface in Drosophila S2 cells. Disrupting the function of its mammalian orthologue, Eg5, in HeLa cells inhibited secretion of a protein called pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) but, surprisingly, not the trafficking of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) to the cell surface. We have previously reported that PAUF is transported from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the cell surface in specific carriers called CARTS that exclude VSV-G. Inhibition of Eg5 function did not affect the biogenesis of CARTS; however, their migration was delayed and they accumulated near the Golgi complex. Altogether, our findings reveal a surprising new role of Eg5 in nonmitotic cells in the facilitation of the transport of specific carriers, CARTS, from the TGN to the cell surface. PMID:23857769

  1. Channel morphometry, sediment transport, and implications for tectonic activity and surficial ages of Titan basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Richard; Clayton, Jordan A.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial features on Titan and drainage basins on Earth are remarkably similar despite differences in gravity and surface composition. We determined network bifurcation (Rb) ratios for five Titan and three terrestrial analog basins. Tectonically-modified Earth basins have Rb values greater than the expected range (3.0–5.0) for dendritic networks; comparisons with Rb values determined for Titanbasins, in conjunction with similarities in network patterns, suggest that portions of Titan's north polar region are modified by tectonic forces. Sufficient elevation data existed to calculate bed slope and potential fluvial sedimenttransport rates in at least one Titanbasin, indicating that 75 mm water ice grains (observed at the Huygens landing site) should be readily entrained given sufficient flow depths of liquid hydrocarbons. Volumetric sedimenttransport estimates suggest that ~6700–10,000 Titan years (~2.0–3.0 x 105 Earth years) are required to erode this basin to its minimum relief (assuming constant 1 m and 1.5 m flows); these lowering rates increase to ~27,000–41,000 Titan years (~8.0–12.0 x 105 Earth years) when flows in the north polar region are restricted to summer months.

  2. The bounding-surfaces record of a barrier spit from Huangqihai Lake, North China: implications for coastal barrier boundary hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xin; Yu, Xinghe; Clift, Peter D.; Wang, Tianyi; Tan, Chengpeng; Jin, Lina

    2016-09-01

    Ground-penetrating radar and trenching studies of a barrier spit on the north shore of Huangqihai Lake were made, that reveal important implications for the coastal washover barrier boundary hierarchy and interpretations of this depositional record. A four-fold hierarchy bounding-surface model, representing different levels of impact and genesis, is defined. Each level of the hierarchy is enclosed by a distinct kind of surface characterized by different ground-penetrating radar reflection features, sedimentary characteristics (color, grain size, sorting, rounding and sedimentary structures) and origin. We suggest that this hierarchical model can be applied to any coastal washover barrier deposits.

  3. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous...

  4. Global climate impacts of bioenergy from forests: implications from biogenic CO2 fluxes and surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan; Strømman, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Production of biomass for bioenergy can alter biogeochemical and biogeophysical mechanisms, thus affecting local and global climate. Recent scientific developments mainly embraced impacts from land use changes resulting from area-expanded biomass production, with several extensive insights available. Comparably less attention, however, is given to the assessment of direct land surface-atmosphere climate impacts of bioenergy systems under rotation such as in plantations and forested ecosystems, whereby land use disturbances are only temporary. In this work, we assess bioenergy systems representative of various biomass species (spruce, pine, aspen, etc.) and climatic regions (US, Canada, Norway, etc.), for both stationary and vehicle applications. In addition to conventional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through life cycle activities (harvest, transport, processing, etc.), we evaluate the contributions to global warming of temporary effects resulting from the perturbation in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration caused by the timing of biogenic CO2 fluxes and in surface reflectivity (albedo). Biogenic CO2 fluxes on site after harvest are directly measured through Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) chronosequences from flux towers established at the interface between the forest canopy and the atmosphere and are inclusive of all CO2 exchanges occurring in the forest (e.g., sequestration of CO2 in growing trees, emissions from soil respiration and decomposition of dead organic materials). These primary data based on empirical measurements provide an accurate representation of the forest carbon sink behavior over time, and they are used in the elaboration of high-resolution IRFs for biogenic CO2 emissions. Chronosequence of albedo values from clear-cut to pre-harvest levels are gathered from satellite data (MODIS black-sky shortwave broadband, Collection 5, MCD43A). Following the cause-effect chain from emissions to damages, through radiative forcing and changes

  5. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...

  6. Transport of temperature and humidity variance and covariance in the marine surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Højstrup, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we address the budget of potential temperature T and moisture mixing ratio q variances as well as the q - T covariance budget. We focus on the vertical transport and study the quantities contained in these terms. Estimates of transport terms are rare and to the best of our knowledge...

  7. Mineralogical study of surface sediments in the western Arctic Ocean and their implications for material sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Linsen; SHI Xuefa; LIU Yanguang; FANG Xisheng; CHEN Zhihua; WANG Chunjuan; ZOU Jianjun; HUANG Yuanhui

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical analysis was performed on bulk sediments of 79 surface samples using X-ray diffraction. The analytical results, combined with data on ocean currents and the regional geological background, were used to investigate the mineral sources. Mineral assemblages in sediments and their distribution in the study area indicate that the material sources are complex. (1) Feldspar is abundant in the sediments of the middle Chukchi Sea near the Bering Strait, originating from sediments in the Anadyr River carried by the Anadyr Current. Sediments deposited on the western side of the Chukchi Sea are rich in feldspar. Compared with other areas, sediments in this region are rich in hornblende transported from volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Siberia by the Anadyr Stream and the Siberian Coastal Current. Sediments in the eastern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz sourced from sediments of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers carried by the Alaska Coastal Current. Sediments in the northern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz and carbonates from the Mackenzie River sediments. (2) Sediments of the southern and central Canada Basin contain little calcite and dolomite, mainly due to the small impact of the Beaufort Gyre carrying carbonates from the Canadian Arctic Islands. Compared with other areas, the mica content in the region is high, implying that the Laptev Sea is the main sediment source for the southern and central Canada Basin. In the other deep sea areas, calcite and dolomite levels are high caused by the input of large amounts of sediment carried by the Beaufort Gyre from the Canadian Arctic Islands (Banks and Victoria). The Siberian Laptev Sea also provides small amounts of sediment for this region. Furthermore, the Atlantic mid-water contributes some fine-grained material to the entire deep western Arctic Ocean.

  8. Tissue As A Medium For Laser Light Transport-Implications For Photoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, L. E.; Bolin, F. P.; Cain, B. W.

    1982-12-01

    An important medical laser application is in the emerging field of photoradiation therapy (PRT). PRT is the process in which malignant tissue is destroyed by administration of light to a specific photosensitized site. Filtered arcs, incandescents and dye lasers have been used as sources of activating light. We have carried out light experiments in tissue to study such PRT light distributions. The results of this research have shown that a number of important optical phenomena occurring within illuminated tissue must be accounted for in order to make good predictions of tumor light dosage. Among these are; tissue type, interface effects and anomalies due to composition. These effects substantially influence light levels in PRT and, thus, the therapeutic effect. The uniqueness of tissue as a medium for light transport presents special problems for optics research and instrumentation. Successful solutions necessarily will involve collaboration between the life sciences and optic specialists. Attempts at treatment of human disease using non-ionizing radiation have a history archaeologically traceable to archaic societies (in which the sun's photons were used and often worshipped).1 Western medicine in the past, has used visible light beneficially, albeit empirically, on a few ailments. However, in this century, a significant development in the understanding and in the therapeutic use of this electromagnetic radiation in the UV, visible and IR has occurred, based on scientific study. This utilization of radiation in the visible and ultraviolet can be by two distinct processes. One is through the direct action of the photons which serve as the sole treatment agent. In this case the photon interacts with the cell, or its components, in a single step, to produce a desired effect. An example is the successful use of blue light for treatment of bilirubinemia in newborns. The second process is a biological effect produced through the combination of electromagnetic radiation

  9. Drastic Control of Texture in a High Performance n-Type Polymeric Semiconductor and Implications for Charge Transport

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2011-07-12

    Control of crystallographic texture from mostly face-on to edge-on is observed for the film morphology of the n-type semicrystalline polymer {[N,N-9-bis(2-octyldodecyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl] -alt-5,59-(2,29-bithiophene)}, P(NDI2OD-T2), when annealing the film to the polymer melting point followed by slow cooling to ambient temperature. A variety of X-ray diffraction analyses, including pole figure construction and Fourier transform peak shape deconvolution, are employed to quantify the texture change, relative degree of crystallinity and lattice order. We find that annealing the polymer film to the melt leads to a shift from 77.5% face-on to 94.6% edge-on lamellar texture as well as to a 2-fold increase in crystallinity and a 40% decrease in intracrystallite cumulative disorder. The texture change results in a significant drop in the electron-only diode current density through the film thickness upon melt annealing, while little change is observed in the in-plane transport of bottom gated thin film transistors. This suggests that the texture change is prevalent in the film interior and that either the (bottom) surface structure is different from the interior structure or the intracrystalline order and texture play a secondary role in transistor transport for this material. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  11. Effects of DNP on the cell surface properties of marine bacteria and its implication for adhesion to surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Nishad, K.K.; Bhosle, N.B.

    The effect of 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP) on extracelluar polysaccharides (EPS), cell surface charge, and hydrophobicity of six marine bacterial cultures was studied, and its influence on attachment of these bacteria to glass and polystyrene...

  12. Nutrient uptake rate as a function of cell size and surface transporter density: A Michaelis-like approximation to the model of Pasciak and Gavis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Robert A.

    2008-10-01

    Pasciak and Gavis were first to propose a model of nutrient uptake that includes both physical transport by diffusion and active biological transport across the cell membrane. While the Pasciak-Gavis model is not complicated mathematically (it can be expressed in closed form as a quadratic equation), its parameters are not so easily interpretable biologically as are the parameters of the Michaelis-Menten uptake model; this lack of transparency is probably the main reason the Pasciak-Gavis model has not been adopted by ecologically oriented modelers. Here I derive a Michaelis-like approximation to the Pasciak-Gavis model, and show how the parameters of the latter map to those of the Michaelis-like model. The derived approximation differs from a pure Michaelis-Menten model in a subtle but potentially critical way: in a pure Michaelis-Menten model, the half-saturation constant for nutrient uptake is independent of the density of transporter (or "porter") proteins on the cell surface, while in the Pasciak-Gavis model and its Michaelis-like approximation, the half-saturation constant does depend on the density of porter proteins. The Pasciak-Gavis model predicts a unique relationship between cell size, nutrient concentration in the medium, the half-saturation constant of porter-limited nutrient uptake, and the resulting rate of uptake; the Michaelis-like approximation preserves the most important feature of that relationship, the size at which porter limitation gives way to diffusion limitation. Finally I discuss the implications for community structure that are implied by the Pasciak-Gavis model and its Michaelis-like approximation.

  13. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  14. Accurate testing of aspheric surfaces using the transport of intensity equation by properly selecting the defocusing distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Peyman; Darudi, Ahmad; Nehmetallah, George; Moradi, Ali Reza; Amiri, Javad

    2016-12-10

    In the last decade, the transport of intensity has been increasingly used in microscopy, wavefront sensing, and metrology. In this study, we verify by simulation and experiment the use of the transport of intensity equation (TIE) in the accurate testing of optical aspheric surfaces. Guided by simulation results and assuming that the experimental setup parameters and the conic constants are known, one can estimate an appropriate defocusing distance Δz that leads to an accurate solution of the TIE. In this paper, this method is verified through the construction of a non-nulled experiment for testing the 2D profile of an aspheric surface. The theoretical method and experimental results are compared to validate the results. Finally, to validate the TIE methodology, the phase distribution obtained by TIE is compared with the phase distribution obtained by a Shack-Hartmann sensor.

  15. Quantitative roughness characterization of geological surfaces and implications for radar signature analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic surface models are useful for analyzing in situ roughness profiles and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of geological terrain. In this paper, two different surface models are discussed: surfaces with a stationary random roughness (conventional model) and surfaces with a power...

  16. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...... because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... number of geochemical processes, allows the simulation of soil geochemical transformations when microbial by-products are released to surface water, and the consideration of non-linear feedbacks on bacterial growth and pollutant transformations. Sensitivity analysis is performed through Monte Carlo...

  17. Effect of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultra-relativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface tran...

  18. Control of start-up and dynamic braking of conveyors used for downhill transport in surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosseger, A.; Borczyk, Z.; Kwater, M. (POLTEGOR Instytut, Wroclaw (Poland))

    1992-04-01

    Presents the structure of a microprocessor-aided control system for conveyors used in surface mines for downhill transport. Control of motor start-up and braking is performed in 8 speed stages. Permissible starting time duration is taken into consideration. The procedure of direct current braking is described. The microprocessor activates emergency braking by disc brakes if direct current braking is not sufficient. The system was implemented on four conveyors and has been used successfully since 1990.

  19. Surface electrocardiogram and action potential in mice lacking urea transporter UT-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yan; Zhao, Chunyan; Zhang, Xuexin; Zhao, Huashan; Guo, Lirong; Lü, Bin; Zhao, Xuejian; Yang, Baoxue

    2009-05-01

    UT-B is a urea transporter protein expressed in the kidney and in many non-renal tissues including erythrocytes, brain, heart, bladder and the testis. The objective of this study was to determine the phenotype of UT-B deletion in the heart. UT-B expression in the heart was studied in wild-type mice vs UT-B null mice by utilizing RT-PCR and Western blot. A surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording (lead II) was measured in wild-type mice and UT-B null mice at the ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks. For the action potential recording, the ventricular myocytes of 16 w mice were isolated and recorded by floating microelectrode method. The sodium current was recorded by the patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot showed the UT-B expression in the heart of wild-type mice. No UT-B transcript and protein was found in UT-B null mice. The ECG recording showed that the P-R interval was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((43.5 +/- 4.2), (45.5 +/- 6.9) and (43.8 +/- 7.6) ms at ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks) vs wild-type mice ((38.6 +/- 2.9), (38.7 +/- 5.6) and (38.2 +/- 7.3) ms, PUT-B null mice (52 w old). The amplitude of action potential and V (max) decreased significantly in UT-B null mice ((92.17 +/- 10.56) and (101.89 +/- 9.54) mV/s) vs those in wild-type mice (vs (110.51 +/- 10.38) and (109.53 +/- 10.64) mV/s, PUT-B null mice ((123.83 +/- 11.17) and (195.43 +/- 16.41) ms) vs that in wild-type mice ((108.27 +/- 10.85) and (171.00 +/- 15.53) ms, PUT-B null mice (-8.80 +/- 0.92) nA vs that in wild-type mice ((-5.98 +/- 1.07) nA, PUT-B deletion causes progressive heart block in mice.

  20. A review of rapid transport of pesticides from sloping farmland to surface waters: Processes and mitigation strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyu Tang; Bo Zhu; Hidetaka Katou

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides applied to sloping farmland may lead to surface water contamination through rapid transport processes as influenced by the complex topography and high spatial variability of soil properties and land use in hilly or mountainous regions.However,the fate of pesticides applied to sloping farmland has not been sufficiently elucidated.This article reviews the current understanding of pesticide transport from sloping farmland to surface water.It examines overland flow and subsurface lateral flow in areas where surface soil is underlain by impervious subsoil or rocks and tile drains.It stresses the importance of quantifying and modeling the contributions of various pathways to rapid pesticide loss at catchment and regional scales.Such models could be used in scenario studies for evaluating the effectiveness of possible mitigation strategies such as constructing vegetated strips,depressions,wetlands and drainage ditches,and implementing good agricultural practices.Field monitoring studies should also be conducted to calibrate and validate the transport models as well as biophysical-economic models,to optimize mitigation measures in areas dominated by sloping farmland.

  1. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  2. In Situ Determination of the Transport Properties of Near-Surface Concrete Using AC Impedance Spectroscopy Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The durability of existing concrete structures has increasingly attracted widespread attention in recent years. The phenomenon of performance degradation is often associated with the intrusion of hazardous ions from outside. As the first barrier to external substances intrusion, the near-surface concrete plays an important role in durability. So the performance of in-service concrete structures often depends on the transport properties of the near-surface concrete. Accordingly, information on service conditions and life prediction can be obtained by testing these transport properties. In this paper, an in situ method for chloride ion diffusion coefficient determination is proposed based on the relationship between the alternating current impedance spectroscopy parameters and the chloride ion diffusion coefficient. By a rational design, the new method can synthetically reflect the transport properties of near-surface concrete and is not affected by the presence of the reinforcing bar. In addition, the experimental results show that the method is in good agreement with “PERMIT” migration test which has been widely used. The proposed method is less time consuming and nondestructive and has good reproducibility.

  3. Redistribution of monocarboxylate transporter 2 on the surface of astrocytes in the human epileptogenic hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Fredrik; Heuser, Kjell; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to monocarboxylates as key players in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, MTLE). Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 2, which are abundantly present on brain endothelial cells and perivascular...

  4. Transport of ultracold neutrons through a mirror system with surface roughness as a velocity filter

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhova, L A; Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Geltenbort, P; Abele, H; Burgdörfer, J

    2012-01-01

    We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations of ultracold neutron transport through an absorbing-reflecting mirror system in the Earth's gravitational field. We show that the underlying mixed phase space of regular skipping motion and random motion due to disorder scattering can be exploited to realize a velocity filter for ultracold neutrons. The range of velocities selected is controlled by geometric parameters of the wave guide. Possible applications include investigations of transport and scattering dynamics in confined systems.

  5. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2017-08-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  6. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  7. A Two-Phase Cooling Loop for Fission Surface Power Waste Heat Transport Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current lunar-based Fission Surface Power (FSP) Systems that will support sustained surface outposts consist of a nuclear reactor with power converters, whose waste...

  8. Low surface gravitational acceleration of Mars results in a thick and weak lithosphere: Implications for topography, volcanism, and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Byrne, Paul K.; Mikhail, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Surface gravitational acceleration (surface gravity) on Mars, the second-smallest planet in the Solar System, is much lower than that on Earth. A direct consequence of this low surface gravity is that lithostatic pressure is lower on Mars than on Earth at any given depth. Collated published data from deformation experiments on basalts suggest that, throughout its geological history (and thus thermal evolution), the Martian brittle lithosphere was much thicker but weaker than that of present-day Earth as a function solely of surface gravity. We also demonstrate, again as a consequence of its lower surface gravity, that the Martian lithosphere is more porous, that fractures on Mars remain open to greater depths and are wider at a given depth, and that the maximum penetration depth for opening-mode fractures (i.e., joints) is much deeper on Mars than on Earth. The result of a weak Martian lithosphere is that dykes-the primary mechanism for magma transport on both planets-can propagate more easily and can be much wider on Mars than on Earth. We suggest that this increased the efficiency of magma delivery to and towards the Martian surface during its volcanically active past, and therefore assisted the exogeneous and endogenous growth of the planet's enormous volcanoes (the heights of which are supported by the thick Martian lithosphere) as well as extensive flood-mode volcanism. The porous and pervasively fractured (and permeable) nature of the Martian lithosphere will have also greatly assisted the subsurface storage of and transport of fluids through the lithosphere throughout its geologically history. And so it is that surface gravity, influenced by the mass of a planetary body, can greatly modify the mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of its lithosphere with manifest differences in surface topography and geomorphology, volcanic character, and hydrology.

  9. Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-09-01

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states.

  10. Implications of Surface and Bulk Properties of Abutment Implants and Their Degradation in the Health of Periodontal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Dorigatti de Avila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current review was to investigate the implications of the surface and bulk properties of abutment implants and their degradation in relation to periodontal health. The success of dental implants is no longer a challenge for dentistry. The scientific literature presents several types of implants that are specific for each case. However, in cases of prosthetics components, such as abutments, further research is needed to improve the materials used to avoid bacterial adhesion and enhance contact with epithelial cells. The implanted surfaces of the abutments are composed of chemical elements that may degrade under different temperatures or be damaged by the forces applied onto them. This study showed that the resulting release of such chemical elements could cause inflammation in the periodontal tissue. At the same time, the surface characteristics can be altered, thus favoring biofilm development and further increasing the inflammation. Finally, if not treated, this inflammation can cause the loss of the implant.

  11. A physically-based integrated numerical model for flow,upland erosion,and contaminant transport in surface-subsurface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based integrated hydrologic model that can simulate the rain-fall-induced 2D surface water flow, 3D variably saturated subsurface flow, upland soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the surface-subsurface system of a watershed. The model couples surface and subsurface flows based on the assumption of continuity conditions of pressure head and exchange flux at the ground, considering infiltration and evapotranspiration. The upland rill/interrill soil erosion and transport are simulated using a non-equilibrium transport model. Contaminant transport in the integrated surface and subsurface domains is simulated using advection-diffusion equations with mass changes due to sediment sorption and desorption and exchanges between two domains due to infiltration, diffusion, and bed change. The model requires no special treatments at the interface of upland areas and streams and is suitable for wetland areas and agricultural watersheds with shallow streams.

  12. Yeast expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen determinants on its surface: Implications for a possible oral vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.P.; Deen, C.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Pouwels, P.H.; Klis, F.M.

    1996-01-01

    The two major hydrophilic regions of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) have been expressed in the outer mannoprotein layer of the cell wall of 'Bakers Yeast', Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by fusing them between the yeast invertase signal sequence and the yeast α-agglutinin carboxyterminal c

  13. Transport signatures of surface potentials on three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Das, Sourin

    2016-02-01

    The spin-momentum-locked nature of the robust surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (3D TIs) makes them promising candidates for spintronics applications. Surface potentials which respect time-reversal symmetry can exist at the surface between a 3D TI and the trivial vacuum. These potentials can distort the spin texture of the surface states while retaining their gapless nature. In this work, the effect of all such surface potentials on the spin textures is studied. Since a tunnel magnetoresistance signal carries the information of the spin texture, it is proposed that spin-polarized tunneling of electrons to a 3D TI surface can be used to uniquely identify the surface potentials and quantitatively characterize them.

  14. Reactive uptake of ozone at simulated leaf surfaces: Implications for 'non-stomatal' ozone flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J. Neil; Hamilton, Richard; Heal, Mathew R.

    The reaction of ozone (O 3) with α-pinene has been studied as a function of temperature and relative humidity and in the presence of wax surfaces that simulate a leaf surface. The objective was to determine whether the presence of a wax surface, in which α-pinene could dissolve and form a high surface concentration, would lead to enhanced reaction with O 3. The reaction of O 3 itself with the empty stainless steel reactor and with aluminium and wax surfaces demonstrated an apparent activation energy of around 30 kJ mol -1 for all the surfaces, similar to that observed in long-term field measurements of O 3 fluxes to vegetation. However, the absolute reaction rate was 14 times greater for aluminium foil and saturated hydrocarbon wax surfaces than for stainless steel, and a further 5 times greater for beeswax than hydrocarbon wax. There was no systematic dependence on either relative or absolute humidity for these surface reactions over the range studied (20-100% RH). Reaction of O 3 with α-pinene occurred at rates close to those predicted for the homogeneous gas-phase reaction, and was similar for both the empty reactor and in the presence of wax surfaces. The hypothesis of enhanced reaction at leaf surfaces caused by enhanced surface concentrations of α-pinene was therefore rejected. Comparison of surface decomposition reactions on different surfaces as reported in the literature with the results obtained here demonstrates that the loss of ozone at the earth's surface by decomposition to molecular oxygen (i.e. without oxidative reaction with a substrate) can account for measured 'non-stomatal' deposition velocities of a few mm s -1. In order to quantify such removal, the effective molecular surface area of the vegetation/soil canopy must be known. Such knowledge, combined with the observed temperature-dependence, provides necessary input to global-scale models of O 3 removal from the troposphere at the earth's surface.

  15. From Soil to Surface Water: a Meta-Analysis of Catchment-Scale Organic Matter Production and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, R. S.; Brooks, P. D.; Perdrial, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter plays a fundamental role in the ecology and biogeochemistry of many ecosystems, from soils to headwater streams to oceans. In most catchments, the terrestrial environment is the dominant source of organic matter for the aquatic system, and thus DOM represents a fundamental linkage between soil and surface water. With trends of increasing DOC concentrations observed in many areas of the world, there is growing interest in identifying which factors drive DOM concentration and chemistry. Studies of systems ranging from tropical rainforests to boreal landscapes have identified many catchment characteristics that co-vary with DOM concentration and chemistry. These include climate elements such as solar radiation and precipitation patterns, chemical measurements such as sulfate or chloride concentration, and land use impacts such as percent agriculture. The question of which catchment characteristics actually control DOM can be broken down into two parts: which factors control the production of mobile DOM and what drives DOM transport from the terrestrial to the aquatic system. Here we review studies covering a range of ecosystems, scales, and measurement techniques, to categorize the major state factors that drive catchment controls of aquatic organic matter. Specifically, we identify three major transport vectors that vary both in their timing of DOM transport to surface water and the propensity for DOM originating from terrestrial source areas to be modified during transport. We use this three vector conceptual model of transport to group catchments and identify reproducible signatures of DOM export with varying levels of disturbance. By developing a generalized conceptual model of catchment-scale controls on aquatic organic matter, we can predict how dissolved organic matter will respond to environmental change. This knowledge can then help guide best management practices.

  16. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms.

  17. T tubules and surface membranes provide equally effective pathways of carbonic anhydrase-facilitated lactic acid transport in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Hallerdei

    Full Text Available We have studied lactic acid transport in the fast mouse extensor digitorum longus muscles (EDL by intracellular and cell surface pH microelectrodes. The role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases (CA of EDL in lactic acid transport was investigated by measuring lactate flux in muscles from wildtype, CAIV-, CAIX- and CAXIV-single ko, CAIV-CAXIV double ko and CAIV-CAIX-CAXIV-triple ko mice. This was complemented by immunocytochemical studies of the subcellular localization of CAIV, CAIX and CAXIV in mouse EDL. We find that CAXIV and CAIX single ko EDL exhibit markedly but not maximally reduced lactate fluxes, whereas triple ko and double ko EDL show maximal or near-maximal inhibition of CA-dependent lactate flux. Interpretation of the flux measurements in the light of the immunocytochemical results leads to the following conclusions. CAXIV, which is homogeneously distributed across the surface membrane of EDL fibers, facilitates lactic acid transport across this membrane. CAIX, which is associated only with T tubular membranes, facilitates lactic acid transport across the T tubule membrane. The removal of lactic acid from the lumen of T tubuli towards the interstitial space involves a CO2-HCO3- diffusional shuttle that is maintained cooperatively by CAIX within the T tubule and, besides CAXIV, by the CAIV, which is strategically located at the opening of the T tubules. The data suggest that about half the CA-dependent muscular lactate flux occurs across the surface membrane, while the other half occurs across the membranes of the T tubuli.

  18. Spinel-structured surface layers for facile Li ion transport and improved chemical stability of lithium manganese oxide spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Ri; Seo, Hyo Ree; Lee, Boeun; Cho, Byung Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Li-ion conducting spinel-structured oxide layer with a manganese oxidation state close to being tetravalent was prepared on aluminum-doped lithium manganese oxide spinel for improving the electrochemical performances at the elevated temperatures. This nanoscale surface layer provides a good ionic conduction path for lithium ion transport to the core and also serves as an excellent chemical barrier for protecting the high-capacity core material from manganese dissolution into the electrolyte. In this work, a simple wet process was employed to prepare thin LiAlMnO4 and LiMg0.5Mn1.5O4 layers on the surface of LiAl0.1Mn1.9O4. X-ray absorption studies revealed an oxidation state close to tetravalent manganese on the surface layer of coated materials. Materials with these surface coating layers exhibited excellent capacity retentions superior to the bare material, without undermining the lithium ion transport characteristics and the high rate performances.

  19. Fossil fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission (FFCO2) uncertainty: An implication for CO2 tracer transport simulation and flux inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomohiro; Ott, Lesley; Baker, David; Pawson, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (FFCO2) are the largest input to the global carbon cycle over decadal time scales. FFCO2 are often used as a reference in carbon budget analyses, such as transport simulations and flux inversions. Thus, inaccuracies in these specified FFCO2 emissions will propagate into those fluxes that are being computed in inverse models. It is thus essential to quantify the uncertainties in FFCO2 estimates. While the FFCO2 estimates from different emission inventories/datasets often agree well at global and national levels, the spatial distributions of emissions at smaller spatial scales are unique, specific to the emission disaggregation methods employed, and subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty associated with the use of spatial proxy data becomes large at fine spatial scales. In this study, an attempt is made to assess the uncertainty associated with spatial distributions of emissions in gridded FFCO2 inventories/datasets. The FFCO2 uncertainty is computed as a combination of the uncertainties associated with (1) emission estimates and (2) emission disaggregation. Emission distributions from four gridded inventories are compared at a 1 × 1 degree resolution and these differences are used as a proxy for the estimate of the disaggregation uncertainty. The calculated uncertainties typically range from 30% to 200% at 1 × 1 degree and are inversely correlated with the emission magnitude. The estimated FFCO2 uncertainty is included in a transport simulation with NASA's GOES model, with the intent of translating the uncertainty estimates in emission magnitude to atmospheric concentration (uncertainty tracer). The FFCO2 uncertainty tracer simulation suggests that the largest uncertainties are confined to the proximity of major source regions at the surface level, and decrease with distance from the source and altitude, where transport and mixing reduce the effect. However, the uncertainty tracer does spread out globally and creates a

  20. Reactive uptake of ozone at simulated leaf surfaces: implications for ‘non-stomatal’ ozone deposition.

    OpenAIRE

    Cape, J. Neil; Hamilton, Richard; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of ozone (O3) with alpha-pinene has been studied as a function of temperature and relative humidity and in the presence of wax surfaces that simulate a leaf surface. The objective was to determine whether the presence of a wax surface, in which alpha-pinene could dissolve and form a high surface concentration, would lead to enhanced reaction with O3. The reaction of O3 itself with the empty stainless steel reactor and with aluminium and wax surfaces demonstrated an apparent activ...

  1. Transport properties of iron-porphyrin molecule sandwiched between Au surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Hisashi [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CMSC, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: KONDO.Hisashi@nims.go.jp; Kino, Hiori; Nara, Jun [CMSC, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ohno, Takahisa [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CMSC, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); MANA, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2008-09-30

    The transport properties of an iron-porphyrin molecule sandwiched between Au(1 1 1) electrodes are investigated using the non-equilibrium Green's function method based on the density functional theory, and in particular, the dependence on a terminal-atom position is studied. We consider four models for terminal-atom positions. It is found that the transport properties of the junction system are very sensitive to a terminal-atom position. We also find that the contribution of the d-orbitals of the Fe atom to the transport properties around the Fermi energy strongly changes, depending on a terminal-atom position. From these results, we propose a suitable terminal-atom position for the molecular sensor discussed in the other paper.

  2. Transport of horseshoe crab eggs by waves and swash on an estuarine beach: Implications for foraging shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, K.F.; Jackson, N.L.; Smith, D.R.; Weber, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The abundance of horseshoe crab eggs in the swash zone and remaining on the beach after tide levels fall was evaluated to identify how numbers of eggs available to shorebirds differ with fluctuations in spawning numbers of horseshoe crabs, wave energies and beach elevation changes. Field data were gathered 1-6 June 2004 at Slaughter Beach on the west side of Delaware Bay, USA. Counts of spawning crabs and process data from a pressure transducer and an anemometer and wind vane were related to number of eggs, embryos and larvae taken at depth and on the surface of the foreshore and in the active swash zone using a streamer trap. Beach elevation changes and depths of sediment activation were used to determine the potential for buried eggs to be exhumed by waves and swash. Mean significant wave heights during high water levels ranged from 0.08 to 0.40 m. Spawning counts were low (50-140 females km-1) when wave heights were low; no spawning occurred when wave heights were high. Vegetative litter (wrack) on the beach provides local traps for eggs, making more eggs available for shorebirds. Accumulation of litter on days when wave energy is low increases the probability that eggs will remain on the surface. High wave energies transport more eggs in the swash, but these eggs are dispersed or buried, and fewer eggs remain on the beach. Peaks in the number of eggs in the swash uprush occur during tidal rise and around time of high tide. The number of eggs in transport decreases during falling tide. Many more eggs move in the active swash zone than are found on the beach after water level falls, increasing the efficiency of bird foraging in the swash. Greater numbers of eggs in the swash during rising tide than falling tide and fewer eggs at lower elevations on the beach, imply that foraging becomes less productive as the tide falls and may help account for the tendency of shorebirds to feed on rising tides rather than on falling or low tides on days when no spawning occurs

  3. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  4. Pseudospin-valve effect on transport in junctions of three-dimensional topological insulator surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Das, Sourin

    2016-07-01

    We show that the surface states of pristine 3D topological insulators (TIs) are analogs of ferromagnetic half metals due to complete polarization of an emergent momentum independent pseudospin (SU(2)) degree of freedom on the surface. To put this claim on firm footing, we present results for TI surfaces perpendicular to the crystal growth axis, which clearly show that the tunneling conductance between two such TI surfaces of the same TI material is dominated by this half metallic behavior leading to physics reminiscent of a spin-valve. Further using the generalized tunnel magnetoresistance derived in this work we also study the tunneling current between arbitrary TI surfaces. We also perform a comprehensive study of the effect of all possible surface potentials allowed by time reversal symmetry on this spin-valve effect and show that it is robust against most of such potentials.

  5. Surface electrocardiogram and action potential in mice lacking urea transporter UT-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Yan; ZHAO ChunYan; ZHANG XueXin; ZHAO HuaShan; GUO LiRong; Lü Bin; ZHAO XueJian; YANG BaoXue

    2009-01-01

    UT-B is a urea transporter protein expressed in the kidney and in many non-renal tissues including erythrocytes, brain, heart, bladder and the testis. The objective of this study was to determine the phenotype of UT-B deletion in the heart. UT-B expression in the heart was studied in wild-type mice vs UT-B null mice by utilizing RT-PCR and Western blot. A surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording (lead Ⅱ) was measured in wild-type mice and UT-B null mice at the ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks. For the action potential recording, the ventricular myocytes of 16 w mice were isolated and recorded by float-ing microelectrode method. The sodium current was recorded by the patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot showed the UT-B expression in the heart of wild-type mice. No UT-B transcript and protein was found in UT-B null mice. The ECG recording showed that the P-R interval was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((43.5±4.2), (45.5±6.9) and (43.8±7.6) ms at ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks) vs wild-type mice ((38.6±2.9), (38.7±5.6) and (38.2±7.3) ms, P<0.05). The atrial ventricular heart block type Ⅱ and Ⅲ only appeared in the aging UT-B null mice (52 w old). The amplitude of action potential and Vmax decreased significantly in UT-B null mice ((92.17±10.56) and (101.89±9.54) mV/s) vs those in wild-type mice (vs (110.51±10.38) and (109.53±10.64) mV/s, P<0.05). The action potential duration at 50% and 90% (APD50 and APD90) was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((123.83±11.17) and (195.43±16.41) ms) vs that in wild-type mice ((108.27±10.85) and (171.00±15.53) ms, P<0.05). The maximal sodium current decreased significantly in UT-B null mice (-8.80±0.92) nA vs that in wild-type mice ((-5.98±1.07) nA, P<0.05). These results provide the first evidence that UT-B deletion causes progressive heart block in mice.

  6. Surface electrocardiogram and action potential in mice lacking urea transporter UT-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    UT-B is a urea transporter protein expressed in the kidney and in many non-renal tissues including erythrocytes, brain, heart, bladder and the testis. The objective of this study was to determine the phenotype of UT-B deletion in the heart. UT-B expression in the heart was studied in wild-type mice vs UT-B null mice by utilizing RT-PCR and Western blot. A surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording (lead II) was measured in wild-type mice and UT-B null mice at the ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks. For the action potential recording, the ventricular myocytes of 16 w mice were isolated and recorded by floating microelectrode method. The sodium current was recorded by the patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot showed the UT-B expression in the heart of wild-type mice. No UT-B transcript and protein was found in UT-B null mice. The ECG recording showed that the P-R interval was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((43.5 ± 4.2), (45.5 ± 6.9) and (43.8 ± 7.6) ms at ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks) vs wild-type mice ((38.6 ± 2.9), (38.7 ± 5.6) and (38.2 ± 7.3) ms, P<0.05). The atrial ventricular heart block type II and III only appeared in the aging UT-B null mice (52 w old). The amplitude of action potential and Vmax decreased significantly in UT-B null mice ((92.17 ± 10.56) and (101.89 ± 9.54) mV/s) vs those in wild-type mice (vs (110.51 ± 10.38) and (109.53 ± 10.64) mV/s, P<0.05). The action potential duration at 50% and 90% (APD50 and APD90) was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((123.83 ± 11.17) and (195.43 ± 16.41) ms) vs that in wild-type mice ((108.27 ± 10.85) and (171.00 ± 15.53) ms, P<0.05). The maximal sodium current decreased significantly in UT-B null mice (-8.80 ± 0.92) nA vs that in wild-type mice ((-5.98 ± 1.07) nA, P<0.05). These results provide the first evidence that UT-B deletion causes progressive heart block in mice.

  7. Distributions of clay minerals in surface sediments of the middle Bay of Bengal: Source and transport pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingrui; Liu, Shengfa; Shi, Xuefa; Feng, Xiuli; Fang, Xisheng; Cao, Peng; Sun, Xingquan; Wenxing, Ye; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Kornkanitnan, Narumol

    2017-08-01

    The clay mineral contents in 110 surface sediment samples collected from the middle of the Bay of Bengal were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the provenance and transport patterns. The illite content was highest, followed by chlorite, kaolinite and then smectite, with average weight percent distributions of 52%, 22%, 14% and 12%, respectively. Illite and chlorite had similar distribution pattern, with higher contents in the northern and central areas and lower contents in the southern area, whereas smectite showed the opposite distribution pattern. Kaolinite show no obvious higher or lower areas and the southern ;belt; was one of the highest content areas. Based on the spatial distribution characteristics and cluster analysis results, the study area can be classified into two provinces. Province I covers the southwestern area and contains high concentrations of illite and smectite sediments. Province II covers most sites and is also characterized by high concentrations of illite, but the weight percent of smectite is only half of that of province I. According to a quantitative estimate using end-member clay minerals contents, the relative contributions from the Himalayan source and the Indian source are 63% and 37% on average, respectively. Integrative analysis indicates that the hydrodynamic environment in the study area, especially the turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation, plays an important role in the spatial distribution and dispersal of the clay fraction in the sediments. The sediments in province I are mainly from the Indian source transported by the East Indian Coastal Current (EICC) and the surface monsoon circulation with minor contributions from the Himalayan source while the sediments in province II are mainly from the Himalayan source transported by turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation with little contribution from Indian river materials.

  8. Decadal Arctic surface atmosphere/ocean heat budgets and mass transport estimates from several atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurin, gennaday; Carton, James

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes associated with the loss of seasonal and permanent ice pack. By exposing the surface ocean to the atmosphere these changes dramatically increase surface exchange processes. In contrast, increases in freshwater and heat input decreases turbulent exchanges within the ocean. In this study we present results from an examination of changing ocean heat flux, storage, and transport during the 36 year period 1980-2015. To identify changes in the surface atmosphere we examine three atmospheric reanalyses: MERRA2, ERA-I, and JRA55. Significant differences in fluxes from these reanalyses arise due to the representation of clouds and water vapor. These differences provide an indication of the uncertainties in the historical record. Next we turn to the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 3 (SODA3) global ocean/sea ice reanalysis system to allow us to infer the full ocean circulation from the limited set of historical record of ocean observations. SODA3 has 10 km horizontal resolution in the Arctic and assimilates the full suite of historical marine temperature and salinity observations. To account for the uncertainties in atmospheric forcing, we repeat our analysis with each of the three atmospheric reanalyses. In the first part of the talk we review the climatological seasonal surface fluxes resulting from our reanalysis system, modified for consistency with the ocean observations, and the limits of what we can learn from the historical record. Next we compare the seasonal hydrography, heat, and mass transports with direct estimates from moorings. Finally we examine the impact on the Arctic climate of the changes in sea ice cover and variability and trends of ocean/sea ice heat storage and transport and their contributions to changes in the seasonal stratification of the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Lagrangian study of surface transport in the Kuroshio Extension area based on simulation of propagation of Fukushima-derived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V; Uleysky, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    Lagrangian approach is applied to study near-surface large-scale transport in the Kuroshio Extension area using a simulation with synthetic particles advected by AVISO altimetric velocity field. A material line technique is applied to find the origin of water masses in cold-core cyclonic rings pinched off from the jet in summer 2011. Tracking and Lagrangian maps provide the evidence of cross-jet transport. Fukushima derived caesium isotopes are used as Lagrangian tracers to study transport and mixing in the area a few months after the March of 2011 tsunami that caused a heavy damage of the Fukushima nuclear power plant (FNPP). Tracking maps are computed to trace the origin of water parcels with measured levels of Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations collected in two R/V cruises in June and July 2011 in the large area of the Northwest Pacific. It is shown that Lagrangian simulation is useful to finding the surface areas that are potentially dangerous due to the risk of radioactive contamination. The results of sim...

  10. Transport Properties and Surface Morphology Correlated Studies on Graphene Formed by Si Desorption of 6H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, William; Beringer, Douglas; Skuza, Jonathan; Clavero, Cesar; Lukaszew, Rosa Alejandra

    2009-11-01

    Interest in graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, has increased in recent years due to exciting characteristics such as its predicted high mobility [1]. However, developing a method to produce graphene that is easily integrated into existing fabrication processes has proved difficult thus far. One promising method is high temperature annealing of 6H-SiC such that Si desorption occurs [2], although this method leads to graphene that exhibits lower mobility than predicted [3]. Thus, we have investigated the relationship between different growth conditions (i.e. annealing time and temperature), the resulting surface morphology and the transport properties of graphene films produced using this method. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Van der Pauw Hall mobility measurements have been used to correlate the surface morphology to transport properties of graphene formed on SiC. Understanding the effect of growth conditions on the resulting transport properties will help optimize the fabrication of graphene for use in the next generation of electronic devices and other applications. [1] Novoselov et al., Science 306, 666 (2004). [2] C. Berger et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 19912 (2004). [3] G. Gu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 253507 (2007).

  11. Transonic unsteady airloads on an energy efficient transport wing with oscillating control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M. C.; Ricketts, R. H.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Cunningham, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    An aspect ratio 10.8 supercritical wing with oscillating control surfaces is described. The wing is instrumental with 252 static orifices and 164 in situ dynamic pressure transducers for studying the effects of control surface deflection on steady and unsteady pressures at transonic speeds. Results from initial wind tunnel tests conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel are discussed. Unsteady pressure results are presented for two trailing edge control surfaces oscillating separately at the design Mach number of 0.78. Some experimental results are compared with analytical results obtained by using linear lifting surface theory.

  12. Molecular dynamics study on mechanism of preformed particle gel transporting through nanopores: Surface chemistry and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Ma, Ying; Hao, Qingquan; Liu, Gang; Sun, Jichao; Yuan, Shiling

    2017-10-01

    The translocation behavior of preformed particle gel (PPG) in porous media is crucial for its application in enhanced oil recovery. By means of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, the translocation mechanism of PPG confined in different silica nanopores were investigated. The influence of surface chemistry and chemical heterogeneity of silica nanopore on the translocation process was revealed. As the degree of surface hydroxylation increases and the heterogeneity decreases, the pulling force needed to drive PPG decreases. We infer that the nanopore's surface (i.e. surface chemistry and heterogeneity) affects the translocation of PPG indirectly by forming different hydration layers.

  13. Climatology of wintertime long-distance transport of surface-layer air masses arriving urban Beijing in 2001-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Xiang-De, XU

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the FLEXPART-WRF coupled modeling system is used to conduct 12-year Lagrangian modeling over Beijing, China, for the winters of 2001-2012. Based on large trajectory tracking ensembles, the long-range air transport properties, in terms of geographic source regions within the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) and large-scale ventilation, and its association with air quality levels were quantified from a climatological perspective. The results show the following: (1) The air masses residing in the near-surface layer over Beijing potentially originate from broader atmospheric boundary-layer regions, which cover vast areas with the backward tracking time elapsed. However, atmospheric transport from northeastern China and, to a lesser extent, from the surrounding regions of Beijing is important. (2) The evolution of air quality over Beijing is negatively correlated with large-scale ventilation conditions, particularly at a synoptic timescale. Thus, the simple but robust backward-trajectory ventilation (BV) index defined in this study could facilitate operational forecasting of severe air pollution events. (3) By comparison, the relatively short-range transport occurring over transport timescales of less than 3 days from southern and southeastern Beijing and its surrounding areas plays a vital role in the formation of severe air pollution events during the wintertime. (4) Additionally, an interannual trend analysis suggests that the geographic sources and ventilation conditions also changed, at least over the last decade, corresponding to the strength variability of the winter East Asian monsoon.

  14. Real-time monitoring of nitrate transport in the deep vadose zone under a crop field - implications for groundwater protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeltaub, Tuvia; Kurtzman, Daniel; Dahan, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is considered the most common non-point pollutant in groundwater. It is often attributed to agricultural management, when excess application of nitrogen fertilizer leaches below the root zone and is eventually transported as nitrate through the unsaturated zone to the water table. A lag time of years to decades between processes occurring in the root zone and their final imprint on groundwater quality prevents proper decision-making on land use and groundwater-resource management. This study implemented the vadose-zone monitoring system (VMS) under a commercial crop field. Data obtained by the VMS for 6 years allowed, for the first time known to us, a unique detailed tracking of water percolation and nitrate migration from the surface through the entire vadose zone to the water table at 18.5 m depth. A nitrate concentration time series, which varied with time and depth, revealed - in real time - a major pulse of nitrate mass propagating down through the vadose zone from the root zone toward the water table. Analysis of stable nitrate isotopes indicated that manure is the prevalent source of nitrate in the deep vadose zone and that nitrogen transformation processes have little effect on nitrate isotopic signature. The total nitrogen mass calculations emphasized the nitrate mass migration towards the water table. Furthermore, the simulated pore-water velocity through analytical solution of the convection-dispersion equation shows that nitrate migration time from land surface to groundwater is relatively rapid, approximately 5.9 years. Ultimately, agricultural land uses, which are constrained to high nitrogen application rates and coarse soil texture, are prone to inducing substantial nitrate leaching.

  15. Unraveling the Role of Transport, Electrocatalysis, and Surface Science in the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2017-04-06

    This final report for project FE0009656 covers the period from 10/01/2012 to 09/30/2015 and covers research accomplishments on the effects of carbon dioxide on the surface composition and structure of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), specifically La1-xSrxFeyCo1- yO3-δ (LSCF). Epitaxially deposited thin films of LSCF on various single-crystal substrates have revealed the selective segregation of strontium to the surface thereby resulting in a surface enrichment of strontium. The near surface compositional profile in the films have been measured using total x-ray fluorescence (TXRF), and show that the kinetics of strontium segregation are higher at higher partial pressures of carbon dioxide. Once the strontium segregates to the surface, it leads to the formation of precipitates of SrO which convert to SrCO3 in the presence of even modest concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This has important implications for the performance of SOFCs which is discussed in this report. These experimental observations have also been verified by Density Functional Theory calculations (DFT) which predict the conditions under which SrO and SrCO3 can occur in LSCF. Furthermore, a few cathode compositions which have received attention in the literature as alternatives to LSCF cathodes have been studied in this work and shown to be thermodynamically unstable under the operating conditions of the SOFCs.

  16. Stability and transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in groundwater and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    A transport study investigating the effects of natural organic matter (NOM) in the presence of monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts was performed in a packed bed column. The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and effective diameter of the graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were measured as a fu...

  17. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  18. 77 FR 10599 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...) Interviews with staff indicated a large staff turnover in certain Districts. The loss of experienced staff... agency staff at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the National... Transportation Systems Center; U.S. FWS. During the onsite audit, the audit team interviewed more than 60 staff...

  19. Importance of bulk states for the electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces: implications for finite slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Nara, Jun; Bowler, David

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the influence of slab thickness on the electronic structure of the Si(1 0 0)- p([Formula: see text]) surface in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, considering both density of states and band structure. Our calculations, with slab thicknesses of up to 78 atomic layers, reveal that the slab thickness profoundly affects the surface band structure, particularly the dangling bond states of the silicon dimers near the Fermi level. We find that, to precisely reproduce the surface bands, the slab thickness needs to be large enough to completely converge the bulk bands in the slab. In the case of the Si(1 0 0) surface, the dispersion features of the surface bands, such as the band shape and width, converge when the slab thickness is larger than 30 layers. Complete convergence of both the surface and bulk bands in the slab is only achieved when the slab thickness is greater than 60 layers.

  20. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...... of the surface reflectivity. Here we report the results of our experimental and theoretical investigations of waveguiding in the SPPBG structures....

  1. Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves: Moving quantum dots versus short barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Lindelof, Poul Erik;

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the response of the acoustoelectric-current driven by a surface-acoustic wave through a quantum point contact in the closed-channel regime. Under proper conditions, the current develops plateaus at integer multiples of ef when the frequency f of the surface-acoustic wave or t...

  2. Flexible Surface Hopping Approach to Model the Crossover from Hopping to Band-like Transport in Organic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linjun; Beljonne, David

    2013-06-06

    Two distinct pictures are usually evoked when modeling charge transport in organic crystals, that is, band and hopping models, the signature of which is conveyed by a characteristic temperature dependence of mobility. Here, we present a novel flexible surface hopping approach compliant with general Hamiltonians that is able to grasp the crossover from hopping to band-like transport regimes. This approach is applied to solve a one-dimensional mixed quantum-classical model and to calculate the temperature dependence of charge mobility along with the degree of charge spatial localization. It is found that the roles of both local and nonlocal electron-phonon couplings strongly depend on the intrinsic charge localization strength.

  3. The diamidine diminazene aceturate is a substrate for the high-affinity pentamidine transporter: implications for the development of high resistance levels in trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teka, Ibrahim A; Kazibwe, Anne J N; El-Sabbagh, Nasser; Al-Salabi, Mohammed I; Ward, Christopher P; Eze, Anthonius A; Munday, Jane C; Mäser, Pascal; Matovu, Enock; Barrett, Michael P; de Koning, Harry P

    2011-07-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a disease of humans and livestock in many areas south of the Sahara. Resistance to the few existing drugs is a major impediment to the control of these diseases, and we investigated how resistance to the main veterinary drug diminazene aceturate correlates with changes in drug transport in resistant strains. The strain tbat1(-/-), lacking the TbAT1/P2 aminopurine transporter implicated previously in diminazene transport, was adapted to higher levels of diminazene resistance. The resulting cell line was designated ABR and was highly cross-resistant to other diamidines and moderately resistant to cymelarsan. Procyclic trypanosomes were shown to be a convenient model to study diamidine uptake in Trypanosoma brucei brucei given the lack of TbAT1/P2 and a 10-fold higher activity of the high-affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). Diminazene could be transported by HAPT1 in procyclic trypanosomes. This drug transport activity was lacking in the ABR line, as reported previously for the pentamidine-adapted line B48. The K(m) for diminazene transport in bloodstream tbat1(-/-) trypanosomes was consistent with uptake by HAPT1. Diminazene transport in ABR and B48 cells was reduced compared with tbat1(-/-), but their resistance phenotype was different: B48 displayed higher levels of resistance to pentamidine and the melaminophenyl arsenicals, whereas ABR displayed higher resistance to diminazene. These results establish a loss of HAPT1 function as a contributing factor to diminazene resistance but equally demonstrate for the first time that adaptations other than those determining the initial rates of drug uptake contribute to diamidine and arsenical resistance in African trypanosomes.

  4. Effect of Surface-optical Phonons on the Charge Transport in Wrap-gated Semiconducting Nanowire Field-effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Aniruddha; Fang, Tian; Jena, Debdeep

    2010-03-01

    Surface phonons (SO-phonons) arise at the boundary of two different dielectric mediums. Though the effect of electron-surface phonon scattering on low-filed charge transport has been studied extensively for thin Si-MOSFET [1] and graphene [2], its effect on the 1D nanowire devices has not studied so far. Vibrating diploes in polar gate-dielectric induces a time-varying potential inside the nanowires. The frequencies of these time-varying fields have been calculated by implementing electrostatic boundary conditions at different interfaces of nanowire-dielectric-metal system. Our calculation shows that the electron-SO phonon interaction strength decays exponentially from the gate-nanowire interface towards the nanowire axis. Electron-SO phonon scattering rate has been calculated using Boltzmann transport equation under relaxation time approximation. We find that for thin nanowires (radius 1-20 nm), electron-SO phonon scattering rate is comparable to other dominant scattering mechanisms (such as impurity and bulk optical phonon scatterings) and reduces carrier mobility significantly. Calculating surface-phonon limited mobility of Si nanowires on various available common dielectrics, we have predicted the optimum choice of gate-dielectrics for nanowire-based electronic devices. [4pt] [1] M. V. Fischetti et. al J. Appl. Phys. 90 4581 (2001). [0pt] [2] A. Konar et. al. arXiv: 0902.0819.

  5. Bream (Abramis brama (L.)) as zoogeomorphic agents and ecosystem engineers: Implications for fine sediment transport in lowland rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James; Rice, Stephen; Hodgkins, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Despite increasing recognition that animals play important roles in geomorphological systems (zoogeomorphology), with important ecological implications for the animals and their ecosystems (ecosystem engineering), sediment transport continues to be regarded as an abiotic process. This research challenges that orthodoxy by investigating the biotic processes associated with bioturbation in rivers caused by feeding bream (Abramis brama (L.)) and quantifying their impact on fine sediment suspension and sediment yield. Experiments in lakes have demonstrated that bream negatively influence ecosystem dynamics through bottom up mechanisms as a result of physical bioturbation caused by benthivorous feeding. Although this level of bioturbation, and thus sediment entrainment, can alter the fundamental biogeochemical cycles and food web dynamics in lentic ecosystems, research is yet to assess this potential effect in riverine ecosystems or evaluate this bioturbation mechanism as a driver of fluvial sediment flux - even though they are common in rivers across mainland Europe. A series of ex-situ mesocosm experiments have investigated the controls of fine sediment entrainment by bream, assessing the roles of both biomass (size and number) and food density on suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Bream create large volumes of suspended sediment during feeding (highest recorded turbidity 1172 NTU) and there are significant (p experimental parameter: number of fish, fish size and food density. Supplementary experiments have assessed bream as ecosystem engineers in the presence of the congener species, roach (Rutilus rutilus (L.)), which share the same ecological niche. In the presence of roach, the impact of bream on turbidity increased by an average of 120% (6.6 NTU to 15 NTU) and increased further at the 90th percentile by 240% (32 NTU to 110 NTU). In light of these findings, the extensive geographical distribution of bream and the observation that shoals of bream

  6. Turbulent momentum transport due to the beating between different tokamak flux surface shaping effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Introducing up-down asymmetry into the tokamak magnetic equilibria appears to be a feasible method to drive fast intrinsic toroidal rotation in future large devices. In this paper we investigate how the intrinsic momentum transport generated by up-down asymmetric shaping scales with the mode number of the shaping effects. Making use the gyrokinetic tilting symmetry (Ball et al (2016) Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 045023), we study the effect of envelopes created by the beating of different high-order shaping effects. This reveals that the presence of an envelope can change the scaling of the momentum flux from exponentially small in the limit of large shaping mode number to just polynomially small. This enhancement of the momentum transport requires the envelope to be both up-down asymmetric and have a spatial scale on the order of the minor radius.

  7. Plasmonic Hot Electron Transport Driven Site-Specific Surface-Chemistry with Nanoscale Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Emiliano; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nanometre resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot carrier transport from...

  8. Turbulent momentum transport due to the beating between different tokamak flux surface shaping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Justin; Parra, Felix I.

    2017-02-01

    Introducing up-down asymmetry into the tokamak magnetic equilibria appears to be a feasible method to drive fast intrinsic toroidal rotation in future large devices. In this paper we investigate how the intrinsic momentum transport generated by up-down asymmetric shaping scales with the mode number of the shaping effects. Making use the gyrokinetic tilting symmetry (Ball et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 045023), we study the effect of envelopes created by the beating of different high-order shaping effects. This reveals that the presence of an envelope can change the scaling of the momentum flux from exponentially small in the limit of large shaping mode number to just polynomially small. This enhancement of the momentum transport requires the envelope to be both up-down asymmetric and have a spatial scale on the order of the minor radius.

  9. Can clouds enhance long-range transport of low volatile, ionizable and surface-active chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric partitioning and transport of low volatile organic compounds is strongly influenced by the presence of water (e.g. clouds) and its deposition velocity (e.g. rainfall, snow). It was identified that the assumption of continuous rainfall underestimates the residence time and the transport...... substances. A modified version of the regional multimedia activity model for ionics MAMI, including twolayered atmosphere with atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower/middle troposphere (LMT), interface partitioning, intermittent rainfall and variable cloud coverage was applied to a selection of ten low...... were run for a constant emission to the atmospheric boundary layer to identify key model inputs. The degradation rate, the duration of dry and wet periods and the parameters describing air-water bulk partitioning (KAW and T) and ionization (pKa and pH) determine the residence time in the ABL...

  10. New York state high-speed surface transportation study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    In 1990, New York State Governor Mario M. Cuomo created an interagency task force under the leadership of Lt. Governor Stan Lundine to investigate the potential of high speed ground transportation (HSGT) systems. Building on information from previous agency activities, including consultant efforts contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), and in-house analyses performed by New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the task force focused on the corridor between New York City and the Niagara Frontier. In December 1991, NYSERDA issued a contract for a study of high speed ground transportation options for New York State. The study`s objective was to assess potential rights-of-way, ridership, energy and environmental impacts, economic benefits, capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and financial viability of HSGT systems. This study builds upon and supplements previous and on-going HSGT activities conducted by the members of the interagency task force. These activities include: Maglev Technical and Economic Feasibility Study (NYSERDA); Maglev Demonstration Site Investigation (NYSTA); and New York/Massachusetts High Speed Ground Transportation Study (NYSDOT). This study is intended to verify and refine previous information and analyses and provide supplemental information and insights to be used in determining if additional investigation and activities involving HSGT are desirable for New York State. This study evaluates HSGT technologies capable of speeds significantly higher than those achieved with the present rail system. Three HSGT categories are used in this study: incremental rail improvement, very high-speed rail, and Maglev.

  11. GPS based surface displacements – a proxy for discharge and sediment transport from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Bent; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Mikkelsen, Andreas Bech

    2014-01-01

    The elastic respond of the Earth’s surface to mass changes has been measured with Global Positioning System (GPS). Mass loss as accumulated runoff and sediment transport from a 10000 km2 segment of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) correlated very well (R2=0.83) with GPS measured uplift. Accumulated....... Based on the entire GPS record (1996–2013), it is shown that until 2005–2006 the mass balance of this segment of the GrIS was rather stable – since then there has been an increasing loss of mass, culminating in 2012....

  12. Updated model for radionuclide transport in the near-surface till at Forsmark - Implementation of decay chains and sensitivity analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Pekala, Marek; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Trinchero, Paolo; Vries, Luis Manuel de [Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The Forsmark area has been proposed for potential siting of a deep underground (geological) repository for radioactive waste in Sweden. Safety assessment of the repository requires radionuclide transport from the disposal depth to recipients at the surface to be studied quantitatively. The near-surface quaternary deposits at Forsmark are considered a pathway for potential discharge of radioactivity from the underground facility to the biosphere, thus radionuclide transport in this system has been extensively investigated over the last years. The most recent work of Pique and co-workers (reported in SKB report R-10-30) demonstrated that in case of release of radioactivity the near-surface sedimentary system at Forsmark would act as an important geochemical barrier, retarding the transport of reactive radionuclides through a combination of retention processes. In this report the conceptual model of radionuclide transport in the quaternary till at Forsmark has been updated, by considering recent revisions regarding the near-surface lithology. In addition, the impact of important conceptual assumptions made in the model has been evaluated through a series of deterministic and probabilistic (Monte Carlo) sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity study focused on the following effects: 1. Radioactive decay of {sup 135}Cs, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra and effects on their transport. 2. Variability in key geochemical parameters, such as the composition of the deep groundwater, availability of sorbing materials in the till, and mineral equilibria. 3. Variability in hydraulic parameters, such as the definition of hydraulic boundaries, and values of hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the deep groundwater inflow rate. The overarching conclusion from this study is that the current implementation of the model is robust (the model is largely insensitive to variations in the parameters within the studied ranges) and conservative (the Base Case calculations have a

  13. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface-A modeling based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Taufique, M. F. N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-02-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  14. AATSR Land Surface Temperature Product Validation Using Ground Measurements in China and Implications for SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Zmuda, Andy; Desnos, Yves-Louis; Ma, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is one of the most important parameters at the interface between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. It acts as a sensitive indicator of climate change and is an essential input parameter for land surface models. Because of the intense variability at different spatial and temporal scales, satellite remote sensing provides the sole opportunity to acquire LSTs over large regions. Validation of the LST products is an necessary step before their applications conducted by scientific community and it is essential for the developers to improve the LST products.

  15. Novel use of trypan blue in ocular surface staining: redefining implications for this vital dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ambrósio Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Different applications of trypan blue (TB for intraocular surgery have been reported, with very high levels of safety and efficacy. We describe the use of TB as an alternative vital dye for staining the ocular surface to assess the integrity of superficial cell layers of the cornea and the surface environment. This facilitates the diagnosis of various ocular surface disorders, including screening for dry eye disease (DED among refractive and cataract patients. TB staining properties are different from fluorescein and both are stable in a solution, so that a double staining technique is introduced.

  16. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  17. Transport of Substances on Different Stages of Processes Initiated by Free Fallen Drop Impact on Surface of Quiescent Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinykh, A. Yu.

    2012-04-01

    Collision of a free fallen drop with a surface of quiescent layer of water initiates a sequence of processes including initial shock, formation of cavern and crown with a chevron edge emitted small water drops, wide central trough surrounding by a train of running surface circular capillary waves, splash, secondary cavern collapsing with a streamer discharge and gradual decal of all disturbances. Fine structure of the drop splashes and transport of substances carrying by the drop inside accepting target fluid are studied by methods of direct registering of flow images by fast video- and photo cameras. Different directions of observations were realized that are side, top and bottom view of flow patterns. Flow patterns produced by clean and coloured water, alcohol (changing the surface tension) and oil drops were investigated. Attention was concentrated on small scale processes dynamics studying which produce fast variations of water surface shapes with sharp local irregularities. Shapes and textures of craters and surrounding rim surfaces as well as coloured filaments of a drop substance inside the fluid body were registered and analyzed. Two groups of flows with relatively large scales defined by the drop diameter and very fine scales were identified. It is supposed that short living and fast changing flow components are result of strong short-acting forces impact. Their manifestations depend on surface tension on the boundaries fluid-fluid and fluid-air. Effects of surface tension gradients on the drop dye propagation pattern are also demonstrated and discussed. Experiments were performed on set-up USU "HPC IPMec RAS" under support of Ministry of Education and Science RF (Goscontract No. 16.518.11.7059).

  18. Implications for Ecosystem Services of Watershed Processes that affect the Transport and Transformations of Mercury in an Adirondack Stream Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    yields of 0.095 μg/m2/yr in a sub-basin of the upper Hudson during this same period. Our work shows that Hg in stream biota, which is largely in the methyl form, is strongly related to MeHg measured in the water column; food web factors that affect Hg bioaccumulation also play a role. In brook trout, the top aquatic predator in the food web of the upper Hudson, Hg concentrations average about 0.1 μg/g, a level believed to affect fish behavior, and a few values were greater than 0.3 μg/g, a level at which human fish consumption advisories are issued. Landscape-based regression models that account for about 80% of the variation in stream MeHg concentrations at 25 sites across the upper Hudson basin include metrics of riparian area and open water indicating the importance of these landscape types in affecting methylation rates, losses of MeHg (through demethylation and other processes), and the transport of MeHg to surface waters. These and other study results indicate that factors such as watershed geomorphology, seasonal variations in discharge and air temperature, and the location and connection of riparian wetlands to streams are the strongest factors that affect stream MeHg concentrations and therefore, the potential ecosystem services provided by fish and other wildlife in the Adirondack region.

  19. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E., E-mail: Alexander-Meyerovich@uri.edu [University of Rhode Island, Department of Physics (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  20. The Helium Field Effect Transistor (II): Gated Transport of Surface-State Electrons Through Micro-constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, F.; Ashari, M.; Lorenz, T.; Rau, R.; Scheer, E.; Kono, K.; Rees, D. G.; Leiderer, P.

    2016-11-01

    We present transport measurements of surface-state electrons on liquid helium films in confined geometry. The measurements are taken using split-gate devices similar to a field effect transistor. The number of electrons passing between the source and drain areas of the device can be precisely controlled by changing the length of the voltage pulse applied to the gate electrode. We find evidence that the effective driving potential depends on electron-electron interactions, as well as the electric field applied to the substrate. Our measurements indicate that the mobility of electrons on helium films can be high and that microfabricated transistor devices allow electron manipulation on length scales close to the interelectron separation. Our experiment is an important step toward investigations of surface-state electron properties at much higher densities, for which the quantum melting of the system to a degenerate Fermi gas should be observed.

  1. Effect of low-concentration rhamnolipid on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 in an ideal porous medium with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hua; Liu, Guansheng; Jiang, Yongbing; Brusseau, Mark L; Liu, Zhifeng; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-03-01

    The success of effective bioaugmentation processes for remediation of soil and groundwater contamination requires effective transport of the injected microorganisms in the subsurface environment. In this study, the effect of low concentrations of monorhamnolipid biosurfactant solutions on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ideal porous medium (glass beads) with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces was investigated by conducting miscible-displacement experiments. Transport behavior was examined for both glucose-grown and hexadecane-grown cells, with low and high surface hydrophobicity, respectively. A clean-bed colloid deposition model was used for determination of deposition rate coefficients. Results show that cells with high surface hydrophobicity exhibit greater retention than cells with low surface hydrophobicity. Rhamnolipid affects cell transport primarily by changing cell surface hydrophobicity, with an additional minor effect by increasing solution ionic strength. There is a good linear relation between k and rhamnolipid-regulated cell surface hydrophobicity presented as bacterial-adhesion-to-hydrocarbon (BATH) rate of cells (R(2)=0.71). The results of this study show the importance of hydrophobic interaction for transport of bacterial cells in silica-based porous media, and the potential of using low-concentration rhamnolipid solutions for facilitating bacterial transport in bioaugmentation efforts.

  2. Microimpact phenomena on Australasian microtektites: Implications for ejecta plume characteristics and lunar surface processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.; Sudhakar, M.

    and dust, craters generated by projectiles defining an oblique trajectory, high-velocity "pitless" craters, and the conventional hypervelocity craters with well-defined central pits and radial and concentric cracks-found commonly on lunar surface materials...

  3. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  4. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  5. Investigation of Ozone Sources in California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Implications for Stratospheric Intrusion and Long Range Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Gore, Warren

    2015-01-01

    High ozone concentrations at low altitudes near the surface were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on May 30, 2012. We investigate the causes of the elevated ozone concentrations using the airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-chem and WRF-STILT model simulations show that the contribution from local sources is small. From MERRA reanalysis, it is found that high potential vorticity (PV) is observed at low altitudes. This high PV appears to be only partially coming through the stratospheric intrusions because the air inside the high PV region is moist, which shows that mixing appears to be enhanced in the low altitudes. Considering that diabatic heating can also produce high PV in the lower troposphere, high ozone is partially coming through stratospheric intrusion, but this cannot explain the whole ozone concentration in the target areas of the western U.S. A back-trajectory model is utilized to see where the air masses originated. The air masses of the target areas came from the lower stratosphere (LS), upper (UT), mid- (MT), and lower troposphere (LT). The relative number of trajectories coming from LS and UT is low (7.7 and 7.6, respectively) compared to that from LT (64.1), but the relative ozone concentration coming from LS and UT is high (38.4 and 20.95, respectively) compared to that from LT (17.7). The air mass coming from LT appears to be mostly coming from Asia. Q diagnostics show that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that ozone from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. This study shows that high ozone concentrations can be detected by airborne measurements, which can be analyzed by integrated platforms such as models, reanalysis, and satellite data.

  6. Tracking of magnetic flux concentrations over a five-day observation, and an insight into surface magnetic flux transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar dynamo problem is the question of how the cyclic variation in the solar magnetic field is maintained. One of the important processes is the transport of magnetic flux by surface convection. To reveal this process, the dependence of the squared displacement of magnetic flux concentrations on the elapsed time is investigated in this paper via a feature-recognition technique and a continual five-day magnetogram. This represents the longest time scale over which a satellite observation has ever been performed for this problem. The dependence is found to follow a power law and differ significantly from that of diffusion transport. Furthermore, there is a change in the behavior at a spatial scale of 103.8 km. A super-diffusion behavior with an index of 1.4 is found at smaller scales, while changing to a sub-diffusion behavior with an index of 0.6 on larger ones. We interpret this difference in the transport regime as coming from the network-flow pattern.

  7. Tracking of magnetic flux concentrations over a five-day observation and an insight into surface magnetic flux transport

    CERN Document Server

    Iida, Y

    2016-01-01

    The solar dynamo problem is the question of how the cyclic variation in the solar magnetic field is maintained. One of the important processes is the transport of magnetic flux by surface convection. To reveal this process, the dependence of the squared displacement of magnetic flux concentrations upon the elapsed time is investigated in this paper via a feature-recognition technique and a continual five-day magnetogram. This represents the longest time scale over which a satellite observation has ever been performed for this problem. The dependence is found to follow a power-law and differ significantly from that of diffusion transport. Furthermore there is a change in the behavior at a spatial scale of 10^{3.8} km. A super-diffusion behavior with an index of 1.4 is found on smaller scales, while changing to a sub-diffusion behavior with an index of 0.6 on larger ones. I interpret this difference in the transport regime as coming from the network-flow pattern.

  8. Surface Rupture of the 2005 Kashmir, Pakistan, Earthquake and its Active Tectonic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, H.; Nakata, T.; Tsutsumi, H.; Kondo, H.; Sugito, N.; Awata, Y.; Akhtar, S. S.; Majid, A.; Khattak, W.; Awan, A. A.; Yeats, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    The 8th October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of Mw 7.6 struck the westernmost area of the Indian-Eurasian collision zone, resulting in the worst earthquake disaster ever recorded along the frontal Himalaya. Although none of the historical Himalayan earthquakes is reported to have produced primary surface rupture, our field mapping reveals that the 2005 earthquake accompanied a NW-trending ~70-km-long distinctive surface rupture with maximum and mean vertical separations of ~7 m and ~3 m, respectively. Typical surface expression of faulting is a NE-side-up fault scarp or warp with surface shortening features at its base and tension cracks on its crest. Bulging and back-tilting are also observed on the upthrown side at many places. The surface rupture is subdivided into three geometrical segments separated by small steps. Location of the hypocenter suggests that the rupture was initiated at a deep portion of the northern-central segment boundary and bilaterally propagated to eventually break three segments. Mapped surface rupture trace clearly shows that neither the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) nor the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is responsible for the earthquake, but a geomorphologically-evident active fault within the Sub-Himalaya, the Balakot-Garhi fault, is a causative fault, although a part of the Balakot-Garhi fault appears to coincide with the surface trace of the MBT. Cumulative vertical separation of the most extensively recognized fluvial terrace surface is 7-8 times larger than the 2005 separation, implying occurrence of 7-8 similar earthquakes after the surface abandonment. If this deeply-incised fill surface is related to sediment yield increase due to the last major glaciation around 20 ka, the rupture interval and vertical slip rate of the Balakot-Garhi fault are estimated to be on the order of ~3000 years and ~1 mm/yr, respectively. By using the seismologically determined fault dip of ~30 degrees, horizontal shortening rate across the fault is then

  9. Circular dichroism and superdiffusive transport at the surface of BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauchain, J; Ohtsubo, Y; Hajlaoui, M; Papalazarou, E; Marsi, M; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Faure, J; Kokh, K A; Tereshchenko, O E; Eremeev, S V; Chulkov, E V; Perfetti, L

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the electronic states of BiTeI after the optical pumping with circularly polarized photons. Our data show that photoexcited electrons reach an internal thermalization within 300 fs of the arrival of the pump pulse. Instead, the dichroic contrast generated by the circularly polarized light relaxes on a time scale shorter than 80 fs. This result implies that orbital and spin polarization created by the circular pump pulse rapidly decays via manybody interaction. The persistent dichroism at longer delay times is due to the helicity dependence of superdiffussive transport. We ascribe it to the lack of inversion symmetry in an electronic system far from equilibrium conditions.

  10. The structure, energetics, and nature of the chemical bonding of phenylthiol adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: implications for density-functional calculations of molecular-electronic conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, Ante; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-03-01

    substrate bands. Significant implications are described for density-functional calculations of through-molecule electron transport in molecular electronics.

  11. Soil surface searching and transport of Euphorbia characias seeds by ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadaler, Xavier; Gómez, Crisanto

    The intensity of exploring the soil surface by ants was studied for the four species involved in the dispersal and predation of seeds of the West-Mediterranean myrmecochorous plant Euphorbia characias. During the dehiscence period (June) the whole soil surface is sccanned in 43 minutes. Not all ants that find a seed take it to the nest. For the four ant species studied ( Pheidole pallidula, Aphaenogaster senilis, Tapinoma nigerrimum, Messor barbarus) the proportion of ants that finally take the seed is 67.6%. In spite of this, the high level of soil surface searching explains the rather short time that seeds remain on the soil before being removed. The presence of an elaiosome is a key element in the outcome of the ant-seed interaction: a seed with elaiosome has a seven-fold increase in probability of being taken to the nest if found by a non-granivorous ant. The predator-avoidance hypothesis for myrmecochory is supported.

  12. The Effect of Diffusional Transport and Surface Catalysis on the Aerothermodynamic Heating for Martian Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henline, William D.; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    For the reentry heating of 70-degree blunt sphere-cones entering Mars at velocities in excess of 6 km/sec, a study was performed to determine the magnitude of both convective and catalytic heating on the cone forebody. Case studies of the peak heating conditions for the current NASA Mars Pathfinder entry probe, as well as the peak heating conditions of the proposed NASA Mars 2001 aerobraking orbiter mission were performed. Since the actual behavior of the chemical recombination of Mars atmosphere hypersonic shock layer species on heat shield materials is not known, and no experimental studies of any consequence have been done to determine surface reaction rates for the CO2 system, a parametric analysis of various reaction schemes and surface catalytic mechanistic models was performed. In many cases the actual Mars entry probe will have a heat shield composed of an ablative material which can either partially or completely preclude the existence of catalytic surface recombination phenomena. The extent of this blockage effect has not been examined at this time and is not considered in this effort. Instead only non-ablative computations are performed to separately evaluate the full extent of the surface catalysis and related diffusional phenomena. Parametric studies include peak heating point comparisons of non-catalytic, partially catalytic and fully catalytic total surface heat transfer for three difference surface recombination catalytic mechanisms (with and without simultaneous CO + O and O + O recombination) as well as with different species diffusion models. Diffusion model studies include constant Schmidt number (equal diffusivities) and the bifurcation, approximate multi-component diffusion model. Since the gas phase reaction kinetics for the Mars CO2 based atmosphere have also not been validated, the effect of two different (fast and slow) sets of gas kinetics on heat transfer is presented.

  13. Efficient Coupling and Transport of a Surface Plasmon at 780 nm in a Gold Nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-28

    We studied plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We designed an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  14. Electronic transport through Si nanowires: Role of bulk and surface disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2006-01-01

    on the situation a preferable method can be identified. Several numerical results are presented to illustrate the relative merits of the two methods. Our calculations of relaxed atomic structures and their conductance properties are based on density functional theory without introducing adjustable parameters. Two...... specific models of disorder are considered: Unpassivated, surface reconstructed SiNW's are perturbed by random on-site (Anderson) disorder whereas defects in hydrogen passivated wires are introduced by randomly removed H atoms. The unpassivated wires are very sensitive to disorder in the surface whereas...

  15. Variability of the temporal bone surface's topography: implications for otologic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoeur, Jérémy; Noble, Jack H.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2012-02-01

    Otologic surgery is performed for a variety of reasons including treatment of recurrent ear infections, alleviation of dizziness, and restoration of hearing loss. A typical ear surgery consists of a tympanomastoidectomy in which both the middle ear is explored via a tympanic membrane flap and the bone behind the ear is removed via mastoidectomy to treat disease and/or provide additional access. The mastoid dissection is performed using a high-speed drill to excavate bone based on a pre-operative CT scan. Intraoperatively, the surface of the mastoid component of the temporal bone provides visual feedback allowing the surgeon to guide their dissection. Dissection begins in "safe areas" which, based on surface topography, are believed to be correlated with greatest distance from surface to vital anatomy thus decreasing the chance of injury to the brain, large blood vessels (e.g. the internal jugular vein and internal carotid artery), the inner ear, and the facial nerve. "Safe areas" have been identified based on surgical experience with no identifiable studies showing correlation of the surface with subsurface anatomy. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether such a correlation exists. Through a three-step registration process, we defined a correspondence between each of twenty five clinically-applicable temporal bone CT scans of patients and an atlas and explored displacement and angular differences of surface topography and depth of critical structures from the surface of the skull. The results of this study reflect current knowledge of osteogenesis and anatomy. Based on two features (distance and angular difference), two regions (suprahelical and posterior) of the temporal bone show the least variability between surface and subsurface anatomy.

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of cyanobacterial soil crusts in the Kalahari: Implications for soil surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A. D.; Dougill, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    Localised patterns of erosion and deposition in vegetated semi-arid rangelands have been shown to influence ecological change and biogeochemical cycles. In the flat, vegetated Kalahari rangelands of Southern Africa the factors regulating erodibility of the fine sand soils and the erosivity of wind regimes require further investigation. This paper reports on the spatial and temporal patterns of cyanobacterial soil crust cover from ten sites at five sampling locations in the semi-arid Kalahari and discusses the likely impact on factors regulating surface erodibility and erosivity. Cyanobacterial soil crust cover on Kalahari Sand varied between 11% and 95% of the ground surface and was higher than previously reported. Cover was inversely related to grazing with the lowest crust cover found close to boreholes and the highest in the Game Reserve and Wildlife Management Zone. In grazed areas, crusts form under the protective canopies of the thorny shrub Acacia mellifera. Fenced plot data showed that crusts recover quickly from disturbance, with a near complete surface crust cover forming within 15 months of disturbance. Crust development is restricted by burial by wind blown sediment and by raindrop impact. Crusts had significantly greater organic matter and total nitrogen compared to unconsolidated surfaces. Crusts also significantly increased the compressive strength of the surface (and thus decreased erodibility) and changed the surface roughness. Establishing exactly how these changes affect aeolian erosion requires further process-based studies. The proportion of shear velocity acting on the surface in this complex mixed bush-grass-crust environment will be the key to understanding how crusts affect erodibility.

  17. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, R W [Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)], E-mail: blake@zoology.ubc.ca

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ({approx}0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid prohibitive

  18. Transport of a nematicide in surface and ground waters in a farmed tropical catchment with volcanic substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, J.-B.; Cattan, P.; Voltz, M.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    Assessment of water-pollution risks in agricultural regions requires studying pesticide transport processes in soil and water compartments at the catchment scale. In tropical regions, banana (Musa spp.) plantations are located in zones with abundant rainfalls and soils with high infiltration rates, which lead to washout and leaching of soil-applied pesticides, causing severe diffuse pollution of water resources. The aim of this paper is to determine how the nematicide cadusafos [S,S-di-sec-butyl O-ethyl phosphorodithioate], used in banana plantations, contaminates water and soils at the two scales of subcatchment and catchment. The study site was a small banana-growing catchment on the tropical volcanic island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean (FWI). The catchment is located in pedoclimatic conditions where rainfall is abundant (> 4000 mm/year), and soil permeable (saturated hydraulic conductivity of Andosol Ks > 30 mm/h). Two campaigns of nematicide application were conducted, one in 2003 over 40% of the catchment and one in 2006 over 12%. For 100 days after application, we monitored the surface water and groundwater flows and the cadusafos concentrations in the soil and in surface and ground waters in a 2400 m² subcatchment and a 17.8 ha catchment. The results show that at the subcatchment scale the high retention in the A horizon of the soil limited the transport of cadusafos by runoff, whereas the lower retention of the molecule in the B horizon favoured percolation towards the shallow groundwater. The contamination levels of surface water, as well as shallow and deep groundwaters, reflected the geological structure of the Féfé catchment: i.e. a shallow aquifer in the most recent volcanic deposits that is rapidly exposed to pollution and a deeper aquifer that is relatively protected from the pollution coming from the treated fields. Comparing the losses of cadusafos at the subcatchment and at the catchment scales revealed that the nematicide re-infiltrated in

  19. Turbulent coherent-structure dynamics in a natural surface storage zone: Mechanisms of mass and momentum transport in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escauriaza, Cristian; Sandoval, Jorge; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mao, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows developed in surface storage zones (SSZ) in rivers control many physical and biogeochemical processes of contaminants in the water. These regions are characterized by low velocities and long residence times, which favor particle deposition, nutrient uptake, and flow interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the flow in SSZ is driven by a shear layer that induces multiple vortical structures with a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. In this work we study the flow in a lateral SSZ of the Lluta River, a high-altitude Andean stream (4,000 masl), with a Re=45,800. We describe the large-scale turbulent coherent structures using field measurements and 3D numerical simulations. We measure the bed topography, instantaneous 3D velocities at selected points, the mean 2D free-surface velocity field, and arsenic concentration in the sediment. Numerical simulations of the flow are also performed using a DES turbulence model. We focus on the mass and momentum transport processes, analyzing the statistics of mass exchange and residence times in the SSZ. With this information we provide new insights on the flow and transport processes between the main channel and the recirculating region in natural conditions. Supported by Fondecyt 1130940.

  20. The effects of the accuracy of the atmospheric forcings on the prediction of the sea surface transport in coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucco, Andrea; Quattrocchi, Giovanni; Satta, Andrea; Antognarelli, Fabio; della Valle, Antonio; De Biasio, Francesco; Cadau, Enrico; Zecchetto, Stefano; Umgiesser, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Italian flagship project RITMARE (http://www.ritmare.it/en/) an Operational Oceanography Systems (OOS hereafter) based on high resolution 3D hydrodynamic model has been developed for the Oristano Gulf (Sardinia, Italy), with the aim of making short term predictions of water currents and pollutant transport. Atmospheric data provided by the SKIRON meteorological model system (http://forecast.uoa.gr/) were used to make the predictions. In order to asses the quality of the wind field adopted to force the hydrodynamic model, a coastal wind measuring system (WMS hereafter) was developed. The WMS is composed by five three-components anemometers located along the Gulf coasts, which provide hourly and operationally wind measurements. These data are then used operationally to derive high resolution wind fields over the entire Gulf and surrounding coastal areas. The modelled wind data have been compared with the measured ones and the meteorological model accuracy estimated. A set of lagrangian buoys were deployed within the Gulf to measure the sea surface transport due to the main local wind regimes. The OOS were used to reproduce the paths followed by each lagrangian buoy using as forcing conditions both the wind fields measured by the local WMS and the predicted ones. Therefore the effects of the atmospheric forcing quality on predicting the surface hydrodynamics at coastal scale were determined.