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Sample records for surface transferrin binding

  1. Binding and endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin by K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using isotopic labeling of human serum apotransferrin, the binding and the endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin (TbC-apotransferrin, TbC-apotransferrin- FeN) by K562 cells, a human leukemic cell line, have been investigated. There are about (8.58±2.41)×105 binding sites per cell surface at 0℃. The association constant for TbC-apo- transferrin binding is 4.1×107 mol-1@L, for TbC-apo- transferrin-FeN 2.7×107 mol-1@L at 0℃. At pH 7.4, upon warming cells to 37℃, endocytosis starts. The rate constants for the endocytosis are about 0.97 min-1 and 0.31 min-1 and the endocytosis ratio reaches 56% and 80% for TbC-apo- transferrin and TbC-apotransferrin-FeN, respectively.

  2. The structural basis of transferrin sequestration by transferrin-binding protein B

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    Calmettes, Charles; Alcantara, Joenel; Yu, Rong-Hua; Schryvers, Anthony B.; Moraes, Trevor F. (Toronto); (Calgary)

    2012-03-28

    Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, acquires the essential element iron from the host glycoprotein transferrin during infection through a surface transferrin receptor system composed of proteins TbpA and TbpB. Here we present the crystal structures of TbpB from N. meningitidis in its apo form and in complex with human transferrin. The structure reveals how TbpB sequesters and initiates iron release from human transferrin.

  3. Ionic residues of human serum transferrin affect binding to the transferrin receptor and iron release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Miller, Brendan F; Roberts, Samantha E; Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-17

    Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on the binding of diferric human serum transferrin (hTF) to its specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of actively dividing cells. Internalization of the complex into an endosome precedes iron removal. The return of hTF to the blood to continue the iron delivery cycle relies on the maintenance of the interaction between apohTF and the TFR after exposure to endosomal pH (≤6.0). Identification of the specific residues accounting for the pH-sensitive nanomolar affinity with which hTF binds to TFR throughout the cycle is important to fully understand the iron delivery process. Alanine substitution of 11 charged hTF residues identified by available structures and modeling studies allowed evaluation of the role of each in (1) binding of hTF to the TFR and (2) TFR-mediated iron release. Six hTF mutants (R50A, R352A, D356A, E357A, E367A, and K511A) competed poorly with biotinylated diferric hTF for binding to TFR. In particular, we show that Asp356 in the C-lobe of hTF is essential to the formation of a stable hTF-TFR complex: mutation of Asp356 in the monoferric C-lobe hTF background prevented the formation of the stoichiometric 2:2 (hTF:TFR monomer) complex. Moreover, mutation of three residues (Asp356, Glu367, and Lys511), whether in the diferric or monoferric C-lobe hTF, significantly affected iron release when in complex with the TFR. Thus, mutagenesis of charged hTF residues has allowed identification of a number of residues that are critical to formation of and release of iron from the hTF-TFR complex.

  4. How the binding of human transferrin primes the transferrin receptor potentiating iron release at endosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenroth, Brian E; Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Everse, Stephen J; Mason, Anne B

    2011-08-09

    Delivery of iron to cells requires binding of two iron-containing human transferrin (hTF) molecules to the specific homodimeric transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. Through receptor-mediated endocytosis involving lower pH, salt, and an unidentified chelator, iron is rapidly released from hTF within the endosome. The crystal structure of a monoferric N-lobe hTF/TFR complex (3.22-Å resolution) features two binding motifs in the N lobe and one in the C lobe of hTF. Binding of Fe(N)hTF induces global and site-specific conformational changes within the TFR ectodomain. Specifically, movements at the TFR dimer interface appear to prime the TFR to undergo pH-induced movements that alter the hTF/TFR interaction. Iron release from each lobe then occurs by distinctly different mechanisms: Binding of His349 to the TFR (strengthened by protonation at low pH) controls iron release from the C lobe, whereas displacement of one N-lobe binding motif, in concert with the action of the dilysine trigger, elicits iron release from the N lobe. One binding motif in each lobe remains attached to the same α-helix in the TFR throughout the endocytic cycle. Collectively, the structure elucidates how the TFR accelerates iron release from the C lobe, slows it from the N lobe, and stabilizes binding of apohTF for return to the cell surface. Importantly, this structure provides new targets for mutagenesis studies to further understand and define this system.

  5. Immunological measurement of transferrin compared with chemical measurement of total iron-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, S H; Rosenthal, W A; Milewski, K A

    1975-07-01

    Because of uncertainty as to the molecular weight of transferrin, a previous comparison [Von der Heul et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 38, 347 (1972)] between transferrin content of serum and total iron-binding capacity cannot be definitive. We found a conversion factor for expressing the maximum amount of iron bound by 1 mg of transferrin. We compared the resulting calculated value with values obtained by three other methods for measuring total iron-binding capacity. We agree with the previous observation that the latter, as measured radioisotopically, give higher results than would be judged from the transferrin content but the same as those for two chemical methods. The diffusion rate of transferrin in agar was the same irrespective of the degree of iron saturation. Serum transferrin concentrations were low in patients with anemia resulting from malignancy, chronic disorders, and cirrhosis of the liver, and high or normal in patients with iron deficiency anemia and in pregnant women or women who were taking birth-control pills. Measurement of transferrin concentration can be used to distinguish iron deficiency anemia from anemia resulting from chronic disorders, but offers no advantages over existing methods for estimating total iron-binding capacity.

  6. A transferrin-like GPI-linked iron-binding protein in detergent-insoluble noncaveolar microdomains at the apical surface of fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; van Deurs, B

    1995-01-01

    of ultracryosections of mucosal tissue, the protein was localized to the apical surface of the enterocytes, whereas it was absent from the basolateral plasma membrane. Interestingly, it was mainly found in patches of flat or invaginated apical membrane domains rather than at the surface of microvilli. Caveolae were...

  7. Interrelationship between Manganese and Iron for Binding to Apo-Transferrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hassanzadeh Ghasabeh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is an essential trace elenent. There is a little evidence for deficiency of manganese in human , while as its toxicity has been reported in several cases. Manganese toxicity occurrs in humans exposed to high enviromental concentrations (for example workers in the dry battery production and may be particularly important in the neonatal period. The chemical similarities between manganese and iron and their binding to apo-transferrin (apo-tf may lead to the disturbances of iron metabolism. In the present project the interrelationship of anemia and manganese toxicity by techniques such as Affinity chromatography ; Equilibrium dialysis ; Urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ; Spectrophotometric titration was investigated. The charactristics of Mn and Fe binding to apo-tf have been investigated and compared in this article . Using Equilibrium dialysis technique the binding of Fe and Mn to apo-tf was also studied. The binding constant of Mn to apo-tf was calculated using scatchared plot analysis. Addition of Mn (1.5 g/ml to reaction mixture containing Fe and apo-tf reduced Fe binding to apo-transferrin in comparison to control. Using Urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Urea-PAGE technique conforming the binding of Mn to apo-tf. The data that has been presented in this article elucidated the probable mechanism by which Mn interference with Fe metabolism; which result in the apperance of anemia.

  8. Different binding affinities of Pb2+ and Cu2+ to glycosylation variants of human serum transferrin interfere with the detection of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lian-Zhong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, Lin; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a specific biomarker of alcohol abuse, and for diagnosis of chronic alcohol, abuse is often determined using isoelectric focusing (IEF) and chromatographic techniques. To allow this method to be used for the diagnosis of alcohol abuse, inferences of various physical and chemical factors with the detection of CDT have been investigated. However, few reports have focused thus far on whether different metal ions have different binding affinities to CDT and HTf variants or further interfere in the detection of CDT. Here, in order to figure out whether and how metal ions such as Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) bind to holo-human serum transferrin (holo-HTf) and further interfere in CDT detection, the binding characteristics and the binding parameters of holo-HTf with metal ions such as Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and ICP-MS. Moreover, whether the metal ions such as Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) will reduce the diagnostic accuracy of CDT in clinic was investigated using IEF. The present study demonstrates that Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) have different binding affinities to holo-HTf variants and produce different changes in the relative amounts of each glycosylation isoforms of HTf. Accordingly, the glycosylation chains of HTf will affect the binding affinities of glycosylation isoforms with Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), causing further interferences in CDT detection.

  9. Engineering an Anti-Transferrin Receptor ScFv for pH-Sensitive Binding Leads to Increased Intracellular Accumulation.

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    Benjamin J Tillotson

    Full Text Available The equilibrium binding affinity of receptor-ligand or antibody-antigen pairs may be modulated by protonation of histidine side-chains, and such pH-dependent mechanisms play important roles in biological systems, affecting molecular uptake and trafficking. Here, we aimed to manipulate cellular transport of single-chain antibodies (scFvs against the transferrin receptor (TfR by engineering pH-dependent antigen binding. An anti-TfR scFv was subjected to histidine saturation mutagenesis of a single CDR. By employing yeast surface display with a pH-dependent screening pressure, scFvs having markedly increased dissociation from TfR at pH 5.5 were identified. The pH-sensitivity generally resulted from a central cluster of histidine residues in CDRH1. When soluble, pH-sensitive, scFv clone M16 was dosed onto live cells, the internalized fraction was 2.6-fold greater than scFvs that lacked pH-sensitive binding and the increase was dependent on endosomal acidification. Differences in the intracellular distribution of M16 were also observed consistent with an intracellular decoupling of the scFv M16-TfR complex. Engineered pH-sensitive TfR binding could prove important for increasing the effectiveness of TfR-targeted antibodies seeking to exploit endocytosis or transcytosis for drug delivery purposes.

  10. Competition between transferrin and the serum ligands citrate and phosphate for the binding of aluminum.

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    Harris, Wesley R; Wang, Zhepeng; Hamada, Yahia Z

    2003-05-19

    A key issue regarding the speciation of Al(3+) in serum is how well the ligands citric acid and phosphate can compete with the iron transport protein serum transferrin for the aluminum. Previous studies have attempted to measure binding constants for each ligand separately, but experimental problems make it very difficult to obtain stability constants with the accuracy required to make a meaningful comparison between these ligands. In this study, effective binding constants for Al-citrate and Al-phosphate at pH 7.4 have been determined using difference UV spectroscopy to monitor the direct competition between these ligands and transferrin. The analysis of this competition equilibrium also includes the binding of citrate and phosphate as anions to apotransferrin. The effective binding constants are 10(11.59) for the 1:1 Al-citrate complexes and 10(14.90) for the 1:2 Al-citrate complexes. The effective binding constant for the 1:2 Al-phosphate complex is 10(12.02). No 1:1 Al-phosphate complex was detected. Speciation calculations based on these effective binding constants indicate that, at serum concentrations of citrate and phosphate, citrate will be the primary low-molecular-mass ligand for aluminum. Formal stability constants for the Al-citrate system have also been determined by potentiometric methods. This equilibrium system is quite complex, and information from both electrospray mass spectrometry and difference UV experiments has been used to select the best model for fitting the potentiometric data. The mass spectra contain peaks that have been assigned to complexes having aluminum:citrate stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 2:2, 2:3, and 3:3. The difference UV results were used to determine the stability constant for Al(H(-1)cta)-, which was then used in the least-squares fitting of the potentiometric data to determine stability constants for Al(Hcta)+, Al(cta), Al(cta)2(3-), Al(H(-1)cta)(cta)(4-), Al2(H(-1)cta)2(2-), and Al3(H(-1)cta)3(OH)(4-).

  11. Immunocytochemical study with an anti-transferrin binding protein serum: a marker for avian oligodendrocytes.

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    Cho, S S; Lucas, J J

    1995-03-13

    We have investigated immunocytochemically the localization of a transferrin binding protein (TfBP) in adult CNS of avian and mammalian species using a polyclonal antibody raised against the protein purified from hen oviduct membranes (alpha OV-TfBP). TfBP has recently been shown to be HSP108. An overall strong immunoreactivity was revealed in most parts of the avian brains, especially in the white matter. The main immunoreactivity originated in small, intensely reacting cells interpreted as oligodendrocytes. The density of TfBP-labeled oligodendrocytes of the avian brains was generally proportional to the degree of myelination. There were no marked differences in TfBP-immunostaining pattern between avian species (chick, pigeon and lovebird). On the other hand, in rat, rabbit and cat brains we could not find any TfBP-immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy has further revealed that TfBP is present in the light and medium types of oligodendrocytes which are known to have high metabolic activities. TfBP reaction product was homogeneously dispersed throughout the perinuclear cytoplasm and fine processes of oligodendrocytes. The intracytoplasmic organelles such as mitochondria and Golgi apparatus were devoid of reaction product. The presence of TfBP in oligodendrocytes implies that this protein may play an important role in transferrin-mediated iron metabolism in the CNS. The complete lack of cross-reactivity between alpha OV-TfBP and mammalian tissues suggests that there is species variability in TfBP structure. We conclude that this chick TfBP antiserum will prove useful in studies of oligodendrocytes and myelination in the avian CNS.

  12. Effects of different transferrin forms on transferrin receptor expression, iron uptake, and cellular proliferation of human leukemic HL60 cells. Mechanisms responsible for the specific cytotoxicity of transferrin-gallium

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    Chitambar, C.R.; Seligman, P.A.

    1986-12-01

    We have previously shown that human leukemic cells proliferate normally in serum-free media containing various transferrin forms, but the addition of transferrin-gallium leads to inhibition of cellular proliferation. Because gallium has therapeutic potential, the effects of transferrin-gallium on leukemic cell proliferation, transferrin receptor expression, and cellular iron utilization were studied. The cytotoxicity of gallium is considerably enhanced by its binding to transferrin and cytotoxicity can be reversed by transferrin-iron but not by other transferrin forms. Exposure to transferrin-gallium leads to a marked increase in cell surface transferrin binding sites, but despite this, cellular /sup 59/Fe incorporation is inappropriately low. Although shunting of transferrin-gallium to another cellular compartment has not been ruled out, other studies suggest that transferrin-gallium impairs intracellular release of /sup 59/Fe from transferrin by interfering with processes responsible for intracellular acidification. These studies, taken together, demonstrate that inhibition of cellular iron incorporation by transferrin-gallium is a prerequisite for inhibition of cellular proliferation.

  13. Enhanced optical immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for determination of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Sun, Ying; Song, Daqian; Zhang, Qinglin; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hanqi

    2006-01-15

    Wavelength modulation surface plasmon resonance biosensors (SPR) using colloidal Au nanoparticles and double-linker sensing membrane enhancement are reported for determination of transferrin. The 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) was immobilized on the biosensor surface with traditional amine coupling method. The interaction between colloidal Au nanoparticles and MEA was investigated. The anti-transferrin was immobilized on the biosensor surface prepared with staphylococcal protein A (SPA). The interaction of the antibody and antigen was monitored in real time. The good response was obtained in the concentration range 1-20, 0.1-20 and 0.05-20 microg/mL for directly immune assay, double-linker assay and colloidal Au-amplified assay. The result clearly demonstrates that these methods may obtain significantly enhancement of sensitivity for the wavelength modulation SPR biosensor.

  14. Machupo virus glycoprotein determinants for human transferrin receptor 1 binding and cell entry.

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    Sheli R Radoshitzky

    Full Text Available Machupo virus (MACV is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1. TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors.

  15. Structural consequences of binding of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to apo-transferrin: Can this protein account for entry of uranium into human cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidaud, C [CEA Valrho, DSV, DIEP, Service de Biochimie Post Genomique and Toxicologie Nucleaire, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Vidaud, C.; Gourion-Arsiquaud, S; Rollin-Genetet, F; Torne-Celer, C; Plantevin, S; Pible, O; Quemeneur, E; Berthomieu, C. [CEA Cadarache, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique Cellulaire and Laboratoire des Interactions Proteine-Metal, DSV/DEVM, UMR 6191 CNRS-CEA-Universite Aix-Marseille II, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2007-02-15

    It has been established that transferrin binds a variety of metals. These include toxic uranyl ions which form rather stable uranyl-transferrin derivatives. We determined the extent to which the iron binding sites might accommodate the peculiar topographic profile of the uranyl ion and the consequences of its binding on protein conformation. Indeed, metal intake via endocytosis of the transferrin/transferrin receptor depends on the adequate coordination of the metal in its site, which controls protein conformation and receptor binding. Using UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy coupled to a micro-dialysis system, we showed that at both metal binding sites two tyrosines are uranyl ligands, while histidine does not participate with its coordination sphere. Analysis by circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed major differences between structural changes associated with interactions of iron or uranyl with apo-transferrin. Uranyl coordination reduces the level of protein stabilization compared to iron, but this may be simply related to partial lobe closure. The lack of interaction between uranyl-TF and its receptor was shown by flow cytometry using Alexa 488-labeled holo-transferrin. We propose a structural model summarizing our conclusion that the uranyl-TF complex adopts an open conformation that is not appropriate for optimal binding to the transferrin receptor. (authors)

  16. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  17. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  18. The distribution of iron between the metal-binding sites of transferrin human serum.

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    Williams, J; Moreton, K

    1980-02-01

    The Makey & Seal [(1976) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 453, 250--256] method of polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in buffer containing 6 M-urea was used to determine the distribution of iron between the N-terminal and C-terminal iron-binding sites of transferrin in human serum. In fresh serum the two sites are unequally occupied; there is preferential occupation of the N-terminal site. On incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C the preference of iron for the N-terminal site becomes more marked. On storage of serum at -15 degrees C the iron distribution changes so that there is a marked preference for the C-terminal site. Dialysis of serum against buffer at pH 7.4 also causes iron to be bound much more strongly by the C-terminal than by the N-terminal site. The original preference for the N-terminal site can be resroted to the dialysed serum by addition of the diffusible fraction.

  19. A comparative, cross-species investigation of the properties and roles of transferrin- and lactoferrin-binding protein B from pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostan, N; Morgenthau, A; Yu, R H; Gray-Owen, S D; Schryvers, A B

    2017-02-01

    Pathogenic bacteria from the families Neisseriaeceae and Moraxellaceae acquire iron from their host using surface receptors that have the ability to hijack iron from the iron-sequestering host proteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf). The process of acquiring iron from Tf has been well-characterized, including the role of the surface lipoprotein transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB). In contrast, the only well-defined role for the homologue, LbpB, is in its protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides, which is mediated by regions present in some LbpBs that are highly enriched in glutamic or aspartic acid. In this study we compare the Tf-TbpB and the Lf-LbpB interactions and examine the protective effect of LbpB against extracts from human and transgenic mouse neutrophils to gains insights into the physiological roles of LbpB. The results indicate that in contrast to the Tf-TbpB interaction, Lf-LbpB interaction is sensitive to pH and varies between species. In addition, the results with transgenic mouse neutrophils raise the question of whether there is species specificity in the cleavage of Lf to generate cationic antimicrobial peptides or differences in the potency of peptides derived from mouse and human Lf.

  20. Recombinant transferrin binding protein A (rTbpA) fragments of Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2 provide variable protection following homologous challenge in mouse model.

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    Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Kumar, Abhinendra; Mohanty, Nihar Nalini; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2015-02-01

    Transferrin binding protein A (TbpA), an iron acquisition surface protein that also acts as virulence factor, is widely distributed among strains of Pasteurella multocida. In the present study, a total of seven clones of TbpA fragments (39D to F777; 39D to Q697; 188V to F777; 188V to Q697; 39D to P377; 188V to P377 and 39D to F187) belonging to P. multocida B:2 were constructed, over-expressed and purified as recombinant fusion proteins from Escherichia coli using affinity chromatography. Immunization of mice with rTbpA fragments resulted in a significant (p multocida B:2 resulted in a variable protective efficacy up to 50%. The study indicated the potential possibilities to incorporate full length TbpA in subunit vaccine formulation composed of synergistic subunit antigens against haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) in cattle and buffalo.

  1. Identification of a kinetically significant anion binding (KISAB) site in the N-lobe of human serum transferrin.

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    Byrne, Shaina L; Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Mason, Anne B

    2010-05-18

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) binds two ferric iron ions which are delivered to cells in a transferrin receptor (TFR) mediated process. Critical to the delivery of iron to cells is the binding of hTF to the TFR and the efficient release of iron orchestrated by the interaction. Within the endosome, iron release from hTF is also aided by lower pH, the presence of anions, and a chelator yet to be identified. We have recently shown that three of the four residues comprising a loop in the N-lobe (Pro142, Lys144, and Pro145) are critical to the high-affinity interaction of hTF with the TFR. In contrast, Arg143 in this loop does not participate in the binding isotherm. In the current study, the kinetics of iron release from alanine mutants of each of these four residues (placed into both diferric and monoferric N-lobe backgrounds) have been determined +/- the TFR. The R143A mutation greatly retards the rate of iron release from the N-lobe in the absence of the TFR but has considerably less of an effect in its presence. Our data definitively show that Arg143 serves as a kinetically significant anion binding (KISAB) site that is, by definition, sensitive to salt concentration and critical to the conformational change necessary to induce iron release from the N-lobe of hTF (in the absence of the TFR). This is the first identification of an authentic KISAB site in the N-lobe of hTF. The effect of the single R143A mutation on the kinetic profile of iron release provides a dramatic illustration of the dynamic nature of hTF.

  2. A straightforward route to the synthesis of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe for targeting transferrin receptor-overexpressed cells

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    Yang Jing; Wang Zhuyuan; Tan Xuebin; Li Jin; Song Chunyuan; Zhang Ruohu; Cui Yiping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Advanced Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-27

    A tumor cell targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe has been successfully synthesized by using p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) as both the SERS reporter and the conjugation agent for attaching transferrin molecules, which shows experimentally the targeting ability for transferrin receptor-overexpressed HeLa cells and exhibits strong SERS signals when being incubated inside cells. To prove that the uptake of such a SERS probe is through a Tf-receptor-mediated endocytosis process, two control experiments: (1) HeLa cells being incubated with the probe at 4 deg. C and (2) HeLa cells being pre-blocked with free transferrin at 37 deg. C, were employed. The difference of SERS intensity between the transferrin-overexpressed HeLa cells and transferrin-pre-blocked HeLa cells indicates that the probe has the potential to selectively target tumor cells.

  3. Machupo Virus Glycoprotein Determinants for Human Transferrin Receptor 1 Binding and Cell Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    and form enveloped virions [1]. Seven arenaviruses cause viral hemorrhagic fever in humans: the Old World arenaviruses Lassa and ‘Lujo,’ and the New...hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to... fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular

  4. Transferrin in ifshes:A review article

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Berhan Asmamaw

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin is a single monomeric glycoprotein of molecular weight of 80 kDa that transports iron involved in many metabolic processes amongst the sites of absorption, storage and utilization, hence considered as the major iron binding protein in the plasma of vertebrate species. In this study, transferrin structure, synthesis, receptor and the mechanism of cellular uptake of iron from transferrin have been reviewed. Besides, the major biological functions of transferrin and the different forms of it (polymorphisms) have been indicated.

  5. Probing molecular interaction between transferrin and anti-transferrin by atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between transferrin (Tf) and its antibody was investigated by atomic force microscope. Tf-antibody was immobilized on the Au-coated glass slide, and the specific combination between antibody and antigen was also characterized by AFM. The results showed that holo-transferrin was jogged with anti-transferrin, and binded anti-tran- sferrin more tightly than apo-transferrin. The force- distance curves revealed that the affinity of anti-trans- ferrin and holo-transferrin was much stronger than that of apo-transferrin.

  6. Cross-protective efficacy of recombinant transferrin-binding protein A of Haemophilus parasuis in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Yu; Fu, Yuguang; Ji, Yanhong; Lian, Kaiqi; Zheng, Haixue; Wei, Jianzhong; Cai, Xuepeng; Zhu, Qiyun

    2013-06-01

    The causative agent of Glasser's disease in swine is Haemophilus parasuis. Commercial bacterins are widely used for protection of the swine population. However, cross protection is limited because H. parasuis has more than 15 serovars. Transferrin-binding protein A has shown potential as a broad-spectrum vaccine candidate against homologous and heterologous strains. Here we amplified the full-length tbpA gene from an H. parasuis serovar 13 isolate and cloned it into a pET-SUMO expression vector. We then expressed and purified the TbpA protein by Ni affinity chromatography. First, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the protein were evaluated in guinea pigs by two subcutaneous immunizations with different doses of Montanide IMS 206 VG adjuvant. The immunized guinea pigs were, respectively, challenged on week 3 after a booster immunization with homologous strain LJ3 (serovar 13) and heterologous strain FX1 (serovar 4), and vaccine-inoculated groups were compared with nonvaccinated controls. All immunized groups showed serum antibody titers higher than those of negative-control groups. Furthermore, the cytokine and chemokine levels were evaluated at the transcriptional level by the real-time PCR analysis of six cytokines and chemokines. Gamma interferon and interleukin-5 in groups immunized with 100 μg were elevated more than 15-fold over those in negative-control groups. The protection rates were 80 and 60% after a challenge with strains LJ3 and FX1, respectively, in the groups vaccinated with 100 μg of recombinant TbpA protein. Subsequently, the data showed that guinea pigs immunized with a single dose (100 μg) were protected at levels of 80, 80, and 60% against LJ3, FX1, and another heterologous strain, SZ (serovar 14), respectively. The results indicate for the first time that TbpA protein cross protects guinea pigs against serovars 13, 4, and 14 of H. parasuis. Taken together, these results suggest that the recombinant TbpA protein is a promising

  7. Applying the Fe(III) binding property of a chemical transferrin mimetic to Ti(IV) anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Timothy B; Cruz, Yahaira M; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2014-02-03

    As an endogenous serum protein binder of Ti(IV), transferrin (Tf) serves as an excellent vehicle to stabilize the hydrolysis prone metal ion and successfully transport it into cells. This transporting role is thought to be central to Ti(IV)'s anticancer function, but efforts to synthesize Ti(IV) compounds targeting transferrin have not produced a drug. Nonetheless, the Ti(IV) transferrin complex (Ti2Tf) greatly informs on a new Ti(IV)-based anticancer drug design strategy. Ti2Tf interferes with cellular uptake of Fe(III), which is particularly detrimental to cancer cells because of their higher requirement for iron. Ti(IV) compounds of chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands were designed to facilitate Ti(IV) activity by attenuating Fe(III) intracellular levels. In having a higher affinity for Fe(III) than Ti(IV), these ligands feature the appropriate balance between stability and lability to effectively transport Ti(IV) into cancer cells, release Ti(IV) via displacement by Fe(III), and deplete the intracellular Fe(III) levels. The cTfm ligand N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) was selected to explore the feasibility of the design strategy. Kinetic studies on the Fe(III) displacement process revealed that Ti(IV) can be transported and released into cells by HBED on a physiologically relevant time scale. Cell viability studies using A549 cancerous and MRC5 normal human lung cells and testing the cytotoxicity of HBED and its Ti(IV), Fe(III), and Ga(III) compounds demonstrate the importance of Fe(III) depletion in the proposed drug design strategy and the specificity of the strategy for Ti(IV) activity. The readily derivatized cTfm ligands demonstrate great promise for improved Ti(IV) anticancer drugs.

  8. Transferrin in fihes: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhan Asmamaw

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin is a single monomeric glycoprotein of molecular weight of 80 kDa that transports iron involved in many metabolic processes amongst the sites of absorption, storage and utilization, hence considered as the major iron binding protein in the plasma of vertebrate species. In this study, transferrin structure, synthesis, receptor and the mechanism of cellular uptake of iron from transferrin have been reviewed. Besides, the major biological functions of transferrin and the different forms of it (polymorphisms have been indicated.

  9. In vitro binding of plutonium to human transferrin and competition reaction with ferric ions; Fixation in vitro du plutonium sur la siderophiline humaine et reaction de competition avec l'ion ferrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, P.; Lafuma, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Plutonium was found to bind strongly to human transferrin, however a maximum capacity of absorption was observed. Presaturation with iron of transferrin resulted in a decrease of plutonium binding, but it still remained appreciable. It was largely affected by the pH as well as by the degree of ferric saturation of the transferrin. (authors) [French] Le plutonium se fixe solidement sur la siderophiline humaine, toutefois on assiste a une capacite d'absorption limite. Une presaturation par le fer de la siderophiline, diminue l'attraction du plutonium, cependant celle-ci reste importante. L'influence du pH est tres importante ainsi que les degres de saturation ferrique de la siderophiline. (auteurs)

  10. Colorimetry and constant-potential coulometry determinations of transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity, and total iron in serum containing iron-dextran, with use of sodium dithionite and alumina columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J C; Alexander, N M

    1990-10-01

    After the parenteral administration of iron-dextran (imferon), the increased total iron concentrations in serum can be determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by colorimetric methods involving sodium dithionite, which reductively dissociates iron from the dextran complex. We report that constant-potential coulometry detects only about 55-70% of dextran-bound iron before dithionite reduction and variable amounts after reaction with the reducing agent. In addition, we have developed a procedure for determining transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), total iron, and dextran-bound iron with the Kodak Ektachem colorimetric system. In determining total serum iron, the sample is first mixed with sodium dithionite, which rapidly dissociates all dextran-bound iron, but does not remove iron from either transferrin or hemoglobin. After the mixture is applied to an Ektachem slide, transferrin-bound iron is released at pH 4 and is detected together with the iron previously bound to dextran. TIBC is determined by mixing serum with ferric citrate in moderate excess and filtering through a small alumina (Al2O3) column, which binds excess free iron and iron-dextran; the iron in the column eluate represents the TIBC. Transferrin-bound iron is determined by applying diluted serum without added ferric citrate to an alumina column and measuring the iron in the column eluate. Dextran-bound iron is equivalent to the difference between total and transferrin-bound iron. Using this method, we found that transferrin iron-binding sites are saturated in vitro by excess iron-dextran less efficiently than by ferric citrate.

  11. Evaluation of iron status in lemurs by analysis of serum iron and ferritin concentrations, total iron-binding capacity, and transferrin saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cathy V; Junge, Randall E; Stalis, Ilse H

    2008-02-15

    To assess serum iron and ferritin concentrations, total iron-binding capacity, and transferrin saturation as indicators of iron metabolic status in 3 genera of lemurs and determine whether these variables are useful for screening for iron overload. Cross-sectional study. 11 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 11 black lemurs (Eulemur macaco macaco), and 11 red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra). Blood samples were collected weekly for 3 weeks and assayed for serum iron and ferritin concentrations and total iron-binding capacity. Liver biopsy specimens were evaluated histologically and assayed for total iron, nonheme iron, and trace mineral concentrations. Deposition of iron was scored on Prussian blue-stained slides. Hepatic iron content ranged from 497 to 12,800 Pg/g dry weight (median, 2,165 Pg/g). Differences were seen in mean hepatic iron content across genera, with ruffed lemurs having the highest concentrations and ring-tailed lemurs having the lowest. Iron accumulation in the liver was mild, and cellular pathologic changes associated with iron storage disease were not detected in any lemur. Ferritin concentration was the only variable that correlated significantly with hepatic iron content in all 3 genera of lemurs; however, both transferrin saturation and serum iron concentration were correlated with hepatic iron concentration in ring-tailed and ruffed lemurs. Serum ferritin concentration was the only variable that was consistently correlated with hepatic iron content in all 3 genera. Mean hepatic iron content varied across genera, suggesting that the propensity for lemurs to develop iron overload in captivity may vary across taxa.

  12. Nutritional immunity. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Matthew F; Elde, Nels C

    2014-12-12

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense, termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens.

  13. Transferrin-functionalized nanoparticles lose their targeting capabilities when a biomolecule corona adsorbs on the surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvati, Anna; Pitek, Andrzej S; Monopoli, Marco P; Prapainop, Kanlaya; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Hristov, Delyan R; Kelly, Philip M; Aberg, Christoffer; Mahon, Eugene; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been proposed as carriers for drugs, genes and therapies to treat various diseases. Many strategies have been developed to target nanomaterials to specific or over-expressed receptors in diseased cells, and these typically involve functionalizing the surface of nanoparticles with

  14. Evidence for a sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor during duodenal absorption of iron in rat and human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasantha L Kolachala; B Sesikeran; K Madhavan Nair

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To elucidate the sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor under various iron status conditions.METHODS:Incorporation of 59Fe into mucosal and luminal proteins was carried out in control WKY rats.The sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor was carried out in iron deficient,control and iron overloaded rats.The duodenal proteins were subjected to immunoprecipitation and quantitation by specific ELISA and in situ localization by microautoradiography and immunohistochemistry in tandem duodenal sections.Human duodenal biopsy(n = 36)collected from subjects with differing iron status were also stained for these proteins.RESULTS:Ferritin was identified as the major protein that incorporated iron in a time-dependent manner in the duodenal mucosa.The concentration of mucosal ferritin was significantly higher in the iron excess group compared to control,iron deficient groups(731.5 ± 191.96 vs 308.3 ± 123.36,731.5 ± 191.96 vs 256.0 ± 1.19,P < 0.005),while that of luminal transferrin which was significantly higher than the mucosal did not differ among the groups(10.9 ± 7.6 vs 0.87 ± 0.79,11.1 ± 10.3 vs 0.80 ± 1.20,6.8 ± 4.7 vs 0.61 ± 0.63,P < 0.001).In situ grading of proteins and iron,and their superimposition,suggested the occurrence of a sequential transfer of iron.This was demonstrated to occur through the initial binding of iron to luminal transferrin then to absorptive cell surface transferrin receptors.The staining intensity of these proteins varied according to the iron nutrition in humans,with intense staining of transferrin receptor observed in iron deficient subjects.CONCLUSION:It is concluded that the intestine takes up iron through a sequential transfer involving interaction of luminal transferrin,transferrin-transferrin receptor and ferritin.

  15. Transferrin-mediated cellular iron delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Essential to iron homeostasis is the transport of iron by the bilobal protein human serum transferrin (hTF). Each lobe (N- and C-lobe) of hTF forms a deep cleft which binds a single Fe(3+). Iron-bearing hTF in the blood binds tightly to the specific transferrin receptor (TFR), a homodimeric transmembrane protein. After undergoing endocytosis, acidification of the endosome initiates the release of Fe(3+) from hTF in a TFR-mediated process. Iron-free hTF remains tightly bound to the TFR at acidic pH; following recycling back to the cell surface, it is released to sequester more iron. Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on hTF/TFR interactions. Therefore, identification of the pH-specific contacts between hTF and the TFR is crucial. Recombinant protein production has enabled deconvolution of this complex system. The studies reviewed herein support a model in which pH-induced interrelated events control receptor-stimulated iron release from each lobe of hTF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  17. The genes that encode the gonococcal transferrin binding proteins, TbpB and TbpA, are differentially regulated by MisR under iron-replete and iron-depleted conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Justin L; Acevedo, Rosuany Vélez; Dickinson, Mary Kathryne; Cash, Devin R; Shafer, William M; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2016-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae produces two transferrin binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB, which together enable efficient iron transport from human transferrin. We demonstrate that expression of the tbp genes is controlled by MisR, a response regulator in the two-component regulatory system that also includes the sensor kinase MisS. The tbp genes were up-regulated in the misR mutant under iron-replete conditions but were conversely down-regulated in the misR mutant under iron-depleted conditions. The misR mutant was capable of transferrin-iron uptake at only 50% of wild-type levels, consistent with decreased tbp expression. We demonstrate that phosphorylated MisR specifically binds to the tbpBA promoter and that MisR interacts with five regions upstream of the tbpB start codon. These analyses confirm that MisR directly regulates tbpBA expression. The MisR binding sites in the gonococcus are only partially conserved in Neisseria meningitidis, which may explain why tbpBA was not MisR-regulated in previous studies using this related pathogen. This is the first report of a trans-acting protein factor other than Fur that can directly contribute to gonococcal tbpBA regulation.

  18. Comparing the interaction of cyclophosphamide monohydrate to human serum albumin as opposed to holo-transferrin by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods: evidence for allocating the binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousi, Shirin Hamed-Akbari; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2010-12-01

    The interaction between cyclophosphamide monohydrate with human serum albumin (HSA) and human serum transferrin (hTf) was studied with UV absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies as well as molecular modeling. Based on the fluorescence quenching results, it was determined that HSA and hTf had two classes of apparent binding constants and binding sites at physiological conditions. The K(SV1), K(SV2), n(1) and n(2) values for HSA were found to be 8.6 x 10(8) Lmol(-1), 6.34 x 10(8) Lmol(-1), 0.7 and 0.8, respectively, and the corresponding results for hTf were 6.08 x 10(7) Lmol(-1), 4.65 x 10(7) Lmol(-1), 1.3 and 2.6, respectively. However, the binding affinity of cyclophosphamide monohydrate to HSA was more significant than to hTf. Circular dichroism results demonstrated that the binding of cyclophosphamide to HSA and hTf induced secondary changes in the structure and that the a-helix content became altered into b-sheet, turn and random coil forms. The participation of tyrosyl and tryptophan residues of proteins was also estimated in the drug-HSA and hTf complexes by synchronous fluorescence. The micro-environment of the HSA and hTf fluorophores was transferred to hydrophobic and hydrophilic conditions, respectively. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Forster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.84 nm and 1.73 nm for HSA and hTf, respectively. This confirmed the existence of static quenching for both proteins in the presence of cyclophosphamide monohydrate. Site marker competitive displacement experiments demonstrated that cyclophosphamide bound with high affinity to Site II, sub-domain IIIA of HSA, and for hTf, the C-lobe constituted the binding site. Furthermore, a study of molecular modeling showed that cyclophosphamide situated in domain II in HSA was bound through hydrogen bonding with Arg 257 and Ser 287, and that cyclophosphamide was situated in the C-lobe in h

  19. Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A P; Bennett, M J; Sellers, V M; Andrews, N C; Enns, C A; Bjorkman, P J

    2000-12-08

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) interacts with two proteins important for iron metabolism, transferrin (Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis. A second receptor for Tf, TfR2, was recently identified and found to be functional for iron uptake in transfected cells (Kawabata, H., Germain, R. S., Vuong, P. T., Nakamaki, T., Said, J. W., and Koeffler, H. P. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 16618-16625). TfR2 has a pattern of expression and regulation that is distinct from TfR, and mutations in TfR2 have been recognized as the cause of a non-HFE linked form of hemochromatosis (Camaschella, C., Roetto, A., Cali, A., De Gobbi, M., Garozzo, G., Carella, M., Majorano, N., Totaro, A., and Gasparini, P. (2000) Nat. Genet. 25, 14-15). To investigate the relationship between TfR, TfR2, Tf, and HFE, we performed a series of binding experiments using soluble forms of these proteins. We find no detectable binding between TfR2 and HFE by co-immunoprecipitation or using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay. The affinity of TfR2 for iron-loaded Tf was determined to be 27 nm, 25-fold lower than the affinity of TfR for Tf. These results imply that HFE regulates Tf-mediated iron uptake only from the classical TfR and that TfR2 does not compete for HFE binding in cells expressing both forms of TfR.

  20. Radioprotective effect of transferrin targeted citicoline liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Reddy, Jannapally; Venkateswarlu, Vobalaboina; Koning, Gerben A

    2006-01-01

    The high level of expression of transferrin receptors (Tf-R) on the surface of endothelial cells of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) had been widely utilized to deliver drugs to the brain. The primary aim of this study was to use transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis as a pathway for the rational development of holo-transferrin coupled liposomes for drug targeting to the brain. Citicoline is a neuroprotective agent used clinically to treat for instance Parkinson disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and brain ischemia. Citicoline does not readily cross the BBB because of its strong polar nature. Hence, citicoline was used as a model drug. (Citicoline liposomes have been prepared using dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) by dry lipid film hydration-extrusion method). The effect of the use of liposomes composed of DPPC or DSPC on their citicoline encapsulation efficiency and their stability in vitro were studied. Transferrin was coupled to liposomes by a technique which involves the prevention of scavenging diferric iron atoms of transferrin. The coupling efficiency of transferrin to the liposomes was studied. In vitro evaluation of transferrin-coupled liposomes was performed for their radioprotective effect in radiation treated cell cultures. In this study, OVCAR-3 cells were used as a model cell type over-expressing the Tf-R and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as BBB endothelial cell model. The average diameter of DPPC and DSPC liposomes were 138 +/- 6.3 and 79.0 +/- 3.2 nm, respectively. The citicoline encapsulation capacity of DPPC and DSPC liposomes was 81.8 +/- 12.8 and 54.9 +/- 0.04 microg/micromol of phospholipid, respectively. Liposomes prepared from DSPC showed relatively better stability than DPPC liposomes at 37 degrees C and in the presence of serum. Hence, DSPC liposomes were used for transferrin coupling and an average of 46-55 molecules of transferrin were present per liposome. Free citicoline

  1. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L and heavy (H subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body's iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin.

  2. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  3. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Farshad; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2004-11-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent experiments show: (1) Attributes are registered over the temporal window defined by the perceptual persistence of segregation, resulting in asynchrony in binding, and (2) attention is necessary for correct registration of attributes in the presence of ambiguity.

  4. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent ex...

  5. Control of transferrin expression by β-amyloid through the CP2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Jung-Woong; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee; Kang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Chul Geun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) is one of the most important pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Although Aβ induces neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus through several molecular mechanisms, few studies have evaluated the modulation of transcription factors during Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the transcriptional activity of transcription factor CP2 in neuronal damage mediated by Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ). An unbiased motif search of the transferrin promoter region showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter, an iron-regulating protein, and regulates transferrin transcription. Ectopic expression of CP2 led to increased transferrin expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas knockdown of CP2 down-regulated transferrin mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, CP2 trans-activated transcription of a transferrin reporter gene. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter region. Furthermore, the binding affinity of CP2 to the transferrin promoter was regulated by Aβ, as Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ) markedly increased the binding affinity of CP2 for the transferrin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that CP2 contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by inducing transferrin expression via up-regulating its transcription.

  6. Iron piracy: acquisition of transferrin-bound iron by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, C N; Sparling, P F

    1994-12-01

    The mechanism of iron utilization from transferrin has been most extensively characterized in the pathogenic Neisseria species and Haemophilus species. Two transferrin-binding proteins, Tbp1 and Tbp2, have been identified in these pathogens and are thought to be components of the transferrin receptor. Tbp1 appears to be an integral, TonB-dependent outer membrane protein while Tbp2, a lipoprotein, may be peripherally associated with the outer membrane. The relative contribution of each of these proteins to transferrin binding and utilization is discussed and a model of iron uptake from transferrin is presented. Sequence comparisons of the genes encoding neisserial transferrin-binding proteins suggest that they are probably under positive selection for variation and may have resulted from inter-species genetic exchange.

  7. Maintenance of transferrin polymorphism in pigeons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frelinger, J.A.

    1972-02-01

    Transferrin, a nonheme iron-binding protein, is polymorphic in most vertebrate species that have been examined. In pigeons, it is controlled by an autosomal gene, with two known codominant alleles, Tf/sup A/ and Tf/sup B/. The two alleles are found in nearly equal frequencies and the three genotypes are at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all populations studied. This report shows that ovotransferrins from heterozygous females inhibit microbial growth, by use of yeast as an assay organism, better than ovetransferrins from either of the homozygous types, or those from a mixture of homozygous types. Heterozygous females hatch a larger percentage of their eggs than homozygous females. This difference is probably accounted for by the transferrin effect. The failure of the mixture of the homozygous types to act like the heterozygous type calls into question the currently accepted structure of transferrin as a monomeric protein. The greater fecundity of heterozygous females can account for the maintenance of transferrin polymorphism in pigeons.

  8. Annotating MYC oncogene status with 89Zr-transferrin imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Jason P.; Evans, Michael J.; Rice, Samuel L.; Wongvipat, John; Sawyers, Charles L.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    A non-invasive technology that quantitatively measures the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways could broadly impact cancer diagnosis and treatment using targeted therapies. Here we describe the development of 89Zr-desferrioxamine transferrin (89Zr-Tf), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer that binds the transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, CD71) with high avidity. 89Zr-Tf produces high contrast PET images that quantitatively reflect treatment-induced changes in MYC-regulated T...

  9. Study of the interaction of trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions with human serum transferrin by means of time-resolved laser-fluorescence spectroscopy; Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung trivalenter Actinid- und Lanthanidionen mit humanem Serumtransferrin mittels zeitaufgeloester Laserfluoreszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Nicole

    2015-04-27

    In the present work the complexation of Cm(III), Eu(III) and Am(III) with human serum transferrin is studied. The aim of this work was the identification and the spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of An(III) and Ln(III) transferrin complex species. Different speciation methods, such as time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), luminescence spectroscopy and EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy were applied. Using TRLFS two unambiguously different Cm(III) transferrin species were identified for the first time. In the pH range from 3.5 to 9.7 the Cm(III) transferrin species I is formed revealing complexation of the metal ion at a nonspecific site of the protein surface. In case of the Cm(III) transferrin species II Cm(III) is bound at the Fe(III) binding site of the protein resulting in a 4-fold coordination via amino acid groups of the protein (His, Asp, 2 x Tyr) and coordination of two water molecules and three additional ligands, e.g. OH{sup -} or CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Due to the kinetic and thermodynamic differences of the binding sites of the N- and C-lobe, the experimental conditions ensure exclusive coordination of Cm(III) at the C-terminal binding site. In addition to the complexation studies of Cm(III) with transferrin, the interaction with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTf/2N) as a model component for the transferrin N-lobe was investigated. At pH≥7.4 a Cm(III) hTf/2N species with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site is formed which is comparable to the Cm(III) transferrin species II. An increase of the temperature from room temperature (T=296 K) to physiological temperature (T=310 K) favors the complexation of Cm(III) with both transferrin and hTf/2N. The complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin was investigated at three different carbonate concentrations (c(carbonate){sub tot}=0 mM, 0,23 mM und 25 mM (physiological carbonate concentration)). An increase of the total carbonate

  10. The effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure: A molecular dynamic simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Z; Housaindokht, M R; Bozorgmehr, M R; Izadyar, M

    2016-09-07

    Transferrins have been defined by the highly cooperative binding of iron and a carbonate anion to form a Fe-CO3-Tf ternary complex. As such, the layout of the binding site residues affects transferrin function significantly; In contrast to N-lobe, C-lobe binding site of the transferrin structure has been less characterized and little research which surveyed the interaction of carbonate with transferrin in the C-lobe binding site has been found. In the present work, molecular dynamic simulation was employed to gain access into the molecular level understanding of carbonate binding site and their interactions in each lobe. Residues responsible for carbonate binding of transferrin structure were pointed out. In addition, native human transferrin is a glycoprotein that two N-linked complex glycan chains located in the C-lobe. Usually, in the molecular dynamic simulation for simplifying, glycan is removed from the protein structure. Here, we explore the effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure. Glycosylation appears to have an effect on the layout of the binding site residue and transferrin structure. On the other hand, sometimes the entire transferrin formed by separated lobes that it allows the results to be interpreted in a straightforward manner rather than more parameters required for full length protein. But, it should be noted that there are differences between the separated lobe and full length transferrin, hence, a comparative analysis by the molecular dynamic simulation was performed to investigate such structural variations. Results revealed that separation in C-lobe caused a significant structural variation in comparison to N-lobe. Consequently, the separated lobes and the full length one are different, showing the importance of the interlobe communication and the impact of the lobes on each other in the transferrin structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phosphate inhibits in vitro Fe3+ loading into transferrin by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex: a potential non-transferrin bound iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert J; Seare, Matthew C; Andros, N David; Kenealey, Zachary; Orozco, Catalina Matias; Webb, Michael; Watt, Richard K

    2012-05-01

    In chronic kidney diseases, NTBI can occur even when total iron levels in serum are low and transferrin is not saturated. We postulated that elevated serum phosphate concentrations, present in CKD patients, might disrupt Fe(3+) loading into apo-transferrin by forming Fe(III)-phosphate species. We report that phosphate competes with apo-transferrin for Fe(3+) by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex. Once formed, the Fe(III)-phosphate complex is not a substrate for donating Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin. Phosphate (1-10mM) does not chelate Fe(III) from diferric transferrin under the conditions examined. Complexed forms of Fe(3+), such as iron nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe(3+)-NTA), and Fe(III)-citrate are not susceptible to this phosphate complexation reaction and efficiently deliver Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin in the presence of phosphate. This reaction suggests that citrate might play an important role in protecting against Fe(III), phosphate interactions in vivo. In contrast to the reactions of Fe(3+) and phosphate, the addition of Fe(2+) to a solution of apo-transferrin and phosphate lead to rapid oxidation and deposition of Fe(3+) into apo-transferrin. These in vitro data suggest that, in principle, elevated phosphate concentrations can influence the ability of apo-transferrin to bind iron, depending on the oxidation state of the iron.

  12. Decreased plasma iron in Alzheimer's disease is due to transferrin desaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dominic J; Doecke, James D; Faux, Noel G; Rembach, Alan; Volitakis, Irene; Fowler, Christopher J; Grimm, Rudolf; Doble, Philip A; Cherny, Robert A; Masters, Colin L; Bush, Ashley I; Roberts, Blaine R

    2015-03-18

    Plasma iron levels are decreased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and associated with an idiopathic anemia. We examined iron-binding plasma proteins from AD patients and healthy controls from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) Flagship Study of Ageing using size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Peak area corresponding to transferrin (Tf) saturation was directly compared to routine pathological testing. We found a significant decrease in transferrin-associated iron in AD that was missed by routine pathological tests of transferrin saturation, and that was able to discriminate between AD and controls. The AD cases showed no significant difference in transferrin concentration, only a decrease in total transferrin-bound iron. These findings support that a previously identified decrease in plasma iron levels in AD patients within the AIBL study is attributable to decreased loading of iron into transferrin, and that this subtle but discriminatory change is not observed through routine pathological testing.

  13. Controlling Multivalent Binding through Surface Chemistry: Model Study on Streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although multivalent binding to surfaces is an important tool in nanotechnology, quantitative information about the residual valency and orientation of surface-bound molecules is missing. To address these questions, we study streptavidin (SAv) binding to commonly used biotinylated surfaces such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Stability and kinetics of SAv binding are characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, while the residual valency of immobilized SAv is quantified using spectroscopic ellipsometry by monitoring binding of biotinylated probes. Purpose-designed SAv constructs having controlled valencies (mono-, di-, trivalent in terms of biotin-binding sites) are studied to rationalize the results obtained on regular (tetravalent) SAv. We find that divalent interaction of SAv with biotinylated surfaces is a strict requirement for stable immobilization, while monovalent attachment is reversible and, in the case of SLBs, leads to the extraction of biotinylated lipids from the bilayer. The surface density and lateral mobility of biotin, and the SAv surface coverage are all found to influence the average orientation and residual valency of SAv on a biotinylated surface. We demonstrate how the residual valency can be adjusted to one or two biotin binding sites per immobilized SAv by choosing appropriate surface chemistry. The obtained results provide means for the rational design of surface-confined supramolecular architectures involving specific biointeractions at tunable valency. This knowledge can be used for the development of well-defined bioactive coatings, biosensors and biomimetic model systems. PMID:28234007

  14. The iron-chelating agent picolinic acid enhances transferrin receptors expression in human erythroleukaemic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, U; Louache, F; Titeux, M; Thomopoulos, P; Rochant, H

    1985-07-01

    Picolinic acid, a metal chelating molecule, was administered to human erythroleukaemic cell lines (K 562 and HEL) that were grown in serum-containing media. Picolinic acid inhibited both iron uptake and cell growth. Furthermore, picolinic acid was shown to markedly decrease the level of ferritin in the cells. In spite of the inhibition of cell growth, picolinic acid induced a marked increase in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. This phenomenon was due to a two-five-fold enhancement of the rate of transferrin receptor biosynthesis. Other iron-chelating compounds, capable of reducing the level of intracellular iron, also elicited a marked enhancement of the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. However, the addition of iron, as ferric ammonium citrate, in the culture medium elicited a marked increase in the level of ferritin and a strong decrease in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. On the basis of these data we propose that a feed-back mechanism is involved in the regulation of transferrin receptors: when the cells accumulate iron they decrease the number of transferrin receptors in order to prevent further accumulation of iron; when no or low iron is available to the cells, the number of transferrin receptors markedly increases as a compensatory mechanism.

  15. Effects of transferrin on aromatase activity in porcine granulosa cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Duda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cells have an absolute requirement for iron, which is delivered by transferrin with subsequent intracellular transport via the transferrin receptor. Recent studies have reported that transferrin plays a crucial role in the local regulation of ovarian function, apart from its iron-binding characteristic. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore the possible role of transferrin in porcine granulosa cells function by examining its influence on aromatase activity, the most important indicator of follicular cell differentiation. In the first series of studies, pig granulosa cells isolated from small, immature follicles were cultured in the presence of transferrin alone (10 microg/ml or 100 microg/ml or with the addition of FSH (100ng/ml. The second series of studies was undertaken to determine transferrin-stimulated granulosa cells ability to aromatize exogenous testosterone (1x10(-7M. One hour after the establishment of cultures an aromatase inhibitor CGS16949A was added to test its influence on estradiol production. After 48 hours, cultures were terminated and cells were processed for immunocytochemical staining of aromatase. Media were frozen for further estradiol level analysis. Positive immunostaining for aromatase was found in all granulosa cell cultures. The intensity of immunostaining was always stronger in cultures supplemented with FSH whereas the addition of transferrin had no effect. Granulosa cells in vitro synthesized the highest amount of estradiol after the addition of FSH and exogenous testosterone as measured radioimmunologically. Concomitant treatment with FSH and transferrin caused an inhibition of FSH-stimulated aromatase activity. The production of estradiol also declined in the presence of FSH, testosterone and transferrin. This study demonstrates that transferrin had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on FSH-stimulated aromatase activity, which was confirmed by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicate

  16. Generation of metal-binding staphylococci through surface display of combinatorially engineered cellulose-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernérus, H; Lehtiö, J; Teeri, T; Nygren, P A; Ståhl, S

    2001-10-01

    Ni(2+)-binding staphylococci were generated through surface display of combinatorially engineered variants of a fungal cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from Trichoderma reesei cellulase Cel7A. Novel CBD variants were generated by combinatorial protein engineering through the randomization of 11 amino acid positions, and eight potentially Ni(2+)-binding CBDs were selected by phage display technology. These new variants were subsequently genetically introduced into chimeric surface proteins for surface display on Staphylococcus carnosus cells. The expressed chimeric proteins were shown to be properly targeted to the cell wall of S. carnosus cells, since full-length proteins could be extracted and affinity purified. Surface accessibility for the chimeric proteins was demonstrated, and furthermore, the engineered CBDs, now devoid of cellulose-binding capacity, were shown to be functional with regard to metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococci had gained Ni(2+)-binding capacity. Potential environmental applications for such tailor-made metal-binding bacteria as bioadsorbents in biofilters or biosensors are discussed.

  17. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  18. Kinetics of iron release from transferrin bound to the transferrin receptor at endosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Mason, Anne B

    2012-03-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) is a bilobal glycoprotein that reversibly binds Fe(3+) and delivers it to cells by the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Despite decades of research, the precise events resulting in iron release from each lobe of hTF within the endosome have not been fully delineated. We provide an overview of the kinetics of iron release from hTF±the transferrin receptor (TFR) at endosomal pH (5.6). A critical evaluation of the array of biophysical techniques used to determine accurate rate constants is provided. Delivery of Fe(3+)to actively dividing cells by hTF is essential; too much or too little Fe(3+) directly impacts the well-being of an individual. Because the interaction of hTF with the TFR controls iron distribution in the body, an understanding of this process at the molecular level is essential. Not only does TFR direct the delivery of iron to the cell through the binding of hTF, kinetic data demonstrate that it also modulates iron release from the N- and C-lobes of hTF. Specifically, the TFR balances the rate of iron release from each lobe, resulting in efficient Fe(3+) release within a physiologically relevant time frame. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Molecular Mechanisms of Iron Transport and Disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  20. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia;

    2016-01-01

    across the endothelial cells by transcytosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transferrin transport in cultured bovine brain endothelial cell monolayers. Transferrin receptor mRNA and protein levels were investigated...... in endothelial mono-cultures and co-cultures with astrocytes, as well as in freshly isolated brain capillaries using qPCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Transendothelial transport and luminal association of holo-transferrin was investigated using [125I]holo-transferrin or [59Fe......]-transferrin. Transferrin receptor mRNA expression in all cell culture configurations was lower than in freshly isolated capillaries, but the expression slightly increased during six days of culture. The mRNA expression levels were similar in mono-cultures and co-cultures. Immunostaining demonstrated comparable transferrin...

  1. Bacterial receptors for host transferrin and lactoferrin: molecular mechanisms and role in host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Adamiak, Paul; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2013-12-01

    Iron homeostasis in the mammalian host limits the availability of iron to invading pathogens and is thought to restrict iron availability for microbes inhabiting mucosal surfaces. The presence of surface receptors for the host iron-binding glycoproteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in globally important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of humans and food production animals suggests that Tf and Lf are important sources of iron in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts, where they exclusively reside. Lf receptors have the additional function of protecting against host cationic antimicrobial peptides, suggesting that the bacteria expressing these receptors reside in a niche where exposure is likely. In this review we compare Tf and Lf receptors with respect to their structural and functional features, their role in colonization and infection, and their distribution among pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

  2. Transferrin serves as a mediator to deliver organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Wang, Fuyi

    2013-05-06

    We report herein a systematic study on interactions of organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) (arene = p-cymene (1) or biphenyl (2), en = ethylenediamine) with human transferrin (hTf) and the effects of the hTf-ligation on the bioavailability of these complexes with cisplatin as a reference. Incubated with a 5-fold excess of complex 1, 2, or cisplatin, 1 mol of diferric hTf (holo-hTf) attached 0.62 mol of 1, 1.01 mol of 2, or 2.14 mol of cisplatin. Mass spectrometry revealed that both ruthenium complexes coordinated to N-donors His242, His273, His578, and His606, whereas cisplatin bound to O donors Tyr136 and Tyr317 and S-donor Met256 in addition to His273 and His578 on the surface of both apo- and holo-hTf. Moreover, cisplatin could bind to Thr457 within the C-lobe iron binding cleft of apo-hTf. Neither ruthenium nor platinum binding interfered with the recognition of holo-hTf by the transferrin receptor (TfR). The ruthenated/platinated holo-hTf complexes could be internalized via TfR-mediated endocytosis at a similar rate to that of holo-hTf itself. Moreover, the binding to holo-hTf well preserved the bioavailability of the ruthenium complexes, and the hTf-bound 1 and 2 showed a similar cytotoxicity toward the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 to those of the complexes themselves. However, the conjugation with holo-hTf significantly reduced the cellular uptake of cisplatin and the amount of platinated DNA adducts formed intracellularly, leading to dramatic reduction of cisplatin cytotoxicity toward MCF-7. These findings suggest that hTf can serve as a mediator for the targeting delivery of Ru(arene) anticancer complexes while deactivating cisplatin.

  3. Expression of human transferrin can be regulated effectively by rabbit transferrin regulatory elements in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingbin; Gong, Xiuli; Pan, Shubiao; Guo, Xinbing; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-06-01

    Human transferrin (hTF) belongs to the iron-binding glycoprotein family. It plays an important role in iron transport throughout the body. Transgenic mice are a good model to study how to produce functional hTF on a large-scale. We have improved the expression of hTF and investigated its regulatory mechanism in transgenic mice. Three expression constructs were prepared in which hTF expression was controlled by different regulatory cassettes of rabbit transferrin (rTF). hTF was secreted into serum of transgenic mice when its expression was controlled by the rTF promoter and enhancer, whereas the rTF enhancer in tandem with the rTF promoter repressed hTF secretion into milk. A significant inverse relationship between methylation of the rTF promoter and hTF expression was observed in liver, heart, mammary gland, and muscle of transgenic mice. The highest concentration of hTF was 700 μg/ml in milk.

  4. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P.; Gorman-Lewis, D.; Aryal, B. P.; Paunesku, T.; Vogt, S.; Rickert, P. G.; Seifert, S.; Lai, B.; Woloschak, G. E.; Soderholm, L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( XSD); (Univ. of Chicago); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2011-08-01

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway -- receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu{sub c}Fe{sub N}Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  5. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Rickert, Paul G; Seifert, Soenke; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E; Soderholm, L

    2011-06-26

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway--receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu(C)Fe(N)Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  6. Relativistic tight-binding model: Application to Pt surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernatinsky, A.; Halley, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    We report a parametrization of a previous self-consistent tight-binding model, suitable for metals with a high atomic number in which nonscalar-relativistic effects are significant in the electron physics of condensed phases. The method is applied to platinum. The model is fitted to density functional theory band structures and cohesive energies and spectroscopic data on platinum atoms in five oxidation states, and is then shown without further parametrization to correctly reproduce several low index surface structures. We also predict reconstructions of some vicinal surfaces.

  7. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of calspermin-calmodulin binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew J; Kemp, Fred; Love, John

    2008-05-01

    We cloned, expressed, and purified a chimeric fusion between a soluble green fluorescent protein (smGFP) and the calmodulin binding protein calspermin. We have shown that the fusion protein, labeled smGN, has a K(i) in the calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity assay of 1.97 nM, i.e., 3800 times smaller than that of the commonly used calmodulin inhibitor W7. Association and dissociation rate constants (k(a) and k(d)) and the dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) of smGN for calmodulin were determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The k(a)=1.24 x 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), the k(d)=5.49 x 10(-3)s(-1), and the K(D)=4.42 x 10(-9)M. We also found that the GFP moiety was important for successfully binding calspermin to the surface of the CM5 flow cell at a sufficiently high concentration for SPR, and that this procedure may be used for SPR analysis of other acidic polypeptides, whose pIliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, indicating a high level of specificity. We conclude that the high affinity and specific binding between smGN and calmodulin make it an easily localized recombinant alternative to chemical calmodulin inhibitors.

  9. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hilary Denis

    2012-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important public health problem, with major implications in patients with a pre-existing liver pathology of viral origin. Hepatitis C, for example, is one of the diseases in which alcohol consumption can lead to the transition from a fairly benign outline to a potentially life-threatening liver disease. Alcohol abuse is usually identified on the basis of clinical judgment, alcoholism related questionnaires, laboratory tests and, more recently, biomarkers. Also on this list of tests, carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) is widely available and useful for determining recent alcohol consumption, particularly when corroborated with elevation of other liver-associated enzymes. Clinicians should be aware of the indications and limitations of this test in order to better evaluate alcohol consumption in their patients.

  10. Structural Signatures of Enzyme Binding Pockets from Order-Independent Surface Alignment: A Study of Metalloendopeptidase and NAD Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Joe; Adamian, Larisa; Liang, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Detecting similarities between local binding surfaces can facilitate identification of enzyme binding sites, prediction of enzyme functions, as well as aid in our understanding of enzyme mechanisms. A challenging task is to construct a template of local surface characteristics for a specific enzyme function or binding activity, as the size and shape of binding surfaces of a biochemical function often varies. Here we introduce the concept of signature binding pockets, which captures information about preserved and varied atomic positions at multi-resolution levels. For proteins with complex enzyme binding and activity, multiple signatures arise naturally in our model, which form a signature basis set that characterize this class of proteins. Both signatures and signature basis set can be automatically constructed by a method called Solar (Signature Of Local Active Regions). This method is based on a sequence order independent alignment of computed binding surface pockets. Solar also provides a structure based multiple sequence fragment alignment (MSFA) to facilitate interpretation of computed signatures. For studying a family of evolutionary related proteins, we show that for metzincin metalloendopeptidase, which has a broad spectrum of substrate binding, signature and basis set pockets can be used to discriminate metzincins from other enzymes, to predict the subclass of enzyme functions, and to identify the specific binding surfaces. For studying unrelated proteins which have evolved to bind to the same NAD co-factor, signatures of NAD binding pockets can be constructed and can be used to predict NAD binding proteins and to locate NAD binding pockets. By measuring preservation ratio and location variation, our method can identify residues and atoms important for binding affinity and specificity. In both cases, we show that signatures and signature basis set reveal significant biological insight. PMID:21145898

  11. Instrumental comparison of the determination of Cr³+ uptake by human transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    UV-VIS absorbance, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy (PB/HC-OES) are presented as techniques for determining Cr³+ loading into transferrin (Tf), with and without Fe³+. The methods are compared based on loading percentages (i.e. 100% loading would be equal to 2 M(n+): 1 Tf) determined for Cr³+ loading into apo-transferrin. Spectral interferences and overlapping LMCT bands cause inaccurate chromium (qualitative) and iron (qualitative and quantitative) results for the UV-VIS absorbance method. The ICP-OES and PB/HC-OES methods are in good agreement providing evidence that the PB/HC-OES method is a valid technique for investigating metal-protein complexes. Maximum Cr³+ loading into apo-transferrin over a 24 h period was determined to be 26.8 3.5% by the ICP-OES method and 25.3 2.2% by the PB/HC-OES method. Loading percentages were increased to 49.7 1.9% (ICP-OES) and 55.7 3.2% (PB/HC-OES) when the metal-transferrin solution was allowed to incubate for up to 10 days. Under non-excess carbonate conditions the Cr³+ loading is elevated over a 24 h incubation time, but under physiological conditions the loading is inhibited. Equal loading of Fe³+ and Cr³+ into apo-transferrin was achieved when chromium was at a level more than 5 times in excess of iron. Inhibition of Cr³+ loading was only observed when an excess of Fe³+ was available to bind into apo-transferrin. The ability for Cr³+ to displace Fe3+ from holo-transferrin was observed as small amounts of Cr³+ were loaded into the once occupied metal binding site.

  12. Iron metabolism in BeWo chorion carcinoma cells. Transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ende, A; du Maine, A; Simmons, C F; Schwartz, A L; Strous, G J

    1987-06-25

    Growing human choriocarcinoma BeWo b24 cells contain 1.5 X 10(6) functional cell surface transferrin binding sites and 2.0 X 10(6) intracellular binding sites. These cells rapidly accumulate iron at a rate of 360,000 iron atoms/min/cell. During iron uptake the transferrin and its receptor recycle at least each 19 min. The accumulated iron is released from the BeWo cells at a considerable rate. The time required to release 50% of previously accumulated iron into the extracellular medium is 30 h. This release process is cell line-specific as HeLa cells release very little if any iron. The release of iron by BeWo cells is stimulated by exogenous chelators such as apotransferrin, diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, desferral, and apolactoferrin. The time required to release 50% of the previously accumulated iron into medium supplemented with chelator is 15 h. In the absence of added chelators iron is released as a low molecular weight complex, whereas in the presence of chelator the iron is found complexed to the chelator. Uptake of iron is inhibited by 250 microM primaquine or 2.5 microM monensin. However, the release of iron is not inhibited by these drugs. Intracellular iron is stored bound to ferritin. A model for the release of iron by BeWo cells and its implication for transplacental iron transport is discussed.

  13. The role of hepatic transferrin receptor 2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christal A Worthen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine tuning of body iron is required to prevent diseases such as iron-overload and anemia. The putative iron-sensor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, is expressed in the liver and mutations in this protein result in the iron-overload disease Type III hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. With the loss of functional TfR2, the liver produces about two-fold less of the peptide hormone hepcidin, which is responsible for negatively regulating iron uptake from the diet. This reduction in hepcidin expression leads to the slow accumulation of iron in the liver, heart, joints, and pancreas and subsequent cirrhosis, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. TfR2 can bind iron-loaded transferrin in the bloodstream, and hepatocytes treated with transferrin respond with a two-fold increase in hepcidin expression through stimulation of the BMP-signaling pathway. Loss of functional TfR2 or its binding partner, the original HH protein (HFE, results in a loss of this transferrin-sensitivity. While much is known about the trafficking and regulation of TfR2, the mechanism of its transferrin-sensitivity through the BMP-signaling pathway is still not known.

  14. Adaptation of transferrin protein and glycan synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Jong (Gerard); W.L. van Noort (W.); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.M.H. de Jeu-Jaspars (Nel); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe report the patterns of variability in transferrin structure in pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, women using oral contraceptives, nonanaemic rheumatoid arthritis, iron deficient rheumatoid arthritis and anemia of the chronic diseases. Changes in microheterogeneity were assessed by cr

  15. Adaptation of transferrin protein and glycan synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Jong (Gerard); W.L. van Noort (W.); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.M.H. de Jeu-Jaspars (Nel); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe report the patterns of variability in transferrin structure in pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, women using oral contraceptives, nonanaemic rheumatoid arthritis, iron deficient rheumatoid arthritis and anemia of the chronic diseases. Changes in microheterogeneity were assessed by

  16. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  17. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  18. [Improvement of carbohydrate deficient transferrin measurement by capillary zone electrophoresis using immunosubtraction of immunoglobulins and transferrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraud, J; Schellenberg, F; Pagès, J-C

    2009-01-01

    CDT (Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin) is considered as the most efficient biomarker of alcohol abuse available for routine use. Among the various methods developed for its measurement, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) on the multicapillary analyzer Capillarys2 provides high quality results at high throughput. However, the non CDT specific measurement of protein absorbance at 200 nm may bring abnormal profiles in samples from patients with high polyclonal immunoglobulin level or monoclonal component. We evaluated the automated immunosubtraction procedure developed by the manufacturer in 48 samples with abnormal electrophoretic profiles that potentially could interfere with CZE measurement of CDT. Elimination of the serum immunoglobulins raised the number of interpretable profiles from 19 (40%) to 37 (77%). The immunosubtraction procedure failed in samples with a monoclonal component present at a concentration > 60 g/L and in some samples harbouring a partially degraded C3 fraction. Six samples identified as genetic BC transferrin variants were also included in the study and submitted to an automated transferrin subtraction procedure to ascertain whether the additional peak were actually transferrin glycoforms. After treatment, two samples were classified as homozygote C for transferrin due to the persistence of one of the supposed transferrin peak. In conclusion, immunoglobulin and transferrin subtraction allow a better CDT measurement in most samples with interfering monoclonal components and avoid misclassification of suspected transferrin BC or CD variants.

  19. Iron-independent neuronal expression of transferrin receptor mRNA in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Oates, Phillip S.; Morgan, Evan H.

    1999-01-01

    Hemochromatosis, hippocampus, in situ hybridization, iron deficiency, neurodegeneration, transferrin......Hemochromatosis, hippocampus, in situ hybridization, iron deficiency, neurodegeneration, transferrin...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus immunodominant surface antigen B is a cell-surface associated nucleic acid binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerca Nuno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus immunodominant surface antigen B (IsaB elicits an immune response during septicemia and is generally classified as a virulence factor, but its biological function remains completely undefined. In an attempt to identify staphylococcal RNA-binding proteins, we designed an RNA Affinity Chromatography assay and subsequently isolated IsaB. Results Western analysis indicated that IsaB was both secreted and cell-surface associated. Gel Shift analysis confirmed the RNA binding activity but revealed that IsaB bound to any nucleic acid without sequence specificity. IsaB exhibited the highest affinity for double-stranded DNA followed by single-stranded DNA and RNA. Because extracellular DNA has been shown to play a role in biofilm formation, we investigated the biofilm-forming capacity of an isogenic isaB deletion mutant but we found that IsaB did not contribute to biofilm formation under any conditions tested. Conclusion IsaB is an extracellular nucleic acid binding protein, with little to no sequence specificity, but its role in virulence remains unclear.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction mechanisms between mono-caffeoylquinic acids and transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanqing; Dong, Jing; Chen, Shizhong; Liu, Meixian; Wang, Daidong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Wang, Hong; Lin, Zongtao

    2017-06-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is an important protein responsible for circulating and transporting iron into cytoplasm. Tf can be taken into cells through endocytosis mediated by Tf receptor, which usually overexpresses in cancer cells. The Tf-Tf receptor pathway opens a possible avenue for novel targeted cancer therapy by utilizing Tf-binding active compounds. Among which, anti-cancer active caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) were recently found to be promising Tf-binders by our group. For better understanding the anti-cancer activities of CQAs, it is important to unveil the binding mechanisms between CQAs and Tf. In this study, the fluorescence quenching, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking were used to investigate the interactions between CQA and Tf. The results showed that the calculated apparent association constants of interactions between 1-, 3-, 4- and 5-CQA and Tf at 298 K were 7.97 × 105 M- 1, 4.36 × 107 M- 1, 6.58 × 105 M- 1 and 4.42 × 106 M- 1, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the interaction between 1-, 3-, 5-CQA and Tf is due to H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions were likely involved in the binding of 4-CQA and Tf. The CD results indicated that bindings of 1-CQA, 4-CQA and 5-CQA with Tf resulted in more stretched β-turn and random coil translated from β-sheet. In contrast, 3-CQA led to more stable a-helix conformation. Molecular docking studies of CQAs with Tf further displayed that CQAs were able to interact with residues near Fe3 + binding site. The spectroscopic studies revealed the action mechanisms, thermodynamics and interacting forces between CQAs and Tf, and thus are helpful for future design and discovery of Tf-binders for targeted cancer therapy applying Tf-Tf receptor pathway.

  2. Interaction of imatinib mesylate with human serum transferrin: The comparative spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska-Hill, Urszula

    2017-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Imt) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph + CML). Human serum transferrin is the most abundant serum protein responsible for the transport of iron ions and many endogenous and exogenous ligands. In this study the mechanism of interactions between the imatinib mesylate and all states of transferrin (apo-Tf, Htf and holo-Tf) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), circular dichroism (CD) and zeta potential spectroscopic methods. Based on the experimental results it was proved that under physiological conditions the imatinib mesylate binds to the each form of transferrin with a binding constant c.a. 105 M- 1. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals were involved in the interaction of apo-Tf with the drug and hydrophobic and ionic strength participate in the reaction of Htf and holo-Tf with imatinib mesylate. Moreover, it was shown that common metal ions, Zn2 + and Ca2 + strongly influenced apo-Tf-Imt binding constant. The CD studies showed that there are no conformational changes in the secondary structure of the proteins. No significant changes in secondary structure of the proteins upon binding with the drug and instability of apo-Tf-Imt system are the desirable effects from pharmacological point of view.

  3. Interaction of Cm(III) and Am(III) with human serum transferrin studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicole; Fröhlich, Daniel R; Panak, Petra J

    2014-05-14

    The complexation of Cm(III) with human serum transferrin was investigated in a pH range from 3.5 to 11.0 using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). At pH ≥ 7.4 Cm(III) is incorporated at the Fe(III) binding site of transferrin whereas at lower pH a partially bound Cm(III) transferrin species is formed. At physiological temperature (310 K) at pH 7.4, about 70% of the partially bound and 30% of the incorporated Cm(III) transferrin species are present in solution. The Cm(III) results obtained by TRLFS are in very good agreement with Am(III) EXAFS results, confirming the incorporation of Am(III) at the Fe(III) binding site at pH 8.5.

  4. Atomic force microscopy study of cellulose surface interaction controlled by cellulose binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nigmatullin, R.; Lovitt, R.; Wright, C; Linder, M.; Nakari-Setälä, T; Gama, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy has been used to study the interaction between model cellulose surfaces and the role of cellulose binding domain (CBD), peptides specifically binding to cellulose, in interfacial interaction of cellulose surfaces modified with CBDs. The interaction between pure cellulose surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solution is dominated by double layer repulsive forces with the range and magnitude of the net force dependent on electrolyte concentration. AFM imaging reve...

  5. Adherence of platelets to in situ albumin-binding surfaces under flow conditions: role of surface-adsorbed albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Miller, Robert; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Surfaces that preferentially bind human serum albumin (HSA) were generated by grafting albumin-binding linear peptide (LP1) onto silicon surfaces. The research aim was to evaluate the adsorption pattern of proteins and the adhesion of platelets from platelet-poor plasma and platelet-rich plasma, respectively, by albumin-binding surfaces under physiological shear rate (96 and 319 s(-1)) conditions. Bound proteins were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A ratio of ∼1000:100:1 of adsorbed HSA, human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFib) was noted, respectively, on LP1-functionalized surfaces, and a ratio of ∼5:2:1 of the same was noted on control surfaces, as confirmed by ELISAs. The surface-adsorbed von Willebrand factor was undetectable by sensitive ELISAs. The amount of adhered platelets correlated with the ratio of adsorbed HSA/HFib. Platelet morphology was more rounded on LP1-functionalized surfaces when compared to control surfaces. The platelet adhesion response on albumin-binding surfaces can be explained by the reduction in the co-adsorption of other plasma proteins in a surface environment where there is an excess of albumin molecules, coupled with restrictions in the conformational transitions of other surface-adsorbed proteins into hemostatically active forms.

  6. XPS investigation of DNA binding to zirconium-phosphonate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Sarah M; Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Bujoli, Bruno; Talham, Daniel R

    2007-07-01

    The surface coverage of phosphorylated oligonucleotides immobilized on a zirconium-phosphonate surface was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By quantifying the intensity of the N 1s signal originating from the oligonucleotide and the Zr 3d peak from the metal-phosphonate surface, the surface coverage of the oligonucleotide could be calculated with a modified substrate-overlayer model. We found relatively low surface coverages indicating that once covalently bound via the terminal phosphate the polymer chain further physisorbs to the surface limiting the adsorption of additional molecules.

  7. Regulation of endocytic trafficking of transferrin receptor by optineurin and its impairment by a glaucoma-associated mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangaraj Nandini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optineurin is a multifunctional protein involved in several functions such as vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the plasma membrane, NF-κB regulation, signal transduction and gene expression. Mutations in optineurin are associated with glaucoma, a neurodegenerative eye disease that causes blindness. Genetic evidence suggests that the E50K (Glu50Lys is a dominant disease-causing mutation of optineurin. However, functional alterations caused by mutations in optineurin are not known. Here, we have analyzed the role of optineurin in endocytic recycling and the effect of E50K mutant on this process. Results We show that the knockdown of optineurin impairs trafficking of transferrin receptor to the juxtanuclear region. A point mutation (D474N in the ubiquitin-binding domain abrogates localization of optineurin to the recycling endosomes and interaction with transferrin receptor. The function of ubiquitin-binding domain of optineurin is also needed for trafficking of transferrin to the juxtanuclear region. A disease causing mutation, E50K, impairs endocytic recycling of transferrin receptor as shown by enlarged recycling endosomes, slower dynamics of E50K vesicles and decreased transferrin uptake by the E50K-expressing cells. This impaired trafficking by the E50K mutant requires the function of its ubiquitin-binding domain. Compared to wild type optineurin, the E50K optineurin shows enhanced interaction and colocalization with transferrin receptor and Rab8. The velocity of Rab8 vesicles is reduced by co-expression of the E50K mutant. These results suggest that the E50K mutant affects Rab8-mediated transferrin receptor trafficking. Conclusions Our results suggest that optineurin regulates endocytic trafficking of transferrin receptor to the juxtanuclear region. The E50K mutant impairs trafficking at the recycling endosomes due to altered interactions with Rab8 and transferrin receptor. These results also have implications for

  8. Experimental treatment of breast cancer-bearing BALB/c mice by artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Amir; Faezizadeh, Zohreh; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Ali Reza; Saravani, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    The combination of artemisinin and transferrin exhibits versatile anticancer activities. In previous, we successfully prepared artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes and evaluated their anti-proliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines in vitro. In this study, we investigate the in vivo anti-breast cancer activity of artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposome against breast transplanted tumors in BALB/c mice model. Artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes were prepared and characterized for some physiochemical properties. Pieces of tumor tissue from the breast cancer-bearing BALB/c mice were transplanted subcutaneously to the syngeneic female BALB/c mice. In the presence of the external magnet that placed at the breast tumor site, the tissue distribution and tumor-suppressing effects of prepared nanoliposomes on tumor growth was evaluated. The prepared nanoliposomes have fine spherical shape, rough surface, nano-sized diameter and magnetic properties. At 2 h after treatment, the intravenous administration of artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes followed using the magnetic field approximately produced 10- and 5.5-fold higher levels of artemisinin and transferrin in the tumors, respectively, compared with free artemisinin and transferrin. Moreover, in the presence of an external magnetic field, the prepared nanoliposomes could significantly induce apoptosis in the mice breast cancer cells as well as could reduce tumor volume in tumorized mice at 15 days after treatment. The data suggested that the artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes would be a good choice for the breast tumor-targeted therapy, due to its high targeting efficiency.

  9. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  10. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  11. Surface selective binding of nanoclay particles to polyampholyte protein chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H. B.

    2009-07-01

    Binding of nanoclay (Laponite) to gelatin-A and gelatin-B (both polyampholytes) molecules was investigated at room temperature (25 °C) both experimentally and theoretically. The stoichiometric binding ratio between gelatin and Laponite was found to be strongly dependent on the solution ionic strength. Large soluble complexes were formed at higher ionic strengths of the solution, a result supported by data obtained from light scattering, viscosity, and zeta potential measurements. The binding problem was theoretically modeled by choosing a suitable two-body screened Coulomb potential, U(R+)=(q-/2ɛ)[(Q-/R-)e-kR--(Q+/R+)e-kR+], where the protein dipole has charges Q+ and Q_ that are located at distances R+ and R_ from the point Laponite charge q- and the dispersion liquid has dielectric constant (ɛ). U(R+) accounted for electrostatic interactions between a dipole (protein molecule) and an effective charge (Laponite particle) located at an angular position θ. Gelatin-A and Laponite association was facilitated by a strong attractive interaction potential that led to preferential binding of the biopolymer chains to negatively charged face of Laponite particles. In the case of gelatin-B selective surf ace patch binding dominated the process where the positively charged rim and negatively charged face of the particles were selectively bound to the oppositely charged segments of the biopolymer. The equilibrium separation (Re) between the protein and nanoclay particle revealed monovalent salt concentration dependence given by Re˜[NaCl]α where α =0.6±0.2 for gelatin-A and α =0.4±0.2 for gelatin-B systems. The equilibrium separations were ≈30% less compared to the gelatin-A system implying preferential short-range ordering of the gelatin-B-nanoclay pair in the solvent.

  12. Coating Nanoparticles with Plant-Produced Transferrin-Hydrophobin Fusion Protein Enhances Their Uptake in Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Lauri J.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Makila, Ermei M.

    2017-01-01

    to a surfactant phase in an aqueous two-phase system, and the transferrin moiety was able to reversibly bind iron. Coating porous silicon nanoparticles with the fusion protein resulted in uptake of the nanoparticles in human cancer cells. This study provides a proof-of concept for the functionalization...

  13. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH2 groups (CONH2-SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH2-SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  14. The glycation site specificity of human serum transferrin is a determinant for transferrin's functional impairment under elevated glycaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, André M N; Sousa, Paulo R H; Coimbra, João T S; Brás, Natércia F; Vitorino, Rui; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms involving iron toxicity in diabetes mellitus are not completely understood. However, the spontaneous reaction of reducing sugars with protein amino groups, known as glycation, has been shown to compromise the action of Tf (transferrin), the systemic iron transporter. In order to understand the structural alterations that impair its function, Tf was glycated in vitro and the modification sites were determined by MS. Iron binding to glycated Tf was assessed and a computational approach was conducted to study how glycation influences the iron-binding capacity of this protein. Glycated Tf samples were found to bind iron less avidly than non-modified Tf and MS results revealed 12 glycation sites, allowing the establishment of Lys534 and Lys206 as the most vulnerable residues to this modification. Their increased susceptibility to glycation was found to relate to their low side-chain pKa values. Lys534 and Lys206 participate in hydrogen bonding crucial for iron stabilization in the C- and N-lobes of the protein respectively, and their modification is bound to influence iron binding. Furthermore, the orientation of the glucose residues at these sites blocks the entrance to the iron-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations also suggested that additional loss of iron binding capacity may result from the stereochemical effects induced by the glycation of lysine residues that prevent the conformational changes (from open to closed Tf forms) required for metal binding. Altogether, the results indicate that Tf is particularly vulnerable to glycation and that this modification targets spots that are particularly relevant to its function.

  15. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniyal, Shweta; Chand, Manesh; Joshi, Subodh; Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  16. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, Memed, E-mail: memi@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces.

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Antifungal Azoles Binding to CYP3A4 with Kinetic Resolution of Multiple Binding Orientations†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Josh T.; Hill, John J.; Swank, Jennifer; Isoherranen, Nina; Kunze, Kent L.; Atkins, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The heme-containing Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are a major enzymatic determinant of drug clearance and drug-drug interactions. The CYP3A4 isoform is inhibited by antifungal imidazoles or triazoles, which form low spin heme iron complexes via formation of a nitrogen-ferric iron coordinate bond. However, CYP3A4 also slowly oxidizes the antifungal itraconazole (ITZ) at a site that is ∼ 25 Å from the triazole nitrogens, suggesting that large antifungal azoles can adopt multiple orientations within the CYP3A4 active site. Here, we report a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis with kinetic resolution of two binding modes of ITZ, and the related drug ketoconazole (KTZ). SPR reveals a very slow off-rate for one binding orientation. Multiphasic binding kinetics are observed and one of the two binding components resolved by curve-fitting exhibits ‘equilibrium overshoot’. Pre-loading of CYP3A4 with the heme ligand imidazole abolishes this component of the antifungal azole binding trajectories, and it eliminates the conspicuously slow off-rate. The fractional populations of CYP3A4 complexes corresponding to different drug orientations can be manipulated by altering the duration of the pulse of drug exposure. UV-vis difference absorbance titrations yield low spin spectra and KD values that are consistent with the high affinity complex resolved by SPR. These results demonstrate that ITZ and KTZ bind in multiple orientations, including a catalytically productive mode and a slowly-dissociating inhibitory mode. Most importantly, they provide the first example of an SPR-based method for the kinetic characterization of drug binding to any human CYP, including mechanistic insight not available from other methods. PMID:16700545

  18. Elucidation of the Mechanism by Which Catecholamine Stress Hormones Liberate Iron from the Innate Immune Defense Proteins Transferrin and Lactoferrin ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, Sara M.; Shergill, Raminder; Woodward, Jonathan; Muralikuttan, Remya; Haigh, Richard D.; Lyte, Mark; Freestone, Primrose P.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of catecholamine stress hormones and inotropes to stimulate the growth of infectious bacteria is now well established. A major element of the growth induction process has been shown to involve the catecholamines binding to the high-affinity ferric-iron-binding proteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin, which then enables bacterial acquisition of normally inaccessible sequestered host iron. The nature of the mechanism(s) by which the stress hormones perturb iron binding of these key innate immune defense proteins has not been fully elucidated. The present study employed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical iron-binding analyses to demonstrate that catecholamine stress hormones form direct complexes with the ferric iron within transferrin and lactoferrin. Moreover, these complexes were shown to result in the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) and the loss of protein-complexed iron. The use of bacterial ferric iron uptake mutants further showed that both the Fe(II) and Fe(III) released from the Tf could be directly used as bacterial nutrient sources. We also analyzed the transferrin-catecholamine interactions in human serum and found that therapeutically relevant concentrations of stress hormones and inotropes could directly affect the iron binding of serum-transferrin so that the normally highly bacteriostatic tissue fluid became significantly more supportive of the growth of bacteria. The relevance of these catecholamine-transferrin/lactoferrin interactions to the infectious disease process is considered. PMID:19820086

  19. Binding of Solvent Molecules to a Protein Surface in Binary Mixtures Follows a Competitive Langmuir Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulschewski, Tobias; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-09-06

    The binding of solvent molecules to a protein surface was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations of of Candida antarctica (C. antarctica) lipase B in binary mixtures of water, methanol, and toluene. Two models were analyzed: a competitive Langmuir model which assumes identical solvent binding sites with a different affinity toward water (KWat), methanol (KMet), and toluene (KTol) and a competitive Langmuir model with an additional interaction between free water and already bound water (KWatWat). The numbers of protein-bound molecules of both components of a binary mixture were determined for different compositions as a function of their thermodynamic activities in the bulk phase, and the binding constants were simultaneously fitted to the six binding curves (two components of three different mixtures). For both Langmuir models, the values of KWat, KMet, and KTol were highly correlated. The highest binding affinity was found for methanol, which was almost 4-fold higher than the binding affinities of water and toluene (KMet ≫ KWat ≈ KTol). Binding of water was dominated by the water-water interaction (KWatWat). Even for the three protein surface patches of highest water affinity, the binding affinity of methanol was 2-fold higher than water and 8-fold higher than toluene (KMet > KWat > KTol). The Langmuir model provides insights into the protein destabilizing mechanism of methanol which has a high binding affinity toward the protein surface. Thus, destabilizing solvents compete with intraprotein interactions and disrupt the tertiary structure. In contrast, benign solvents such as water or toluene have a low affinity toward the protein surface. Water is a special solvent: only few water molecules bind directly to the protein; most water molecules bind to already bound water molecules thus forming water patches. A quantitative mechanistic model of protein-solvent interactions that includes competition and miscibility of the components contributes a robust basis

  20. A general scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on binary transition metal surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    A simple scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on transition metal surface alloys is presented. It is shown that a d-band center model of the alloy surfaces is a convenient and appropriate basis for this scheme; variations in chemical composition, strain effects, and ligand effects...... for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on a wide variety of transition metal alloys. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transferrin levels aids in the diagnosis of malnutrition, acute inflammation, infection, and red blood cell disorders, such as iron deficiency anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M.; Christiansen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch...... to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert...

  3. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design.

  4. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  5. Transport and expression in human melanomas of a transferrin-like glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food, M R; Rothenberger, S; Gabathuler, R; Haidl, I D; Reid, G; Jefferies, W A

    1994-01-28

    Melanotransferrin, also called p97, is a cell surface glycoprotein which was first described as a marker antigen for human melanoma cells. Although p97 has a striking structural similarity to human serum transferrin and lactoferrin, its function has not yet been determined. One feature that distinguishes p97 from the other members of the transferrin family is the presence of a stretch of 24 hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus, previously assumed to form a proteinacious transmembrane domain. In this study, sensitivity to bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, biosynthetic labeling with [3H]ethanolamine, and partitioning in Triton X-114 are used to establish that p97 is expressed at the cell surface as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In addition, to gain insight into the intracellular transport of p97, biosynthetic transport studies were performed on a melanoma cell line. These studies resulted in the identification of an additional form of p97 which is found in the medium and which likely does not originate from an alternatively spliced form of the p97 mRNA. These findings, together with our recent observation of the co-localization of p97 and the transferrin receptor in brain capillary endothelium (W. A. Jefferies, M. R. Food, R. Gabathuler, S. Rothenberger, T. Yamada, and P. L. McGeer, manuscript submitted) raise important questions about the function of the two forms of p97 detected and the possible involvement of this protein in a cellular iron uptake mechanism that is independent from the transferrin/transferrin receptor system.

  6. DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography of human serum: use for purification of native transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, P A; Galbraith, R M; Arnaud, P

    1983-10-01

    Human serum was subjected to chromatography on DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue which combines ion-exchange and pseudo-ligand-affinity chromatography in a 0.02 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. All serum proteins were bound with the exception of transferrin, IgG (immunoglobulin G) and trace amounts of IgA. After a second step of Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, or affinity chromatography against goat anti-human IgG F(ab')2 coupled to AH-Sepharose 4B, IgG and IgA were removed. The transferrin obtained was homogeneous and of high yield (greater than 80%), and was unaltered as judged by analyses of molecular weight, isoelectric point, iron-binding capacity, antigenicity, and ability to bind to high-affinity specific cellular receptors. Thus, DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography may be used as the basis for a simple, rapid, two-step method for the purification of large amounts of native transferrin from serum.

  7. Roles of multiple surface sites, long substrate binding clefts, and carbohydrate binding modules in the action of amylolytic enzymes on polysaccharide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, E.S.; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2008-01-01

    with a characteristic subsite binding energy profile around the catalytic site. Furthermore, several amylolytic enzymes that facilitate attack on the natural substrate, i.e. the endosperm starch granules, have secondary sugar binding sites either situated on the surface of the protein domain or structural unit...... that contains the catalytic site or belonging to a separate starch binding domain. The role of surface sites in the function of barley alpha-amylase 1 has been investigated by using mutational analysis in conjunction with carbohydrate binding analyses and crystallography. The ability to bind starch depends...

  8. Elevated transferrin saturation and risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Andersen, Henrik Ullits;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that elevated transferrin saturation is associated with an increased risk of any form of diabetes, as well as type 1 or type 2 diabetes separately. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used two general population studies, The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS, N = 9......,121) and The Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS, N = 24,195), as well as a 1:1 age- and sex-matched population-based case-control study with 6,129 patients with diabetes from the Steno Diabetes Centre and 6,129 control subjects, totaling 8,535 patients with diabetes and 37,039 control subjects. RESULTS...

  9. Iron uptake by melanoma cells from the soluble form of the transferrin homologue, melanotransferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food, Michael R; Des Richardson, R

    2002-01-01

    Melanotransferrin (MTf) is a membrane-bound transferrin (Tf) homologue that can also exist in a soluble form (sMTf). Considering the high homology of MTf to Tf, it is possible to suggest that sMTf could bind to the high affinity transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) or lower affinity TfR2. We have used sMTf labelled with 59Fe to examine its ability to donate Fe to cells. Our experiments demonstrate that sMTf is far less effective than Tf at donating Fe to cells and this does not occur via specific receptors. Indeed, the uptake of sMTf by cells occurred via a non-specific process (e.g. adsorptive pinocytosis).

  10. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  11. SIgA binding to mucosal surfaces is mediated by mucin-mucin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L Gibbins

    Full Text Available The oral mucosal pellicle is a layer of absorbed salivary proteins, including secretory IgA (SIgA, bound onto the surface of oral epithelial cells and is a useful model for all mucosal surfaces. The mechanism by which SIgA concentrates on mucosal surfaces is examined here using a tissue culture model with real saliva. Salivary mucins may initiate the formation of the mucosal pellicle through interactions with membrane-bound mucins on cells. Further protein interactions with mucins may then trigger binding of other pellicle proteins. HT29 colon cell lines, which when treated with methotrexate (HT29-MTX produce a gel-forming mucin, were used to determine the importance of these mucin-mucin interactions. Binding of SIgA to cells was then compared using whole mouth saliva, parotid (mucin-free saliva and a source of purified SIgA. Greatest SIgA binding occurred when WMS was incubated with HT29-MTX expressing mucus. Since salivary MUC5B was only able to bind to cells which produced mucus and purified SIgA showed little binding to the same cells we conclude that most SIgA binding to mucosal cells occurs because SIgA forms complexes with salivary mucins which then bind to cells expressing membrane-bound mucins. This work highlights the importance of mucin interactions in the development of the mucosal pellicle.

  12. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  13. Nanopatterned submicron pores as a shield for nonspecific binding in surface plasmon resonance-based sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Marchesini, Gerardo R.; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Colpo, Pascal; Garcia, Cesar Pascual; Guidetti, Guido; Norde, Willem; Rossi, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel approach to tackle the most common drawback of using surface plasmon resonance for analyte screening in complex biological matrices - the nonspecific binding to the sensor chip surface. By using a perforated membrane supported by a polymeric gel structure at the evanescent wave pe

  14. Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Koduri, R S; Han, S K; Othman, R; Baker, S F; Molini, B J; Wilton, D C; Gelb, M H; Cho, W

    1997-11-25

    Human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2 (hIIa-PLA2) contains a large number of prominent cationic patches on its molecular surface and has exceptionally high affinity for anionic surfaces, including anionic membranes. To identify the cationic amino acid residues that support binding of hIIa-PLA2 to anionic membranes, we have performed extensive site-directed mutagenesis of this protein and measured vesicle binding and interfacial kinetic properties of the mutants using polymerized liposomes and nonpolymerized anionic vesicles. Unlike other secretory PLA2s, which have a few cationic residues that support binding of enzyme to anionic membranes, interfacial binding of hIIa-PLA2 is driven in part by electrostatic interactions involving a number of cationic residues forming patches on the putative interfacial binding surface. Among these residues, the amino-terminal patch composed of Arg-7, Lys-10, and Lys-16 makes the most significant contribution to interfacial adsorption, and this is supplemented by contributions from other patches, most notably Lys-74/Lys-87/Arg-92 and Lys-124/Arg-127. For these mutants, complete vesicle binding occurs in the presence of high vesicle concentrations, and under these conditions the mutants display specific activities comparable to that of wild-type enzyme. These studies indicate that electrostatic interactions between surface lysine and arginine residues and the interface contribute to interfacial binding of hIIa-PLA2 to anionic vesicles and that cationic residues closest to the opening of the active-site slot make the most important interactions with the membrane. However, because the wild type binds extremely tightly to anionic vesicles, it was not possible to exactly determine what fraction of the total interfacial binding energy is due to electrostatics.

  15. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  16. Detecting local ligand-binding site similarity in nonhomologous proteins by surface patch comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations.

  17. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands.

  18. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren

    1997-01-01

    concentration than controls with a low alcohol intake (detected between carbohydrate deficient transferrin in artery and liver vein or artery and renal vein, either in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 11) or in controls (n = 8......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has been introduced as a marker of excessive alcohol intake. The present study was undertaken in order to measure the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to assess arteriovenous kinetics...... of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in liver and kidney. METHODS/RESULTS: The median value of serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin was 16.0 U/l in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 41), and this value was not significantly different from that of a normal control group (median 17.4 U/l, n = 55, ns...

  19. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  20. Guanine Nucleotides Modulate Cell Surface cAMP-Binding Sites in Membranes from Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    D. discoideum contains kinetically distinguishable cell surface cAMP binding sites. One class, S, is slowly dissociating and has high affinity for cAMP (Kd = 15 nM, t½ = 15 s). A second class is fast dissociating (t½ about 1 s) and is composed of high affinity binding sites H (Kd ≈ 60 nM), and low a

  1. Identification of pneumococcal surface protein A as a lactoferrin-binding protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, S; Bethe, G; Remane, P H; Chhatwal, G S

    1999-04-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-sequestering glycoprotein, predominates in mucosal secretions, where the level of free extracellular iron (10(-18) M) is not sufficient for bacterial growth. This represents a mechanism of resistance to bacterial infections by prevention of colonization of the host by pathogens. In this study we were able to show that Streptococcus pneumoniae specifically recognizes and binds the iron carrier protein human Lf (hLf). Pretreatment of pneumococci with proteases reduced hLf binding significantly, indicating that the hLf receptor is proteinaceous. Binding assays performed with 63 clinical isolates belonging to different serotypes showed that 88% of the tested isolates interacted with hLf. Scatchard analysis showed the existence of two hLf-binding proteins with dissociation constants of 5.7 x 10(-8) and 2.74 x 10(-7) M. The receptors were purified by affinity chromatography, and internal sequence analysis revealed that one of the S. pneumoniae proteins was homologous to pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). The function of PspA as an hLf-binding protein was confirmed by the ability of purified PspA to bind hLf and to competitively inhibit hLf binding to pneumococci. S. pneumoniae may use the hLf-PspA interaction to overcome the iron limitation at mucosal surfaces, and this might represent a potential virulence mechanism.

  2. Bioadhesive micelles of d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate 1000: Synergism of chitosan and transferrin in targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Poornima; Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Mehata, Abhishesh K; Singh, Sanjay; Rajesh, Chellapa V; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare targeted bioadhesive d-α- tocopheryl glycol succinate 1000 (TPGS) micelles containing docetaxel (DTX) for brain targeted cancer therapy. Considering the unique bioadhesive feature of chitosan, herein, we have developed a synergistic transferrin receptor targeted bioadhesive micelles using TPGS conjugated chitosan (TPGS-chitosan), which target the overexpressed transferrin receptors of glioma cells for brain cancer therapy. The micelles were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release. The IC50 values demonstrated transferrin receptor targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles could be 248 folds more effective than Docel™ after 24h treatment with the C6 glioma cells. Further, time dependent bioadhesive cellular uptake study indicated that a synergistic effect was achieved with the chitosan and transferrin in targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles through the biodhesive property of chitosan as well as transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. The in-vivo pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that relative bioavailability of non-targeted and targeted micelles were 2.89 and 4.08 times more effective than Docel™ after 48h of treatments, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibacterial surfaces by adsorptive binding of polyvinyl-sulphonate-stabilized silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilev, Krasimir; Sah, Vasu R; Goreham, Renee V; Short, Robert D [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Ndi, Chi; Griesser, Hans J, E-mail: Krasimir.vasilev@unisa.edu.au [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-05-28

    This paper presents a novel and facile method for the generation of efficient antibacterial coatings which can be applied to practically any type of substrate. Silver nanoparticles were stabilized with an adsorbed surface layer of polyvinyl sulphonate (PVS). This steric layer provided excellent colloidal stability, preventing aggregation over periods of months. PVS-coated silver nanoparticles were bound onto amine-containing surfaces, here produced by deposition of an allylamine plasma polymer thin film onto various substrates. SEM imaging showed no aggregation upon surface binding of the nanoparticles; they were well dispersed on amine surfaces. Such nanoparticle-coated surfaces were found to be effective in preventing attachment of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria and also in preventing biofilm formation. Combined with the ability of plasma polymerization to apply the thin polymeric binding layer onto a wide range of materials, this method appears promising for the fabrication of a wide range of infection-resistant biomedical devices.

  4. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano De Michele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion, which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts.

  5. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  6. Spatially selective surface platforms for binding fibrinogen prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E; Saner, Chamarra K; Garno, Jayne C

    2013-06-06

    We introduce an approach based on particle lithography to prepare spatially selective surface platforms of organosilanes that are suitable for nanoscale studies of protein binding. Particle lithography was applied for patterning fibrinogen, a plasma protein that has a major role in the clotting cascade for blood coagulation and wound healing. Surface nanopatterns of mercaptosilanes were designed as sites for the attachment of fibrinogen within a protein-resistant matrix of 2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl] trichlorosilane (PEG-silane). Preparing site-selective surfaces was problematic in our studies, because of the self-reactive properties of PEG-organosilanes. Certain organosilanes presenting hydroxyl head groups will cross react to form mixed surface multi-layers. We developed a clever strategy with particle lithography using masks of silica mesospheres to protect small, discrete regions of the surface from cross reactions. Images acquired with atomic force microscopy (AFM) disclose that fibrinogen attached primarily to the surface areas presenting thiol head groups, which were surrounded by PEG-silane. The activity for binding anti-fibrinogen was further evaluated using ex situ AFM studies, confirming that after immobilization the fibrinogen nanopatterns retained capacity for binding immunoglobulin G. Studies with AFM provide advantages of achieving nanoscale resolution for detecting surface changes during steps of biochemical surface reactions, without requiring chemical modification of proteins or fluorescent labels.

  7. The binding of phosphonic acids at aluminium oxide surfaces and correlation with passivation of aluminium flake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rachel J; Camp, Philip J; Henderson, David K; Lovatt, Paul A; Nation, David A; Richards, Stuart; Tasker, Peter A

    2007-04-07

    Measurements of adsorption isotherms of a series of thirteen mono- and di-phosphonic acids have shown that these bind strongly to the surface of high surface area aluminium trihydroxide. The incorporation of such phosphonates into a suspension of aluminium flake in an aqueous medium, modelling the continuous phase of a water-based paint, greatly suppresses the evolution of hydrogen. Whilst strong binding of the phosphonate to aluminium oxides is an essential criterion for good passivation, other factors such as the hydrophobicity of the ligand are also important in suppressing hydrogen-evolution.

  8. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  9. Monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability using radiolabeled transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basran, G.S.; Hardy, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    A simple, noninvasive technique for monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability in patients in critical care units is discussed. High vascular permeability is observed in patients with clinically defined adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but not in patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema or in patients with minor pulmonary insults who are considered to be at risk of developing ARDS. The technique has been used in the field of therapeutics and pharmacology to test the effects of the putative antipermeability agents methylprednisolone and terbutaline sulfate. There appears to be a good correlation between the acute inhibitory effect of either drug on transferrin exudation and patient prognosis. Thus, a byproduct of such drug studies may be an index of survival in patients with established ARDS.

  10. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, A.

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  11. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  12. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, Alyn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a 13C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  13. Structural insights into alginate binding by bacterial cell-surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtrirath, Kanate; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-02

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 inducibly forms a mouth-like pit on the cell surface in the presence of alginate and directly incorporates polymers into the cytoplasm via the pit and ABC transporter. Among the bacterial proteins involved in import of alginate, a cell-surface EfeO-like Algp7 shows an ability to bind alginate, suggesting its contribution to accumulate alginate in the pit. Here, we show identification of its positively charged cluster involved in alginate binding using X-ray crystallography, docking simulation, and site-directed mutagenesis. The tertiary structure of Algp7 was determined at a high resolution (1.99Å) by molecular replacement, although no alginates were included in the structure. Thus, an in silico model of Algp7/oligoalginate was constructed by docking simulation using atomic coordinates of Algp7 and alginate oligosaccharides, where some charged residues were found to be potential candidates for alginate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and five purified mutants K68A, K69A, E194A, N221A, and K68A/K69A were subjected to a binding assay. UV absorption difference spectroscopy along with differential scanning fluorimetry analysis indicated that K68A/K69A exhibited a significant reduction in binding affinity with alginate than wild-type Algp7. Based on these data, Lys68/Lys69 residues of Algp7 probably play an important role in binding alginate.

  14. Differential carbohydrate binding and cell surface glycosylation of human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Nadia X; Tiralongo, Joe; Madge, Paul D; von Itzstein, Mark; Day, Christopher J

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is only a modest level knowledge of the glycosylation status of immortalised cell lines that are commonly used in cancer biology as well as their binding affinities to different glycan structures. Through use of glycan and lectin microarray technology, this study has endeavoured to define the different bindings of cell surface carbohydrate structures to glycan-binding lectins. The screening of breast cancer MDA-MB435 cells, cervical cancer HeLa cells and colon cancer Caco-2, HCT116 and HCT116-FM6 cells was conducted to determine their differential bindings to a variety of glycan and lectin structures printed on the array slides. An inverse relationship between the number of glycan structures recognised and the variety of cell surface glycosylation was observed. Of the cell lines tested, it was found that four bound to sialylated structures in initial screening. Secondary screening in the presence of a neuraminidase inhibitor (4-deoxy-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en) significantly reduced sialic acid binding. The array technology has proven to be useful in determining the glycosylation signatures of various cell-lines as well as their glycan binding preferences. The findings of this study provide the groundwork for further investigation into the numerous glycan-lectin interactions that are exhibited by immortalised cell lines.

  15. Evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate transferrin multi-gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2014-11-01

    In a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate transferrins (TFs), six major clades (subfamilies) were identified: (a) S, the mammalian serotransferrins; (b) ICA, the mammalian inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase (ICA) homologs; (c) L, the mammalian lactoferrins; (d) O, the ovotransferrins of birds and reptiles; (e) M, the melanotransferrins of bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; and (f) M-like, a newly identified TF subfamily found in bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. A phylogenetic tree based on the joint alignment of N-lobes and C-lobes supported the hypothesis that three separate events of internal duplication occurred in vertebrate TFs: (a) in the common ancestor of the M subfamily, (b) in the common ancestor of the M-like subfamily, and (c) in the common ancestor of other vertebrate TFs. The S, ICA, and L subfamilies were found only in placental mammals, and the phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis that these three subfamilies arose by gene duplication after the divergence of placental mammals from marsupials. The M-like subfamily was unusual in several respects, including the presence of a uniquely high proportion of clade-specific conserved residues, including distinctive but conserved residues in the sites homologous to those functioning in carbonate binding of human serotransferrin. The M-like family also showed an unusually high proportion of cationic residues in the positively charged region corresponding to human lactoferrampin, suggesting a distinctive role of this region in the M-like subfamily, perhaps in antimicrobial defense.

  16. Use of surface plasmon resonance in the binding study of vitamin D, metabolites and analogues with vitamin D binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canoa, Pilar; Rivadulla, Marcos L; Popplewell, Jonathan; van Oosten, René; Gómez, Generosa; Fall, Yagamare

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin D3 and its metabolites are lipophilic molecules with low aqueous solubility and must be transported bound to plasma carrier proteins, primarily to vitamin D binding protein (DBP). The biological functions of vitamin D3 metabolites are intimately dependent on the protein, hence the importance of determining their affinity for DBP. In this study, we developed a novel procedure for measuring the kinetic and equilibrium constants of human-DBP with vitamin D3 and three metabolites: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24,25(OH)2D3] by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). At the same time, five different analogues, synthetized in our laboratory, were evaluated in order to compare the affinity values with the metabolites. Real-time SPR measurements showed that 25OHD3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 had higher affinity (0.3 μM) than 1,25(OH)2D3 (5 μM), with the higher affinity of 25OHD3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 due to dissociation constants 1 order of magnitude slower. In the case of the analogues, the affinity values were lower, with 1-hydroxy-25-nitro-vitamin D3 (NO2-446), structurally closer to 1,25(OH)2D3, showing the highest value with a K D of 50 μM. (24R)-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-24-buthyl-28-norvitamin D2 (Bu-471) and (24R)-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-24-phenyl-28-norvitamin D2 (Ph-491), structurally similar, had affinities of 180 and 170 μM, respectively. (22R,23E)-1-hydroxy-22-ethenyl-25-methoxy-23-dehydrovitamin D3 (MeO-455) and 1-hydroxy-20(R)-[5(S)-(2,2-dimethyltetrahydropyran-5-yl)]-22,23-dinor vitamin D3 (Oxan-429) had affinities of 310 and 100 μM, respectively. The binding of the metabolites and analogues was reversible allowing the rapid capture of data for replicates. The kinetic and equilibrium data for both the metabolites and the analogues fitted to the Langmuir model describing a 1:1 interaction. Graphical Abstract Label-free, real time binding study between vitamin D binding protein immmobilized on the

  17. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: A Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jacob; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of s...

  18. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  19. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffert, David H; Okholm, Anders H; Sørensen, Rasmus S; Nielsen, Jesper S; Tørring, Thomas; Rosen, Christian B; Kodal, Anne Louise B; Mortensen, Michael R; Gothelf, Kurt V; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms. Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site-selective labeling technique to retain ligand functionality. A combination of confocal fluorescence microscopy and quantitative (qPCR) techniques shows up to 22-fold increased cytoplasmic uptake compared to unmodified structures and with an efficiency that correlates to the number of transferrin molecules on the origami surface.

  20. Study of MMLV RT- Binding with DNA using Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei WU; Ming-Hui HUANG; Jian-Long ZHAO; Meng-Su YANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance biosensor technique was used to study the binding of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase without RNase H domain (MMLV RT-) with DNA in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors. Different DNA substrates, including single-stranded DNA (ssDNA),DNA template-primer (T-P) duplex and gapped DNA, were immobilized on the biosensor chip surface using streptavidin-biotin, and MMLV RT--DNA binding kinetics were analyzed by different models. MMLV RT-could bind with ssDNA and the binding was involved in conformation change. MMLV RT- binding DNA T-P duplex and gapped DNA could be analyzed using the simple 1:1 Langmuir model. The lack of RNase H domain reduced the affinity between MMLV RT- and T-P duplex. The effects of RT inhibitors, including efavirenz, nevirapine and quercetin, on the interaction between MMLV RT- and gapped DNA were analyzed according to recovered kinetics parameters. Efavirenz slightly interfered with the binding between RT and DNA and the affinity constant in the presence of the inhibitor (KA=1.21× 106 M-1) was lower than in the absence of the inhibitor (KA=4.61× 106 M-1). Nevirapine induced relatively tight binding between RT and DNA and the affinity constant in the presence of the inhibsitor (KA=l.47×107 M-1) was approximately three folds higher than without nevirapine, mainly due to rapid association and slow dissociation. Quercetin, a flavonoid originating from plant which has previously shown strong inhibition of the activity of RT, was found to have minimal effect on the RT-DNA binding.

  1. Spatially selective surface platforms for binding fibrinogen prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes

    OpenAIRE

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E.; Saner, ChaMarra K.; Garno, Jayne C.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an approach based on particle lithography to prepare spatially selective surface platforms of organosilanes that are suitable for nanoscale studies of protein binding. Particle lithography was applied for patterning fibrinogen, a plasma protein that has a major role in the clotting cascade for blood coagulation and wound healing. Surface nanopatterns of mercaptosilanes were designed as sites for the attachment of fibrinogen within a protein-resistant matrix of 2-[methoxy(polyethy...

  2. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L;

    1991-01-01

    part of the intact receptor, probably including the whole sequence 1-87, and contained N-linked carbohydrate. After detergent phase separation in the Triton X-114 system, the fragment was present in the water phase where its binding activity could be demonstrated in the absence of the rest...... applications in interfering with cell-surface plasmin-mediated proteolysis....

  3. Selectivity of the surface binding site (SBS) on barley starch synthase I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Palcic, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase I (SSI) from various sources has been shown to preferentially elongate branch chains of degree of polymerisation (DP) from 6–7 to produce chains of DP 8–12. In the recently determined crystal structure of barley starch synthase I (HvSSI) a so-called surface binding site (SBS) was ...

  4. The complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles targeting the transferrin receptor for cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Tian, Shaomin; Petros, Robby A; Napier, Mary E; Desimone, Joseph M

    2010-08-18

    Transferrin receptor (TfR, CD71) has long been a therapeutic target due to its overexpression in many malignant tissues. In this study, PRINT() nanoparticles were conjugated with TfR ligands for targeted drug delivery. Cylindrical poly(ethylene glycol)-based PRINT nanoparticles (diameter (d) = 200 nm, height (h) = 200 nm) labeled with transferrin receptor antibody (NP-OKT9) or human transferrin (NP-hTf) showed highly specific TfR-mediated uptake by all human tumor cell lines tested, relative to negative controls (IgG1 for OKT9 or bovine transferrin (bTf) for hTf). The targeting efficiency was dependent on particle concentration, ligand density, dosing time, and cell surface receptor expression level. Interestingly, NP-OKT9 or NP-hTf showed little cytotoxicity on all solid tumor cell lines tested but were very toxic to Ramos B-cell lymphoma, whereas free OKT9 or hTf was not toxic. There was a strong correlation between TfR ligand density on the particle surface and cell viability and particle uptake. NP-OKT9 and NP-hTf were internalized into acidic intracellular compartments but were not localized in EEA1-enriched early endosomes or lysosomes. Elevated caspase 3/7 activity indicates activation of apoptosis pathways upon particle treatment. Supplementation of iron suppressed the toxicity of NP-OKT9 but not NP-hTf, suggesting different mechanisms by which NP-hTf and NP-OKT9 exerts cytotoxicity on Ramos cells. On the basis of such an observation, the complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles is discussed. In addition, our data clearly reveal that one must be careful in making claims of "lack of toxicity" when a targeting molecule is used on nanoparticles and also raise concerns for unanticipated off-target effects when one is designing targeted chemotherapy nanodelivery agents.

  5. Plant-derived recombinant human serum transferrin demonstrates multiple functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Martin E; Diao, Hong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2010-05-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTf) is the major iron-binding protein in human plasma, having a vital role in iron transport. Additionally, hTf has many other uses including antimicrobial functions and growth factor effects on mammalian cell proliferation and differentiation. The multitask nature of hTf makes it highly valuable for different therapeutic and commercial applications. However, the success of hTf in these applications is critically dependent on the availability of high-quality hTf in large amounts. In this study, we have developed plants as a novel platform for the production of recombinant (r)hTf. We show here that transgenic plants are an efficient system for rhTf production, with a maximum accumulation of 0.25% total soluble protein (TSP) (or up to 33.5 microg/g fresh leaf weight). Furthermore, plant-derived rhTf retains many of the biological activities synonymous with native hTf. In particular, rhTf reversibly binds iron in vitro, exhibits bacteriostatic activity, supports cell proliferation in serum-free medium and can be internalized into mammalian cells in vitro. The success of this study validates the future application of plant rhTf in a variety of fields. Of particular interest is the use of plant rhTf as a novel carrier for cell-specific or oral delivery of protein/peptide drugs for the treatment of human diseases such as diabetes.To demonstrate this hypothesis, we have additionally expressed an hTf fusion protein containing glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or its derivative in plants. Here, we show that plant-derived hTf-GLP-1 fusion proteins retain the ability to be internalized by mammalian cells when added to culture medium in vitro.

  6. Ceruloplasmin/Transferrin Ratio Changes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Squitti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between iron and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been mainly investigated with a focus on the local accumulation of this metal in specific areas of the brain that are critical for AD. In the present study, we have instead looked at systemic variations of markers of iron metabolism. We measured serum levels of iron, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin and calculated the transferrin saturation and the ceruloplasmin to transferrin ratio (Cp/Tf. Cp/Tf and transferrin saturation increased in AD patients. Cp/Tf ratios also correlated positively with peroxide levels and negatively with serum iron concentrations. Elevated values of ceruloplasmin, peroxides, and Cp/Tf inversely correlated with MMSE scores. Isolated medial temporal lobe atrophy positively correlated with Cp/Tf and negatively with serum iron. All these findings indicate that the local iron accumulation found in brain areas critical for AD should be viewed in the frame of iron systemic alterations.

  7. Assessing Iron Status: Beyond Serum Ferritin and Transferrin Saturation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jay B. Wish

    2006-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multiple comorbidities among anemic patients with chronic kidney disease has made the use of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation more challenging in diagnosing iron deficiency...

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Grain Surface Chemistry to Binding Energies of Ice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, E. M.; Walsh, C.; Cuppen, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced telescopes, such as ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, are likely to show that the chemical universe may be even more complex than currently observed, requiring astrochemical modelers to improve their models to account for the impact of new data. However, essential input information for gas-grain models, such as binding energies of molecules to the surface, have been derived experimentally only for a handful of species, leaving hundreds of species with highly uncertain estimates. We present in this paper a systematic study of the effect of uncertainties in the binding energies on an astrochemical two-phase model of a dark molecular cloud, using the rate equations approach. A list of recommended binding energy values based on a literature search of published data is presented. Thousands of simulations of dark cloud models were run, and in each simulation a value for the binding energy of hundreds of species was randomly chosen from a normal distribution. Our results show that the binding energy of H2 is critical for the surface chemistry. For high binding energies, H2 freezes out on the grain forming an H2 ice. This is not physically realistic, and we suggest a change in the rate equations. The abundance ranges found are in reasonable agreement with astronomical ice observations. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that the binding energy of HCO, HNO, CH2, and C correlate most strongly with the abundance of dominant ice species. Finally, the formation route of complex organic molecules was found to be sensitive to the branching ratios of H2CO hydrogenation.

  9. Spectroscopic study of binding of chlorogenic acid with the surface of ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction properties of biological materials with ZnO NPs is fundamental interest in the field of biotechnological applications as well as in the formation of optoelectronic devices. In this research, the binding of ZnO NPs and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were investigated using fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The study results indicated the fluorescence quenching between ZnO NPs and CGA rationalized in terms of static quenching mechanism or the formation of nonfluorescent CGA-ZnO. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis the binding constant ( K a ), number of binding sites ( n), and thermodynamic properties, were determined. The quenching constants ( K sv) and binding constant ( K a ), decrease with increasing the temperature and their binding sites n are 2. The thermodynamic parameters determined using Van't Hoff equation indicated binding occurs spontaneously involving the hydrogen bond and van der Walls forces played the major role in the reaction of ZnO NPs with CGA. The Raman, SEM, DLS, and Zeta potential measurements were also indicated the differences in the structure, morphology and sizes of CGA, ZnO NPs, and their corresponding CGA-ZnO due to adsorption of CGA on the surface of ZnO NPs

  10. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition.

  11. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  12. Modelling of binding free energy of targeted nanocarriers to cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a numerical model based on Metropolis Monte Carlo and the weighted histogram analysis method that enables the calculation of the absolute binding free energy between functionalized nanocarriers (NC) and endothelial cell (EC) surfaces. The binding affinities are calculated according to the free energy landscapes. The model predictions quantitatively agree with the analogous measurements of specific antibody coated NCs (100 nm in diameter) to intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressing EC surface in in vitro cell culture experiments. The model also enables an investigation of the effects of a broad range of parameters that include antibody surface coverage of NC, glycocalyx in both in vivo and in vitro conditions, shear flow and NC size. Using our model we explore the effects of shear flow and reproduce the shear-enhanced binding observed in equilibrium measurements in collagen-coated tube. Furthermore, our results indicate that the bond stiffness, representing the specific antibody-antigen interaction, significantly impacts the binding affinities. The predictive success of our computational protocol represents a sound quantitative approach for model driven design and optimization of functionalized NC in targeted vascular drug delivery.

  13. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  14. Controlled FCC/on-top binding of H/Pt(111) using surface stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    The preferred binding site of H/Pt(111) has been shown to be change from the on-top to FCC as the Pt(111) surface goes approximately from a state of compressive to tensile strain. A chemical analysis of the system has shown that for both FCC and on-top bound cases the H ssbnd Pt s and H ssbnd Pt d interactions have a similar importance in determining the preferred binding position. It has been seen that FCC-bound H forms a distinct state below the Pt d-band, whereas the on-top bound H does not.

  15. Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1999-08-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05+/-9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

  16. Transferrin-bearing maghemite nano-constructs for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraux, H.; Hai, J.; Gaudisson, T.; Ammar, S.; Gazeau, F.; El Hage Chahine, J. M.; Hémadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in biomedicine for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imagery. Targeting them to specific cancerous cells is, therefore, of a great value for therapy and diagnostic. Transferrin and its receptor constitute the major iron-acquisition system in human. The former crosses the plasma membrane within a few minutes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Thus, transferrin can be a valuable vector for the delivery of NPs to specific cells and across the blood brain barrier. For such a purpose, three different sizes of maghemite NPs (5, 10, and 15 nm) were synthesized by the polyol method, coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and coupled to transferrin by amide bonds. The number of transferrins per nanoparticle was determined. Raw nanoparticles and the "transferrin-nanoparticle" constructs were characterized. The magnetic properties and the colloidal stability of raw NPs and transferrin-NP constructs were measured and analyzed in relation to their inorganic core size variation. They all proved to be good candidates for nanoparticle targeting for biomedical application.

  17. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  18. Surface tension method for determining binding constants for cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of ionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmawardana, U.R.; Christian, S.D.; Tucker, E.E.; Taylor, R.W.; Scamehorn, J.F. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A new method has been developed for determining binding constants of complexes of cyclodextrins with surface-active compounds, including water-soluble ionic surfactants. The technique requires measuring the change in surface tension caused by addition of a cyclodextrin (CD) to aqueous solutions of the surfactant; the experimental results lead directly to inferred values of the thermodynamic activity of the surfactant. Surface tension results are reported for three different surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the presence and in the absence of added [beta]-CD. Data for CPC have been obtained at surfactant concentrations below and above the critical micelle concentration. Correlations between surface tension and surfactant activity are expressed by the Szyszkowski equation, which subsumes the Langmuir adsorption model and the Gibbs equation. It is observed that the surface tension increases monotonically as [beta]-cyclodextrin is added to ionic surfactant solutions. At concentrations of CD well in excess of the surfactant concentration, the surface tension approaches that of pure water, indicating that neither the surfactant-CD complexes nor CD itself are surface active. Binding constants are inferred from a model that incorporates the parameters of the Szyszkowski equation and mass action constants relating to the formation of micelles from monomers of the surfactant and the counterion. Evidence is given that two molecules of CD can complex the C-16 hydrocarbon chain of the cetyl surfactants. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A missense mutation in TFRC, encoding transferrin receptor 1, causes combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabara, Haifa H; Boyden, Steven E; Chou, Janet; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J; Benson, Halli; Bainter, Wayne; Fraulino, David; Rahimov, Fedik; Sieff, Colin; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Alshemmari, Salem H; Al-Ramadi, Basel K; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Arnaout, Rand; Abu-Shukair, Mohammad; Vatsayan, Anant; Silver, Eli; Ahuja, Sanjay; Davies, E Graham; Sola-Visner, Martha; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Andrews, Nancy C; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Fleming, Mark D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kunkel, Louis M; Geha, Raif S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a combined immunodeficiency characterized by normal numbers but impaired function of T and B cells had a homozygous p.Tyr20His substitution in transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), encoded by TFRC. The substitution disrupts the TfR1 internalization motif, resulting in defective receptor endocytosis and markedly increased TfR1 expression on the cell surface. Iron citrate rescued the lymphocyte defects, and expression of wild-type but not mutant TfR1 rescued impaired transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts. Tfrc(Y20H/Y20H) mice recapitulated the immunological defects of patients. Despite the critical role of TfR1 in erythrocyte development and function, patients had only mild anemia and only slightly increased TfR1 expression in erythroid precursors. We show that STEAP3, a metalloreductase expressed in erythroblasts, associates with TfR1 and partially rescues transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts, suggesting that STEAP3 may provide an accessory TfR1 endocytosis signal that spares patients from severe anemia. These findings demonstrate the importance of TfR1 in adaptive immunity.

  20. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Joseph P Bressler

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. ...

  1. Binding and activation of host plasminogen on the surface of Francisella tularensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitt Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis (FT is a gram-negative facultative intracellular coccobacillus and is the causal agent of a life-threatening zoonotic disease known as tularemia. Although FT preferentially infects phagocytic cells of the host, recent evidence suggests that a significant number of bacteria can be found extracellularly in the plasma fraction of the blood during active infection. This observation suggests that the interaction between FT and host plasma components may play an important role in survival and dissemination of the bacterium during the course of infection. Plasminogen (PLG is a protein zymogen that is found in abundance in the blood of mammalian hosts. A number of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens have the ability to bind to PLG, giving them a survival advantage by increasing their ability to penetrate extracellular matrices and cross tissue barriers. Results We show that PLG binds to the surface of FT and that surface-bound PLG can be activated to plasmin in the presence of tissue PLG activator in vitro. In addition, using Far-Western blotting assays coupled with proteomic analyses of FT outer membrane preparations, we have identified several putative PLG-binding proteins of FT. Conclusions The ability of FT to acquire surface bound PLG that can be activated on its surface may be an important virulence mechanism that results in an increase in initial infectivity, survival, and/or dissemination of this bacterium in vivo.

  2. Short term memory for single surface features and bindings in ageing: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Valeria; Molteni, Federica; Mapelli, Cristina; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    In the present study we replicated a previous experiment investigating visuo-spatial short term memory binding in young and older healthy individuals, in the attempt to verify the pattern of impairment that can be observed in normal elderly for short term memory for single items vs short term memory for bindings. Assessing a larger sample size (25 young and 25 older subjects), using a more appropriate measure of accuracy for a change detection task (A'), and adding the evaluation of speed of performance, we confirmed that old normals show a decline in short term memory for bindings of shape and colour that is of comparable extent, and not major, to the decline in memory for single shapes and single colours. The absence of a specific deficit of short term memory for conjunctions of surface features seems to distinguish cognitive ageing from Alzheimer's Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Binding of Streptavidin to Surface-attached Biotin with Different Spacer Thicknesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yifei; ZHANG Haining

    2015-01-01

    The specific binding of receptor to ligand covalently attached to surface with different surface densities was studied using streptavidin-biotin model pair. Biotinylated substrates with different spacer thicknesses as formed through a simple reaction between amine immobilized surfaces and N-hydroxysucciimide groups at the end of biotin modiifed PEG in anhydrous organic solutions (“grafting to”technique). The amount of the speciifcally adsorbed protein was measured as a function of spacer thickness between hard surface and biotin moieties. It has been shown that the amount of specifically adsorbed streptavidin decreases with the increase spacer thickness and the protein adsorbs onto the functionalized surfaces in a single molecular manner. It provides an interesting model system for studying single molecular interactions.

  4. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  5. A Polyethylenimine-Containing and Transferrin-Conjugated Lipid Nanoparticle System for Antisense Oligonucleotide Delivery to AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited success of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO in clinical anticancer therapy calls for more effective delivery carriers. The goal of this study was to develop a nanoparticle system for delivery of ASO G3139, which targets mRNA of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, to acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. The synthesized nanoparticle Tf-LPN-G3139 contained a small molecular weight polyethylenimine and two cationic lipids as condensing agents, with transferrin on its surface for selective binding and enhanced cellular uptake. The optimized nitrogen to phosphate (N/P ratio was 4 to achieve small particle size and high G3139 entrapment efficiency. The Tf-LPN-G3139 exhibited excellent colloidal stability during storage for at least 12 weeks and remained intact for 4 hours in nuclease-containing serum. The cellular uptake results showed extensive internalization of fluorescence-labelled G3139 in MV4-11 cells through Tf-LPN. Following transfection, Tf-LPN-G3139 at 1 µM ASO level induced 54% Bcl-2 downregulation and >20-fold apoptosis compared to no treatment. When evaluated in mice bearing human xenograft AML tumors, Tf-LPN-G3139 suppressed tumor growth by ~60% at the end of treatment period, accompanied by remarkable pharmacological effect of Bcl-2 inhibition in tumor. In conclusion, Tf-LPN-G3139 is a promising nanoparticle system for ASO G3139 delivery to AML and warrants further investigations.

  6. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  7. Tight attachment of chitin-binding-domain-tagged proteins to surfaces coated with acetylated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Michael P; Cao, Donghui; Myers, Rebecca V; Moyle, William R

    2004-04-15

    Several excellent procedures for trapping tagged proteins have been devised, but many of these are expensive, cannot be used outside a limited pH range, fail to work in the presence of chaotropic agents, or are difficult to use. The chitin binding domain (CBD) of Bacillus circulans chitinase, which binds to chitin matrices prepared from inexpensive reagents isolated from crab shells, is an alternative tag that can be used under a variety of pH and denaturing conditions. Kits based on the interaction between the CBD and the chitin beads are available commercially. Here, we show that simultaneous treatment of microtiter plates with chitosan, a deacetylated form of chitin, and acetic anhydride produces a surface-bound film of chitin that also interacts tightly with the CBD. Chitin-coated microtiter well plates captured a CBD-tagged heterodimeric human glycoprotein hormone analog directly from mammalian cell culture media, even when present in trace amounts. Binding to the surface was stable in sodium dodecylsulfate and reversed only partially at low pH or in 8M urea at 37 degrees C. This technique appears well suited to surface attachment and permits biochemical or other analyses of molecules that can be tagged with a CBD.

  8. Characterization of homing endonuclease binding and cleavage specificities using yeast surface display SELEX (YSD-SELEX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Kyle; Lambert, Abigail R; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2017-02-17

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are a class of rare-cleaving nucleases that possess several unique attributes for genome engineering applications. An important approach for advancing LHE technology is the generation of a library of design ‘starting points’ through the discovery and characterization of natural LHEs with diverse specificities. However, while identification of natural LHE proteins by sequence homology from genomic and metagenomic sequence databases is straightforward, prediction of corresponding target sequences from genomic data remains challenging. Here, we describe a general approach that we developed to circumvent this issue that combines two technologies: yeast surface display (YSD) of LHEs and systematic evolution of ligands via exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using LHEs expressed on the surface of yeast, we show that SELEX can yield binding specificity motifs and identify cleavable LHE targets using a combination of bioinformatics and biochemical cleavage assays. This approach, which we term YSD-SELEX, represents a simple and rapid first principles approach to determining the binding and cleavage specificity of novel LHEs that should also be generally applicable to any type of yeast surface expressible DNA-binding protein. In this marriage, SELEX adds DNA specificity determination to the YSD platform, and YSD brings diagnostics and inexpensive, facile protein-matrix generation to SELEX.

  9. Surface Binding and Organization of Sensitizing Dyes on Metal Oxide Single Crystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkinson, Bruce

    2010-06-04

    Even though investigations of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductors in solar cells has dominated research on dye-sensitized semiconductors over the past two decades. Single crystal electrodes represent far simpler model systems for studying the sensitization process with a continuing train of studies dating back more than forty years. Even today single crystal surfaces prove to be more controlled experimental models for the study of dye-sensitized semiconductors than the nanocrystalline substrates. We analyzed the scientific advances in the model sensitized single crystal systems that preceded the introduction of nanocrystalline semiconductor electrodes. It then follows the single crystal research to the present, illustrating both their striking simplicity of use and clarity of interpretation relative to nanocrystalline electrodes. Researchers have employed many electrochemical, photochemical and scanning probe techniques for studying monolayer quantities of sensitizing dyes at specific crystallographic faces of different semiconductors. These methods include photochronocoulometry, electronic spectroscopy and flash photolysis of dyes at potential-controlled semiconductor electrodes and the use of total internal reflection methods. In addition, we describe the preparation of surfaces of single crystal SnS2 and TiO2 electrodes to serve as reproducible model systems for charge separation at dye sensitized solar cells. This process involves cleaving the SnS2 electrodes and a photoelectrochemical surface treatment for TiO2 that produces clean surfaces for sensitization (as verified by AFM) resulting in near unity yields for electron transfer from the molecular excited dyes into the conduction band.

  10. LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying pockets on protein surfaces is of great importance for many structure-based drug design applications and protein-ligand docking algorithms. Over the last ten years, many geometric methods for the prediction of ligand-binding sites have been developed. Results We present LIGSITEcsc, an extension and implementation of the LIGSITE algorithm. LIGSITEcsc is based on the notion of surface-solvent-surface events and the degree of conservation of the involved surface residues. We compare our algorithm to four other approaches, LIGSITE, CAST, PASS, and SURFNET, and evaluate all on a dataset of 48 unbound/bound structures and 210 bound-structures. LIGSITEcsc performs slightly better than the other tools and achieves a success rate of 71% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the Connolly surface leads to slight improvements, the prediction re-ranking by conservation to significant improvements of the binding site predictions. A web server for LIGSITEcsc and its source code is available at scoppi.biotec.tu-dresden.de/pocket.

  11. Requirement of aggregation propensity of Alzheimer amyloid peptides for neuronal cell surface binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaurin JoAnne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregation of the amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, is known to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Here we investigate the relationship between peptide aggregation and cell surface binding of three forms of Aβ (Aβ40, Aβ42, and an Aβ mutant. Results Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry with fluorescently labelled Aβ, we demonstrate a correlation between the aggregation propensity of the Alzheimer amyloid peptides and their neuronal cell surface association. We find that the highly aggregation prone Aβ42 associates with the surface of neuronal cells within one hour, while the less aggregation prone Aβ40 associates over 24 hours. We show that a double mutation in Aβ42 that reduces its aggregation propensity also reduces its association with the cell surface. Furthermore, we find that a cell line that is resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, the non-neuronal human lymphoma cell line U937, does not bind either Aβ40 or Aβ42. Conclusion Taken together, our findings reveal that amyloid peptide aggregation propensity is an essential determinant of neuronal cell surface association. We anticipate that our approach, involving Aβ imaging in live cells, will be highly useful for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic drugs that prevent toxic Aβ association with neuronal cells.

  12. Second Harmonic Correlation Spectroscopy: Theory and Principles for Determining Surface Binding Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2017-06-01

    A novel application of second harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) for the direct determination of molecular adsorption and desorption kinetics to a surface is discussed in detail. The surface-specific nature of second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an efficient means to determine the kinetic rates of adsorption and desorption of molecular species to an interface without interference from bulk diffusion, which is a significant limitation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The underlying principles of SHCS for the determination of surface binding kinetics are presented, including the role of optical coherence and optical heterodyne mixing. These properties of SHCS are extremely advantageous and lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise (S/N) of the correlation data, increasing the sensitivity of the technique. The influence of experimental parameters, including the uniformity of the TEM00 laser beam, the overall photon flux, and collection time are also discussed, and are shown to significantly affect the S/N of the correlation data. Second harmonic correlation spectroscopy is a powerful, surface-specific, and label-free alternative to other correlation spectroscopic methods for examining surface binding kinetics.

  13. Ferristatin II promotes degradation of transferrin receptor-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaina L Byrne

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the small molecule iron transport inhibitor ferristatin (NSC30611 acts by down-regulating transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 via receptor degradation. In this investigation, we show that another small molecule, ferristatin II (NSC8679, acts in a similar manner to degrade the receptor through a nystatin-sensitive lipid raft pathway. Structural domains of the receptor necessary for interactions with the clathrin pathway do not appear to be necessary for ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. While TfR1 constitutively traffics through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with or without ligand, the presence of Tf blocked ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. This effect of Tf was lost in a ligand binding receptor mutant G647A TfR1, suggesting that Tf binding to its receptor interferes with the drug's activity. Rats treated with ferristatin II have lower TfR1 in liver. These effects are associated with reduced intestinal (59Fe uptake, lower serum iron and transferrin saturation, but no change in liver non-heme iron stores. The observed hypoferremia promoted by degradation of TfR1 by ferristatin II appears to be due to induced hepcidin gene expression.

  14. Manganese transport via the transferrin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Thomas E; Gerstner, Brent; Gunter, Karlene K; Malecki, Jon; Gelein, Robert; Valentine, William M; Aschner, Michael; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) uptake by brain cells, particularly in regions like the basal ganglia, can lead to toxicity. Mn(2+) is transported into cells via a number of mechanisms, while Mn(3+) is believed to be transported similarly to iron (Fe) via the transferrin (Tf) mechanism. Cellular Mn uptake is therefore determined by the activity of the mechanisms transporting Mn into each type of cell and by the amounts of Mn(2+), Mn(3+) and their complexes to which these cells are exposed; this complicates understanding the contributions of each transporter to Mn toxicity. While uptake of Fe(3+) via the Tf mechanism is well understood, uptake of Mn(3+) via this mechanism has not been systematically studied. The stability of the Mn(3+)Tf complex allowed us to form and purify this complex and label it with a fluorescent (Alexa green) tag. Using purified and labeled Mn(3+)Tf and biophysical tools, we have developed a novel approach to study Mn(3+)Tf transport independently of other Mn transport mechanisms. This approach was used to compare the uptake of Mn(3+)Tf into neuronal cell lines with published descriptions of Fe(3+) uptake via the Tf mechanism, and to obtain quantitative information on Mn uptake via the Tf mechanism. Results confirm that in these cell lines significant Mn(3+) is transported by the Tf mechanism similarly to Fe(3+)Tf transport; although Mn(3+)Tf transport is markedly slower than other Mn transport mechanisms. This novel approach may prove useful for studying Mn toxicity in other systems and cell types.

  15. Insights into molecular plasticity of choline binding proteins (pneumococcal surface proteins) by SAXS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M; Monterroso, Begoña; Menéndez, Margarita; Diakun, Greg; Chacón, Pablo; Hermoso, Juan Antonio; Díaz, J Fernando

    2007-01-12

    Phosphocholine moieties decorating the pneumococcal surface are used as a docking station for a family of modular proteins, the so-called choline binding proteins or CBPs. Choline recognition is essential for CBPs function and may also be a determinant for their quaternary structure. There is little knowledge about modular arrangement or oligomeric structures in this family. Therefore, we have used the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique combined with analytical ultracentrifugation in order to model the three-dimensional envelope of two highly different CBPs: the phage encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme and the pneumococcal phosphorylcholine esterase Pce. Both enzymes have an N-terminal catalytic module and a C-terminal choline-binding module (CBM) that attaches them to the bacterial surface and comprises six and ten sequence repeats in Cpl-1 and Pce, respectively. SAXS experiments have shown an inherent conformational plasticity in Cpl-1 that accounts for the different relative position of these regions in the solution and crystal structures. Dimerization of Cpl-1 upon choline binding has been also visualised for the first time, and monomer-monomer interactions take place through the first CBR where a non-canonical choline binding site has now been identified. This mode of association seems to be independent of the absence or presence of the Cpl-1 catalytic module and reveals that the arrangement of the monomers differs from that previously found in the isolated CBM dimer of pneumococcal LytA amidase. In contrast, Pce displays the same modular disposition in the solution and crystal structures, and remains almost invariant upon choline binding. The present results suggest that protein dimerization and duplication of CBRs may be alternative but not equivalent ways of improving cell wall recognition by CBPs, since they provide different interaction geometries for choline residues present in (lipo)teichoic acids.

  16. Sensing (un)binding events via surface plasmons: effects of resonator geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Claudio, Virginia; Käll, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The resonance conditions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) can be perturbed in any number ways making plasmon nanoresonators viable tools in detection of e.g. phase changes, pH, gasses, and single molecules. Precise measurement via LSPR of molecular concentrations hinge on the ability to confidently count the number of molecules attached to a metal resonator and ideally to track binding and unbinding events in real-time. These two requirements make it necessary to rigorously quantify relations between the number of bound molecules and response of plasmonic sensors. This endeavor is hindered on the one hand by a spatially varying response of a given plasmonic nanosensor. On the other hand movement of molecules is determined by stochastic effects (Brownian motion) as well as deterministic flow, if present, in microfluidic channels. The combination of molecular dynamics and the electromagnetic response of the LSPR yield an uncertainty which is little understood and whose effect is often disregarded in quantitative sensing experiments. Using a combination of electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the plasmon resonance peak shift of various metal nanosensors (disk, cone, rod, dimer) and stochastic diffusion-reaction simulations of biomolecular interactions on a sensor surface we clarify the interplay between position dependent binding probability and inhomogeneous sensitivity distribution. We show, how the statistical characteristics of the total signal upon molecular binding are determined. The proposed methodology is, in general, applicable to any sensor and any transduction mechanism, although the specifics of implementation will vary depending on circumstances. In this work we focus on elucidating how the interplay between electromagnetic and stochastic effects impacts the feasibility of employing particular shapes of plasmonic sensors for real-time monitoring of individual binding reactions or sensing low concentrations

  17. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Schneider, Marc [Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Daum, Nicole, E-mail: Marc.Schneider@mx.uni-saarland.de [Drug Delivery, Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (<2 nm) are stabilized in the protein via sulfur groups and have a high fluorescence emission in the near infrared region (QY = 4.3%; {lambda}{sub em} = 695 nm). Structural investigation and photophysical measurements show a high population of clusters formed of 22-33 gold atoms covalently bound to the transferrin. In solutions with pH ranging from 5 to 10 and in buffer solutions (PBS, HEPES), those biolabelled proteins exhibit a good stability. No significant quenching effect of the fluorescent transferrin has been detected after iron loading of iron-free transferrin (apoTf) and in the presence of a specific polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 {mu}g ml{sup -1}-1 mg ml{sup -1}). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  18. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a surface-associated, fibronectin-binding protein of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, A; Kucknoor, A; Mundodi, V; Alderete, J F

    2009-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the urogenital tract of humans and causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted disease. We have shown an association of T. vaginalis with basement membrane extracellular matrix components, a property which we hypothesize is important for colonization and persistence. In this study, we identify a fibronectin (FN)-binding protein of T. vaginalis. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) from a library of hybridomas that inhibited the binding of T. vaginalis organisms to immobilized FN was identified. The MAb (called ws1) recognized a 39-kDa protein and was used to screen a cDNA expression library of T. vaginalis. A 1,086-bp reactive cDNA clone that encoded a protein of 362 amino acids with identity to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was obtained. The gapdh gene was cloned, and recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Natural GAPDH and rGAPDH bound to immobilized FN and to plasminogen and collagen but not to laminin. MAb ws1 inhibited binding to FN. GAPDH was detected on the surface of trichomonads and was upregulated in synthesis and surface expression by iron. Higher levels of binding to FN were seen for organisms grown in iron-replete medium than for organisms grown in iron-depleted medium. In addition, decreased synthesis of GAPDH by antisense transfection of T. vaginalis gave lower levels of organisms bound to FN and had no adverse effect on growth kinetics. Finally, GAPDH did not associate with immortalized vaginal epithelial cells (VECs), and neither GAPDH nor MAb ws1 inhibited the adherence of trichomonads to VECs. These results indicate that GAPDH is a surface-associated protein of T. vaginalis with alternative functions.

  19. Iron and bismuth bound human serum transferrin reveals a partially-opened conformation in the N-lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Minji; Hao, Quan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) binds Fe(III) tightly but reversibly, and delivers it to cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process. The metal-binding and release result in significant conformational changes of the protein. Here, we report the crystal structures of diferric-hTF (Fe(N)Fe(C)-hTF) and bismuth-bound hTF (Bi(N)Fe(C)-hTF) at 2.8 and 2.4 Å resolutions respectively. Notably, the N-lobes of both structures exhibit unique "partially-opened" conformations between those of the apo-hTF and holo-hTF. Fe(III) and Bi(III) in the N-lobe coordinate to, besides anions, only two (Tyr95 and Tyr188) and one (Tyr188) tyrosine residues, respectively, in contrast to four residues in the holo-hTF. The C-lobe of both structures are fully closed with iron coordinating to four residues and a carbonate. The structures of hTF observed here represent key conformers captured in the dynamic nature of the transferrin family proteins and provide a structural basis for understanding the mechanism of metal uptake and release in transferrin families.

  20. Analysis of novel iron-regulated, surface-anchored hemin-binding proteins in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Courtni E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Michael P

    2013-06-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources during growth in iron-depleted environments, and recent studies have shown that the surface-exposed HtaA protein binds both hemin and Hb and also contributes to the utilization of hemin iron. Conserved (CR) domains within HtaA and in the associated hemin-binding protein, HtaB, are required for the ability to bind hemin and Hb. In this study, we identified and characterized two novel genetic loci in C. diphtheriae that encode factors that bind hemin and Hb. Both genetic systems contain two-gene operons that are transcriptionally regulated by DtxR and iron. The gene products of these operons are ChtA-ChtB and ChtC-CirA (previously DIP0522-DIP0523). The chtA and chtB genes are carried on a putative composite transposon associated with C. diphtheriae isolates that dominated the diphtheria outbreak in the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. ChtA and ChtC each contain a single N-terminal CR domain and exhibit significant sequence similarity to each other but only limited similarity with HtaA. The chtB and htaB gene products exhibited a high level of sequence similarity throughout their sequences, and both proteins contain a single CR domain. Whole-cell binding studies as well as protease analysis indicated that all four of the proteins encoded by these two operons are surface exposed, which is consistent with the presence of a transmembrane segment in their C-terminal regions. ChtA, ChtB, and ChtC are able to bind hemin and Hb, with ChtA showing the highest affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that specific tyrosine residues within the ChtA CR domain were critical for hemin and Hb binding. Hemin iron utilization assays using various C. diphtheriae mutants indicate that deletion of the chtA-chtB region and the chtC gene has no affect on the ability of C. diphtheriae to use hemin or Hb as iron sources; however, a chtB htaB double mutant exhibits a significant decrease in hemin iron use

  1. Sources of strong copper-binding ligands in Antarctic Peninsula surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Randelle M.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Buck, Kristen N.

    2013-06-01

    Copper-binding organic ligands were measured during austral winter in surface waters around the Antarctic Peninsula using competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with multiple analytical windows. Samples were collected from four distinct water masses including the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front, Bransfield Strait, and the shelf region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Strong copper-binding organic ligands were detected in each water mass. The strongest copper-binding ligands were detected at the highest competition strength in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, with an average conditional stability constant of logKCuL,Cucond=16.00±0.82. The weakest ligands were found at the lowest competition strength in the shelf region with logKCuL,Cucond=12.68±0.48. No ligands with stability constants less than logKCuL,Cucond=13.5 were detected in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at any competition strength, suggesting a shelf source of weaker copper-binding ligands. Free, hydrated copper ion concentrations, the biologically available form of dissolved copper, were less than 10-14 M in all samples, approaching levels that may be limiting for some types of inducible iron acquisition.

  2. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  3. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  4. Adeno-associated virus type 2 binding study on model heparan sulfate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Atsuko; Liu, Jian; McCarty, Douglas; Samulski, Jude; Superfine, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms involved in virus infections is useful in its application in areas such as gene therapy, drug development and delivery, and biosensors. In collaboration with UNC Gene Therapy Center and School of Pharmacy, we are specifically looking at the interaction between human parvovirus adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2), a potential viral vector, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), a known cell surface receptor for AAV2. Recent development in glycobiology has shown that some protein-polysaccharide binding is sugar sequence dependent. Heparan sulfate (HS) is a polysaccharide chain of sulfated iduronic/glucuronic and sulfate glucosamine residues and can be differentiated into sequence specific structures by enzymes. These enzymatic modifications, known as heparan sulfate sulfotransferase modified modifications, have been shown to change the biological nature of heparan sulfate such as specific binding to proteins and viruses. For understanding HS-assisted viral infection mechanisms, we are interested in investigating the binding affinity and stability of AAV to different HS structures. We have developed a model heparan sulfate surface in which AAV adsorption studies are done and analyzed using the atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, a miniArray assay has been created to facilitate to this study. Adsorption studies are done in 4 white LED wells with approximately 3 mm2 reaction areas which minimize sample use and waste.

  5. Differential affinity of FLIP and procaspase 8 for FADD's DED binding surfaces regulates DISC assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, J; Sgobba, M; Holohan, C; Crawford, N; Logan, A E; Kerr, E; Higgins, C A; Redmond, K L; Riley, J S; Stasik, I; Fennell, D A; Van Schaeybroeck, S; Haider, S; Johnston, P G; Haigh, D; Longley, D B

    2014-02-28

    Death receptor activation triggers recruitment of FADD, which via its death effector domain (DED) engages the DEDs of procaspase 8 and its inhibitor FLIP to form death-inducing signalling complexes (DISCs). The DEDs of FADD, FLIP and procaspase 8 interact with one another using two binding surfaces defined by α1/α4 and α2/α5 helices, respectively. Here we report that FLIP has preferential affinity for the α1/α4 surface of FADD, whereas procaspase 8 has preferential affinity for FADD's α2/α5 surface. These relative affinities contribute to FLIP being recruited to the DISC at comparable levels to procaspase 8 despite lower cellular expression. Additional studies, including assessment of DISC stoichiometry and functional assays, suggest that following death receptor recruitment, the FADD DED preferentially engages FLIP using its α1/α4 surface and procaspase 8 using its α2/α5 surface; these tripartite intermediates then interact via the α1/α4 surface of FLIP DED1 and the α2/α5 surface of procaspase 8 DED2.

  6. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Zartman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA, more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100 retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944. Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy treated with choline (Kd = 13,800 and carnitine (Kd = 3960 adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944. A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100 adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340 or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293. Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity.

  7. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestler, J.E.; McLeod, J.F.; Kowalski, M.A.; Strauss, J.F. 3d.; Haddad, J.G. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with (/sup 35/S)methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated.

  8. Incorporation of 5-hydroxytryptophan into transferrin and its receptor allows assignment of the pH induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence when iron is released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas G; Byrne, Shaina L; Mason, Anne B

    2009-03-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) is a bilobal glycoprotein that transports iron to cells. At neutral pH, diferric hTF binds with nM affinity to the transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. The complex is taken into the cell where, at the acidic pH of the endosome ( approximately pH 5.6), iron is released. Since iron coordination strongly quenches the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of hTF, the increase in the fluorescent signal reports the rate constant(s) of iron release. At pH 5.6, the TFR considerably enhances iron release from the C-lobe (with little effect on iron release from the N-lobe). The recombinant soluble TFR is a dimer with 11 tryptophan residues per monomer. In the hTF/TFR complex these residues could contribute to and compromise the readout ascribed to iron release from hTF. We report that compared to Fe(C) hTF alone, the increase in the fluorescent signal from the preformed complex of Fe(C) hTF and the TFR at pH 5.6 is significantly quenched (75%). To dissect the contributions of hTF and the TFR to the change in fluorescence, 5-hydroxytryptophan was incorporated into each using our mammalian expression system. Selective excitation of the samples at 280 or 315 nm shows that the TFR contributes little or nothing to the increase in fluorescence when ferric iron is released from Fe(C) hTF. Quantum yield determinations of TFR, Fe(C) hTF and the Fe(C) hTF/TFR complex strongly support our interpretation of the kinetic data.

  9. Self-consistent tight-binding study of low-index titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdin, Serkan; Lin, You; Halley, J. Woods

    2005-07-01

    We report development of a self-consistent tight-binding (SCTB) model for metallic titanium and its use to simulate relaxed, self-consistent low-index surfaces of hcp titanium. We find oscillations in atomic plane separation and electronic density as a function of depth below the surface that do not stabilize until the supercell slab used in the calculation is more than ten layers deep. The SCTB model can only give stable, structures and reasonable surface structures and energies if multipole (particularly dipole) moments are allowed to be induced at the atomic sites and if the first-principles data base includes calculations on short wave length (“frozen phonon”) distortions of the bulk unit cell.

  10. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  11. Surface binding sites (SBSs), mechanism and regulation of enzymes degrading amylopectin and α-limit dextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Jonas W.;

    2013-01-01

    Certain enzymes interact with polysaccharides at surface binding sites (SBSs) situated outside of their active sites. SBSs are not easily identified and their function has been discerned in relatively few cases. Starch degradation is a concerted action involving GH13 hydrolases. New insight...... into barley seed α-amylase 1 (AMY1) and limit dextrinase (LD) includes i. kinetics of bi-exponential amylopectin hydrolysis by AMY1, one reaction having low Km (8 μg/mL) and high kcat (57 s-1) and the other high Km (97 μg/mL) and low kcat (23 s-1). β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) inhibits the first reaction by binding...

  12. Binding of a neutralizing antibody to dengue virus alters the arrangement of surface glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lok, Shee-Mei; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Nybakken, Grant E.; Holdaway, Heather A.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Sedlak, Dagmar; Fremont, Daved H.; Chipman, Paul R.; Roehrig, John T.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (WU-MED); (CDC)

    2008-04-02

    The monoclonal antibody 1A1D-2 has been shown to strongly neutralize dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 3, primarily by inhibiting attachment to host cells. A crystal structure of its antigen binding fragment (Fab) complexed with domain III of the viral envelope glycoprotein, E, showed that the epitope would be partially occluded in the known structure of the mature dengue virus. Nevertheless, antibody could bind to the virus at 37 degrees C, suggesting that the virus is in dynamic motion making hidden epitopes briefly available. A cryo-electron microscope image reconstruction of the virus:Fab complex showed large changes in the organization of the E protein that exposed the epitopes on two of the three E molecules in each of the 60 icosahedral asymmetric units of the virus. The changes in the structure of the viral surface are presumably responsible for inhibiting attachment to cells.

  13. Surface displaced alfa-enolase of Lactobacillus plantarum is a fibronectin binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Vastano, Valeria; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Candela, Marco; Vici, Manuela; Muscariello, Lidia; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are one of the most important health promoting groups of the human intestinal microbiota. Their protective role within the gut consists in out competing invading pathogens for ecological niches and metabolic substrates. Among the features necessary to provide health benefits, commensal microorganisms must have the ability to adhere to human intestinal cells and consequently to colonize the gut. Studies on mechanisms mediating adhesion of lactobacilli to human intestinal cells showed that factors involved in the interaction vary mostly among different species and strains, mainly regarding interaction between bacterial adhesins and extracellular matrix or mucus proteins. We have investigated the adhesive properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, a member of the human microbiota of healthy individuals. Results We show the identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum LM3 cell surface protein (48 kDa), which specifically binds to human fibronectin (Fn), an extracellular matrix protein. By means of mass spectrometric analysis this protein was identified as the product of the L. plantarum enoA1 gene, coding the EnoA1 alfa-enolase. Surface localization of EnoA1 was proved by immune electron microscopy. In the mutant strain LM3-CC1, carrying the enoA1 null mutation, the 48 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable neither by anti-enolase Western blot nor by Fn-overlay immunoblotting assay. Moreover, by an adhesion assay we show that LM3-CC1 cells bind to fibronectin-coated surfaces less efficiently than wild type cells, thus demonstrating the significance of the surface displaced EnoA1 protein for the L. plantarum LM3 adhesion to fibronectin. Conclusion Adhesion to host tissues represents a crucial early step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensal bacteria. We demonstrated the involvement of the L. plantarum Eno A1 alfa-enolase in Fn-binding, by studying LM3 and LM3-CC1 surface

  14. Interaction of vanadium(IV) with human serum apo-transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehtab, Sameena; Gonçalves, Gisela; Roy, Somnath; Tomaz, Ana Isabel; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Santos, Marino F A; Romão, Maria J; Jakusch, Tamás; Kiss, Tamás; Pessoa, João Costa

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of V(IV)O-salts as well as of a few V(IV)O(carrier)n complexes with human serum transferrin (hTF) is studied focusing on the determination of the nature and stoichiometry of the binding of V(IV)O(2+) to hTF, as well as whether the conformation of hTF upon binding to V(IV)O(2+) or to its complexes is changed. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra measured for solutions containing V(IV)O(2+) and apo-hTF, and V(IV)O-maltol and apo-hTF, clearly indicate that hTF-V(IV)O-maltol ternary species form with a V(IV)O:maltol stoichiometry of 1:1. For V(IV)O salts and several V(IV)O(carrier)n complexes (carrier ligand=maltolato, dhp, picolinato and dipicolinato) (Hdhp=1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) the maximum number of V(IV)O(2+) bound per mole of hTF is determined to be ~2 or lower in all cases. The binding of V(IV)O to apo-hTF most certainly involves several amino acid residues of the Fe-binding site, and as concluded by urea gel electrophoresis experiments, the formation of (V(IV)O)2hTF species may occur with the closing of the hTF conformation as is the case in (Fe(III))2hTF, which is an essential feature for the transferrin receptor recognition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of VO2+ ion with human serum transferrin and albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Daniele; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni

    2009-04-01

    The complexation of VO(2+) ion with the high molecular mass components of the blood serum, human serum transferrin (hTf) and albumin (HSA), has been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy. In the case of transferrin, the results confirm those previously obtained, showing that VO(2+) ion occupies three different binding sites, A, B(1) and B(2), distinguishable in the X-band anisotropic spectrum recorded in D(2)O. With albumin the results show that a dinuclear complex (VO)(2)(d)HSA is formed in equimolar aqueous solutions or with an excess of protein; in the presence of an excess of VO(2+), the multinuclear complex (VO)(x)(m)HSA is the prevalent species, where x=5-6 indicates the equivalents of metal ion coordinated by HSA. The structure of the dinuclear species is discussed and the donor atoms involved in the metal coordination are proposed on the basis of the measured EPR parameters. Two different binding modes of albumin can be distinguished varying the pH, with only one species being present at the physiological value. The results show that the previously named "strong" site is not the N-terminal copper binding site, and some hypothesis on the metal coordination is discussed, with the (51)V A(z) values for the proposed donor sets obtained by DFT (density functional theory) calculations. Finally, preliminary results obtained in the ternary system VO(2+)/hTf/HSA are shown in order to determine the different binding strength of the two proteins. Due to the low VO(2+) concentration used, the recording of the EPR spectra through the repeated acquisition of the weak signals is essential to obtain a good signal to noise ratio in these systems.

  16. Serum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.; Ndeto, P.; Burema, J.; Benguin, Y.; Kok, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory

  17. Transferrin microheterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis - Relation with disease activity and anemia of chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); G. Vreugdenhil (Gerard); G. de Jong (G.); A.J.G. Swaak (Antonius); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the relation between disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the microheterogeneity of transferrin. Using crossed immuno isoelectric focusing, transferrin microheterogeneity patterns were analyzed in sera of healthy individuals, nonanemic RA patients, iron deficient

  18. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, David Henning; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler;

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms....... Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site...... on the origami surface....

  19. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guével, Xavier; Daum, Nicole; Schneider, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight® Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 µg ml - 1-1 mg ml - 1). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  20. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  1. Selective Binding, Self-Assembly and Nanopatterning of the Creutz-Taube Ion on Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingling Hang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface attachment properties of the Creutz-Taube ion, i.e., [(NH35Ru(pyrazineRu(NH35]5+, on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic types of surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results indicated that the Creutz-Taube ions only bound to hydrophilic surfaces, such as SiO2 and –OH terminated organic SAMs on gold substrates. No attachment of the ions on hydrophobic surfaces such as –CH3 terminated organic SAMs and poly(methylmethacrylate (PMMA thin films covered gold or SiO2 substrates was observed. Further ellipsometric, atomic force microscopy (AFM and time-dependent XPS studies suggested that the attached cations could form an inorganic analog of the self-assembled monolayer on SiO2 substrate with a “lying-down” orientation. The strong electrostatic interaction between the highly charged cations and the anionic SiO2 surface was believed to account for these observations. Based on its selective binding property, patterning of wide (~200 nm and narrow (~35 nm lines of the Creutz-Taube ions on SiO2 surface were demonstrated through PMMA electron resist masks written by electron beam lithography (EBL.

  2. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  3. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazanova, Mariya; Huppertz, Thom; Beerthuyzen, Marke; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Janssen, Patrick; Wels, Michiel; Kok, Jan; Bachmann, Herwig

    2017-01-01

    Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  4. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  5. Efficient conformational sampling of peptides adsorbed onto inorganic surfaces: insights from a quartz binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Louise B; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2013-04-07

    Harnessing the properties of biomolecules, such as peptides, adsorbed on inorganic surfaces is of interest to many cross-disciplinary areas of science, ranging from biomineralisation to nanomedicine. Key to advancing research in this area is determination of the peptide conformation(s) in its adsorbed state, at the aqueous interface. Molecular simulation is one such approach for accomplishing this goal. In this respect, use of temperature-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) can yield enhanced sampling of the interfacial conformations, but does so at great computational expense, chiefly because of the need to include an explicit representation of water at the interface. Here, we investigate a number of more economical variations on REMD, chiefly those based on Replica Exchange with Solvent Tempering (REST), using the aqueous quartz-binding peptide S1-(100) α-quartz interfacial system as a benchmark. We also incorporate additional implementation details specifically targeted at improving sampling of biomolecules at interfaces. We find the REST-based variants yield configurational sampling of the peptide-surface system comparable with T-REMD, at a fraction of the computational time and resource. Our findings also deliver novel insights into the binding behaviour of the S1 peptide at the quartz (100) surface that are consistent with available experimental data.

  6. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  7. Partial characterization of transferrins of catfish (Silurus glanis L.) and pike (Esox lucius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratil, A; Tomásek, V; Clamp, J R; Williams, J

    1985-01-01

    Basic composition and properties of isolated transferrins of Silurus glanis and Esox lucius have been compared. In transferrin of S. glanis carbohydrate is absent, but it is present in transferrin of E. lucius (2.5%). The N-terminal amino acid is alanine in both species. Mol. wts are 68,400 (S. glanis) and 86,800 (E. lucius). Transferrins of the two species are heterogeneous, but genetic polymorphism was not observed.

  8. Specific binding of avidin to biotin containing lipid lamella surfaces studied with monolayers and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Qin, H; Xiao, C; Wen, C; Wang, S; Sui, S F

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of avidin (from egg white) with phospholipid (monolayer and bilayer) model membranes containing biotin-conjugated phospholipids has been studied. In the first part, using surface sensitive techniques (ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance) we demonstrated that the nonspecific adsorption of avidin to phospholipid lamella could be abolished by adding an amount of Ca2+, Mg2+ or Ba2+ that led to an electrostatic interaction. The specific binding of avidin to lipid mixtures containing biotin-conjugated phospholipids was obviously composition dependent. The ratio 1:12 of a B-DPPE/DPPE mixture was found to be the optimum molar ratio. When we compared the results from the surface sensitive techniques with those from the electron micrographs of a two dimensional crystal of avidin (obtained in our laboratory), the optimum ratio was found to be determined by the effect of lateral steric hindrance. In the second part, we observed the pattern of the layers of fluorescently labeled phospholipid and adsorbed proteins with a home-made micro fluorescence film balance. The fluorescence images showed that avidin was preferentially bound to the receptors that were in the fluid domains. Further, with a sensitive fluorescence assay method, the effect of the phase behavior of liposomes on the specific binding of avidin was measured. This showed that avidin interacted with biotinlipid more weakly in the gel state liposome than in the liquid state liposome. The major conclusion was that the binding of avidin to a membrane bound model receptor was significantly restricted by two factors: one was the lateral steric hindrance and the other was the fluidity of the model membrane.

  9. Characterization of transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deshui; Lee, Hsin-Fang; Pettit, Steven C; Zaro, Jennica L; Huang, Ning; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2012-11-30

    Transferrin (TF) plays a critical physiological role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR)-mediated endocytosis pathway in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. Human serum TF (hTF) is extensively used as an iron-delivery vehicle in various mammalian cell cultures for production of therapeutic proteins, and is also being explored for use as a drug carrier to treat a number of diseases by employing its unique TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway. With the increasing concerns over the risk of transmission of infectious pathogenic agents of human plasma-derived TF, recombinant hTF is preferred to use for these applications. Here, we carry out comparative studies of the TFR binding, TFR-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant hTF from rice (rhTF), and evaluate its suitability for biopharmaceutical applications. Through a TFR competition binding affinity assay with HeLa human cervic carcinoma cells (CCL-2) and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells (HTB-37), we show that rhTF competes similarly as hTF to bind TFR, and both the TFR binding capacity and dissociation constant of rhTF are comparable to that of hTF. The endocytosis assay confirms that rhTF behaves similarly as hTF in the slow accumulation in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and the rapid recycling pathway in HeLa cells. The pulse-chase assay of rhTF in Caco-2 and HeLa cells further illustrates that rice-derived rhTF possesses the similar endocytosis and intracellular processing compared to hTF. The cell culture assays show that rhTF is functionally similar to hTF in the delivery of iron to two diverse mammalian cell lines, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (CCL-240) and murine hybridoma cells derived from a Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma fusion partner (HB-72), for supporting their proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of antibody production. The functional similarity between rice derived rhTF and native hTF in their cellular iron delivery, TFR binding, and TFR

  10. Characterization of transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Deshui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transferrin (TF plays a critical physiological role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. Human serum TF (hTF is extensively used as an iron-delivery vehicle in various mammalian cell cultures for production of therapeutic proteins, and is also being explored for use as a drug carrier to treat a number of diseases by employing its unique TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway. With the increasing concerns over the risk of transmission of infectious pathogenic agents of human plasma-derived TF, recombinant hTF is preferred to use for these applications. Here, we carry out comparative studies of the TFR binding, TFR-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant hTF from rice (rhTF, and evaluate its suitability for biopharmaceutical applications. Result Through a TFR competition binding affinity assay with HeLa human cervic carcinoma cells (CCL-2 and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells (HTB-37, we show that rhTF competes similarly as hTF to bind TFR, and both the TFR binding capacity and dissociation constant of rhTF are comparable to that of hTF. The endocytosis assay confirms that rhTF behaves similarly as hTF in the slow accumulation in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and the rapid recycling pathway in HeLa cells. The pulse-chase assay of rhTF in Caco-2 and HeLa cells further illustrates that rice-derived rhTF possesses the similar endocytosis and intracellular processing compared to hTF. The cell culture assays show that rhTF is functionally similar to hTF in the delivery of iron to two diverse mammalian cell lines, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (CCL-240 and murine hybridoma cells derived from a Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma fusion partner (HB-72, for supporting their proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of antibody production. Conclusion The functional similarity between rice derived rhTF and native hTF in

  11. Weakly Hydrated Surfaces and the Binding Interactions of Small Biological Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J. W.; Tavagnacco, L.; Ehrlich, L.; Chen, M.; Schnupf, U.; Himmel, M. E.; Saboungi, M. L.; Cesaro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  12. Vibrations of small cobalt clusters on low-index surfaces of copper: Tight-binding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, S. D.; Eremeev, S. V.; Rusina, G. G.; Stepanyuk, V. S.; Bruno, P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-08-01

    Vibrational properties (frequencies, polarizations, and lifetimes) of a single adatom, dimer, and trimer of Co on low-index Cu surfaces, Cu(111), Cu(001), and Cu(110) are studied by using tight-binding second moment approximation interatomic interaction potentials. We show that structural and vibrational properties of the Co clusters strongly depend on the substrate orientation. The longest lifetimes of 1-2.5 ps have been found for high-frequency z -polarized vibrations in all the Co clusters considered. The shortest lifetimes of 0.1-0.8 ps have been obtained for low-frequency horizontal (frustrated translation) vibrational modes.

  13. Transferrin-modified nanostructured lipid carriers as multifunctional nanomedicine for codelivery of DNA and doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Y

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Yiqun Han,1,† Ying Zhang,2,† Danni Li,3 Yuanyuan Chen,1 Jiping Sun,1 Fansheng Kong4 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, General Hospital of Ji’nan Command, PLA, 2Center of Interventional Therapy, Ji’nan Infectious Disease Hospital, 3Department of Internal Neurology, Ji’nan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, 4Department of Hematology, General Hospital of Ji’nan Command, PLA, Ji’nan, People’s Republic of China †These two authors contributed equally to this work Background: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC, composed of solid and liquid lipids, and surfactants are potentially good colloidal drug carriers. The aim of this study was to develop surface-modified NLC as multifunctional nanomedicine for codelivery of enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pEGFP and doxorubicin (DOX. Methods: Two different nanocarriers: pEGFP- and DOX-loaded NLC, and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN were prepared. Transferrin-containing ligands were used for the surface coating of the vectors. Their average size, zeta potential, and drug encapsulation capacity were evaluated. In vitro transfection efficiency of the modified vectors was evaluated in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549 cells, and in vivo transfection efficiency of the modified vectors was evaluated in a mouse bearing A549 cells model. Results: Transferrin-modified DOX and pEGFP coencapsulated NLC (T-NLC has a particle size of 198 nm and a +19 mV surface charge. The in vitro cell viabilities of the T-NLC formulations were over 80% compared with the control. T-NLC displayed remarkably greater gene transfection efficiency and enhanced antitumor activity than DOX- and pEGFP-coencapsulated SLN in vivo.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that T-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity through the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy. Also coating of active transferrin improved the lung cancer cell-targeting of the carriers. In summary, the novel gene

  14. The protective role of transferrin in Müller glial cells after iron-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Emilie; Fontaine, Isabelle; Jonet, Laurent; Guillou, Florian; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Courtois, Yves; Jeanny, Jean-Claude

    2008-05-20

    Transferrin (Tf) expression is enhanced by aging and inflammation in humans. We investigated the role of transferrin in glial protection. We generated transgenic mice (Tg) carrying the complete human transferrin gene on a C57Bl/6J genetic background. We studied human (hTf) and mouse (mTf) transferrin localization in Tg and wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6J mice using immunochemistry with specific antibodies. Müller glial (MG) cells were cultured from explants and characterized using cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) and vimentin antibodies. They were further subcultured for study. We incubated cells with FeCl(3)-nitrilotriacetate to test for the iron-induced stress response; viability was determined by direct counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Tf expression was determined by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR with human- or mouse-specific probes. hTf and mTf in the medium were assayed by ELISA or radioimmunoassay (RIA), respectively. mTf was mainly localized in retinal pigment epithelium and ganglion cell layers in retina sections of both mouse lines. hTf was abundant in MG cells. The distribution of mTf and hTf mRNA was consistent with these findings. mTf and hTf were secreted into the medium of MG cell primary cultures. Cells from Tg mice secreted hTf at a particularly high level. However, both WT and Tg cell cultures lose their ability to secrete Tf after a few passages. Tg MG cells secreting hTf were more resistant to iron-induced stress toxicity than those no longer secreted hTf. Similarly, exogenous human apo-Tf, but not human holo-Tf, conferred resistance to iron-induced stress on MG cells from WT mice. hTf localization in MG cells from Tg mice was reminiscent of that reported for aged human retina and age-related macular degeneration, both conditions associated with iron deposition. The role of hTf in protection against toxicity in Tg MG cells probably involves an adaptive mechanism developed in neural retina to

  15. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Yeu-Kuang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Din Ping [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S, E-mail: rsliu@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  16. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Liu, Ru-Shi; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tsai, Din Ping; Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  17. Binding of dengue virus particles and dengue proteins onto solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Edla M A; Dario, Aline F; França, Rafael F O; Fonseca, Benedito A L; Petri, Denise F S

    2010-09-01

    The interaction between dengue virus particles (DENV), sedimentation hemagglutinin particles (SHA), dengue virus envelope protein (Eprot), and solid surfaces was investigated by means of ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surfaces chosen are bare Si/SiO2 wafers and Si/SiO2 wafers covered with concanavalin A (ConA), jacalin (Jac), polystyrene (PS), or poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) films. Adsorption experiments at pH 7.2 and pH 3 onto all surfaces revealed that (i) adsorption of DENV particles took place only onto ConA under pH 7.2, because of specific recognition between glycans on DENV surface and ConA binding site; (ii) DENV particles did not attach to any of the surfaces at pH 3, suggesting the presence of positive charges on DENV surface at this pH, which repel the positively charged lectin surfaces; (iii) SHA particles are positively charged at pH 7.2 and pH 3 because they adhered to negatively charged surfaces at pH 7.2 and repelled positively charged layers at pH 3; and (iv) SHA particles carry polar groups on the surface because they attached to silanol surfaces at pH 3 and avoided hydrophobic PS films at pH 3 and pH 7.2. The adsorption behavior of Eprot at pH 7.2 revealed affinity for ConA>Jac>PSS>PS≈bare Si/SiO2 layers. These findings indicate that selectivity of the Eprot adsorption is higher when it is part of virus structure than when it is free in solution. The correlation between surface energy values determined by means of contact angle measurements and DENV, SHA, or Eprot adsorption behavior was used to understand the intermolecular forces at the interfaces. A direct correlation was not found because the contributions from surface energy were probably surpassed by specific contributions.

  18. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  19. Total mortality by elevated transferrin saturation in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2013-01-01

    It is not known to what extent iron overload predicts prognosis in patients with diabetes after diagnosis or whether iron overload is a risk factor independent of the HFE genotype. We investigated total and cause-specific mortality according to increased transferrin saturation (≥ 50 vs....

  20. Isoforms of transferrin in psoriasis patients abusing alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hoefkens (Peter); E.M. Higgins; R.J. Ward (Roberta); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe different isoforms of transferrin have been quantified by isoelectric focusing in the sera of psoriasis patients with and without a history of abusing alcohol. In both male and female psoriasis subjects abusing alcohol, there were significant increases in the 2-sial

  1. Nonrandom distribution of iron in circulating human transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, O; Aisen, P

    1986-07-01

    By combining the urea gel electrophoresis technique of Makey and Seal with Western immunoblotting, a method has been developed for analyzing the distribution of iron between the two sites of circulating human transferrin. The new method avoids exposure of samples to a nonphysiologic pH that may promote removal or redistribution of iron from the protein; this facilitates examination of multiple samples at one time. Analysis of 21 freshly drawn specimens from normal human subjects confirms previous reports that iron is not randomly distributed in the specific sites of transferrin. Rather, there is a considerable range in the ratio of occupancies of N-terminal and C-terminal sites (N:C ratio), from 0.31 to 6.87 in the present study, with the N-terminal site predominantly occupied in most subjects. The N:C ratio correlates modestly with serum iron concentration (r = .54). Possible flaws in studies indicating a random occupancy of the specific sites of circulating transferrin may lie in the low pH to which samples may be exposed during procedures based on isoelectric focusing or in drawing inferences from data considering only total monoferric transferrin rather than the two distinguishable monoferric species.

  2. Cargo binding promotes KDEL receptor clustering at the mammalian cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Björn; Shaebani, M Reza; Rammo, Domenik; Bubel, Tobias; Santen, Ludger; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2016-06-29

    Transmembrane receptor clustering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in pro- and eukaryotic cells to physically sense receptor/ligand interactions and subsequently translate an exogenous signal into a cellular response. Despite that receptor cluster formation has been described for a wide variety of receptors, ranging from chemotactic receptors in bacteria to growth factor and neurotransmitter receptors in mammalian cells, a mechanistic understanding of the underlying molecular processes is still puzzling. In an attempt to fill this gap we followed a combined experimental and theoretical approach by dissecting and modulating cargo binding, internalization and cellular response mediated by KDEL receptors (KDELRs) at the mammalian cell surface after interaction with a model cargo/ligand. Using a fluorescent variant of ricin toxin A chain as KDELR-ligand (eGFP-RTA(H/KDEL)), we demonstrate that cargo binding induces dose-dependent receptor cluster formation at and subsequent internalization from the membrane which is associated and counteracted by anterograde and microtubule-assisted receptor transport to preferred docking sites at the plasma membrane. By means of analytical arguments and extensive numerical simulations we show that cargo-synchronized receptor transport from and to the membrane is causative for KDELR/cargo cluster formation at the mammalian cell surface.

  3. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To enhance our understanding of LBSs, it is worth performing such comparisons among patches and classifying them based on similarities of their surface configurations and electrostatic potentials. In this study, we first developed a rapid method to compare two patches. We then clustered patches corresponding to the same PDB chemical component identifier for a ligand, and selected a representative patch from each cluster. We subsequently exhaustively as compared the representative patches and clustered them using similarity score, PatSim. Finally, the resultant PatSim scores were compared with similarities of atomic structures of the LBSs and those of the ligand-binding protein sequences and functions. Consequently, we classified the patches into ∼2000 well-characterized clusters. We found that about 63% of these clusters are used in identical protein folds, although about 25% of the clusters are conserved in distantly related proteins and even in proteins with cross-fold similarity. Furthermore, we showed that patches with higher PatSim score have potential to be involved in similar biological processes. PMID:23934772

  4. Targeting of cytosolic mRNA to mitochondria: naked RNA can bind to the mitochondrial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Morgane; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondria contain hundreds of proteins but only a few are encoded by the mitochondrial genome. The other proteins are nuclear-encoded and imported into mitochondria. These proteins can be translated on free cytosolic polysomes, then targeted and imported into mitochondria. Nonetheless, numerous cytosolic mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins are detected at the surface of mitochondria in yeast, plants and animals. The localization of mRNAs to the vicinity of mitochondria would be a way for mitochondrial protein sorting. The mechanisms responsible for mRNA targeting to mitochondria are not clearly identified. Sequences within the mRNA molecules (cis-elements), as well as a few trans-acting factors, have been shown to be essential for targeting of some mRNAs. In order to identify receptors involved in mRNA docking to the mitochondrial surface, we have developed an in vitro mRNA binding assay with isolated plant mitochondria. We show that naked mRNAs are able to bind to isolated mitochondria, and our results strongly suggest that mRNA docking to the plant mitochondrial outer membrane requires at least one component of TOM complex.

  5. Brownian nanoimaging of interface dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at cell surfaces in 3-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Evans, Evan A

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method for nanoimaging interfacial dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at surfaces of live cells in 3-D. The imaging probe is a 1-μm diameter glass bead confined by a soft laser trap to create a "cloud" of fluctuating states. Using a facile on-line method of video image analysis, the probe displacements are reported at ~10 ms intervals with bare precisions (±SD) of 4-6 nm along the optical axis (elevation) and 2 nm in the transverse directions. We demonstrate how the Brownian distributions are analyzed to characterize the free energy potential of each small probe in 3-D taking into account the blur effect of its motions during CCD image capture. Then, using the approach to image interactions of a labeled probe with lamellae of leukocytic cells spreading on cover-glass substrates, we show that deformations of the soft distribution in probe elevations provide both a sensitive long-range sensor for defining the steric topography of a cell lamella and a fast telemetry for reporting rare events of probe binding with its surface receptors. Invoking established principles of Brownian physics and statistical thermodynamics, we describe an off-line method of super resolution that improves precision of probe separations from a non-reactive steric boundary to ~1 nm.

  6. Biochemical and structural characterization of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Bobst, Cedric E; Zhang, Deshui; Pettit, Steve C; Kaltashov, Igor A; Huang, Ning; Mason, Anne B

    2012-11-01

    The Fe(3+) binding protein human serum transferrin (hTF) is well known for its role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR). A new application is the use of hTF as a therapy and targeted drug delivery system for a number of diseases. Recently, production of hTF in plants has been reported; such systems provide a relatively inexpensive, animal-free (eliminating potential contamination by animal pathogens) method to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins for such biopharmaceutical applications. Specifically, the production of Optiferrin (hTF produced in rice, Oryza sativa, from InVitria) has been shown to yield large amounts of functional protein for use in culture medium for cellular iron delivery to promote growth. In the present work we describe further purification (by gel filtration) and characterization of hTF produced in rice (purified Optiferrin) to determine its suitability in biopharmaceutical applications. The spectral, mass spectrometric, urea gel and kinetic analysis shows that purified Optiferrin is similar to recombinant nonglycosylated N-His tagged hTF expressed by baby hamster kidney cells and/or serum derived glycosylated hTF. Additionally, in a competitive immunoassay, iron-loaded Optiferrin is equivalent to iron-loaded N-His hTF in its ability to bind to the soluble portion of the TFR immobilized in an assay plate. As an essential requirement for any functional hTF, both lobes of purified Optiferrin bind Fe(3+) tightly yet reversibly. Although previously shown to be capable of delivering Fe(3+) to cells, the kinetics of iron release from iron-loaded Optiferrin™/sTFR and iron-loaded N-His hTF/sTFR complexes differ somewhat. We conclude that the purified Optiferrin might be suitable for consideration in biopharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Nonferrous Metals as Potential In Vivo Tracers of Transferrin-Based Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hanwei; Wang, Shunhai; Nguyen, Son N.; Elci, S. Gokhan; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2016-02-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is a promising candidate for targeted drug delivery. While development of such products is impossible without the ability to monitor biodistribution of Tf-drug conjugates in tissues and reliable measurements of their levels in blood and other biological fluids, the presence of very abundant endogenous Tf presents a significant impediment to such efforts. Several noncognate metals have been evaluated in this work as possible tracers of exogenous transferrin in complex biological matrices using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) as a detection tool. Placing Ni(II) on a His-tag of recombinant Tf resulted in formation of a marginally stable protein-metal complex, which readily transfers the metal to ubiquitous physiological scavengers, such as serum albumin. An alternative strategy targeted iron-binding pockets of Tf, where cognate Fe(III) was replaced by metal ions known to bind this protein. Both Ga(III) and In(III) were evaluated, with the latter being vastly superior as a tracer (stronger binding to Tf unaffected by the presence of metal scavengers and the retained ability to associate with Tf receptor). Spiking serum with indium-loaded Tf followed by ICP MS detection demonstrated that protein quantities as low as 0.04 nM can be readily detected in animal blood. Combining laser ablation with ICP MS detection allows distribution of exogenous Tf to be mapped within animal tissue cross-sections with spatial resolution exceeding 100 μm. The method can be readily extended to a range of other therapeutics where metalloproteins are used as either carriers or payloads.

  8. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  9. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt Barbara A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192 in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  10. Structure-based mutagenesis reveals critical residues in the transferrin receptor participating in the mechanism of pH-induced release of iron from human serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Miller, Brendan F; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2012-03-13

    The recent crystal structure of two monoferric human serum transferrin (Fe(N)hTF) molecules bound to the soluble portion of the homodimeric transferrin receptor (sTFR) has provided new details about this binding interaction that dictates the delivery of iron to cells. Specifically, substantial rearrangements in the homodimer interface of the sTFR occur as a result of the binding of the two Fe(N)hTF molecules. Mutagenesis of selected residues in the sTFR highlighted in the structure was undertaken to evaluate the effect on function. Elimination of Ca(2+) binding in the sTFR by mutating two of four coordinating residues ([E465A,E468A]) results in low production of an unstable and aggregated sTFR. Mutagenesis of two histidines ([H475A,H684A]) at the dimer interface had little effect on the kinetics of release of iron at pH 5.6 from either lobe, reflecting the inaccessibility of this cluster to solvent. Creation of an H318A sTFR mutant allows assignment of a small pH-dependent initial decrease in the magnitude of the fluorescence signal to His318. Removal of the four C-terminal residues of the sTFR, Asp757-Asn758-Glu759-Phe760, eliminates pH-stimulated release of iron from the C-lobe of the Fe(2)hTF/sTFR Δ757-760 complex. The inability of this sTFR mutant to bind and stabilize protonated hTF His349 (a pH-inducible switch) in the C-lobe of hTF accounts for the loss. Collectively, these studies support a model in which a series of pH-induced events involving both TFR residue His318 and hTF residue His349 occurs to promote receptor-stimulated release of iron from the C-lobe of hTF.

  11. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes: evidence for the selective acquisition of oligomeric ferric citrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Arezes

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient in several biological processes such as oxygen transport, DNA replication and erythropoiesis. Plasma iron normally circulates bound to transferrin. In iron overload disorders, however, iron concentrations exceed transferrin binding capacity and iron appears complexed with low molecular weight molecules, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI. NTBI is responsible for the toxicity associated with iron-overload pathologies but the mechanisms leading to NTBI uptake are not fully understood. Here we show for the first time that T lymphocytes are able to take up and accumulate NTBI in a manner that resembles that of hepatocytes. Moreover, we show that both hepatocytes and T lymphocytes take up the oligomeric Fe3Cit3 preferentially to other iron-citrate species, suggesting the existence of a selective NTBI carrier. These results provide a tool for the identification of the still elusive ferric-citrate cellular carrier and may also open a new pathway towards the design of more efficient iron chelators for the treatment of iron overload disorders.

  12. Protein-protein interactions: general trends in the relationship between binding affinity and interfacial buried surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieming; Sawyer, Nicholas; Regan, Lynne

    2013-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in many cellular processes and their affinities and specificities are finely tuned to the functions they perform. Here, we present a study on the relationship between binding affinity and the size and chemical nature of protein-protein interfaces. Our analysis focuses on heterodimers and includes curated structural and thermodynamic data for 113 complexes. We observe a direct correlation between binding affinity and the amount of surface area buried at the interface. For a given amount of surface area buried, the binding affinity spans four orders of magnitude in terms of the dissociation constant (Kd ). Across the entire dataset, we observe no obvious relationship between binding affinity and the chemical composition of the interface. We also calculate the free energy per unit surface area buried, or "surface energy density," of each heterodimer. For interfacial surface areas between 500 and 2000 Å(2) , the surface energy density decreases as the buried surface area increases. As the buried surface area increases beyond about 2000 Å(2) , the surface energy density levels off to a constant value. We believe that these analyses and data will be useful for researchers with an interest in understanding, designing or inhibiting protein-protein interfaces.

  13. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  14. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  15. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  16. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. Results We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the

  17. Design and development of in situ albumin binding surfaces: Evaluation in the paradigm of blood-biomaterial compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta

    Biocompatibility of natural and synthetic implant materials as blood contacting devices is crucial to host response. Implantation often raises complications from thrombotic and thromboembolic events. The aspect of hemocompatibility concentrates on minimizing thrombotic and thromboembolic response of foreign materials in contact with blood. The initial layer of surface adsorbed proteins plays a pivotal role in the adhesion and subsequent aggregation of platelets and in the activation of the coagulation cascade. Therefore, an improved surface architecture is required to gain control over the initial protein adsorption events, thereby extending the sustainability of an implantable device. In general, surfaces with an ability to bind endogenous albumin has been known to minimize platelet adhesion and activation. While the scope of applicability is broad, in this study silicon-based surfaces were selected as model surfaces. A densely packed uniformly distributed silane monolayer was achieved on silicon based surfaces with -- NH2 functionality, upon a careful optimization of hydroxylation and the subsequent silanization with 2 vol% of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxy Silane (APTES). Two linear peptides with affinity for albumin over other serum proteins were selected to create affinity surfaces. Silanized surfaces covalently immobilized with albumin binding peptides were evaluated in the paradigm of blood-biomaterial compatibility. When compared to control surfaces, albumin binding surfaces prepared in this study: (a) possessed 2.0 to 3.0 mug/cm2 of surface bound albumin with minimal surface adsorbed fibrinogen, (b) depicted low levels of adhered platelets and supported a rounded platelet morphology, (c) displayed delayed clotting, (d) showed reduced platelet adhesion and activation under shearing, and (f) exhibited faster adsorption kinetics. Conclusively, in-situ albumin binding surfaces selectively and specifically interacted with albumin without being severely displaced by

  18. Characterization of the Trichomonas vaginalis surface-associated AP65 and binding domain interacting with trichomonads and host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana F; Alderete, Jf

    2007-12-25

    AP65 is a prominent adhesin of Trichomonas vaginalis that mediates binding of parasites to host vaginal epithelial cells (VECs). AP65 with no secretion signal sequence, membrane targeting peptide, and anchoring motif was recently found to be secreted. We first wanted to demonstrate surface association of AP65 to the parasite followed by the identification of the binding epitope interacting with both organisms and VECs. AP65 was found to bind to trichomonads, but not to trypsin-treated parasites, in an auto-ligand assay, suggesting the existence of a surface protein associating with AP65. Since rabbit antiserum IgG antibodies reactive with epitopes localized to the N-terminal region of AP65 inhibit the attachment of live parasites to VECs, we hypothesized that the binding domain was localized to this region. We subcloned five overlapping fragments of AP65 called c1 through c5, and expression of recombinant clones was confirmed with antibodies to AP65. Each purified recombinant protein was then tested for binding activity using an established ligand assay, and fragment c1 with the first twenty-five amino acids in the N-terminal domain was required for binding to VECs and, surprisingly, also to parasites. Importantly, c1 competed with the binding of AP65 to both cells types. T. vaginalis AP65 is a secreted, surface-associated protein and a model is proposed to explain how this secreted protein functions as an adhesin.

  19. Characterization of the Trichomonas vaginalis surface-associated AP65 and binding domain interacting with trichomonads and host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alderete JF

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AP65 is a prominent adhesin of Trichomonas vaginalis that mediates binding of parasites to host vaginal epithelial cells (VECs. AP65 with no secretion signal sequence, membrane targeting peptide, and anchoring motif was recently found to be secreted. Results We first wanted to demonstrate surface association of AP65 to the parasite followed by the identification of the binding epitope interacting with both organisms and VECs. AP65 was found to bind to trichomonads, but not to trypsin-treated parasites, in an auto-ligand assay, suggesting the existence of a surface protein associating with AP65. Since rabbit antiserum IgG antibodies reactive with epitopes localized to the N-terminal region of AP65 inhibit the attachment of live parasites to VECs, we hypothesized that the binding domain was localized to this region. We subcloned five overlapping fragments of AP65 called c1 through c5, and expression of recombinant clones was confirmed with antibodies to AP65. Each purified recombinant protein was then tested for binding activity using an established ligand assay, and fragment c1 with the first twenty-five amino acids in the N-terminal domain was required for binding to VECs and, surprisingly, also to parasites. Importantly, c1 competed with the binding of AP65 to both cells types. Conclusion T. vaginalis AP65 is a secreted, surface-associated protein and a model is proposed to explain how this secreted protein functions as an adhesin.

  20. Binding characteristics of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor to streptococcal surface collagen-like proteins A and B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seron, Mercedes Valls; Plug, Tom; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Marx, Pauline F.; Herwald, Heiko; de Groot, Philip G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of diseases in humans. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) binds to collagen-like proteins ScIA and ScIB at the surface of S. pyogenes. Activation of TAFI at this surface redirects inflammation from a transient to chronic s

  1. Transferrin variation and genetic structure of reindeer populations in Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut H. Røed

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyse transferrin variation in herds of semi-domestic reindeer from Scandinavia. The results are compared with previously reported values for other populations of both semi-domestic and wild reindeer using the same techniques as in the present study. In all populations the number of alleles was high, ranging from seven to eleven, and the heterozygosity was correspondingly high, with a mean of 0.749. This high genetic variation in all populations suggests that inbreeding is not widespread among Scandinavian reindeer. The pattern of allele frequency distribution indicates a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in the transferrin locus, both between the different semi-domestic herds and between the different wild populations. The mean value of genetic distance was 0.069 between semi-domestic herds and 0.091 between wild populations. Between semi-domestic and wild populations the genetic distance was particularly high, with a mean of 0.188. This high value was mainly due to a different pattern in the distribution of the two most common transferrin alleles: Tfu was most common among semi-domestic herds, while TfEI was most common among wild populations. These differences in transferrin allele distribution are discussed in relation to possible different origins of semi-domestic and wild reindeer in Scandinavia, or alternatively, to different selection forces acting on transferrin genotypes in semi-domestic and wild populations.Transferrin-variasjon og genetisk struktur hos rein i Skandinavia.Abstact in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Transferrin-variasjon i tamreinflokker ble analysert ved hjelp av polyacrylamid gel elektroforese. Resultatene er sammenlignet med verdier som tidligere er beskrevet for både tamrein og villrein hvor det ble benyttet samme metode som i denne undersøkelsen. I alle populasjonene ble det registrert et høyt antall alleler (7-11 og heterozygositeten var tilsvarende høy med en

  2. Surface-associated plasminogen binding of Cryptococcus neoformans promotes extracellular matrix invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Stie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of illness and death in persons with predisposing factors, including: malignancies, solid organ transplants, and corticosteroid use. C. neoformans is ubiquitous in the environment and enters into the lungs via inhalation, where it can disseminate through the bloodstream and penetrate the central nervous system (CNS, resulting in a difficult to treat and often-fatal infection of the brain, called meningoencephalitis. Plasminogen is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by cancer cells during metastasis and several pathogenic species of bacteria have been found to manipulate the host plasminogen system to facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of plasminogen at their surface. METHODOLOGY: The invasion of the brain and the central nervous system by penetration of the protective blood-brain barrier is a prerequisite to the establishment of meningoencephalitis by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. neoformans. In this study, we examined the ability of C. neoformans to subvert the host plasminogen system to facilitate tissue barrier invasion. Through a combination of biochemical, cell biology, and proteomic approaches, we have shown that C. neoformans utilizes the host plasminogen system to cross tissue barriers, providing support for the hypothesis that plasminogen-binding may contribute to the invasion of the blood-brain barrier by penetration of the brain endothelial cells and underlying matrix. In addition, we have identified the cell wall-associated proteins that serve as plasminogen receptors and characterized both the plasminogen-binding and plasmin-activation potential for this significant human pathogen. CONCLUSIONS: The results of

  3. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  4. Chelation gradients for investigation of metal ion binding at silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Balamurali; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2014-08-26

    Centimeter-long surface gradients in bi- and tridentate chelating agents have been formed via controlled rate infusion, and the coordination of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) to these surfaces has been examined as a function of distance by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). 3-(Trimethoxysilylpropyl)ethylenediamine and 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine were used as precursor silanes to form the chelation gradients. When the gradients were exposed to a metal ion solution, a series of coordination complexes formed along the length of the substrate. For both chelating agents at the three different concentrations studied, the amine content gradually increased from top to bottom as expected for a surface chemical gradient. While the Cu 2p peak area had nearly the same profile as nitrogen, the Zn 2p peak area did not and exhibited a plateau along much of the gradient. The normalized nitrogen-to-metal peak area ratio (N/M) was found to be highly dependent on the type of ligand, its surface concentration, and the type of metal ion. For Cu(2+), the N/M ratio ranged from 8 to 11 on the diamine gradient and was ∼4 on the triamine gradient, while for Zn(2+), the N/M ratio was 4-8 on diamine and 5-7 on triamine gradients. The extent of protonation of amine groups was higher for the diamine gradients, which could lead to an increased N/M ratio. Both 1:1 and 1:2 ligand/metal complexes along with dinuclear complexes are proposed to form, with their relative amounts dependent on the ligand, ligand density, and metal ion. Collectively, the methods and results described herein represent a new approach to study metal ion binding and coordination on surfaces, which is especially important to the extraction, preconcentration, and separation of metal ions.

  5. Tailoring odorant-binding protein coatings characteristics for surface acoustic wave biosensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietrantonio, F.; Benetti, M.; Dinca, V.; Cannatà, D.; Verona, E.; D'Auria, S.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, wild type bovine odorant-binding proteins (wtbOBPs) were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and utilized as active material on surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to determine the chemical, morphological characteristics of the protein thin films. The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups of wtbOBPs do not suffer significant changes in the MAPLE-deposited films when compared to the reference one. The topographical studies show that the homogeneity, density and the roughness of the coatings are related mainly to the laser parameters (fluence and number of pulses). SAW biosensor responses to different concentrations of R-(-)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(-)-carvone (carvone) were evaluated. The obtained sensitivities, achieved through the optimization of deposition parameters, demonstrated that MAPLE is a promising deposition technique for SAW biosensor implementation.

  6. An Allergen Portrait Gallery: Representative Structures and an Overview of IgE Binding Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Ivanciuc

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the biochemical classification and structural determination of allergens and allergen–antibody complexes has enhanced our understanding of the molecular determinants of allergenicity. Databases of allergens and their epitopes have facilitated the clustering of allergens according to their sequences and, more recently, their structures. Groups of similar sequences are identified for allergenic proteins from diverse sources, and all allergens are classified into a limited number of protein structural families. A gallery of experimental structures selected from the protein classes with the largest number of allergens demonstrate the structural diversity of the allergen universe. Further comparison of these structures and identification of areas that are different from innocuous proteins within the same protein family can be used to identify features specific to known allergens. Experimental and computational results related to the determination of IgE binding surfaces and methods to define allergen-specific motifs are highlighted.

  7. Tailoring odorant-binding protein coatings characteristics for surface acoustic wave biosensor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pietrantonio, F., E-mail: fabio.dp@idasc.cnr.it [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Benetti, M. [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dinca, V. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Cannatà, D. [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Verona, E. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); D’Auria, S. [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, National Research Council of Italy, Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    In this study, wild type bovine odorant-binding proteins (wtbOBPs) were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and utilized as active material on surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to determine the chemical, morphological characteristics of the protein thin films. The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups of wtbOBPs do not suffer significant changes in the MAPLE-deposited films when compared to the reference one. The topographical studies show that the homogeneity, density and the roughness of the coatings are related mainly to the laser parameters (fluence and number of pulses). SAW biosensor responses to different concentrations of R-(–)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(–)-carvone (carvone) were evaluated. The obtained sensitivities, achieved through the optimization of deposition parameters, demonstrated that MAPLE is a promising deposition technique for SAW biosensor implementation.

  8. Fractal binding and dissociation kinetics of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), a heart-related compound, on biosensor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doke, Atul M.; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-05-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation of different heart-related compounds in solution to receptors immobilized on biosensor surfaces. The data analyzed include LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) concentrations in solution to egg-white apoA-I rHDL immobilized on a biosensor chip surface.1 Single- and dual- fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s), affinity values, and the fractal dimensions were obtained from the regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited).2 The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. Predictive equations are developed for the binding rate coefficient as a function of the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface and on the LCAT concentration in solution, and for the affinity as a function of the ratio of fractal dimensions present in the binding and the dissociation phases. The analysis presented provided physical insights into these analyte-receptor reactions occurring on different biosensor surfaces.

  9. Probing the recognition surface of a DNA triplex: binding studies with intercalator-neomycin conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang; Xi, Hongjuan; Kumar, Sunil; Gray, David; Davis, Erik; Hamilton, Paris; Skriba, Michael; Arya, Dev P

    2010-07-06

    Thermodynamic studies on the interactions between intercalator-neomycin conjugates and a DNA polynucleotide triplex [poly(dA).2poly(dT)] were conducted. To draw a complete picture of such interactions, naphthalene diimide-neomycin (3) and anthraquinone-neomycin (4) conjugates were synthesized and used together with two other analogues, previously synthesized pyrene-neomycin (1) and BQQ-neomycin (2) conjugates, in our investigations. A combination of experiments, including UV denaturation, circular dichroism (CD) titration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), revealed that all four conjugates (1-4) stabilized poly(dA).2poly(dT) much more than its parent compound, neomycin. UV melting experiments clearly showed that the temperature (T(m3-->2)) at which poly(dA).2poly(dT) dissociated into poly(dA).poly(dT) and poly(dT) increased dramatically (>12 degrees C) in the presence of intercalator-neomycin conjugates (1-4) even at a very low concentration (2 muM). In contrast to intercalator-neomycin conjugates, the increment of T(m3-->2) of poly(dA).2poly(dT) induced by neomycin was negligible under the same conditions. The binding preference of intercalator-neomycin conjugates (1-4) to poly(dA).2poly(dT) was also confirmed by competition dialysis and a fluorescent intercalator displacement assay. Circular dichroism titration studies revealed that compounds 1-4 had slightly larger binding site size ( approximately 7-7.5) with poly(dA).2poly(dT) as compared to neomycin ( approximately 6.5). The thermodynamic parameters of these intercalator-neomycin conjugates with poly(dA).2poly(dT) were derived from an integrated van't Hoff equation using the T(m3-->2) values, the binding site size numbers, and other parameters obtained from DSC and ITC. The binding affinity of all tested ligands with poly(dA).2poly(dT) increased in the following order: neomycin intercalator-neomycin conjugates for poly(dA).2poly(dT) increases as a function of

  10. Binding of chloroquine to ionic micelles: Effect of pH and micellar surface charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Santos, Marcela de, E-mail: marcelafarmausp77@gmail.com [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Perpétua Freire de Morais Del Lama, Maria, E-mail: mpemdel@fcfrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Departamento de Química Analítica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, s/n, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-970 (Brazil); Siuiti Ito, Amando, E-mail: amandosi@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); and others

    2014-03-15

    The pharmacological action of chloroquine relies on its ability to cross biological membranes in order to accumulate inside lysosomes. The present work aimed at understanding the basis for the interaction between different chloroquine species and ionic micelles of opposite charges, the latter used as a simple membrane model. The sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence of chloroquine to changes in its local environment was used to probe its interaction with cetyltrimethylammonium micelles presenting bromide (CTAB) and sulfate (CTAS) as counterions, in addition to dodecyl sulfate micelles bearing sodium (SDS) and tetramethylammonium (TMADS) counterions. Counterion exchange was shown to have little effect on drug–micelle interaction. Chloroquine first dissociation constant (pKa{sub 1}) shifted to opposite directions when anionic and cationic micelles were compared. Chloroquine binding constants (K{sub b}) revealed that electrostatic forces mediate charged drug–micelle association, whereas hydrophobic interactions allowed neutral chloroquine to associate with anionic and cationic micelles. Fluorescence quenching studies indicated that monoprotonated chloroquine is inserted deeper into the micelle surface of anionic micelles than its neutral form, the latter being less exposed to the aqueous phase when associated with cationic over anionic assemblies. The findings provide further evidence that chloroquine–micelle interaction is driven by a tight interplay between the drug form and the micellar surface charge, which can have a major effect on the drug biological activity. -- Highlights: • Chloroquine (CQ) pKa{sub 1} increased for SDS micelles and decreased for CTAB micelles. • CQ is solubilized to the surface of both CTAB and SDS micelles. • Monoprotonated CQ is buried deeper into SDS micelles than neutral CQ. • Neutral CQ is less exposed to aqueous phase in CTAB over SDS micelles. • Local pH and micellar surface charge mediate interaction of CQ with

  11. Cytisine binds with similar affinity to nicotinic alpha4beta2 receptors on the cell surface and in homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jessie; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2003-01-03

    Cytisine and nicotine bound to specific sites in homogenates prepared from HEK 293 cells which stably express human neuronal nicotinic alpha4 and beta2 subunits. The number of sites was the same for both ligands and nicotine was a full competitive inhibitor of cytisine binding. However, when binding was done to intact cells the number of binding sites per cell for nicotine was approximately 4-fold the number of sites for cytisine. Nicotine fully blocked cytisine binding, but cytisine only partially blocked nicotine binding to intact cells. When cells were permeabilized with saponin, the number of sites for nicotine was unchanged, while the number of sites for cytisine was increased, and cytisine was able to fully block nicotine binding. These data indicate that cytisine binds only to surface receptors on intact cells. The apparent affinity of cytisine for surface receptors (K(d)=0.8 nM) was not significantly different from that for receptors in the cell homogenate (0.3 nM).

  12. Transferrin gene frequencies in Cádiz (southern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, J J; Romero, J L; Vizcaya, M A; Arufe, I

    1990-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of transferrin (Tf) was studied in a sample of 385 healthy unrelated subjects of both sexes resident in the province of Cádiz (southern Spain). Isoelectric focusing was carried out in polyacrylamide gels, followed by staining with Coomassie Blue R250. The gene frequencies obtained were as follows: Tf C1, 0.7922; Tf C2, 0.1883; Tf C3, 0.0195.

  13. Transferrin and Haemoglobin types in the African Elephant (Loxodonta Africana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R Osterhoff

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available In a random sample of 84 elephants from the Kruger National Park and five elephants from the Addo Elephant National Park, biochemical polymorphism in the serum transferrins could be established. It seems that elephants in the Kruger and Addo Parks are genetically similar but further studies are indicated to confirm these preliminary findings. For the haemo- globin investigations 109 blood samples were available, all originating from the Kruger National Park and all revealing only one type of haemoglobin.

  14. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein: Protein Redesign to Lower Protein-lignin Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Smith, Matthew D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Chundawat, Shishir P. S. [Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey; Sammond, Deanne [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Whitehead, Timothy A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824

    2016-11-07

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue towards energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28 to 0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active

  15. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  16. Low levels of serum ferritin and moderate transferrin saturation lead to adequate hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients, retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Chie; Tsuchiya, Ken; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kanda, Fumiyoshi; Maeda, Kunimi; Maeda, Teiryo

    2017-01-01

    Optimal iron levels in patients on hemodialysis are currently unknown, and a higher level than that for the healthy population is usually set for such patients considering the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents or the occurrence of chronic inflammation. However, excessive iron causes oxidative stress and impairment of its utilization by cells. Therefore we investigated the relationship between hemoglobin (Hb) level and iron status in hemodialysis patients to identify the optimal iron levels for patients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 208 outpatients on maintenance hemodialysis were followed up between July 2006 and June 2007. Men accounted for 64.9% cases [mean age, 59.3 ± 13.1 years and median dialysis history, 7.7 (3.6-13.2) years], and diabetic nephropathy accounted for 25.0% cases. Hemoglobin level was measured twice a month and serum ferritin, serum iron, and total iron-binding capacity were measured once a month. The doses of recombinant human erythropoietin and low-dose iron supplement were adjusted to maintain a hemoglobin level of 10-11 g/dL, according to the guidelines of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy. Hepcidin was measured at baseline. Using the mean values for 1-year period, the relationships among hemoglobin, serum ferritin levels, and transferrin saturation levels were investigated based on a receiver operating characteristic curve and a logistic regression model. In addition, the correlations among serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and hepcidin levels were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and linear regression model. By receiver operating characteristic curve, the cutoff point of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels with a hemoglobin ≥10 g/dL showed serum ferritin ≥90 ng/mL and transferrin saturation serum ferritin serum ferritin [r = 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.83, p serum ferritin [β-coefficient of 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.27-0.34, p serum ferritin <90 ng

  17. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  18. Binding of semenogelin I to intact human spermatozoa studied by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Magnus; Frohm, Birgitta; Malm, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 10 couples is infertile. No definite cause can be found in about 25% of those cases. Studies have indicated that seminal vesicle secretion functions as an optimizer of fertilization. The Zn(2+) binding protein semenogelin I (SgI) represents a major fraction of the proteins present in seminal vesicle fluid, and it serves as a structural component of the coagulum that is formed after ejaculation. Cleavage of SgI by prostate-specific antigen results in liquefaction of the coagulum. Fragmented SgI has antibacterial effects and inhibits spermatozoa mobility. SgI has also been found complexed to eppin on spermatozoa, and this complex has been suggested to be of importance for fertility. Here, we used flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance to study SgI regarding its association with spermatozoa and the interaction dependency on Zn(2+). The concentration of Zn(2+) in seminal plasma is approximately 100 times higher than in blood plasma, and the metal ion is known to change the structure of SgI. We found that SgI binds to spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. In solution, SgI bound to spermatozoa in a non-Zn(2+)-dependent way, whereas immobilized SgI interacts with spermatozoa only in the presence of Zn(2+). It indicates that SgI must exhibit a specific structure or free flexibility to be able to interact with that ligand. Our results indicate that the association of SgI to spermatozoa is conformation dependent and specific. These findings could constitute a basis for the development of a male contraceptive.

  19. Anchorless surface associated glycolytic enzymes from Lactobacillus plantarum 299v bind to epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenting, Jacob; Beck, Hans Christian; Vrang, Astrid; Riemann, Holger; Ravn, Peter; Hansen, Anne Maria; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv; Israelsen, Hans; Madsen, Søren

    2013-06-12

    An important criterion for the selection of a probiotic bacterial strain is its ability to adhere to the mucosal surface. Adhesion is usually mediated by proteins or other components located on the outer cell surface of the bacterium. In the present study we characterized the adhesive properties of two classical intracellular enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and enolase (ENO) isolated from the outer cell surface of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. None of the genes encoded signal peptides or cell surface anchoring motifs that could explain their extracellular location on the bacterial surface. The presence of the glycolytic enzymes on the outer surface was verified by western blotting using polyclonal antibodies raised against the specific enzymes. GAPDH and ENO showed a highly specific binding to plasminogen and fibronectin whereas GAPDH but not ENO showed weak binding to mucin. Furthermore, a pH dependent and specific binding of GAPDH and ENO to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells at pH 5 but not at pH 7 was demonstrated. The results showed that these glycolytic enzymes could play a role in the adhesion of the probiotic bacterium L. plantarum 299v to the gastrointestinal tract of the host. Finally, a number of probiotic as well non-probiotic Lactobacillus strains were analyzed for the presence of GAPDH and ENO on the outer surface, but no correlation between the extracellular location of these enzymes and the probiotic status of the applied strains was demonstrated.

  20. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  1. Human serum transferrin: Is there a link between autism, high oxalate and iron deficiency anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N.; Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.; Mason, Anne B.

    2013-01-01

    It has been previously suggested that high amounts of oxalate in plasma could play a role in autism by binding to the bilobal iron transport protein transferrin (hTF) thereby interfering with iron metabolism by inhibiting iron delivery to cells. By examining the effect of the substitution of oxalate for the physiologically utilized synergistic carbonate anion in each lobe of hTF we sought to provide a molecular basis for or against such a role. Our work clearly shows both qualitatively (6 M urea gels) and quantitatively (kinetic analysis by stop flow spectrofluorimetry) that the presence of oxalate in place of carbonate in each binding site of hTF does indeed greatly interfere with iron removal from each lobe (both in the absence and presence of the specific hTF receptor). However, we also clearly demonstrate that once the iron is bound within each lobe of hTF, neither anion can displace the other. Additionally, as verified by urea gels and electrospray mass spectrometry, formation of completely homogeneous hTF-anion complexes requires that all iron must first be removed and hTF then reloaded with iron in the presence of either carbonate or oxalate. Of significance, experiments described herein show that carbonate is the preferred binding partner, i.e., even if an equal amount of each anion is available during the iron loading process the hTF-carbonate complex is formed. PMID:24152109

  2. Human serum transferrin: is there a link among autism, high oxalate levels, and iron deficiency anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N; Bobst, Cedric E; Kaltashov, Igor A; Mason, Anne B

    2013-11-19

    It has been previously suggested that large amounts of oxalate in plasma could play a role in autism by binding to the bilobal iron transport protein transferrin (hTF), thereby interfering with iron metabolism by inhibiting the delivery of iron to cells. By examining the effect of the substitution of oxalate for the physiologically utilized synergistic carbonate anion in each lobe of hTF, we sought to provide a molecular basis for or against such a role. Our work clearly shows both qualitatively (6 M urea gels) and quantitatively (kinetic analysis by stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry) that the presence of oxalate in place of carbonate in each binding site of hTF does indeed greatly interfere with the removal of iron from each lobe (in the absence and presence of the specific hTF receptor). However, we also clearly demonstrate that once the iron is bound within each lobe of hTF, neither anion can displace the other. Additionally, as verified by urea gels and electrospray mass spectrometry, formation of completely homogeneous hTF-anion complexes requires that all iron must first be removed and hTF then reloaded with iron in the presence of either carbonate or oxalate. Significantly, experiments described here show that carbonate is the preferred binding partner; i.e., even if an equal amount of each anion is available during the iron loading process, the hTF-carbonate complex is formed.

  3. Effects of carboxylic acids on the uptake of non-transferrin-bound iron by astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Belinda M; Robinson, Stephen R; Bishop, Glenda M

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of non-transferrin-bound iron are elevated in the brain during pathological conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes are specialised for sequestering this iron, however little is known about the mechanisms involved. Carboxylates, such as citrate, have been reported to facilitate iron uptake by intestinal cells. Citrate binds iron and limits its redox activity. The presence of high citrate concentrations in the interstitial fluid of the brain suggests that citrate may be an important ligand for iron transport by astrocytes. This study investigates whether iron accumulation by cultured rat astrocytes is facilitated by citrate or other carboxylates. Contrary to expectations, citrate, tartrate and malate were found to block iron accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner; alpha-ketoglutarate had limited effects, while fumarate, succinate and glutarate had no effect. This blockade was not due to an inhibition of ferric reductase activity. Instead, it appeared to be related to the capacity of these carboxylates to bind iron, since phosphate, which also binds iron, diminished the capacity of citrate, tartrate and malate to block the cellular accumulation of iron. These findings raise the possibility that citrate may have therapeutic potential in the management of neurodegenerative conditions that involve cellular iron overload.

  4. Distinctive receptor binding properties of the surface glycoprotein of a natural Feline Leukemia Virus isolate with unusual disease spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albritton Lorraine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline leukemia virus (FeLV-945, a member of the FeLV-A subgroup, was previously isolated from a cohort of naturally infected cats. An unusual multicentric lymphoma of non-T-cell origin was observed in natural and experimental infection with FeLV-945. Previous studies implicated the FeLV-945 surface glycoprotein (SU as a determinant of disease outcome by an as yet unknown mechanism. The present studies demonstrate that FeLV-945 SU confers distinctive properties of binding to the cell surface receptor. Results Virions bearing the FeLV-945 Env protein were observed to bind the cell surface receptor with significantly increased efficiency, as was soluble FeLV-945 SU protein, as compared to the corresponding virions or soluble protein from a prototype FeLV-A isolate. SU proteins cloned from other cohort isolates exhibited increased binding efficiency comparable to or greater than FeLV-945 SU. Mutational analysis implicated a domain containing variable region B (VRB to be the major determinant of increased receptor binding, and identified a single residue, valine 186, to be responsible for the effect. Conclusions The FeLV-945 SU protein binds its cell surface receptor, feTHTR1, with significantly greater efficiency than does that of prototype FeLV-A (FeLV-A/61E when present on the surface of virus particles or in soluble form, demonstrating a 2-fold difference in the relative dissociation constant. The results implicate a single residue, valine 186, as the major determinant of increased binding affinity. Computational modeling suggests a molecular mechanism by which residue 186 interacts with the receptor-binding domain through residue glutamine 110 to effect increased binding affinity. Through its increased receptor binding affinity, FeLV-945 SU might function in pathogenesis by increasing the rate of virus entry and spread in vivo, or by facilitating entry into a novel target cell with a low receptor density.

  5. Meningococcal surface fibril (Msf) binds to activated vitronectin and inhibits the terminal complement pathway to increase serum resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Natalie J; Hill, Darryl J; Borodina, Elena; Sessions, Richard B; Devos, Nathalie I; Feron, Christiane M; Poolman, Jan T; Virji, Mumtaz

    2011-12-01

    Complement evasion is an important survival strategy of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) during colonization and infection. Previously, we have shown that Nm Opc binds to serum vitronectin to inhibit complement-mediated killing. In this study, we demonstrate meningococcal interactions with vitronectin via a novel adhesin, Msf (meningococcal surface fibril, previously NhhA or Hsf). As with Opc, Msf binds preferentially to activated vitronectin (aVn), engaging at its N-terminal region but the C-terminal heparin binding domain may also participate. However, unlike Opc, the latter binding is not heparin-mediated. By binding to aVn, Msf or Opc can impart serum resistance, which is further increased in coexpressers, a phenomenon dependent on serum aVn concentrations. The survival fitness of aVn-binding derivatives was evident from mixed population studies, in which msf/opc mutants were preferentially depleted. In addition, using vitronectin peptides to block Msf-aVn interactions, aVn-induced inhibition of lytic C5b-9 formation and of serum killing could be reversed. As Msf-encoding gene is ubiquitous in the meningococcal strains examined and is expressed in vivo, serum resistance via Msf may be of significance to meningococcal pathogenesis. The data imply that vitronectin binding may be an important strategy for the in vivo survival of Nm for which the bacterium has evolved redundant mechanisms.

  6. Isolation of a glycopeptide fraction from the surface of the sea urchin egg that inhibits sperm-egg binding and fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The role of cell surface glycoproteins of the sea urchin egg in binding sperm has been examined by studying the biological activity of glycopeptides derived from these glycoproteins. Glycopeptides were produced from egg surface glycoproteins by Pronase digestion. After fractionation by gel filtration the glycopeptides were tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of sperm to eggs, presumably by competing with the egg surface glycoproteins for binding sites on the sperm. One glycopeptid...

  7. Molecular mass spectrometry in metallodrug development: A case of mapping transferrin-mediated transformations for a ruthenium(III) anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarosz, Maciej [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Matczuk, Magdalena, E-mail: mmatczuk@ch.pw.edu.pl [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Pawlak, Katarzyna [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Timerbaev, Andrei R. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 19, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-03

    Highlights: • Extra- and intra-cellular interactions of Ru(III) anticancer drug candidate. • ESI-TOF-MS mapping of the ruthenium species bound to transferring. • ESI-QqQ-MS identification of released Ru species under cytosol simulated conditions. - Abstract: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques have been used to characterize the speciation of a Ru(III) anticancer drug, indazolium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole) ruthenate(III)], upon its binding to transferrin and the impact of cellular reducing components on drug–transferrin adducts. Using time-of-flight ESI-MS, the polymorphism of apo- (iron-free) and holo-form (iron-saturated) of the protein was confirmed. While the ruthenium moieties bound to each of five isoforms under simulated extracellular conditions are essentially identical in numbers for apo- and holo-transferrin, distinct differences were found in the composition of Ru(III) species attached to either of the protein forms, which are dominated by differently coordinated aquated complexes. On the other hand, at least one of the Ru-N bonds in metal-organic framework remains intact even after prolonged interaction with the protein. Triple quadrupole tandem ESI-MS measurements demonstrated that the ruthenium species released from drug adducts with holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol are underwent strong ligand exchange (as compared to the protein-bound forms) but most strikingly, they contain the metal center in the reduced Ru(II) state. In vitro probing the extra- and intracellular interactions of promising Ru(III) drug candidate performed by ESI-MS is thought to shed light on the transportation to tumor cells by transferrin and on the activation to more reactive species by the reducing environment of solid tumors.

  8. Rapid screening of transferrin-binders in the flowers of Bauhinia blakeana Dunn by on-line high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-electrospray ionization-ion-trap-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry-transferrin-fluorescence detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meixian; Dong, Jing; Lin, Zongtao; Niu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiaotian; Jiang, Haixiu; Guo, Ning; Li, Wei; Wang, Hong; Chen, Shizhong

    2016-06-10

    Transferrin (Transferrin, TRF, TF) has drawn increasing attention in cancer therapy due to its potential applications in drug delivery. TF receptor, highly expressed in tumor cells, recognizes and transports Fe(3+)-TF into cells to release iron into cytoplasm. Thus, discovering TF-binding compounds has become an active research area and is of great importance for target therapy. In this study, an on-line analysis method was established for screening TF-binding compounds from the flowers of Bauhinia blakeana Dunn using a high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-multi-stage mass spectrometry-transferrin-fluorescence detector (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)-TF-FLD) method. As a result, 33 of 80 identified or tentatively characterized compounds in the sample were TF-binding active. Twenty-five flavonol glycosides and eight phenolic acids were identified as TF-binders. Twelve of these active compounds together with six standard compounds were used to study the dose-response effects and structure-activity relationships of flavonoids and phenolic acids. The method was validated by vitexin with a good linearity in the range of concentrations used in the study. The limit of detection for vitexin was 0.1596 nmol. Our study indicated that the established method is simple, rapid and sensitive for screening TF-binding active compounds in the extract of Bauhinia blakeana Dunn, and therefore is important for discovering potential anti-cancer ingredients from complex samples for TF related drug delivery.

  9. Direct biomolecule binding on nonfouling surfaces via newly discovered supramolecular self-assembly of lysozyme under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng

    2012-08-01

    When lysozyme is dissolved in a neutral HEPES buffer solution (pH = 7.4) with 0.001-0.050 M TCEP added, a fast phase transition process occurs and the resulting novel fiber-like hierarchical supramolecular assemblies made by primary spherical-particle aggregation can function as a "superglue" that binds strongly and quickly onto non-fouling coatings. This binding is highly selective towards lysozyme, and excludes synthetic, chemical/physical activation/deactivation (blocking) steps. By using biotinylated lysozyme, such a phase transition quickly creates a perfect biotinylated surface on non-fouling surfaces for avidin binding, showing great potential for the development of low-cost and practical biochips.

  10. Protection of nonself surfaces from complement attack by factor H-binding peptides: implications for therapeutic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2011-04-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5-18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  11. The Role of OOH Binding Site and Pt Surface Structure on ORR Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingying; Caldwell, Keegan; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.; Kongkanand, Anusorn; Wagner, Frederick T.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Ramaker, David E.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimentally observed molecular adsorbate coverages (e.g., O(H), OOH and HOOH) on real operating dealloyed bimetallic PtMx (M = Ni or Co) catalysts under oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) conditions obtained using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). The results reveal a complex Sabatier catalysis behavior and indicate the active ORR mechanism changes with Pt–O bond weakening from the O2 dissociative mechanism, to the peroxyl mechanism, and finally to the hydrogen peroxide mechanism. An important rearrangement of the OOH binding site, an intermediate in the ORR, enables facile H addition to OOH and faster O–O bond breaking on 111 faces at optimal Pt–O bonding strength, such as that occurring in dealloyed PtM core-shell nanoparticles. This rearrangement is identified by previous DFT calculations and confirmed from in situ measured OOH adsorption coverages during the ORR. The importance of surface structural effects and 111 ordered faces is confirmed by the higher specific ORR rates on solid core vs porous multi-core nanoparticles. PMID:26190857

  12. Determination of specific binding interactions at L-cystine crystal surfaces with chemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Trinanjana; Ward, Michael D

    2013-04-17

    The pathogenesis of L-cystine kidney stones involves four critical steps: nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal adhesion to cells. Although inhibition of crystal growth by L-cystine "imposters" at L-cystine crystal surfaces has been suggested as a plausible route for the suppression of stones, understanding the factors that govern crystal-crystal aggregation and adhesion of crystals to epithelial cells also is essential for devising strategies to mitigate L-cystine stone formation. Chemical force microscopy performed with atomic force microscope tips decorated with functional groups commonly found in urinary constituents that likely mediate aggregation and attachment (e.g., COOH, NH2, SH, CH3, OH) revealed signatures that reflect differences in the chemical affinity of these groups for the (001) and {100} faces of the naturally occurring hexagonal form of L-cystine single crystals and the {110} faces of the non-native tetragonal form. These signatures can be explained by the different chemical compositions of the crystal faces, and they reveal a remarkable binding specificity of the thiol group for the sulfur-rich {100} and {110} faces of the hexagonal and tetragonal forms, respectively. Collectively, these observations suggest that alterations of the crystal habit and polymorph by crystal growth inhibitors may not affect crystal aggregation or adhesion to cells significantly.

  13. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  14. Discovery and characterization of surface binding sites in polysaccharide converting enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper

    polysaccharide binding interactions to also occur at a distance from the active site. AnAbf62A-m2,3’s preferred substrate is wheat arabinoxylan having kcat and KM of 178 ± 26 s-1 and 4.90 ± 0.91 mg ml-1, respectively. While AnAbf62A-m2,3 from singly substituted xylose releases 1,2-linked at threefold higher rate...... than 1,3-linked arabinosyl residues, it has no activity towards doubly 1,2- and 1,3-arabinose substituted xylosyl residues. 1H NMR identified produced arabinose as the β-furanose form indicating AnAbf62A-m2,3 to have an inverting mechanism as also inferred from the similarity with GH43 that together...... almost 10 years ago that a SBS was present on AgaA. AgaA E147S was subjected to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis and KD values were determined for deca-agarose (92.5 ± 9.8 µM), octa-agarose (128.0 ± 0.5 µM) and hexa-agarose (266.4 ± 7.2 µM). The three-fold difference in affinity between deca...

  15. Molecular Statics Calculations of Proton Binding to Goethite Surfaces: Thermodynamic Modeling of the Surface Charging and Protonation of Goethite in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Rustad, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular statics calculations of proton binding at the hydroxylated faces of goethite are used to guide the development of a thermodynamic model which describes the surface charging properties of goethite in electrolyte solutions. The molecular statics calculations combined with a linear free energy relation between the energies of the hydroxylated surface and the aqueous solvated surface predict that the acidity constants for most singly (aqua or hydroxo), doubly (μ-hydroxo), and triply (μ 3-hydroxo or μ 3-oxo) coordinated surface sites all have similar values. This model which binds protons to the goethite 110 and 021 faces satisfactorily describes the surface charging behavior of goethite, if pair formation between bulk electrolyte species, i.e., Na +, Cl -, and NO 3-, is included in the model. Inclusion of minor species of quite different charging behavior (designed to describe the possible presence of defect species) did not improve our predictions of surface charge since the protonation of the major surface sites changed when these minor species were introduced into the calculations thereby negating the effect of small amounts of defect species on the overall charging behavior. The final thermodynamic model is shown to be consistent with the surface charging properties of goethite over a range of pH values, NaNO 3, and NaCl concentrations.

  16. Engineering a Highly Hydrophilic PVDF Membrane via Binding TiO₂Nanoparticles and a PVA Layer onto a Membrane Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Aiwen; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; He, Chunju

    2015-04-29

    A highly hydrophilic PVDF membrane was fabricated through chemically binding TiO2 nanoparticles and a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer onto a membrane surface simultaneously. The chemical composition of the modified membrane surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the binding performance of TiO2 nanoparticles and the PVA layer was investigated by a rinsing test. The results indicated that the TiO2 nanoparticles were uniformly and strongly tailored onto the membrane surface, while the PVA layer was firmly attached onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles and the membrane by adsorption-cross-linking. The possible mechanisms during the modification process and filtration performance, i.e., water permeability and bovine serum albumin (BSA) rejection, were investigated as well. Furthermore, antifouling property was discussed through multicycles of BSA solution filtration tests, where the flux recovery ratio was significantly increased from 20.0% for pristine PVDF membrane to 80.5% for PVDF/TiO2/PVA-modified membrane. This remarkable promotion is mainly ascribed to the improvement of surface hydrophilicity, where the water contact angle of the membrane surface was decreased from 84° for pristine membrane to 24° for PVDF/TiO2/PVA membrane. This study presents a novel and varied strategy for immobilization of nanoparticles and PVA layer on substrate surface, which could be easily adapted for a variety of materials for surface modification.

  17. Simulation analysis of the cellulase Cel7A carbohydrate binding module on the surface of the cellulose Iβ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekozai, Emal M. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uberbacher, Edward C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crowley, Michael F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Jeremy C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-08-22

    The Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei consists of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) joined by a linker to a catalytic domain. Cellulose hydrolysis is limited by the accessibility of Cel7A to crystalline substrates, which is perceived to be primarily mediated by the CBM. The binding of CBM to the cellulose I fiber is characterized by combined Brownian dynamics (BD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results confirm that CBM prefers to dock to the hydrophobic than to the hydrophilic fiber faces. Both electrostatic (ES) and van der Waals (VDW) interactions are required for achieving the observed binding preference. The VDW interactions play a more important role in stabilizing the CBM-fiber binding, whereas the ES interactions contribute through the formation of a number of hydrogen bonds between the CBM and the fiber. At long distances, an ES steering effect is also observed that tends to align the CBM in an antiparallel manner relative to the fiber axis. Moreover, the MD results reveal hindered diffusion of the CBM on all fiber surfaces. The binding of the CBM to the hydrophobic surfaces is found to involve partial dewetting at the CBM-fiber interface coupled with local structural arrangements of the protein. The present simulation results complement and rationalize a large body of previous work and provide detailed insights into the mechanism of the CBM-cellulose fiber interactions.

  18. Mechanisms by Which Salt Concentration Moderates the Dynamics of Human Serum Transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdizadeh, Haleh; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2017-05-11

    The dynamical and thermodynamic behavior of human transferrin (hTf) protein in saline aqueous solution of various concentrations is studied. hTf is an essential transport protein circulating iron in the blood and delivering it to tissues. It displays highly pH dependent cooperativity between the two lobes, each carrying an iron, and forms a tight complex with the receptor during endocytosis, eventually recycled to the serum after iron release. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effects of the amount of salt on protein conformation and dynamics to analyze the structure-function relationship in free hTf at serum pH. To monitor the ionic strength dependence, four different ionic concentrations, 0, 50, 130, and 210 mM NaCl for two protonation states of the iron coordination site is considered. Two mechanisms by which salt affects hTf are disclosed. In the totally closed state where iron coordinating tyrosines are deprotonated, the addition of even 50 mM of salt alters the electrostatic potential distribution around the protein, opening energetic pathways for tyrosine protonation from nearby charged residues as a required first step for iron release. Once domain opening is observed, conformational plasticity renders the iron binding site more accessible by the solvent. At this second stage of iron release, R124 in the N-lobe is identified as kinetically significant anion binding site that accommodates chloride ions and allosterically communicates with the iron binding residues. Opening motions are maximized at 150 mM IS in the N-lobe, and at 210 mM in the C-lobe. The extra mobility in the latter is thought to preclude binding of hTf to its receptor. Thus, the physiological IS is optimal for exposing iron for release from hTf. However, the calculated binding affinities of iron show that even in the most open conformations, iron dissociation needs to be accompanied by chelators.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of tumor-targeted copolymer nanocarrier modified by transferrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ran Liu,1,2 Yonglu Wang,1,3 Xueming Li,3 Wen Bao,1,2 Guohua Xia,1,2 Wei Chen,3 Jian Cheng,1,2 Yuanlong Xu,3 Liting Guo,1,2 Baoan Chen1,21Department of Hematology (Key Department of Jiangsu Medicine, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, 2Faculty of Oncology, Medical School, Southeast University, 3College of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To increase the encapsulation of hydrophilic antitumor agent daunorubicin (DNR and multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (Tet in the drug delivery system of nanoparticles (NPs, a functional copolymer NP composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, poly-l-lysine (PLL, and polyethylene glycol (PEG was synthesized and then loaded with DNR and Tet simultaneously to construct DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG-NPs using a modified double-emulsion solvent evaporation/diffusion method. And to increase the targeted antitumor effect, DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG-NPs were further modified with transferrin (Tf due to its specific binding to Tf receptors (TfR, which is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells. In this study, the influence of the diversity of formulation parameters was investigated systematically, such as drug loading, mean particle size, molecular weight, the concentration of PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf, volume ratio of acetone to dichloromethane, the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in the external aqueous phase, the volume ratio of the internal aqueous phase to the external aqueous phase, and the type of surfactants in the internal aqueous phase. Meanwhile, its possible effect on cell viability was evaluated. Our results showed that the regular spherical DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf-NPs with a smooth surface, a relatively low polydispersity index, and a diameter of 213.0±12.0 nm could be produced. The encapsulation efficiency was 70.23%±1.91% for DNR and 86.5%±0.70% for Tet, the moderate drug loading was 3.63%±0.15% for DNR and 4

  20. Complexation of Cm(III) with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, N; Smith, V C; MacGillivray, R T A; Panak, P J

    2015-01-28

    The complexation of Cm(III) with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTf/2N) is investigated in the pH range from 4.0 to 11.0 using TRLFS. At pH ≥ 7.4 a Cm(III) hTf/2N species is formed with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site. The results are compared with Cm(III) transferrin interaction at the C-lobe and indicate the similarity of the coordination environment of the C- and N-terminal binding sites with four amino acid residues of the protein, two H2O molecules and three additional ligands (e.g. synergistic anions such as carbonate) in the first coordination sphere. Measurements at c(carbonate)tot = 0.23 mM (ambient carbonate concentration) and c(carbonate)tot = 25 mM (physiological carbonate concentration) show that an increase of the total carbonate concentration suppresses the formation of the Cm(III) hTf/2N species significantly. Additionally, the three Cm(III) carbonate species Cm(CO3)(+), Cm(CO3)2(-) and Cm(CO3)3(3-) are formed successively with increasing pH. In general, carbonate complexation is a competing reaction for both Cm(III) complexation with transferrin and hTf/2N but the effect is significantly higher for the half molecule. At c(carbonate)tot = 0.23 mM the complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin and hTf/2N starts at pH ≥ 7.4. At physiological carbonate concentration the Cm(III) transferrin species II forms at pH ≥ 7.0 whereas the Cm(III) hTf/2N species is not formed until pH > 10.0. Hence, our results reveal significant differences in the complexation behavior of the C-terminal site of transferrin and the recombinant N-lobe (hTf/2N) towards trivalent actinides.

  1. Differential affinity of FLIP and procaspase 8 for FADD’s DED binding surfaces regulates DISC assembly

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Death receptor activation triggers recruitment of FADD, which via its death effector domain (DED) engages DEDs in procaspase 8 and its inhibitor FLIP to form death-inducing signalling complexes (DISCs). The DEDs of FADD, FLIP and procaspase 8 interact with one another using two binding surfaces defined by α1/α4 and α2/α5 helices respectively. Here we report that FLIP has preferential affinity for the α1/α4 surface of FADD, whereas procaspase 8 has preferential affinity for FADD’s α2/α5 surfac...

  2. Scaling properties of the radius of gyration and surface area for EF-hand calcium binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitulice, L. [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Isvoran, A. [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Craescu, C.T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, A. [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2009-04-30

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling properties of both the radius of gyration and the surface area for EF-hand calcium binding proteins. These properties are different for two conformational subfamilies: proteins with extended and compact structures, respectively. The radius of gyration is a measure of the shape of protein, whereas its surface fractal dimension is a measure of its interatomic packing. Different scaling properties for the radius of gyration underline that these two subfamilies present different shapes whilst different scaling properties for the surface area reveal different strengths of their intermolecular forces. All these data suggest different mechanisms responsible for the global folding of proteins belonging to these two subfamilies.

  3. The salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA binds MBL and regulates the lectin pathway of complement in solution and on surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eParnov Reichhardt

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR protein SALSA, also known as gp340, salivary agglutinin (SAG and deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1, is a 340 kDa glycoprotein expressed on mucosal surfaces and secreted into several body fluids. SALSA binds to a broad variety of microbes and endogenous ligands, such as complement factor C1q, surfactant proteins D and A (SP-D and SP-A and IgA. Our search for novel ligands of SALSA by direct protein-interaction studies led to the identification of mannan binding lectin (MBL as a new binding partner. We observed that surface-associated SALSA activates complement via binding of MBL. On the other hand, soluble SALSA was found to inhibit C. albicans-induced complement activation. Thus, SALSA has a dual complement regulatory function. It activates the lectin pathway when bound to a surface and inhibits it when free in the fluid-phase. These activities are mediated via a direct interaction with MBL.

  4. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  5. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  6. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  7. An immunogenic, surface-exposed domain of Haemophilus ducreyi outer membrane protein HgbA is involved in hemoglobin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepluev, Igor; Afonina, Galyna; Fusco, William G; Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Temple, Brenda; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    HgbA is the sole TonB-dependent receptor for hemoglobin (Hb) acquisition of Haemophilus ducreyi. Binding of Hb to HgbA is the initial step in heme acquisition from Hb. To better understand this step, we mutagenized hgbA by deletion of each of the 11 putative surface-exposed loops and expressed each of the mutant proteins in trans in host strain H. ducreyi FX547 hgbA. All mutant proteins were expressed, exported, and detected on the surface by anti-HgbA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Deletion of sequences in loops 5 and 7 of HgbA abolished Hb binding in two different formats. In contrast, HgbA proteins containing deletions in the other nine loops retained the ability to bind Hb. None of the clones expressing mutant proteins were able to grow on plates containing low concentrations of Hb. Previously we demonstrated in a swine model of chancroid infection that an HgbA vaccine conferred complete protection from a challenge infection. Using anti-HgbA IgG from this study and the above deletion mutants, we show that loops 4, 5, and 7 of HgbA were immunogenic and surface exposed and that IgG directed against loops 4 and 5 blocked Hb binding. Furthermore, loop 6 was cleaved by protease on intact H. ducreyi, suggesting surface exposure. These data implicate a central domain of HgbA (in respect to the primary amino acid sequence) as important in Hb binding and suggest that this region of the molecule might have potential as a subunit vaccine.

  8. High level theoretical study of binding and of the potential energy surface in benzene-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coletti, Cecilia, E-mail: ccoletti@unich.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Re, Nazzareno [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: In-plane minimum geometries for benzene-H{sup -} non-covalent adducts: linear adduct (left) with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to one aromatic hydrogen; bifurcated adduct (right), with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to two adjacent aromatic hydrogens. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical study on covalent and non-covalent binding in benzene-hydride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two non-covalent stable adducts were characterized in the in-plane geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant sections of the potential energy surface were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of a very stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion upon covalent binding to carbon. - Abstract: High level ab initio calculations were performed on the interaction of the hydride anion with benzene, a system of potential interest for modelling the interactions occurring in hydrogen rich planetary atmospheres. We investigated both non-covalent and covalent binding, exploring the complete basis set limit using highly correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Two non-covalent minima on the potential energy surface have been characterized, and found to correspond to moderately strong hydrogen bonding interactions. To gain further insight on the nature of binding, the total interaction energy was decomposed into its physically meaningful components and selected sections of the potential energy surface were calculated. Moreover, we found that H{sup -} can easily covalently bind to one of the carbon atoms of benzene to form a stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion, a global minimum on the potential energy surface, characterized by a puckered geometry, with a carbon atom bending out of the benzene plane. A slightly less stable planar C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} structure was also identified, corresponding to the transition state for the flipping motion of the puckered species.

  9. Cell-surface changes in cadmium-resistant Euglena: Studies using lectin-binding techniques and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaly, J.; Brochiero, E. [Faculte de Pharmacie, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    1994-01-01

    Most in vitro studies on contaminants focus on the short-term effects of pollutants on cells, without regard to long-term effects and the ability of cells or microorganisms to develop a specific resistance to a pollutant. Cadmium is ubiquitous environmental contaminant. This heavy metal enters the aquatic environment mainly through vapor emissions and fallout during smelting operations. Diverse mechanisms of algal resistance to toxic metals are known. Among these, the most general mechanism is the development of metal-binding proteins. In cadmium-resistant unicellular Euglena gracilis Z algae cells, the metal did not appear to be sequestered on soluble metal-binding ligands. Previous experiments have shown that resistance development is related to a diminution of cadmium penetration into cells, implicating cell surface or membrane alteration. This research investigates the mechanisms of development of cadmium resistance in Euglena cells at the cell-surface level. Sugar chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids are a predominant feature of the surface of cells. Moreover, the cell-response to environmental changes is often orchestrated through surface macromolecules such as glycoproteins. In this study, we applied this lectin method to investigate surface carbohydrate expression during and after resistance development. Our interest was twofold: (1) to learn more about the carbohydrate composition of the cell-surface of Euglena; and (2) to determine whether transition from wild cells to Cd-resistant cells changes the expression of cell-surface carbohydrates. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 months, and group 2 comprised 20 adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Results In group 1, patients' serum sTfR levels correlated negatively with mean corpuscular volume; hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, and serum iron levels; and transferrin saturation and positively with total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and red cell distribution width. In group 2, patients' serum sTfR levels did not correlate with ferritin levels and TIBC, but had a significant relationship with other iron indices. Hb and serum sTfR levels had a significant inverse relationship in both groups; however, in group 1, there was no correlation between Hb and serum ferritin levels. In 30 patients of group 1, serum sTfR levels were significantly decreased with an increase in Hb levels after iron supplementation for 1 month. Conclusion Serum sTfR levels significantly correlated with other diagnostic iron parameters of IDA and inversely correlated with an increase in Hb levels following iron supplementation. Therefore, serum sTfR levels can be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of IDA in children. PMID:25729394

  11. Molecular binding mechanisms of aqueous cadmium and lead to siderophores, bacteria and mineral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh

    Recent studies have shown that diverse groups of bacteria adsorb metals to similar extents and uptake can be modeled using a universal adsorption model. In this study, XAFS has been used to resolve whether binding sites determined for single species systems are responsible for adsorption in more complex natural bacterial assemblages. Results obtained from a series of XAFS experiments on pure Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains and consortia of bacteria as a function of pH and Cd loading suggests that every bacterial strain has a complex physiology and they are all slightly different from each other. Nevertheless from the metal adsorption chemistry point of view, the main difference between them lies in the site ratio of three fundamental sites only - carboxyl, phosphoryl and sulfide. Two completely different consortia of bacteria (obtained from natural river water, and soil system with severe organic contamination) were successfully modeled in the pH range 3.4--7.8 using the EXAFS models developed for single species systems. Results thus obtained can potentially have very high impact on the modeling of the complex bacterial systems in realistic geological settings, leading to further refinement and development of robust remediation strategies for metal contamination at macroscopic level. In another study, solution speciation of Pb and Cd with DFO-B has been examined using a combination of techniques (ICP, TOC, thermodynamic modeling and XAFS). Results indicate that Pb does not complex with DFO-B at all until about pH 3.5, but forms a totally caged structure at pH 7.5. At intermediate pH conditions, mixture of species (one and two hydroxamate groups complexed) is formed. Cd on the other hand, does not complex until pH 5, forms intermediate complexes at pH 8 and is totally chelated at pH 9. Further studies were conducted for Pb sorption to mineral surface kaolinite with and without DFO-B. In the absence of DFO-B, results suggest outer sphere and inner

  12. Binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin to thymocytes reveals alterations in surface glycosylation during T-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkora, J; Kolínská, J; Reháková, Z; Cerný, J; Doubravská, L

    2002-02-01

    Surface binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to thymocyte subsets has been studied in pigs and rodents by multicolour flow cytometry. In all the species examined, analogous staining profiles have been recorded. Counter-staining with anti-CD3epsilon, anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) revealed that a significant increase of the GNA targets on the cell surface occurred during early thymocyte differentiation and reached its maximum at the level of the CD3loCD4+CD8+ small cortical thymocyte. This was followed by a decrease in the GNA binding capacity upon terminal maturation to the single positive thymocytes. PAGE analysis has revealed a dominant GNA-binding glycoprotein (molar mass approx. 90 kDa) present on thymocyte plasma membranes and absent on the surface of splenic lymphocytes, although both the whole cell lysates from both organs contained GNA ligands of the same size. Our findings are in agreement with previous data showing that immature thymocytes differ from their mature counterparts and peripheral T lymphocytes in the surface glycosylation pattern, and support the hypothesis that lectin-glycoprotein interaction plays a significant role in the cell-to-cell crosstalk in the thymic cortex.

  13. Direct Biomolecules Binding on Nonfouling Surface via Newly Discovered Supramolecular Self-assembly of Lysozyme under Physiological Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of low cost and practical strategies for biomolecules immobilization on solid supports is that the multi-step chemical/physical activating and following deactivating procedures on nonfouling substrates often increase the cost and complexity of surface functional group types as well as deteriorate the surface integrity. Herein, we show a novel phase transition of lysozyme could be used to constitute a major step to address the above problem. It is found that when lysozyme is dissolved in a neutral buffer solution of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES, pH 7.4) with 1–50 mM tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) added, a fast phase transition process occurs and the resulting novel fibra-like hierarchical supramolecular assemblies made by primary spherical particles aggregation would function as a “superglue” that strongly and quickly bind onto non-fouling coatings. This binding is highly selective towards lysozyme, and excludes completely tedious synthetical, chemical/physical activation/deactivation (blocking) steps. When biotin is conjugated with lysozyme, such phase transition quickly constructs a perfect biotinylated surface on nonfouling surface for avidin binding, showing great potential for the development of low-cost and practical biochips. PMID:22707360

  14. Targeting folded RNA: A branched peptide boronic acid that binds to a large surface area of HIV-1 RRE RNA†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Bryson, David I.; Crumpton, Jason B.; Wynn, Jessica; Santos, Webster L.

    2013-01-01

    On-bead high throughput screening of a medium sized (1000–2000 Da) branched peptide boronic acid (BPBA) library consisting of 46,656 unique sequences against HIV-1 RRE RNA generated peptides with binding affinities in the low micromolar range. In particular, BPBA1 had a Kd of 1.4 µM with RRE IIB, preference for RNA over DNA (27 fold), and selectivity of up to >75 fold against a panel of RRE IIB variants. Structure-activity studies suggest that the boronic acid moiety and “branching” in peptides are key structural features for efficient binding and selectivity for the folded RNA target. BPBA1 was efficiently taken up by HeLa and A2780 cells. RNA-footprinting studies revealed that the BPBA1 binding site encompasses a large surface area that spans both the upper stem as well as the internal loop regions of RRE IIB. PMID:23925474

  15. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled reovirus to cell surface receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R.L.; Powers, M.L.; Rogart, R.B.; Weiner, H.L.

    1984-02-01

    Quantitative studies of /sup 125/I-labeled reovirus binding at equilibrium to several cell types was studied, including (1) murine L cell fibroblasts; (2) murine splenic T lymphocytes; (3) YAC cells, a murine lymphoma cell line; and (4) R1.1 cells, a murine thymoma cell line. Competition and saturation studies demonstrated (1) specific, saturable, high-affinity binding of reovirus types 1 and 3 to nonidentical receptors on L cell fibroblasts; (2) high-affinity binding of type 3 reovirus to murine splenic lymphocytes and R1.1 cells; (3) low-affinity binding of reovirus type 1 to lymphocytes and R1.1 cells; and (4) no significant binding of either serotype to YAC cells. Differences in the binding characteristics of the two reovirus serotypes to L cell fibroblasts were found to be a property of the viral hemagglutinin, as demonstrated using a recombinant viral clone. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for viral binding was of extremely high affinity (Kd in the range of 0.5 nM), and was slowly reversible. Experiments demonstrated temperature and pH dependence of reovirus binding and receptor modification studies using pronase, neuraminidase, and various sugars confirmed previous studies that reovirus receptors are predominantly protein in structure. The reovirus receptor site density was in the range of 2-8 X 10(4) sites/cell. These studies demonstrate that the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for ligand-receptor interactions provides a useful model for studying interactions of viral particles with membrane viral receptors. They also suggest that one cell may have distinct receptor sites for two serotypes of the same virus, and that one viral serotype may bind with different kinetics depending on the cell type.

  17. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis.

  18. Changes in transferrin are related to changes in insulin resistance: the SLIM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roumen, C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Jansen, E.H.; Saris, W.H.; Blaak, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine the effect of a lifestyle intervention on serum transferrin and ferritin levels and the relationship between changes in transferrin and ferritin and changes in glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Methods Randomized controlled lifestyle intervention directed at a healthy diet

  19. Synthesis and secretion of transferrin by a bovine trabecular meshwork cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bertazolli-Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The trabecular meshwork (TM is the main outflow pathway in the mammalian eye. Oxidative damage to TM cells has been suggested to be an important cause of impairment of TM functions, leading to deficient drainage of aqueous humor, with deleterious consequences to the eye. Transferrin, a metalloprotein involved in iron transport, has been characterized as an intrinsic eye protein. Since transferrin is implicated in the control of oxidative stress, the objective of the present study was to determine if a bovine TM cell line (CTOB synthesizes and secretes transferrin. The CTOB cell line was cultured in the presence of 35S-methionine and the incubation medium was submitted to immunoprecipitation. Total RNAs from CTOB and isolated bovine TM (freshly isolated, incubated or not were subjected to the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the amplification products were sequenced. Also, both CTOB and histological TM preparations were processed for transferrin immunolocalization. A labeled peptide of about 80 kDa, the expected size for transferrin, was immunopurified from CTOB samples obtained from the incubation assays. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing experiments detected the presence of transferrin mRNA in CTOB and isolated bovine TM. Reactivity to antibodies against transferrin was observed both in CTOB and TM. The results obtained in all of these experiments indicated that the TM is capable of synthesizing and secreting transferrin. The possible implications for the physiology of the eye are discussed.

  20. Changes in transferrin are related to changes in insulin resistance: the SLIM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roumen, C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Jansen, E.H.; Saris, W.H.; Blaak, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine the effect of a lifestyle intervention on serum transferrin and ferritin levels and the relationship between changes in transferrin and ferritin and changes in glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Methods Randomized controlled lifestyle intervention directed at a healthy diet

  1. Binding Studies of Cucurbit[7]uril with Gold Nanoparticles Bearing Different Surface Functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Saha, Krishnendu; Jiang, Ziwen; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Riddha; Rotello, Vincent M

    2015-06-03

    Host-guest interactions between a synthetic receptor, cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been quantified using isothermal titration calorimetry. AuNPs were functionalized with ligands containing tertiary or quaternary benzylamine derivatives, with electron donating or withdrawing groups at the para position of the benzene ring. Analysis of binding interactions reveals that functional groups at the para position have no significant effect on binding constant. However, headgroups bearing a permanent positive charge increased the binding of AuNPs to CB[7] ten-fold compared to monomethyl counterparts.

  2. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Cation Mediation on Asp Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chunya [Harbin Institute of Technology; Skelton, Adam [Vanderbilt University; Chen, Mingjun [Harbin Institute of Technology; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a negatively charged residue, aspartic acid (Asp) in tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid, onto a negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution, containing divalent (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, or Sr{sup 2+}) or monovalent (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, or Rb{sup +}) cations, was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that ionic radii and charges will significantly affect the hydration, adsorption geometry, and distance of cations from the rutile surface, thereby regulating the Asp/rutile binding mode. The adsorption strength of monovalent cations on the rutile surface in the order Na{sup +} > K{sup +} > Rb{sup +} shows a 'reverse' lyotropic trend, while the divalent cations on the same surface exhibit a 'regular' lyotropic behavior with decreasing crystallographic radii (the adsorption strength of divalent cations: Sr{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}). The Asp side chain in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl solutions remains stably H-bonded to the surface hydroxyls and the inner-sphere adsorbed compensating monovalent cations act as a bridge between the COO{sup -} group and the rutile, helping to 'trap' the negatively charged Asp side chain on the negatively charged surface. In contrast, the mediating divalent cations actively participate in linking the COO{sup -} group to the rutile surface; thus the Asp side chain can remain stably on the rutile (110) surface, even if it is not involved in any hydrogen bonds with the surface hydroxyls. Inner- and outer-sphere geometries are all possible mediation modes for divalent cations in bridging the peptide to the rutile surface.

  3. Inequivalent contribution of the five tryptophan residues in the C-lobe of human serum transferrin to the fluorescence increase when iron is released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas G; Byrne, Shaina L; Steere, Ashley N; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2009-04-07

    Human serum transferrin (hTF), with two Fe3+ binding lobes, transports iron into cells. Diferric hTF preferentially binds to a specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of cells, and the complex undergoes clathrin dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin-coated vesicle fuses with an endosome where the pH is lowered, facilitating iron release from hTF. On a biologically relevant time scale (2-3 min), the factors critical to iron release include pH, anions, a chelator, and the interaction of hTF with the TFR. Previous work, in which the increase in the intrinsic fluorescence signal was used to monitor iron release from the hTF/TFR complex, established that the TFR significantly enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe of hTF. In the current study, the role of the five C-lobe Trp residues in reporting the fluorescence change has been evaluated (+/-sTFR). Only four of the five recombinant Trp --> Phe mutants produced well. A single slow rate constant for iron release is found for the monoferric C-lobe (FeC hTF) and the four Trp mutants in the FeC hTF background. The three Trp residues equivalent to those in the N-lobe differed from the N-lobe and each other in their contributions to the fluorescent signal. Two rate constants are observed for the FeC hTF control and the four Trp mutants in complex with the TFR: k(obsC1) reports conformational changes in the C-lobe initiated by the TFR, and k(obsC2) is ascribed to iron release. Excitation at 295 nm (Trp only) and at 280 nm (Trp and Tyr) reveals interesting and significant differences in the rate constants for the complex.

  4. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  5. Rashba-Dirac cones at the tungsten surface: Insights from a tight-binding model and thin film subband structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirczenow, George

    2016-11-01

    A tight-binding model of bcc tungsten that includes spin-orbit coupling is developed and applied to the surface states of (110) tungsten thin films. The model describes accurately the anisotropic Dirac conelike dispersion and Rashba-like spin polarization of the surface states, including the crucial effect of the relaxation of the surface atomic layer of the tungsten towards the bulk. It is shown that the surface relaxation affects the tungsten surface states because it results in increased overlaps between atomic orbitals of the surface atomic layer and nearby layers, whereas electric fields that are due to charge transfer between the tungsten and the vacuum near the surface or between the bulk and surface layers do not significantly affect the Rashba-Dirac surface states. It is found that hybridization with bulk modes has differing strengths for thin film surface states belonging to the upper and lower Rashba-Dirac cones and results in reversal of the directions of travel of spin ↑ and ↓ electrons in most of the upper Rashba-Dirac cone relative to those expected from phenomenology. It is also shown that intrasite (not intersite) matrix elements of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian are primarily responsible for the formation of the Rashba-Dirac cones and their spin polarization. This finding should be considered when modeling topological insulators, the spin Hall effect, and related phenomena.

  6. Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Surface Modification and Purification on Bovine Serum Albumin Binding and Biological Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs has been used to improve solubility in aqueous systems and for further functionalization with biologically active moieties for biomedical uses. An important consideration is that oxidation debris is generated during the process of carboxylation, which can be removed by base washing. We hypothesized that surface modification as well as purification by debris removal may alter physicochemical properties of MWCNTs and their ability to bind proteins. We utilized pristine MWCNT, carboxylated MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs, and base-washed carboxylated MWCNTs (BW-F-MWCNTs to examine formation of a bovine serum albumin (BSA protein corona and impact on biological responses. We found that carboxylation increased the capability of F-MWCNTs to bind BSA, and base washing further increased this binding. Functionalization increased cellular uptake by rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC and mouse macrophages (RAW264.7, while base washing showed results similar to the functionalized analog. Interestingly, BSA binding downregulated mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1 in RAEC cells but upregulated the expression of IL-6 and Hmox1 in RAW264.7 cells. Overall, our study demonstrated that surface modification as well as further purification impacted the interaction of MWCNTs with proteins and subsequent cellular responses.

  7. Use of chromatofocusing to detect a transferrin variant in serum of alcoholic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, E L; Mack, U; Powell, L W; Halliday, J W

    1985-09-01

    We describe a technique for detecting an abnormal (pl 5.7) transferrin component in serum, which appears after prolonged heavy consumption of alcohol. Serum transferrin was purified by chromatography on DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue and analyzed by chromatofocusing on an ion-exchange column (Mono P). The abnormal transferrin component was detected in 17 of 20 patients (85%) with a history or prolonged consumption of alcohol (100 g per day), and in control subjects who ingested up to 80 g of alcohol per day for seven days, but not in 14 normal control subjects or 14 patients with liver disease unrelated to alcohol. The variant consistently disappeared from the serum within three weeks of cessation of alcohol consumption. It is apparently produced by desialylation of ordinary human transferrin. We find that chromatofocusing on an ion-exchange column is a sensitive and reliable technique for its identification and conclude that detection of this desialylated transferrin indicates recent prolonged alcohol ingestion.

  8. Binding Interactions Between α-glucans from Lactobacillus reuteri and Milk Proteins Characterised by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Silja Kej; Svensson, Birte; Babol, Linnéa N.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between milk proteins and α-glucans at pH 4.0–5.5 were investigated by use of surface plasmon resonance. The α-glucans were synthesised with glucansucrase enzymes from Lactobacillus reuteri strains ATCC-55730, 180, ML1 and 121. Variations in the molecular characteristics of the α......-glucans, such as molecular weight, linkage type and degree of branching, influenced the interactions with native and denatured β-lactoglobulin and κ-casein. The highest overall binding levels were reached with α-(1,4) compared to α-(1,3) linked glucans. Glucans with many α-(1,6) linkages demonstrated the highest binding......-casein were not pH dependent, whereas binding to denatured β-lactoglobulin was highest at pH 4.0 and binding to native β-lactoglobulin was optimal at pH 4.5–5.0. This study shows that molecular weight, linkage type and degree of branching of α-glucans highly influence the binding interactions with milk...

  9. Characterization of heparin-binding site of tissue transglutaminase: its importance in cell surface targeting, matrix deposition, and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-04-13

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 (202)KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR(222). We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed.

  10. Tannic acid binding of cell surfaces in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davina, J H; Lamers, G E; van Haelst, U J; Kenemans, P; Stadhouders, A M

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in tannic acid (TA) binding capacity of cell surface carbohydrates in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix have been studied using electron microscopic visualization in combination with microdensitometric evaluation. While in normal epithelium there is distinct binding in four to five cell layers of the deep intermediate zone, cells of carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer lesions lack TA binding. In moderate dysplasia an intermediate reacting pattern is found. Deep intermediate cells in areas bordering the carcinoma in situ lesions do not show any binding, although their ultrastructure cannot be distinguished from similar cells in normal tissue. The TA deposition within the deep intermediate zone is probably related to the presence here of glycoprotein-containing membrane-coating granules. The finding that TA binding discriminates between cells in normal squamous epithelium and morphologically normal cells in juxtaposition with lesional areas in premalignant and malignant epithelium opens the possibility for a more reliable cytologic diagnosis of cervical epithelial neoplasia.

  11. Fluorescent adduct formation with terbium: a novel strategy for transferrin glycoform identification in human body fluids and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin HPLC method validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorio, Daniela; De Palo, Elio Franco; Bertaso, Anna; Bortolotti, Federica; Tagliaro, Franco

    2017-02-01

    This paper puts forward a new method for the transferrin (Tf) glycoform analysis in body fluids that involves the formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct (TfFluo). The key idea is to validate the analytical procedure for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), a traditional biochemical serum marker to identify chronic alcohol abuse. Terbium added to a human body-fluid sample produced TfFluo. Anion exchange HPLC technique, with fluorescence detection (λ exc 298 nm and λ em 550 nm), permitted clear separation and identification of Tf glycoform peaks without any interfering signals, allowing selective Tf sialoforms analysis in human serum and body fluids (cadaveric blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and dried blood spots) hampered for routine test. Serum samples (n = 78) were analyzed by both traditional absorbance (Abs) and fluorescence (Fl) HPLC methods and CDT% levels demonstrated a significant correlation (p body fluid analysis. Its sensitivity and absence of interferences extend clinical applications being reliable for CDT assay on body fluids usually not suitable for routine test. Graphical Abstract The formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct can be used to analyze the transferrin glycoforms. The HPLC method for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT%) measurement was validated and employed to determine the levels in different body fluids.

  12. Binding Studies of Cucurbit[7]uril with Gold Nanoparticles Bearing Different Surface Functionalities‡

    OpenAIRE

    Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Saha, Krishnendu; Jiang, Ziwen; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Riddha; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Host-guest interactions between a synthetic receptor, cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been quantified using isothermal titration calorimetry. AuNPs were functionalized with ligands containing tertiary or quaternary benzylamine derivatives, with electron donating or withdrawing groups at the para position of the benzene ring. Analysis of binding interactions reveals that functional groups at the para position have no significant effect on binding constant. However,...

  13. Tight-binding calculation of the electronic states of bulk-terminated GaAs(311)A and B surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾瑜; 马丙现; 姚乾凯; 唐明生

    2002-01-01

    We have carried out theoretical investigations on the electronic structure of GaAs(311)A and GaAs(311)B sur-faces. The bulk electronic structure of GaAs has been described by the second-neighbour tight-binding formalism andthe surface electronic structure was evaluated via an analytic Green function method. First, we present the surfaceband structure together with the projected bulk band of both Ga-terminated and As-terminated for GaAs(311)A andGaAs(311)B surfaces, respectively. In each case, the number of surface states is determined, and the localized surfacefeatures and orbitproperties of these surface states along -Y-S-X- high symmetry lines of the surface Brillouinzone are discussed. For the Ga-terminated GaAs(311)A (1×1) surface, we have tested two possible structure models,i.e. "the bridge site" and "the hollow site" models. In comparison with the angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopystudied recently, the results have shown that the surface electronic states of the hollow site model are in good agreementwith the experiments, whereas those of the bridge site model are not. So we have concluded that the hollow site modelis favourable for the Ga-terminated GaAs(311) (1× 1) surface and the bridge site model should be excluded.

  14. Iron Oxide Surface Chemistry: The Effect of Chemical Structure on Binding in Benzoic Acid and Catechol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpany, Katalin V; Majewski, Dorothy D; Chiu, Cindy T; Cross, Shoronia N; Blum, Amy Szuchmacher

    2017-02-18

    Excellent performance of functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles in nanomaterial and biomedical applications often relies on achieving attachment of ligands to the iron oxide surface both in sufficient number and with proper orientation. Towards this end, we determine relationships between ligand chemical structure and surface binding on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for a series of related benzoic acid and catechol derivatives. Ligand exchange was used to introduce the model ligands, and the resulting nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR-ATR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nanoparticle solubility behavior. An in-depth analysis of ligand electronic effects and reaction conditions reveals that the nature of ligand binding does not solely depend on the presence of functional groups known to bind to iron oxide nanoparticles. The structure of the resulting ligand-surface complex was primarily influenced by the relative positioning of hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups within the ligand as well as whether or not HCl(aq) was added to the ligand exchange reaction. Overall, this study will help guide future ligand design and ligand exchange strategies towards realizing truly custom-built iron oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Lethal iron deprivation induced by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting transferrin receptor 1 in malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José A; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; López-Valdés, Héctor E; Casero, David; Daniels, Tracy R; Patel, Shabnum; Avila, David; Leuchter, Richard; So, Sokuntheavy; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Charles, Andrew C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    A number of antibodies have been developed that induce lethal iron deprivation (LID) by targeting the transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1/CD71) and either neutralizing transferrin (Tf) binding, blocking internalization of the receptor and/or inducing its degradation. We have developed recombinant antibodies targeting human TfR1 (ch128.1 and ch128.1Av), which induce receptor degradation and are cytotoxic to certain malignant B-cells. We now show that internalization of TfR1 bound to these antibodies can lead to its sequestration and degradation, as well as reduced Tf uptake, and the induction of a transcriptional response consistent with iron deprivation, which is mediated in part by downstream targets of p53. Cells resistant to these antibodies do not sequester and degrade TfR1 after internalization of the antibody/receptor complex, and accordingly maintain their ability to internalize Tf. These findings are expected to facilitate the rational design and clinical use of therapeutic agents targeting iron import via TfR1 in hematopoietic malignancies.

  16. α-Taxilin interacts with sorting nexin 4 and participates in the recycling pathway of transferrin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakane

    Full Text Available Membrane traffic plays a crucial role in delivering proteins and lipids to their intracellular destinations. We previously identified α-taxilin as a binding partner of the syntaxin family, which is involved in intracellular vesicle traffic. α-Taxilin is overexpressed in tumor tissues and interacts with polymerized tubulin, but the precise function of α-taxilin remains unclear. Receptor proteins on the plasma membrane are internalized, delivered to early endosomes and then either sorted to the lysosome for degradation or recycled back to the plasma membrane. In this study, we found that knockdown of α-taxilin induced the lysosomal degradation of transferrin receptor (TfnR, a well-known receptor which is generally recycled back to the plasma membrane after internalization, and impeded the recycling of transferrin. α-Taxilin was immunoprecipitated with sorting nexin 4 (SNX4, which is involved in the recycling of TfnR. Furthermore, knockdown of α-taxilin decreased the number and length of SNX4-positive tubular structures. We report for the first time that α-taxilin interacts with SNX4 and plays a role in the recycling pathway of TfnR.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SdrE binds complement regulator factor H as an immune evasion tactic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism.

  18. Direct observation of the binding process between protein and quantum dots by in situ surface plasmon resonance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Qi; Zhou Bo; Tian Fangfang; Ge Yushu; Liu Xiaorong; Liu Yi [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang Shan; Guan Hongliang; He Zhike, E-mail: prof.liuyi@263.ne [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2009-08-12

    A layer-by-layer surface decoration technique has been developed to anchor quantum dots (QDs) onto a gold substrate and an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique has been used to study interactions between the QDs and different proteins. Direct observation of the binding of the protein onto the QDs and the kinetics of the adsorption and dissociation of different proteins on the QDs has been achieved. This would be helpful for the identification of particle-associated proteins and may offer a fundamental prerequisite for nanobiology, nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. The combination of the novel layer-by-layer surface modification method and in situ surface plasmon resonance would be powerful in studying biological systems such as DNA and cells.

  19. Selective binding of oligonucleotide on TiO{sub 2} surfaces modified by swift heavy ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente Pérez-Girón, J. [Nanoate, S.L. C/Poeta Rafael Morales 2, San Sebastian de los Reyes, 28702 Madrid (Spain); Emerging Viruses Department Heinrich Pette Institute, Hamburg 20251 (Germany); Hirtz, M. [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); McAtamney, C.; Bell, A.P. [Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Antonio Mas, J. [Laboratorio de Genómica del Centro de Apoyo Tecnológico, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Campus de Alcorcón 28922, Madrid (Spain); Jaafar, M. [Nanoate, S.L. C/Poeta Rafael Morales 2, San Sebastian de los Reyes, 28702 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Luis, O. de [Nanoate, S.L. C/Poeta Rafael Morales 2, San Sebastian de los Reyes, 28702 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Campus de Alcorcón, 28922 Madrid (Spain); Fuchs, H. [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Physical Institute and Center for Nanotechnology (CeNTech), Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, University of Münster (Germany); and others

    2014-11-15

    We have used swift heavy-ion beam based lithography to create patterned bio-functional surfaces on rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystals. The applied lithography method generates a permanent and well defined periodic structure of micrometre sized square holes having nanostructured TiO{sub 2} surfaces, presenting different physical and chemical properties compared to the surrounding rutile single crystal surface. On the patterned substrates selective binding of oligonucleotides molecules is possible at the surfaces of the holes. This immobilisation process is only being controlled by UV light exposure. The patterned transparent substrates are compatible with fluorescence detection techniques, are mechanically robust, have a high tolerance to extreme chemical and temperature environments, and apparently do not degrade after ten cycles of use. These qualities make the patterned TiO{sub 2} substrates useful for potential biosensor applications.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism characterization of cucurbitacins binding to serum albumins for early pharmacokinetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabini, Edoardo; Fiori, Giovana Maria Lanchoti; Tedesco, Daniele; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Bertucci, Carlo

    2016-04-15

    Cucurbitacins are a group of tetracyclic triterpenoids, known for centuries for their anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties, which are being actively investigated over the past decades in order to elucidate their mechanism of action. In perspective of being used as therapeutic molecules, a pharmacokinetic characterization is crucial to assess the affinity toward blood carrier proteins and extrapolate distribution volumes. Usually, pharmacokinetic data are first collected on animal models and later translated to humans; therefore, an early characterization of the interaction with carrier proteins from different species is highly desirable. In the present study, the interactions of cucurbitacins E and I with human and rat serum albumins (HSA and RSA) were investigated by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based optical biosensing and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Active HSA and RSA sensor chip surfaces were prepared through an amine coupling reaction protocol, and the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the different cucurbitacins-serum albumins complexes were then determined by SPR analysis. Further information on the binding of cucurbitacins to serum albumins was obtained by CD competition experiments with biliverdin, a specific marker binding to subdomain IB of HSA. SPR data unveiled a previously unreported binding event between CucI and HSA; the determined binding affinities of both compounds were slightly higher for RSA with respect to HSA, even though all the compounds can be ranked as high-affinity binders for both carriers. CD analysis showed that the two cucurbitacins modify the binding of biliverdin to serum albumins through opposite allosteric modulation (positive for HSA, negative for RSA), confirming the need for caution in the translation of pharmacokinetic data across species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ionic Surfactant Binding to pH-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush-Grafted Nanoparticles in Suspension and on Charged Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, John K; An, Junxue; Tilton, Robert D

    2015-12-29

    The interactions between silica nanoparticles grafted with a brush of cationic poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (SiO2-g-PDMAEMA) and anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is investigated by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA exhibits pH-dependent charge and size properties which enable the SDS binding to be probed over a range of electrostatic conditions and brush conformations. SDS monomers bind irreversibly to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA at low surfactant concentrations (∼10(-4) M) while exhibiting a pH-dependent threshold above which cooperative, partially reversible SDS binding occurs. At pH 5, SDS binding induces collapse of the highly charged and swollen brush as observed in the bulk by DLS and on surfaces by QCM-D. Similar experiments at pH 9 suggest that SDS binds to the periphery of the weakly charged and deswollen brush and produces SiO2-g-PDMAEMA/SDS complexes with a net negative charge. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA brush collapse and charge neutralization is further confirmed by colloidal probe AFM measurements, where reduced electrosteric repulsions and bridging adhesion are attributed to effects of the bound SDS. Additionally, sequential adsorption schemes with SDS and SiO2-g-PDMAEMA are used to enhance deposition relative to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA direct adsorption on silica. This work shows that the polyelectrolyte brush configuration responds in a more dramatic fashion to SDS than to pH-induced changes in ionization, and this can be exploited to manipulate the structure of adsorbed layers and the corresponding forces of compression and friction between opposing surfaces.

  2. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  3. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  4. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R; Soderblom, Erik J; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders.

  5. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1 might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  6. Modifications of nano-titania surface for in vitro evaluations of hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and nonspecific protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Aparna; Dasgupta, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade, a variety of drug carriers based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been extensively reported. However, their biocompatibility still remains debatable, which motivated us to explore the porous nanostructures of other metal oxides, for example titanium dioxide (TiO2), as potential drug delivery vehicles. Herein, we report the in vitro hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and protein binding of TiO2 nanoparticles, synthesized by a sol-gel method. The surface of the TiO2 nanoparticles was modified with hydroxyl, amine, or thiol containing moieties to examine the influence of surface functional groups on the toxicity and protein binding aspects of the nanoparticles. Our study revealed the superior hemocompatibility of pristine, as well as functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles, compared to that of mesoporous silica, the present gold standard. Among the functional groups studied, aminosilane moieties on the TiO2 surface substantially reduced the degree of hemolysis (down to 5%). Further, cytotoxicity studies by MTT assay suggested that surface functional moieties play a crucial role in determining the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The presence of NH2- functional groups on the TiO2 nanoparticle surface enhanced the cell viability by almost 28% as compared to its native counterpart (at 100 μg/ml), which was in agreement with the hemolysis assay. Finally, nonspecific protein adsorption on functionalized TiO2 surfaces was examined using human serum albumin and it was found that negatively charged surface moieties, like -OH and -SH, could mitigate protein adsorption to a significant extent.

  7. Binding domains of Bacillus anthracis phage endolysins recognize cell culture age-related features on the bacterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Mundra, Ruchir V; Mehta, Krunal K; Pangule, Ravindra C; Wu, Xia; Glatfelter, Willing S; Chen, Zijing; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriolytic enzymes often possess a C-terminal binding domain that recognizes specific motifs on the bacterial surface and a catalytic domain that cleaves covalent linkages within the cell wall peptidoglycan. PlyPH, one such lytic enzyme of bacteriophage origin, has been reported to be highly effective against Bacillus anthracis, and can kill up to 99.99% of the viable bacteria. The bactericidal activity of this enzyme, however, appears to be strongly dependent on the age of the bacterial culture. Although highly bactericidal against cells in the early exponential phase, the enzyme is substantially less effective against stationary phase cells, thus limiting its application in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the binding domain of PlyPH may differ in affinity to cells in different Bacillus growth stages and may be primarily responsible for the age-restricted activity. We therefore employed an in silico approach to identify phage lysins differing in their specificity for the bacterial cell wall. Specifically we focused our attention on Plyβ, an enzyme with improved cell wall-binding ability and age-independent bactericidal activity. Although PlyPH and Plyβ have dissimilar binding domains, their catalytic domains are highly homologous. We characterized the biocatalytic mechanism of Plyβ by identifying the specific bonds cleaved within the cell wall peptidoglycan. Our results provide an example of the diversity of phage endolysins and the opportunity for these biocatalysts to be used for broad-based protection from bacterial pathogens.

  8. A facile drug delivery system preparation through the interaction between drug and iron ion of transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Liu, Jihua [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Wei, Shaohua; Ge, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jiahong, E-mail: zhoujiahong@njnu.edu.cn [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yu, Boyang, E-mail: boyangyu59@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Shen, Jian [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2013-09-15

    Many anticancer drugs have the capability to form stable complex with metal ions. Based on such property, a simple method to combine these drugs with transferrin, through the interaction between drug and Fe ion of transferrin, to improve their anticancer activity, is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, the complex of photosensitive anticancer drug hypocrellin A and transferrin was prepared by such facile method. The results indicated that the complex of hypocrellin A and transferrin can stabilize in aqueous solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated the superior cancer cell uptake ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin complex to the free hypocrellin A. Significant damage to such drug-impregnated tumor cells was observed upon irradiation and the cancer cells killing ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin was stronger than the free hypocrellin A within a certain range of concentrations. The above results demonstrated the validity and potential of our proposed strategy to prepare the drug delivery system of this type of anti-cancer drugs and transferrin.

  9. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes, particularly those that are active on polysaccharides, are often found associated with carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which can play several roles in supporting enzyme function, such as localizing the enzyme to the substrate. However, the presence of CBMs...

  10. Urokinase plasminogen activator cleaves its cell surface receptor releasing the ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E; Solberg, H

    1992-01-01

    -domain form, uPAR(2+3), lacking ligand-binding domain 1. Trypsin treatment showed that both variants are present on the outside of the cells. Addition to the culture medium of an anticatalytic monoclonal antibody to uPA inhibited the formation of the uPAR(2+3), indicating that uPA is involved in its...

  11. Neural and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells: Transferrin Effects on Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Silvestroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available NSC (neural stem cells/NPC (neural progenitor cells are multipotent and self-renew throughout adulthood in the SVZ (subventricular zone of the mammalian CNS (central nervous system. These cells are considered interesting targets for CNS neurodegenerative disorder cell therapies, and understanding their behaviour in vitro is crucial if they are to be cultured prior to transplantation. We cultured the SVZ tissue belonging to newborn rats under the form of NS (neurospheres to evaluate the effects of Tf (transferrin on cell proliferation. The NS were heterogeneous in terms of the NSC/NPC markers GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, Nestin and Sox2 and the OL (oligodendrocyte progenitor markers NG2 (nerve/glia antigen 2 and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. The results of this study indicate that aTf (apoTransferrin is able to increase cell proliferation of SVZ-derived cells in vitro, and that these effects were mediated at least in part by the TfRc1 (Tf receptor 1. Since OPCs (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells represent a significant proportion of the proliferating cells in the SVZ-derived primary cultures, we used the immature OL cell line N20.1 to show that Tf was able to augment the proliferation rate of OPC, either by adding aTf to the culture medium or by overexpressing rat Tf in situ. The culture medium supplemented with ferric iron, together with aTf, increased the DNA content, while ferrous iron did not. The present work provides data that could have a potential application in human cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disease and/or CNS injury that require the use of in vitro amplified NPCs.

  12. Synthesis of trimethoprim metal complexes: Spectral, electrochemical, thermal, DNA-binding and surface morphology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Nihat; Tarınç, Derya; Polat, Duygu; Ceşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Complexes of trimethoprim (TMP), with Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Fe(III) have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic techniques involving UV-vis, IR, mass and (1)H NMR. CHN elemental analysis, electrochemical and thermal behavior of complexes have also been investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that these compounds can bind to CT DNA. The binding constants of the complexes with CT DNA have also been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA by both the intercalative and the electrostatic binding mode. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with the reference drug TMP. Almost all types of complexes show excellent activity against all type of bacteria and fungi. The morphology of the CT DNA, TMP, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with CT DNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at CT DNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  13. A Density Functional Tight Binding Study of Acetic Acid Adsorption on Crystalline and Amorphous Surfaces of Titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Manzhos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative density functional tight binding study of an organic molecule attachment to TiO2 via a carboxylic group, with the example of acetic acid. For the first time, binding to low-energy surfaces of crystalline anatase (101, rutile (110 and (B-TiO2 (001, as well as to the surface of amorphous (a- TiO2 is compared with the same computational setup. On all surfaces, bidentate configurations are identified as providing the strongest adsorption energy, Eads = −1.93, −2.49 and −1.09 eV for anatase, rutile and (B-TiO2, respectively. For monodentate configurations, the strongest Eads = −1.06, −1.11 and −0.86 eV for anatase, rutile and (B-TiO2, respectively. Multiple monodentate and bidentate configurations are identified on a-TiO2 with a distribution of adsorption energies and with the lowest energy configuration having stronger bonding than that of the crystalline counterparts, with Eads up to −4.92 eV for bidentate and −1.83 eV for monodentate adsorption. Amorphous TiO2 can therefore be used to achieve strong anchoring of organic molecules, such as dyes, that bind via a -COOH group. While the presence of the surface leads to a contraction of the band gap vs. the bulk, molecular adsorption caused no appreciable effect on the band structure around the gap in any of the systems.

  14. Surface-binding through polyfunction groups of Rhodamine B on composite surface and its high performance photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yiqun; Wang, Xiaofen; Gu, Yun; Guo, Lan; Xu, Zhaodi

    2016-03-01

    A kind of novel composite ZnS/In(OH)3/In2S3 is synthesized using zinc oxide nanoplates as zinc raw material during hydrothermal process. Although the obtained samples are composited of ZnS and In(OH)3 and In2S3 phase, the samples possess different structure, morphology and optical absorption property depending on molar ratio of raw materials. Zeta potential analysis indicates different surface electrical property since various content and particle size of the phases. The equilibrium adsorption study confirms the composite ZnS/In(OH)3/In2S3 with surface negative charge is good adsorbent for Rhodamine B (Rh B) dye. In addition, the degradation of Rh B over the samples with surface negative charge under visible light (λ ≥ 420 nm) is more effective than the samples with surface positive charge. The samples before and after adsorbing Rh B molecule are examined by FTIR spectra and Zetasizer. It is found that the three function groups of Rh B molecule, especially carboxyl group anchors to surface of the sample through electrostatic adsorption, coordination and hydrogen-bond. It contributes to rapid transformation of photogenerated electron to conduction band of In(OH)3 and suppresses the recombination of photogenerated carrier. The possible adsorption modes of Rh B are discussed on the basis of the experiment results.

  15. Soluble Form of Canine Transferrin Receptor Inhibits Canine Parvovirus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexia Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus (CPV disease is an acute, highly infectious disease threatening the dog-raising industry. So far there are no effective therapeutic strategies to control this disease. Although the canine transferrin receptor (TfR was identified as a receptor for CPV infection, whether extracellular domain of TfR (called soluble TfR (sTfR possesses anti-CPV activities remains elusive. Here, we used the recombinant sTfR prepared from HEK293T cells with codon-optimized gene structure to investigate its anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that codon optimization could significantly improve sTfR expression in HEK293T cells. The prepared recombinant sTfR possessed a binding activity to both CPV and CPV VP2 capsid proteins and significantly inhibited CPV infection of cultured feline F81 cells and decreased the mortality of CPV-infected dogs, which indicates that the sTfR has the anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Transferrin receptor 1 in the zoonosis and pathogenesis of New World hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Hyeryun; Jemielity, Stephanie; Abraham, Jonathan; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Farzan, Michael

    2011-08-01

    At least five New World arenaviruses cause severe human hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses are transmitted to humans through contact with their respective South American rodent hosts. Each uses human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) as its obligate receptor. Accidental similarities between human TfR1 and TfR1 orthologs of arenaviral host species enable zoonoses, whereas mice and rats are not infectable because they lack these TfR1 determinants of infection. All pathogenic New World arenaviruses bind to a common region of the apical domain of TfR1. The ability of a New World arenavirus to use human TfR1 is absolutely predictive of its ability to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. Nonpathogenic arenaviruses, closely related to hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses, cannot utilize human TfR1 but efficiently enter cells through TfR1 orthologs of their native rodent hosts. Mutagenesis studies suggest that minor changes in the entry glycoproteins of these nonpathogenic viruses may allow human transmission. TfR1 is upregulated as a result of iron sequestration during the acute-phase response to infection, and the severity of disease may result from amplification of viral replication during this response.

  17. Soluble form of canine transferrin receptor inhibits canine parvovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiexia; Pan, Sumin; Liang, Shuang; Zhong, Zhenyu; He, Ying; Lin, Hongyu; Li, Wenyan; Wang, Liyue; Li, Xiujin; Zhong, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) disease is an acute, highly infectious disease threatening the dog-raising industry. So far there are no effective therapeutic strategies to control this disease. Although the canine transferrin receptor (TfR) was identified as a receptor for CPV infection, whether extracellular domain of TfR (called soluble TfR (sTfR)) possesses anti-CPV activities remains elusive. Here, we used the recombinant sTfR prepared from HEK293T cells with codon-optimized gene structure to investigate its anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that codon optimization could significantly improve sTfR expression in HEK293T cells. The prepared recombinant sTfR possessed a binding activity to both CPV and CPV VP2 capsid proteins and significantly inhibited CPV infection of cultured feline F81 cells and decreased the mortality of CPV-infected dogs, which indicates that the sTfR has the anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malczewska, J; Szczepańska, B; Stupnicki, R; Sendecki, W

    2001-03-01

    The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logFerr) was determined in 131 male and 121 female athletes in order to assess the frequency of iron deficiency (threshold value of that index taken as 1.8). Blood was drawn for determining morphological indices as well as sTfR, ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and haptoglobin. A significantly (p iron deficiency was observed in women (26%) than in men (11%). The iron deficiency was latent, since no subject was found to be anemic. The plasma iron was significantly lower and TIBC higher (p iron-deficient subgroups than in the non-deficient ones. This confirmed the latent character of iron deficiency. Some hematological indices (Hb, MCH, MCHC, MCV) were significantly lower in iron-deficient female athletes than in male athletes, which suggested a more profound iron deficiency in the former. The sTfR/logFerr index might thus be useful in detecting iron deficiency in athletes, especially in those with erythropoiesis disorders, since physical loads may affect the widely used ferritin levels.

  19. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Enolase Is a Surface Protein That Binds Plasminogen and Mediates Interaction of Yeast Forms with Host Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Mundodi, Vasanth; Abi-Chacra, Erika A.; Winters, Michael S.; Alderete, John F.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is a disseminated, systemic disorder that involves the lungs and other organs. The ability of the pathogen to interact with host components, including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, is essential to further colonization, invasion, and growth. Previously, enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) was characterized as a fibronectin binding protein in P. brasiliensis. Interaction of surface-bound enolase with plasminogen has been incriminated in tissue invasion for pathogenesis in several pathogens. In this paper, enolase was expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (recombinant P. brasiliensis enolase [rPbEno]). The P. brasiliensis native enolase (PbEno) was detected at the fungus surface and cytoplasm by immunofluorescence with an anti-rPbEno antibody. Immobilized purified rPbEno bound plasminogen in a specific, concentration-dependent fashion. Both native enolase and rPbEno activated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin through tissue plasminogen activator. The association between PbEno and plasminogen was lysine dependent. In competition experiments, purified rPbEno, in its soluble form, inhibited plasminogen binding to fixed P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this interaction required surface-localized PbEno. Plasminogen-coated P. brasiliensis yeast cells were capable of degrading purified fibronectin, providing in vitro evidence for the generation of active plasmin on the fungus surface. Exposure of epithelial cells and phagocytes to enolase was associated with an increased expression of surface sites of adhesion. In fact, the association of P. brasiliensis with epithelial cells and phagocytes was increased in the presence of rPbEno. The expression of PbEno was upregulated in yeast cells derived from mouse-infected tissues. These data indicate that surface-associated PbEno may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. brasiliensis. PMID

  20. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis enolase is a surface protein that binds plasminogen and mediates interaction of yeast forms with host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Fonseca, Fernanda L; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Mundodi, Vasanth; Abi-Chacra, Erika A; Winters, Michael S; Alderete, John F; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2010-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is a disseminated, systemic disorder that involves the lungs and other organs. The ability of the pathogen to interact with host components, including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, is essential to further colonization, invasion, and growth. Previously, enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) was characterized as a fibronectin binding protein in P. brasiliensis. Interaction of surface-bound enolase with plasminogen has been incriminated in tissue invasion for pathogenesis in several pathogens. In this paper, enolase was expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (recombinant P. brasiliensis enolase [rPbEno]). The P. brasiliensis native enolase (PbEno) was detected at the fungus surface and cytoplasm by immunofluorescence with an anti-rPbEno antibody. Immobilized purified rPbEno bound plasminogen in a specific, concentration-dependent fashion. Both native enolase and rPbEno activated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin through tissue plasminogen activator. The association between PbEno and plasminogen was lysine dependent. In competition experiments, purified rPbEno, in its soluble form, inhibited plasminogen binding to fixed P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this interaction required surface-localized PbEno. Plasminogen-coated P. brasiliensis yeast cells were capable of degrading purified fibronectin, providing in vitro evidence for the generation of active plasmin on the fungus surface. Exposure of epithelial cells and phagocytes to enolase was associated with an increased expression of surface sites of adhesion. In fact, the association of P. brasiliensis with epithelial cells and phagocytes was increased in the presence of rPbEno. The expression of PbEno was upregulated in yeast cells derived from mouse-infected tissues. These data indicate that surface-associated PbEno may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. brasiliensis.

  1. CELL-SURFACE BINDING OF DEOXYNIVALENOL TO Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans ISOLATED FROM SOURDOUGH STARTER CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef I. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON and fumonisin B1 (FB1 are two contaminant-mycotoxins frequently found in food commodities produced under poor conditions. Several methods have been suggested for the detoxification of such mycotoxins. Among the proposed methods, biological detoxification seems to be the most promising and cost-efficient. This study explores the capability of one strain of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans, to bind both DON and FB1 in liquid cultures. Here we report the ability of heat-inactivated cells to significantly reduce concentrations of DON in liquid cultures. Further mechanistic investigation showed that the detoxification process is a result of the physical binding of such mycotoxins to the cell wall of this bacterium.

  2. Serum transferrin receptor, serum ferritin and serum transferrin receptor-ferritin index in adults with iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Seema; Shah, Shahida; Iqbal, Touqueer; Iqbal, Zafar; Hanif, Ejaz

    2011-01-01

    Serum Ferritin (SF) and iron both show acute phase responses to inflammation, so iron may fall and ferritin rise independent of the marrow iron store. Bone marrow iron store has been considered the gold standard, but is invasive, painful and expensive and not suitable for everyone. Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) which is the concentration of the soluble fragment of transferrin receptor in serum, is an important new haematological parameter. The ratio of sTfR to log SF is known as sTfR-SF index. This study was conducted to evaluate sTfR, Ferritin and sTfR-F Index in diagnosing and differentiating iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) from anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). One hundred and sixteen (116) adult subjects (80 anaemic and 36 controls) who already had their bone marrow examination done for various reasons were included in the study. sTfR, SF, and their index were measured and compared with bone marrow iron stores. Absence of iron stores denoted IDA whereas increased macrophage iron with decreased siderocytes and sideroblasts was diagnostic of ACD. Out of 80 anaemic patients, 47 were diagnosed as IDA while 33 were diagnosed as ACD. In case of IDA the diagnostic accuracy of index was 91.57%, sTfR had accuracy of 85.54% while SF had accuracy of 75.90%. In case of ACD, the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR was 91.30%, index 89.86%, while SF had accuracy of 79.71%. sTfR-SF index is a better parameter than sTfR or ferritin alone but should only be used when the results of these parameters seem altered or a bone marrow aspiration is mandatory for diagnosis of ACD. The estimation of sTfR or index may offer a simple non invasive method that may enable more accurate assessments of iron status in such patients.

  3. A surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for detecting a dioxin precursor using a gold binding polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, N; Tokuda, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2,4-dichloroph......A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2...

  4. Surface binding sites (SBSs), mechanism and regulation of enzymes degrading amylopectin and α-limit dextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Jonas W.

    2013-01-01

    into barley seed α-amylase 1 (AMY1) and limit dextrinase (LD) includes i. kinetics of bi-exponential amylopectin hydrolysis by AMY1, one reaction having low Km (8 μg/mL) and high kcat (57 s-1) and the other high Km (97 μg/mL) and low kcat (23 s-1). β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) inhibits the first reaction by binding...

  5. CELL-SURFACE BINDING OF DEOXYNIVALENOL TO Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans ISOLATED FROM SOURDOUGH STARTER CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Yousef I.; Lloyd B. Bullerman

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are two contaminant-mycotoxins frequently found in food commodities produced under poor conditions. Several methods have been suggested for the detoxification of such mycotoxins. Among the proposed methods, biological detoxification seems to be the most promising and cost-efficient. This study explores the capability of one strain of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans, to bind both DON and FB1 in liquid cultu...

  6. Poly(A) binding proteins located at the inner surface of resealed nuclear envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, D; Riedel, N; Agutter, P S; Fasold, H

    1990-04-25

    We have used a photoreactive cross-linking reagent, poly(A/8-N3-A) (a poly(A) of average molecular mass of 100 kDa in which 5-10% of the A residues are replaced by 8-N3-A), to label poly(A) binding proteins of rat liver nuclear envelopes. This reagent was prepared by polymerizing a mixture of ADP and 8-N3-ADP with polynucleotide phosphorylase. The purified poly(A) was labeled in the 5'-position with a 32P group. In nuclear envelopes prepared by a low salt DNase I procedure, the poly(A/8-N3-A) labeled a protein-nucleic acid complex of approximately 270 kDa, which on degradation with RNase U2 or NaOH at pH 10 yielded two polypeptides of approximately 50 and 30 kDa. These photoreaction products were markedly decreased when resealed nuclear envelopes or non-nuclear envelope proteins were irradiated in the presence of poly(A/8-N3-A). The affinity labeling was intensified when resealed vesicles were made leaky by freezing or ultrasonication, suggesting that the poly(A) binding proteins are accessible from the nucleoplasmic but not the cytoplasmic face of the envelope. Moreover binding was specific for poly(A). Alternative reagents, random poly(A/8-N3-A,C,G,U) of about 100 kDa and poly(dA) (molecular mass between 350 and 515 kDa), showed a very low affinity for poly(A) recognition proteins in the low salt DNase I-treated nuclear envelopes; the 270-kDa band was labeled only weakly. The binding site was not protected by poly(A,C,G,U), weakly by poly(dA), and distinctly by poly(A).

  7. New metal based drugs: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding, surface morphology and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Aysegul; Demirtaş, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The NSAID piroxicam (PRX) drug was used for complex formation reactions with Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) metal salts have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the complexes were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSFSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the PRX and its complexes with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. The morphology of the FSdsDNA, PRX, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with FSdsDNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at FSdsDNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism. The effect of proliferation PRX and complexes were examined on the HeLA and C6 cells using real-time cell analyzer with four different concentrations.

  8. Surface chemical/binding reaction of coated Li layer by lithium vapor injectors in LIGHT-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikawa, Naoko, E-mail: ashikawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Chung, K.-S.; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nagayama, Yoshio [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The Lithium Injection Gettering of Hydrogen and its Transport (LIGHT-1) experiment has begun at the NIFS. To study the material probes installed in the cylindrical vacuum chamber, the chemical characteristics for lithium are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characteristics of chemical binding between lithium and other impurities are shown to be oxide bindings. In addition, the influence of the vacuum vent effect due to exposure to air was determined in both solid lithium and lithium-coated probes in LIGHT-1. Using the peak positions of Li{sub 2}O and pure lithium, the thickness of the coated lithium is estimated. For the SS316 target, the coated lithium shows two different peaks, Li1s and Fe3p, located at a similar binding energy region. Thus, the real lithium intensities can be measured by the separation of the peaks. After this analysis, the coated thickness of lithium is estimated to be from 8 to 20 nm, and it is not uniform in the Z-axis direction, probably due to erosion by glow discharge.

  9. QCM Biosensor Based on Polydopamine Surface for Real-Time Analysis of the Binding Kinetics of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensor based on polydopamine (PDA surface was developed for real-time analysis of the binding kinetics of protein-protein interactions. The biosensor was fabricated by simply immersing the gold sensor chip into an aqueous dopamine solution at pH 8.5 leading to a spontaneous deposition of PDA film onto the sensor chip surface, which was followed by incubation with the protein to immobilize it onto the PDA-coated sensor chip surface via Michael addition and/or Schiff base reactions. In this paper, the interaction between monoclonal anti-myoglobin 7005 antibody (IgG1 and its antigen human cardiac myoglobin was used as a model system for real-time analysis of biomolecule interactions on the biosensor surface. The kinetic parameters of the interaction between anti-myoglobin 7005 and myoglobin were studied on the biosensor surface, which were consistent with the results obtained via amine coupling. The biosensor based on PDA surface has excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and specificity. Compared with the most frequently/typically used amine coupling method for immobilization of proteins on carboxylated substrates, the modification methodology presented in this paper is simple, mild and is not subjected to the limitations of the isoelectric point (pI of the protein. In addition, the PDA biosensor chip can be easily reused, which makes QCM biosensor analysis more efficient and cost effective.

  10. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  11. Achyranthes japonica Nakai Water Extract Suppresses Binding of IgE Antibody to Cell Surface FcɛRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sun Yup; Lee, Mina; Lee, Kyung Dong

    2016-01-01

    Achyranthes japonica Nakai (AJN) water extract has a variety of physiological properties, including anti-diabetic, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of AJN extract were investigated in high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcɛRI)-mediated KU812F cells activation. AJN extract showed suppressive effects on histamine release and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i elevation from anti-FcɛRI antibody (CRA-1)-stimulated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that AJN extract treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in the cell surface FcɛRI expression and the binding between the cell surface FcɛRI and the IgE antibody. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that levels of the mRNA for the FcɛRI α chain was decreased by treatment with AJN extract. These results indicate that AJN extract may exert anti-allergic effects via the inhibition of calcium influx and histamine release, which occurs as a result from the down-regulation of the binding of IgE antibody to cell surface FcɛRI. This mechanism may occur through FcɛRI expression inhibition. PMID:28078254

  12. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...

  13. Transferrin coated nanoparticles: study of the bionano interface in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej S Pitek

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the surface of nanoparticles (NPs in a biological environment is immediately modified by the adsorption of biomolecules with the formation of a protein corona and it is also accepted that the protein corona, rather than the original nanoparticle surface, defines a new biological identity. Consequently, a methodology to effectively study the interaction between nanomaterials and the biological corona encountered within an organism is a key objective in nanoscience for understanding the impact of the nanoparticle-protein interactions on the biological response in vitro and in vivo. Here, we outline an integrated methodology to address the different aspects governing the formation and the function of the protein corona of polystyrene nanoparticles coated with Transferrin by different strategies. Protein-NP complexes are studied both in situ (in human plasma, full corona FC and after washing (hard corona, HC in terms of structural properties, composition and second-order interactions with protein microarrays. Human protein microarrays are used to effectively study NP-corona/proteins interactions addressing the growing demand to advance investigations of the extrinsic function of corona complexes. Our data highlight the importance of this methodology as an analysis to be used in advance of the application of engineered NPs in biological environments.

  14. A simple method for obtaining transferrins from human plasma and porcine serum: preparations and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Ren, Guoyan; Hu, Yiqiao

    2008-05-01

    A simple method was described for the purification of serum transferrin (Tf) from human plasma and porcine serum with relative high yield and purity. The properties including purity, integrity, immunoreactivity and the receptor-binding ability of the proteins were studied by several assays, comprising spectrometry, SDS-PAGE, HPLC, Western blotting, urea electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and cytometry. Analysis from all the different aspects manifested that the proteins were of high purity. The two kinds of Tfs appeared to be iron-saturated as confirmed by their absorbance spectra and urea-PAGE mobility. The specific spectra of absorption of the two Tfs were both at around 465 nm. The relative molecular weights of human Tf (hTf) and porcine Tf (pTf) were determined by SDS-PAGE and further identified by MAIDI-TOF mass spectrometry with a result of 79,707 and 79,258, respectively. Immunoblotting assay showed that pTf could react with the anti-human Tf monoclonal antibody with a less level compared to hTf. FACS assays of their binding activities to Tf receptor-positive cell (K562 cell line) indicated that pTf could be recognized by the hTf receptor and internalized into cells, with a slightly less efficacy than hTf. All special property studies demonstrated that pTf was similar to hTf in physical and chemical characteristics, which gave a hint that pTf could substitute for hTf in some kinds of researches, such as using hTf as a carrier in drug targeting system.

  15. Transferrin saturation ratio and risk of total and cardiovascular mortality in the general population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, A G

    2014-08-01

    The transferrin saturation (TSAT) ratio is a commonly used indicator of iron deficiency and iron overload in clinical practice but precise relationships with total and cardiovascular mortality are unclear.

  16. TRANSFERRIN POLYMORPHISM IN FOUR LOCAL BREEDS OF GOAT IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kurnianto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the gene frequency and individual heterozygosity of transferrin in four local breeds of goat in Central Java-Indonesia. The number of blood samples were taken from 96 heads of goat, in which each of breeds were 24 samples, those were Kejobong (Purbalingga regency, Ettawa Grade (Purworejo regency, Kacang (Grobogan regency and Jawarandu (Pemalang regency. Polyacrilamide Gel Electrophoresis was performed to detect the bands of blood plasm protein. Gen frequency was calculated using general formula of population genetics. Estimated heterozygosity and individual heterosizygosity were calculated to analysis the equilibrium condition of transferrin. Result showed there was two allele of transferrin, namely TfA and TfB. Gene frequency of TfA was higher than that of TfB. Transferrin gene and genotypes were in disequilibrium of Hardy-Weinberg Law.

  17. Studies on the mitogenic effect of transferrin by membrane signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEUNGTM; PLLIM; 等

    1990-01-01

    One of the earliest events leading to cell activation and growth is the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids producing various membrane signals induced by an interaction between growth factors or hormones with their respective receptors on the cell membrane [1].To demonstrate the mitogenic action of transferrin,our results show that an addition of transferrin to “serum-deprived” rat hepatoma cells produced a rapid but transient rise in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate(IP3) level,and at the same time,an increased intracellular Ca2+ activity and a cytoplasmic alkalinization were observed.These signal transductions further lend support to the mitogenic nature of transferrin.In addition,a possible link between the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin with the generation of intracellular signals is discussed herewith.

  18. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Pashov, D. L.; Kohanoff, J. J.; Paxton, A. T.

    2014-07-01

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris-Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  19. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Kohanoff, J. J. [Atomistic Simulation Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Pashov, D. L.; Paxton, A. T., E-mail: Tony.Paxton@KCL.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-28

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg–Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris–Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  20. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C releases myosin heads from the surface of cardiac thick filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W.; Craig, Roger; Moss, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) has a key regulatory role in cardiac contraction, but the mechanism by which changes in phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerate cross-bridge kinetics remains unknown. In this study, we isolated thick filaments from the hearts of mice in which the three serine residues (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302) that are phosphorylated by protein kinase A in the m-domain of cMyBP-C were replaced by either alanine or aspartic acid, mimicking the fully nonphosphorylated and the fully phosphorylated state of cMyBP-C, respectively. We found that thick filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-deficient hearts had highly ordered cross-bridge arrays, whereas the filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-mimetic hearts showed a strong tendency toward disorder. Our results support the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of cMyBP-C promotes or stabilizes the relaxed/superrelaxed quasi-helical ordering of the myosin heads on the filament surface, whereas phosphorylation weakens this stabilization and binding of the heads to the backbone. Such structural changes would modulate the probability of myosin binding to actin and could help explain the acceleration of cross-bridge interactions with actin when cMyBP-C is phosphorylated because of, for example, activation of β1-adrenergic receptors in myocardium. PMID:28167762

  1. Supernatant from a cloned helper T cell stimulates resting B cells to express transferrin and IL-2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Leclercq, L; Dautry-Varsat, A; Theze, J

    1987-07-01

    We describe the properties of the supernatant from a murine cloned helper T cell (clone 52.3) which is able to polyclonally activate most resting B cells in the absence of any additional stimulus. We hypothesize that an activity which we call BCAF (B-cell-activating factor(s] exists in our supernatant which can activate resting B cells alone or in conjunction with other lymphokines. In the present report, we investigate changes in the surface antigen pattern induced on resting B cells by BCAF-containing supernatant. Analysis of the cells by flow cytometry shows that transferrin receptor and IL-2 receptor expression increase on a large fraction of B cells after 2 days of activation by the T-helper-cell clone supernatant. Monoclonal anti-transferrin receptor antibody inhibits cell division but does not affect blastogenesis, while IL-2 has no effect in our experimental system. Our present results confirm that BCAF-containing supernatants can act on most resting B cells and replace helper T cells in inducing B-cell activation and proliferation.

  2. On the Structure of the Free Surface of Self-Binding Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hajyan, G S

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of electrons and of electrical at the free surface if strange quark matter are determined within the framework of the MIT bag model. It is shown that, with the allowance for the betta-decay of quarks near the surface due to the outward escape of electrons, the electric charge density of quarks at the surface increases by a factor of 17-25, the thickness of the transitional layer decreases from 230 Fm to 15 Fm, and the field strength increases by a factor of 1.7. The difference between the chemical potentials of electrons at the surface and deep layers decreases from 7 MeV to 0.8 MeV, which increases the limiting possible density of ordinary matter above a strange quark star.

  3. Study of lysozyme mobility and binding free energy during adsorption on a graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, C. Masato [Flintridge Preparatory School, La Canada Flintridge, California 91011 (United States); Ma, Heng; Wei, Tao, E-mail: twei@lamar.edu [Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Understanding protein adsorption is a key to the development of biosensors and anti-biofouling materials. Hydration essentially controls the adsorption process on hydrophobic surfaces, but its effect is complicated by various factors. Here, we present an ideal model system to isolate hydration effects—lysozyme adsorption on a flat hydrophobic graphene surface. Our all-atom molecular dynamics and molecular-mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area computation study reveal that lysozyme on graphene displays much larger diffusivity than in bulk water. Protein's hydration free energy within the first hydration shell is dominated by the protein-water electrostatic interactions and acts as an energy barrier for protein adsorption. On the other hand, the surface tension, especially that from the hydrophobic graphene, can effectively weaken the barrier to promote adsorption.

  4. DNA nanostructure-decorated surfaces for enhanced aptamer-target binding and electrochemical cocaine sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanli; Pei, Hao; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Huang, Qing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity of aptamer-based electrochemical sensors is often limited by restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure, which arise from imperfect packing of probes on the heterogeneous and locally crowded surface. In this study, we have developed an ultrasensitive and highly selective electrochemical aptamer-based cocaine sensor (EACS), based on a DNA nanotechnology-based sensing platform. We have found that the electrode surface decorated with an aptamer probe-pendant tetrahedral DNA nanostructure greatly facilitates cocaine-induced fusion of the split anticocaine aptamer. This novel design leads to a sensitive cocaine sensor with a remarkably low detection limit of 33 nM. It is also important that the tetrahedra-decorated surface is protein-resistant, which not only suits the enzyme-based signal amplification scheme employed in this work, but ensures high selectivity of this sensor when deployed in sera or other adulterated samples.

  5. Binding modes of phosphonic acid derivatives adsorbed on TiO2 surfaces: Assignments of experimental IR and NMR spectra based on DFT/PBC calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldof, D.; Tassi, M.; Carleer, R.; Adriaensens, P.; Roevens, A.; Meynen, V.; Blockhuys, F.

    2017-01-01

    A DFT study on the adsorption of a series of phosphonic acids (PAs) on the TiO2 anatase (101) and (001) surfaces was performed. The adsorption energies and geometries of the most stable binding modes were compared to literature data and the effect of the inclusion of dispersion forces in the energy calculations was gauged. As the (101) surface is the most exposed surface of TiO2 anatase, the calculated chemical shifts and vibrational frequencies of PAs adsorbed on this surface were compared to experimental 31P and 17O NMR and IR data in order to assign the two possible binding modes (mono- and bidentate) to peaks and bands in these spectra; due to the corrugated nature of anatase (101) tridentate binding is not possible on this surface. Analysis of the calculated and experimental 31P chemical shifts indicates that both monodentate and bidentate binding modes are present. For the reactive (001) surface, the results of the calculations indicate that both bi- and tridentate binding modes result in stable systems. Due to the particular sensitivity of 17O chemical shifts to hydrogen bonding and solvent effects, the model used is insufficient to assign these spectra at present. Comparison of calculated and experimental IR spectra leads to the conclusion that IR spectroscopy is not suitable for the characterization of the different binding modes of the adsorption complexes.

  6. Effects of transferrin conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in lung cancer delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rahul Pratap [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sharma, Gunjan [Genotoxicology and Cancer Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sonali [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Sanjay [Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005 (India); Patne, Shashikant C.U. [Department of Pathology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Pandey, Bajarangprasad L. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Koch, Biplob, E-mail: kochbiplob@gmail.com [Genotoxicology and Cancer Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Muthu, Madaswamy S., E-mail: muthubits@rediffmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005 (India); Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) which were covalently conjugated with transferrin by carbodiimide chemistry and loaded with docetaxel as a model drug for effective treatment of lung cancer in comparison with the commercial docetaxel injection (Docel™). D-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was used as amphiphilic surfactant to improve the aqueous dispersity and biocompatibility of MWCNT. Human lung cancer cells (A549 cells) were employed as an in-vitro model to access cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the docetaxel/coumarin-6 loaded MWCNT. The cellular uptake results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT showed higher efficiency in comparison with free C6. The IC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the transferrin conjugated MWCNT could be 136-fold more efficient than Docel™ after 24 h treatment with the A549 cells. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that cancerous cells appeared significantly (P < 0.05) in the sub-G1 phase for transferrin conjugated MWCNT in comparison with Docel™. Results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT have showed better efficacy with safety than Docel™. - Highlights: • It shows the development of transferrin conjugated MWCNT formulation of DTX for the effective treatment of lung cancer. • Evaluated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, cell cycle, and ROS level of the DTX/C6 loaded MWCNT. • The IC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the transferrin conjugated MWCNT could be 136-fold more effective than Docel™. • Safety of the DTX formulations were studied by the measurements of ALP, LDH and total protein count levels in BAL fluid. • Results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT have showed better efficacy with safety than Docel™ in lung cancer delivery.

  7. Evolutionary relationships of a "primitive" shark (Heterodontus) assessed by micro-complement fixation of serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D H; Lawson, R; Burch, S J; Hanson, J E

    1987-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships of six sharks were investigated by comparing their transferrins using the micro-complement fixation method. The immunological distances observed were used to build a tree that confirms that the squaloid and galeoid species examined belong to two separate groups and that Heterodontus, a genus of hitherto uncertain position, belongs with the galeoids. The divergence time estimated from the transferrin comparisons is roughly 240 +/- 65 million years between Heterodontus and galeoids.

  8. Total mortality by transferrin saturation levels: two general population studies and a metaanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence for increased mortality in patients with clinically overt hereditary hemochromatosis. Whether increased transferrin saturation (TS), as a proxy for iron overload is associated with increased mortality in the general population is largely unknown.......There is evidence for increased mortality in patients with clinically overt hereditary hemochromatosis. Whether increased transferrin saturation (TS), as a proxy for iron overload is associated with increased mortality in the general population is largely unknown....

  9. Benzene derivatives adsorbed to the Ag(111) surface: Binding sites and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel P.; Simpson, Scott; Tymińska, Nina; Zurek, Eva

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion corrected Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to study the adsorption of benzenes derivatized with functional groups encompassing a large region of the activated/deactivated spectrum to the Ag(111) surface. Benzenes substituted with weak activating or deactivating groups, such as methyl and fluoro, do not have a strong preference for adsorbing to a particular site on the substrate, with the corrugations in the potential energy surface being similar to those of benzene. Strong activating (N(CH3)2) and deactivating (NO2) groups, on the other hand, possess a distinct site preference. The nitrogen in the former prefers to lie above a silver atom (top site), but in the latter a hollow hexagonal-closed-packed (Hhcp) site of the Ag(111) surface is favored instead. Benzenes derivatized with classic activating groups donate electron density from their highest occupied molecular orbital to the surface, and those functionalized with deactivating groups withdraw electron density from the surface into orbitals that are unoccupied in the gas phase. For benzenes functionalized with two substituents, the groups that are strongly activating or deactivating control the site preference and the other groups assume sites that are, to a large degree, dictated by their positions on the benzene ring. The relative stabilities of the ortho, meta, and para positional isomers of disubstituted benzenes can, in some cases, be modified by adsorption to the surface.

  10. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. II. Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoi, A Y; Sheppard, T J; Pashov, D L; Kohanoff, J J; Paxton, A T

    2014-07-28

    A revised water model intended for use in condensed phase simulations in the framework of the self consistent polarizable ion tight binding theory is constructed. The model is applied to water monomer, dimer, hexamers, ice, and liquid, where it demonstrates good agreement with theoretical results obtained by more accurate methods, such as DFT and CCSD(T), and with experiment. In particular, the temperature dependence of the self diffusion coefficient in liquid water predicted by the model, closely reproduces experimental curves in the temperature interval between 230 K and 350 K. In addition, and in contrast to standard DFT, the model properly orders the relative densities of liquid water and ice. A notable, but inevitable, shortcoming of the model is underestimation of the static dielectric constant by a factor of two. We demonstrate that the description of inter and intramolecular forces embodied in the tight binding approximation in quantum mechanics leads to a number of valuable insights which can be missing from ab initio quantum chemistry and classical force fields. These include a discussion of the origin of the enhanced molecular electric dipole moment in the condensed phases, and a detailed explanation for the increase of coordination number in liquid water as a function of temperature and compared with ice--leading to insights into the anomalous expansion on freezing. The theory holds out the prospect of an understanding of the currently unexplained density maximum of water near the freezing point.

  11. Cell Surface Binding and Internalization of Aβ Modulated by Degree of Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bateman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, are generated through endoproteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Here we have developed a model to investigate the interaction of living cells with various forms of aggregated Aβ40/42. After incubation at endosomal pH 6, we observed a variety of Aβ conformations after 3 (Aβ3, 24 (Aβ24, and 90 hours (Aβ90. Both Aβ4224 and Aβ4024 were observed to rapidly bind and internalize into differentiated PC12 cells, leading to accumulation in the lysosome. In contrast, Aβ40/4290 were both found to only weakly associate with cells, but were observed as the most aggregated using dynamic light scattering and thioflavin-T. Internalization of Aβ40/4224 was inhibited with treatment of monodansylcadaverine, an endocytosis inhibitor. These studies indicate that the ability of Aβ40/42 to bind and internalize into living cells increases with degree of aggregation until it reaches a maximum beyond which its ability to interact with cells diminishes drastically.

  12. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Gründel

    Full Text Available The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen.

  13. Differential transferrin expression in placentae from normal and abnormal pregnancies: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukovsky Antonin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placenta is an important site for iron metabolism in humans. It transfers iron from the mother to the fetus. One of the major iron transport proteins is transferrin, which is a blood plasma protein crucial for iron uptake. Its localization and expression may be one of the markers to distinguish placental dysfunction. Methods In the experimental study we used antibody preparation, mass spectrometric analysis, biochemical and immunocytochemical methods for characterization of transferrin expression on the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR (JAR cells, placental lysates, and cryostat sections. Newly designed monoclonal antibody TRO-tf-01 to human transferrin was applied on human placentae from normal (n = 3 and abnormal (n = 9 pregnancies. Results Variations of transferrin expression were detected in villous syncytiotrophoblast, which is in direct contact with maternal blood. In placentae from normal pregnancies, the expression of transferrin in the syncytium was significantly lower (p Conclusion These observations suggest that in the case of abnormal pregnancies, the fetus may require higher levels of transferrin in order to prevent iron depletion due to the stress from the placental dysfunction.

  14. Applying 89Zr-Transferrin To Study the Pharmacology of Inhibitors to BET Bromodomain Containing Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifying proteins are attractive drug targets in oncology, given the fundamental reliance of cancer on altered transcriptional activity. Multiple transcription factors can be impacted downstream of primary target inhibition, thus making it challenging to understand the driving mechanism of action of pharmacologic inhibition of chromatin modifying proteins. This in turn makes it difficult to identify biomarkers predictive of response and pharmacodynamic tools to optimize drug dosing. In this report, we show that 89Zr-transferrin, an imaging tool we developed to measure MYC activity in cancer, can be used to identify cancer models that respond to broad spectrum inhibitors of transcription primarily due to MYC inhibition. As a proof of concept, we studied inhibitors of BET bromodomain containing proteins, as they can impart antitumor effects in a MYC dependent or independent fashion. In vitro, we show that transferrin receptor biology is inhibited in multiple MYC positive models of prostate cancer and double hit lymphoma when MYC biology is impacted. Moreover, we show that bromodomain inhibition in one lymphoma model results in transferrin receptor expression changes large enough to be quantified with 89Zr-transferrin and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo. Collectively, these data further underscore the diagnostic utility of the relationship between MYC and transferrin in oncology, and provide the rationale to incorporate transferrin-based PET into early clinical trials with bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26725682

  15. Purification of transferrins and lactoferrin using DEAE affi-gel blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M C; Chan, S L; Shimizu, S

    1991-01-01

    1. A simple method for purifying transferrins and lactoferrin is described. 2. The method consists of a preliminary step of dye-ligand chromatography using DEAE Affi-Gel Blue as the gel matrix at pH 7.5. In this chromatographic step, the transferrins and lactoferrin were readily separated from the bulk of the other proteins by start buffer elution. 3. Differences in the chromatographic behaviour of the various serum transferrins (monkey, human, rabbit, pig, chicken and duck) and ovotransferrin upon DEAE Affi-Gel Blue chromatography can be attributed to differences in the anionic charge of the transferrins in 0.02 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, thus resulting in the differential retardation of these protein molecules by the gel matrix. 4. The result of DEAE Affi-Gel Blue chromatography of human lactoferrin is different from that for the transferrins. This may possibly reflect the differences in the strength of interaction between lactoferrin and transferrin with this gel matrix.

  16. Glycoprotein C of equine herpesvirus 4 plays a role in viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Walid; Tsujimura, Koji; Maeda, Ken; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Mohamed, Yassir Mahgoub; Kato, Kentaro; Matsumura, Tomio; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2010-07-01

    Heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for several herpesviruses. For herpes simplex virus 1, pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1, glycoprotein C (gC) homologues have been shown to mediate the binding to cell surface heparan sulfate. However, the role of gC in equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) infection has not yet been analyzed. Using pull-down assay, we first determined that EHV-4 gC as well as gB are heparin-binding glycoproteins. To study the role of gC in EHV-4 infection, we constructed a gC-deletion mutant, WA79DeltagC, where the kanamycin resistant gene was inserted instead of the open reading frame encoding gC. We found that soluble heparin was capable of blocking both wild-type EHV-4 and WA79DeltagC infection of fetal horse kidney. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with heparinase reduces considerably the ability of both viruses to adsorb to these cells and to form plaques. Similar results were obtained when cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis was inhibited by chlorate treatment. In addition, we did find that gC protects EHV-4 from complement-mediated neutralization. These results suggest that, like other herpesviruses, EHV-4 gC plays a role in the interaction of the virus with cellular heparan sulfate. Moreover, gC can protect the virus from complement-mediated neutralization.

  17. Measurement of glucose concentration in interstitial fluid by surface plasmon resonance with D-galactose/D-glucose binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. C.; Zhang, J. X.; Wu, P.; Huang, F. X.; Song, B.; Xu, K. X.

    2009-08-01

    A novel minimally invasive way to measure blood glucose concentration is proposed by combining interstitial fluid transdermal extraction and surface plasma resonance (SPR) detecting. 55K Hz low-frequency ultrasound pulse is applied for less than 30 seconds to enhance the skin permeability and then interstitial fluid is extracted out of skin by vacuum. The mathematical model to express the correlation between interstitial fluid glucose and blood glucose is also developed by considering the changes of the skin conductivity. The glucose concentration in the interstitial fluid is determined using an optical SPR biological sensor that measures the refractive index. A protein-glucose binding technology using Dgalactose/ D-glucose Binding Protein for specific absorption of glucose is employed to increase SPR measurement precision. By immobilizing GGBP onto the surface of the SPR sensor, the experimental result indicates the detecting resolution of glucose rises to 1mg/L, the system succeeds in distinguishing glucose from other components in mixture. The feasibility of this method is validated for clinical application with the requirements of bloodless, painless, continuous glucose monitoring and a prototype microfluidic diabetes-monitoring device is under development.

  18. PPARγ regulates expression of carbohydrate sulfotransferase 11 (CHST11/C4ST1, a regulator of LPL cell surface binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismayil Tasdelen

    Full Text Available The transcription factor PPARγ is the key regulator of adipocyte differentiation, function and maintenance, and the cellular target of the insulin-sensitizing thiazolidinediones. Identification and functional characterization of genes regulated by PPARγ will therefore lead to a better understanding of adipocyte biology and may also contribute to the development of new anti-diabetic drugs. Here, we report carbohydrate sulfotransferase 11 (Chst11/C4st1 as a novel PPARγ target gene. Chst11 can sulphate chondroitin, a major glycosaminoglycan involved in development and disease. The Chst11 gene contains two functional intronic PPARγ binding sites, and is up-regulated at the mRNA and protein level during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. Chst11 knockdown reduced intracellular lipid accumulation in mature adipocytes, which is due to a lowered activity of lipoprotein lipase, which may associate with the adipocyte cell surface through Chst11-mediated sulfation of chondroitin, rather than impaired adipogenesis. Besides directly inducing Lpl expression, PPARγ may therefore control lipid accumulation by elevating the levels of Chst11-mediated proteoglycan sulfation and thereby increasing the binding capacity for Lpl on the adipocyte cell surface.

  19. Benzene Derivatives Adsorbed to the Ag(111) Surface: A Binding Site Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel; Simpson, Scott; Tyminska, Nina; Zurek, Eva; Zurek Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion corrected Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the interaction of benzenes mono and disubstituted with functional groups encompassing a region of the activated/deacivated spectrum. Benzenes substituted with weak activating or deactivating groups like methyl and fluoro, respectively, do not have a strong site preference for adsorption to the Ag(111) surface. Strong activating (N(CH3)2) and deactivating (NO2) groups, on the other hand, have a distinct site preference. The nitrogen in the former prefers to lie above a silver atom (top site), but in the latter an Hhcp site of the Ag(111) surface is favored. Benzenes derivatized with classic activating groups donate electron density from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the molecule to the surface, and those functionalized with deactivating groups withdraw electron density from the surface into orbitals that are unoccupied in the gas phase. In the case of disubstituted benzenes, the strong activating/deactivating groups control the site preference and other groups assume sites that are, to a large degree, dictated by their positions on the benzene ring. Surface adsorption alters the relative stabilities of the ortho, meta and para positional isomers of disubstituted benzenes.

  20. Screening Effect of PEG on Avidin Binding to Liposome Surface Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the screening effect of poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipids (PE-PEG) on the interaction of avidin with PEGylated liposomes containing surface-bound biotin ligands. The influence of grafting density and lipopolymer chain length is examined. A simple fluorescence assay....... and it is found that the screening effect of PE-PEG(5000) is stronger than that for PE-PEG(2000). Thus, the results reveal that both the grafting density and the polymer length of the PE-PEC lipopolymers are of importance for the ability of water-soluble macromolecules to reach the surface of PEG liposomes...

  1. [Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and ethyl glucuronide: markers for alcohol use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paling, Erik P; Mostert, Leendert J

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on the usefulness of physicians testing for carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) when there are doubts about alcohol use by their patients. A 44-year-old male consulted his general practitioner with depressive symptoms and denied using alcohol. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated CDT value. The latter was caused by chronic alcohol use. The second patient, a 32-year-old female with known alcohol dependence and receiving inpatient treatment at an addiction clinic, came back from leave. She denied having consumed alcohol and her blood alcohol concentration was zero. Examination of her urine showed an elevated EtG/creatinine ratio. This was caused by having had a few drinks during her leave and could not have been caused by using mouthwash or disinfection soap. We describe how to use the results of CDT and EtG testing in the therapeutic process and give recommendations for patient communication before performing these two tests.

  2. Characterization of a Putative Receptor Binding Surface on Skint-1, a Critical Determinant of Dendritic Epidermal T Cell Selection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mahboob; Knowles, Timothy J.; Hart, Rosie; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Woodward, Martin J.; Willcox, Carrie R.; Overduin, Michael; Hayday, Adrian C.; Willcox, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) form a skin-resident γδ T cell population that makes key contributions to cutaneous immune stress surveillance, including non-redundant contributions to protection from cutaneous carcinogens. How DETC become uniquely associated with the epidermis was in large part solved by the identification of Skint-1, the prototypic member of a novel B7-related multigene family. Expressed only by thymic epithelial cells and epidermal keratinocytes, Skint-1 drives specifically the development of DETC progenitors, making it the first clear candidate for a selecting ligand for non-MHC/CD1-restricted T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Skint-1 activity are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that DETC selection requires Skint-1 expression on the surface of thymic epithelial cells, and depends upon specific residues on the CDR3-like loop within the membrane-distal variable domain of Skint-1 (Skint-1 DV). Nuclear magnetic resonance of Skint-1 DV revealed a core tertiary structure conserved across the Skint family, but a highly distinct surface charge distribution, possibly explaining its unique function. Crucially, the CDR3-like loop formed an electrostatically distinct surface, featuring key charged and hydrophobic solvent-exposed residues, at the membrane-distal tip of DV. These results provide the first structural insights into the Skint family, identifying a putative receptor binding surface that directly implicates Skint-1 in receptor-ligand interactions crucial for DETC selection. PMID:26917727

  3. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  4. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  5. Transferrin modified PEG-PLA-resveratrol conjugates: in vitro and in vivo studies for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wanhua; Li, Aimei; Jia, Zhijun; Yuan, Yi; Dai, Haifeng; Li, Hongxiu

    2013-10-15

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with a poor prognosis. In this study, we examined the effects of transferrin (Tf)-modified poly ethyleneglycol-poly lactic acid (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles conjugated with resveratrol (Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV) to glioma therapy in vitro and in vivo. The cell viability of Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV on C6 and U87 glioma cells was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity were investigated in Brain glioma bearing rat model of C6 glioma by i.p. administration of RSV-polymer conjugates. We found that the average diameter of each Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV is around 150 nm with 32 molecules of Tf on surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of PEG-PLA-RSV against C6 and U87 cells was higher than that of free RSV, and further the modification of Tf enhanced the cytotoxicity of the RSV-polymer conjugates as a result of the increased cellular uptake of the RSV-modified conjugates by glioma cells. In comparison with free RSV, RSV conjugates could significantly decrease tumor volume and accumulate in brain tumor, which resulted in prolonging the survival of C6 glioma-bearing rats. These results suggest that Tf-NP-RSV had a potential of therapeutic effect to glioma both in vitro and in vivo and might be a potential candidate for targeted therapy of glioma and worthy of further investigation.

  6. Surface modification by cold-plasma technique for dental implants—Bio-functionalization with binding pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Yoshinari

    2011-08-01

    At the bone tissue/implant interface, a thin calcium phosphate coating and rapid heating with infrared radiation were effective in controlling the dissolution without cracking the coating. These thin calcium phosphate coatings may directly promote osteogenisis, but also enable immobilization and subsequent drug delivery system (DDS of bisphosphonates. Simvastatin is also an effective candidate that is reported to increase the expression of BMP-2. The thin-film of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO was plasma-polymerized onto titanium, and then HMDSO surface was activated by O2-plasma treatment. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D technique demonstrated that simvastatin was immobilized on the plasma-treated surfaces due to introduction of O2-functional groups. At the soft tissue/implant interface, multi-grooved surface topographies and utilizing the adhesive proteins such as fibronectin or laminin-5 may help in providing a biological seal around the implant. At the oral fluid/implant interface, an alumina coating, F+-implantation and immobilization of anti-microbial peptides were responsible for inhibiting the biofilm accumulation.

  7. Influence of cations on the blue to purple transition of bacteriorhodopsin. Comparison of Ca2+ and Hg2+ binding and their effect on the surface potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duñach, M; Seigneuret, M; Rigaud, J L; Padrós, E

    1988-11-25

    We have investigated the effect of Ca2+ and Hg2+ binding on various properties of the blue membrane prepared by deionization of the Halobacterium halobium purple membrane. Binding of radioactive 45Ca2+ and 203Hg2+ was monitored by a filtration technique. Five high and medium affinity sites for Ca2+ and seven low affinity sites for Hg2+ were found per bacteriorhodopsin. Competitive binding was observed only for three Ca2+ and three Hg2+. Visible absorption studies indicated that Ca2+ binding could restore the purple color of bacteriorhodopsin while Hg2+ was inefficient. Hg2- could partially reverse to blue the Ca2+-regenerated purple membrane in parallel with the displacement of three Ca2+. Effects of cation binding on the surface potential of the membrane were measured by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy using a cationic spin-labeled amphiphile. Cations such as La3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, or Na+ strongly increased (i.e. rendered less negative) the surface potential. An univocal correlation was found between the cation-induced variation of surface potential and the extent of regeneration of the purple color. Hg2+ induced a smaller increase in surface potential than that corresponding to the effective divalent cations. This lower effect appears to be due to binding to sites not related to those of other cations.

  8. Serum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, H; West, C E; Ndeto, P; Burema, J; Beguin, Y; Kok, F J

    2001-12-01

    Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory response to infection. We assessed iron status and examined the relation between serum transferrin receptor concentrations and malaria in children aged 2-36 mo who were asymptomatic for malaria. This was a community-based cluster survey (n = 318). Prevalences of malaria, anemia (hemoglobin concentration serum ferritin concentration Malaria was associated with lower mean hemoglobin concentrations (92.7 compared with 104.1 g/L; P = 0.0001) and higher geometric mean serum concentrations of transferrin receptor (11.4 compared with 7.8 mg/L; P = 0.005), ferritin (21.6 compared with 11.9 microg/L; P = 0.05), and C-reactive protein (12.5 compared with 6.8 mg/L; P = 0.004). There was no evidence for an association between serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and transferrin receptor. Children with malaria had higher serum transferrin receptor concentrations than expected for the degree of anemia, even after adjustment for inflammation indicated by serum C-reactive protein concentration quartiles (P = 0.02). Our findings are consistent with the notion that malaria-induced hemolysis is accompanied by increased erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor concentration is not useful for detecting iron deficiency in individuals with malaria. Individuals with high concentrations of serum C-reactive protein or similar acute phase reactants should be excluded from analysis if serum ferritin concentrations malaria-endemic areas.

  9. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Berry, G.; Rockett, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  10. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  11. Binding of oxygen with titanium dioxide on singlet potential energy surface: An ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanchikov, Georgii A.; Baklanov, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate interaction of titanium dioxide TiO2 with oxygen O2 in ground triplet and excited singlet states. On a singlet potential energy surface (PES) formation of a stable compound of titanium peroxide TiO4 is revealed which should appear in reaction of TiO2 with singlet oxygen without activation barrier. This peroxide is lower in energy than the ground state of two individual molecules TiO2 + 3O2 by 34.6 kcal/mol. Location of conical intersection between triplet and singlet PESs of TiO2sbnd O2 is also investigated.

  12. Gold-surface binding of molecular switches studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homenya, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.homenya@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Messerschmidt, Markus; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie (Germany); Martinez, Victor [University of Valencia, Institut de Ciencia Molecular (Spain); Cheng, Yajun [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie (Germany); Gutmann, Jochen S. [Max Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung (Germany); Klein, Michael; Jung, Stefan; Wolff, Morris; Saadat, Reza; Nariaki, Driss [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Boca, Roman [Slovak Technical University (FCHPT), Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Slovakia); Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Tremel, Wolfgang [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie (Germany); Renz, Franz, E-mail: franz.renz@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The nonanuclear coordination compound [Mo{sup IV}{l_brace}(CN)Fe{sup III}(3-methyl-saldptn){r_brace}{sub 8}]Cl{sub 4} exhibits multiple spin transitions (3-methyl-saldptn = N,N Prime -bis(3 Prime Prime -methyl-2 Prime Prime -hydroxy-benzyliden)-1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane). This spin crossover cluster is bound via a self-assembled monolayer onto a two dimensional array gold surface. Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates that the thermally and optically induced spin crossover of the compound is maintained. Thereby, the foundation for its potential practical application (e.g. in the field of information storage) was laid.

  13. Tight-binding model for topological insulators: Analysis of helical surface modes over the whole Brillouin zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shijun; Yamakage, Ai; Kuramoto, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    A tight-binding model is constructed for Bi2Se3-type topological insulators with rhombohedral crystal structure. The model takes full account of the spin-orbit interaction, and realizes both strong (S) and weak (W) topological insulators (TIs) depending on the mass parameter that causes the band inversion. It is found that there are two separate STIs with either a single or three Dirac cones on the surface, while the WTI realizes either zero or four surface Dirac cones keeping the same Z2 indices. Closing of the bulk direct gap gives rise to transition between either STI and WTI, or TI and an ordinary insulator. On the other hand, closing of the indirect gap keeps intact the surface Dirac cones in both STIs and WTIs. As a result, helical modes can remain even in semimetals. It is found that reentrant helical modes appear in finite-momentum regions in some cases in STIs, and even in ordinary insulators with strong particle-hole asymmetry. All results are obtained analytically.

  14. Quantitative assessment of erythropoiesis and functional classification of anemia based on measurements of serum transferrin receptor and erythropoietin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beguin, Y; Clemons, G K; Pootrakul, P; Fillet, G

    1993-01-01

    .... The RBC mass was quantitated by direct isotopic measurement (RCM), Epo production by serum Epo levels, and erythropoiesis by the ferrokinetic measurement of the erythron transferrin uptake (ETU...

  15. Protein imprinted ionic liquid polymer on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes with high binding capacity for lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shifang; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Wangwang; Wang, Shuo

    2014-06-01

    In this research, ionic liquid as functional monomer to prepare molecularly imprinted polymers for protein recognition was for the first time demonstrated, in which, 1-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium chloride was selected as functional monomer, acrylamide as co-functional monomer and lysozyme (Lyz) as template protein to synthesize imprinted polymers on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes in aqueous medium. The results indicated that ionic liquid was helpful to improve binding capacity of imprinted polymers, which had a maximum binding capacity of 763.36 mg/g in the optimum adsorption conditions. The prepared imprinted polymers had a fast adsorption rate and a much higher adsorption capacity than the corresponding non-imprinted polymers, with the difference in adsorption capacity up to 258.31 mg/g. The obtained polymer was evaluated by Lyz, bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine hemoglobin (BHb), equine myoglobin (MB) and cytochrome c (Cyt c). The selectivity factor (β) for Lyz/BSA, Lyz/Mb, Lyz/BHb, and Lyz/Cyt c were 7.17, 2.12, 1.76 and 1.57, respectively, indicating the imprinted polymers had a good selectivity. Easy preparation of the imprinted polymers as well as high ability and selectivity to adsorb template proteins makes this polymer attractive and broadly applicable in biomacromolecular separation, biotechnology and sensors.

  16. The E1 beta-subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase is surface-expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum and binds fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Valeria; Salzillo, Marzia; Siciliano, Rosa A; Muscariello, Lidia; Sacco, Margherita; Marasco, Rosangela

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is among the species with a probiotic activity. Adhesion of probiotic bacteria to host tissues is an important principle for strain selection, because it represents a crucial step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensals. Most bacterial adhesins are proteins, and a major target for them is fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that PDHB, a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is a factor contributing to fibronectin-binding in L. plantarum LM3. By means of fibronectin overlay immunoblotting assay, we identified a L. plantarum LM3 surface protein with apparent molecular mass of 35 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that this protein is the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta-subunit (PDHB). The corresponding pdhB gene is located in a 4-gene cluster encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase. In LM3-B1, carrying a null mutation in pdhB, the 35 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable by immunoblotting assay. Nevertheless, the pdhB null mutation did not abolish pdhA, pdhC, and pdhD transcription in LM3-B1. By adhesion assays, we show that LM3-B1 cells bind to immobilized fibronectin less efficiently than wild type cells. Moreover, we show that pdhB expression is negatively regulated by the CcpA protein and is induced by bile.

  17. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate.

  18. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface.

  19. Polymer binding to carbon nanotubes in aqueous dispersions: residence time on the nanotube surface as obtained by NMR diffusometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frise, Anton E; Pagès, Guilhem; Shtein, Michael; Pri Bar, Ilan; Regev, Oren; Furó, István

    2012-03-08

    The binding of block copolymer Pluronic F-127 in aqueous dispersions of single- (SWCNT) and multiwalled (MWCNT) carbon nanotubes has been studied by pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. We show that a major fraction of polymers exist as a free species while a minor fraction is bound to the carbon nanotubes (CNT). The polymers exchange between these two states with residence times on the nanotube surface of 24 ± 5 ms for SWCNT and of 54 ± 11 ms for MWCNT. The CNT concentration in the solution was determined by improved thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicating that the concentration of SWCNT dispersed by F-127 was significantly higher than that for MWCNT. For SWCNT, the area per adsorbed Pluronic F-127 molecule is estimated to be about 40 nm(2).

  20. β-Synuclein suppresses both the initiation and amplification steps of α-synuclein aggregation via competitive binding to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James W. P.; Buell, Alexander K.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Meisl, Georg; Carozza, Jacqueline; Flagmeier, Patrick; Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Galvagnion, Céline

    2016-11-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein that is associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease through the processes involved in the formation of amyloid fibrils. α and β-synuclein are homologous proteins found at comparable levels in presynaptic terminals but β-synuclein has a greatly reduced propensity to aggregate and indeed has been found to inhibit α-synuclein aggregation. In this paper, we describe how sequence differences between α- and β-synuclein affect individual microscopic processes in amyloid formation. In particular, we show that β-synuclein strongly suppresses both lipid-induced aggregation and secondary nucleation of α-synuclein by competing for binding sites at the surfaces of lipid vesicles and fibrils, respectively. These results suggest that β-synuclein can act as a natural inhibitor of α-synuclein aggregation by reducing both the initiation of its self-assembly and the proliferation of its aggregates.

  1. Acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (EhADH2) and clathrin are involved in internalization of human transferrin by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-López, Magda; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Avila, Eva E; de la Garza, Mireya

    2011-01-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is a host glycoprotein capable of binding two ferric-iron ions to become holotransferrin (holoTf), which transports iron in to all cells. Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan able to use holoTf as a sole iron source in vitro. The mechanism by which this parasite scavenges iron from holoTf is unknown. An E. histolytica holoTf-binding protein (EhTfbp) was purified by using an anti-human transferrin receptor (TfR) monoclonal antibody. EhTfbp was identified by MS/MS analysis and database searches as E. histolytica acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (EhADH2), an iron-dependent enzyme. Both EhTfbp and EhADH2 bound holoTf and were recognized by the anti-human TfR antibody, indicating that they correspond to the same protein. It was found that the amoebae internalized holoTf through clathrin-coated pits, suggesting that holoTf endocytosis could be important for the parasite during colonization and invasion of the intestinal mucosa and liver.

  2. Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Transferrin Receptor Overexpressing Tumor Cells via Peptide Modified Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuran Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of small interference RNA (siRNA to target oncogenes is a promising treatment approach for cancer. However, siRNA cancer therapies are hindered by poor delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Transferrin receptor (TfR is overexpressed in many types of tumor cells and therefore is a potential target for the selective delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Here, we used the TfR binding peptide HAIYPRH (HAI peptide conjugated to cationic polymer branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, optimized the coupling strategy, and the TfR selective delivery of siRNA was evaluated in cells with high (H1299 and low TfR expression (A549 and H460. The HAI-bPEI conjugate exhibited chemico-physical properties in terms of size, zeta-potential, and siRNA condensation efficiency similar to unmodified bPEI. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results revealed that HAI-bPEI selectively delivered siRNA to H1299 cells compared with A549 or H460 cells. Moreover, HAI-bPEI achieved more efficient glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH gene knockdown in H1299 cells compared with bPEI alone. However, despite optimization of the targeting peptide and coupling strategy, HAI-bPEI can only silence reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP at the protein level when chloroquine is present, indicating that further optimization of the conjugate is required. In conclusion, the HAI peptide may be useful to target TfR overexpressing tumors in targeted gene and siRNA delivery approaches.

  3. Construction of single chain Fv antibody against transferrin receptor and its protein fusion with alkaline phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Feng Yang; Hui-Fen Zhu; Zhi-Hua Wang; Guan-Xin Shen; De-Ying Tian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct fusion protein of a single-chain antibody(scFv) against transferrin receptor (TfR) with alkalinephosphatase (AP).METHODS: The VH-linker-VL, namely scFv gene, wasprepared by amplifying the VH and VL genes from plasmid pGEM-T-VH and pGEM-T-VL with splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE PCR). After the ScFv gene was modified by SfiⅠ and NotⅠ, it was subcloned into the secretory expression vector pUC19/119, and then was transformed into E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were screened by colony PCR and their expressions were induced by IPTG. ScFv gene was gained by digesting ScFv expression vector pUC19/119 with Sfi I and NotⅠ restriction enzymes, then subcloned into expression vector pDAP2, followed by transformation in E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were selected by bacterial colony PCR. The expression of fusion protein (scFv-AP) was induced by IPTG. Its activity was detected by enzyme immunoassay. The molecular weights of scFv and scFv-AP were measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).RESULTS: The product of SOE PCR formed a band of 700 bp in agarose gel electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE demonstrated the molecular weight of scFv was 27 ku. Immunofluorescent assay (IFA) demonstrated its reactivity with TfR. The molecular weight of scFv-AP was 75 ku. Enzyme immunoassay showed that scFv-AP could specifically bind to human TfR and play AP activity.CONCLUSION: We have successfully prepared the antihuman TfR scFv and constructed the fusion protein of scFv and AP. It is promising for immunological experiments.

  4. Investigation of the binding sites and orientation of caffeine on human serum albumin by surface-enhanced Raman scattering and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weinan; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Yaokai; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Liangren; Zhao, Bing; Tu, Pengfei

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescence, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) were introduced to explore the absorptive geometry of caffeine on Human Serum Albumin (HSA) at physiological condition. The molecular docking was also employed to make a better understanding of the interaction between caffeine and HSA as well as to elucidate the detailed information of the major binding site. The results showed that caffeine could bind to HSA via the hydrophobic force of aromatic stacking and the main binding group on caffeine could be the pyrimidine ring. In addition, a consecutive set of changes in the orientation of caffeine molecule had been demonstrated during the process of caffeine binding to HSA, and the primary binding site was considered to be a hydrophobic cavity formed by Leu198, Lys199, Ser202, Phe211, Trp214, Val344, Ser454 and Leu481 in domain II.

  5. Iron uptake and increased intracellular enzyme activity follow host lactoferrin binding by Trichomonas vaginalis receptors

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Lactoferrin acquisition and iron uptake by pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Saturation binding kinetics were obtained for trichomonads using increasing amounts of radioiodinated lactoferrin, while no significant binding by transferrin under similar conditions was achieved. Only unlabeled lactoferrin successfully and stoichiometrically competed with 125I-labeled lactoferrin binding. Time course studies showed maximal lactoferrin binding by 30 min at 37 degrees C. Data suggest no ...

  6. A molecular docking study of the interactions between human transferrin and seven metallocene dichlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güette-Fernández, Jorge R; Meléndez, Enrique; Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Ortega-Zúñiga, Carlos; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Parés-Matos, Elsie I

    2017-08-01

    Human Transferrin (hTf) is a metal-binding protein found in blood plasma and is well known for its role in iron delivery. With only a 30% of its capacity for Fe(+3) binding, this protein has the potential ability to transport other metal ions or organometallic compounds from the blood stream to all cell tissues. In this perspective, recent studies have described seven metallocene dichlorides (Cp2M(IV)Cl2, M(IV)=V, Mo, W, Nb, Ti, Zr, Hf) suitable as anticancer drugs and less secondary effects than cisplatin. However, these studies have not provided enough data to clearly explain how hTf binds and transports these organometallic compounds into the cells. Thus, a computational docking study with native apo-hTf using Sybyl-X 2.0 program was conducted to explore the binding modes of these seven Cp2M(IV)Cl2 after their optimization and minimization using Gaussian 09. Our model showed that the first three Cp2M(IV)Cl2 (M(IV)=V, Mo, W) can interact with apo-hTf on a common binding site with the amino acid residues Leu-46, Ile-49, Arg-50, Leu-66, Asp-69, Ala-70, Leu-72, Ala-73, Pro-74 and Asn-75, while the next four Cp2M(IV)Cl2 (M(IV)=Nb, Ti, Zr, Hf) showed different binding sites, unknown until now. A decreasing order in the total score (equal to -log Kd) was observed from these docking studies: W (5.4356), Mo (5.2692), Nb (5.1672), V (4.5973), Ti (3.6529), Zr (2.0054) and Hf (1.8811). High and significant correlation between the affinity of these seven ligands (metallocenes) for apo-hTf and their bond angles CpMCp (r=0.94, phTf, measured at pH 7.4, had a decrease in the fluorescence emission spectrum with increasing concentration of Cp2M(IV)Cl2. Experimental data has a good correlation between KA (r=0.84, p=0.027) and Kd (r=0.94, p=0.0014) values and the calculated total scores obtained from our docking experiments. In conclusion, these results suggest that the seven Cp2M(IV)Cl2 used for this study can interact with apo-hTf, and their affinity was directly and inversely

  7. Surface-Associated Host Proteins on Virulent Treponema pallidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, John F.; Baseman, Joel B.

    1979-01-01

    A surface coat of host serum proteins was detected on virulent Treponema pallidum by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The loosely associated serum proteins could be removed by repeated washings in a protein-free medium. Washed T. pallidum retained the ability to readsorb numerous host proteins from rabbit serum as well as iodinated rabbit or human albumin. In addition, various avidly associated host serum proteins including albumin, α2-macroglobulin, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, and C3 were identified on the outer envelope of washed treponemes by an immunoadsorbent technique with protein A-bearing staphylococcus. Hyaluronidase treatment did not remove the avidly associated host proteins from the surface of washed treponemes, whereas trypsin treatment resulted in decreased levels of agglutination. Electrophoretic patterns of trypsin-treated treponemes showed that treponemal proteins as well as adsorbed host proteins were released concurrently by protease digestion. Reacquisition studies involving α2-macroglobulin and transferrin suggested the presence of noncompetitive binding sites for serum proteins on the treponemal outer envelope. Finally, differences among the T. pallidum preparations from individual rabbits with respect to incorporation of [35S]methionine, extent of agglutination with antisera, and length of time required for removal of avidly associated host proteins by trypsin treatment indicated biological variability among the treponemal populations. Images PMID:93574

  8. Testing the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area solvent model for protein stability, ligand binding, and protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathelt Christine

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction and computational protein design require efficient yet sufficiently accurate descriptions of aqueous solvent. We continue to evaluate the performance of the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area (CASA implicit solvent model, in combination with the Charmm19 molecular mechanics force field. We test a set of model parameters optimized earlier, and we also carry out a new optimization in this work, using as a target a set of experimental stability changes for single point mutations of various proteins and peptides. The optimization procedure is general, and could be used with other force fields. The computation of stability changes requires a model for the unfolded state of the protein. In our approach, this state is represented by tripeptide structures of the sequence Ala-X-Ala for each amino acid type X. We followed an iterative optimization scheme which, at each cycle, optimizes the solvation parameters and a set of tripeptide structures for the unfolded state. This protocol uses a set of 140 experimental stability mutations and a large set of tripeptide conformations to find the best tripeptide structures and solvation parameters. Results Using the optimized parameters, we obtain a mean unsigned error of 2.28 kcal/mol for the stability mutations. The performance of the CASA model is assessed by two further applications: (i calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities and (ii computational protein design. For these two applications, the previous parameters and the ones optimized here give a similar performance. For ligand binding, we obtain reasonable agreement with a set of 55 experimental mutation data, with a mean unsigned error of 1.76 kcal/mol with the new parameters and 1.47 kcal/mol with the earlier ones. We show that the optimized CASA model is not inferior to the Generalized Born/Surface Area (GB/SA model for the prediction of these binding affinities. Likewise, the new parameters perform

  9. SgrA, a nidogen-binding LPXTG surface adhesin implicated in biofilm formation, and EcbA, a collagen binding MSCRAMM, are two novel adhesins of hospital-acquired Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; van Wamel, Willem J B; Braat, Johanna C; Wijnands, Lucas M; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2009-11-01

    Hospital-acquired Enterococcus faecium isolates responsible for nosocomial outbreaks and invasive infections are enriched in the orf2351 and orf2430 genes, encoding the SgrA and EcbA LPXTG-like cell wall-anchored proteins, respectively. These two surface proteins were characterized to gain insight into their function, since they may have favored the rapid emergence of this nosocomial pathogen. We are the first to identify a surface adhesin among bacteria (SgrA) that binds to the extracellular matrix molecules nidogen 1 and nidogen 2, which are constituents of the basal lamina. EcbA is a novel E. faecium MSCRAMM (microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) that binds to collagen type V. In addition, both SgrA and EcbA bound to fibrinogen; however, SgrA targeted the alpha and beta chains, whereas EcbA bound to the gamma chain of fibrinogen. An E. faecium sgrA insertion mutant displayed reduced binding to both nidogens and fibrinogen. SgrA did not mediate binding of E. faecium cells to biotic materials, such as human intestinal epithelial cells, human bladder cells, and kidney cells, while this LPXTG surface adhesin is implicated in E. faecium biofilm formation. The acm and scm genes, encoding two other E. faecium MSCRAMMs, were expressed at the mRNA level together with sgrA during all phases of growth, whereas ecbA was expressed only in exponential and late exponential phase, suggesting orchestrated expression of these adhesins. Expression of these surface proteins, which bind to extracellular matrix proteins and are involved in biofilm formation (SgrA), may contribute to the pathogenesis of hospital-acquired E. faecium infections.

  10. Adsorption of croconate dyes on TiO2 anatase (101) surface: A periodic DFT study to understand the binding of diketo groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash L Puyad; Ch Ramesh Kumar; K Bhanuprakash

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of model croconate dyes on the stoichiometric TiO2 anatase (101) surface has been studied by means of periodic density functional calculations to understand the adsorption of the diketo (-COCO-) groups. Past experimental and theoretical results have shown the strong binding ability of the acid group (-COOH) to the TiO2 surface but here the theoretical studies predicts the binding strength of the diketo group to be also significant and comparable with that of the -COOH group. This may cause a competitive binding between the keto groups and the acid groups on the TiO2 surface in the case of croconate dyes and cause a reduction in the efficiency of the DSSC.

  11. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen on Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, $E_{\\rm des}$, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of $E_{\\rm des}$ for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of $E_{\\rm des}$ are $1660\\pm 60$~K and $1850\\pm 90$~K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For $n=10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ and $G_0$=10$^2$ ($G_0$=1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H$_2$O can form on grains at lower visual extinction $A_{\\rm V}$, closer to the cloud surface. A higher ...

  12. P113 is a merozoite surface protein that binds the N terminus of Plasmodium falciparum RH5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaway, Francis; Drought, Laura G.; Fala, Maria; Cross, Nadia; Kemp, Alison C.; Rayner, Julian C.; Wright, Gavin J.

    2017-01-01

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is necessary for malaria pathogenesis and is therefore a primary target for vaccine development. RH5 is a leading subunit vaccine candidate because anti-RH5 antibodies inhibit parasite growth and the interaction with its erythrocyte receptor basigin is essential for invasion. RH5 is secreted, complexes with other parasite proteins including CyRPA and RIPR, and contains a conserved N-terminal region (RH5Nt) of unknown function that is cleaved from the native protein. Here, we identify P113 as a merozoite surface protein that directly interacts with RH5Nt. Using recombinant proteins and a sensitive protein interaction assay, we establish the binding interdependencies of all the other known RH5 complex components and conclude that the RH5Nt-P113 interaction provides a releasable mechanism for anchoring RH5 to the merozoite surface. We exploit these findings to design a chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to RH5Nt, which could contribute to a cost-effective malaria vaccine. PMID:28186186

  13. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  14. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue.

  15. Display of aggregation-prone ligand binding domain of human PPAR gamma on surface of bacteriophage lambda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo KONG; Wei-jun MA

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To display the aggregation-prone ligand binding domain (LBD) of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) on the surface of bacteriophages to establish an easy screening assay for the identification of PPARγ ligands. Methods: Plasmids were constructed for the expression of the PPARγ LBD as a fusion to the N-terminus of the g3p protein of filamentous phage or the C-terminus of the capsid protein D (pD) of phage lambda. The fusion proteins were expressed in E coli and solubility characteristics were compared. Polyclonal antibodies against the LBD as well as the pD protein were prepared for Western blot analysis and phage capture assay. Results: The pD-LBD fusion protein was partially soluble, whereas the LBD-g3p fusion protein was detected only in the insoluble fraction. The pD-LBD fusion protein was efficiently incorporated in phage particles. Furthermore, the LBD was shown to be displayed on the surface of bacteriophage lambda. On average, the pD-LBD fusion protein accounted for 28% of the total pD protein in the lambda head capsid. Conclusion: The hydrophobic PPARγLBD was expressed as a soluble form of fusionprotein in E coli and displayed on the surface of bacteriophage lambda when it was fused to the lambda pD protein. The lambda pD fusion system could be used for improving the solubility of proteins that tend to form inclusion bodies when expressed in E coli. The lambda phage particles displaying the LBD of PPARγ may be of great value for the identification of novel PPARγ ligands.

  16. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Lewis

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  17. ZRT/IRT-like Protein 14 (ZIP14) Promotes the Cellular Assimilation of Iron from Transferrin*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Gao, Junwei; Enns, Caroline A; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2010-01-01

    ZIP14 is a transmembrane metal ion transporter that is abundantly expressed in the liver, heart, and pancreas. Previous studies of HEK 293 cells and the hepatocyte cell lines AML12 and HepG2 established that ZIP14 mediates the uptake of non-transferrin-bound iron, a form of iron that appears in the plasma during pathologic iron overload. In this study we investigated the role of ZIP14 in the cellular assimilation of iron from transferrin, the circulating plasma protein that normally delivers ...

  18. (111)Indium-transferrin for localization and quantification of gastrointestinal protein loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jane Angel; Braad, Poul-Erik; Veje, Annegrete;

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the indium-111 ((111)In)-transferrin method as a means of localization and quantification of gastrointestinal protein loss. Methods. Fourteen patients and 15 healthy subjects underwent an (111)In-transferrin study consisting of abdominal scintigraphy, whole-body counting...... measurement and determination of plasma activity of (111)In during the course of 5 days. Two of the patients went through a subsequent chromium-51-trichloride test with analysis of radioactivity in faeces in order to compare the results of the two methods. Results. The patients had a mean+/-SEM whole-body...

  19. The significance of soluble transferrin receptors in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijanić Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, determination of soluble transferrin receptor levels has been emerging as a test that can reliably indicate iron deficiency in various states, and that is non-invasive and easy to use. The aim of this study was: to determine reference values of soluble transferrin receptor concentrations in serums in our population, to examine the reliability of this method in the diagnosis of anemia due to iron deficiency and associated iron deficiency in anemia accompanying malignant hemopathies, and to identify possible limitations of the test in certain conditions.

  20. Positively-charged semi-tunnel is a structural and surface characteristic of polyphosphate-binding proteins: an in-silico study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zachory Wei

    Full Text Available Phosphate is essential for all major life processes, especially energy metabolism and signal transduction. A linear phosphate polymer, polyphosphate (polyP, linked by high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds, can interact with various proteins, playing important roles as an energy source and regulatory factor. However, polyP-binding structures are largely unknown. Here we proposed a putative polyP binding site, a positively-charged semi-tunnel (PCST, identified by surface electrostatics analyses in polyP kinases (PPKs and many other polyP-related proteins. We found that the PCSTs in varied proteins were folded in different secondary structure compositions. Molecular docking calculations revealed a significant value for binding affinity to polyP in PCST-containing proteins. Utilizing the PCST identified in the β subunit of PPK3, we predicted the potential polyP-binding domain of PPK3. The discovery of this feature facilitates future searches for polyP-binding proteins and discovery of the mechanisms for polyP-binding activities. This should greatly enhance the understanding of the many physiological functions of protein-bound polyP and the involvement of polyP and polyP-binding proteins in various human diseases.

  1. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  2. Comparison of the binding properties of the mushroom Marasmius oreades lectin and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B isolectin to alphagalactosyl carbohydrate antigens in the surface phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2004-01-01

    The binding of two alpha-galactophilic lectins, Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B(4) (GS I-B(4)) to neoglycoproteins and natural glycoproteins were compared in a surface phase assay. Neoglycoproteins carrying various alpha-galactosylated glycans and lam...

  3. The impact of the 67kDa laminin receptor on both cell-surface binding and anti-allergic action of tea catechins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Umeda, Daisuke; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2008-08-15

    Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of major green tea catechins and their corresponding epimers on cell-surface binding and inhibitory effect on histamine release. Galloylated catechins; (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), (-)-gallocatechin-3-O-gallate (GCG), (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate (ECG), and (-)-catechin-3-O-gallate (CG) showed the cell-surface binding to the human basophilic KU812 cells by surface plasmon resonance analysis, but their non-galloylated forms did not. Binding activities of pyrogallol-type catechins (EGCG and GCG) were higher than those of catechol-type catechins (ECG and CG). These patterns were also observed in their inhibitory effects on histamine release. Previously, we have reported that biological activities of EGCG are mediated through the binding to the cell-surface 67kDa laminin receptor (67LR). Downregulation of 67LR expression caused a reduction of both activities of galloylated catechins. These results suggest that both the galloyl moiety and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern contribute to the exertion of biological activities of tea catechins and their 67LR-dependencies.

  4. A new generation of starch products as excipient in pharmaceutical tablets .1. Preparation and binding properties of high surface area potato starch products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierik, GHPT; ArendsScholte, AW; Eissens, AC; Lerk, CF

    1996-01-01

    A new pharmaceutical excipient with a high binding capacity was prepared from potato starch by enzymatic degradation, followed by suitable dehydration of the precipitated and filtered retrograded starch to produce high specific surface area products. Thermal dehydration methods like drying at room o

  5. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form.

  6. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Santiago, César; Rodríguez Frade, José Miguel; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-05-13

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention.

  7. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  8. Impact of Oral Iron Challenges on Circulating Non-Transferrin-Bound Iron in Healthy Guatemalan Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuemann, Klaus; Kroll, Sylvia; Romero-Abal, Maria-Eugenia; Georgiou, Niki A.; Marx, Jo J. M.; Weiss, Guenter; Solomons, Noel W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Oral iron as a supplement has been associated with adverse health consequences, especially in the context of young children with active malaria. A potential aggravating role of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) has been proposed. Material and Methods: NTBI responses in both a fasting an

  9. Impact of Oral Iron Challenges on Circulating Non-Transferrin-Bound Iron in Healthy Guatemalan Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuemann, Klaus; Kroll, Sylvia; Romero-Abal, Maria-Eugenia; Georgiou, Niki A.; Marx, Jo J. M.; Weiss, Guenter; Solomons, Noel W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Oral iron as a supplement has been associated with adverse health consequences, especially in the context of young children with active malaria. A potential aggravating role of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) has been proposed. Material and Methods: NTBI responses in both a fasting an

  10. Crossing the blood-brain-barrier with transferrin conjugated carbon dots: A zebrafish model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Dallman, Julia; Baker, James; Othman, Abdelhameed M; Blackwelder, Patrica L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) in biological systems remains a major medical challenge due to the tight junctions between endothelial cells known as the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Here we use a zebrafish model to explore the possibility of using transferrin-conjugated carbon dots (C-Dots) to ferry compounds across the BBB. C-Dots have previously been reported to inhibit protein fibrillation, and they are also used to deliver drugs for disease treatment. In terms of the potential medical application of C-Dots for the treatment of CNS diseases, one of the most formidable challenges is how to deliver them inside the CNS. To achieve this in this study, human transferrin was covalently conjugated to C-Dots. The conjugates were then injected into the vasculature of zebrafish to examine the possibility of crossing the BBB in vivo via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. The experimental observations suggest that the transferrin-C-Dots can enter the CNS while C-Dots alone cannot.

  11. Genetic resistance of carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) to Trypanoplasma borreli: influence of transferrin polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurecka, P.M.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Rakus, K.L.; Pilarczyk, A.; Irnazarow, I.

    2009-01-01

    In serum most of the iron molecules are bound to transferrin (Tf), which is a highly polymorphic protein in fish. Tf is an essential growth factor for mammalian trypanosomes. We performed a series of experiments with Trypanoplasma borreli to detect putative correlations between different Tf genotype

  12. Mutation analysis of the transferrin receptor-2 gene in patients with iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P L; Halloran, C; West, C; Beutler, E

    2001-01-01

    Three mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene have recently been identified in four Sicilian families with iron overload who had a normal hemochromatosis gene, HFE (C. Camaschella, personal communication). To determine the extent to which mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene occur in other populations with iron overload, we have completely sequenced this gene in 17 whites, 10 Asians, and 8 African Americans with iron overload and a C282C/C282C HFE genotype, as well as 4 subjects without iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, 5 patients with iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, and 5 normal individuals. None of the individuals exhibited the Sicilian mutations, Y250X in exon 6, M172K in exon 4, and E60X in exon 2. One iron-overloaded individual of Asian descent exhibited a I238M mutation which was subsequently found to be a polymorphism present in the Asian population at a frequency of 0.0192. The presence of the I238M mutation was not associated with an increase in ferritin or transferrin saturation levels. Three silent polymorphisms were also identified, nt 1770 (D590D) and nt 1851 (A617A) and a polymorphism at nt 2255 in the 3' UTR. Thus, mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene were not responsible for the iron overload seen in our subjects.

  13. The unique kinetics of iron release from transferrin: the role of receptor, lobe-lobe interactions, and salt at endosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Steere, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2010-02-12

    Transferrins are a family of bilobal iron-binding proteins that play the crucial role of binding ferric iron and keeping it in solution, thereby controlling the levels of this important metal. Human serum transferrin (hTF) carries one iron in each of two similar lobes. Understanding the detailed mechanism of iron release from each lobe of hTF during receptor-mediated endocytosis has been extremely challenging because of the active participation of the transferrin receptor (TFR), salt, a chelator, lobe-lobe interactions, and the low pH within the endosome. Our use of authentic monoferric hTF (unable to bind iron in one lobe) or diferric hTF (with iron locked in one lobe) provided distinct kinetic end points, allowing us to bypass many of the previous difficulties. The capture and unambiguous assignment of all kinetic events associated with iron release by stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry, in the presence and in the absence of the TFR, unequivocally establish the decisive role of the TFR in promoting efficient and balanced iron release from both lobes of hTF during one endocytic cycle. For the first time, the four microscopic rate constants required to accurately describe the kinetics of iron removal are reported for hTF with and without the TFR. Specifically, at pH 5.6, the TFR enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe (7-fold to 11-fold) and slows the rate of iron release from the N-lobe (6-fold to 15-fold), making them more equivalent and producing an increase in the net rate of iron removal from Fe(2)hTF. Calculated cooperativity factors, in addition to plots of time-dependent species distributions in the absence and in the presence of the TFR, clearly illustrate the differences. Accurate rate constants for the pH and salt-induced conformational changes in each lobe precisely delineate how delivery of iron within the physiologically relevant time frame of 2 min might be accomplished. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. X-ray structure of Pur-alpha reveals a Whirly-like fold and an unusual nucleic-acid binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebsch, Almut; Roche, Stéphane; Niessing, Dierk

    2009-11-03

    The PUR protein family is a distinct and highly conserved class that is characterized by its sequence-specific RNA- and DNA-binding. Its best-studied family member, Pur-alpha, acts as a transcriptional regulator, as host factor for viral replication, and as cofactor for mRNP localization in dendrites. Pur-alpha-deficient mice show severe neurologic defects and die after birth. Nucleic-acid binding by Pur-alpha is mediated by its central core region, for which no structural information is available. We determined the x-ray structure of residues 40 to 185 from Drosophila melanogaster Pur-alpha, which constitutes a major part of the core region. We found that this region contains two almost identical structural motifs, termed "PUR repeats," which interact with each other to form a PUR domain. DNA- and RNA-binding studies confirmed that PUR domains are indeed functional nucleic-acid binding domains. Database analysis show that PUR domains share a fold with the Whirly class of nucleic-acid binding proteins. Structural analysis combined with mutational studies suggest that a PUR domain binds nucleic acids through two independent surface regions involving concave beta-sheets. Structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the core region harbors a third PUR repeat at its C terminus. Subsequent characterization by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and size-exclusion chromatography indicated that PUR repeat III mediates dimerization of Pur-alpha. Surface envelopes calculated from SAXS data show that the Pur-alpha dimer consisting of repeats I to III is arranged in a Z-like shape. This unexpected domain organization of the entire core domain of Pur-alpha has direct implications for ssDNA/ssRNA and dsDNA binding.

  15. CorA is a copper repressible surface-associated copper(I)-binding protein produced in Methylomicrobium album BG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth A; Ve, Thomas; Larsen, Oivind; Pedersen, Rolf B; Lillehaug, Johan R; Jensen, Harald B; Helland, Ronny; Karlsen, Odd A

    2014-01-01

    CorA is a copper repressible protein previously identified in the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium album BG8. In this work, we demonstrate that CorA is located on the cell surface and binds one copper ion per protein molecule, which, based on X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis, is in the reduced state (Cu(I)). The structure of endogenously expressed CorA was solved using X-ray crystallography. The 1.6 Å three-dimensional structure confirmed the binding of copper and revealed that the copper atom was coordinated in a mononuclear binding site defined by two histidines, one water molecule, and the tryptophan metabolite, kynurenine. This arrangement of the copper-binding site is similar to that of its homologous protein MopE* from Metylococcus capsulatus Bath, confirming the importance of kynurenine for copper binding in these proteins. Our findings show that CorA has an overall fold similar to MopE, including the unique copper(I)-binding site and most of the secondary structure elements. We suggest that CorA plays a role in the M. album BG8 copper acquisition.

  16. Residues essential for Panton-Valentine leukocidin S component binding to its cell receptor suggest both plasticity and adaptability in its interaction surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit-Joseph Laventie

    Full Text Available Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a bicomponent staphylococcal leukotoxin, is involved in the poor prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia. The present study aimed to elucidate the binding mechanism of PVL and in particular its cell-binding domain. The class S component of PVL, LukS-PV, is known to ensure cell targeting and exhibits the highest affinity for the neutrophil membrane (Kd∼10(-10 M compared to the class F component of PVL, LukF-PV (Kd∼10(-9 M. Alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to identify the residues involved in LukS-PV binding to the neutrophil surface. Nineteen single alanine mutations were performed in the rim domain previously described as implicated in cell membrane interactions. Positions were chosen in order to replace polar or exposed charged residues and according to conservation between leukotoxin class S components. Characterization studies enabled to identify a cluster of residues essential for LukS-PV binding, localized on two loops of the rim domain. The mutations R73A, Y184A, T244A, H245A and Y250A led to dramatically reduced binding affinities for both human leukocytes and undifferentiated U937 cells expressing the C5a receptor. The three-dimensional structure of five of the mutants was determined using X-ray crystallography. Structure analysis identified residues Y184 and Y250 as crucial in providing structural flexibility in the receptor-binding domain of LukS-PV.

  17. The Modification of Indium Tin Oxide with Phosphonic Acids: Mechanism of Binding, Tuning of Surface Properties, and Potential for Use in Organic Electronic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Jones, Simon C.; Paniagua, Sergio A.; Sharma, Asha; Kippelen, Bernard; Armstrong, Neal R.; Marder, Seth R.

    2012-03-20

    Transparent metal oxides, in particular, indium tin oxide (ITO), are critical transparent contact materials for applications in next-generation organic electronics, including organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Understanding and controlling the surface properties of ITO allows for the molecular engineering of the ITO–organic interface, resulting in fine control of the interfacial chemistries and electronics. In particular, both surface energy matching and work function compatibility at material interfaces can result in marked improvement in OLED and OPV performance. Although there are numerous ways to change the surface properties of ITO, one of the more successful surface modifications is the use of monolayers based on organic molecules with widely variable end functional groups. Phosphonic acids (PAs) are known to bind strongly to metal oxides and form robust monolayers on many different metal oxide materials. They also demonstrate several advantages over other functionalizing moieties such as silanes or carboxylic acids. Most notably, PAs can be stored in ambient conditions without degradation, and the surface modification procedures are typically robust and easy to employ. This Account focuses on our research studying PA binding to ITO, the tunable properties of the resulting surfaces, and subsequent effects on the performance of organic electronic devices. We have used surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to determine that PAs bind to ITO in a predominantly bidentate fashion (where two of three oxygen atoms from the PA are involved in surface binding). Modification of the functional R-groups on PAs allows us to control and tune the surface energy and work function of the ITO surface. In one study using fluorinated benzyl PAs, we can keep the surface energy of ITO relatively low and constant but tune the surface work

  18. A new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based method to quantitate exogenous recombinant transferrin in cerebrospinal fluid: a potential approach for pharmacokinetic studies of transferrin-based therapeutics in the central nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunhai; Bobst, Cedric E; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is an 80 kDa iron-binding protein that is viewed as a promising drug carrier to target the central nervous system as a result of its ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Among the many challenges during the development of Tf-based therapeutics, the sensitive and accurate quantitation of the administered Tf in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) remains particularly difficult because of the presence of abundant endogenous Tf. Herein, we describe the development of a new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based method for the sensitive and accurate quantitation of exogenous recombinant human Tf in rat CSF. By taking advantage of a His-tag present in recombinant Tf and applying Ni affinity purification, the exogenous human serum Tf can be greatly enriched from rat CSF, despite the presence of the abundant endogenous protein. Additionally, we applied a newly developed (18)O-labeling technique that can generate internal standards at the protein level, which greatly improved the accuracy and robustness of quantitation. The developed method was investigated for linearity, accuracy, precision, and lower limit of quantitation, all of which met the commonly accepted criteria for bioanalytical method validation.

  19. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  20. Two Secondary Carbohydrate Binding Sites on the Surface of Barley alpha-Amylase 1 Have Distinct Functions and Display Synergy in Hydrolysis of Starch Granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Bozonnet, Sophie; Seo, Eun-Seong

    2009-01-01

    Some polysaccharide processing enzymes possess secondary carbohydrate binding sites situated on the surface far from the active site. In barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1), two such sites, SBS1 and SBS2, are found on the catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel and the noncatalytic C-terminal domain, respective...... to single alpha-glucan chains accessible for hydrolysis, is proposed. SBS1 and SBS2 also influence the kinetics of hydrolysis for amylose and maltooligosaccharides, the degree of multiple attack on amylose, and subsite binding energies....

  1. Surface plasmon resonance analysis to evaluate the importance of heparin sulfate groups' binding with human aFGF and bFGF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小锋; 许雅香; 沈国新; KAMEIKaeko; TAKANORyo; HARASaburo

    2003-01-01

    Human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (aFGF and bFGF) are classic and well characterized members of the heparin-binding growth factor family. Heparin is generally thought to play an extremely important role in regulating aFGF and bFGF bioactivities through its strong binding with them. In order to unravel the mechanism of the interactions between heparin and FGFs, and evaluate the importance of heparin sulfate groups' binding with FGFs, surface plasmon resonance analyses were performed using IAsys Cuvettes System. Heparin and its regioselectively desulfated derivatives were immobilized on the cuvettes, aFGF and bFGF solutions with different concentrations were pipetted into the cuvettes and the progress of the interaction was monitored in real-time by Windows-based software, yielding kinetic and equilibrium constants for these interactions. In addition, in order to reduce the delicate difference among the cuvettes, inhibition analyses of mixture of FGFs and immobilized native heparin by modified heparins were also done. The data from these two methods were similar, indicating that all sulfate groups at 2-0, 6-0 and N- in heparin were required for the binding to aFGF; and that their contribution to the binding was in the order 2-O, N- and 6-O-sulfate group.In contrast, definite contribution of the 6-O-sulfate group to the binding with bFGF was most apparent, while the other two sulfate groups appeared to be necessary in the order 2-O and N-sulfate group. These methods established here can be used for analysing the effect of sulfate groups in heparin on the binding with other human FGF members or other heparin-binding proteins.

  2. Surface plasmon resonance analysis to evaluate the importance of heparin sulfate groups' binding with human aFGF and bFGF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (aFGF and bFGF) are classic and well characterized members of the heparin-binding growth factor family. Heparin is generally thought to play an extremely important role in regulating aFGF and bFGF bioactivities through its strong binding with them. In order to unravel the mechanism of the interactions between heparin and FGFs, and evaluate the importance of heparin sulfate groups' binding with FGFs, surface plasmon resonance analyses were performed using IAsys Cuvettes System. Heparin and its regioselectively desulfated derivatives were immobilized on the cuvettes. aFGF and bFGF solutions with different concentrations were pipetted into the cuvettes and the progress of the interaction was monitored in real-time by Windows-based software, yielding kinetic and equilibrium constants for these interactions. In addition, in order to reduce the delicate difference among the cuvettes, inhibition analyses of mixture of FGFs and immobilized native heparin by modified heparins were also done. The data from these two methods were similar, indicating that all sulfate groups at 2-O, 6-O and N- in heparin were required for the binding to aFGF; and that their contribution to the binding was in the order 2-O, N- and 6-O-sulfate group. In contrast, definite contribution of the 6-O-sulfate group to the binding with bFGF was most apparent, while the other two sulfate groups appeared to be necessary in the order 2-O and N-sulfate group. These methods established here can be used for analysing the effect of sulfate groups in heparin on the binding with other human FGF members or other heparin-binding proteins.

  3. Influence of endurance exercise (triathlon) on circulating transferrin receptors and other indicators of iron status in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcker, Lothar; Hinz, Katrin; Holland, Karsten; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Vogelgesang, Jens; Kiesewetter, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Numerous reports have described a poor iron status in female endurance athletes. However, the traditionally applied indicators of iron status (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin) may not truly reflect the iron status. Therefore we studied the newly developed soluble transferrin receptor and other indicators of iron status in twelve female endurance athletes before and after a triathlon race. Resting values showed a poor iron status in the participants of the race. Serum TfR concentration increased slightly after the race. However, if the values are corrected for hemoconcentration no change could be found. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and transferrin values were increased after the race.

  4. Labeling of Anti-MUC-1 Binding Single Chain Fv Fragments to Surface Modified Upconversion Nanoparticles for an Initial in Vivo Molecular Imaging Proof of Principle Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Haase

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo optical Imaging is an inexpensive and highly sensitive modality to investigate and follow up diseases like breast cancer. However, fluorescence labels and specific tracers are still works in progress to bring this promising modality into the clinical day-to-day use. In this study an anti-MUC-1 binding single-chain antibody fragment was screened, produced and afterwards labeled with newly designed and surface modified NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion nanoparticles as fluorescence reporter constructs. The MUC-1 binding of the conjugate was examined in vitro and in vivo using modified state-of-the-art small animal Imaging equipment. Binding of the newly generated upconversion nanoparticle based probe to MUC-1 positive cells was clearly shown via laser scanning microscopy and in an initial proof of principal small animal optical imaging approach.

  5. Applications of a tight-binding total energy method for transition and noble metals Elastic Constants, Vacancies, and Surfaces of Monatomic Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Mehl, M J; Mehl, Michael J.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.

    1996-01-01

    A recent tight-binding scheme provides a method for extending the results of first principles calculations to regimes involving $10^2 - 10^3$ atoms in a unit cell. The method uses an analytic set of two-center, non-orthogonal tight-binding parameters, on-site terms which change with the local environment, and no pair potential. The free parameters in this method are chosen to simultaneously fit band structures and total energies from a set of first-principles calculations for monatomic fcc and bcc crystals. To check the accuracy of this method we evaluate structural energy differences, elastic constants, vacancy formation energies, and surface energies, comparing to first-principles calculations and experiment. In most cases there is good agreement between this theory and experiment. We present a detailed account of the method, a complete set of tight-binding parameters, and results for twenty-nine of the alkaline earth, transition and noble metals.

  6. TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosoni, Daniela; Puri, Claudia; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    with endocytic proteins, including clathrin, dynamin, and the TfR, and localizes selectively to TfR-containing coated-pits (CCP) and -vesicles (CCV). Overexpression of TTP specifically inhibits TfR internalization, and causes the formation of morphologically aberrant CCP, which are probably fission impaired....... This effect is mediated by the SH3 of TTP, which can bind to dynamin, and it is rescued by overexpression of dynamin. Functional ablation of TTP causes a reduction in TfR internalization, and reduced cargo loading and size of TfR-CCV. Tyrosine phosphorylation of either TTP or dynamin prevents...

  7. Effects of synthetic cohesin-containing scaffold protein architecture on binding dockerin-enzyme fusions on the surface of Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microbial synthesis of fuels, commodity chemicals, and bioactive compounds necessitates the assemblage of multiple enzyme activities to carry out sequential chemical reactions, often via substrate channeling by means of multi-domain or multi-enzyme complexes. Engineering the controlled incorporation of enzymes in recombinant protein complexes is therefore of interest. The cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum is an extracellular enzyme complex that efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose. Enzymes interact with protein scaffolds via type 1 dockerin/cohesin interactions, while scaffolds in turn bind surface anchor proteins by means of type 2 dockerin/cohesin interactions, which demonstrate a different binding specificity than their type 1 counterparts. Recombinant chimeric scaffold proteins containing cohesins of different specificity allow binding of multiple enzymes to specific sites within an engineered complex. Results We report the successful display of engineered chimeric scaffold proteins containing both type 1 and type 2 cohesins on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells. The chimeric scaffold proteins were able to form complexes with the Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase fused to either type 1 or type 2 dockerin, and differences in binding efficiencies were correlated with scaffold architecture. We used E. coli β-galactosidase, also fused to type 1 or type 2 dockerins, to demonstrate the targeted incorporation of two enzymes into the complexes. The simultaneous binding of enzyme pairs each containing a different dockerin resulted in bi-enzymatic complexes tethered to the cell surface. The sequential binding of the two enzymes yielded insights into parameters affecting assembly of the complex such as protein size and position within the scaffold. Conclusions The spatial organization of enzymes into complexes is an important strategy for increasing the efficiency of biochemical pathways. In this study

  8. Detachment and successive re-attachment of multiple, reversibly-binding tethers result in irreversible bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; van der Mei, Henny C; Hall, Connie L; Peterson, Brandon W; de Vries, Joop; Song, Lei; Jong, Ed D de; Busscher, Henk J; Swartjes, Jan J T M

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to surfaces occurs ubiquitously and is initially reversible, though becoming more irreversible within minutes after first contact with a surface. We here demonstrate for eight bacterial strains comprising four species, that bacteria adhere irreversibly to surfaces through multiple

  9. Distribution of dissolved organic carbon and metal-binding capacity among ultrafilterable fractions isolated from selected surface waters of the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, James J.; Giesy, John P.; Evans, David W.

    1984-06-01

    The binding capacities of surface waters for Cd, Cu, and Pb were determined for eight water samples representing four rivers and two swamps from Florida and Georgia in the southeastern United States The binding capacity ranges were CdBC=0 04 to 0 79 μg atm/L, CuBC=1 0 to 5 4 μg atm/L, and PbBC=5 0 to 17 8 μg atm/L Binding capacity values from the southeastern United States are shown to be in good agreement with values reported from the northeastern part of the country and northern Europe The CdBC was due primarily to inorganic ligand binding, while PbBC was predominantly a result of organic matter The CuBC was due to a complex function of both organic and inorganic binding Significant portions of the CuBC and PbBC could be removed from the waters by ultrafiltration of particles between 0·45 μm and 52 Å in diameter Ultrafiltration, even to removing particles > 13 Å diameter, did not affect the CdBC Distributional studies of the dissolved organic carbon in these systems reveal that significant fractions of the DOC are present in the ultrafilterable fraction which contains significant portions of the CuBC and PbBC

  10. Visualization of high-throughput and label-free antibody-polypeptide binding for drug screening based on microarrays and surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengyi; Deng, Tao; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Jia; Li, Xin; Li, Qiang; Huang, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a visualization method for the high-throughput monitoring of antibody-polypeptide binding by integrating a microarray chip with surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). A prism-coupled SPRi system with smart images processing software and a 5×5 polypeptide microarray was developed. The modeling analysis was performed to optimize the system and the materials of prism and chip, looking for the optimal incident wavelength and angle of incidence for dynamic SPRi detection in solution. The system can dynamically monitor 25 tunnels of biomolecule interactions in solution without secondary tag reactants. In addition, this system can determine the specific profile of antibody-polypeptide binding in each tunnel and yield a visual three-dimensional histogram of dynamic combinations in all microarray tunnels. Furthermore, the detection limit of the label-free antibody-polypeptide binding reached 1 pg/μL in a one-step binding test, and an ultrasensitive detection of 10 fg/μL was obtained using three-step cascade binding. Using the peptide microarray, the amount of sample and reagents used was reduced to 80 nL per tunnel, and 20×20 tunnels of biomolecule interactions could be analyzed in parallel in a 7 mm×7 mm microreaction cells. This device and method offer a potential platform for high-throughput and label-free dynamic monitoring multiple biomolecule interactions for drug discovery and basic biomedical research.

  11. 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol; synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and BSA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Savithri; Basappa Chidananda, Vasantha Kumar; Hosakere Doddarevanna, Revanasiddappa; Hamse Kameshwar, Vivek; Kaur, Manpreet; Jasinski, Jerry P.

    2017-08-01

    A new imine-based molecule 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol (FBt) was synthesized by microwave and conventional method. It was structurally characterized by spectral techniques (NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS and electronic absorption), elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Hirshfeld surface analysis was employed to ensure the existence of intermolecular interactions in FBt structure. A preliminary in vitro susceptibility test against two pathogenic fungi with respect to standard has shown that the ligand is proved to be a potent antifungal agent. Since the carrying of a drug by BSA may effect on its structure and action, the investigation on the interaction between model protein BSA and FBt was carried out by employing UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characteristics of the binding, i.e., binding constant, number of binding sites, and nature of binding were determined. Besides, the Förster's parameters associated with the binding process were calculated. Molecular docking was also carried on interaction study of the FBt with BSA.

  12. Implications of surface charge and curvature for the binding orientation of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase on negatively charged or zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles as studied by ESR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, E.M.K.; Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Patkar, S.A.;

    2005-01-01

    , Y., et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 413-423]. The productive-mode binding orientation of TLL at the lipid-water interface of small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyi-sn-glycero-3-phosphati-dylglycerol (POPG) was previously determined using electron spin resonance (ESR......) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin-labeling [Hedin, E. M. K., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 1418514196]. In our investigation, we have studied the interfacial orientation of TLL when bound to large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) consisting of POPG, and bound to SUV consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2...... fluorescence quenching efficiency between each spin-label positioned on TLL, and the lipid membrane. ESR exposure and fluorescence quenching data show that TILL associates closer to the negatively charged PG surface than the zwitterionic PC surface, and binds to both POPG LUV and POPC SUV predominantly through...

  13. Megalin-dependent cubilin-mediated endocytosis is a major pathway for the apical uptake of transferrin in polarized epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Verroust, P J; Jacobsen, C; Dautry-Varsat, A; Gburek, J; Willnow, T E; Christensen, E I; Moestrup, S K

    2001-10-23

    Cubilin is a 460-kDa protein functioning as an endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor vitamin B(12) complex in the intestine and as a receptor for apolipoprotein A1 and albumin reabsorption in the kidney proximal tubules and the yolk sac. In the present study, we report the identification of cubilin as a novel transferrin (Tf) receptor involved in catabolism of Tf. Consistent with a cubilin-mediated endocytosis of Tf in the kidney, lysosomes of human, dog, and mouse renal proximal tubules strongly accumulate Tf, whereas no Tf is detectable in the endocytic apparatus of the renal tubule epithelium of dogs with deficient surface expression of cubilin. As a consequence, these dogs excrete increased amounts of Tf in the urine. Mice with deficient synthesis of megalin, the putative coreceptor colocalizing with cubilin, also excrete high amounts of Tf and fail to internalize Tf in their proximal tubules. However, in contrast to the dogs with the defective cubilin expression, the megalin-deficient mice accumulate Tf on the luminal cubilin-expressing surface of the proximal tubule epithelium. This observation indicates that megalin deficiency causes failure in internalization of the cubilin-ligand complex. The megalin-dependent, cubilin-mediated endocytosis of Tf and the potential of the receptors thereby to facilitate iron uptake were further confirmed by analyzing the uptake of (125)I- and (59)Fe-labeled Tf in cultured yolk sac cells.

  14. Binding structures of propylene glycol stereoisomers on the Si(001)-2×1 surface: a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jae Ryang; Bharath, Satyaveda C; Jeong, Sukmin; Pearl, Thomas P

    2011-01-28

    The binding configuration of propylene glycol stereoisomer molecules adsorbed on the Si(001)-2×1 surface was investigated using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. Propylene glycol was found to adsorb dissociatively via two hydroxyl groups exclusively as a bridge between the ends of two adjacent dimers along the dimer row. The chirality was preserved during bonding to Si atoms and was identifiable with STM imaging. The large number of propylene glycol conformers in the gas phase was reduced to a single configuration adsorbed on the surface at low molecular coverage.

  15. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, J; Surmacz, L; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY), and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K), and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LY uptake (575 ng LY/mg protein/hr) decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/mg protein/hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5%) in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min) followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin-FITC) were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in "mixing" endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  16. Increased hepcidin in transferrin-treated thalassemic mice correlates with increased liver BMP2 expression and decreased hepatocyte ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huiyong; Choesang, Tenzin; Li, Huihui; Sun, Shuming; Pham, Petra; Bao, Weili; Feola, Maria; Westerman, Mark; Li, Guiyuan; Follenzi, Antonia; Blanc, Lionel; Rivella, Stefano; Fleming, Robert E; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2016-03-01

    Iron overload results in significant morbidity and mortality in β-thalassemic patients. Insufficient hepcidin is implicated in parenchymal iron overload in β-thalassemia and approaches to increase hepcidin have therapeutic potential. We have previously shown that exogenous apo-transferrin markedly ameliorates ineffective erythropoiesis and increases hepcidin expression in Hbb(th1/th1) (thalassemic) mice. We utilize in vivo and in vitro systems to investigate effects of exogenous apo-transferrin on Smad and ERK1/2 signaling, pathways that participate in hepcidin regulation. Our results demonstrate that apo-transferrin increases hepcidin expression in vivo despite decreased circulating and parenchymal iron concentrations and unchanged liver Bmp6 mRNA expression in thalassemic mice. Hepatocytes from apo-transferrin-treated mice demonstrate decreased ERK1/2 pathway and increased serum BMP2 concentration and hepatocyte BMP2 expression. Furthermore, hepatocyte ERK1/2 phosphorylation is enhanced by neutralizing anti-BMP2/4 antibodies and suppressed in vitro in a dose-dependent manner by BMP2, resulting in converse effects on hepcidin expression, and hepatocytes treated with MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in combination with BMP2 exhibit an additive increase in hepcidin expression. Lastly, bone marrow erythroferrone expression is normalized in apo-transferrin treated thalassemic mice but increased in apo-transferrin injected wild-type mice. These findings suggest that increased hepcidin expression after exogenous apo-transferrin is in part independent of erythroferrone and support a model in which apo-transferrin treatment in thalassemic mice increases BMP2 expression in the liver and other organs, decreases hepatocellular ERK1/2 activation, and increases nuclear Smad to increase hepcidin expression in hepatocytes.

  17. Tissue distribution and clearance kinetics of non-transferrin-bound iron in the hypotransferrinemic mouse: a rodent model for hemochromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, C.M.; Alexander, J.; Eldridge, M.; Kushner, J.P.; Bernstein, S.; Kaplan, J.

    1987-05-01

    Genetically hypotransferrinemic mice accumulate iron in the liver and pancreas. A similar pattern of tissue iron accumulation occurs in humans with hereditary hemochromatosis. In both disorders, there is a decrease plasma concentration of apotransferrin. To test the hypothesis that nontransferrin-bound iron exists and is clear by the parenchymal tissues, the tissue distribution of /sup 59/Fe was studied in animals lacking apotransferrin. Two groups of animals were used: normal rats and mice whose transferrin had been saturated by an intravenous injection of nonradiolabeled iron, and mice with congential hypotransferrinemia. In control animals, injected /sup 59/Fe was found primarily in the bone marrow and spleen. In the transferrin iron-saturated animals, injected /sup 59/Fe accumulated in the liver and pancreas. Gastrointestinally absorbed iron in hypotransferrinemic or transferrin iron-saturated mice was deposited in the liver. This indicates that newly absorbed iron is released from mucosal cells not bound to transferrin. Clearance studies demonstrated that transferrin-bound /sup 59/Fe was removed from the circulation of rats with a half-time of 50 min. In transferrin iron-saturated animals, injected /sup 59/Fe was removed with a half-time of <30 s. Analysis of the distribution of /sup 59/Fe in serum samples by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of /sup 59/Fe not bound to transferrin. These results demonstrate the existence of and uptake system for non-transferrin-bound iron. These observations support the hypothesis that parenchymal iron overload is consequence of reduced concentrations of apotransferrin.

  18. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wiejak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY, and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K, and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LYuptake (575 ng LY/ mg protein /hr decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/ mg protein /hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5% in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin– FITC were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in “mixing” endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  19. Relationship between the biological activities of methylated derivatives of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) and their cell surface binding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Satomi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Umeda, Daisuke; Miyase, Toshio; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2007-08-22

    It was previously reported that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) suppresses the expression of the high-affinity IgE receptor FcepsilonRI in human basophilic cells and that this suppressive effect is associated with EGCG binding to the cell surface. This study examined the effects of five methylated derivatives of EGCG, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl)gallate (EGCG 3' 'Me), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(4-O-methyl)gallate (EGCG 4' 'Me), (-)-4'-O-methyl-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG 4'Me), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3,4-O-methyl)gallate (EGCG 3' '4' 'diMe), and (-)-4'-O-methyl-epigallocatechin-3-O-(4-O-methyl)gallate (EGCG 4'4' 'diMe) on FcepsilonRI expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and each of their cell surface binding activities was measured. Of these five methylated derivatives, three that are methylated at the 3' '- and/or 4' '-position, EGCG 3' 'Me, EGCG 4' 'Me, and EGCG 3' '4' 'diMe, suppressed FcepsilonRI expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, although the suppressive effects were lower than that of EGCG. EGCG 4'Me and EGCG 4'4' 'diMe, both of which are methylated at the 4'-position, did not demonstrate a suppressive effect. Furthermore, it was found that EGCG 3' 'Me, EGCG 4' 'Me, EGCG 3' '4' 'diMe, and EGCG 4'Me, which are methylated at the 3' '- and/or 4' '-positions or the 4'-position, could bind to the cell surface even though their binding activities were lower than that of EGCG. Only EGCG 4'4' 'diMe, which is methylated at both the 4'- and 4' '-positions, could not bind. These results suggest that the trihydroxyl structure of the B ring is essential for EGCG to exert the suppressive effects and that the hydroxyl groups on both the 4'-position in the B ring and the 4' '-position in the gallate are crucial for the cell surface binding activity of EGCG.

  20. Snx3 regulates recycling of the transferrin receptor and iron assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caiyong; Garcia-Santos, Daniel; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Seguin, Alexandra; Li, Liangtao; Fegan, Katherine H; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Shah, Dhvanit I; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Chen, Wen; King, Matthew J; Yien, Yvette Y; Schultz, Iman J; Anderson, Heidi; Dalton, Arthur J; Freedman, Matthew L; Kingsley, Paul D; Palis, James; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Lodish, Harvey F; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry; Maeda, Takahiro; Ponka, Prem; Paw, Barry H

    2013-03-01

    Sorting of endocytic ligands and receptors is critical for diverse cellular processes. The physiological significance of endosomal sorting proteins in vertebrates, however, remains largely unknown. Here we report that sorting nexin 3 (Snx3) facilitates the recycling of transferrin receptor (Tfrc) and thus is required for the proper delivery of iron to erythroid progenitors. Snx3 is highly expressed in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues. Silencing of Snx3 results in anemia and hemoglobin defects in vertebrates due to impaired transferrin (Tf)-mediated iron uptake and its accumulation in early endosomes. This impaired iron assimilation can be complemented with non-Tf iron chelates. We show that Snx3 and Vps35, a component of the retromer, interact with Tfrc to sort it to the recycling endosomes. Our findings uncover a role of Snx3 in regulating Tfrc recycling, iron homeostasis, and erythropoiesis. Thus, the identification of Snx3 provides a genetic tool for exploring erythropoiesis and disorders of iron metabolism.

  1. Loss of genetic variability at the transferrin locus in five hatchery stocks of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcagnotto Daniela

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and conservation of the genetic variability in stocks maintained as live gene banks have become a high priority task for Brazilian fish culture. The aim of the present survey was to assess the transferrin allelic diversity of five hatchery stocks of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum. The tambaqui stock from Pentecoste, the oldest maintained in Brazilian hatchery stations, retained three of the six alleles detected in wild populations of tambaqui from the Amazon River. Other hatchery stocks, directly or indirectly derived from the Pentecoste stock, did not show transferrin allelic variability. Insufficient number of founders and genetic drift due to sampling errors seem to be the main causes leading to loss of genetic diversity in tambaqui hatchery stocks. Appropriate management strategies are required in order to improve the genetic potential of tambaqui stocks in Brazil.

  2. Beta-2-transferrin to detect cerebrospinal fluid pleural effusion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jennifer C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pleural effusion secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion is a rare and potentially life-threatening occurrence. Case presentation We describe a 14-month-old Caucasian boy who had a ventriculoperitoneal shunt inserted for progressive hydrocephalus of unknown etiology. Two and a half months post-shunt insertion, the patient presented with mild respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a large right pleural effusion and a shunt series demonstrated an appropriately placed distal catheter tip. A subsequent abdominal ultrasound revealed marked ascites. Fluid drained via tube thoracostomy was sent for beta-2-transferrin electrophoresis. A positive test was highly suggestive of cerebral spinal fluid hydrothorax. Post-externalization of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt, the ascites and pleural effusion resolved. Conclusion Testing for beta-2-transferrin protein in pleural fluid may serve as a useful technique for diagnosing cerebrospinal fluid hydrothorax in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts.

  3. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  4. Transferrin hypoglycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance: using the clues and avoiding the pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, M; Płoski, R; Rokicki, D; Morava, E; Gizewska, M; Mierzewska, H; Pollak, A; Lefeber, D J; Wevers, R A; Pronicka, E

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is caused by a deficiency of aldolase B due to mutations of the ALDOB gene. The disease poses diagnostic problems because of unspecific clinical manifestations. We report three cases of HFI all of whom had a chronic disease with neurological, nephrological or gastroenterological symptoms, whereas nutritional fructose intolerance, the pathognomonic sign of HFI, was apparent only in retrospect. In all patients a hypoglycosylated pattern of transferrin isoforms was found but was misinterpreted as a sign of CDG Ix. The correct diagnosis was achieved with marked delay (26, 36 and 24 months, respectively) by sequencing of the ALDOB gene two common mutations were identified on both alleles or on one (A150P/A175D, A150P/-, and A150P/A175D). The diagnosis was further supported by normalization of transferrin isoforms on a fructose-free diet. Data available in two patients showed that following the fructose restriction the type I pattern of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin detectable on fructose-containing diet disappeared after 3-4 weeks. These cases illustrate that in the first years of life HFI may show misleading variability in clinical presentation and that protein glycosylation analysis such as transferrin isofocusing may give important diagnostic clues. However, care should be taken not to misinterpret the abnormal results as CDG Ix as well as to remember that a normal profile does not exclude HFI due to the possibility of spontaneous fructose restriction in the diet. The presented data also emphasize the usefulness of ALDOB mutation screening for diagnosis of HFI.

  5. The role of lactoferrin binding protein B in mediating protection against human lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Livingstone, Margaret; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts of mammals encounter an iron-deficient environment because of iron sequestration by the host iron-binding proteins transferrin and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin is also present in high concentrations at sites of inflammation where the cationic, antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin is produced by proteolysis of lactoferrin. Several Gram-negative pathogens express a lactoferrin receptor that enables the bacteria to use lactoferrin as an iron source. The receptor is composed of an integral membrane protein, lactoferrin binding protein A (LbpA), and a membrane-bound lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB). LbpA is essential for growth with lactoferrin as the sole iron source, whereas the role of LbpB in iron acquisition is not yet known. In this study, we demonstrate that LbpB from 2 different species is capable of providing protection against the killing activity of a human lactoferrin-derived peptide. We investigated the prevalence of lactoferrin receptors in bacteria and examined their sequence diversity. We propose that the protection against the cationic antimicrobial human lactoferrin-derived peptide is associated with clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the C-terminal lobe of LbpB that is a common feature of this protein.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-I and transferrin mediate growth and survival of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstrom, N A; Gay, R D; Wong, D C; Kitchen, N A; DeBoer, L; Gray, P P

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the roles of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transferrin in the survival and proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells upon withdrawal of serum. For this purpose, we employed DNA analysis and flow cytometry to compare CHO cell lines expressing either IGF-I alone or IGF-I and transferrin. The ability of cells to cycle and the occurrence of apoptosis were monitored in these cells in serum-free medium. These results indicate that IGF-I alone is able to maintain the viability of CHO cells for an extended length of time in the absence of serum. Transferrin alone does not promote survival or proliferation. Only in the presence of both IGF-I and transferrin do cells survive and proliferate. Therefore, in attached CHO cultures, IGF-I alone does not stimulate cell proliferation but is a requirement for growth in serum-free medium in cooperation with transferrin. We report on the dual role of IGF-I as a survival factor in CHO cells and its interlocking role with transferrin to stimulate cell growth.

  7. Multiple epitope presentation and surface density control enabled by chemoselective immobilization lead to enhanced performance in IgE-binding fingerprinting on peptide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Alessandro; Cretich, Marina; Vanna, Renzo; Sola, Laura; Gagni, Paola; Bruni, Giulia; Liprino, Marta; Gramatica, Furio; Burastero, Samuele; Chiari, Marcella

    2017-08-29

    Multiple ligand presentation is a powerful strategy to enhance the affinity of a probe for its corresponding target. A promising application of this concept lies in the analytical field, where surface immobilized probes interact with their corresponding targets in the context of complex biological samples. Here we investigate the effect of multiple epitope presentation (MEP) in the challenging context of IgE-detection in serum samples using peptide microarrays, and evaluate the influence of probes surface density on the assay results. Using the milk allergen alpha-lactalbumin as a model, we have synthesized three immunoreactive epitope sequences in a linear, branched and tandem form and exploited a chemoselective click strategy (CuAAC) for their immobilization on the surface of two biosensors, a microarray and an SPR chip both modified with the same clickable polymeric coating. We first demonstrated that a fine tuning of the surface peptide density plays a crucial role to fully exploit the potential of oriented and multiple peptide display. We then compared the three multiple epitope presentations in a microarray assay using sera samples from milk allergic patients, confirming that a multiple presentation, in particular that of the tandem construct, allows for a more efficient characterization of IgE-binding fingerprints at a statistically significant level. To gain insights on the binding parameters that characterize antibody/epitopes affinity, we selected the most reactive epitope of the series (LAC1) and performed a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi) analysis comparing different epitope architectures (linear versus branched versus tandem). We demonstrated that the tandem peptide provides an approximately twofold increased binding capacity with respect to the linear and branched peptides, that could be attributed to a lower rate of dissociation (Kd). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation of the starch components amylopectin and amylose by barley α-amylase 1: Role of surface binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Willum; Kramhøft, Birte; Bozonnet, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    of amylose progressed mono-exponentially. β-Cyclodextrin, however, inhibited only one of the two reaction rates of amylopectin and β-limit dextrin hydrolysis, whereas hydrolysis of amylose was unaffected. The Y380A enzyme showed no detectable inhibition by β-cyclodextrin but displayed similar kinetics...... is required for binding of the amylose helix mimic, β-cyclodextrin. Also, mutant enzymes altered at position 380 displayed reduced binding to starch granules. Similarly, binding of wild type AMY1 to starch granules was suppressed in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. We investigated the role of SBS2 by comparing...... kinetic properties of the wild type AMY1 and the Y380A mutant enzyme in hydrolysis of amylopectin, amylose and β-limit dextrin, and the inhibition by β-cyclodextrin. Progress curves of the release of reducing ends revealed a bi-exponential hydrolysis of amylopectin and β-limit dextrin, whereas hydrolysis...

  9. Surface mapping of binding